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  1. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuropathy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Peripheral neuropathy, a result of damage to your peripheral nerves, often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. It can also ...

  2. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Louis S; Pabbidi, Reddy M

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions. There are two forms of diabetes: type 1 diabetes mellitus is due to auto-immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells resulting in absolute insulin deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus is due to reduced insulin secretion and or insulin resistance. Both forms of diabetes are characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, leading to the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and microvascular pathology. DPN is characterized by enhanced or reduced thermal, chemical, and mechanical pain sensitivities. In the long-term, DPN results in peripheral nerve damage and accounts for a substantial number of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations. This review will address the mechanisms, especially the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the development and progression of DPN.

  3. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage your nerves. Other health conditions that may cause neuropathy are: Autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus Chronic kidney disease Infections such as HIV/AIDS, shingles , hepatitis C ...

  4. Peripheral neuropathy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Majumder, A; Chatterjee, S; Maji, D

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is common complication of diabetes. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy among diabetic patients on the basis of loss of vibration sensation had been studied. Detailed clinical history of each patient including age, gender, duration of diabetes, foot ulcer and biothesiometry was recorded in 211 diabetic patients between 20 and 80 years of age. It was observed that all patients under 30 years age (n = 8) felt vibration below 15 volts (no risk zone); 77% (24 out of 31) of the patients in the age group of 30-39 years were in the no risk zone, and 23% (n = 7) had mild peripheral neuropathy. Sixty per cent of the patients between 40 and 50 years (n = 44) were in the no risk zone, while 32% (n = 24) had mild peripheral neuropathy, 5% (n = 4) had moderate neuropathy and 3% (n = 2) had severe peripheral neuropathy. Amongst patients above 50 years of age, 31% (n = 31) were in no risk zone, 34% (n = 34) had mild peripheral neuropathy, 22% (n = 20) had moderate peripheral neuropathy and 13% (n = 13) had severe peripheral neuropathy. Of the patients with diabetes for less than 5 years, 58% had no neuropathy, and only 3% had severe neuropathy. Of the patients with diabetes for 5 to 15 years, 50% had no neuropathy, 30% had mild, and 10% had severe peripheral neuropathy. When patients with diabetes for over 15 years were studied, only 6% had no neuropathy and 19% had severe peripheral neuropathy. The study re-establishes that the severity of peripheral neuropathy increases with age and vibration perception decreses progressively with increased duration of diabetes. Vibration perception threshold testing helps to identify the high risk subjects who require special counselling and education to protect their feet.

  5. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset ... percent disabling by VA's rating regulations. About peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is a condition of the peripheral ...

  6. Peripheral neuropathies 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Assal, J.P.; Liniger, C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results and experience in sixteen specific disciplines related to the study of nerve physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment. Twenty-two different peripheral neuropathies are presented, and different models related to health care strategies are discussed. The authors report on Inflammatory and autoimmune neuropathies and Genetic neuropathies.

  7. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Plays a Key Role in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Shevalye, Hanna; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress resulting from abnormal folding of newly synthesized proteins impairs metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and gene expression, and it is a key mechanism of cell injury. Endoplasmic reticulum stress plays an important role in cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and diabetes. We evaluated the role for this phenomenon in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Endoplasmic reticulum stress manifest in upregulation of multiple components of unfolded protein response was identified in neural tissues (sciatic nerve, spinal cord) of streptozotocin diabetic rats and mice. A chemical chaperone, trimethylamine oxide, administered for 12 weeks after induction of diabetes (110 mg⋅kg−1⋅d−1, a prevention paradigm) attenuated endoplasmic reticulum stress, peripheral nerve dysfunction, intraepidermal nerve fiber loss, and sciatic nerve and spinal cord oxidative-nitrative stress in streptozotocin diabetic rats. Similar effects on diabetes-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and peripheral nerve dysfunction were observed with a structurally unrelated chemical chaperone, 4-phenylbutyric acid (100 mg⋅kg−1⋅d−1, intraperitoneal). CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP)−/− mice made diabetic with streptozotocin displayed less severe sciatic nerve oxidative-nitrative stress and peripheral neuropathy than the wild-type (C57Bl6/J) mice. Neither chemical chaperones nor CHOP gene deficiency reduced diabetic hyperglycemia. Our findings reveal an important role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and identify a potential new therapeutic target. PMID:23364451

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tomography Scan (CAT) Electrodiagnostic Testing Lumbar Puncture Imaging Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) Peripheral Neuropathy Treatments Facts + Risk ... Tomography Scan (CAT) Electrodiagnostic Testing Lumbar Puncture Imaging Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) Peripheral Neuropathy Treatments Facts + Risk ...

  10. Cardiac Involvement in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Burakgazi, Ahmet Z; AlMahameed, Soufian

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is the least recognized and understood complication of peripheral neuropathy. However, because of its potential adverse effects including sudden death, CAN is one of the most important forms of autonomic neuropathies. CAN presents with different clinical manifestations including postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, fluctuation of blood pressure and heart rate, arrhythmia, and increased risk of myocardial infarction. In this article, the prevalence, clinical presentations, and management of cardiac involvement in certain peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy, human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathy, hereditary neuropathies, and amyloid neuropathy are examined in detail.

  11. [Peripheral neuropathies: Diagnostic strategy].

    PubMed

    Magy, L

    2017-02-28

    Diagnosing a peripheral neuropathy is sometimes challenging, as the causes are diverse and the clinical pictures heterogeneous. Overall, diagnosing a patient with peripheral neuropathy will require some knowledge in almost every field of medicine. Therefore, it appears crucial to adopt a diagnostic strategy that is based on solid clinical and neurophysiological grounds. The present paper describes a three-step diagnostic strategy: (1) to delineate a clinico-pathologic entity from clinical and electrodiagnostic findings; (2) to propose a list of plausible causes based on step one, history and clinical context; (3) to use appropriate workup in order to determine the cause or mechanism of the neuropathy. The three steps of this diagnostic strategy necessitate a high level of expertise and interaction between physicians is highly desirable. Finally, an aggressive course and a severe impairment should lead to relentlessly look for a curable cause.

  12. Evidence from Human and Animal Studies: Pathological Roles of CD8(+) T Cells in Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mu; Peyret, Corentin; Shi, Xiang Qun; Siron, Nicolas; Jang, Jeong Ho; Wu, Sonia; Fournier, Sylvie; Zhang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) affect millions of people worldwide. Despite significant advances in understanding the pathology, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune-mediated neuropathies remain elusive. T lymphocytes definitely play an important role in disease pathogenesis and CD4(+) T cells have been the main area of research for decades. This is partly due to the fact that the most frequent animal model to study autoimmune peripheral neuropathy is experimental allergic neuritis (EAN). As it is induced commonly by immunization with peripheral nerve proteins, EAN is driven mainly by CD4(+) T cells. However, similarly to what has been reported for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, a significant body of evidence indicates that CD8(+) T cells may play a pathogenic role in GBS and CIDP disease development and/or progression. Here, we summarize clinical studies pertaining to the presence and potential role of CD8(+) T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies. We also discuss the findings from our most recent studies using a transgenic mouse line (L31 mice) in which the T cell co-stimulator molecule B7.2 (CD86) is constitutively expressed in antigen presenting cells of the nervous tissues. L31 mice spontaneously develop peripheral neuropathy, and CD8(+) T cells are found accumulating in peripheral nerves of symptomatic animals. Interestingly, depletion of CD4(+) T cells accelerates disease onset and increases disease prevalence. Finally, we point out some unanswered questions for future research to dissect the critical roles of CD8(+) T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

  13. [Role of Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Paclitaxel- and Oxaliplatin-induced Peripheral Neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of paclitaxel and oxaliplatin treatment. The major dose-limiting side effect of these drugs is peripheral sensory neuropathy. The symptoms of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy are mostly sensory and peripheral in nature, consisting of mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia, tingling, and numbness. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity manifests as rapid-onset neuropathic symptoms that are exacerbated by cold exposure and as chronic neuropathy that develops after several treatment cycles. Although many basic and clinical researchers have studied anticancer drug-induced peripheral neuropathy, the mechanism is not well understood. In this review, we focus on (1) analysis of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after paclitaxel treatment and (2) analysis of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel in the DRG after oxaliplatin treatment. This review describes that (1) paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain may be the result of up-regulation of TRPV1 in small- and medium-diameter DRG neurons. In addition, paclitaxel treatment increases the release of substance P, but not calcitonin gene-related peptide, in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn. (2) TRPA1 expression via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in small-diameter DRG neurons, at least in part, contributes to the development of oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hyperalgesia. We suggest that TRPV1 or TRPA1 antagonists may be potential therapeutic lead compounds for treating anticancer drug-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  14. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z) Hepatitis HIV Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse Military Sexual Trauma PTSD Research ( ... eligible for a free Agent Orange registry health exam . Research on peripheral neuropathy and herbicides The Health ...

  15. Mitochondrial dynamics and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Baloh, Robert H

    2008-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is perhaps the archetypal disease of axonal degeneration, characteristically involving degeneration of the longest axons in the body. Evidence from both inherited and acquired forms of peripheral neuropathy strongly supports that the primary pathology is in the axons themselves and points to disruption of axonal transport as an important disease mechanism. Recent studies in human genetics have further identified abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics--the fusion, fission, and movement of mitochondria--as a player in the pathogenesis of inherited peripheral neuropathy. This review provides an update on the mechanisms of mitochondrial trafficking in axons and the emerging relationship between the disruption of mitochondrial dynamics and axonal degeneration. Evidence suggests mitochondria are a "critical cargo" whose transport is necessary for proper axonal and synaptic function. Importantly, understanding the regulation of mitochondrial movement and the consequences of decreased axonal mitochondrial function may define new paths for therapeutic agents in peripheral neuropathy and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Peripheral neuropathy in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Moroni, Isabella; Salsano, Ettore; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    Why is peripheral neuropathy common but mild in many mitochondrial disorders, and why is it, in some cases, the predominant or only manifestation? Although this question remains largely unanswered, recent advances in cellular and molecular biology have begun to clarify the importance of mitochondrial functioning and distribution in the peripheral nerve. Mutations in proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics (ie, fusion and fission) frequently result in a Charcot-Marie-Tooth phenotype. Peripheral neuropathies with different phenotypic presentations occur in mitochondrial diseases associated with abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance, or associated with defects in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex V. Our knowledge of mitochondrial disorders is rapidly growing as new nuclear genes are identified and new phenotypes described. Early diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders, essential to provide appropriate genetic counselling, has become crucial in a few treatable conditions. Recognising and diagnosing an underlying mitochondrial defect in patients presenting with peripheral neuropathy is therefore of paramount importance.

  17. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Nair, Pradeep P.

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG). EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block) and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG). Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them. PMID:19893645

  18. Hypothyroidism: Can It Cause Peripheral Neuropathy?

    MedlinePlus

    Hypothyroidism: Can it cause peripheral neuropathy? Can hypothyroidism cause peripheral neuropathy and, if so, how is it treated? Answers from Todd B. Nippoldt, M.D. Hypothyroidism — a condition in which your ...

  19. Role of insulin signaling impairment, adiponectin and dyslipidemia in peripheral and central neuropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nicholas J.; King, Matthew R.; Delbruck, Lina; Jolivalt, Corinne G.

    2014-01-01

    One of the tissues or organs affected by diabetes is the nervous system, predominantly the peripheral system (peripheral polyneuropathy and/or painful peripheral neuropathy) but also the central system with impaired learning, memory and mental flexibility. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the pre-diabetic or diabetic condition caused by a high-fat diet (HFD) can damage both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Groups of C57BL6 and Swiss Webster mice were fed a diet containing 60% fat for 8 months and compared to control and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic groups that were fed a standard diet containing 10% fat. Aspects of peripheral nerve function (conduction velocity, thermal sensitivity) and central nervous system function (learning ability, memory) were measured at assorted times during the study. Both strains of mice on HFD developed impaired glucose tolerance, indicative of insulin resistance, but only the C57BL6 mice showed statistically significant hyperglycemia. STZ-diabetic C57BL6 mice developed learning deficits in the Barnes maze after 8 weeks of diabetes, whereas neither C57BL6 nor Swiss Webster mice fed a HFD showed signs of defects at that time point. By 6 months on HFD, Swiss Webster mice developed learning and memory deficits in the Barnes maze test, whereas their peripheral nervous system remained normal. In contrast, C57BL6 mice fed the HFD developed peripheral nerve dysfunction, as indicated by nerve conduction slowing and thermal hyperalgesia, but showed normal learning and memory functions. Our data indicate that STZ-induced diabetes or a HFD can damage both peripheral and central nervous systems, but learning deficits develop more rapidly in insulin-deficient than in insulin-resistant conditions and only in Swiss Webster mice. In addition to insulin impairment, dyslipidemia or adiponectinemia might determine the neuropathy phenotype. PMID:24764191

  20. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy.

  1. Peripheral neuropathy: the importance of rare subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Price, Ray S.; Chen, Kevin S.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination, but limited diagnostic evaluation. Rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, however, often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. Objective To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. Evidence Review References were identified from PubMed searches with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the author's own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Findings Diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Effective disease modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies including GBS, CIDP, MMN, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyoptrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Conclusions and Relevance Recognition of rare localizations of periperhal neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important early step in the

  2. Potential Therapeutic Benefits of Maintaining Mitochondrial Health in Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Areti, Aparna; Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Komirishetty, Prashanth; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peripheral neuropathies are a group of diseases characterized by malfunctioning of peripheral nervous system. Neuropathic pain, one of the core manifestations of peripheral neuropathy remains as the most severe disabling condition affecting the social and daily routine life of patients suffering from peripheral neuropathy. Method: The current review is aimed at unfolding the possible role of mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral nerve damage and to discuss on the probable therapeutic strategies against neuronal mitotoxicity. The article also highlights the therapeutic significance of maintaining a healthy mitochondrial environment in neuronal cells via pharmacological management in context of peripheral neuropathies. Results: Aberrant cellular signaling coupled with changes in neurotransmission, peripheral and central sensitization are found to be responsible for the pathogenesis of variant toxic neuropathies. Current research reports have indicated the possible involvement of mitochondria mediated redox imbalance as one of the principal causes of neuropathy aetiologies. In addition to imbalance in redox homeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction is also responsible for alterations in physiological bioenergetic metabolism, apoptosis and autophagy pathways. Conclusions: In spite of various etiological factors, mitochondrial dysfunction has been found to be a major pathomechanism underlying the neuronal dysfunction associated with peripheral neuropathies. Pharmacological modulation of mitochondria either directly or indirectly is expected to yield therapeutic relief from various primary and secondary mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26818748

  3. Experimental Alcohol-Related Peripheral Neuropathy: Role of Insulin/IGF Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van Anh; Le, Tran; Tong, Ming; Mellion, Michelle; Gilchrist, James; de la Monte, Suzanne M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of alcohol-related peripheral neuropathy (ALPN) are poorly understood. We hypothesize that, like alcohol-related liver and brain degeneration, ALPN may be mediated by combined effects of insulin/IGF resistance and oxidative stress. Adult male Long Evans rats were chronically pair-fed with diets containing 0% or 37% ethanol (caloric), and subjected to nerve conduction studies. Chronic ethanol feeding slowed nerve conduction in the tibial (p = 0.0021) motor nerve, and not plantar sensory nerve, but it did not affect amplitude. Histological studies of the sciatic nerve revealed reduced nerve fiber diameters with increased regenerative sprouts, and denervation myopathy in ethanol-fed rats. qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated reduced mRNA levels of insulin, IGF-1, and IGF-2 polypeptides, IGF-1 receptor, and IRS2, and ELISAs revealed reduced immunoreactivity for insulin and IGF-1 receptors, IRS-1, IRS-4, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and tau in sciatic nerves of ethanol-fed rats (all p < 0.05 or better). The findings suggest that ALPN is characterized by (1) slowed conduction velocity with demyelination, and a small component of axonal degeneration; (2) impaired trophic factor signaling due to insulin and IGF resistance; and (3) degeneration of myelin and axonal cytoskeletal proteins. Therefore, ALPN is likely mediated by molecular and signal transduction abnormalities similar to those identified in alcoholic liver and brain degeneration. PMID:23016131

  4. Updates in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Juster-Switlyk, Kelsey; Smith, A Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes has become one of the largest global health-care problems of the 21 (st) century. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the population prevalence of diabetes in the US is approaching 10% and is increasing by 5% each year. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication associated with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes causes a broad spectrum of neuropathic complications, including acute and chronic forms affecting each level of the peripheral nerve, from the root to the distal axon. This review will focus on the most common form, distal symmetric diabetic polyneuropathy. There has been an evolution in our understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of diabetic polyneuropathy over the past decade. We highlight these new perspectives and provide updates from the past decade of research.

  5. Updates in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Juster-Switlyk, Kelsey; Smith, A. Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes has become one of the largest global health-care problems of the 21 st century. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the population prevalence of diabetes in the US is approaching 10% and is increasing by 5% each year. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication associated with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes causes a broad spectrum of neuropathic complications, including acute and chronic forms affecting each level of the peripheral nerve, from the root to the distal axon. This review will focus on the most common form, distal symmetric diabetic polyneuropathy. There has been an evolution in our understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of diabetic polyneuropathy over the past decade. We highlight these new perspectives and provide updates from the past decade of research. PMID:27158461

  6. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö.; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27605249

  7. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain.

    PubMed

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-09-08

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment.

  8. APOE gene polymorphisms and diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Monastiriotis, Christodoulos; Papanas, Nikolaos; Veletza, Stavroula; Maltezos, Efstratios

    2012-09-08

    Genetic factors may influence the natural course of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and explain some of its variability. The aim of this review was to examine the association between apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene polymorphisms and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Four relevant studies were identified. The two earlier works provided evidence that the ɛ4 allele is a risk factor for this complication, while the two more recent studies were negative. Important differences in the methodology used and in the populations included are obvious, rendering difficult the comparison between studies. In conclusion, the association between APOE gene polymorphisms and diabetic peripheral neuropathy is still unclear. Available evidence is rather limited and results have so far been contradictory. Future studies should employ more robust methodology, adjusting for potential confounders and for the prevalence of neuropathy in the general population with diabetes.

  9. Clinical Profile of Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Sarker, U K; Uddin, M J; Chowdhury, R; Roy, N; Bhattacharjee, M; Roy, J

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to see the association of peripheral neuropathy in leprosy and to find out the clinical profile of peripheral neuropathy and disability status in leprosy. It was descriptive type of cross sectional study was conducted among the cases of leprosy attended in the out-patient departments of neurology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital (MMCH) and Mymensingh tuberculosis and leprosy hospital that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in this study, during the study period of January 2010 to December 2011.In this study of 62 cases revealed that leprosy is more common in male (71%) people and 21% leprosy patient had contact with known case of leprosy. Leprosy causes peripheral neuropathy (61.3%). Duration of occurrence of peripheral neuropathy was prolonged (>6 month) in most of the patients (47.4%) and the disease progression was also slow (63.2%). Numbness was complained by 89.4% patients and 65.8% subjects complained of weakness of limbs. Deformities and ulcers were present in 26.3% and 50% of patients respectively. Ulnar nerve (43.6%), Lateral popliteal nerve (41.9%), Posterior tibial nerve (41.9%) and Great auricular nerve (17.7%) were the most commonly involved thickened peripheral nerves. The rate of visible physical impairment (WHO Grade 2 disability) among people affected by leprosy in feet was 27.4% and in hands was 16.1%. The position and vibration sense was found to normal all patients of peripheral neuropathy.

  10. Evaluation of peripheral neuropathy. Part III: vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    In this, the third of a 3-part series on peripheral neuropathy, the syndromes of vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathy are discussed. Vasculitis is a frequent cause of neuropathy in the setting of a connective tissue disease. The infectious neuropathies most likely to be encountered in the United States are those due to varicella-zoster virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Lyme disease, hepatitis C virus, and, most recently, West Nile virus. Inherited neuropathies are divided into 2 main types: predominant motor or predominant sensory. The former are generally classed as the Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases and the latter as the hereditary sensory neuropathies. Each category has a number of different subtypes. If the results of routine screening tests are negative, the clinician must consider special testing for unusual disorders, including evaluations for underlying autoimmune or malignant disorders, genetic tests for inherited neuropathies, and other unusual or selectively ordered tests. These tests are very expensive and should be ordered only after the common causes of neuropathy are excluded. Unless the neuropathy can be substantially alleviated or cured, symptomatic treatment (most often for pain) plays a significant role for these patients.

  11. Burn-related peripheral neuropathy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiji; Lineaweaver, William C; Zheng, Xianyou; Chen, Zenggan; Mullins, Fred; Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-24

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most frequent disabling neuromuscular complication of burns. However, the insidious and progressive onset of burn neuropathy makes it often undiagnosed or overlooked. In our study, we reviewed the current studies on the burn-related peripheral neuropathy to summarize the morbidity, mechanism, detecting method and management of peripheral neuropathy in burn patients. Of the 1533 burn patients included in our study, 98 cases (6.39%) were presented with peripheral neuropathy. Thermal and electrical burns were the most common etiologies. Surgical procedures, especially nerve decompression, showed good effect on functional recovery of both acute and delayed peripheral neuropathy in burn patients. It is noteworthy that, for early detection and prevention of peripheral neuropathy, electrodiagnostic examinations should be performed on burn patients independent of symptoms. Still, the underlying mechanisms of burn-related peripheral neuropathy remain to be clarified.

  12. Painful peripheral neuropathy and sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-02

    Peripheral neuropathy can lead to neuropathic pain in a subset of patients. Painful peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating disorder, reflected by a reduced quality of life. Therapeutic strategies are limited and often disappointing, as in most cases targeted treatment is not available. Elucidating pathogenetic factors for pain might provide a target for optimal treatment. Voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7-NaV1.9 are expressed in the small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and their axons. By a targeted gene approach, missense gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.7-NaV1.9 have been demonstrated in painful peripheral neuropathy. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations produce a spectrum of pro-excitatory changes in channel biophysics, with the shared outcome at the cellular level of dorsal root ganglion hyperexcitability. Reduced neurite outgrowth may be another consequence of sodium channel mutations, and possible therapeutic strategies include blockade of sodium channels or block of reverse operation of the sodium-calcium exchanger. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of painful peripheral neuropathy offers new targets that may provide a basis for more effective treatment.

  13. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: current perspective and future directions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Randhir; Kishore, Lalit; Kaur, Navpreet

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders with extremely complex pathophysiology and affects both somatic and autonomic components of the nervous system. Neuropathy is the most common chronic complication of diabetes mellitus. Metabolic disruptions in the peripheral nervous system, including altered protein kinase C activity, and increased polyol pathway activity in neurons and Schwann cells resulting from hyperglycemia plays a key role in the development of diabetic neuropathy. These pathways are related to the metabolic and/or redox state of the cell and are the major source of damage. Activation of these metabolic pathways leads to oxidative stress, which is a mediator of hyperglycemia induced cell injury and a unifying theme for all mechanisms of diabetic neuropathy. The therapeutic intervention of these metabolic pathways is capable of ameliorating diabetic neuropathy but therapeutics which target one particular mechanism may have a limited success. Available therapeutic approaches are based upon the agents that modulate pathogenetic mechanisms (glycemic control) and relieve the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. This review emphasizes the pathogenesis, presently available therapeutic approaches and future directions for the management of diabetic neuropathy.

  14. [Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: reflections and drug-rehabilitative treatment].

    PubMed

    Pagano, Lucia; Proietto, Maria; Biondi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy can be classified as peripheral, autonomic, proximal, focal and multifocal or mixed. Peripheral neuropathy, the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, causes pain and/or loss of feeling in the toes, feet, legs, hands, and arms; extreme sensitivity to touch, loss of balance and coordination; muscle weakness and loss of reflexes, especially at the ankle, leading to changes in the way a person walks. The aim of this study is to underline the importance of drug and rehabilitative approach in the therapy of peripheral neuropathy, that frequently influences both diabetes mellitus type 1 and diabetes mellitus type 2.

  15. Alcohol consumption enhances antiretroviral painful peripheral neuropathy by mitochondrial mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2010-09-01

    A major dose-limiting side effect of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) chemotherapies, such as the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), is a small-fiber painful peripheral neuropathy, mediated by its mitochondrial toxicity. Co-morbid conditions may also contribute to this dose-limiting effect of HIV/AIDS treatment. Alcohol abuse, which alone also produces painful neuropathy, is one of the most important co-morbid risk factors for peripheral neuropathy in patients with HIV/AIDS. Despite the prevalence of this problem and its serious impact on the quality of life and continued therapy in HIV/AIDS patients, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse exacerbates highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced neuropathic pain has not been demonstrated. In this study, performed in rats, we investigated the cellular mechanism by which consumed alcohol impacts antiretroviral-induced neuropathic pain. NRTI 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 50 mg/kg) neuropathy was mitochondrial-dependent and PKCε-independent, and alcohol-induced painful neuropathy was PKCε-dependent and mitochondrial-independent. At low doses, ddC (5 mg/kg) and alcohol (6.5% ethanol diet for 1 week), which alone do not affect nociception, together produce profound mechanical hyperalgesia. This hyperalgesia is mitochondrial-dependent but PKCε-independent. These experiments, which provide the first model for studying the impact of co-morbidity in painful neuropathy, support the clinical impression that alcohol consumption enhances HIV/AIDS therapy neuropathy, and provide evidence for a role of mitochondrial mechanisms underlying this interaction.

  16. Screening for Electrophysiological Abnormalities in Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: Peripheral Neuropathy and Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    KÖŞKDERELİOĞLU, Aslı; ORTAN, Pınar; ARI, Alpay; GEDİZLİOĞLU, Muhteşem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the existence of peripheral and optic neuropathies in asymptomatic individuals with hepatitis C infection. Methods Thirty consecutive patients who were followed in a hepatitis C outpatient clinic were recruited for electrophysiological evaluation together with 30 age- and gender-compatible healthy controls. All patients had a detailed neurological examination. The information regarding the disease duration and management with interferons were collected. Nerve conduction studies and visual evoked potentials (VEP) were recorded in all subjects. The results of the patient and control groups were statistically compared. Results Of the patients with hepatitis C infection, 16 were females and 14 males. The mean age was 57.5 years, and the average disease duration was 6.43 years. The P100 latencies in the patient group were within normal limits, while the amplitudes were meaningfully small by comparison with the controls. There were some abnormalities in the nerve conduction studies of 15 patients. Sensorial neuropathy was detected in two patients, sensorimotor polyneuropathy in four, carpal tunnel syndrome in seven, and carpal tunnel syndrome and sensorimotor polyneuropathy as comorbid states in another two patients. The nerve conduction studies and VEP parameters were entirely normal in the control group. Conclusion Hepatitis C-related neurological abnormalities may occur both in the central and peripheral nervous system. Mononeuritis multiplex, sensorial axonal neuropathy, and multiple mononeuropathies are some of the presentations of the peripheral nervous system involvement. The mode of infection is considered to be via vasculitic mechanisms. In addition, optic neuropathy is a known complication of interferon treatment. Autoantibodies, cytokines, chemokines, and cryoglobulins are accused to play roles in the pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the peripheral nervous system and optic nerves in a group of patients

  17. The prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in an outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Mimi, O; Teng, C L; Chia, Y C

    2003-10-01

    This study was undertaken to clinically estimate the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy amongst patients attending an outpatient clinic and to evaluate their risk factors for developing peripheral neuropathy. It was a cross-sectional study of 134 diabetes mellitus patients who attended the Primary Care Clinic, University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. The patients were interviewed for their demographic data, past and present medical/surgical history, social history, personal habits and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Foot examination and clinical neurological tests were conducted and the presence of peripheral neuropathy was assessed. The main outcome measures were the Neuropathy Symptom Score and the Neuropathy Disability Score. The prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be 50.7%. Peripheral neuropathy was related to the age of the patient and the duration of diabetes but did not seem to be significantly related to diabetic control. To conclude, there was a high prevalence of peripheral neuropathy amongst the diabetics in this study. These patients developed peripheral neuropathy at a younger age and shorter duration of diabetes compared to a similar study that was done in the UK.

  18. Intravenous Lidocaine Infusion to Treat Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Peter; Kumar, Aashish J; Muppuri, Rudram; Chakrabortty, Shushovan

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating side effect of chemotherapy, which manifests as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and numbness in the hands and feet. Numerous chemoprotective agents and treatments have been used with limited success to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. We report a case in which a patient presenting with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy received an IV lidocaine infusion over the course of 60 minutes with complete symptomatic pain relief for a prolonged period of 2 weeks.

  19. Peripheral neuropathy in subclinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Misiunas, A; Niepomniszcze, H; Ravera, B; Faraj, G; Faure, E

    1995-08-01

    Alterations in peripheral nerves are well documented in overt myxedema but not in subclinical hypothyroidism. We performed electrophysiologic studies to investigate such abnormalities in patients with normal serum total T4 and hyperresponsiveness of TSH to TRH, either with normal or high levels of basal circulating TSH. Subjects were divided in three groups: (i) Hypothyroidism Stage I (group () (n = 17, mean age = 39 +/- 34 years), T4 = 9 +/- 0.7 micrograms/dL, TSH = 4.3 +/- 0.4 microU/mL, sTSH post-TRH (peak value) = 37.6 +/- 1.6 microU/mL; (ii) Hypothyroidism Stage II (group II) (n = 10, mean age: 43 +/- 6 years), T4 = 7.7 +/- 0.8 microgram/dL, TSH = 20 +/- 5 microU/mL, TSH post-TRH > 50 microU/mL; (iii) Control Group (n = 20, mean age 41 +/- 5 years), healthy subjects. All patients and controls were women. TRH test consisted in the i.v. injection of 200 micrograms TRH (normal peak value up to 25 microU/mL, normal basal TSH < 5.5 microU/mL. None of the patients had carpal tunnel syndrome or any other neurological or metabolic disturbances. We studied the distal motor latencies, motor and sensory amplitudes, and nerve conduction velocities. The motor parameters were measured in the median and external sciatic popliteal (ESP) nerves, and the sensory parameters in the median and sural nerves. In most cases values were obtained from both right and left nerves. Motor parameters: no differences were found between all groups for conduction velocities (CV).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  1. Peripheral neuropathy associated with mitochondrial disease in children.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Manoj P; Ouvrier, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases in children are often associated with a peripheral neuropathy but the presence of the neuropathy is under-recognized because of the overwhelming involvement of the central nervous system (CNS). These mitochondrial neuropathies are heterogeneous in their clinical, neurophysiological, and histopathological characteristics. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of childhood mitochondrial neuropathy. Early recognition of neuropathy may help with the identification of the mitochondrial syndrome. While it is not definite that the characteristics of the neuropathy would help in directing genetic testing without the requirement for invasive skin, muscle or liver biopsies, there appears to be some evidence for this hypothesis in Leigh syndrome, in which nuclear SURF1 mutations cause a demyelinating neuropathy and mitochondrial DNA MTATP6 mutations cause an axonal neuropathy. POLG1 mutations, especially when associated with late-onset phenotypes, appear to cause a predominantly sensory neuropathy with prominent ataxia. The identification of the peripheral neuropathy also helps to target genetic testing in the mitochondrial optic neuropathies. Although often subclinical, the peripheral neuropathy may occasionally be symptomatic and cause significant disability. Where it is symptomatic, recognition of the neuropathy will help the early institution of rehabilitative therapy. We therefore suggest that nerve conduction studies should be a part of the early evaluation of children with suspected mitochondrial disease.

  2. Selective antagonism of muscarinic receptors is neuroprotective in peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Calcutt, Nigel A; Smith, Darrell R; Frizzi, Katie; Sabbir, Mohammad Golam; Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Mixcoatl-Zecuatl, Teresa; Saleh, Ali; Muttalib, Nabeel; Van der Ploeg, Randy; Ochoa, Joseline; Gopaul, Allison; Tessler, Lori; Wess, Jürgen; Jolivalt, Corinne G; Fernyhough, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Sensory neurons have the capacity to produce, release, and respond to acetylcholine (ACh), but the functional role of cholinergic systems in adult mammalian peripheral sensory nerves has not been established. Here, we have reported that neurite outgrowth from adult sensory neurons that were maintained under subsaturating neurotrophic factor conditions operates under cholinergic constraint that is mediated by muscarinic receptor-dependent regulation of mitochondrial function via AMPK. Sensory neurons from mice lacking the muscarinic ACh type 1 receptor (M1R) exhibited enhanced neurite outgrowth, confirming the role of M1R in tonic suppression of axonal plasticity. M1R-deficient mice made diabetic with streptozotocin were protected from physiological and structural indices of sensory neuropathy. Pharmacological blockade of M1R using specific or selective antagonists, pirenzepine, VU0255035, or muscarinic toxin 7 (MT7) activated AMPK and overcame diabetes-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro and in vivo. These antimuscarinic drugs prevented or reversed indices of peripheral neuropathy, such as depletion of sensory nerve terminals, thermal hypoalgesia, and nerve conduction slowing in diverse rodent models of diabetes. Pirenzepine and MT7 also prevented peripheral neuropathy induced by the chemotherapeutic agents dichloroacetate and paclitaxel or HIV envelope protein gp120. As a variety of antimuscarinic drugs are approved for clinical use against other conditions, prompt translation of this therapeutic approach to clinical trials is feasible.

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy: A Practical Approach to Diagnosis and Symptom Management.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Dyck, P James B

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most prevalent neurologic conditions encountered by physicians of all specialties. Physicians are faced with 3 distinct challenges in caring for patients with peripheral neuropathy: (1) how to efficiently and effectively screen (in less than 2 minutes) an asymptomatic patient for peripheral neuropathy when they have a disorder in which peripheral neuropathy is highly prevalent (eg, diabetes mellitus), (2) how to clinically stratify patients presenting with symptoms of neuropathy to determine who would benefit from specialty consultation and what testing is appropriate for those who do not need consultation, and (3) how to treat the symptoms of painful peripheral neuropathy. In this concise review, we address these 3 common clinical scenarios. Easily defined clinical patterns of involvement are used to identify patients in need of neurologic consultation, the yield of laboratory and other diagnostic testing is reviewed for the evaluation of length-dependent, sensorimotor peripheral neuropathies (the most common form of neuropathy), and an algorithmic approach with dosing recommendations is provided for the treatment of neuropathic pain associated with peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Validity of the neurological examination in diagnosing diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Höliner, Isabella; Haslinger, Vera; Lütschg, Jürg; Müller, Guido; Barbarini, Daniela Seick; Fussenegger, Jörg; Zanier, Ulrike; Saely, Christoph H; Drexel, Heinz; Simma, Burkhard

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and examine whether the neurological examination validly diagnoses diabetic peripheral neuropathy as compared with the gold standard of nerve conduction velocity in these patients. Nerve conduction velocity was measured in an unselected consecutive series of patients aged 8-18 years who had been suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus for at least 1 year. For the neurological examination, neuropathy disability scores and neuropathy sign scores were used. Of the 39 patients, six (15%) had clinically evident diabetic peripheral neuropathy, whereas nerve conduction velocity testing revealed diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 15 (38%) patients. Sensitivity and specificity of the neurological examination for the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy were 40% and 100%, respectively. The corresponding positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 72.7%, respectively. This conclusions from this study are that in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, diabetic peripheral neuropathy is highly prevalent, but in the majority of patients it is subclinical. Sensitivity and negative predictive values of the neurological examination are low. Therefore, routine nerve conduction velocity measurement for the assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy appears to be warranted in these patients.

  5. Assessment of bortezomib induced peripheral neuropathy in multiple myeloma by the reduced Total Neuropathy Score.

    PubMed

    Zaroulis, Chrysothea K; Chairopoulos, Konstantinos; Sachanas, Sotirios P; Maltezas, Dimitris; Tzenou, Tatiana; Pessach, Ilias; Koulieris, Efstathios; Koutra, Eleni; Kilindireas, Konstantinos; Pangalis, Gerasimos A; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated bortezomib induced peripheral neuropathy (BIPN) characteristics in an attempt to better clarify the type, grade, duration and reversibility of neuropathy as well as investigate possible peripheral neuropathy (PN) risk factors and detect the best way to manage it. We calculated the grading of neuropathy using the Total Neuropathy Score reduced version (TNSr) in a series of 51 patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma treated with bortezomib. Seventy percent developed clinical PN. BIPN, although manageable, is frequently underestimated in patients treated with bortezomib intravenously. Continuous follow-up and management of PN are needed to avoid quality of life impairment.

  6. Peripheral insensate neuropathy--a tall problem for US adults?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yiling J; Gregg, Edward W; Kahn, Henry S; Williams, Desmond E; De Rekeneire, Nathalie; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2006-11-01

    The relation between height and lower extremity peripheral insensate neuropathy among persons with and without diabetes was examined by use of the 1999-2002 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with 5,229 subjects aged 40 or more years. A monofilament was used to determine whether any of three areas on each foot were insensate. Peripheral insensate neuropathy was defined as the presence of one or more insensate areas. Its prevalence was nearly twice as high among persons with diabetes (21.2%) as among those without diabetes (11.5%; p < 0.001). Men (16.2%) had 1.7 times the prevalence of peripheral insensate neuropathy as did women (9.4%), but the difference was not significant after adjustment for height. Greater height was associated with increased peripheral insensate neuropathy prevalence among persons with and without diabetes (p < 0.001). This association was characterized by a sharp increase in prevalence among persons who were taller than 175.5 cm. Peripheral insensate neuropathy risk was significantly higher among those taller than 175.5 cm (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.5, 3.5). The authors conclude that body height is an important correlate of peripheral insensate neuropathy. This association largely accounts for the difference in peripheral insensate neuropathy prevalence between men and women. Height may help health-care providers to identify persons at high risk of peripheral insensate neuropathy.

  7. Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Matthew J; Gibbs, Lawrence M; Lindsay, Tammy J

    2016-08-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in approximately 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus who are treated in the office setting and significantly affects quality of life. It typically causes burning pain, paresthesias, and numbness in a stocking-glove pattern that progresses proximally from the feet and hands. Clinicians should carefully consider the patient's goals and functional status and potential adverse effects of medication when choosing a treatment for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Pregabalin and duloxetine are the only medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating this disorder. Based on current practice guidelines, these medications, with gabapentin and amitriptyline, should be considered for the initial treatment. Second-line therapy includes opioid-like medications (tramadol and tapentadol), venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, and topical agents (lidocaine patches and capsaicin cream). Isosorbide dinitrate spray and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may provide relief in some patients and can be considered at any point during therapy. Opioids and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are optional third-line medications. Acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, primrose oil, and electromagnetic field application lack high-quality evidence to support their use.

  8. Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Vitamin Deficiency, Toxins, and Medications

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Nathan P.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Peripheral neuropathies secondary to vitamin deficiencies, medications, or toxins are frequently considered but can be difficult to definitively diagnose. Accurate diagnosis is important since these conditions are often treatable and preventable. This article reviews the key features of different types of neuropathies caused by these etiologies and provides a comprehensive list of specific agents that must be kept in mind. Recent Findings: While most agents that cause peripheral neuropathy have been known for years, newly developed medications that cause peripheral neuropathy are discussed. Summary: Peripheral nerves are susceptible to damage by a wide array of toxins, medications, and vitamin deficiencies. It is important to consider these etiologies when approaching patients with a variety of neuropathic presentations; additionally, etiologic clues may be provided by other systemic symptoms. While length-dependent sensorimotor axonal peripheral neuropathy is the most common presentation, several examples present in a subacute severe fashion, mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. PMID:25299283

  9. Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity In Postmenopausal Women with Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Singh, Paras Nath; Hossain, Mohd Mobarak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The post-menopausal phase is characterized by a decline in the serum oestrogen and progesterone levels. This phase is also associated with higher incidence of peripheral neuropathy. Aim To explore the relationship between the peripheral motor nerve status and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels through assessment of Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity (MNCV) in post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College during 2011-2013. The study included 30 post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy (age: 51.4±7.9) and 30 post-menopausal women without peripheral neuropathy (control) (age: 52.5±4.9). They were compared for MNCV in median, ulnar and common peroneal nerves and serum levels of oestrogen and progesterone estimated through enzyme immunoassays. To study the relationship between hormone levels and MNCV, a stepwise linear regression analysis was done. Results The post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy had significantly lower MNCV and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels as compared to control subjects. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed oestrogen with main effect on MNCV. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that while the post-menopausal age group is at a greater risk of peripheral neuropathy, it is the decline in the serum estrogen levels which is critical in the development of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:28208850

  10. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types.

  11. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  12. Peripheral neuropathy: pathogenic mechanisms and alternative therapies.

    PubMed

    Head, Kathleen A

    2006-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN), associated with diabetes, neurotoxic chemotherapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/antiretroviral drugs, alcoholism, nutrient deficiencies, heavy metal toxicity, and other etiologies, results in significant morbidity. Conventional pain medications primarily mask symptoms and have significant side effects and addiction profiles. However, a widening body of research indicates alternative medicine may offer significant benefit to this patient population. Alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, benfotiamine, methylcobalamin, and topical capsaicin are among the most well-researched alternative options for the treatment of PN. Other potential nutrient or botanical therapies include vitamin E, glutathione, folate, pyridoxine, biotin, myo-inositol, omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, L-arginine, L-glutamine, taurine, N-acetylcysteine, zinc, magnesium, chromium, and St. John's wort. In the realm of physical medicine, acupuncture, magnetic therapy, and yoga have been found to provide benefit. New cutting-edge conventional therapies, including dual-action peptides, may also hold promise.

  13. Quality assessment of online patient education resources for peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hansberry, David R; Suresh, Ragha; Agarwal, Nitin; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2013-03-01

    Given its practicality, the internet is a primary resource for patients afflicted with diseases like peripheral neuropathy. Therefore, it is important that the readily available online resources on peripheral neuropathy are tailored to the general public, particularly concerning readability. Patient education resources were downloaded from the US National Library of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Neuropathy.org, GBS/CIDP Foundation International, Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association, Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy, and Neuropathy Action Foundation websites. All patient education material related to peripheral neuropathy was evaluated for its level of readability using the Flesch Reading Ease (FRE) and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level. The FRE scores averaged 43.4 with only the US National Library of Medicine scoring above 60 (76.5). The Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level scores averaged 11.0. All scores were above a seventh-grade level except the US National Library of Medicine, which had a score of a fifth-grade reading level. Most Americans may not fully benefit from patient education resources concerning peripheral neuropathy education on many of the websites. Only the US National Library of Medicine, which is written at a fifth-grade level, is likely to benefit the average American.

  14. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: Current status and progress.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Jamie R; Morrison, Gladys; Dolan, M Eileen; Fleming, Gini F

    2016-01-01

    As there are increasing numbers of cancer survivors, more attention is being paid to the long term unwanted effects patients may experience as a result of their treatment and the impact these side effects can have on their quality of life. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most common long-term toxicities from chemotherapy. In this review we will briefly review the clinical presentation, evaluation and management of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, with a focus on CIPN related to platinum and taxane agents. We will then discuss current clinical models of peripheral neuropathy and ongoing research to better understand CIPN and develop potential treatment options.

  15. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: Current Status and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Jamie R; Morrison, Gladys; Dolan, M. Eileen; Fleming, Gini F

    2015-01-01

    As there are increasing numbers of cancer survivors, more attention is being paid to the long term unwanted effects patients may experience as a result of their treatment and the impact these side effects can have on their quality of life. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most common long-term toxicities from chemotherapy. In this review we will briefly review the clinical presentation, evaluation and management of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, with a focus on CIPN related to platinum and taxane agents. We will then discuss current clinical models of peripheral neuropathy and ongoing research to better understand CIPN and develop potential treatment options. PMID:26556766

  16. Animal Models of Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Environmental Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Deepa B.; Jortner, Bernard S.; Sills, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress in our understanding of pathogeneses and the identification of etiologies of peripheral neuropathy, idiopathic neuropathy remains common. Typically, attention to peripheral neuropathies resulting from exposure to environmental agents is limited relative to more commonly diagnosed causes of peripheral neuropathy (diabetes and chemotherapeutic agents). Given that there are more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and that at least 1000 chemicals are known to have neurotoxic potential, very few chemicals have been established to affect the peripheral nervous system (mainly after occupational exposures). A wide spectrum of exposures, including pesticides, metals, solvents, nutritional sources, and pharmaceutical agents, has been related, both historically and recently, to environmental toxicant-induced peripheral neuropathy. A review of the literature shows that the toxicity and pathogeneses of chemicals adversely affecting the peripheral nervous system have been studied using animal models. This article includes an overview of five prototypical environmental agents known to cause peripheral neuropathy—namely, organophosphates, carbon disulfide, pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), acrylamide, and hexacarbons (mainly n-hexane, 2,5-hexanedione, methyl n-butyl ketone). Also included is a brief introduction to the structural components of the peripheral nervous system and pointers on common methodologies for histopathologic evaluation of the peripheral nerves. PMID:24615445

  17. Peripheral neuropathy: evidence-based treatment of a complex disorder.

    PubMed

    Hammersla, Margaret; Kapustin, Jane Faith

    2012-05-11

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is a common and often progressive condition frequently seen in primary care. The chronic pain associated with PN, or neuropathic pain, can significantly diminish patients' quality of life and be challenging to treat.

  18. Mitotoxicity and bortezomib-induced chronic painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Xiao, W H; Bennett, G J

    2012-12-01

    Many of the most effective anti-cancer drugs induce a dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy that compromises therapy. Evidence from animal models of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy produced by the taxane agent, paclitaxel, and the platinum-complex agent, oxaliplatin, indicate that they produce neuropathy via a common mechanism-a toxic effect on the mitochondria in primary afferent sensory neurons. Bortezomib is from the proteasome-inhibitor class of chemotherapeutics. It also produces a dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy, but its effects on neuronal mitochondria are unknown. To investigate this, we developed a model of bortezomib-induced painful peripheral neuropathy in the rat and assessed mitochondrial function (respiration and ATP production) in sciatic nerve samples harvested at two time points: day 7, which is three days after treatment and before pain appears, and day 35, which is one month post-treatment and the time of peak pain severity. We found significant deficits in Complex I-mediated and Complex II-mediated respiration, and in ATP production at both time points. Prophylactic treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine, which has previously been shown to prevent paclitaxel- and oxaliplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and pain, completely blocked bortezomib's effects on mitochondria and pain. These results suggest that mitotoxicity may be the core pathology for all chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and that drugs that protect mitochondrial function may be useful chemotherapy adjuncts.

  19. Peripheral neuropathy in Whipples disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rusina, R; Keller, O; Síma, R; Zámečník, J

    2012-04-01

    Whipples disease is a chronic multisystem inflammatory disease with predominantly gastrointestinal manifestations due to Tropheryma whipplei infection. Typical neurological abnormalities include dementia, eye movement abnormalities, hypothalamic dysfunction and oculomasticatory myorhythmias. The literature on peripheral neuropathy in Whipples disease is sparse and the involvement of peripheral nerves in Whipples disease has not been documented convincingly so far. We present a case of Whipples disease presenting by axonal peripheral neuropathy without gastrointestinal involvement. The diagnosis was confirmed by a sural nerve biopsy and consequent PCR of the sample. All clinical signs disappeared progressively during the antibiotic therapy. Two years after the T. whipplei infection, the patient developed dopa-sensitive Parkinson's disease, although these two events seem to be unrelated. This case illustrates the value of peripheral nerve biopsy in cases of axonal neuropathy of unexplained origin and extends the clinical spectrum of Whipples disease to a new modality.

  20. Sodium Channels, Mitochondria, and Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Persson, Anna-Karin; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Estacion, Mark; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy results from damage to peripheral nerves and is often accompanied by pain in affected limbs. Treatment represents an unmet medical need and a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying axonal injury is needed. Longer nerve fibers tend to degenerate first (length-dependence), and patients carrying pathogenic mutations throughout life usually become symptomatic in mid- or late-life (time-dependence). The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels can contribute to axonal injury and sodium channel gain-of-function mutations have been linked to peripheral neuropathy. Recent studies have implicated sodium channel activity, mitochondrial compromise, and reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange in time- and length-dependent axonal injury. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying axonal injury in peripheral neuropathy may provide new therapeutic strategies for this painful and debilitating condition.

  1. Ambient geothermal hydrogen sulfide exposure and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pope, Karl; So, Yuen T; Crane, Julian; Bates, Michael N

    2017-02-14

    The mechanism of toxicity of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is thought mainly to operate through effects on the nervous system. The gas has high acute toxicity, but whether chronic exposure causes effects, including peripheral neuropathy, is yet unclear. The city of Rotorua, New Zealand, sits on an active geothermal field and the population has some of the highest measured ambient H2S exposures. A previous study in Rotorua provided evidence that H2S is associated with peripheral neuropathy. Using clinical methods, the present study sought to investigate and possibly confirm this association in the Rotorua population. The study population comprised 1635 adult residents of Rotorua, aged 18-65. Collected data relevant to the peripheral neuropathy investigation included symptoms, ankle stretch reflex, vibration sensitivity, as measured by the timed-tuning fork test and a Bio-Thesiometer (Bio-Medical Instrument Co., Ohio), and light touch sensitivity measured by monofilaments. An exposure metric, estimating time-weighted H2S exposure across the last 30 years was used. Principal components analysis was used to combine data across the various indicators of possible peripheral neuropathy. The main data analysis used linear regression to examine associations between the peripheral nerve function indicators and H2S exposure. None of the peripheral nerve function indicators were associated with H2S exposure, providing no evidence that H2S exposure at levels found in Rotorua is a cause of peripheral neuropathy. The earlier association between H2S exposure and peripheral neuropathy diagnoses may be attributable to the ecological study design used. The possibility that H2S exposure misclassification could account for the lack of association found cannot be entirely excluded.

  2. Myanmarese Neuropathy: Clinical Description of Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Detected among Myanmarese Refugees in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fu Liong, Hiew; Santhi, Datuk Puvanarajah; Shanthi, Viswanathan; Mohd Hanip, Rafia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2008, we have observed an increasing number of Myanmarese refugees in Malaysia being admitted for acute/subacute onset peripheral neuropathy. Most of them had a preceding history of starvation. Methods. We retrospectively studied the clinical features of all Myanmarese patients admitted with peripheral neuropathy from September 2008 to January 2014. Results. A total of 24 patients from the Chin, Rohingya, and Rakhine ethnicities (mean age, 23.8 years; male, 96%) had symmetrical, ascending areflexic weakness with at least one additional presenting symptom of fever, lower limb swelling, vomiting, abdominal pain, or difficulty in breathing. Twenty (83.3%) had sensory symptoms. Ten (41.6%) had cranial nerve involvement. Nineteen patients had cerebrospinal fluid examinations but none with evidence of albuminocytological dissociation. Neurophysiological assessment revealed axonal polyneuropathy, predominantly a motor-sensory subtype. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies were detected in 31.5% of them. These findings suggested the presence of a polyneuropathy related to nutrition against a backdrop of other possible environmental factors such as infections, metabolic disorders, or exposure to unknown toxin. Supportive treatment with appropriate vitamins supplementation improved functional outcome in most patients. Conclusion. We report a spectrum of acquired reversible neurological manifestations among Myanmarese refugees likely to be multifactorial with micronutrient deficiencies playing an important role in the pathogenesis.

  3. Peripheral neuropathy following intentional inhalation of naphtha fumes.

    PubMed Central

    Tenenbein, M; deGroot, W; Rajani, K R

    1984-01-01

    Two adolescent native Canadians who presented with peripheral neuropathy secondary to the abuse of volatile hydrocarbons are described. They were initially thought to have been sniffing leaded gasoline fumes, but public health investigation revealed that they had been sniffing naphtha fumes. Naphtha contains a significant amount of n-hexane, a known inducer of neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of naphtha abuse. These cases emphasize the need to specifically identify the formulation of hydrocarbons being abused. PMID:6093978

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy in Prediabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, A Gordon

    2017-03-07

    Peripheral neuropathy is a major cause of disability worldwide. Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy, accounting for 50% of cases. Over half of people with diabetes develop neuropathy, and diabetic neuropathy (DPN) is a major cause of reduced quality of life due to pain, sensory loss, gait instability, fall related injury, and foot ulceration and amputation. Most patients with nondiabetic neuropathy have cryptogenic sensory peripheral neuropathy (CSPN). A growing body of literature links prediabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) to risk of both DPN and CSPN (CSPN-MetS). This association may be particularly strong in type 2 diabetes (T2D). There are no effective medical treatments for CSPN or DPN and aggressive glycemic control is an effective approach to neuropathy risk reduction only in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Several studies suggest lifestyle based treatments that integrate dietary counseling with exercise may be a promising therapeutic approach to early DPN in T2D and CSPN-MetS . This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy and painful peripheral neuropathy in Turkish diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Tomris; Ertas, Mustafa; Yucel, Aysen; Keskinaslan, Abdulkadir; Senocak, Mustafa

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and neuropathic pain in diabetic patients attending university outpatient clinics in Turkey. In this multicenter cross-sectional study, neurologic examinations and nerve conduction studies along with clinical diabetic neuropathy score, and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale were performed on 1,113 patients (46.2% male) from 14 centers. Prevalence of DPN determined only by clinical examination was 40.4% and increased to 62.2%, by combining nerve conduction studies with clinical examination. According to Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs scores, neuropathic pain prevalence was 16.0% in those who reported pain. Poor glycemic control, retinopathy, microalbuminuria, hyperlipidemia, diabetic foot, and foot amputation were more commonly observed in patients with DPN. Clinical DPN affected 40.4% of diabetic patients, and neuropathic pain prevalence in diabetic patient population was 14.0%. Clinical examinations and nerve conduction studies are important components for early detection and accurate diagnosis of DPN and painful DPN.

  6. A Role for Insulin in Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Caleb W.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system is one of several organ systems that are profoundly affected in diabetes. The longstanding view is that insulin does not have a major role in modulating neuronal function in both central and peripheral nervous systems is now being challenged. In the setting of insulin deficiency or excess insulin, it is logical to propose that insulin dysregulation can contribute to neuropathic changes in sensory neurons. This is particularly important as sensory nerve damage associated with prediabetes, type 1 and type 2 diabetes is so prevalent. Here, we discuss the current experimental literature related to insulin's role as a potential neurotrophic factor in peripheral nerve function, as well as the possibility that insulin deficiency plays a role in diabetic neuropathy. In addition, we discuss how sensory neurons in the peripheral nervous system respond to insulin similar to other insulin-sensitive tissues. Moreover, studies now suggest that sensory neurons can also become insulin resistant like other tissues. Collectively, emerging studies are revealing that insulin signaling pathways are active contributors to sensory nerve modulation, and this review highlights this novel activity and should provide new insight into insulin's role in both peripheral and central nervous system diseases. PMID:28066166

  7. [Diabetic neuropathies. IV. Autonomous neuropathy. Peripheral sympathetic innervation and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Marmo, R; Costume, A; Persico, M; Bronzino, P; Contaldi, P; Stroffolini, T

    1984-04-28

    The clinical conditions due to damage to the peripheral sympathetic nervous system during diabetic neuropathy mainly involve alterations to subcutaneous vasomotility , temperature body regulation and exudation, which may take form of hyper or hypoactivity. Gustatory exudation and local anhydrosis are described in detail as well as the connection with aggravating factors like long duration, poor balance and early onset of diabetes mellitus . Change in the relevant cardiovascular reflexes, commonly used in diagnosing diabetic neuropathy, are also analysed with a discussion of their physiopathological background and clinical significance. Finally the painless infarct, sudden death and abnormal response to hypoglycaemia, that are the common features of diabetic neuropathy, are also described.

  8. [Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Schuler, U; Heller, S

    2017-03-14

    The perception of the media is that chemotherapy is mainly associated with nausea, vomiting and hair loss. In the longer term the development of peripheral neuropathy, i.e. chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is often more important for patients. The CIPN represents a side effect of many antineoplastic substances with severe functional impairment and its prevention and treatment is an important task. In addition to many interventions, which have been shown to be ineffective, physiotherapeutic measures and possibly the prophylactic application of cold are helpful for prevention. Randomized studies on the treatment of painful CIPN provided positive data for duloxetine and to a lesser extent for venlafaxine.

  9. [Diagnosis of the peripheral hereditary neuropathies and its molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Arenas-Sordo, María de la Luz

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies include a wide range of pathological disorders characterized by damage of peripheral nerves. Among them, peripheral hereditary neuropathies are a group of frequent illnesses and early evolution. They have been named hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peripheral hereditary neuropathies type Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). The most frequent types are CMT1, CMT2 and CMTX. Approximately 70% of the cases correspond to subtype CMT1A, associated with tandem duplication of a 1.5 Mb DNA fragment on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 that codifies the peripheral myelin protein PMP22. So far, there five different types of CMT (1,2,3,4,X) with approximately 32 subtypes, associated with more than 30 genes. Have been reported genetic heterogeneity and expression variability of the illness makes it necessary to carry on diagnostic strategies that integrate clinical study for determining genetic clinical history, family history, complete physical exploration, muscular strength, physical deformities, reflexes and sensitivity, and molecular studies allow detection of different types of mutations and help establish a correct diagnosis and an adequate genetic counseling.

  10. 77 FR 59930 - Clinical Development Programs for Disease-Modifying Agents for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...-modifying agents for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy. Discussion will focus on possible therapeutic targets for these agents, the types of painful peripheral neuropathies amenable to treatment with...

  11. An Early Diagnostic Tool for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kambiz, Shoista; van Neck, Johan W.; Cosgun, Saniye G.; van Velzen, Marit H. N.; Janssen, Joop A. M. J. L.; Avazverdi, Naim; Hovius, Steven E. R.; Walbeehm, Erik T.

    2015-01-01

    The skin’s rewarming rate of diabetic patients is used as a diagnostic tool for early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. At present, the relationship between microvascular changes in the skin and diabetic neuropathy is unclear in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the skin rewarming rate in diabetic rats is related to microvascular changes and whether this is accompanied by changes observed in classical diagnostic methods for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Computer-assisted infrared thermography was used to assess the rewarming rate after cold exposure on the plantar skin of STZ diabetic rats’ hind paws. Peripheral neuropathy was determined by the density of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (IENFs), mechanical sensitivity, and electrophysiological recordings. Data were obtained in diabetic rats at four, six, and eight weeks after the induction of diabetes and in controls. Four weeks after the induction of diabetes, a delayed rewarming rate, decreased skin blood flow and decreased density of IENFs were observed. However, the mechanical hyposensitivity and decreased motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) developed 6 and 8 weeks after the induction of diabetes. Our study shows that the skin rewarming rate is related to microvascular changes in diabetic rats. Moreover, the skin rewarming rate is a non-invasive method that provides more information for an earlier diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy than the classical monofilament test and MNCV in STZ induced diabetic rats. PMID:25984949

  12. [Occupational toxic neuropathies: morphology in peripheral nerve biopsies].

    PubMed

    Scelsi, Roberto; Candura, Stefano M

    2012-01-01

    Many peripheral neuropathies are caused by the (acute or chronic) toxic action of metals, solvents, pesticides, and other occupational and environmental contaminants. These agents often reproduce the anatomoclinical pictures of hereditary (e.g., Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease), autoimmune (Guillain-Barrè syndrome), or dysmetabolic (thiamine deficiency, diabetic neuropathy) forms. Toxic peripheral neuropathies can be classified on the basis of etiology, clinical features (sensitive, motor, sensitive-motor), or histopathology: neuronopathies (uncommon, mostly secondary to retrograde axonal degeneration; e.g., arsenic, thallium), axonopathies (acrylamide, esacarbons, CS2, organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy), myelinopathies (trichloroethylene), mixed forms (axonal and demyelinating: lead). For many substances, experimental research has led to the identification of the molecular and cellular targets of neurotoxicity. Several compounds are active by biotransformation (e.g., the esacarbons n-hexane and MnBK are neurotoxic since they are metabolized to 2,5-hexanedione), Genetic, physiological and environmental factors determine the individual metabolic set-up, and they may give origin to differences in the workers' sensitivity. Cessation of exposure is often followed by (microscopically observable) regenerative phenomena and clinical improvement. The morphology of neuropathies can be studied through peripheral nerve biopsy. Samples of sural nerve (or other nervous trunks of the limbs), adequately fixed, sectioned, and stained, allow the observation of alterations in axonal fibres (e.g., giant-axonal neuropathy, dying back neuropathy), myelin (demyelination), Schwann cells, interstitium, and blood vessels; possible inflammatory infiltrates; fibre density; regenerative phenomena (growth cone, remyelination). In occupational medicine, biopsy is indicated when the anamnestic-clinical picture, laboratory tests, and instrumental exams leave doubts about the nature, type

  13. Image analysis software for following progression of peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epplin-Zapf, Thomas; Miller, Clayton; Larkin, Sean; Hermesmeyer, Eduardo; Macy, Jenny; Pellegrini, Marco; Luccarelli, Saverio; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Timothy

    2009-02-01

    A relationship has been reported by several research groups [1 - 4] between the density and shapes of nerve fibers in the cornea and the existence and severity of peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a complication of several prevalent diseases or conditions, which include diabetes, HIV, prolonged alcohol overconsumption and aging. A common clinical technique for confirming the condition is intramuscular electromyography (EMG), which is invasive, so a noninvasive technique like the one proposed here carries important potential advantages for the physician and patient. A software program that automatically detects the nerve fibers, counts them and measures their shapes is being developed and tested. Tests were carried out with a database of subjects with levels of severity of diabetic neuropathy as determined by EMG testing. Results from this testing, that include a linear regression analysis are shown.

  14. Clinical peripheral neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus in 3 dogs.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Megan J; Vite, Charles H; Radhakrishnan, Anant; Hess, Rebecka S

    2008-06-01

    Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in 3 spontaneously diabetic dogs with clinical peripheral neuropathy (PN) are reported. Clinical signs of a PN may develop in diabetic dogs with adequate glycemic control. In addition, laryngeal paralysis may develop in association with diabetes mellitus in dogs with clinical PN.

  15. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Should a Chaperone Accompany Our Therapeutic Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Kevin L.; Li, Chengyuan

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes that is associated with axonal atrophy, demyelination, blunted regenerative potential, and loss of peripheral nerve fibers. The development and progression of DPN is due in large part to hyperglycemia but is also affected by insulin deficiency and dyslipidemia. Although numerous biochemical mechanisms contribute to DPN, increased oxidative/nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction seem intimately associated with nerve dysfunction and diminished regenerative capacity. Despite advances in understanding the etiology of DPN, few approved therapies exist for the pharmacological management of painful or insensate DPN. Therefore, identifying novel therapeutic strategies remains paramount. Because DPN does not develop with either temporal or biochemical uniformity, its therapeutic management may benefit from a multifaceted approach that inhibits pathogenic mechanisms, manages inflammation, and increases cytoprotective responses. Finally, exercise has long been recognized as a part of the therapeutic management of diabetes, and exercise can delay and/or prevent the development of painful DPN. This review presents an overview of existing therapies that target both causal and symptomatic features of DPN and discusses the role of up-regulating cytoprotective pathways via modulating molecular chaperones. Overall, it may be unrealistic to expect that a single pharmacologic entity will suffice to ameliorate the multiple symptoms of human DPN. Thus, combinatorial therapies that target causal mechanisms and enhance endogenous reparative capacity may enhance nerve function and improve regeneration in DPN if they converge to decrease oxidative stress, improve mitochondrial bioenergetics, and increase response to trophic factors. PMID:22885705

  16. Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy: Treatment regimen and peripheral neuropathy as a side effect.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gulce Sari; Torcun, Ceyda Corek; Grune, Tilman; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2017-02-01

    Proteasomal system plays an important role in protein turnover, which is essential for homeostasis of cells. Besides degradation of oxidized proteins, it is involved in the regulation of many different signaling pathways. These pathways include mainly cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, transcriptional activation and angiogenesis. Thus, proteasomal system is a crucial target for treatment of several diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cystic fibrosis, atherosclerosis, autoimmune diseases, diabetes and cancer. Over the last fifteen years, proteasome inhibitors have been tested to highlight their mechanisms of action and used in the clinic to treat different types of cancer. Proteasome inhibitors are mainly used in combinational therapy along with classical chemo-radiotherapy. Several studies have proved their significant effects but serious side effects such as peripheral neuropathy, limits their use in required effective doses. Recent studies focus on peripheral neuropathy as the primary side effect of proteasome inhibitors. Therefore, it is important to delineate the underlying mechanisms of peripheral neuropathy and develop new inhibitors according to obtained data. This review will detail the role of proteasome inhibition in cancer therapy and development of peripheral neuropathy as a side effect. Additionally, new approaches to prevent treatment-limiting side effects will be discussed in order to help researchers in developing effective strategies to overcome side effects of proteasome inhibitors.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF ALCOHOL-RELATED PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    MELLION, MICHELLE L.; NGUYEN, VANANH; TONG, MING; GILCHRIST, JAMES; DE LA MONTE, SUZANNE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this work was to determine the effect of chronic alcohol exposure on peripheral nerves in a nutritionally balanced rat model of alcoholism. Methods Three different strains of adult male rats were pair-fed for 8 weeks with isocaloric liquid diets containing 0% or 37% ethanol. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed. Peripheral nerve and muscle were examined histologically with morphometrics. Results Ethanol exposure significantly slowed velocity in tibial and fibular nerves, but not in the plantar nerve in all 3 strains. Studies of the sciatic nerve revealed decreased fiber diameters and increased regenerative sprouts in peripheral nerves. There was muscle denervation of ethanol-exposed rats in all 3 strains. Conclusions Chronic ethanol exposure caused a polyneuropathy characterized by axonal degeneration despite adequate nutrition. These results suggest that ethanol exposure has direct neurotoxic effects on peripheral nerves. This model may be useful in understanding the underlying mechanism(s) of alcohol-related peripheral neuropathy. PMID:23761140

  18. Painful neuropathies: the emerging role of sodium channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Brigitte A; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Waxman, Stephen G; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a frequent debilitating feature reported in peripheral neuropathies with involvement of small nerve (Aδ and C) fibers. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the generation and conduction of action potentials in the peripheral nociceptive neuronal pathway where NaV 1.7, NaV 1.8, and NaV 1.9 sodium channels (encoded by SCN9A, SCN10A, and SCN11A) are preferentially expressed. The human genetic pain conditions inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder were the first to be linked to gain-of-function SCN9A mutations. Recent studies have expanded this spectrum with gain-of-function SCN9A mutations in patients with small fiber neuropathy and in a new syndrome of pain, dysautonomia, and small hands and small feet (acromesomelia). In addition, painful neuropathies have been recently linked to SCN10A mutations. Patch-clamp studies have shown that the effect of SCN9A mutations is dependent upon the cell-type background. The functional effects of a mutation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sympathetic neuron cells may differ per mutation, reflecting the pattern of expression of autonomic symptoms in patients with painful neuropathies who carry the mutation in question. Peripheral neuropathies may not always be length-dependent, as demonstrated in patients with initial facial and scalp pain symptoms with SCN9A mutations showing hyperexcitability in both trigeminal ganglion and DRG neurons. There is some evidence suggesting that gain-of-function SCN9A mutations can lead to degeneration of peripheral axons. This review will focus on the emerging role of sodium channelopathies in painful peripheral neuropathies, which could serve as a basis for novel therapeutic strategies.

  19. Peripheral neuropathy in HIV: an analysis of evidence-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Evans, Linda A

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common and vexing symptom for people living with HIV infection (PLWH). Neuropathy occurs in several different syndromes and is identified in the literature as distal sensory polyneuropathy or distal sensory peripheral neuropathy. More recently, the HIV literature has focused on the syndrome as painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy, addressing the symptom rather than the underlying pathophysiology. Assessment of neuropathy in PLWH is critical and must be incorporated into nursing practice for each visit. Neuropathy has been attributed to the direct effects of HIV, exposure to antiretroviral medications (particularly the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), advanced immune suppression, and comorbid tuberculosis infection and exposure to antituberculosis medications. Evidence supports the importance of addressing neuropathy in PLWH with pharmacologic treatment regimens and complementary/alternative approaches. This paper examines the pathophysiology, evidence, and approaches to managing peripheral neuropathy. A case study has been included to illustrate a patient's experience with neuropathy symptoms.

  20. Vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in pediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Erika; Smith, Ellen M Lavoie; Donohoe, Clare; Hertz, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Vincristine is a chemotherapeutic agent that is a component of many combination regimens for a variety of malignancies, including several common pediatric tumors. Vincristine treatment is limited by a progressive sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy. Vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy (VIPN) is particularly challenging to detect and monitor in pediatric patients, in whom the side effect can diminish long term quality of life. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding VIPN, focusing on its description, assessment, prediction, prevention, and treatment. Significant progress has been made in our knowledge about VIPN incidence and progression, and tools have been developed that enable clinicians to reliably measure VIPN in pediatric patients. Despite these successes, little progress has been made in identifying clinically useful predictors of VIPN or in developing effective approaches for VIPN prevention or treatment in either pediatric or adult patients. Further research is needed to predict, prevent, and treat VIPN to maximize therapeutic benefit and avoid unnecessary toxicity from vincristine treatment. PMID:27904761

  1. Human beta-mannosidase deficiency associated with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Graber, D; Flurin, V; Delisle, M B; Pieraggi, M T; Testut, M F; Carrière, J P; Salvayre, R

    1994-01-01

    Human beta-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder described in only seven families. We present a further case in a black African 14-year-old boy with severely deficient beta-mannosidase activity, bilateral thenar and hypothenar amyotrophy, electrophysiologically demonstrable demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, and cytoplasmic vacuolation of skin fibroblasts and lymphoid cells. The clinical and biochemical features of our patient are compared to those of previously reported patients.

  2. Genetic advances uncover mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chua, K C; Kroetz, D L

    2017-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common dose-limiting toxicity experienced in 30-40% of patients undergoing treatment with various chemotherapeutics, including taxanes, vinca alkaloids, epothilones, proteasome inhibitors, and thalidomide. Importantly, CIPN significantly affects a patient's quality of life. Recent genetic association studies are enhancing our understanding of CIPN pathophysiology and serve as a foundation for identification of genetic biomarkers to predict toxicity risk and for the development of novel strategies for prevention and treatment.

  3. [Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: characteristics, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Istenes, Ildikó; Nagy, Zsolt; Demeter, Judit

    2016-06-06

    Longer remissions and better overall survival rates can be achieved with the introduction of new, effective treatments and targeted therapies in the past 1-2 decades, however, the incidence of side effects is also increasing parallelly. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common and potentially debilitating side effect due to peripheral somatic or autonomic nerve dysfunction. CIPN becomes increasingly important, as it affects patients' quality of life, and it is very often a dose limiting factor with the potential for reduced treatment efficacy. The pathomechanism, diagnosis, prevention and treatment possibilities are described in this review with special attention to the different groups of drugs.

  4. Peripheral neuropathy in acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (Herxheimer).

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, H C

    1975-01-01

    Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a dermatological condition that takes a chronically progressive course and finally leads to a widespread atrophy of the skin. Involvement of the peripheral nervous system is frequently observed, predominantly a sensory polyneuropathy. General reactions, the effect of penicillin treatment, the histological findings, and reports concerning a communicable agent transmittable from human to human as well in tissue cultures point to an infectious disease. Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans follows a peculiar geographical distribution forming clusters of high prevalence in certain regions. Transmission by ticks is suggested. Images PMID:168318

  5. Alternative Quantitative Tools in the Assessment of Diabetic Peripheral and Autonomic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, A I; Casellini, C; Névoret, M-L

    2016-01-01

    Here we review some seldom-discussed presentations of diabetic neuropathy, including large fiber dysfunction and peripheral autonomic dysfunction, emphasizing the impact of sympathetic/parasympathetic imbalance. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes and contributes additional risks in the aging adult. Loss of sensory perception, loss of muscle strength, and ataxia or incoordination lead to a risk of falling that is 17-fold greater in the older diabetic compared to their young nondiabetic counterparts. A fall is accompanied by lacerations, tears, fractures, and worst of all, traumatic brain injury, from which more than 60% do not recover. Autonomic neuropathy has been hailed as the "Prophet of Doom" for good reason. It is conducive to increased risk of myocardial infarction and sudden death. An imbalance in the autonomic nervous system occurs early in the evolution of diabetes, at a stage when active intervention can abrogate the otherwise relentless progression. In addition to hypotension, many newly recognized syndromes can be attributed to cardiac autonomic neuropathy such as orthostatic tachycardia and bradycardia. Ultimately, this constellation of features of neuropathy conspire to impede activities of daily living, especially in the patient with pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. The resulting reduction in quality of life may worsen prognosis and should be routinely evaluated and addressed. Early neuropathy detection can only be achieved by assessment of both large and small- nerve fibers. New noninvasive sudomotor function technologies may play an increasing role in identifying early peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, allowing rapid intervention and potentially reversal of small-fiber loss.

  6. Tart Cherry Juice as a Treatment for Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Cindy Alberts

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tart cherries have a long history as a treatment for gout and joint pain. While the exact mechanism of action is unknown, it is believed that acanthocyanin pigments and related bioflavonoids found in tart cherries and other red fruits scavenge free radicals, modulate cytokines, reduce DNA degradation, decrease capillary permeability, inhibit cyclooxygenase, and strengthen biological membranes. Many of these biochemical reactions would be expected to reduce inflammation, pain, and edema. Significance of Study Peripheral polyneuropathies are common and are believed to affect up to 9% of the US population older than 50 y. These neuropathies may develop from direct compression of peripheral nerves, toxic or metabolic injury to nerve tissue, autoimmune attack, or nutritional deficiency. No cause is identified in approximately 30% of patients. The pathophysiology of polyneuropathies is complex and not fully understood, but 3 common patterns of damage occur: (1) distal axonopathy, where the cell bodies remain intact, but axons degenerate from distal to proximal, usually as the result of toxic or metabolic injury; (2) demyelination neuropathy, where damage to the myelin sheath from autoimmune, infectious, or other causes disrupts electrical signaling; and (3) ganglionopathies, where damage occurs at the cell body or neuron, a relatively rare occurrence. While weakness and loss of sensation are common in many peripheral polyneuropathies, “gain of function” symptoms, such as paresthesias and allodynia, are the most distressing and are very difficult to treat. It is believed that these symptoms are caused by alterations in ion channels, alterations in neurotransmitters and their receptors, and altered gene expression. Common conventional treatments include antiepileptics, antidepressants, NSAIDs, and narcotics. These medications alter ion channels and neurotransmitters, decrease the sensitivity of nociceptive receptors, and desensitize C fibers. Most patients

  7. Japanese neuropathy patients with peripheral myelin protein-22 gene aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Lebo, R.V.; Li, L.Y.; Flandermeyer, R.R.

    1994-09-01

    Peripheral myelin protein (PMP-22) gene aneuploidy results in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1A (CMT1A) and the Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy (HNPP) in Japanese patients as well as Caucasian Americans. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, results when expression of one of at least seven genes is defective. CMT1A, about half of all CMT mutations, is usually associated with a duplication spanning the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene on distal chromosome band 17p11.2. Autosomal dominant HNPP (hereditary pressure and sensory neuropathy, HPSN) results from a deletion of the CMT1A gene region. Multicolor in situ hybridization with PMP-22 gene region probe characterized HNPP deletion reliably and detected all different size duplications reported previously. In summary, 72% of 28 Japanese CMT1 (HMSNI) patients tested had the CMT1A duplication, while none of the CMT2 (HMSNII) or CMT3 (HMSNIII) patients had a duplication. Three cases of HNPP were identified by deletion of the CMT1A gene region on chromosome 17p. HNPP and CMT1A have been reported to result simultaneously from the same unequal recombination event. The lower frequency of HNPP compared to CMT1A suggests that HNPP patients have a lower reproductive fitness than CMT1A patients. This result, along with a CMT1A duplication found in an Asian Indian family, demonstrates the broad geographic distribution and high frequency of PMP-22 gene aneuploidy.

  8. Mechanisms of Distal Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, Christopher R.; Höke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of a variety of diseases and treatments, including diabetes, cancer chemotherapy, and infectious causes (HIV, hepatitis C, and Campylobacter jejuni). Despite the fundamental difference between these insults, peripheral neuropathy develops as a combination of just six primary mechanisms: altered metabolism, covalent modification, altered organelle function and reactive oxygen species formation, altered intracellular and inflammatory signaling, slowed axonal transport, and altered ion channel dynamics and expression. All of these pathways converge to lead to axon dysfunction and symptoms of neuropathy. The detailed mechanisms of axon degeneration itself have begun to be elucidated with studies of animal models with altered degeneration kinetics, including the slowed Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) and Sarmknockout animal models. These studies have shown axonal degeneration to occur througha programmed pathway of injury signaling and cytoskeletal degradation. Insights into the common disease insults that converge on the axonal degeneration pathway promise to facilitate the development of therapeutics that may be effective against other mechanisms of neurodegeneration. PMID:25617478

  9. Reliability of presynaptic inhibition in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Shannon J; Hong, Junggi

    2012-09-01

    There has been rising interest in evaluating spinal reflex activity within the clinical population, however no study has yet investigated the reliability of presynaptic inhibition (PI) on patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Because neuropathy is closely related to central nervous system modification, it is important to understand the mechanism of spinal reflex activity in the DPN population. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the reliability of PI in patients with DPN. Eight participants (58.24 ± 6.38 yrs.) diagnosed with either type I or type II diabetes and peripheral neuropathy were recruited for the study. Each subject's H-reflex was measured using an EMG to elicit and record a series of 10 paired reflex depression trials. Reliability was measured by calculating Intra Class Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) with a 95% confidence interval. The results showed excellent reliability in both intraday (0.94) and interday (0.88) reliability. Therefore, analyzing PI in the central nervous system allows for an accurate evaluation of spinal cord circuitry in a non-invasive manner.

  10. Angiogenin gene polymorphism: A risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the northern Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Fan, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yingshuang

    2013-12-25

    Angiogenin is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Here, we quenced the coding region of the angiogenin gene in genomic DNA from 207 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (129 diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and 78 diabetic non-neuropathy patients) and 268 healthy controls. All subjects were from the Han population of northern China. No mutations were found. We then compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the angiogenin synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism rs11701 between the diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and controls, and between the diabetic neuropathy and non-neuropathy patients, using a case-control design. We detected no statistically significant genetic associations. Angiogenin may not be associated with genetic susceptibility to diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the Han population of northern China.

  11. HDAC6 inhibition effectively reverses chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Krukowski, Karen; Ma, Jiacheng; Golonzhka, Olga; Laumet, Geoffroy O; Gutti, Tanuja; van Duzer, John H; Mazitschek, Ralph; Jarpe, Matthew B; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2017-03-04

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common doselimiting side-effects of cancer treatment. Currently, there is no FDA-approved treatment available. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a microtubule-associated deacetylase whose function includes regulation of á-tubulin-dependent intracellular mitochondrial transport. Here we examined the effect of HDAC6 inhibition on established cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. We used a novel HDAC6 inhibitor ACY-1083, which shows 260-fold selectivity towards HDAC6 versus other HDACs. Our results show that HDAC6 inhibition prevented cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, and also completely reversed already existing cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, spontaneous pain, and numbness. These findings were confirmed using the established HDAC6 inhibitor ACY-1215 (Ricolinostat), which is currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment. Mechanistically, treatment with the HDAC6 inhibitor increased á-tubulin acetylation in the peripheral nerve. In addition, HDAC6 inhibition restored the cisplatin-induced reduction in mitochondrial bioenergetics and mitochondrial content in the tibial nerve, indicating increased mitochondrial transport. At a later time point, dorsal root ganglion mitochondrial bioenergetics also improved. HDAC6 inhibition restored the loss of intra-epidermal nerve fiber density in cisplatin-treated mice. Our results demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of HDAC6 completely reverses all the hallmarks of established cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy by normalization of mitochondrial function in DRG and nerve, and restoration of intra-epidermal innervation. These results are especially promising because one of the HDAC6 inhibitors tested here is currently in clinical trials as an add-on cancer therapy, highlighting the potential for a fast clinical translation of our findings.

  12. Noninvasive and minimally invasive detection and monitoring of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, David N

    2008-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are diverse and require a multidimensional approach for detection and monitoring in a clinical and research setting. This review describes non- and minimally-invasive measures of distal predominantly sensory polyneuropathy (DSP), the most common form of neuropathy. A combination of clinical and electrophysiologic assessment with nerve-conduction studies (NCSs) suffices for the detection and characterization of most DSPs. NCS are insensitive to variants of DSP that predominantly affect small diameter sensory nerve fibers (SFNs) and cutaneous nerve terminals that subserve pain and thermal sensation. Skin biopsy with assessment of epidermal nerve fiber density permits objective detection and monitoring of SFNs. Conventional clinical and NCS measures have limitations as outcomes in experimental therapeutics in DSP. For clinical trials, biopsy evaluation of epidermal innervation and emerging noninvasive imaging approaches (in vivo confocal microscopy of corneal innervation and of Meissner corpuscles in the skin) hold promise as surrogate markers that are complementary to traditional DSP measures.

  13. Small-Fiber Degeneration in Alcohol-Related Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mellion, Michelle L.; Silbermann, Elizabeth; Gilchrist, James M.; Machan, Jason T.; Leggio, Lorenzo; de la Monte, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol-related peripheral neuropathy (ALN) is generally characterized as an axonal large-fiber polyneuropathy caused by thiamine deficiency. We hypothesized, based on clinical observations, that ALN is associated with a small-fiber polyneuropathy that can be diagnosed with skin biopsy in heavy alcohol drinking subjects with normal thiamine status. Methods Eighteen individuals (9 heavy alcohol drinking subjects and 9 healthy control subjects) were assessed for the potential utility of skin biopsies in detecting ALN-associated small nerve fiber degeneration. Heavy drinking was defined as greater than 4 drinks/d and 5 drinks/d in women and men, respectively, as determined by the Timeline Follow-Back and lifetime drinking history. All subjects underwent neurological examination, nerve conduction studies, and skin biopsies to quantify end nerve fiber densities (ENFD). Other causes of neuropathy were excluded and thiamine status was assessed. Results Average ENFD were significantly decreased at the calf in the alcohol group as compared with control group (p < 0.0001). Histological sections demonstrated striking attrition and architectural simplification of intraepidermal nerve fibers in the heavy alcohol drinking subjects. There were no significant intergroup differences with respect to clinical assessments of neuropathy or thiamine status. Conclusions ALN is associated with a small-fiber neuropathy that can be detected with skin biopsy in heavy alcohol drinking individuals with normal thiamine status. Skin biopsy is a useful, minimally invasive biomarker that could extend studies to understand the effect of alcohol on the peripheral nerves and to evaluate potential therapeutic agents in larger clinical trials. PMID:24961481

  14. Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    It usually starts in the hands and/or feet and creeps up the arms and legs. Sometimes it feels like a tingling or numbness. Other times, it’s more of a shooting and/or burning pain or sensitivity to temperature. It can include sharp, stabbing pain, and it can make it difficult to perform normal day-to-day tasks like buttoning a shirt, sorting coins in a purse, or walking. An estimated 30 to 40 percent of cancer patients treated with chemotherapy experience these symptoms, a condition called chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). |

  15. The Armadillo as a Model for Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard W.; Ebenezer, Gigi J.; Pena, Maria T.; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Scollard, David M.; McArthur, Justin C.; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text. PMID:24615444

  16. Treatment of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy by intravenous mangafodipir

    PubMed Central

    Coriat, Romain; Alexandre, Jérôme; Nicco, Carole; Quinquis, Laurent; Benoit, Evelyne; Chéreau, Christiane; Lemaréchal, Hervé; Mir, Olivier; Borderie, Didier; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Weill, Bernard; Coste, Joel; Goldwasser, François; Batteux, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Background. The majority of patients receiving the platinum-based chemotherapy drug oxaliplatin develop peripheral neurotoxicity. Because this neurotoxicity involves ROS production, we investigated the efficacy of mangafodipir, a molecule that has antioxidant properties and is approved for use as an MRI contrast enhancer. Methods. The effects of mangafodipir were examined in mice following treatment with oxaliplatin. Neurotoxicity, axon myelination, and advanced oxidized protein products (AOPPs) were monitored. In addition, we enrolled 23 cancer patients with grade ≥2 oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in a phase II study, with 22 patients receiving i.v. mangafodipir following oxaliplatin. Neuropathic effects were monitored for up to 8 cycles of oxaliplatin and mangafodipir. Results. Mangafodipir prevented motor and sensory dysfunction and demyelinating lesion formation. In mice, serum AOPPs decreased after 4 weeks of mangafodipir treatment. In 77% of patients treated with oxaliplatin and mangafodipir, neuropathy improved or stabilized after 4 cycles. After 8 cycles, neurotoxicity was downgraded to grade ≥2 in 6 of 7 patients. Prior to enrollment, patients received an average of 880 ± 239 mg/m2 oxaliplatin. Patients treated with mangafodipir tolerated an additional dose of 458 ± 207 mg/m2 oxaliplatin despite preexisting neuropathy. Mangafodipir responders managed a cumulative dose of 1,426 ± 204 mg/m2 oxaliplatin. Serum AOPPs were lower in responders compared with those in nonresponders. Conclusion. Our study suggests that mangafodipir can prevent and/or relieve oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in cancer patients. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00727922. Funding. Université Paris Descartes, Ministère de la Recherche et de l’Enseignement Supérieur, and Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris. PMID:24355920

  17. Melatonin prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and promotes neuroprotection by inducing autophagy during oxaliplatin-evoked peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Areti, Aparna; Komirishetty, Prashanth; Akuthota, Manasaveena; Malik, Rayaz A; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-04-01

    Oxaliplatin, an organoplatinum compound, is used in the treatment of colorectal cancer, but its clinical use can be limited due to the development of peripheral neuropathy. Whilst mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as a major pathomechanism for oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity, the prevention of autophagy may also aggravate neuronal cell death. Melatonin, a well-known mitoprotectant and autophagy inducer, was used to examine its neuroprotective role in oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN). Melatonin prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) and promoted neuritogenesis in oxaliplatin-challenged neuro-2a cells. It did not interfere with the cytotoxic activity of oxaliplatin in human colon cancer cell line, HT-29. Melatonin treatment significantly alleviated oxaliplatin-induced pain behavior and neuropathic deficits in rats. It also ameliorated nitro-oxidative stress mediated by oxaliplatin, thus prevented nitrosylation of proteins and loss of antioxidant enzymes, and therefore, it improved mitochondrial electron transport chain function and maintained cellular bioenergetics by improving the ATP levels. The protective effects of melatonin were attributed to preventing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal apoptosis by increasing the autophagy pathway (via LC3A/3B) in peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Hence, it preserved the epidermal nerve fiber density in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic rats. Taken together, we provide detailed molecular mechanisms for the neuroprotective effect of melatonin and suggest it has translational potential for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.

  18. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: an update on the current understanding.

    PubMed

    Addington, James; Freimer, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of selected chemotherapeutic agents. Previous work has suggested that patients often under report the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and physicians fail to recognize the presence of such symptoms in a timely fashion. The precise pathophysiology that underlies chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, in both the acute and the chronic phase, remains complex and appears to be medication specific. Recent work has begun to demonstrate and further clarify potential pathophysiological processes that predispose and, ultimately, lead to the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. There is increasing evidence that the pathway to neuropathy varies with each agent. With a clearer understanding of how these agents affect the peripheral nervous system, more targeted treatments can be developed in order to optimize treatment and prevent long-term side effects.

  19. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: an update on the current understanding

    PubMed Central

    Addington, James; Freimer, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of selected chemotherapeutic agents. Previous work has suggested that patients often under report the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and physicians fail to recognize the presence of such symptoms in a timely fashion. The precise pathophysiology that underlies chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, in both the acute and the chronic phase, remains complex and appears to be medication specific. Recent work has begun to demonstrate and further clarify potential pathophysiological processes that predispose and, ultimately, lead to the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. There is increasing evidence that the pathway to neuropathy varies with each agent. With a clearer understanding of how these agents affect the peripheral nervous system, more targeted treatments can be developed in order to optimize treatment and prevent long-term side effects. PMID:27408692

  20. High-dose thalidomide increases the risk of peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hong-Xia; Fu, Wen-Yi; Cui, Hua-Dong; Yang, Li-Li; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Li-Juan

    2015-05-01

    Thalidomide is an effective drug for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis but might induce peripheral neuropathy. This major adverse reaction has attracted much concern. The current study aimed to observe the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy among ankylosing spondylitis patients for 1 year after treatment. In this study, 207 ankylosing spondylitis cases received thalidomide treatment, while 116 ankylosing spondylitis cases received other treatments. Results showed that the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy in the thalidomide group was higher than that in the non-thalidomide group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of neuropathy between the < 6 months medication and ≥ 6 months medication groups. There were no differences in the mean age, gender, or daily dose between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy among patients receiving 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg thalidomide per day was 4.6%, 8.5%, 17.1%, 21.7%, respectively. The incidence was significantly different between the groups receiving 25 mg and 100 mg thalidomide. In conclusion, thalidomide can induce peripheral neuropathy within 1 year after treatment of ankylosing spondylitis; however, age and gender have no obvious impact on the incidence of peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is associated with increasing daily doses of thalidomide.

  1. Peripheral neuropathies from chemotherapeutics and targeted agents: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Grisold, Wolfgang; Cavaletti, Guido; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy (CIPN) are an increasingly frequent problem. Contrary to hema­tologic adverse effects, which can be treated with hematopoetic growth factors, neither prophylaxis nor spe­cific treatment is available, and only symptomatic treatment can be offered. Neurotoxic drugs are becoming a major dose-limiting factor. The epidemiology is still unclear. Several drug-dependent pathogenetic mechanisms exist. CIPN are predominately sensory, length-dependent neuropathies that develop after a typical cumulative dose. Usually, the appearance of CIPN is dose dependent, although in at least 2 drugs (oxaliplatin and taxanes), immediate toxic effects occur. The most frequent substances causing CIPN are platin compounds, vinka alkaloids, taxanes, and bortezomib and thalidomide. The role of synergistic neurotoxicity caused by previously given chemo­therapies and concomitant chemotherapies and the role pre-existent neuropathy on the development of a CIPN is not clear. As the number of long-term cancer survivors increases and a new focus on long-term effects of chemotherapy-induced neuropathies emerge, concepts of rehabili­tation need to be implemented to improve the patients’ functions and quality of life. PMID:23095830

  2. HLA class II alleles and risk for peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Marzban, Ahmad; Kiani, Javad; Hajilooi, Mehrdad; Rezaei, Hamzeh; Kahramfar, Zohreh; Solgi, Ghasem

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype variations on development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is not well determined. This study aimed to identify the association of HLA class II alleles with DPN in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Totally 106 T2D patients, 49 with DPN and 57 without DPN, and 100 ethnic-matched healthy controls were analyzed. Both groups of the patients were matched based on sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and duration of T2D. Polyneuropathy was diagnosed using electrodiagnostic methods. HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 genotyping was performed in all subjects by the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. T2D patients with DPN showed higher frequencies of HLA-DRB1*10 and DRB1*12 alleles compared to control group (P = 0.04). HLA-DQB1*02 allele and HLA-DRB1*07-DQB1*02 haplotype were associated with a decreased risk for developing DPN in T2D patients (P = 0.02 and P = 0.05 respectively). Also, patients with severe neuropathy showed higher frequencies of DRB1*07 (P = 0.003) and DQB1*02 (P = 0.02) alleles than those with mild-to-moderate form of neuropathy. The distribution of DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and haplotypes were not statistically different between all patients and healthy controls. Our findings implicate a possible protective role of HLA-DQB1*02 allele and HLA-DRB1*07-DQB1*02 haplotype against development of peripheral neuropathy in T2D patients. Therefore, variations in HLA genotypes might be used as genetic markers for prediction and potentially management of neuropathy in T2D patients. PMID:28123430

  3. The association of vitamin D with inflammatory cytokines in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Bulent; Tulubas, Feti; Bilir, Betul Ekiz; Atile, Neslihan Soysal; Kara, Sonat Pinar; Yildirim, Tulay; Gumustas, Seyit Ali; Topcu, Birol; Kaymaz, Ozlem; Aydin, Murat

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The effects of vitamin D on the circulating levels of IL-17 and IL-13 were investigated in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 without neuropathy, and healthy controls. [Subjects and Methods] A single-blind controlled clinical study was performed, including70 type 2 diabetic patients with or without diabetic peripheral neuropathy and 33 healthy volunteer controls. The 25(OH)D levels were evaluated using ultra-performance liquid chromatography, and IL-17 and IL-13 levels were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. [Results] The 25(OH) vitamin D concentration was lower in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients than in diabetes mellitus patients without neuropathy and healthy controls. Similarly, 25(OH)D levels were lower in diabetes mellitus patients than healthy controls. IL-17 and IL-13 levels were higher in diabetes mellitus patients than in controls. Additionally, IL-13 levels were higher in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients than in diabetes mellitus patients without neuropathy. These differences were statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between 25(OH)D and IL-13,and a negative correlation between 25(OH)D andIL-17 in the diabetic and diabetic neuropathy groups. [Conclusion] Vitamin D is a potential modifiable risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy and may regulate inflammatory mediators, e.g., IL-17 and IL-13.

  4. Generalized peripheral neuropathy in a dental technician exposed to methyl methacrylate monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Donaghy, M.; Rushworth, G.; Jacobs, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    A 58-year-old dental prosthetic technician developed generalized sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy. Neurophysiologic studies showed a generalized sensorimotor neuropathy of axonal degeneration type. Examination of a sural nerve biopsy showed a moderately severe axonal neuropathy with loss of large myelinated fibers and unmyelinated axons. There was evidence of slow ongoing degeneration and considerable fiber regeneration. Electron microscopy showed increased numbers of filaments in a few fibers. These findings show resemblances to the nerve changes caused by another acrylic resin, acrylamide. They suggest that the neuropathy may have been caused by 30 years of occupational cutaneous and inhalational exposure to methyl methacrylate monomer since they excluded other recognized causes of neuropathy.

  5. Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Presentations, Mechanisms, and Exercise Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Min; Sharma, Neena; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Kluding, Patricia M

    2013-06-30

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a frequent complication of diabetes and a major cause of morbidity and increased mortality. It is typically characterized by significant deficits in tactile sensitivity, vibration sense, lower-limb proprioception, and kinesthesia. Painful diabetic neuropathy (P-DPN) is a common phenotype of DPN that affects up to one-third of the general diabetic population. P-DPN has been shown to be associated with significant reductions in overall quality of life, increased levels of anxiety and depression, sleep impairment, and greater gait variability. The purpose of this review is to examine proposed mechanisms of P-DPN, summarize current treatment regimen, and assess exercise as a potential therapy for P-PDN. Although exercise has been shown to be an effective therapeutic modality for diabetes, its specific effects on DPN and especially the painful phenotype have not been sufficiently investigated in current literature. Several rodent models and clinical trials have presented promising results in this area, and warrant further investigations examining the effect of exercise on P-DPN.

  6. Intractable Acute Pain Related to Fluoroquinolone-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Danesh, Arash; Onyima, Chiemeka; Dukewich, Matthew; Gupta, Anita

    2017-03-30

    Fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed antibiotics, used for various infectious etiologies. These antibiotics carry the possibility of the serious adverse effect of peripheral neuropathy, with a true incidence not known owing to its rare existence. Recently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has required alterations to drug labels to highlight this adverse effect of fluoroquinolones. This is a case report of a single patient at an inpatient neurology service at an urban academic medical center in the United States. The patient is a 20-year-old male, with well-controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus, presenting with a short duration of bilateral lower extremity pain following a 10-day course of levofloxacin for suspected epididymitis. The patient was initially diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome and treated with a variety of pain medications, including lidocaine infusions, hydromorphone, methadone, and ketamine infusions. After review of the patient's history and limited response to medical management, the patient's condition was reclassified as an adverse effect from fluoroquinolone treatment. Pain of unknown etiology can be perplexing, both for the physician and the patient. Reporting of similar incidents attributed to medication adverse effects will increase the awareness of this type of neuropathy, avoid future cases of misdiagnosis, and enable early detection and treatment.

  7. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course.

  8. Pathobiology of cancer chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yaqin; Smith, Maree T.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a type of neuropathic pain that is a major dose-limiting side-effect of potentially curative cancer chemotherapy treatment regimens that develops in a “stocking and glove” distribution. When pain is severe, a change to less effective chemotherapy agents may be required, or patients may choose to discontinue treatment. Medications used to alleviate CIPN often lack efficacy and/or have unacceptable side-effects. Hence the unmet medical need for novel analgesics for relief of this painful condition has driven establishment of rodent models of CIPN. New insights on the pathobiology of CIPN gained using these models are discussed in this review. These include mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress that are implicated as key mechanisms in the development of CIPN. Associated structural changes in peripheral nerves include neuronopathy, axonopathy and/or myelinopathy, especially intra-epidermal nerve fiber (IENF) degeneration. In patients with CIPN, loss of heat sensitivity is a hallmark symptom due to preferential damage to myelinated primary afferent sensory nerve fibers in the presence or absence of demyelination. The pathobiology of CIPN is complex as cancer chemotherapy treatment regimens frequently involve drug combinations. Adding to this complexity, there are also subtle differences in the pathobiological consequences of commonly used cancer chemotherapy drugs, viz platinum compounds, taxanes, vincristine, bortezomib, thalidomide and ixabepilone, on peripheral nerves. PMID:24385965

  9. Peripheral neuropathy and parkinsonism: a large clinical and pathogenic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sebastien; Vital, Claude

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) has been reported in idiopathic and hereditary forms of parkinsonism, but the pathogenic mechanisms are unclear and likely heterogeneous. Levodopa-induced vitamin B12 deficiency has been discussed as a causal factor of PN in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, but peripheral nervous system involvement might also be a consequence of the underlying neurodegenerative process. Occurrence of PN with parkinsonism has been associated with a panel of mitochondrial cytopathies, more frequently related to a nuclear gene defect and mainly polymerase gamma (POLG1) gene. Parkin (PARK2) gene mutations are responsible for juvenile parkinsonism, and possible peripheral nervous system involvement has been reported. Rarely, an association of parkinsonism with PN may be encountered in other neurodegenerative diseases such as fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome related to premutation CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene, Machado-Joseph disease related to an abnormal CAG repeat expansion in ataxin-3 (ATXN3) gene, Kufor-Rakeb syndrome caused by mutations in ATP13A2 gene, or in hereditary systemic disorders such as Gaucher disease due to mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene and Chediak-Higashi syndrome due to LYST gene mutations. This article reviews conditions in which PN may coexist with parkinsonism.

  10. Functional deficits in peripheral nerve mitochondria in rats with paclitaxel- and oxaliplatin-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huaien; Xiao, Wen Hua; Bennett, Gary J

    2011-12-01

    Cancer chemotherapeutics like paclitaxel and oxaliplatin produce a dose-limiting chronic sensory peripheral neuropathy that is often accompanied by neuropathic pain. The cause of the neuropathy and pain is unknown. In animal models, paclitaxel-evoked and oxaliplatin-evoked painful peripheral neuropathies are accompanied by an increase in the incidence of swollen and vacuolated mitochondria in peripheral nerve axons. It has been proposed that mitochondrial swelling and vacuolation are indicative of a functional impairment and that this results in a chronic axonal energy deficiency that is the cause of the neuropathy's symptoms. However, the significance of mitochondrial swelling and vacuolation is ambiguous and a test of the hypothesis requires a direct assessment of the effects of chemotherapy on mitochondrial function. The results of such an assessment are reported here. Mitochondrial respiration and ATP production were measured in rat sciatic nerve samples taken 1-2 days after and 3-4 weeks after induction of painful peripheral neuropathy with paclitaxel and oxaliplatin. Significant deficits in Complex I-mediated and Complex II-mediated respiration and significant deficits in ATP production were found for both drugs at both time points. In addition, prophylactic treatment with acetyl-l-carnitine, which inhibited the development of paclitaxel-evoked and oxaliplatin-evoked neuropathy, prevented the deficits in mitochondrial function. These results implicate mitotoxicity as a possible cause of chemotherapy-evoked chronic sensory peripheral neuropathy.

  11. Tapentadol-ER for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Games, Gina; Hutchison, Amber

    2013-10-01

    With the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) increasing, pathologic complications such as diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) are also becoming more common. Of those diagnosed with DM, 10% to 20% of patients suffer from painful DPN. Until recently, only pregabalin and duloxetine possessed Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this condition. However, FDA recently approved tapentadol-ER [extended release] (Nucynta ER) for painful DPN. Tapentadol-ER is an opioid analgesic commonly used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain that contains a unique dual mechanism acting as both a weak mu-opiod receptor agonist and norepinephine-reuptake inhibitor. It is by way of this unique dual mechanism that allows for effective analgesic effects with increased tolerability. This new FDA approval provides an additional therapeutic option to treat DPN in symptomatic patients.

  12. Recent Advances in Diagnostic Strategies for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is an increasing epidemic in Korea, and associated diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is its most common and disabling complication. DPN has an insidious onset and heterogeneous clinical manifestations, making it difficult to detect high-risk patients of DPN. Early diagnosis is recommended and is the key factor for a better prognosis and preventing diabetic foot ulcers, amputation, or disability. However, diagnostic tests for DPN are not clearly established because of the various pathophysiology developing from the nerve injury to clinical manifestations, differences in mechanisms according to the type of diabetes, comorbidities, and the unclear natural history of DPN. Therefore, DPN remains a challenge for physicians to screen, diagnose, follow up, and evaluate for treatment response. In this review, diagnosing DPN using various methods to assess clinical symptoms and/or signs, sensorineural impairment, and nerve conduction studies will be discussed. Clinicians should rely on established modalities and utilize current available testing as complementary to specific clinical situations. PMID:27246283

  13. Evaluation of oxidative stress markers and vascular risk factors in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    El Boghdady, Noha Ahmed; Badr, Gamal Ali

    2012-06-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most common diabetic chronic complications. The pathogenesis of DPN is complex and involves an intertwined array of mechanisms. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the association of oxidative stress and vascular risk factors with the prevalence of DPN and to determine the role of these biochemical parameters in the prognosis of DPN. One hundred patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 40 clinically healthy individuals were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 40 diabetic patients without peripheral neuropathy, and group 2 consisted of 60 patients with DPN. Erythrocytes glutathione (GSH) level, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), nitrite/nitrate (NOx) and homocysteine (Hcy) levels as well as serum ceruloplasmin (Cp), total antioxidants (TAO), endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity were estimated. A significant decrease of erythrocyte GSH was observed in groups 1 and 2 relative to the controls. An increase in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), MDA, NOx, GGT, Cp, TAO, Hcy and ET-1 was noted in patients with DPN. In conclusion, oxidative stress biomarkers and vascular risk factors could be important in the pathogenesis of DPN. The measurement of serum GGT and Hcy in addition to HbA1c and disease duration could facilitate the early detection of neuropathy in diabetic patients.

  14. Hepatitis C virus infection with peripheral neuropathy is not always associated with cryoglobulinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lidove, O; Cacoub, P; Maisonobe, T; Servan, J; Thibault, V; Piette, J; Leger, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To describe cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with chronic hepatitis C virus infection without mixed cryoglobulinaemia.
METHODS—Four cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with chronic hepatitis C virus infection with persistent negativity of mixed cryoglobulinaemia were found.
RESULTS—All patients had small increases of transaminase levels and a positive viraemia. Liver biopsy showed chronic active hepatitis in all but one case (Knodell 4-9, Metavir A0F0-A3F3). Neuromuscular biopsy showed axonal neuropathy associated with lymphoid infiltrates around small vessels in two cases. Rheumatoid factor was always negative and C4 complement level was always normal. In three patients, neuropathy improved with interferon α, interferon α + ursodesoxycholic acid, or steroids + plasma exchange.
CONCLUSION—Peripheral neuropathy may be associated with hepatitis C virus infection without mixed cryoglobulinaemia.

 PMID:11171696

  15. Serum micronutrients and prealbumin during development and recovery of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Roser; Santos, Cristina; Soler, Gemma; Gil-Gil, Miguel; Pernas, Sonia; Galan, Maica; Palmero, Ramon; Bruna, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a frequent adverse event. Nutritional status can become impaired in cancer patients, potentially contributing to neuropathy's evolution. Our aim was to evaluate serum micronutrients and prealbumin in a cohort of 113 solid-cancer patients receiving platinum and taxane compounds during the development and recovery of neuropathy, up to 1 year after finishing treatment. CIPN was graded according to Total Neuropathy Score(©) and NCI.CTCv3 at T0 (baseline), T1 (1-3 months), and T12 (12 months) after chemotherapy. CIPN was classified as asymptomatic (< grade 2) or symptomatic (≥2). CIPN recovery was defined as ≥1 grade improvement at T12. Symptomatic CIPN developed in 52% of patients. Symptomatic patients presented a higher increase in TNSc (p < 0.001), in TNSr(©) (p < 0.001), and decrease in sural (p < 0.001) and radial nerve conduction (p < 0.001). No significant differences with any of the micronutrients were observed along T0-T1 period between severity or chemotherapy groups. By T12, symptomatic patients without recovery had a decrease in vitamin E levels (p = 0.019) and prealbumin (p = 0.062) compared with those symptomatic that improved. A correlation between the variation of vitamin E and prealbumin at T0-T1 (r = 0.626, p = 0.001) and T1-T12 (r = 0.411, p = 0.06) was observed. After chemotherapy treatment, the improvement of patients displaying symptomatic neuropathy is related to vitamin E and prealbumin serum levels. Our results suggest that nutritional status can play a role in CIPN recovery.

  16. Challenges Evaluating Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Mohrmann, Caroline; Armer, Jane; Hayashi, Robert J

    Children treated for cancer are exposed to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents with known toxicity to the peripheral nervous system. The side effect of peripheral neuropathy can cause changes in sensation, function, and even cause pain. Although peripheral neuropathy is recognized by pediatric oncology nurses as an important and significant side effect, measuring neuropathy can be quite complex for clinical care and research efforts. With more children surviving a cancer diagnosis today, this issue is increasingly important for childhood cancer survivors. This article has reviewed existing literature examining peripheral neuropathy in childhood cancer survivors with particular interest paid to measurement tools available and needs for future research. It is important for nurses to choose appropriate measures for clinical care and research methods in order to have an impact on patients experiencing this condition.

  17. Phosphodiesterase-5 is a therapeutic target for peripheral neuropathy in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chopp, M; Szalad, A; Liu, Z; Bolz, M; Alvarez, F M; Lu, M; Zhang, L; Cui, Y; Zhang, R L; Zhang, Z G

    2011-10-13

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common and major complication of diabetes, the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully understood. Using a mouse model of type II diabetes, the present study investigated the role of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) in peripheral neuropathy. BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J (db/db) mice were treated with sildenafil, a specific inhibitor of PDE5, at doses of 2 and 10 mg/kg or saline. Levels of PDE5 and morphometric parameters in sciatic nerve tissue as well as the motor and sensory function were measured in these mice. In diabetic mice, PDE5 expression in sciatic nerve tissue was significantly upregulated, whereas the myelin sheath thickness, myelin basic protein (MBP), and subcutaneous nerve fibers were significantly reduced. Treatment with sildenafil significantly improved neurological function, assayed by motor and sensory conducting velocities and thermal and mechanical noxious stimuli, concomitantly with increases in myelin sheath thickness, MBP levels, and subcutaneous nerve fibers. In vitro, hyperglycemia upregulated PDE5 in Schwann cells and reduced Schwann cell proliferation, migration, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Blockage of PDE5 with sildenafil increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and completely abolished the effect of hyperglycemia on Schwann cells. Sildenafil upregulated cGMP-dependent protein kinase G I (PKGI), whereas inhibition of PKGI with a PKG inhibitor, KT5823, suppressed the inhibitory effect of sildenafil on Schwann cells. These data indicate that hyperglycemia substantially upregulates PDE5 expression and that the cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by sildenafil mediates the beneficial effects of sildenafil on diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  18. TNF-Alpha in Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Impaired Glucose Regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Zhu, Ju; Liu, Na; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Zhecheng

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation (IGR) is the prestate of diabetes; about 1/3 of IGR patients will develop to diabetes finally. In this study, we investigated the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in peripheral neuropathy impaired patients with impaired glucose regulation (IGR). A total of 70 IGR patients received the conventional nerve conduction test, including 30 patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 40 patients without peripheral neuropathy (NPN). The other 40 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. The serum TNF-α and IL-6 in IGR patients were higher than in control group, and serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in IGR-PN group were higher than in IGR-NPN group (27.7 ± 17.8 versus 13.1 ± 6.7 pg/mL and 18.1 ± 17.7 versus 6.4 ± 3.7 pg/mL, resp., both p < 0.05). Multifactors logistic regression analysis showed that TNF-α (OR = 0.893; p = 0.009) was an independent factor affecting whether IGR could combine with peripheral neuropathy. TNF-α and IL-6 could aggregate peripheral neuropathy in impaired glucose regulation patients; TNF-α might be independent risk factor for peripheral neuropathy in glucose regulation impaired patients.

  19. TNF-Alpha in Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Impaired Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ju; Liu, Na; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation (IGR) is the prestate of diabetes; about 1/3 of IGR patients will develop to diabetes finally. In this study, we investigated the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in peripheral neuropathy impaired patients with impaired glucose regulation (IGR). A total of 70 IGR patients received the conventional nerve conduction test, including 30 patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 40 patients without peripheral neuropathy (NPN). The other 40 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. The serum TNF-α and IL-6 in IGR patients were higher than in control group, and serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in IGR-PN group were higher than in IGR-NPN group (27.7 ± 17.8 versus 13.1 ± 6.7 pg/mL and 18.1 ± 17.7 versus 6.4 ± 3.7 pg/mL, resp., both p < 0.05). Multifactors logistic regression analysis showed that TNF-α (OR = 0.893; p = 0.009) was an independent factor affecting whether IGR could combine with peripheral neuropathy. TNF-α and IL-6 could aggregate peripheral neuropathy in impaired glucose regulation patients; TNF-α might be independent risk factor for peripheral neuropathy in glucose regulation impaired patients. PMID:28251164

  20. Mouse forward genetics in the study of the peripheral nervous system and human peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Darlene S.; Popko, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Forward genetics, the phenotype-driven approach to investigating gene identity and function, has a long history in mouse genetics. Random mutations in the mouse transcend bias about gene function and provide avenues towards unique discoveries. The study of the peripheral nervous system is no exception; from historical strains such as the trembler mouse, which led to the identification of PMP22 as a human disease gene causing multiple forms of peripheral neuropathy, to the more recent identification of the claw paw and sprawling mutations, forward genetics has long been a tool for probing the physiology, pathogenesis, and genetics of the PNS. Even as spontaneous and mutagenized mice continue to enable the identification of novel genes, provide allelic series for detailed functional studies, and generate models useful for clinical research, new methods, such as the piggyBac transposon, are being developed to further harness the power of forward genetics. PMID:18481175

  1. Arterial Stiffness and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Ahmet; Demir, Kenan; Kaya, Zeynettin; Marakoglu, Kamile; Ceylan, Esra; Ekmekci, Ahmet Hakan; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Demir, Aysegul; Altunkeser, Bulent Behlul

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the relationship between peripheral neuropathy and parameters of arterial stiffness and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Material/Methods The study included 161 patients (80 females and 81 males), 69 of whom had peripheral neuropathy. All patients underwent 24-h blood pressure monitoring, and arterial stiffness parameters were measured. The CIMT was measured using B-mode ultrasonography and patients also underwent transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Results Patients with peripheral neuropathy, compared with those without it, were older (54.68±8.35 years vs. 51.04±7.89 years; p=0.005) and had T2DM for longer periods (60 vs. 36 months; p=0.004). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values (8.55±1.85 mg/dL vs. 7.30±1.51 mg/dL; p<0.001), pulse wave velocity (PWV) (7.74±1.14 m/s vs. 7.15±1.10 m/s; p=0.001), CIMT (anterior 0.74±0.15 mm vs. 0.67±0.13 mm; p=0.01), and left ventricular mass (LVM) index (98.68±26.28 g/m2 vs. 89.71±19.70 g/m2; p=0.02) were all significantly increased in the group with peripheral neuropathy compared to the group without peripheral neuropathy. We determined that duration of diabetes, HbA1c, and LVM index were predictors of peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions A significant relationship was found between diabetic neuropathy and increased PWV, a parameter of arterial stiffness, as well as CIMT, a marker of systemic atherosclerosis. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy may be a determinant of subclinical atherosclerosis in T2DM. PMID:25351260

  2. Evaluation and management of peripheral neuropathy in diabetic patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Visovsky, Constance; Meyer, Rachel R; Roller, Jeffre; Poppas, Megan

    2008-04-01

    Recently, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy has received a great deal of attention. However, the interaction of diabetic neuropathy with potentially neurotoxic chemotherapy is far less understood. The incidence of type II diabetes has risen exponentially in the past two decades. In concert with the rise in type II diabetes, the number of individuals with diabetes who need chemotherapy for cancer also is expected to increase. Diabetic neuropathy and the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy have a significant potential to cause functional disability. Diabetics may be most at risk for the effects of neurotoxic agents on peripheral nerve functioning, in addition to the other effects induced by chemotherapeutic agents. The purpose of this article is to review the evaluation, management, and clinical implications of peripheral neuropathy in patients with cancer and diabetes.

  3. Unhealthy behaviours for self-management of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, P K; Voss, J G; Corless, I B; Lindgren, T G; Wantland, D J; Kemppainen, J K; Canaval, G E; Sefcik, E F; Nokes, K M; Bain, C A; Kirksey, K M; Eller, L S; Dole, P J; Hamilton, M J; Coleman, C L; Holzemer, W L; Reynolds, N R; Portillo, C J; Bunch, E H; Tsai, Y-F; Mendez, M R; Davis, S M; Gallagher, D M

    2007-11-01

    The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy is frequent in HIV disease and is often associated with antiretroviral therapy. Unhealthy behaviours, particularly substance-use behaviours, are utilized by many HIV-positive individuals to manage neuropathic symptoms. As part of a larger study on self-care for symptoms in HIV disease, this study analyzed the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy behaviours to self-manage peripheral neuropathy in HIV disease. Sociodemographic and disease-related correlates and unhealthy behaviours were examined in a convenience sample of 1,217 respondents who were recruited from data collection sites in several US cities, Puerto Rico, Colombia, and Taiwan. Results of the study indicated that respondents with peripheral neuropathy (n=450) identified a variety of unhealthy self-care behaviours including injection drug use, oral drug use, smoking cigarettes and alcohol ingestion. Specific unhealthy behaviours that participants reported to alleviate peripheral neuropathy included use of marijuana (n=67), smoking cigarettes (n=139), drinking alcohol (n=81) and street drugs (n=30). A subset of those individuals (n=160), who identified high levels of neuropathy (greater than five on a scale of 1-10), indicated significantly higher use of amphetamines and injection drug use in addition to alcohol use and cigarette smoking. For participants from Norway, substance use (using alcohol: 56%) was one of the most frequent self-management strategies. Implications for clinical practice include assessment and education of persons with HIV for self-care management of the complex symptom of peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Evidence of GLP-1-mediated neuroprotection in an animal model of pyridoxine-induced peripheral sensory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Perry, TracyAnn; Holloway, Harold W.; Weerasuriya, Ananda; Mouton, Peter R.; Duffy, Kara; Mattison, Julie A.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2007-01-01

    Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) intoxicated rodents develop a peripheral neuropathy characterized by sensory nerve conduction deficits associated with disturbances of nerve fiber geometry and axonal atrophy. To investigate the possibility that glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)-amide (GLP-1) receptor agonism may influence axonal structure and function through neuroprotection neurotrophic support, effects of GLP-1 and its long acting analog, Exendin-4 (Ex4) treatment on pyridoxine-induced peripheral neuropathy were examined in rats using behavioral and morphometric techniques. GLP-1 is an endogenous insulinotropic peptide secreted from the gut in response to the presence of food. GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) are coupled to the cAMP second messenger pathway, and are expressed widely throughout neural tissues of humans and rodents. Recent studies have established that GLP-1 and Ex4, have multiple synergistic effects on glucose-dependent insulin secretion pathways of pancreatic β-cells and on neural plasticity. Data reported here suggest that clinically relevant doses of GLP-1 and Ex4 may offer some protection against the sensory peripheral neuropathy induced by pyridoxine. Our findings suggest a potential role for these peptides in the treatment of neuropathies, including that associated with type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:17125767

  5. A Systematic Review of Experimental and Clinical Acupuncture in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Franconi, Giovanna; Schröder, Sven; Marchetti, Paolo; Robinson, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect that can be very disabling and can limit or delay the dose of chemotherapy that can be administered. Acupuncture may be effective for treating peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the use of acupuncture for CIPN. The systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Database, CINHAL, and ISI Proceedings. Hand searching was conducted, and consensus was reached on all extracted data. Only papers in the English language were included, irrespective of study design. From 3989 retrieved papers, 8 relevant papers were identified. One was an experimental study which showed that electroacupuncture suppressed CIPN pain in rats. In addition, there were 7 very heterogeneous clinical studies, 1 controlled randomised study using auricular acupuncture, 2 randomized controlled studies using somatic acupuncture, and 3 case series/case reports which suggested a positive effect of acupuncture in CIPN. Conclusions. Only one controlled randomised study demonstrated that acupuncture may be beneficial for CIPN. All the clinical studies reviewed had important methodological limitations. Further studies with robust methodology are needed to demonstrate the role of acupuncture for treating CIPN resulting from cancer treatment. PMID:23983788

  6. Independent contributions of alcohol and stress axis hormones to painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Levine, E; Levine, J D

    2013-01-03

    Painful small-fiber peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating complication of chronic alcohol abuse. Evidence from previous studies suggests that neuroendocrine mechanisms, in combination with other, as yet unidentified actions of alcohol, are required to produce this neuropathic pain syndrome. In addition to neurotoxic effects of alcohol, in the setting of alcohol abuse neuroendocrine stress axes release glucocorticoids and catecholamines. Since receptors for these stress hormones are located on nociceptors, at which they can act to cause neuronal dysfunction, we tested the hypothesis that alcohol and stress hormones act on the nociceptor, independently, to produce neuropathic pain. We used a rat model, which allows the distinction of the effects of alcohol from those produced by neuroendocrine stress axis mediators. We now demonstrate that topical application of alcohol and exposure to unpredictable sound stress, each alone, has no effect on the nociceptive threshold. However, when animals that had previous exposure to alcohol were subsequently exposed to stress, they rapidly developed mechanical hyperalgesia. Conversely, sound stress followed by topical alcohol exposure also produced mechanical hyperalgesia. The contribution of stress hormones was prevented by spinal intrathecal administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to β(2)-adrenergic or glucocorticoid receptor mRNA, which attenuates receptor level in nociceptors, as well as by adrenal medullectomy. These experiments establish an independent role of alcohol and stress hormones on the primary afferent nociceptor in the induction of painful peripheral neuropathy.

  7. Peripheral Neuropathies Due to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in China

    PubMed Central

    Xianbin, Wang; Mingyu, Wang; Dong, Xu; Huiying, Li; Yan, Xu; Fengchun, Zhang; Xiaofeng, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article aims to analyze the frequency and clinical characteristics of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A total of 4924 SLE patients admitted to the Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China, from January 1995 to September 2013 were included in this retrospective analysis. The individuals designated as control patients were selected from the pool of SLE patients without PN using the systematic sampling method of 1:2 during the same time. The prevalence of SLE-associated PN (SLE-PN) in SLE patients was 1.5% (73/4924). Seventy-nine cases of PN affected 73 patients and 6 of these patients (8.2%) presented with 2 types of PN. Among the 7 types of PN, polyneuropathy was the most frequent and was diagnosed in 47 cases (59.5%); the remaining patients suffered from mononeuropathy (13.9%), cranial neuropathy (12.7%), myasthenia gravis (10.1%), autonomic neuropathy (2.5%), or acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (1.3%). Five patients developed PN before the onset of SLE (3 out of 5 patients had myasthenia gravis). The most common PN-related symptoms were myasthenia and numbness (50.6%), followed by pain in affected regions (35.9%). PN symptoms were relieved in a majority of the patients (76.7%) after treatment. Compared with non-SLE-PN patients, patients with SLE-PN had a higher frequency of fever (65.8% vs 45.9%, P < 0.01), mucocutaneous involvement (73.9% vs 36.3%, P < 0.01), arthritis (42.5% vs 28.1%, P < 0.05), myositis (17.8% vs 5.5%, P < 0.01), and central nervous system involvement (38.4% vs 21.9%, P < 0.05) as well as being positive for the anti-Sm antibody (31.4% vs 18.8%), immunoglobulin G (IgG) elevation (53.6% vs 37.1%, P < 0.01), and reduction in complement 3 (54.8% vs 36.9%, P < 0.05). A statistically significant difference was found between the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index scores in SLE-PN patients compared with the non

  8. Peripheral neuropathy predicts nuclear gene defect in patients with mitochondrial ophthalmoplegia.

    PubMed

    Horga, Alejandro; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Blake, Julian C; Woodward, Catherine E; Zapater, Pedro; Fratter, Carl; Mudanohwo, Ese E; Plant, Gordon T; Houlden, Henry; Sweeney, Mary G; Hanna, Michael G; Reilly, Mary M

    2014-12-01

    Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is a common clinical feature in mitochondrial disease caused by nuclear DNA defects and single, large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletions and is less frequently associated with point mutations of mitochondrial DNA. Peripheral neuropathy is also a frequent manifestation of mitochondrial disease, although its prevalence and characteristics varies considerably among the different syndromes and genetic aetiologies. Based on clinical observations, we systematically investigated whether the presence of peripheral neuropathy could predict the underlying genetic defect in patients with progressive external ophthalmoplegia. We analysed detailed demographic, clinical and neurophysiological data from 116 patients with genetically-defined mitochondrial disease and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Seventy-eight patients (67%) had a single mitochondrial DNA deletion, 12 (10%) had a point mutation of mitochondrial DNA and 26 (22%) had mutations in either POLG, C10orf2 or RRM2B, or had multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in muscle without an identified nuclear gene defect. Seventy-seven patients had neurophysiological studies; of these, 16 patients (21%) had a large-fibre peripheral neuropathy. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was significantly lower in patients with a single mitochondrial DNA deletion (2%) as compared to those with a point mutation of mitochondrial DNA or with a nuclear DNA defect (44% and 52%, respectively; P<0.001). Univariate analyses revealed significant differences in the distribution of other clinical features between genotypes, including age at disease onset, gender, family history, progressive external ophthalmoplegia at clinical presentation, hearing loss, pigmentary retinopathy and extrapyramidal features. However, binomial logistic regression analysis identified peripheral neuropathy as the only independent predictor associated with a nuclear DNA defect (P=0.002; odds ratio 8.43, 95% confidence interval 2

  9. Treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-related peripheral neuropathy with Scrambler Therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas J; Auwaerter, Paul; Knowlton, Amy; Saylor, Deanna; McArthur, Justin

    2017-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common neurological complications of HIV infection with a 30-60% lifetime prevalence. Newer HIV drugs cause less peripheral neuropathy, but patients are now living long enough to develop concomitant diabetes-related, vascular-related, and chemotherapy-related neuropathy so it continues as a major debilitating issue. Recent national CDC guidelines have stressed the importance of non-opioid therapies, especially in this population that may have had drug abuse problems. We treated a 52-year-old man who had severe disabling classic peripheral neuropathy since 1998 with Scrambler Therapy (Calmare), an FDA-cleared peripheral non-invasive neuromodulation device. His pain rapidly improved, as did his motor and sensory function, with just four 45-min treatments, and he was able to come off opioids for the first time in years. When his pain returned six months later, only two treatments were needed to resolve it. This represents the first published use of this novel, inexpensive, and non-invasive pain modality in HIV peripheral neuropathy, and should engender further trials.

  10. The long-term impact of oxaliplatin chemotherapy on rodent cognition and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fardell, Joanna E; Vardy, Janette; Monds, Lauren A; Johnston, Ian N

    2015-09-15

    Chemotherapy treatment is associated with cognitive dysfunction in cancer survivors after treatment completion. The duration of these impairments is unclear. Therefore this paper aims to evaluate the lasting impact of varying doses of the chemotherapy oxaliplatin (OX) on cognition and peripheral neuropathy. In Experiment 1 rats were treated once a week for 3 weeks with either physiological saline (control) or 6 mg/kg OX i.p. and were assessed for peripheral neuropathy, using von Frey filaments, and cognitive function, using novel object and location recognition, up to 2 weeks after treatment completion. For Experiment 2 rats received 3 weekly i.p. injections of either physiological saline (control), 0.6 mg/kg, 2mg/kg or 6 mg/kg OX and assessed for peripheral neuropathy and cognitive function up to 11 months after treatment completion. Systemic OX treatment induced lasting effects on cognitive function at 11 months after treatment, and peripheral neuropathy at 1 month after treatment and these were dose dependent; higher doses of OX resulted in worse cognitive outcomes and more severe peripheral neuropathy.

  11. A 70-year-old male with peripheral neuropathy, ataxia and antigliadin antibodies shows improvement in neuropathy, but not ataxia, after intravenous immunoglobulin and gluten-free diet

    PubMed Central

    Anandacoomaraswamy, Dharshan; Ullal, Jagdeesh; Vinik, Aaron I

    2008-01-01

    This is a case of a 70-year-old man with severe peripheral neuropathy, type 2 diabetes and progressively worsening cerebellar ataxia. He was found to have circulating antigliadin and antireticulin antibodies compatible with celiac disease in the absence of intestinal pathology. The peripheral neuropathy improved with a gluten-free diet, antioxidants and intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas the ataxia did not. This case illustrates the need to test for celiac disease in patients with idiopathic ataxia and peripheral neuropathy and the need for alternative therapies for ataxia. PMID:21197340

  12. A 70-year-old male with peripheral neuropathy, ataxia and antigliadin antibodies shows improvement in neuropathy, but not ataxia, after intravenous immunoglobulin and gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Anandacoomaraswamy, Dharshan; Ullal, Jagdeesh; Vinik, Aaron I

    2008-10-01

    This is a case of a 70-year-old man with severe peripheral neuropathy, type 2 diabetes and progressively worsening cerebellar ataxia. He was found to have circulating antigliadin and antireticulin antibodies compatible with celiac disease in the absence of intestinal pathology. The peripheral neuropathy improved with a gluten-free diet, antioxidants and intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas the ataxia did not. This case illustrates the need to test for celiac disease in patients with idiopathic ataxia and peripheral neuropathy and the need for alternative therapies for ataxia.

  13. Clinical value of tapentadol extended-release in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Bansri; Freeman, Erin; Huang, Ellen; Hung, Anna; Knapp, Edward; Breunig, Ian M; McPherson, Mary L; Shaya, Fadia T

    2014-03-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is difficult to treat, partially because the underlying mechanism of pain is not fully understood. Various treatment guidelines recommend first-line agents, such as α2-δ ligands, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants but combination therapy of alternative agents including opiates is often warranted. Tapentadol extended-release has a novel dual mechanism of action; it is both a mu-opioid receptor agonist and a norephinephrine reuptake inhibitor. It has been in the spotlight since it was FDA-approved specifically for the treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 2012. Previous reviews of tapentadol have focused on chronic pain. The purpose of this review article is to assess the efficacy and safety of tapentadol extended-release in adult populations with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and provide guidance for formulary decisions.

  14. Tadalafil Promotes the Recovery of Peripheral Neuropathy in Type II Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chopp, Michael; Szalad, Alexandra; Lu, XueRong; Jia, LongFei; Lu, Mei; Zhang, Rui Lan; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with the short (4 hours) half-life phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, sildenafil, improved functional outcome in diabetic db/db mice. To further examine the effect of PDE5 inhibition on diabetic peripheral neuropathy, we investigated the effect of another potent PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Tadalafil is pharmacokinetically distinct from sildenafil and has a longer half-life (17+hours) than sildenafil. Diabetic mice (BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J, db/db) at age 20 weeks were treated with tadalafil every 48 hours for 8 consecutive weeks. Compared with diabetic mice treated with saline, tadalafil treatment significantly improved motor and sensory conduction velocities in the sciatic nerve and peripheral thermal sensitivity. Tadalafil treatment also markedly increased local blood flow and the density of FITC-dextran perfused vessels in the sciatic nerve concomitantly with increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Moreover, tadalafil reversed the diabetes-induced reductions of axon diameter and myelin thickness and reversed the diabetes-induced increased g-ratio in the sciatic nerve. Furthermore, tadalafil enhanced diabetes-reduced nerve growth factor (NGF) and platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) protein levels in diabetic sciatic nerve tissue. The present study demonstrates that tadalafil increases regional blood flow in the sciatic nerve tissue, which may contribute to the improvement of peripheral nerve function and the amelioration of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27438594

  15. Peripheral sensory neuropathy is associated with altered postocclusive reactive hyperemia in the diabetic foot

    PubMed Central

    Barwick, Alex L; Tessier, John W; Janse de Jonge, Xanne; Ivers, James R; Chuter, Vivienne H

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined whether the presence of peripheral sensory neuropathy or cardiac autonomic deficits is associated with postocclusive reactive hyperemia (reflective of microvascular function) in the diabetic foot. Research design and methods 99 participants with type 2 diabetes were recruited into this cross-sectional study. The presence of peripheral sensory neuropathy was determined with standard clinical tests and cardiac autonomic function was assessed with heart rate variation testing. Postocclusive reactive hyperemia was measured with laser Doppler in the hallux. Multiple hierarchical regression was performed to examine relationships between neuropathy and the peak perfusion following occlusion and the time to reach this peak. Results Peripheral sensory neuropathy predicted 22% of the variance in time to peak following occlusion (p<0.05), being associated with a slower time to peak but was not associated with the magnitude of the peak. Heart rate variation was not associated with the postocclusive reactive hyperemia response. Conclusions This study found an association between the presence of peripheral sensory neuropathy in people with diabetes and altered microvascular reactivity in the lower limb. PMID:27486520

  16. Characterization of oxaliplatin-induced chronic painful peripheral neuropathy in the rat and comparison to the neuropathy induced by paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, W. H.; Zheng, H.; Bennett, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Anti-neoplastic agents in the platinum-complex, taxane, vinca alkaloid, and proteasome inhibitor classes induce a dose-limiting, chronic, distal, symmetrical, sensory peripheral neuropathy that is often accompanied by neuropathic pain. Clinical descriptions suggest that these conditions are very similar but clinical data are insufficient to determine the degree of similarity and to determine if they share common pathophysiological mechanisms. Animal models do not have the limitations of clinical studies and so we have characterized a rat model of chronic painful peripheral neuropathy induced by a platinum-complex agent, oxaliplatin, in order to compare it to a previously characterized model of chronic painful peripheral neuropathy induced by a taxane agent, paclitaxel. The oxaliplatin model evokes mechano-allodynia, mechano-hyperalgesia, and cold-allodynia that have a delayed onset, gradually increasing severity, a distinct delay to peak severity, and duration of about 2.5 months. There is no effect on heat sensitivity. EM analyses found no evidence for axonal degeneration in peripheral nerve and there is no up-regulation of activating transcription factor-3 in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia. There is a statistically significant loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in the plantar hind paw skin. Oxaliplatin treatment causes a significant increase in the incidence of swollen and vacuolated mitochondria in peripheral nerve axons, but not in their Schwann cells. Nerve conduction studies found significant slowing of sensory axons, but no change in motor axons. Single fiber recordings found an abnormal incidence of A- and C-fibers with irregular, low-frequency spontaneous discharge. Prophylactic dosing with two drugs that are known to protect mitochondria, acetyl-L-carnitine and olesoxime, significantly reduced the development of pain hypersensitivity. Our results are very similar to those obtained previously with paclitaxel and support the hypothesis that these two

  17. Therapeutic Effects of Phytochemicals and Medicinal Herbs on Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gihyun; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-09-20

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a frequent adverse effect of neurotoxic anticancer medicines. It leads to autonomic and somatic system dysfunction and decreases the patient's quality of life. This side effect eventually causes chemotherapy non-compliance. Patients are prompted to seek alternative treatment options since there is no conventional remedy for CIPN. A range of medicinal herbs have multifarious effects, and they have shown some evidence of efficacy in various neurological and immunological diseases. While CIPN has multiple mechanisms of neurotoxicity, these phytomedicines might offer neuronal protection or regeneration with the multiple targets in CIPN. Thus far, researchers have investigated the therapeutic benefits of several herbs, herbal formulas, and phytochemicals in preventing the onset and progress of CIPN in animals and humans. Here, we summarize current knowledge regarding the role of phytochemicals, herb extracts, and herbal formulas in alleviating CIPN.

  18. Development and validation of a tactile sensitivity scale for peripheral neuropathy screening.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, M L; Cannella, F; Liberini, P; Caldwell, D G

    2014-01-01

    One of the difficult of the hands peripheral neuropathy screening uncertainty is that the current diagnosis is based not on assessments obtained by accurate and repeatable devices, but mostly on the clinical examination. So, in this paper the authors present a tactile pins-array scale determined with well-defined parameters assessed by non-invasive DITA device (Dynamic Investigation Test-rig on hAptics). This high resolution scale permits to screen the gradual tactile sensory deficit of patients affected by neuropathic diseases. The work has started with an experiment on healthy subjects penalizing their bare finger tactile sensitivity with five different pins-arrays. So, a pins-array scale divided in six levels (grouped in three ranges: low, uncertain and normal tactile sensitivity) was created. The scale was validated with a pilot study on six subjects affected by neuropathic disease. Results show an important role of the scale, supporting the clinical screening and reducing the uncertainty.

  19. Usability and Acceptability of a Web-Based Program for Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tofthagen, Cindy; Kip, Kevin E; Passmore, Denise; Loy, Ian; Berry, Donna L

    2016-07-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy is a painful and debilitating adverse effect of certain chemotherapy drugs. There have not been any patient-centered, easily accessible Web-based interventions to assist with self-management of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. The aims of this study were to evaluate usability and acceptability and to estimate an effect size of a Web-based intervention for assessing and managing chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. Participants (N = 14) were instructed to complete the Creativity, Optimism, Planning, and Expert Information for Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy program and provide verbal responses to the program. Participants completed the Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Tool and Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire. Iterative changes were made to the COPE-CIPN. Participants were asked to provide feedback on the revised COPE-CIPN, repeat the Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Tool, and evaluate acceptability using the Acceptability e-Scale. The COPE-CIPN demonstrated high usability (mean, 1.98 [SD, 1.12]) and acceptability (mean, 4.40 [SD, 0.52]). Comments indicated that the interface was easy to use, and the information was helpful. While neuropathy symptoms continued to increase in this group of patients receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy, there was a decrease in mean level of interference with activities from 53.71 to 39.29 over 3 to 4 months, which indicated a moderate effect (d = 0.39) size. The COPE-CIPN may be a useful intervention to support self-management of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy.

  20. Incidence and risk of peripheral neuropathy with nab-paclitaxel in patients with cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, L; Bu, Z; Ye, X; Zhou, Y; Zhao, Q

    2015-11-04

    Nab-paclitaxel, a Cremophor EL-free formulation of paclitaxel, is used to treat various malignancies. Peripheral neuropathy is one of its major toxicities, although the overall incidence remains unclear. We performed a meta-analysis to calculate the incidence of peripheral neuropathy in cancer patients treated with nab-paclitaxel and to compare the relative risk (RR) with conventional taxanes. The electronic databases were searched for relevant clinical trials. Eligible studies included phase II and III prospective clinical trials of cancer patients treated with nab-paclitaxel with toxicity profile on peripheral neuropathy. Statistical analyses were done to calculate summary incidences, RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI), using fixed-effects or random-effects models based on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Nineteen trials were selected for the meta-analysis, yielding a total of 2878 cancer patients. The overall incidences of peripheral neuropathy (all-grade) was 51.0% (95% CI: 45.1-57.6%), and that of high-grade peripheral neuropathy was 12.4% (9.8-15.7%). The RRs of peripheral neuropathy of nab-paclitaxel compared to taxanes were not increased for all-grade and high-grade peripheral neuropathy. Nab-paclitaxel is associated with an increased risk of developing peripheral neuropathy. Future clinical studies are still needed to investigate the risk reduction and possible use of nab-paclitaxel.

  1. Laser-Doppler Imaging in the Detection of Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Illigens, Ben M.W.; Siepmann, Timo; Roofeh, Joe; Gibbons, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Small fiber neuropathy is common in a number of systemic diseases and is often challenging to diagnose. Laser-Doppler Imaging (LDI) is a test of small fiber neurovascular function that can quantify the integrity of the vasomotor C-fiber mediated axon-reflex, but no standardized method of analysis exists. We developed a novel LDI analysis technique and tested it in a human model of small fiber neuropathy. Eighteen healthy subjects (age 24±3 years) underwent LDI testing to assess the axon-mediated flare area in response to 10% acetylcholine iontophoresis. LDI measurements were taken before and longitudinally after a 48-hour application of 0.1% capsaicin (to cause a transient small fiber neuropathy) on the skin of the thigh; placebo cream was placed on the contralateral thigh as a control. We compared our new LDI image analysis technique to two previously published methods. The new LDI analysis technique was the only method to show a consistent difference in axon-reflex area between capsaicin treated and placebo treated skin on all testing days (p<0.05) with maximum attenuation of the flare area immediately post-application (438 ±298 mm2 vs. 824 ±375 mm2, p<0.05). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that our novel flare area method for LDI analysis can detect neurovascular dysfunction in a model of small fiber neuropathy, is an improvement over existing methods, and may supplement clinical assessment of small fiber neuropathy. PMID:23850386

  2. Laser Doppler imaging in the detection of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Illigens, Ben M W; Siepmann, Timo; Roofeh, Joseph; Gibbons, Christopher H

    2013-10-01

    Small fiber neuropathy is common in a number of systemic diseases and is often challenging to diagnose. Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) is a test of small fiber neurovascular function that can quantify the integrity of the vasomotor C-fiber mediated axon-reflex, but no standardized method of analysis exists. We developed a novel LDI analysis technique and tested it in a human model of small fiber neuropathy. Eighteen healthy subjects (age 24 ± 3 years) underwent LDI testing to assess the axon-mediated flare area in response to 10% acetylcholine iontophoresis. LDI measurements were taken before and longitudinally after a 48-hour application of 0.1% capsaicin (to cause a transient small fiber neuropathy) on the skin of the thigh; placebo cream was placed on the contralateral thigh as a control. We compared our new LDI image analysis technique to two previously published methods. The new LDI analysis technique was the only method to show a consistent difference in axon-reflex area between capsaicin treated and placebo treated skin on all testing days (p<0.05) with maximum attenuation of the flare area immediately post-application (438 ± 298 mm(2) vs. 824 ± 375 mm(2), p<0.05). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that our novel flare area method for LDI analysis can detect neurovascular dysfunction in a model of small fiber neuropathy, is an improvement over existing methods, and may supplement clinical assessment of small fiber neuropathy.

  3. Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy presenting as a peripheral nerve tumor.

    PubMed

    Allen, David C; Smallman, Clare A; Mills, Kerry R

    2006-09-01

    A man with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), or Lewis-Sumner syndrome, presented with a progressive left lumbosacral plexus lesion resembling a neurofibroma. After 7 years he developed a left ulnar nerve lesion with conduction block in its upper segment. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved the symptoms and signs of both lesions. We conclude that inflammatory neuropathy must be considered in the differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve tumors, and that unifocal lesions may precede multifocal involvement in MADSAM by several years. In addition, we discuss the clinical features in 9 patients attending a specialist peripheral nerve clinic and review the literature.

  4. Carcinoma associated paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathies in patients with and without anti-onconeural antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, J.; Mosnier, J.; Absi, L.; Convers, P.; Honnorat, J.; Michel, D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—When to suspect a paraneoplastic disorder is a puzzling problem that has not recently been studied in a large series of patients referred for peripheral neuropathy.
METHODS—From 422 consecutive patients with peripheral neuropathy, 26 were analysed who concomitantly had carcinoma but no tumorous infiltration, drug toxicity, or cachexia. Their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological data were analysed according to the presence of anti-onconeural antibodies, the latency between presentation and cancer diagnosis, and the incidence of carcinoma in the corresponding types of neuropathy of the population of 422patients.
RESULTS—Seven patients (group I) had anti-onconeural antibodies (six anti-Hu, one anti-CV2) and 19 did not (groups IIA and B). In group I, subacute sensory neuropathy (SSN) was the most frequent but other neuropathies including demyelinating neuropathies were present. Patients in group II A had a short latency (mean 7.88months), and a rapidly and usually severe neuropathy which corresponded in 11/14 to an established inflammatory disorder including neuropathy with encephalomyelitis, mononeuritis multiplex, and acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Patients in group IIB had a long latency (mean 8.4 years) and a very chronic disorder corresponding in four of five to an axonal non-inflammatory polyneuropathy. In this population, the incidence of carcinoma occurring with a short latency was 47% in sensory neuronopathy, 1.7% in Guillain-Barré syndrome, 10% in mononeuritis multiplex and CIDP, and 4.5% in axonal polyneuropathy.
CONCLUSIONS—Paraneoplastic neuropathies associated with carcinoma are heterogeneous disorders. Neuropathies occurring with a long latency with tumours probably resulted from a coincidental association. Neuropathies which occurred within a few years of the tumour evolved rapidly and corresponded mostly to inflammatory disorders. As dysimmune neuropathies are probably

  5. Metabolic Correction in the Management of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improving Clinical Results Beyond Symptom Control

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Massari, Jorge R.; Gonzalez, Michael J.; Jimenez, Francisco J.; Allende-Vigo, Myriam Z.; Duconge, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Current Clinical Management Guidelines of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) are based on adequate glucose control and symptomatic pain relief. However, meticulous glycemic control could delay the onset or slow the progression of diabetic neuropathy in patients with DM type 2, but it does not completely prevent the progression of the disease. Complications of DPN as it continues its natural course, produce increasing pain and discomfort, loss of sensation, ulcers, infections, amputations and even death. In addition to the increased suffering, disability and loss of productivity, there is a very significant economic impact related to the treatment of DPN and its complications. In USA alone, it has been estimated that there are more than 5,000,000 patients suffering from DPN and the total annual cost of treating the disease and its complications is over $10,000 million dollars. In order to be able to reduce complications of DPN, it is crucial to improve or correct the metabolic conditions that lead to the pathology present in this condition. Pathophysiologic mechanisms implicated in diabetic neuropathy include: increased polyol pathway with accumulation of sorbitol and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity, microvascular damage and hypoxia due to nitric oxide deficit and increased oxygen free radical activity. Moreover, there is a decrease in glutathione and increase in homocysteine. Clinical trials in the last two decades have demonstrated that the use of specific nutrients can correct some of these metabolic derangements, improving symptom control and providing further benefits such as improved sensorium, blood flow and nerve regeneration. We will discuss the evidence on lipoic acid, acetyi-L-carnitine, benfotiamine and the combination of active B vitamins L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin and piridoxal-6-phosphate. In addition, we discuss the role of metforrnin, an important drug in the management of diabetes, and the presence of specific polymorphic genes, in the risk

  6. Premature aging-related peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of progeria.

    PubMed

    Goss, James R; Stolz, Donna Beer; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Zhang, Mingdi; Arbujas, Norma; Robbins, Paul D; Glorioso, Joseph C; Niedernhofer, Laura J

    2011-08-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common aging-related degenerative disorder that interferes with daily activities and leads to increased risk of falls and injury in the elderly. The etiology of most aging-related peripheral neuropathy is unknown. Inherited defects in several genome maintenance mechanisms cause tissue-specific accelerated aging, including neurodegeneration. We tested the hypothesis that a murine model of XFE progeroid syndrome, caused by reduced expression of ERCC1-XPF DNA repair endonuclease, develops peripheral neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies revealed normal nerve function in young adult (8 week) Ercc1(-/Δ) mice, but significant abnormalities in 20 week-old animals. Morphologic and ultrastructural analysis of the sciatic nerve from mutant mice revealed significant alterations at 20 but not 8 weeks of age. We conclude that Ercc1(-/Δ) mice have accelerated spontaneous peripheral neurodegeneration that mimics aging-related disease. This provides strong evidence that DNA damage can drive peripheral neuropathy and offers a rapid and novel model to test therapies.

  7. Goshajinkigan reduces oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy without affecting anti-tumour efficacy in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Soichiro; Egashira, Nobuaki; Sada, Hikaru; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Shirahama, Masafumi; Masuguchi, Ken; Oishi, Ryozo

    2012-06-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug in the treatment of colorectal cancer, but it causes acute and chronic neuropathies in patients. Goshajinkigan (GJG) is a Kampo medicine that is used for the treatments of several neurological symptoms including pain and numbness. More recently, GJG has been reported to prevent the oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in clinical studies. No experimental study, however, has been conducted to date to determine the effect of GJG on pain behaviour in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Moreover, the impact on the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of GJG on the peripheral neuropathy and anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin in rodents. Repeated administration of oxaliplatin caused cold hyperalgesia from days 3 to 37 and mechanical allodynia from days 21 to 28. Repeated administration of GJG prevented the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia and axonal degeneration in rat sciatic nerve. Single administration of GJG reduced both cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after the development of neuropathy. In addition, GJG did not affect the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin in the tumour cells or tumour cells-implanted mice. These results suggest that GJG relieves the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia without affecting anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin, and, therefore, may be useful for the oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in clinical practice.

  8. A clinical decision support system with an integrated EMR for diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kunhimangalam, Reeda; Ovallath, Sujith; Joseph, Paul K

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in general population is ever increasing. The diagnosis and classification of peripheral neuropathies is often difficult as it involves careful clinical and electro-diagnostic examination by an expert neurologist. In developing countries a large percentage of the disease remains undiagnosed due to lack of adequate number of experts. In this study a novel clinical decision support system has been developed using a fuzzy expert system. The study was done to provide a solution to the demand of systems that can improve health care by accurate diagnosis in limited time, in the absence of specialists. It employs a graphical user interface and a fuzzy logic controller with rule viewer for identification of the type of peripheral neuropathy. An integrated medical records database is also developed for the storage and retrieval of the data. The system consists of 24 input fields, which includes the clinical values of the diagnostic test and the clinical symptoms. The output field is the disease diagnosis, whether it is Motor (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, sensory (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, mixed type or a normal case. The results obtained were compared with the expert's opinion and the system showed 93.27 % accuracy. The study aims at showing that Fuzzy Expert Systems may prove useful in providing diagnostic and predictive medical opinions. It enables the clinicians to arrive at a better diagnosis as it keeps the expert knowledge in an intelligent system to be used efficiently and effectively.

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1, 2, 3, and 6.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Christoph; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Rakowicz, Maryla; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Szymanski, Sandra; Berciano, Jose; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Pedersen, Karine; Depondt, Chantal; Rola, Rafal; Klockgether, Thomas; García, Antonio; Mutlu, Gurkan; Schöls, Ludger

    2016-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are characterized by autosomal dominantly inherited progressive ataxia but are clinically heterogeneous due to variable involvement of non-cerebellar parts of the nervous system. Non-cerebellar symptoms contribute significantly to the burden of SCAs, may guide the clinician to the underlying genetic subtype, and might be useful markers to monitor disease. Peripheral neuropathy is frequently observed in SCA, but subtype-specific features and subclinical manifestations have rarely been evaluated. We performed a multicenter nerve conduction study with 162 patients with genetically confirmed SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6. The study proved peripheral nerves to be involved in the neurodegenerative process in 82 % of SCA1, 63 % of SCA2, 55 % of SCA3, and 22 % of SCA6 patients. Most patients of all subtypes revealed affection of both sensory and motor fibers. Neuropathy was most frequently of mixed type with axonal and demyelinating characteristics in all SCA subtypes. However, nerve conduction velocities of SCA1 patients were slower compared to other genotypes. SCA6 patients revealed less axonal damage than patients with other subtypes. No influence of CAG repeat length or biometric determinants on peripheral neuropathy could be identified in SCA1, SCA3, and SCA6. In SCA2, earlier onset and more severe ataxia were associated with peripheral neuropathy. We proved peripheral neuropathy to be a frequent site of the neurodegenerative process in all common SCA subtypes. Since damage to peripheral nerves is readily assessable by electrophysiological means, nerve conduction studies should be performed in a longitudinal approach to assess these parameters as potential progression markers.

  10. Autosomal recessive peripheral sensory neuropathy in 3 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families.

    PubMed Central

    Tamari, I; Goodman, R M; Sarova, I; Hertz, M; Adar, R; Zvibach, T

    1980-01-01

    Three unrelated Oriental Jewish families with a total of eight subjects with progressive hereditary sensory neuropathy are reported. The parents were all unaffected and because of parental consanguinity in each of the three families it is postulated that this rare neurological disorder is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner. In one family both parents showed an abnormal response to pain stimulation with normal motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity. This response may be an expression of the carrier state for this hereditary disease. Only five other families (non-Jewish) have been reported as having this form of peripheral hereditary sensory neuropathy. These observations suggest that one type, the progressive form, of peripheral hereditary sensory neuropathy may be more common in Oriental Jews. Images PMID:6937618

  11. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition reverses manifestation of peripheral diabetic neuropathy in type 1 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Shevalye, Hanna; Vareniuk, Igor; Obrosov, Alexander; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for an important role for Na+/H+ exchangers in diabetic complications is emerging. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition reverses experimental peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats were treated with the specific Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibitor cariporide for 4 wk after 12 wk without treatment. Neuropathy end points included sciatic motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, endoneurial nutritive blood flow, vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, thermal nociception, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Advanced glycation end product and markers of oxidative stress, including nitrated protein levels in sciatic nerve, were evaluated by Western blot. Rats with 12-wk duration of diabetes developed motor and sensory nerve conduction deficits, thermal hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and intraepidermal nerve fiber loss. All these changes, including impairment of nerve blood flow and vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, were partially reversed by 4 wk of cariporide treatment. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibition was also associated with reduction of diabetes-induced accumulation of advanced glycation endproduct, oxidative stress, and nitrated proteins in sciatic nerve. In conclusion, these findings support an important role for Na+/H+ exchanger 1 in functional, structural, and biochemical manifestations of peripheral diabetic neuropathy and provide the rationale for development of Na+/H+ exchanger 1 inhibitors for treatment of diabetic vascular and neural complications. PMID:23736542

  12. 78 FR 54763 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. This amendment implements a... governing retroactive awards for certain diseases associated with herbicide exposure as required by...

  13. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... connection for acute and sub-acute peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents... associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. DATES: Comments must be received by VA on or...

  14. Automated Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Using Optical Imaging and Foot Anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Hafeez-U R; Spruce, Michelle; Alty, Stephen R; Dudley, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals who live with type-2 diabetes suffer from plantar sensory neuropathy. Regular testing and assessment for the condition is required to avoid ulceration or other damage to patient's feet. Currently accepted practice involves a trained clinician testing a patient's feet manually with a hand-held nylon monofilament probe. The procedure is time consuming, labor intensive, requires special training, is prone to error, and repeatability is difficult. With the vast increase in type-2 diabetes, the number of plantar sensory neuropathy sufferers has already grown to such an extent as to make a traditional manual test problematic. This paper presents the first investigation of a novel approach to automatically identify the pressure points on a given patient's foot for the examination of sensory neuropathy via optical image processing incorporating plantar anthropometry. The method automatically selects suitable test points on the plantar surface that correspond to those repeatedly chosen by a trained podiatrist. The proposed system automatically identifies the specific pressure points at different locations, namely the toe (hallux), metatarsal heads and heel (Calcaneum) areas. The approach is generic and has shown 100% reliability on the available database used. The database consists of Chinese, Asian, African, and Caucasian foot images.

  15. Symptom management and self-care for peripheral neuropathy in HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, P K; Kemppainen, J K; Canaval, G E; Corless, I B; Sefcik, E F; Nokes, K M; Bain, C A; Kirksey, K M; Eller, L Sanzero; Dole, P J; Hamilton, M J; Coleman, C L; Holzemer, W L; Reynolds, N R; Portillo, C J; Bunch, E H; Wantland, D J; Voss, J; Phillips, R; Tsai, Y-F; Mendez, M Rivero; Lindgren, T G; Davis, S M; Gallagher, D M

    2007-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurological complication in HIV and is often associated with antiretroviral therapy. As part of a larger study on self-care for symptoms in HIV disease, this study analyzed the prevalence and characteristics of peripheral neuropathy in HIV disease, sociodemographic and disease-related correlates and self-care strategies. A convenience sample of 1,217 respondents was recruited from data collection sites in several US cities, Puerto Rico, Colombia and Taiwan. Results of the study indicated that respondents with peripheral neuropathy (n=450) identified 20 self-care behaviors including complementary therapies, use of medications, exercise and rest and/or elevation of extremities. Ratings of frequency and effectiveness were also included. An activities checklist summarized into five categories of self-care behaviors including activities/thoughts, exercise, medications, complementary therapies and substance was used to determine self-care behaviors. Taking a hot bath was the most frequent strategy used by those with peripheral neuropathy (n=292) and received the highest overall rating of effectiveness of any self-management strategies included in this study at 8.1 (scale 1-10). Other self-care strategies to manage this symptom included: staying off the feet (n=258), rubbing the feet with cream (n=177), elevating the feet (n=236), walking (n=262), prescribed anti-epileptic agent (n=80), prescribed analgesics (n=84), over-the-counter medications (n=123), vitamin B (n=122), calcium supplements (n=72), magnesium (n=48), massage (n=156), acupuncture (n=43), reflexology (n=23) and meditation (n=80). Several behaviors that are often deemed unhealthy were included among the strategies reported to alleviate peripheral neuropathy including use of marijuana (n=67), cigarette smoking (n=139), drinking alcohol (n=81) and street drugs (n=30).

  16. [Peripheral neuropathies in the State of São Paulo from 1939 to 1985].

    PubMed

    Barreira, A A; Marques Júnior, W

    1997-03-01

    Studies on peripheral neuropathies by investigators residing in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, and published since the 1930 and 1940 decades until 1985 were revised in the present survey. Investigations in the area were greatly encouraged by the appearance of the journal Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria(São Paulo). Oswaldo Freitas Julião may be considered the author who began these studies in the State and his most important contributions were related to leprosy and to Andrade disease, although he also published papers on other types of peripheral neuropathies. Horacio Martins Canelas also made a very important contribution to the study of different neuropathies, especially those due to vitamin B12 deficiency. A series of papers on neuropathies published by neurologists residing in the State is summarized. We also present a catalogue of the major university centers where groups of neurologists preferentially devote their time to the study of neuromuscular disease in São Paulo and a selected bibliography about neuropathies by investigators from this State.

  17. Peripheral neuropathy in chronic liver disease: clinical, electrodiagnostic, and nerve biopsy findings

    PubMed Central

    Knill-Jones, R. P.; Goodwill, C. J.; Dayan, A. D.; Williams, Roger

    1972-01-01

    In a prospective study of 70 unselected patients with chronic liver disease, clinical signs of a peripheral neuropathy were observed in 13 patients. Abnormal nerve conduction was demonstrated in nine of these and in one further patient who had no abnormal neurological signs. The occurrence of a neuropathy (in patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis, haemochromatosis, active chronic hepatitis as well as in alcoholic cirrhosis) could not be related to liver function, although it was associated with higher IgA and IgM values. Clinical diabetes was present in six of the 14 patients with neuropathy but there was no relation in the non-diabetic patients between neuropathy and minor impairment of carbohydrate tolerance. Those with neuropathy had a significantly higher incidence of oesophageal varices and there was also a relationship to a history of previous encephalopathy. Sural nerve biopsy was carried out on 14 patients, eight of whom had clinical or electrodiagnostic evidence of neuropathy. Single nerve fibres were examined by teasing and in all nerves histological evidence was found of an indolent process which had damaged whole Schwann cells and which resulted in demyelination and remyelination. Diabetic angiopathy was not seen and axonal degeneration, which was never severe, was found in all disease groups equally. Images PMID:4337271

  18. Peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity: medical comorbidity that confounds common orthopedic pathology.

    PubMed

    Bales, Joshua G; Meals, Roy

    2009-10-01

    In the orthopedic patient, the diagnosis of a compression neuropathy may be straightforward. However, various medical comorbidities can obscure this diagnosis. It is paramount for the practicing orthopedic surgeon to have an appreciation for the medical pathology of common axonal neuropathies to properly diagnose, treat, and refer a patient with altered sensation in the upper extremity. The prevalence of diabetes in the United States is 10%, and roughly 20% of diabetic patients have peripheral neuropathy. In addition to diabetes, 32% of heavy alcohol users present with polyneuropathy. With advancements in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinicians may see the long-term effects of the virus manifested as axonal neuropathies and extreme allodynia. In some regions of the world, Hansen's disease usurps diabetes as the most common cause of polyneuropathy. Based on patient demographics and social habits, Lyme disease, multiple sclerosis, and syphilis can all manifest as polyneuropathies. Understanding the common medical causes of neuropathy will aid the orthopedic surgeon in differentiating simple compression neuropathies from diseases mimicking or confounding them.

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 pathway as a potential therapeutic target in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Aaron P; Cheng, Hsinlin Thomas; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common diabetic complication and is the leading cause of diabetes-related hospital admissions and non-traumatic amputations. DPN is also associated with a poor quality of life and high economic costs for both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. An effective treatment for DPN, besides tight glycemic control, is not yet available. The pathogenesis of DPN is complex and involves an intertwined array of mechanisms. Glucose-mediated alteration of cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway activity with subsequent impaired production and function of prostaglandins (PGs) is one mechanism that is implicated in the pathogenesis of DPN. COX-2, the inducible COX isoform, is upregulated in a variety of pathophysiological conditions including diabetes. COX-2 upregulation has tissue-specific consequences and is associated with activation of downstream inflammatory reactions. We have previously reported that COX-2 is upregulated in the peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia neurons in experimental diabetes and that COX-2 gene inactivation and/or selective COX-2 inhibition provides protection against various DPN deficits. This review will summarize current evidence supporting the role of COX-2 activation in inducing diabetic neurovascular dysfunction and that modulation of the COX-2 pathway is a potential therapeutic target for DPN.

  20. Thymoquinone Alleviates the Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy by Modulation of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Li, Bing; Chen, Biqin; Shao, Yiye; Luo, Qiong; Shi, Xiaohong; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Inflammation plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This study investigated the effects of TQ on proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells exposed to high glucose conditions and electrophysiological and morphological changes of the sciatic nerve in a DPN rat model as well as relevant inflammatory mechanism. Cell proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells were measured using the Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry. DPN model was established in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Nerve conduction velocity was measured before and after treatment. Morphologic changes were observed by H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and Caspase-3 expression was investigated by western blotting and Bio-Plex ProTM Assays. Finally, TQ alleviated the inhibition of Schwann cell proliferation and protected against Schwann cell apoptosis. It improved nerve conduction velocity, and alleviated the DPN-induced morphological changes and demyelination of the sciatic nerve. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6 and Caspase-3 expression in sciatic nerve or isolated cultured Schwann cells, were also decreased by TQ. These results indicate TQ has a protective effect on peripheral nerves in a DPN rat model. The mechanism may be mediated partly by the modulation of the inflammatory reaction. PMID:27545310

  1. Assessment of 3-nitropropionic acid-evoked peripheral neuropathy in rats: neuroprotective effects of acetyl-l-carnitine and resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Binienda, Zbigniew K; Beaudoin, Micheal A; Gough, Bobby; Ali, Syed F; Virmani, Ashraf

    2010-08-16

    Oxidative stress and secondary excitotoxicity, due to cellular energy deficit, are major factors playing roles in 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Acute or chronic exposure to 3-NPA also leads to neuronal degeneration in different brain regions. The present study quantitatively assessed peripheral neuropathy induced by chronic exposure to 3-NPA in rats. The neuroprotective abilities of two antioxidants, acetyl-l-carnitine and resveratrol, were investigated as well. Rats were exposed for up to four weeks to 3-NPA alone or 3-NPA combined with acetyl-l-carnitine or resveratrol, administered peripherally. The experimental outcome was evaluated by neurophysiological, histological, and morphometric analyses. Rats exposed to 3-NPA developed hind limb paresis. Furthermore, a significant decrease in motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) was detected in tail nerves and axonal degeneration in sciatic nerves (p<0.05). Treatment with resveratrol prevented the functional effects of 3-NPA exposure, whereas treatment with acetyl-l-carnitine, preventing paresis, was not effective to MCV and morphological changes. These data suggest that resveratrol is a good candidate for treatment of metabolic neuropathy. The experimental outcome of this study shows that chronic treatment with 3-NPA in rats is relevant in development of an experimental model of toxic neuropathy.

  2. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuai; Chen, Ying; Hou, Xu; Xu, Donghua; Che, Kui; Li, Changgui; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Wang, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies suggested a possible association between serum uric acid levels and peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes, but no definite evidence was available. A systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies were performed to comprehensively estimate the association. Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase, and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases were searched for eligible studies. Study-specific data were combined using random-effect or fixed-effect models of meta-analysis according to between-study heterogeneity. Twelve studies were finally included into the meta-analysis, which involved a total of 1388 type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy and 4746 patients without peripheral neuropathy. Meta-analysis showed that there were obvious increased serum uric acid levels in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 50.03 μmol/L, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 22.14-77.93, P = 0.0004). Hyperuricemia was also significantly associated with increased risk of peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes (risk ratio [RR] = 2.83, 95%CI 2.13-3.76, P < 0.00001). Meta-analysis of two studies with adjusted risk estimates showed that hyperuricemia was independently associated with increased risk of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients (RR = 1.95, 95%CI 1.23-3.11, P = 0.005). Type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy have obvious increased serum uric acid levels, and hyperuricemia is associated with increased risk of peripheral neuropathy. Further prospective cohort studies are needed to validate the impact of serum uric acid levels on peripheral neuropathy risk.

  3. Vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in a neonate with congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baker, Steven K; Lipson, David M

    2010-04-01

    We report the case of a 46-day-old boy with a fulminant vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy after treatment for congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Flaccid paralysis developed at the end of the first phase of induction, requiring intubation and ventilation for 51 days. Treatment was initiated with levocarnitine, N-acetylcysteine, and pyridoxine and progressive reversal of the neuropathy occurred over the next 4 months. Potential differences in pathogenesis and presentation of vincristine neurotoxicity and Guillian-Barre syndrome in the neonate are discussed.

  4. Peripheral neuropathy associated with novel therapies in patients with multiple myeloma: consensus statement of the IMF Nurse Leadership Board.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Love, Ginger; McCullagh, Emily; Sandifer, Stacey

    2008-06-01

    The novel therapies thalidomide and bortezomib can cause peripheral neuropathy, a challenging adverse event that can affect quality of life and compromise optimal treatment for patients with multiple myeloma. At baseline, patients should be evaluated for signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy with a neurotoxicity assessment tool and educated about the symptoms and the importance of reporting them. Signs, symptoms, and the ability to perform activities of daily living should be evaluated regularly so that appropriate interventions can be employed if necessary. Specific management strategies for peripheral neuropathy are based on the grade of severity and on signs and symptoms; strategies include dose and schedule modifications, pharmacologic interventions, nonpharmacologic approaches, and patient education.

  5. Clinical effectiveness of low-level laser treatment on peripheral somatosensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Alireza; Mirzaei, Alireza; Gutknecht, Norbert; Demneh, Amir Saberi

    2017-04-01

    Peripheral sensory neuropathy treatment is one of the common treatment problems and causes morbidity and mortality in people suffering from that. Although treatment depends on the underlying cause of the condition, nevertheless, in some cases, there is no cure for it, and it requires palliative and symptomatic treatment. In laboratory studies, low-level laser has been effective in the nerves protection and restoration. The aim of this article is to investigate the clinical efficacy of low-level laser on improvement of the peripheral somatosensory neuropathy. Search in the articles published up to 30 October 2015 (full text and abstracts) in databases PubMed (Medline), Cochrane library, Physiotherapy Evidence Database was performed. The studies of low-level laser trials on patients with peripheral neuropathy were carried out and evaluated in terms of the exclusion criteria. There are 35 articles among which 10 articles had the intended and required criteria. 1, 3, and 6 articles study the patients with diabetes, neuropathy caused by trauma, and carpal tunnel syndrome, respectively. In six studies, laser led to a reduction in sensory impairment and improvement of the physiological function of the sensory nerves. In these articles, lasers (Diode, GaAlAs, He-Ne) had wavelength range 660-860 nm, radiation power 20-250 mW, energy density 0.45-70 J/cm(2). The intervention sessions range was 6-21 times and patient follow-up was 0-6 months. According to the results of these studies, low-level laser therapy can improve sensory function in patients with peripheral somatosensory neuropathy, although little research have not been done, laser treatment regimens are varied and do not recommend a specific treatment protocol. It seems it requires more research to sum up better, particularly in relation to diabetes.

  6. Therapeutic strategies for diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Habib, Ali A; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of peripheral neuropathy globally. Duration of diabetes, glycemic control, and preexisting cardiovascular risk factors independently correlate with the development and progression of diabetic peripheral neuropathy as well as cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. The pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy remains unclear, although insulin resistance, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, abnormal glucose metabolism, advanced glycation end products, neurotrophic factors, and protein kinase C activation all may play a role. Strict glycemic control remains the only available treatment option, although other treatments are in development. Multiple options are available for symptom management. In this article, we review factors associated with development and progression of diabetic neuropathy and discuss available treatment options.

  7. Familial lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency complicated with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and peripheral neuropathy. The first reported cases in the Far East.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, A; Naito, C; Teramoto, T; Kato, H; Kako, M; Kariya, T; Shimizu, T; Oka, H; Oda, T

    1978-01-01

    Three Japanese patients with lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency, the offspring of a consanguineous marriage, are described. In addition to the characteristic clinical and laboratory findings of the disease, our patients had hitherto unreported manifestations, namely unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, peripheral neuropathy and marked hypocholesterolemia. Although the mechanism of the unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia is not clear, the role of impaired hepatic bilirubin uridine-diphosphate-glucuronyl transferase activity combined with another unknown factor(s) was postulated. Non-random assortment was observed between LCAT deficiency and haptoglobin types, as previously reported. The discovery of Japanese patients with LCAT deficiency indicates that the distribution of this hereditary metabolic disorder is not confined to the Western hemisphere.

  8. Surgical Decompression in the Treatment of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiji; Lineaweaver, William Charles; Chen, Zenggan; Hu, Junda; Mullins, Fred; Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Background Over the last decade, surgical decompression procedures have been commonly used in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. However, the effectiveness of them remains to be proved. Methods A comprehensive literature search of databases including PubMed-Medline, Ovid-EMBASE, and Cochrane Library was performed to collect the related literatures. The Medical Subject Headings used were "diabetic neuropathy," "surgical decompression," and "outcomes." The methodological index for nonrandomized studies was adopted for assessing the studies included in this review. Analyses were performed with Review Manager (Version 5.3, Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Centre, the Cochrane Collaboration, 2014). Results A total of 12 literatures (including 8 prospective and 4 retrospective) encompassing 1,825 patients with DPN were included in the final analysis. Only one literature was identified as a randomized controlled trial. The remaining 11 literatures were observational studies; 7 of them were classified as upper-extremity nerve decompression group and 4 of them were classified as lower-extremity nerve decompression group. Meta-analysis shows that Boston questionnaire symptom severity and functional status of upper extremities, and distal motor latency and sensory conduction velocity of median nerve of DPN patients are significantly improved after carpal tunnel release. Besides, visual analog scale and two-point discrimination are considered clinically and statistically significant in lower extremities after operation. Conclusions The findings from our review have shown the efficacy of surgical decompression procedures in relieving the neurologic symptoms and restoring the sensory deficits in DPN patients. As there are few high-quality randomized controlled trials or well-designed prospective studies, more data are needed to elucidate the role of surgical procedures for DPN treatment in the future.

  9. Effects of Meditation on Pain and Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis and Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rensel, Mary; Planchon, Sarah M.; Butler, Robert S.; Stone, Lael

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether meditation affects pain and quality of life in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and peripheral neuropathy (PN). A total of 22 patients (10 with MS, 12 with PN) participated in a weekly meditation class over a 2-month period. A total of 18 controls (7 with MS, 11 with PN) received standard care. Primary outcome assessments were based on the 36-item Short Form Health Status Survey (SF-36) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain at baseline and at 2 months. Secondary outcome measures included the Neuropathy Impairment Score (NIS) for PN patients and the Patient-Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) questionnaire and 5-item Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS-5) for MS patients. After 2 months, study participants who practiced meditation reported an improvement in pain on the VAS (P = .035 combined group), summed physical health scores on the SF-36 (P = .011 MS, P = .014 PN), summed mental health scores (P = .02 combined group), vitality (P = .005 combined group), and physical role (P = .003 combined group). A significant improvement was also observed for bodily pain (P = .031) in MS patients. In contrast, no significant differences before and after the intervention were observed for controls. Regarding the secondary measure of fatigue, improved scores for the cognitive and psychosocial components of the MFIS were noted in MS patients in the intervention group (P = .037, P = .032). No statistically significant changes were observed in the NIS for PN patients or in PDDS scores for MS patients. Meditation may be helpful in reducing pain and improving quality of life in patients with MS and PN. The lack of changes seen in mobility (MS) and sensorimotor deficits (PN) suggests that meditation may not affect the overall clinical course. PMID:24453721

  10. [Physiological approach to peripheral neuropathy. Conventional nerve conduction studies and magnetic motor root stimulation].

    PubMed

    Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2004-11-01

    In this communication, I first show some points we should mind in the conventional peripheral nerve conduction studies and later present clinical usefulness of motor root stimulation for peripheral neuropathy. CONVENTIONAL NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES (NCS): The most important point revealed by the conventional NCSs is whether neuropathy is due to axonal degeneration or demyelinating process. Precise clinical examination with this neurophysiological information leads us to a diagnosis and treatment. Poor clinical examination makes these findings useless. Long standing axonal degeneration sometimes induces secondary demyelination at the most distal part of involved nerves. On the other hand, severe segmental demyelination often provokes secondary axonal degeneration at distal parts to the site of demyelination. These secondary changes show the same abnormal neurophysiological findings as those of the primary involvement. We should be careful of this possibility when interpreting the results of NCS. NCS of sensory nerves is not good at revealing demyelinating process. Mild temporal dispersion of potentials often reduces an amplitude of SNAP or loss of responses, which usually suggests axonal degeneration, because of short duration of sensory nerve potentials. MOTOR ROOT STIMULATION IN PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: Magnetic stimulation with a coil placed over the spine activates motor roots and evokes EMG responses from upper and lower limb muscles. The site of activation with this method was determined to be where the motor roots exit from the spinal canal (intervertebral foramina) (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 52 (9): 1025-1032, 1989) because induced currents are very dense at such a foramen made by electric resistant bones. In several kinds of peripheral neuropathy, this method has been used to detect a lesion at a proximal part of the peripheral nerves which can not be detected by the conventional NCSs. I present a few cases in whom motor root stimulation had a clinical

  11. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

  12. Epalrestat protects against diabetic peripheral neuropathy by alleviating oxidative stress and inhibiting polyol pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing-rong; Wang, Zhuo; Zhou, Wei; Fan, Shou-rui; Ma, Run; Xue, Li; Yang, Lu; Li, Ya-shan; Tan, Hong-li; Shao, Qing-hua; Yang, Hong-ying

    2016-01-01

    Epalrestat is a noncompetitive and reversible aldose reductase inhibitor used for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This study assumed that epalrestat had a protective effect on diabetic peripheral nerve injury by suppressing the expression of aldose reductase in peripheral nerves of diabetes mellitus rats. The high-fat and high-carbohydrate model rats were established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Peripheral neuropathy occurred in these rats after sustaining high blood glucose for 8 weeks. At 12 weeks after streptozotocin injection, rats were intragastrically administered epalrestat 100 mg/kg daily for 6 weeks. Transmission electron microscope revealed that the injuries to myelinated nerve fibers, non-myelinated nerve fibers and Schwann cells of rat sciatic nerves had reduced compared to rats without epalrestat administuation. Western blot assay and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after intervention with epalrestat, the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase gradually increased, but aldose reductase protein expression gradually diminished. Results confirmed that epalrestat could protect against diabetic peripheral neuropathy by relieving oxidative stress and suppressing the polyol pathway. PMID:27073391

  13. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  14. The use of complementary and alternative medicines by patients with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Brian; Gorson, Kenneth C

    2004-03-15

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies have become increasingly popular and are used regularly by patients with chronic neurological disorders. The prevalence and characteristics of CAM use by patients with peripheral neuropathy is unknown. We performed a prospective, questionnaire-based study to determine the prevalence and patterns of use of CAM therapies in 180 consecutive outpatients with peripheral neuropathy. The use of CAM was reported by 77 patients (43%) with neuropathy. The most frequent were megavitamins (35%), magnets (30%), acupuncture (30%), herbal remedies (22%), and chiropractic manipulation (21%); 37 (48%) tried more than one form of alternative treatment. Seventeen respondents (27%) thought their neuropathy symptoms improved with these approaches. Those who used CAM were slightly younger (mean age 62 vs. 65 years, p = 0.05) and more often college educated (39% vs. 24%, p = 0.03) compared to CAM nonusers. They also more often reported burning neuropathic pain (62% vs. 44%, p = 0.01). Patients with diabetic neuropathy used CAM more frequently than others (p = 0.03). The most common reason for using CAM was inadequate pain control (32%). Almost half of patients did not consult a physician before starting CAM. We conclude that there is a high prevalence of CAM use in our patients with neuropathy, and one-quarter reported that their symptoms improved. CAM users were better educated than nonusers, but most did not discuss CAM treatments with their physician. Neuropathic pain was substantially more common in CAM users, and lack of pain control was the most common reason for CAM use.

  15. The period effect in the prevalence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, gross proteinuria, and peripheral neuropathy in type 1 diabetes: A longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Horak, Kayla; Lee, Kristine E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether, for a specific duration of type 1 diabetes, there is a significant change in the prevalence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, gross proteinuria and peripheral neuropathy in those more recently diagnosed with diabetes (a period effect), in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy. Where present, to determine how common risk factors for diabetic complications might be associated with it, and what might be driving it. Materials and methods Longitudinal cohort study with seven examination phases between 1980 and 2014. Multivariate logistic regression models and ordinal parameterization were used to test for and evaluate any period effect. Results There is a period effect in the prevalence of gross proteinuria and peripheral neuropathy (decreasing), as seen with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (p < 0.001). Adjusting for changing levels of common risk factors attenuates the period effect, particularly for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. For gross proteinuria and peripheral neuropathy, however there is a persistent period effect in spite of adjusting for the major risk factors. Conclusions There are period effects in the prevalence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, gross proteinuria and peripheral neuropathy that cannot be fully explained by changes in common risk factors for complications of type 1 diabetes in this cohort. The role of other potential confounders warrants further exploration. PMID:28362881

  16. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Standing balance and trunk position sense in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)-related peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allon; Russell, James William; Alexander, Neil Burton

    2008-07-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and pre-diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) affect a large segment of the population. Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is a common complication of T2DM, leading to sensory and motor deficits. While T2DM-related PN often results in balance- and mobility-related dysfunction which manifests as gait instability and falls, little is known about balance capabilities in patients who have evidence of PN related to IGT (IGT-PN). We evaluated patients with IGT-PN on commonly-used clinical balance and mobility tests as well as a new test of trunk position sense and balance impairment, trunk repositioning errors (TREs). Eight participants aged 50-72 years with IGT-PN, and eight age- and gender-matched controls underwent balance, mobility and trunk repositioning accuracy tests at a university neurology clinic and mobility research laboratory. Compared to controls, IGT-PN participants had as much as twice the magnitude of TREs and stood approximately half as long on the single leg balance test. People with IGT-PN exhibit deficits in standing balance and trunk position sense. Furthermore, there was a significant association between performance on commonly-used clinical balance and mobility tests, and electrophysiological and clinical measures of neuropathy in IGT-PN participants. Because IGT-related neuropathy represents the earliest stage of diabetic neuropathy, deficits in IGT-PN participants highlight the importance of early screening in the dysglycemic process for neuropathy and associated balance deficits.

  18. Physical activity, glycemic control, and diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a national sample.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Hager, Kathy K; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2014-01-01

    To determine if physical activity and/or blood glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) are associated with the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in a representative population of diabetics. Three hundred thirty-nine diabetic participants (40-85 yrs) taking part in 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were studied. Participants were defined as having peripheral neuropathy if examination determined ≥1 insensate area in either foot. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was objectively-measured using accelerometry. After adjustments, MVPA was not significantly associated with PN (OR=1.16; 95% CI: 0.48-2.78), nor was HbA1c (OR=0.55; 95% CI: 0.28-1.04). However, there was evidence of statistical interaction (OR=0.24; 95% CI: 0.06-0.87) between MVPA and HbA1c status, showing that diabetics engaging in higher levels of MVPA and having normal HgbA1c levels were less likely to have PN than what would be expected based on the individual effects of MVPA and HbA1c alone. Although MVPA was not directly associated with PN, these findings suggest that proper physical activity, coupled with good glycemic control, is associated with less neuropathy. Future longitudinal studies are required to evaluate whether physical activity and improved glycemic control may help prevent or slow the progression of diabetic end-organ damage, particularly diabetic neuropathy.

  19. Pharmacogenetics of nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-associated peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kallianpur, Asha R; Hulgan, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is an important complication of antiretroviral therapy. Nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and nutritional factors are implicated in its pathogenesis. Pharmacogenetic and genomic studies investigating NRTI neurotoxicity have only recently become possible via the linkage of HIV clinical studies to large DNA repositories. Preliminary case–control studies using these resources suggest that host mitochondrial DNA haplogroup polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis gene and proinflammatory cytokine genes may influence the risk of peripheral neuropathy during antiretroviral therapy. These putative risk factors await confirmation in other HIV-infected populations but they have strong biological plausibility. Work to identify underlying mechanisms for these associations is ongoing. Large-scale studies incorporating clearly defined and validated methods of neuropathy assessment and the use of novel laboratory models of NRTI-associated neuropathy to clarify its pathophysiology are now needed. Such investigations may facilitate the development of more effective strategies to predict, prevent and ameliorate this debilitating treatment toxicity in diverse clinical settings. PMID:19374518

  20. Multimodality imaging of peripheral neuropathies of the upper limb and brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Linda, Dorota Dominika; Harish, Srinivasan; Stewart, Brian G; Finlay, Karen; Parasu, Naveen; Rebello, Ryan Paul

    2010-09-01

    The peripheral nerves of the upper limb are affected by a number of entrapment and compression neuropathies. These discrete syndromes involve the brachial plexus as well as the musculocutaneous, axillary, suprascapular, ulnar, radial, and median nerves. Clinical examination and electrophysiologic studies are the traditional mainstay of diagnostic work-up; however, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide spatial information regarding the affected nerve and its surroundings, often assisting in narrowing the differential diagnosis and guiding treatment. Imaging is particularly valuable in complex cases with discrepant nerve function test results. Familiarity with the clinical features of various peripheral neuropathies of the upper extremity, the relevant anatomy, and the most common sites and causes of nerve entrapment assists in diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Systematic review of treatments for diabetic peripheral neuropathy: lost in translation.

    PubMed

    Volchegorskii, I A

    2017-02-22

    We read with great interest the systematic review by Çakici et al. [1] on treatments for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Unfortunately, on careful reading, we found a number of inaccuracies and factual errors. First, we were rather surprised that there was almost no mention of mexidol, although a conclusion about its effectiveness in treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy is in the 'What's new?' section, as well as in the final sentence of the main text under the 'Strengths and limitations' section and in the abstract. Furthermore, the results on mexidol are presented in Table 2 (page 1470) from our article, Volchegorskii et al. [2]. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical features and electrodiagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the dysvascular patient.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Karen

    2009-11-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common disorder that can lead to limb loss and death. Up to 50% of DPN patients can be asymptomatic. This fact contributes to making DPN the leading cause of lower limb amputation. The degree of heterogeneity in the clinical manifestations of DPN makes diagnosing this condition difficult. This article reviews the characteristics, diagnosis, electrodiagnosis, classification, pathogenesis, and treatment of DPN.

  3. Pain modality and spinal glia expression by streptozotocin induced diabetic peripheral neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sok Ho; Kwon, Jung Kee; Kwon, Young Bae

    2012-06-01

    Pain symptoms are a common complication of diabetic peripheral neuropathy or an inflammatory condition. In the most experiments, only one or two evident pain modalities are observed at diabetic peripheral neuropathy according to experimental conditions. Following diabetic peripheral neuropathy or inflammation, spinal glial activation may be considered as an important mediator in the development of pain. For this reason, the present study was aimed to address the induction of pain modalities and spinal glial expression after streptozotocin injection as compared with that of zymosan inflammation in the rat. Evaluation of pain behavior by either thermal or mechanical stimuli was performed at 3 weeks or 5 hours after either intravenous streptozotocin or zymosan. Degrees of pain were divided into 4 groups: severe, moderate, mild, and non-pain induction. On the mechanical allodynia test, zymosan evoked predominantly a severe type of pain, whereas streptozotocin induced a weak degree of pain (severe+moderate: 57.1%). Although zymosan did not evoke cold allodynia, streptozotocin evoked stronger pain behavior, compared with zymosan (severe+moderate: 50.0%). On the other hand, the high incidence of thermal hyperalgesia (severe+moderate: 90.0%) and mechanical hyperalgesia (severe+moderate: 85.7%) by streptozotocin was observed, as similar to that of zymosan. In the spinal cord, the increase of microglia and astrocyte was evident by streptozotocin, only microglia was activated by zymosan. Therefore, it is recommended that the selection of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia is suitable for the evaluation of streptozotocin induced diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Moreover, spinal glial activation may be considered an important factor.

  4. Kinin Receptors Sensitize TRPV4 Channel and Induce Mechanical Hyperalgesia: Relevance to Paclitaxel-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Robson; Bicca, Maíra A; Manjavachi, Marianne N; Segat, Gabriela C; Dias, Fabiana Chaves; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Calixto, João B

    2017-03-10

    Kinin B1 (B1R) and B2 receptors (B2R) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channel are known to play a critical role in the peripheral neuropathy induced by paclitaxel (PTX) in rodents. However, the downstream pathways activated by kinin receptors as well as the sensitizers of the TRPV4 channel involved in this process remain unknown. Herein, we investigated whether kinins sensitize TRPV4 channels in order to maintain PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy in mice. The mechanical hyperalgesia induced by bradykinin (BK, a B2R agonist) or des-Arg(9)-BK (DABK, a B1R agonist) was inhibited by the selective TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047. Additionally, BK was able to sensitize TRPV4, thus contributing to mechanical hyperalgesia. This response was dependent on phospholipase C/protein kinase C (PKC) activation. The selective kinin B1R (des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin) and B2R (HOE 140) antagonists reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by PTX, with efficacies and time response profiles similar to those observed for the TRPV4 antagonist (HC-067047). Additionally, both kinin receptor antagonists inhibited the overt nociception induced by hypotonic solution in PTX-injected animals. The same animals presented lower PKCε levels in skin and dorsal root ganglion samples. The selective PKCε inhibitor (εV1-2) reduced the hypotonicity-induced overt nociception in PTX-treated mice with the same magnitude observed for the kinin receptor antagonists. These findings suggest that B1R or B2R agonists sensitize TRPV4 channels to induce mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. This mechanism of interaction may contribute to PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy through the activation of PKCε. We suggest these targets represent new opportunities for the development of effective analgesics to treat chronic pain.

  5. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a review and implications for oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Rita

    2007-06-01

    Advances in supportive care have increased the likelihood that previously less common adverse effects of chemotherapy will be more evident. The incidence of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is increasing because more neurotoxic drugs have been developed and because patients are living longer and receiving multiple chemotherapy regimens. This article reviews the anatomy of the peripheral nervous system, the proposed mechanisms of CIPN, and manifestations of CIPN from vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and platinum analogs. Major topics of this article are evidence-based data regarding symptom management, a review of medical management, and a synthesis of nursing care for patients at risk for or experiencing CIPN.

  6. Relationship between loss of pedal sensibility, balance, and falls in patients with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ducic, Ivica; Short, Kelly W; Dellon, A Lee

    2004-06-01

    in the remaining 48%. Similarly, at the heel, sensibility was normal in 6.5%, abnormal at a level consistent with axonal loss in 71%, and absent in the remaining 22.5%. The correlation coefficient between sway and sensibility score was 0.36. The results of this investigation for the first time document the intuitive relationship between increasing loss of foot sensibility and increasing loss of balance. These measurements can now be used prospectively to evaluate whether restoration of sensation to patients with neuropathy, through peripheral nerve decompression, can improve balance and reduce falls/fractures in this patient population.

  7. Carvedilol prevents functional deficits in peripheral nerve mitochondria of rats with oxaliplatin-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Areti, Aparna; Komirishetty, Prashanth; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-03-09

    Oxaliplatin use as chemotherapeutic agent is frequently limited by cumulative neurotoxicity which may compromise quality of life. Reports relate this neurotoxic effect to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Carvedilol is an antihypertensive drug, has also been appreciated for its antioxidant and mitoprotective properties. Carvedilol co-treatment did not reduce the anti-tumor effects of oxaliplatin in human colon cancer cells (HT-29), but exhibited free radical scavenging activity against oxaliplatin-induced oxidative stress in neuronal cells (Neuro-2a). Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of carvedilol in the experimental model of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Oxaliplatin reduced the sensory nerve conduction velocity and produced the thermal and mechanical nociception. Carvedilol significantly (P<0.001) attenuated these functional and sensorimotor deficits. It also counteracted oxidative/nitrosative stress by reducing the levels of nitrotyrosine and improving the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression in both sciatic nerve and DRG tissues. It improved the mitochondrial function and prevented the oxaliplatin-induced alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential in sciatic nerve thus prevented loss of intra epidermal nerve fiber density in the foot pads. Together the results prompt the use of carvedilol along with chemotherapy with oxaliplatin to prevent the peripheral neuropathy.

  8. Symptomatology of peripheral neuropathy in an African language.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Asma; Bentley, Alison; Kamerman, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    The terminology used to describe neuropathic pain appears to be conserved across languages, which facilitates the translation of validated neuropathic pain screening tools into other languages. However, this assumption has not been assessed in an African language. Therefore we investigated the terminology used by 54 patients whose native language was isiZulu, a major Bantu language of Africa, when describing their symptomatic HIV-associated sensory neuropathy. Also, because English is a commonly spoken second-language in the region, we assessed these patients' knowledge and understanding of 21 English terms commonly used to describe neuropathic pain. English translations of the most commonly used isiZulu symptom descriptors included: "hot/burning" (50%), "cramping" (35%), "painful/sore/aching" (32%), "itching" (22%), "numb" (22%), "cold/freezing" (17%), and "stabbing/pricking/pins-and-needles" (13%). Thus, the isiZulu terminology to describe neuropathic pain was very similar to that used in non-African languages. However, knowledge and understanding of English neuropathic pain descriptors by these non-native English speakers was highly variable. For example, knowledge of English terms ranged from >98% ("hot", "cold/freezing", "cramping") to <25% ("pricking", "radiating", "throbbing"), and true understanding of English terms ranged from >90% ("hot", "burning", "cramping") to <35% ("tingling", "jumping", "shooting", "radiating"). In conclusion, we show significant similarity in the terms used to describe neuropathic pain in isiZulu compared to non-African languages, thus indicating that translation of existing neuropathic pain screening tools into this, and possibly other Bantu languages, is a viable option. However, the usefulness of English-language screening tools in this non-native English speaking population may be limited.

  9. Defective autoimmune regulator-dependent central tolerance to myelin protein zero is linked to autoimmune peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Su, Maureen A; Davini, Dan; Cheng, Philip; Giang, Karen; Fan, Una; DeVoss, Jason J; Johannes, Kellsey P A; Taylor, Lorelei; Shum, Anthony K; Valenzise, Mariella; Meloni, Antonella; Bour-Jordan, Helene; Anderson, Mark S

    2012-05-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a debilitating autoimmune disease characterized by peripheral nerve demyelination and dysfunction. How the autoimmune response is initiated, identity of provoking Ags, and pathogenic effector mechanisms are not well defined. The autoimmune regulator (Aire) plays a critical role in central tolerance by promoting thymic expression of self-Ags and deletion of self-reactive T cells. In this study, we used mice with hypomorphic Aire function and two patients with Aire mutations to define how Aire deficiency results in spontaneous autoimmune peripheral neuropathy. Autoimmunity against peripheral nerves in both mice and humans targets myelin protein zero, an Ag for which expression is Aire-regulated in the thymus. Consistent with a defect in thymic tolerance, CD4(+) T cells are sufficient to transfer disease in mice and produce IFN-γ in infiltrated peripheral nerves. Our findings suggest that defective Aire-mediated central tolerance to myelin protein zero initiates an autoimmune Th1 effector response toward peripheral nerves.

  10. Concurrent Outbreaks of Cholera and Peripheral Neuropathy Associated with High Mortality among Persons Internally Displaced by a Volcanic Eruption

    PubMed Central

    Rosewell, Alexander; Clark, Geoff; Mabong, Paul; Ropa, Berry; Posanai, Enoch; Man, Nicola W. Y.; Dutta, Samir R.; Wickramasinghe, Wasa; Qi, Lixia; Ng, Jack C.; Mola, Glen; Zwi, Anthony B.; MacIntyre, C. Raina

    2013-01-01

    Background In October 2004, Manam Island volcano in Papua New Guinea erupted, causing over 10 000 villagers to flee to internally displaced person (IDP) camps, including 550 from Dugulaba village. Following violence over land access in March 2010, the IDPs fled the camps, and four months later concurrent outbreaks of acute watery diarrhea and unusual neurological complaints were reported in this population. Materials and Methods A retrospective case-control study was conducted to identify the risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Rectal swabs were collected from cases of acute watery diarrhea. Hair and serum metals and metalloids were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results There were 17 deaths among the 550 village inhabitants during the outbreak period at a crude mortality rate 21-fold that of a humanitarian crisis. Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Ogawa was confirmed among the population. Access to community-level rehydration was crucial to mortality. Peripheral neuropathy was diagnosed among cases with neurological symptoms. A balanced diet was significantly protective against neuropathy. A dose-response relationship was seen between peripheral neuropathy and a decreasing number of micronutrient- rich foods in the diet. Deficiencies in copper, iron, selenium and zinc were identified among the cases of peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions Cholera likely caused the mostly preventable excess mortality. Peripheral neuropathy was not caused by cholera, but cholera may worsen existing nutritional deficiencies. The peripheral neuropathy was likely caused by complex micronutrient deficiencies linked to non-diversified diets that potentially increased the vulnerability of this population, however a new zinc-associated neuropathy could not be ruled out. Reoccurrence can be prevented by addressing the root cause of displacement and ensuring access to arable land and timely resettlement. PMID:24023752

  11. Peripheral neuropathy in hepatitis C virus infection with and without cryoglobulinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Nemni, R; Sanvito, L; Quattrini, A; Santuccio, G; Camerlingo, M; Canal, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is often associated with cryoglobulinaemia (CG). Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is a comparatively common complication of CG associated with HCV infection and it is thought to be attributable to nerve ischaemia. Only few HCV CG patients with PN have been reported. The recent finding of HCV RNA in nerve biopsy specimens has suggested a possible direct role of HCV in the pathogenesis of PN. The authors studied 51 HCV patients to determine the prevalence of CG and to clarify the possible mechanism by which HCV determines the PN. Methods: All the patients were studied clinically, by laboratory tests and electrophysiologically. Twenty eight patients underwent sural nerve biopsy where both morphological and morphometric evaluation of the biopsy specimen was performed, as well as statistical analysis. Results: CG was found in 40 of 51 cases (78%). Polyneuropathy was significantly prevalent in CG+ patients compared with CG- (18 of 40 compared with 1 of 11 patients; p=0.01). HCV CG- patients more frequently developed well defined mononeuropathy or multiple neuropathy when compared with HCV CG+ (10 of 11 compared with 22 of 40; p<0.03). HCV CG+ patients showed significantly higher proportion of rheumatoid factor positivity (p<0.001) and low C4 levels (p=0.001). Nerve biopsy was performed in 25 of 40 HCV CG+ patients and in 3 of 11 HCV CG- patients: epineurial vasculitis was present in 8 of 25 HCV CG+ (32%) and in 2 of 3 HCV CG-. Differential fascicular loss of axons was found in 10 of 25 CG+ (40%) and 1 of 3 CG-, signs of both demyelination and axonal degeneration were present in 7 of 25 CG+ (28%). No significant difference was found in neuropathological features, while histometrical analysis disclosed more severe involvement in CG+ patients. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the presence of CG is a negative predictive factor for the associated PN. Morphological findings in the sural nerve from HCV CG- and CG+ are consistent

  12. Electrophysiological Studies to Detect Peripheral Neuropathy in Children Treated With Vincristine.

    PubMed

    Kavcic, Marko; Koritnik, Blaz; Krzan, Matevz; Velikonja, Orjana; Prelog, Tomaz; Stefanovic, Milica; Debeljak, Maruša; Jazbec, Janez

    2017-04-03

    Patients treated with vincristine predictably develop peripheral neuropathy. The aim of our study was to investigate the pattern of vincristine-induced neuropathy in children by nerve conduction studies and somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs). We included data from 39 children who received vincristine for various pediatric malignancies, and we performed initial and follow-up (after a minimum of 4 doses of vincristine 1.5 mg/m) conduction studies in 27 patients and SSEPs studies in 34 patients. On follow-up the most prevalent symptoms were paresthesias (44%) and constipation (22%), and the most common neurological sign was impaired myotatic reflexes (89%). Performing nerve conduction studies we found that significant reductions were measured for distal amplitudes, distal latencies were prolonged, and conduction velocities were relatively preserved. The most pronounced differences in amplitudes and distal latencies were measured in the peroneal nerves. Changes of SSEPs studies were subtle. Vincristine-induced neuropathy presents with primary axonal involvement and is more pronounced on motor neurons. We found a trend between higher age and higher dose and the degree of neuropathy in our group of patients.

  13. Inverse association between serum total bilirubin levels and diabetic peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Sook; Lee, Sung Won; Mo, Eun Young; Moon, Sung Dae; Han, Je Ho

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have suggested that bilirubin, a potent innate antioxidant, plays a protective role against cardiovascular and microvascular disease. This study investigated the association between serum concentrations of total bilirubin (TB) and the presence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in Korean diabetic patients. This cross-sectional study involved 1207 patients aged more than 30 years with type 2 diabetes. DPN was assessed according to clinical symptoms and physical examinations using Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument examination score, 10-g monofilament sensation, and current perception threshold. The subjects were stratified into gender-specific tertiles based on TB values, and the relationship between the TB values and DPN was analyzed. Compared with patients within the lowest TB tertile, those with higher TB levels consisted of patients with shorter duration of diabetes, lower HbA1c, better renal function, and less autonomic neuropathy, retinopathy, and albuminuria. Serum TB levels were inversely associated with DPN. In multivariate analysis for the development of DPN after adjusting for potential confounding factors including retinopathy, albuminuria, and autonomic neuropathy, the TB levels were inversely associated with the presence of DPN, both as a continuous variable [odds ratio (OR) per log standard deviation (SD) 0.79; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65-0.97; P = 0.022] and when categorized in tertiles (the highest vs. the lowest tertile; OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.40-0.99; P = 0.046). Low serum bilirubin levels are significantly associated with DPN, independently of classic risk factors and other microvascular complications. Further investigation is necessary to determine whether serum bilirubin has a prognostic significance on DPN.

  14. Acupuncture for the treatment of chronic painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy: a long-term study.

    PubMed

    Abuaisha, B B; Costanzi, J B; Boulton, A J

    1998-02-01

    Forty-six diabetic patients with chronic painful peripheral neuropathy were treated with acupuncture analgesia to determine its efficacy and long-term effectiveness. Twenty-nine (63%) patients were already on standard medical treatment for painful neuropathy. Patients initially received up to six courses of classical acupuncture analgesia over a period of 10 weeks, using traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture points. Forty-four patients completed the study with 34 (77%) showing significant improvement in their primary and/or secondary symptoms (P < 0.01). These patients were followed up for a period of 18-52 weeks with 67% were able to stop or reduce their medications significantly. During the follow-up period only eight (24%) patients required further acupuncture treatment. Although 34 (77%) patients noted significant improvement in their symptoms, only seven (21%) noted that their symptoms cleared completely. All the patients but one finished the full course of acupuncture treatment without reported or observed side effects. There were no significant changes either in the peripheral neurological examination scores, VPT or in HbA1c during the course of treatment. These data suggest that acupuncture is a safe and effective therapy for the long-term management of painful diabetic neuropathy, although its mechanism of action remains speculative.

  15. Prevalence, self-care behaviors, and self-care activities for peripheral neuropathy symptoms of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Voss, Joachim; Wantland, Dean; Lindgren, Teri; Huang, Emily; Holzemer, William L; Cuca, Yvette; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Portillo, Carmen; Willard, Suzanne; Arudo, John; Kirksey, Kenn; Corless, Inge B; Rosa, María E; Robinson, Linda; Hamilton, Mary J; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Human, Sarie; Rivero-Mendez, Marta; Maryland, Mary; Nokes, Kathleen M; Eller, Lucille; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Brion, John M; Bunch, Elli H; Shannon, Maureen; Nicholas, Thomas P; Viamonte-Ros, Ana; Bain, Catherine A

    2010-03-01

    As part of a larger randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual (n = 775), this study examined the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in HIV-infected individuals at 12 sites in the USA, Puerto Rico, and Africa. Neuropathy was reported by 44% of the sample; however, only 29.4% reported initiating self-care behaviors to address the neuropathy symptoms. Antiretroviral therapy was found to increase the frequency of neuropathy symptoms, with an increased mean intensity of 28%. A principal axis factor analysis with Promax rotation was used to assess the relationships in the frequency of use of the 18 self-care activities for neuropathy, revealing three distinct factors: (i) an interactive self-care factor; (ii) a complementary medicine factor; and (iii) a third factor consisting of the negative health items of smoking, alcohol, and street drugs. The study's results suggest that peripheral neuropathy is a common symptom and the presence of neuropathy is associated with self-care behaviors to ameliorate HIV symptoms. The implications for nursing practice include the assessment and evaluation of nursing interventions related to management strategies for neuropathy.

  16. Clinical, neurophysiological, and skin biopsy findings in peripheral neuropathy associated with hepatitis C virus-related cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Biasiotta, A; Casato, M; La Cesa, S; Colantuono, S; Di Stefano, G; Leone, C; Carlesimo, M; Piroso, S; Cruccu, G; Truini, A

    2014-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cryoglobulinemia commonly causes disabling complications including peripheral neuropathy and neuropathic pain. In this prospective clinical, neurophysiological, and skin biopsy study we aimed at assessing clinical characteristics and risk factors of peripheral neuropathy and neuropathic pain in patients with HCV-related cryoglobulinemia. We enrolled 69 consecutive patients with HCV-related cryoglobulinemia. We diagnosed neuropathic pain with the DN4 (Neuropathic Pain Diagnostic) questionnaire, and rated the various neuropathic pains with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI). All patients underwent a standard nerve conduction study to assess Aβ-fiber function, laser-evoked potentials to assess Aδ-fiber function, and skin biopsy to assess C-fiber terminals. Of the 69 patients studied, 47 had a peripheral neuropathy, and 29 had neuropathic pain. Patients with peripheral neuropathy were older than those without (P < 0.0001). While peripheral neuropathy was significantly associated with the duration of HCV infection (P < 0.01), it was unrelated to the duration of cryoglobulinemia and cryocrit (P > 0.5). The severity of peripheral neuropathy significantly correlated with the duration of HCV infection (P < 0.05). Laser-evoked potential amplitudes were significantly lower in patients with than in those without neuropathic pain (P < 0.05). Conversely, no difference was found in nerve conduction study and skin biopsy findings (P > 0.05). Our findings show that peripheral neuropathy is related to age and HCV infection, rather than to cryoglobulinemia, and neuropathic pain is associated with damage to nociceptive pathways as assessed with laser-evoked potentials; this might be useful for designing more effective clinical interventions for these common HCV related-cryoglobulinemia complications.

  17. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Loci for Paclitaxel-Induced Sensory Peripheral Neuropathy in CALGB 40101

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, R. Michael; Owzar, Kouros; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Chhibber, Aparna; Kubo, Michiaki; Jiang, Chen; Watson, Dorothy; Eclov, Rachel J.; Mefford, Joel; McLeod, Howard L.; Friedman, Paula N.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Winer, Eric P.; Jorgenson, Eric M.; Witte, John S.; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ratain, Mark J.; Kroetz, Deanna L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Sensory peripheral neuropathy is a common and sometimes debilitating toxicity associated with paclitaxel therapy. This study aims to identify genetic risk factors for development of this toxicity. Experimental Design A prospective pharmacogenetic analysis of primary breast cancer patients randomized to the paclitaxel arm of CALGB 40101 was used to identify genetic predictors of the onset and severity of sensory peripheral neuropathy. A genome-wide association study in 855 subjects of European ancestry was performed and findings were replicated in additional European (n = 154) and African American (n = 117) subjects. Results A single nucleotide polymorphism in FGD4 was associated with the onset of sensory peripheral neuropathy in the discovery cohort (rs10771973; HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.30–1.91; P = 2.6 × 10−6) and in a European (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.06–2.80; P = 0.013) and African American (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.13-3.28; P = 6.7 × 10−3) replication cohort. There is also evidence that markers in additional genes, including EPHA5 (rs7349683) and FZD3 (rs10771973), were associated with the onset or severity of paclitaxel-induced sensory peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions A genome-wide association study has identified novel genetic markers of paclitaxel-induced sensory peripheral neuropathy, including a common polymorphism in FGD4, a congenital peripheral neuropathy gene. These findings suggest that genetic variation may contribute to variation in development of this toxicity. Validation of these findings may allow for the identification of patients at increased risk of peripheral neuropathy and inform the use of an alternative to paclitaxel and/or the clinical management of this toxicity. PMID:22843789

  18. Amplitude of sensory nerve action potential in early stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy: an analysis of 500 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunqian; Li, Jintao; Wang, Tingjuan; Wang, Jianlin

    2014-07-15

    Early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is important for the successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we recruited 500 diabetic patients from the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University in China from June 2008 to September 2013: 221 cases showed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (symptomatic group) and 279 cases had no symptoms of peripheral impairment (asymptomatic group). One hundred healthy control subjects were also recruited. Nerve conduction studies revealed that distal motor latency was longer, sensory nerve conduction velocity was slower, and sensory nerve action potential and amplitude of compound muscle action potential were significantly lower in the median, ulnar, posterior tibial and common peroneal nerve in the diabetic groups compared with control subjects. Moreover, the alterations were more obvious in patients with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Of the 500 diabetic patients, neural conduction abnormalities were detected in 358 cases (71.6%), among which impairment of the common peroneal nerve was most prominent. Sensory nerve abnormality was more obvious than motor nerve abnormality in the diabetic groups. The amplitude of sensory nerve action potential was the most sensitive measure of peripheral neuropathy. Our results reveal that varying degrees of nerve conduction changes are present in the early, asymptomatic stage of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  19. Surface electromyogram and muscle ultrasonography for detection of muscle fasciculations in pediatric peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Masayoshi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Wataru; Ohno, Koyo; Togawa, Masami; Fukuda, Chisako; Saito, Yuko; Nishino, Ichizo; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-16

    A 12-year-old girl presented with talipes equinus of both legs, attenuation of upper and lower limb tendon reflexes, thermal hyperalgesia, and reduction of vibratory sensation. On clinical examination, muscle twitches of fingers of both hands, as well as the abductor halluces and the dorsal interossei muscles of the right foot were observed. Nerve conduction velocity was significantly declined in the upper and lower extremities. Needle electromyography (EMG) was not performed; however, ultrasonography revealed repetitive, semi-regular muscle twitches lasting 0.2-0.4s, concomitant with muscle discharges on surface EMG in the right foot muscles. These findings were compatible with contraction fasciculation in muscles under chronic reinnervation. Nerve and muscle biopsies were suggestive of chronic motor, sensory, and autonomic neuropathy. This is the first case of pediatric peripheral neuropathy where muscle fasciculation was noninvasively identified by simultaneous surface EMG and ultrasonography.

  20. Ultrasound assessment of selected peripheral nerves pathologies. Part II: Entrapment neuropathies of the lower limb

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    Similarly to entrapment neuropathies of upper extremities, the ultrasound constitutes a valuable supplementation of diagnostic examinations performed in patients with suspicions of nerve entrapment syndromes of the lower limb. For many years, it was claimed that such pathologies were rare. This probably resulted from the lack of proper diagnostic tools (including high frequency ultrasound transducers) as well as the lack of sufficient knowledge in this area. In relation to the above, the symptoms of compression neuropathies were frequently interpreted as a manifestation of pathologies of the lumbar part of the spine or a other orthopedic disease (degenerative or overuse one). Consequently, many patients were treated ineffectively for many months and even, years which led to irreparable neurological changes and changes in the motor organ. Apart from a clinical examination, the diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies of lower limb is currently based on imaging tests (ultrasound, magnetic resonance) as well as functional assessments (electromyography). Magnetic resonance imaging is characterized by a relatively low resolution (as compared to ultrasound) which results in limited possibilities of morphological evaluation of the visualized pathology. Electromyography allows for the assessment of nerve function, but does not precisely determine the type and degree of change. This article presents examples of the most common entrapment neuropathies of the lower limb concerning the following nerves: sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, obturator, fibular and its branches, tibial and its branches as well as sural. The pathomorphological basis of the neuropathies as well as corresponding ultrasound images are presented in this paper. Attention has been drawn to echogenicity, degree of vascularization and bundle presentation of the trunk of a pathological peripheral nerve. PMID:26673938

  1. Association of peripheral neuropathy with sleep-related breathing disorders in myotonic dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Marta; Antczak, Jakub; Rola, Rafał

    2017-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy (DM) type 1 and type 2 are inherited diseases characterized by myotonia and myopathy. Additional symptoms include, among others, peripheral neuropathy and sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs). There is growing evidence for a complex association between DM1 and DM2, which was described in patients with diabetes mellitus and in the general population. In this study, we investigated whether there is an association between peripheral neuropathy and SRBDs also in the population of patients with DM. Methods The study included 16 patients with DM1 (mean age, 37.9±14.1 years; 20–69 years) and eight patients with DM2 (mean age, 47.6±14.1 years; 20–65 years), who underwent a sensory and motor nerve conduction study (NCS) and diagnostic screening for SRBDs. In both groups, the NCS parameters were correlated with respiratory parameters. Results In both groups, the amplitude of the ulnar sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) correlated with the mean arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2). In addition, in the DM2 group, the median SNAP correlated with the mean SaO2. In the DM1 group, the median SNAP and the distal motor latency (DML) of the ulnar nerve correlated with the apnea–hypopnea index, while the oxygen desaturation index correlated with the DML of the tibial nerve and with conduction velocity in the sural nerve. Conclusion Our results indicate a complex association between neuropathy and SRBDs in DM1 and DM2. Axonal degeneration may contribute to nocturnal hypoxemia and vice versa. Neuropathy may contribute to muscle weakness, which in turn may cause respiratory events. PMID:28138246

  2. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb - excluding carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-traumatic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assessment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology - both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon's canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg's disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonography 2012; 12 (49): 120-163 - Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the example of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles). The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established - echogenicity and echostructure, thickness (edema and related increase

  3. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Nevoret, Marie-Laure; Casellini, Carolina; Parson, Henri

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common and troublesome complication of diabetes mellitus, leading to the greatest morbidity and mortality and resulting in a huge economic burden for diabetes care. The clinical assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its treatment options are multifactorial. Patients with DN should be screened for autonomic neuropathy, as there is a high degree of coexistence of the two complications. A review of the clinical assessment and treatment algorithms for diabetic neuropathy, painful neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction is provided.

  4. Vasculitic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Luzia; Silva, Lã Gia; Terroso, Georgina; Nadais, Goreti; Mariz, Eva; Ventura, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Vasculitic neuropathy corresponds to the occurrence of vasculitis at the level of vasa nervorum, resulting in ischemic damage of the peripheral nerve and axonal degeneration. Vasculitic neuropathy commonly occurs in association with systemic diseases and may be the initial manifestation or arise in the course of established disease. Although rare, vasculitis can be confined to the peripheral nervous system - non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy. This paper aims to review the classification, diagnosis and treatment of vasculitic neuropathy.

  5. Decreased serum vitamin D levels are associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a rural area of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Celikbilek, Asuman; Gocmen, Ayse Yesim; Tanik, Nermin; Borekci, Elif; Adam, Mehmet; Celikbilek, Mehmet; Suher, Murat; Delibas, Namik

    2015-03-01

    Data examining the association between vitamin D and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are limited. This study investigated the serum levels of vitamin D, vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP), and vitamin D receptor (VDR) in diabetics in the Yozgat region of Turkey, and assessed their relationships with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. 69 diabetic patients and 49 age- and sex-matched control subjects were enrolled in this clinical prospective study. All the diabetics underwent conventional sensory and motor nerve conduction studies, and diabetic peripheral neuropathy was confirmed or ruled out according to the electromyography findings and Douleur Neuropathique 4 questions. Serum vitamin D, VDBP and VDR levels were measured using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The serum vitamin D levels (p = 0.001) were significantly lower, while the VDR levels (p = 0.003) were higher, in diabetics than in controls. The serum VDBP levels were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). The serum vitamin D levels were significantly lower in diabetics with diabetic peripheral neuropathy than in those without (p = 0.032), whereas the serum VDBP and VDR levels were similar in these two groups (p > 0.05). The lower serum vitamin D levels in diabetics, especially in those with peripheral neuropathy, may suggest a neurotrophic effect of vitamin D.

  6. Charcot Marie Tooth 2B Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy: How Rab7 Mutations Impact NGF Signaling?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Harry; Wu, Chengbiao

    2017-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2B peripheral sensory neuropathy (CMT2B) is a debilitating autosomal dominant hereditary sensory neuropathy. Patients with this disease lose pain sensation and frequently need amputation. Axonal dysfunction and degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons is a major clinical manifestation of CMT2B. However, the cellular and molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. CMT2B is caused by missense point mutations (L129F, K157N, N161T/I, V162M) in Rab7 GTPase. Strong evidence suggests that the Rab7 mutation(s) enhances the cellular levels of activated Rab7 proteins, thus resulting in increased lysosomal activity and autophagy. As a consequence, trafficking and signaling of neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF) in the long axons of peripheral sensory neurons are particularly vulnerable to premature degradation. A “gain of toxicity” model has, thus, been proposed based on these observations. However, studies of fly photo-sensory neurons indicate that the Rab7 mutation(s) causes a “loss of function”, resulting in haploinsufficiency. In the review, we summarize experimental evidence for both hypotheses. We argue that better models (rodent animals and human neurons) of CMT2B are needed to precisely define the disease mechanisms. PMID:28165391

  7. Charcot Marie Tooth 2B Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy: How Rab7 Mutations Impact NGF Signaling?

    PubMed

    Liu, Harry; Wu, Chengbiao

    2017-02-04

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2B peripheral sensory neuropathy (CMT2B) is a debilitating autosomal dominant hereditary sensory neuropathy. Patients with this disease lose pain sensation and frequently need amputation. Axonal dysfunction and degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons is a major clinical manifestation of CMT2B. However, the cellular and molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. CMT2B is caused by missense point mutations (L129F, K157N, N161T/I, V162M) in Rab7 GTPase. Strong evidence suggests that the Rab7 mutation(s) enhances the cellular levels of activated Rab7 proteins, thus resulting in increased lysosomal activity and autophagy. As a consequence, trafficking and signaling of neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF) in the long axons of peripheral sensory neurons are particularly vulnerable to premature degradation. A "gain of toxicity" model has, thus, been proposed based on these observations. However, studies of fly photo-sensory neurons indicate that the Rab7 mutation(s) causes a "loss of function", resulting in haploinsufficiency. In the review, we summarize experimental evidence for both hypotheses. We argue that better models (rodent animals and human neurons) of CMT2B are needed to precisely define the disease mechanisms.

  8. New Insights into Potential Prevention and Management Options for Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schloss, Janet; Colosimo, Maree; Vitetta, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neurological complications such as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and neuropathic pain are frequent side effects of neurotoxic chemotherapy agents. An increasing survival rate and frequent administration of adjuvant chemotherapy treatments involving neurotoxic agents makes it imperative that accurate diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of these neurological complications be implemented. Methods: A consideration was undertaken of the current options regarding protective and treatment interventions for patients undergoing chemotherapy with neurotoxic chemotherapy agent or experience with CIPN. Current knowledge on the mechanism of action has also been identified. The following databases PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Science Direct, Scopus, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, CNKI, and Google Scholar were searched for relevant article retrieval. Results: A range of pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and herbal medicine treatments were identified that either showed efficacy or had some evidence of efficacy. Duloxetine was the most effective pharmaceutical agent for the treatment of CIPN. Vitamin E demonstrated potential for the prevention of cisplatin-IPN. Intravenous glutathione for oxaliplatin, Vitamin B6 for both oxaliplatin and cisplatin, and omega 3 fatty acids for paclitaxel have shown protection for CIPN. Acetyl-L-carnitine may provide some relief as a treatment option. Acupuncture may be of benefit for some patients and Gosha-jinki-gan may be of benefit for protection from adverse effects of oxaliplatin induced peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions: Clinicians and researchers acknowledge that there are numerous challenges involved in understanding, preventing, and treating peripheral neuropathy caused by chemotherapeutic agents. New insights into mechanisms of action from chemotherapy agents may facilitate the development of novel preventative and treatment options, thereby enabling medical staff to better support patients by reducing this

  9. Novel mutations highlight the key role of the ankyrin repeat domain in TRPV4-mediated neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zimanyi, Christina M.; Aisenberg, William; Bears, Breanne; Chen, Dong-Hui; Day, John W.; Bird, Thomas D.; Siskind, Carly E.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Sumner, Charlotte J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterize 2 novel TRPV4 mutations in 2 unrelated families exhibiting the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C (CMT2C) phenotype. Methods: Direct CMT gene testing was performed on 2 unrelated families with CMT2C. A 4-fold symmetric tetramer model of human TRPV4 was generated to map the locations of novel TRPV4 mutations in these families relative to previously identified disease-causing mutations (neuropathy, skeletal dysplasia, and osteoarthropathy). Effects of the mutations on TRPV4 expression, localization, and channel activity were determined by immunocytochemical, immunoblotting, Ca2+ imaging, and cytotoxicity assays. Results: Previous studies suggest that neuropathy-causing mutations occur primarily at arginine residues on the convex face of the TRPV4 ankyrin repeat domain (ARD). Further highlighting the key role of this domain in TRPV4-mediated hereditary neuropathy, we report 2 novel heterozygous missense mutations in the TRPV4-ARD convex face (p.Arg237Gly and p.Arg237Leu). Generation of a model of the TRPV4 homotetramer revealed that while ARD residues mutated in neuropathy (including Arg237) are likely accessible for intermolecular interactions, skeletal dysplasia–causing TRPV4 mutations occur at sites suggesting disruption of intramolecular and/or intersubunit interactions. Like previously described neuropathy-causing mutations, the p.Arg237Gly and p.Arg237Leu substitutions do not alter TRPV4 subcellular localization in transfected cells but cause elevations of cytosolic Ca2+ levels and marked cytotoxicity. Conclusions: These findings expand the number of ARD residues mutated in TRPV4-mediated neuropathy, providing further evidence of the central importance of this domain to TRPV4 function in peripheral nerve. PMID:27066566

  10. Potential application of the Kampo medicine goshajinkigan for prevention of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Marco; Muzio, Maria Rosaria

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most common and severe adverse effects related to cancer treatment. Unfortunately, although several agents and protocols have been proposed, no prophylactic strategies have yet to be proven useful. Therefore, new alternative therapies have been considered for CIPN prevention. Herbal medicine in Japan, called Kampo medicine, is derived from traditional Chinese medicine. Goshajinkigan (GJG) is a Kampo medicine, that is comprised of ten herbs. The aim of this work is to analyse the results of pre-clinical and clinical studies on the potential applications of GJG in CIPN prevention.

  11. Quantifying Dynamic Changes in Plantar Pressure Gradient in Diabetics with Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lung, Chi-Wen; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T.; Burns, Stephanie; Lin, Fang; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers remain one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Peak plantar pressure (PPP) and peak pressure gradient (PPG) during walking have been shown to be associated with the development of diabetic foot ulcers. To gain further insight into the mechanical etiology of diabetic foot ulcers, examination of the pressure gradient angle (PGA) has been recently proposed. The PGA quantifies directional variation or orientation of the pressure gradient during walking and provides a measure of whether pressure gradient patterns are concentrated or dispersed along the plantar surface. We hypothesized that diabetics at risk of foot ulceration would have smaller PGA in key plantar regions, suggesting less movement of the pressure gradient over time. A total of 27 participants were studied, including 19 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 non-diabetic control subjects. A foot pressure measurement system was used to measure plantar pressures during walking. PPP, PPG, and PGA were calculated for four foot regions – first toe (T1), first metatarsal head (M1), second metatarsal head (M2), and heel (HL). Consistent with prior studies, PPP and PPG were significantly larger in the diabetic group compared with non-diabetic controls in the T1 and M1 regions, but not M2 or HL. For example, PPP was 165% (P = 0.02) and PPG was 214% (P < 0.001) larger in T1. PGA was found to be significantly smaller in the diabetic group in T1 (46%, P = 0.04), suggesting a more concentrated pressure gradient pattern under the toe. The proposed PGA may improve our understanding of the role of pressure gradient on the risk of diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:27486576

  12. Xanthine Oxidase Activity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with and without Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic-Danic, Snezana; Miric, Marko B.; Puhalo-Sladoje, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between serum xanthine oxidase (XOD) activity and the occurrence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Serum XOD activity, ischemia-modified albumin (IMA), uric acid (UA), albumin, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), advanced glycation end products (AGE), total free thiols, atherogenic index of plasma (AIP), and body mass index (BMI) were measured in 80 T2DM patients (29 with and 51 without DPN), and 30 nondiabetic control subjects. Duration of diabetes, hypertension, medication, and microalbuminuria was recorded. Serum XOD activities in controls, non-DPN, and DPN were 5.7 ± 2.4 U/L, 20.3 ± 8.6 U/L, and 27.5 ± 10.6 U/L (p < 0.01), respectively. XOD activity was directly correlated to IMA, UA, BMI, HbA1c, and AGE, while inversely correlated to serum total free thiols. A multivariable logistic regression model, which included duration of diabetes, hypertension, AIP, HbA1c, UA, and XOD activity, revealed HbA1c [OR = 1.03 (1.00–1.05); p = 0.034] and XOD activity [OR = 1.07 (1.00–1.14); p = 0.036] as independent predictors of DPN. Serum XOD activity was well correlated to several other risk factors. These results indicate the role of XOD in the development of DPN among T2DM patients. PMID:27965983

  13. Increased gene expression of growth associated protein-43 in skin of patients with early-stage peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Scheytt, Sarah; Riediger, Nadja; Braunsdorf, Silvia; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan

    2015-08-15

    Growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) is one of the neural proteins associated with nerve injury that is upregulated after nerve injury. To investigate whether GAP-43 quantification in skin biopsies would differentiate subtypes of peripheral neuropathies, we analyzed GAP-43 expression in skin from the lateral thigh and the distal leg. We prospectively enrolled 130 patients with peripheral neuropathies and compared data with healthy controls. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) was determined using antibodies against protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5); anti-GAP-43 antibodies were applied to visualize regenerating nerve fibers. PGP 9.5 and GAP-43 gene expression was analyzed using qRT-PCR. Patients with neuropathies had a generalized reduction of IENFD and GAP-43 immunoreactive fibers compared to controls (p<0.01). In contrast, cutaneous GAP-43 gene expression was increased in proximal skin in patients (p<0.05), particularly when disease duration was short (<3 years; p<0.01). While fiber density for both markers decreased with age in healthy skin (p<0.01), age-dependent reduction of skin innervation was absent in neuropathies. Diagnostic subgroups and neuropathic pain had no influence on skin innervation. We conclude that peripheral neuropathies lead to an initial increase in GAP-43 gene expression as a potential mechanism of regeneration, which is not sustained in neuropathies of long duration.

  14. Monocyte Traffic, Dorsal Root Ganglion Histopathology, and Loss of Intraepidermal Nerve Fiber Density in SIV Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lakritz, Jessica R.; Bodair, Ayman; Shah, Neal; O'Donnell, Ryan; Polydefkis, Michael J.; Miller, Andrew D.; Burdo, Tricia H.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy remains the most common neurological complication of HIV infection and is characterized by dorsal root ganglion (DRG) inflammation and intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) loss. Chronic peripheral immune cell activation and accumulation may cause damage to the DRG, but has not been fully investigated yet. By using an SIV-infected, CD8-lymphocyte–depleted rhesus macaque model, we defined immune cells surrounding DRG neurons and their role in DRG pathology, measured cell traffic from the bone marrow to the DRGs using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse, and serially measured IENFD. We found an increase in CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages in DRGs of SIV-infected animals. MAC387+ recently recruited monocytes/macrophages were increased, along with BrdU+ cells, in the DRGs of SIV-infected macaques. We demonstrated that 78.1% of all BrdU+ cells in DRGs were also MAC387+. The number of BrdU+ monocytes correlated with severe DRG histopathology, which included neuronophagia, neuronal loss, and Nageotte nodules. These data demonstrate that newly recruited MAC387+BrdU+ macrophages may play a significant role in DRG pathogenesis. IENFD decreased early (day 21), consistent with the development of sensory neuropathy in SIV-infected macaques. Decreased IENFD was associated with elevated BrdU+ cells in the DRG. These data suggest that increased recruitment of macrophages to DRG is associated with severe DRG histopathology and IENFD loss. PMID:25956030

  15. Therapeutic potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Monfrini, Marianna; Donzelli, Elisabetta; Rodriguez-Menendez, Virginia; Ballarini, Elisa; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Chiorazzi, Alessia; Meregalli, Cristina; Canta, Annalisa; Oggioni, Norberto; Crippa, Luca; Avezza, Federica; Silvani, Sara; Bonandrini, Barbara; Figliuzzi, Marina; Remuzzi, Andrea; Porretta-Serapiglia, Carla; Bianchi, Roberto; Lauria, Giuseppe; Tredici, Giovanni; Cavaletti, Guido; Scuteri, Arianna

    2017-02-01

    Type-1 Diabetes is generally treated with exogenous insulin administration. Despite treatment, a very common long term consequence of diabetes is the development of a disabling and painful peripheral neuropathy. The transplantation of pancreatic islets is an advanced alternative therapeutic approach, but its clinical application is still very limited, mainly because of the great number of islets required to complete the procedure and of their short-term survival. An intriguing method to improve the performance of pancreatic islets transplantation is the co-transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs), adult stem cells already known to support the survival of different cellular populations. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrated using an in vivo model of diabetes, the ability of allogenic MSCs to reduce the number of pancreatic islets necessary to achieve glycemic control in diabetic rats, and overall their positive effect on diabetic neuropathy, with the reduction of all the neuropathic signs showed after disease induction. The cutback of the pancreatic islet number required to control glycemia and the regression of the painful neuropathy make MSC co-transplantation a very promising tool to improve the clinical feasibility of pancreatic islet transplantation for diabetes treatment.

  16. Comparative study of peripheral neuropathy and nerve regeneration in NOD and ICR diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Homs, Judit; Ariza, Lorena; Pagès, Gemma; Verdú, Enrique; Casals, Laura; Udina, Esther; Chillón, Miguel; Bosch, Assumpció; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-09-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse was suggested as an adequate model for diabetic autonomic neuropathy. We evaluated sensory-motor neuropathy and nerve regeneration following sciatic nerve crush in NOD males rendered diabetic by multiple low doses of streptozotocin, in comparison with similarly treated Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice, a widely used model for type I diabetes. Neurophysiological values for both strains showed a decline in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity at 7 and 8 weeks after induction of diabetes in the intact hindlimb. However, amplitudes of compound muscle and sensory action potentials (CMAPs and CNAPs) were significantly reduced in NOD but not in ICR diabetic mice. Morphometrical analysis showed myelinated fiber loss in highly hyperglycemic NOD mice, but no significant changes in fiber size. There was a reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, more pronounced in NOD than in ICR diabetic mice. Interestingly, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities were increased already at 1 week of hyperglycemia, persisting until the end of the experiment in both strains. Muscle and nerve reinnervation was delayed in diabetic mice following sciatic nerve crush, being more marked in NOD mice. Thus, diabetes of mid-duration induces more severe peripheral neuropathy and slower nerve regeneration in NOD than in ICR mice.

  17. Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Sahar; Asayesh, Hamid; Sharifi, Farshad; Djalalinia, Shirin; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Arzaghi, Seyed Masoud; Mansourian, Morteza; Rezapoor, Aziz; Ansari, Hossein; Masoud, Mohammad Parvaresh; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is an important microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). It is a major contributor to foot ulceration and lower limb amputation in persons with DM and have also a significant negative effect on patient's quality of life. This meta-analysis reviews prevalence of DPN among patients with type 1 and 2 DM in Iran. Using PubMed and NLM Gateway (for MEDLINE), Institute of Scientific Information (ISI), and SCOPUS as the main international electronic data sources, and Iranmedex, Irandoc, and Scientific Information Database (SID), as the main domestic databases with systematic search capability, we systematically searched surveys, papers, and reports on the prevalence of DPN (between January 1991 to February 2013). Heterogeneity of reported prevalence's between studies was assessed by the Chi-square-based Q test and due to heterogeneity; overall prevalence of DPN was estimated using random-effect meta-analysis model. We found 304 records; from them a total of 21 studies comprising 5540 diabetic patients were included. The prevalence of diabetic neuropathy (reported) from 16% to 87%. In overall the prevalence of DPN estimated 53% (95% CI: 41-65) by using random-effect. This study show that the prevalence of DPN seems very high among the population with diabetes in Iran and more than half of the patients with DM has any type of diabetic neuropathy.

  18. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy assessment through texture based analysis of corneal nerve images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Susana F.; Gouveia, Sofia; Gomes, Leonor; Negrão, Luís; João Quadrado, Maria; Domingues, José Paulo; Morgado, António Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one common complication of diabetes. Early diagnosis of DPN often fails due to the non-availability of a simple, reliable, non-invasive method. Several published studies show that corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) can identify small nerve fibre damage and quantify the severity of DPN, using nerve morphometric parameters. Here, we used image texture features, extracted from corneal sub-basal nerve plexus images, obtained in vivo by CCM, to identify DPN patients, using classification techniques. A SVM classifier using image texture features was used to identify (DPN vs. No DPN) DPN patients. The accuracies were 80.6%, when excluding diabetic patients without neuropathy, and 73.5%, when including diabetic patients without diabetic neuropathy jointly with healthy controls. The results suggest that texture analysis might be used as a complementing technique for DPN diagnosis, without requiring nerve segmentation in CCM images. The results also suggest that this technique has enough sensitivity to detect early disorders in the corneal nerves of diabetic patients.

  19. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. TRIGLYCERIDE, NEFA, AND PREDIABETIC NEUROPATHY: ROLE FOR OXIDATIVE-NITROSATIVE STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Hasanova, Nailia; Julius, Ulrich; G.Obrosova, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy develops in human subjects with prediabetes and metabolic syndrome, prior to overt hyperglycemia. The contributions of impaired glucose tolerance and insulin signaling, hypertriglyceridemia and/or increased NEFA, and hypercholesterolemia to this condition remain unknown. Niacin and its derivatives alleviate dyslipidemia with a minor effect on glucose homeostasis. This study evaluated the roles of impaired glucose tolerance versus dyslipidemia in prediabetic neuropathy using Zucker fatty (fa/fa) rats and the niacin derivative acipimox, as well as the interplay of hypertriglyceridemia, increased NEFA, and oxidative-nitrosative stress. 16 wk-old Zucker fatty rats with impaired glucose tolerance, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and increased NEFA, displayed sensory nerve conduction velocity deficit, thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia, and tactile allodynia. Acipimox (100 mgkg−1d−1, 4 weeks) reduced serum insulin, NEFA, and triglyceride concentrations without affecting glucose tolerance and hypercholesterolemia. It alleviated sensory nerve conduction velocity deficit, changes in behavioral measures of sensory function, and corrected oxidative-nitrosative stress, but not impaired insulin signaling, in peripheral nerve. Elevated NEFA increased total and mitochondrial superoxide production and NAD(P)H oxidase activity in cultured human Schwann cells. In conclusion, hypertriglyceridemia and/or increased NEFA concentrations cause prediabetic neuropathy through oxidative-nitrosative stress. Lipid-lowering agents and antioxidants may find use in management of this condition. PMID:22366714

  1. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F. )

    1991-04-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy.

  2. Multimodal assessment of painful peripheral neuropathy induced by chronic oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A major clinical issue affecting 10-40% of cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin is severe peripheral neuropathy with symptoms including cold sensitivity and neuropathic pain. Rat models have been used to describe the pathological features of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy; however, they are inadequate for parallel studies of oxaliplatin's antineoplastic activity and neurotoxicity because most cancer models are developed in mice. Thus, we characterized the effects of chronic, bi-weekly administration of oxaliplatin in BALB/c mice. We first studied oxaliplatin's effects on the peripheral nervous system by measuring caudal and digital nerve conduction velocities (NCV) followed by ultrastructural and morphometric analyses of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and sciatic nerves. To further characterize the model, we examined nocifensive behavior and central nervous system excitability by in vivo electrophysiological recording of spinal dorsal horn (SDH) wide dynamic range neurons in oxaliplatin-treated mice Results We found significantly decreased NCV and action potential amplitude after oxaliplatin treatment along with neuronal atrophy and multinucleolated DRG neurons that have eccentric nucleoli. Oxaliplatin also induced significant mechanical allodynia and cold hyperalgesia, starting from the first week of treatment, and a significant increase in the activity of wide dynamic range neurons in the SDH. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that chronic treatment with oxaliplatin produces neurotoxic changes in BALB/c mice, confirming that this model is a suitable tool to conduct further mechanistic studies of oxaliplatin-related antineoplastic activity, peripheral neurotoxicity and pain. Further, this model can be used for the preclinical discovery of new neuroprotective and analgesic compounds. PMID:21521528

  3. Peripheral neuropathy does not alter the fractal dynamics of stride intervals of gait.

    PubMed

    Gates, Deanna H; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect (if any) of significant sensory loss on the long-range correlations normally observed in the stride intervals of human gait. Fourteen patients with severe peripheral neuropathy and 12 gender-, age-, height-, and weight-matched nondiabetic controls participated. Subjects walked around an approximately 200-m open-level walkway for 10 min at their comfortable pace. Continuous knee joint kinematics were recorded and used to calculate a stride interval time series for each subject. Power spectral density and detrended fluctuation analyses were used to determine whether these stride intervals exhibited long-range correlations. If the loss of long-range correlations indicates deterioration of the central control of gait, then changes in peripheral sensation should have no effect. If instead the loss of long-range correlations is a consequence of a general inability to regulate gait cycle timing, then a similar loss should occur in patients with peripheral locomotor disorders. Both power spectral density analyses and detrended fluctuation analyses showed that temporal correlations in the stride times of neuropathic and control subjects were statistically identical (P = 0.954 and P = 0.974, respectively), despite slower gait speeds (P = 0.008) and increased stride time variability (P = 0.036) among the neuropathy patients. All subjects in both groups exhibited long-range correlations. These findings demonstrate that the normal long-range correlation structure of stride intervals is unaltered by significant peripheral sensory loss. This further supports the hypothesis that the central nervous system is involved in the regulation of long-range correlations.

  4. Prevalence and characteristics of peripheral neuropathy in hepatitis C virus population

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, L; Manganelli, F; Briani, C; Giannini, F; Benedetti, L; Vitelli, E; Mazzeo, A; Beghi, E

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) and its correlation with cryoglobulinemia (CG) in an unselected, untreated referral hepatitis C virus (HCV) population. Patients and Methods Two hundred and thirty four patients (120 women and 114 men) with untreated HCV infection were consecutively enrolled by seven Italian centres. Clinical neuropathy was diagnosed when symptoms and signs of peripheral sensory or motor involvement were present. Median, ulnar, peroneal, and sural nerves were explored in all patients and distal symmetric polyneuropathy was diagnosed when all explored nerves or both lower limb nerves were affected. Mononeuropathy and mononeuropathy multiplex were diagnosed when one nerve or two non‐contiguous nerves with asymmetrical distribution were affected. Screening for CG was done in 191 unselected patients. Results Clinical signs of PN were observed in 25 of the 234 patients (10.6%). Electrophysiological PN was found in 36 (15.3%). CG was present in 56/191 patients (29.3%). The prevalence of CG increased significantly with age (p<0.001) and disease duration (p<0.05). PN was present in 12/56 (21%) patients with CG and 18/135 (13%) without CG (p = NS). PN increased significantly with age (p<0.001) and logistic regression analysis confirmed age as the only independent predictor of PN (OR 1.10 for each year; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.15; p<0.001). Conclusions Electrophysiological examination detected subclinical neuropathy in 11 patients (4.7%). Statistical analysis showed that CG was not a risk factor for PN whereas PN prevalence increased significantly with age. PMID:16464900

  5. Improved inherited peripheral neuropathy genetic diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Alexander P; Zhu, Danqing; Kidambi, Aditi; Ly, Carolyn; Tey, Shelisa; Brewer, Megan H; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2015-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) are a group of related diseases primarily affecting the peripheral motor and sensory neurons. They include the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), hereditary motor neuropathies (HMN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) to achieve a genetic diagnosis is particularly suited to IPNs, where over 80 genes are involved with weak genotype–phenotype correlations beyond the most common genes. We performed WES for 110 index patients with IPN where the genetic cause was undetermined after previous screening for mutations in common genes selected by phenotype and mode of inheritance. We identified 41 missense sequence variants in the known IPN genes in our cohort of 110 index patients. Nine variants (8%), identified in the genes MFN2, GJB1, BSCL2, and SETX, are previously reported mutations and considered to be pathogenic in these families. Twelve novel variants (11%) in the genes NEFL, TRPV4, KIF1B, BICD2, and SETX are implicated in the disease but require further evidence of pathogenicity. The remaining 20 variants were confirmed as polymorphisms (not causing the disease) and are detailed here to help interpret sequence variants identified in other family studies. Validation using segregation, normal controls, and bioinformatics tools was valuable as supporting evidence for sequence variants implicated in disease. In addition, we identified one SETX sequence variant (c.7640T>C), previously reported as a putative mutation, which we have confirmed as a nonpathogenic rare polymorphism. This study highlights the advantage of using WES for genetic diagnosis in highly heterogeneous diseases such as IPNs and has been particularly powerful in this cohort where genetic diagnosis could not be achieved due to phenotype and mode of inheritance not being previously obvious. However, first tier testing for common genes in clinically well-defined cases remains important and will account for most positive

  6. Cerebrolysin improves sciatic nerve dysfunction in a mouse model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Han-yu; Jiang, Xin-mei; Niu, Chun-bo; Du, Lin; Feng, Jun-yan; Jia, Fei-yong

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of Cerebrolysin on the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, we first established a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus by administering a high-glucose, high-fat diet and a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Mice defined as diabetic in this model were then treated with 1.80, 5.39 or 8.98 mL/kg of Cerebrolysin via intraperitoneal injections for 10 consecutive days. Our results demonstrated that the number, diameter and area of myelinated nerve fibers increased in the sciatic nerves of these mice after administration of Cerebrolysin. The results of several behavioral tests showed that Cerebrolysin dose-dependently increased the slope angle in the inclined plane test (indicating an improved ability to maintain body position), prolonged tail-flick latency and foot-licking time (indicating enhanced sensitivity to thermal and chemical pain, respectively, and reduced pain thresholds), and increased an index of sciatic nerve function in diabetic mice compared with those behavioral results in untreated diabetic mice. Taken together, the anatomical and functional results suggest that Cerebrolysin ameliorated peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26981106

  7. Cerebrolysin improves sciatic nerve dysfunction in a mouse model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Han-Yu; Jiang, Xin-Mei; Niu, Chun-Bo; Du, Lin; Feng, Jun-Yan; Jia, Fei-Yong

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of Cerebrolysin on the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, we first established a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus by administering a high-glucose, high-fat diet and a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Mice defined as diabetic in this model were then treated with 1.80, 5.39 or 8.98 mL/kg of Cerebrolysin via intraperitoneal injections for 10 consecutive days. Our results demonstrated that the number, diameter and area of myelinated nerve fibers increased in the sciatic nerves of these mice after administration of Cerebrolysin. The results of several behavioral tests showed that Cerebrolysin dose-dependently increased the slope angle in the inclined plane test (indicating an improved ability to maintain body position), prolonged tail-flick latency and foot-licking time (indicating enhanced sensitivity to thermal and chemical pain, respectively, and reduced pain thresholds), and increased an index of sciatic nerve function in diabetic mice compared with those behavioral results in untreated diabetic mice. Taken together, the anatomical and functional results suggest that Cerebrolysin ameliorated peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Immune-mediated processes implicated in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Makker, Preet G S; Tonkin, Ryan S; Abdulla, Munawwar; Park, Susanna B; Goldstein, David; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and associated neuropathic pain are challenging complications of cancer treatment. Many of the major classes of chemotherapeutics can cause neurotoxicity and significantly modulate the immune system. There is ongoing investigation regarding whether reciprocal crosstalk between the nervous and immune systems occurs and, indeed, contributes to neuropathic pain during treatment with chemotherapeutics. An emerging concept is that neuroinflammation is one of the major mechanisms underlying CIPN. Here, we discuss recent findings, which provide insight into this complex process of neuroimmune interactions. Findings show limited infiltration of leukocytes into the nervous system of CIPN animals and varying degrees of peripheral and central glial activation depending on the chemotherapeutic drug, dose, schedule, and timing. Most evidence suggests an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and changes in immune signalling pathways. There is, however, limited evidence available from human studies and it remains unclear whether neuroinflammatory responses are the cause of neuropathy or a bystander effect of the chemotherapy treatment.

  9. A quantitative sensory analysis of peripheral neuropathy in colorectal cancer and its exacerbation by oxaliplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Barbosa, Mariana; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Eng, Cathy; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William R; Simone, Donald A; Wang, Xin S; Cleeland, Charles S; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially platins and taxanes, is a widespread problem among cancer survivors that is likely to continue to expand in the future. However, little work to date has focused on understanding this challenge. The goal in this study was to determine the impact of colorectal cancer and cumulative chemotherapeutic dose on sensory function to gain mechanistic insight into the subtypes of primary afferent fibers damaged by chemotherapy. Patients with colorectal cancer underwent quantitative sensory testing before and then prior to each cycle of oxaliplatin. These data were compared with those from 47 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Patients showed significant subclinical deficits in sensory function before any therapy compared with healthy volunteers, and they became more pronounced in patients who received chemotherapy. Sensory modalities that involved large Aβ myelinated fibers and unmyelinated C fibers were most affected by chemotherapy, whereas sensory modalities conveyed by thinly myelinated Aδ fibers were less sensitive to chemotherapy. Patients with baseline sensory deficits went on to develop more symptom complaints during chemotherapy than those who had no baseline deficit. Patients who were tested again 6 to 12 months after chemotherapy presented with the most numbness and pain and also the most pronounced sensory deficits. Our results illuminate a mechanistic connection between the pattern of effects on sensory function and the nerve fiber types that appear to be most vulnerable to chemotherapy-induced toxicity, with implications for how to focus future work to ameloirate risks of peripheral neuropathy.

  10. Postural Control and Gait Performance in the Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mustapa, Amirah; Justine, Maria; Mohd Mustafah, Nadia; Jamil, Nursuriati; Manaf, Haidzir

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this paper is to review the published studies on the characteristics of impairments in the postural control and gait performance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods. A review was performed by obtaining publication of all papers reporting on the postural control and gait performance in DPN from Google Scholar, Ovid, SAGE, Springerlink, Science Direct (SD), EBSCO Discovery Service, and Web of Science databases. The keywords used for searching were "postural control," "balance," "gait performance," "diabetes mellitus," and "diabetic peripheral neuropathy." Results. Total of 4,337 studies were hit in the search. 1,524 studies were screened on their titles and citations. Then, 79 studies were screened on their abstract. Only 38 studies were eligible to be selected: 17 studies on postural control and 21 studies on the gait performance. Most previous researches were found to have strong evidence of postural control impairments and noticeable gait deficits in DPN. Deterioration of somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems with the pathologic condition of diabetes on cognitive impairment causes further instability of postural and gait performance in DPN. Conclusions. Postural instability and gait imbalance in DPN may contribute to high risk of fall incidence, especially in the geriatric population. Thus, further works are crucial to highlight this fact in the hospital based and community adults.

  11. Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy: The Case for Nerve Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Eric L.; Rivadeneira, Andres F.; Jouvin, Renato Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Plastic surgery has a tradition of caring for patients with facial deformity and hand deformity related to leprosy. The approach, however, to the progressive deformity and disability related to chronic nerve compression is underappreciated in the world today. A cohort of patients with leprous neuropathy from an indigenous area of leprosy in Ecuador was evaluated for the presence of chronic peripheral nerve compression, and 12 patients were chosen for simultaneous upper and lower extremity, unilateral, nerve decompression at multiple levels along the course of each nerve. The results at 1 year of follow-up show that 6 patients improved into the excellent category and 4 patients improved into the good category for improved function. Based on the early results in this small cohort of patients with leprous neuropathy, an approach to peripheral nerve decompression, encompassing the concept of multiple crush at multiple levels of each nerve, seems to offer optimism to improve upper and lower extremity limb function. Long-term studies with quality-of-life outcomes would be welcome. PMID:27257567

  12. Glutathione alleviated peripheral neuropathy in oxaliplatin-treated mice by removing aluminum from dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minji; Cho, Sungrae; Roh, Kangsan; Chae, Jisook; Park, Jin-Hee; Park, Jaehyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Kim, Jinheung; Auh, Chung-Kyoon; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2017-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, induces peripheral neuropathy as a side effect and causes cold hyperalgesia in cancer patients receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy. In oxaliplatin-treated mice, aluminum was accumulated in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and accumulated aluminum in DRG or other organs aggravated oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. To investigate whether aluminum oxalate, which is the compound of aluminum and oxaliplatin, might be the peripheral neuropathy inducer, the withdrawal responses of mice to coldness, the expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays in DRG were analyzed in mice administered with aluminum oxalate. In addition, the concentrations of aluminum in aluminum oxalate-treated mice were significantly increased compared to those of mice treated with aluminum chloride. To alleviate neuropathic pain, glutathione (GSH), known as an antioxidant and a metal chelator, was injected into oxaliplatin-treated mice. The concentrations of aluminum in the DRG were decreased by the chelation action of GSH. Taken together, behavioral and molecular analyses also supported that aluminum accumulation on the DRG might be a factor for neuropathic pain. This result also suggested that the aluminum chelation by GSH can provide an alleviatory remedy of neuropathic pain for cancer patients with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:28386322

  13. Glutathione alleviated peripheral neuropathy in oxaliplatin-treated mice by removing aluminum from dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minji; Cho, Sungrae; Roh, Kangsan; Chae, Jisook; Park, Jin-Hee; Park, Jaehyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Kim, Jinheung; Auh, Chung-Kyoon; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2017-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, induces peripheral neuropathy as a side effect and causes cold hyperalgesia in cancer patients receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy. In oxaliplatin-treated mice, aluminum was accumulated in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and accumulated aluminum in DRG or other organs aggravated oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. To investigate whether aluminum oxalate, which is the compound of aluminum and oxaliplatin, might be the peripheral neuropathy inducer, the withdrawal responses of mice to coldness, the expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays in DRG were analyzed in mice administered with aluminum oxalate. In addition, the concentrations of aluminum in aluminum oxalate-treated mice were significantly increased compared to those of mice treated with aluminum chloride. To alleviate neuropathic pain, glutathione (GSH), known as an antioxidant and a metal chelator, was injected into oxaliplatin-treated mice. The concentrations of aluminum in the DRG were decreased by the chelation action of GSH. Taken together, behavioral and molecular analyses also supported that aluminum accumulation on the DRG might be a factor for neuropathic pain. This result also suggested that the aluminum chelation by GSH can provide an alleviatory remedy of neuropathic pain for cancer patients with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain.

  14. Use of natural compounds in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Galuppo, Maria; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2014-03-05

    Nephropathy, retinopathy cardiomyopathy and peripheral neuropathy are all recognized as important complications in about 50% of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, mostly related to a poor glycemic control or to an improper management of this pathology. In any case, amongst others, diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) seems the leading and most painful complication usually affecting many DM patients. For this reason, this work was conceived to review the large variety of strategies adopted for management of DPN, starting from the most conventional therapies to arrive at alternative approaches. From this perspective, both the most popular pharmacological treatments used to respond to the poorly effect of common analgesics--non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and opioids--understood as gabapentin vs. pregabalin clinical use, and the guidelines provided by Oriental Medicine as well as by a long list of natural compounds that many authors identify as possible therapeutic or alternative agents to replace or to combine with the existing therapies will be included. Moreover, in the effort to provide the widest panel of remedies, the most antique techniques of acupuncture and electrostimulation will be considered as alternative, which are useful approaches to take into account in any non-pharmacological strategy for DPN management.

  15. Postural Control and Gait Performance in the Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mustapa, Amirah; Mohd Mustafah, Nadia; Jamil, Nursuriati

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this paper is to review the published studies on the characteristics of impairments in the postural control and gait performance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods. A review was performed by obtaining publication of all papers reporting on the postural control and gait performance in DPN from Google Scholar, Ovid, SAGE, Springerlink, Science Direct (SD), EBSCO Discovery Service, and Web of Science databases. The keywords used for searching were “postural control,” “balance,” “gait performance,” “diabetes mellitus,” and “diabetic peripheral neuropathy.” Results. Total of 4,337 studies were hit in the search. 1,524 studies were screened on their titles and citations. Then, 79 studies were screened on their abstract. Only 38 studies were eligible to be selected: 17 studies on postural control and 21 studies on the gait performance. Most previous researches were found to have strong evidence of postural control impairments and noticeable gait deficits in DPN. Deterioration of somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems with the pathologic condition of diabetes on cognitive impairment causes further instability of postural and gait performance in DPN. Conclusions. Postural instability and gait imbalance in DPN may contribute to high risk of fall incidence, especially in the geriatric population. Thus, further works are crucial to highlight this fact in the hospital based and community adults. PMID:27525281

  16. Poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma accompanied by anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takahiro; Hori, Yumiko; Nagano, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Marubashi, Shigeru; Wada, Hiroshi; Wada, Naoki; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Sakamoto, Michiie; Morii, Eiichi

    2015-07-01

    The anti-Hu antibody is one of the most famous onco-neural antibodies related to paraneoplastic neurological syndrome, and is associated with small cell lung carcinoma in most cases. Here, we report a case of poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma accompanied by paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy positive for the anti-Hu antibody. Image inspection before operation revealed that no tumors were found in organs other than the liver, including lung, and that the liver tumor had no metastatic lesion. The liver tumor showed histological appearance of poorly differentiated carcinoma with cartilaginous metaplasia and partial blastoid cell appearance. Most tumor cells presented trabecular-like structure lined by sinusoidal vessels. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for low molecular weight cytokeratin and vimentin, partially positive for cytokeratin 19 and CD56, but negative for synaptophysin, chromogranin A and alpha-fetoprotein. Based on the trabecular-like morphology and the results of immunohistochemical staining, we concluded that the tumor was diagnosed as poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy accompanied with liver tumor is extremely rare as far as is known. The presented case indicates that poorly differentiated carcinoma has the potential to be the responsible lesion of anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and systemic work-up is important for the management of this neurological disorder.

  17. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... supervised exercise program, eating a balanced diet, correcting vitamin deficiencies, and limiting or avoiding alcohol consumption -- can reduce ... supervised exercise program, eating a balanced diet, correcting vitamin deficiencies, and limiting or avoiding alcohol consumption -- can reduce ...

  18. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibers are affected. Blood tests can detect diabetes, vitamin deficiencies, liver or kidney dysfunction, other metabolic disorders, and ... such as infection, toxin exposure, medication-related toxicity, vitamin deficiencies, hormonal deficiencies, autoimmune disorders, or compression that can ...

  19. Is the C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene or plasma homocysteine a risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese individuals?☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongli; Fan, Dongsheng; Hong, Tianpei

    2012-01-01

    The present study enrolled 251 diabetic patients, including 101 with neuropathy and 150 without neuropathy. Of the 150 patients, 100 had no complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to identify methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variants. Plasma homocysteine levels were also measured. Homocysteine levels and the frequency of hyperhomocysteinemia were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with diabetic patients without neuropathy (P < 0.05). In logistic regression analysis with neuropathy as the dependent variable, the frequency of C677T in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with patients without diabetic complications. Homocysteine levels were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy carrying the 677T allele and low folic acid levels. In conclusion, hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for diabetic neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes. The C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and low folic acid levels may be risk factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes. PMID:25538764

  20. Is the C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene or plasma homocysteine a risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese individuals?

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Fan, Dongsheng; Hong, Tianpei

    2012-10-25

    The present study enrolled 251 diabetic patients, including 101 with neuropathy and 150 without neuropathy. Of the 150 patients, 100 had no complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to identify methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variants. Plasma homocysteine levels were also measured. Homocysteine levels and the frequency of hyperhomocysteinemia were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with diabetic patients without neuropathy (P < 0.05). In logistic regression analysis with neuropathy as the dependent variable, the frequency of C677T in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with patients without diabetic complications. Homocysteine levels were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy carrying the 677T allele and low folic acid levels. In conclusion, hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for diabetic neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes. The C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and low folic acid levels may be risk factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes.

  1. A review of the epidemiology of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and less commonly studied neuropathic pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadosky, Alesia; McDermott, Anne M; Brandenburg, Nancy A; Strauss, Marcie

    2008-01-01

    Although the burden of neuropathic pain is well-recognized, the descriptive epidemiology of specific neuropathic pain conditions has not been well-described. While painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia have been widely evaluated, many other peripheral and central neuropathic pain syndromes have been less frequently studied. This review summarizes incidence and/or prevalence information about two relatively frequent neuropathic pain conditions-painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia-and similarly summarizes the more limited epidemiologic information available for other peripheral and central neuropathic pain conditions. The data suggest that while our knowledge is still incomplete, the high frequency of several of these conditions in specific populations should be considered an important impetus for further studies designed to evaluate their contribution to the overall burden of neuropathic pain.

  2. Development profile in a patient with monosomy 10q and Dup(17p) associated with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrino, J.E.; Spinner, N.B.; Zackai, E.H.

    1996-02-02

    We report on a patient with dup(17p) and monosomy (10q) resulting from a familial translocation. Manifestations typical of both syndromes were present. The overall development of this patient was better by comparison with similar reported cases of either anomaly. Our evaluation detected severe gross motor delay and signs of a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. This patient is trisomic for the region of 17p which includes the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP-22) gene, known to be duplicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1A (CMT1A). Our analysis in this patient suggests that trisomy for the PMP-22 gene led to the demyelinating neuropathy and contributed to his severe motor development delay. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. [Pathophysiology of sensory ataxic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Sobue, G

    1996-12-01

    The main lesions of sensory ataxic neuropathy such as chronic idiopathic sensory ataxic neuropathy, (ISAN), carcinomatous neuropathy, Sjögren syndrome-associated neuropathy and acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy (AASN) are the large-diameter sensory neurons and dosal column of the spinal cord and the large myelinated fibers in the peripheral nerve trunks. In addition, afferent fibers to the Clarke's nuclei are also severely involved, suggesting Ia fibers being involved in these neuropathies. In NT-3 knockout mouse, an animal model of sensory ataxia, large-sized la neurons as well as muscle spindle and Golgi tendon organs are depleted, and are causative for sensory ataxia. Thus, the proprioceptive Ia neurons would play a role in pathogenesis of sensory ataxia in human sensory ataxic neuropathies, but the significance of dorsal column involvement in human sensory ataxia is still needed to evaluate.

  4. Pain Relief and Health-Related Quality-of-Life Improvement After Microsurgical Decompression of Entrapped Peripheral Nerves in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqiang; Guo, Zhuangli; Yu, Yanbing; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Li

    Surgery had been shown to be effective for superimposed peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), with pain relief and sensation restored. Few studies, however, have reported the quality-of-life outcomes of surgery for the treatment of painful DPN (PDPN). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of microsurgical decompression of multiple entrapped peripheral nerves on pain and health-related quality of life in patients with refractory PDPN of the lower limbs. Eleven patients with intractable PDPN of the lower limbs were recruited for the present study. All the patients underwent microsurgical decompression of the common peroneal nerve, deep peroneal nerve, and posterior tibial nerve. The pain intensity was assessed using the visual analog scale and health-related quality of life was measured using the short-form 36-item quality-of-life survey. Six (54.6%) patients experienced >50% pain relief (both daytime pain and nocturnal pain) at 2 weeks after the decompression procedure and 8 (72.7%) patients at 24 months postoperatively. Two (18.2%) patients experienced a >50% decrease in peak pain at the 2 weeks after the procedure and 8 (72.7%) patients at 24 months. Additionally, the scores from the short-form 36-item quality-of-life survey were significantly improved in the following 2 domains: bodily pain and general health at 2 weeks after the decompression procedure. Also, at 24 months postoperatively, 6 domains had significantly improved, including physical function, bodily pain, general health, social function, role emotional, and mental health. No significant side effects were recorded during the study. Microsurgical decompression of peripheral nerves is an effective and safe therapy for intractable PDPN with superimposed nerve compression.

  5. Infantile peripheral neuropathy, deafness, and proximal tubulopathy associated with a novel mutation of the RRM2B gene

    PubMed Central

    Stojanović, Vesna; Mayr, Johannes A.; Sperl, Wolfgang; Barišić, Nenad; Doronjski, Aleksandra; Milak, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes are a group of autosomal recessive hereditary disorders characterized by reduction of the amount of mitochondrial DNA in the affected tissue (muscle, liver, brain, or kidneys). We report a case of an infant with myopathy, deafness, peripheral neuropathy, nephrocalcinosis, proximal renal tubulopathy, moderate lactic acidosis, and a novel mutation of the RRM2B gene. PMID:24382854

  6. Cryotherapy in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy and Nail Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Who Are Receiving Paclitaxel

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Pain; Peripheral Neuropathy; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  7. Individual, social and environmental predictors of regular exercise among adults with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy in China.

    PubMed

    Pei, Li; Wang, Yan; Sun, Chunyan Y; Zhang, Qing

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the individual, social and environmental factors influencing regular exercise on the basis of the theoretical framework of social ecological model among adults with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. A total of 122 participants were chosen from Tianjin Metabolic Disease Hospital from November 2013 to May 2014. Information on exercise status and influencing factors was collected. Most participants took walking as the mode of exercise and exercised alone. Only 59.8% of participants were reported to carry out regular exercise. Logistic regression analysis suggested that being male, longer duration with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, higher self-efficacy for exercise and higher objective support were associated with regular exercise. Exercise status was clearly not ideal among adults with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. The study highlighted the need to take measures to improve self-efficacy for exercise and social support in order to promote exercise participation among adults with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy.

  8. Infantile peripheral neuropathy, deafness, and proximal tubulopathy associated with a novel mutation of the RRM2B gene: case study.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Vesna; Mayr, Johannes A; Sperl, Wolfgang; Barišić, Nenad; Doronjski, Aleksandra; Milak, Gordana

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes are a group of autosomal recessive hereditary disorders characterized by reduction of the amount of mitochondrial DNA in the affected tissue (muscle, liver, brain, or kidneys). We report a case of an infant with myopathy, deafness, peripheral neuropathy, nephrocalcinosis, proximal renal tubulopathy, moderate lactic acidosis, and a novel mutation of the RRM2B gene.

  9. Optic atrophy, cataracts, lipodystrophy/lipoatrophy, and peripheral neuropathy caused by a de novo OPA3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Stephanie C.; Townsend, Katelin N.; Shyr, Casper; Matthews, Allison; Lear, Scott A.; Attariwala, Raj; Lehman, Anna; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; van Karnebeek, Clara; Sinclair, Graham; Vallance, Hilary; Gibson, William T.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a woman who presented with cataracts, optic atrophy, lipodystrophy/lipoatrophy, and peripheral neuropathy. Exome sequencing identified a c.235C > G p.(Leu79Val) variant in the optic atrophy 3 (OPA3) gene that was confirmed to be de novo. This report expands the severity of the phenotypic spectrum of autosomal dominant OPA3 mutations. PMID:28050599

  10. A rodent model of HIV protease inhibitor indinavir induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenlong; Calvo, Margarita; Pheby, Tim; Bennett, David L H; Rice, Andrew S C

    2017-01-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is the most frequent manifestation of HIV disease. It often presents with significant neuropathic pain and is associated with previous exposure to neurotoxic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. However, HIV-SN prevalence remains high even in resource-rich settings where these drugs are no longer used. Previous evidence suggests that exposure to indinavir, a protease inhibitor commonly used in antiretroviral therapy, may link to elevated HIV-SN risk. Here, we investigated whether indinavir treatment was associated with the development of a "dying back" axonal neuropathy and changes in pain-relevant limb withdrawal and thigmotactic behaviours. After 2 intravenous injections of indinavir (50 mg/kg, 4 days apart), adult rats developed hind paw mechanical hypersensitivity, which peaked around 2 weeks post first injection (44% reduction from baseline). At this time, animals also had (1) significantly changed thigmotactic behaviour (62% reduction in central zone entries) comparing with the controls and (2) a significant reduction (45%) in hind paw intraepidermal nerve fibre density. Treatment with gabapentin, but not amitriptyline, was associated with a complete attenuation of hind paw mechanical hypersensitivity observed with indinavir treatment. Furthermore, we found a small but significant increase in microglia with the effector morphology in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn in indinavir-treated animals, coupled with significantly increased expression of phospho-p38 in microglia. In summary, we have reported neuropathic pain-related sensory and behavioural changes accompanied by a significant loss of hind paw skin sensory innervation in a rat model of indinavir-induced peripheral neuropathy that is suitable for further pathophysiological investigation and preclinical evaluation of novel analgesics.

  11. The role of aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Smith, Darrell R; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a neurological complication of diabetes that causes significant morbidity and, because of the obesity-driven rise in incidence of type 2 diabetes, is becoming a major international health problem. Mitochondrial phenotype is abnormal in sensory neurons in diabetes and may contribute to the etiology of diabetic neuropathy where a distal dying-back neurodegenerative process is a key component contributing to fiber loss. This review summarizes the major features of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons and Schwann cells in human diabetic patients and in experimental animal models (primarily exhibiting type 1 diabetes). This article attempts to relate these findings to the development of critical neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Recent work reveals that hyperglycemia in diabetes triggers nutrient excess in neurons that, in turn, mediates a phenotypic change in mitochondrial biology through alteration of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) signaling axis. This vital energy sensing metabolic pathway modulates mitochondrial function, biogenesis and regeneration. The bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria in diabetic neurons is aberrant due to deleterious alterations in expression and activity of respiratory chain components as a direct consequence of abnormal AMPK/PGC-1α signaling. Utilization of innovative respirometry equipment to analyze mitochondrial function of cultured adult sensory neurons from diabetic rodents shows that the outcome for cellular bioenergetics is a reduced adaptability to fluctuations in ATP demand. The diabetes-induced maladaptive process is hypothesized to result in exhaustion of the ATP supply in the distal nerve compartment and induction of nerve fiber dissolution. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of diabetic neuropathy is compared with other types of neuropathy with a distal dying-back pathology such as Friedreich

  12. Facial nerve palsy, headache, peripheral neuropathy and Kaposi’s sarcoma in an elderly man

    PubMed Central

    Daoussis, Dimitrios; Chroni, Elisabeth; Tsamandas, Athanassios C; Andonopoulos, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of an elderly man, who initially presented with right facial nerve palsy, ipsilateral headache, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and no fever. A presumptive diagnosis of giant cell arteritis was made and the patient was treated with high-dose steroids. A temporal artery biopsy was negative. Several months later, while on 16 mg of methylprednisolone daily, he presented with severe sensorimotor peripheral symmetric neuropathy, muscle wasting and inability to walk, uncontrolled blood sugar and psychosis. A work-up for malignancy was initiated with the suspicion of a paraneoplastic process. At the same time a biopsy of the macular skin lesions that had appeared on the skin of the left elbow and right knee almost simultaneously was inconclusive, whereas a repeat biopsy from the same area of the lesions that had become nodular, a month later, was indicative of Kaposi’s sarcoma. Finally, a third biopsy of a similar lesion, after spreading of the skin process, confirmed the diagnosis of Kaposi’s sarcoma. He was treated with interferon α and later was seen in very satisfactory condition, with no clinical evidence of neuropathy, normal muscle strength, no headache, normal electrophysiologic nerve studies, involution of Kaposi’s lesions and a normal ESR. PMID:24945015

  13. National Cancer Institute-supported chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy trials: outcomes and lessons

    PubMed Central

    Majithia, Neil; Temkin, Sarah M.; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Beutler, Andreas S.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most common and debilitating complications of cancer treatment. Due to a lack of effective management options for patients with CIPN, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a series of trials aimed at both prevention and treatment. A total of 15 such studies were approved, evaluating use of various neuro-modulatory agents which have shown benefit in other neuropathic pain states. Aside from duloxetine, none of the pharmacologic methods demonstrated therapeutic benefit for patients with CIPN. Despite these disappointing results, the series of trials revealed important lessons that have informed subsequent work. Some examples of this include the use of patient-reported symptom metrics, the elimination of traditional—yet unsubstantiated—practice approaches, and the discovery of molecular genetic predictors of neuropathy. Current inquiry is being guided by the results from these large-scale trials, and as such, stands better chance of identifying durable solutions for this treatment-limiting toxicity. PMID:26686859

  14. Homozygous mutation in PTRH2 gene causes progressive sensorineural deafness and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sharkia, Rajech; Shalev, Stavit A; Zalan, Abdelnaser; Marom-David, Milit; Watemberg, Nathan; Urquhart, Jill E; Daly, Sarah B; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Williams, Simon G; Newman, William G; Spiegel, Ronen; Azem, Abdussalam; Elpeleg, Orly; Mahajnah, Muhammad

    2017-04-01

    PTRH2 is an evolutionarily highly conserved mitochondrial protein that belongs to a family of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases. Recently, patients from two consanguineous families with mutations in the PTRH2 gene were reported. Global developmental delay associated with microcephaly, growth retardation, progressive ataxia, distal muscle weakness with ankle contractures, demyelinating sensorimotor neuropathy, and sensorineural hearing loss were present in all patients, while facial dysmorphism with widely spaced eyes, exotropia, thin upper lip, proximally placed thumbs, and deformities of the fingers and toes were present in some individuals. Here, we report a new family with three siblings affected by sensorineural hearing loss and peripheral neuropathy. Autozygosity mapping followed by exome sequencing identified a previously reported homozygous missense mutation in PTRH2 (c.254A>C; p.(Gln85Pro)). Sanger sequencing confirmed that the variant segregated with the phenotype. In contrast to the previously reported patient, the affected siblings had normal intelligence, milder microcephaly, delayed puberty, myopia, and moderate insensitivity to pain. Our findings expand the clinical phenotype and further demonstrate the clinical heterogeneity related to PTRH2 variants.

  15. Patterns and severity of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lavoie Smith, Ellen M; Li, Lang; Chiang, ChienWei; Thomas, Karin; Hutchinson, Raymond J; Wells, Elizabeth M; Ho, Richard H; Skiles, Jodi; Chakraborty, Arindom; Bridges, Celia M; Renbarger, Jamie

    2015-03-01

    Vincristine, a critical component of combination chemotherapy treatment for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), can lead to vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy (VIPN). Longitudinal VIPN assessments were obtained over 12 months from newly diagnosed children with ALL (N = 128) aged 1-18 years who received vincristine at one of four academic children's hospitals. VIPN assessments were obtained using the Total Neuropathy Score-Pediatric Vincristine (TNS©-PV), National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE©), Balis© grading scale, and Pediatric Neuropathic Pain Scale©-Five (PNPS©-5). Of children who provided a full TNS©-PV score, 85/109 (78%) developed VIPN (TNS©-PV ≥4). Mean TNS©-PV, grading scale, and pain scores were low. CTCAE©-derived grades 3 and 4 sensory and motor VIPN occurred in 1.6%/0%, and 1.9%/0% of subjects, respectively. VIPN did not resolve in months 8-12 despite decreasing dose density. VIPN was worse in older children. Partition cluster analysis revealed 2-3 patient clusters; one cluster (n = 14) experienced severe VIPN. In this population, VIPN occurs more commonly than previous research suggests, persists throughout the first year of treatment, and can be severe.

  16. Acupuncture treatment for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy--a case series.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raimond; Sagar, Stephen

    2006-06-01

    Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) occurs in 10 to 20% of cancer patients treated with neurotoxic chemotherapy. A mixture of sensory, sensorimotor and autonomic nervous system dysfunction can occur, resulting in deterioration in function and worsened quality of life. A major feature is discomfort and pain. Early termination of treatment and dose reduction of chemotherapy may be necessary. The clinical course is variable and depends on the chemotherapy agents and their cumulative dose. Although symptoms can resolve completely, in most patients CIPN is either only partially reversible or completely irreversible. Current management for CIPN is symptomatic using membrane stabilising medications and antidepressants. The use of nerve growth factors is still experimental. Dysaesthesia and pain involving the feet and hands are described in both traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western biomedicine. In TCM, the pathogenesis is related to the inability to direct Qi and Blood to the extremities, and is associated with Qi, Blood, Yang and Kidney deficiencies. Acupuncture is moderately effective in treating diabetic neuropathy. However, to date, there is no report of the usefulness of acupuncture for CIPN. We report the result of a pilot prospective case series of five patients treated with an acupuncture protocol that aims to correct Qi, Blood and Yang deficiencies and directs Qi and Blood to the extremities, with the goal of improving the symptoms of CIPN. The responses were encouraging, and cannot be easily explained by the known neurophysiological mechanisms of acupuncture.

  17. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations for Animal Models of Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Brabb, Thea; Carbone, Larry; Snyder, Jessica; Phillips, Nona

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy and neuropathic pain are debilitating, life-altering conditions that affect a significant proportion of the human population. Animal models, used to study basic disease mechanisms and treatment modalities, are diverse and provide many challenges for institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) review and postapproval monitoring. Items to consider include regulatory and ethical imperatives in animal models that may be designed to study pain, the basic mechanism of neurodegeneration, and different disease processes for which neuropathic pain is a side effect. Neuropathic pain can be difficult to detect or quantify in many models, and pain management is often unsuccessful in both humans and animals, inspiring the need for more research. Design of humane endpoints requires clear communication of potential adverse outcomes and solutions. Communication with the IACUC, researchers, and veterinary staff is also key for successful postapproval monitoring of these challenging models. PMID:24615447

  18. Whole body vibration therapy for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Nathan J; Hong, Junggi

    2013-10-01

    The unsatisfactory results associated with conventional treatments for symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) demonstrate a need for research into alternative therapies. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of whole body vibration therapy (WBV) as a treatment for pain associated with DPN. Participants (n = 8) with painful DPN received three treatment sessions per week for four weeks. Each session consisted of four bouts of 3 min of vibration (frequency 25 Hz, amplitude 5 mm). The primary outcome measures were changes in the visual analog pain scale (VAS) and changes in the neuropathic pain scale (NPS). WBV demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) acute pain reduction in the VAS, and a significant chronic reduction in both the VAS and NPS scales. No side-effects were observed during this study. WBV appears to be an effective, non-invasive treatment for pain associated with DPN.

  19. Cerebral Perfusion and Gray Matter Changes Associated With Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nudelman, Kelly N.H.; McDonald, Brenna C.; Wang, Yang; Smith, Dori J.; West, John D.; O'Neill, Darren P.; Zanville, Noah R.; Champion, Victoria L.; Schneider, Bryan P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the longitudinal relationship between chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) symptoms (sx) and brain perfusion changes in patients with breast cancer. Interaction of CIPN-sx perfusion effects with known chemotherapy-associated gray matter density decrease was also assessed to elucidate the relationship between CIPN and previously reported cancer treatment–related brain structural changes. Methods Patients with breast cancer treated with (n = 24) or without (n = 23) chemotherapy underwent clinical examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging at the following three time points: before treatment (baseline), 1 month after treatment completion, and 1 year after the 1-month assessment. CIPN-sx were evaluated with the self-reported Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecologic Oncology Group–Neurotoxicity four-item sensory-specific scale. Perfusion and gray matter density were assessed using voxel-based pulsed arterial spin labeling and morphometric analyses and tested for association with CIPN-sx in the patients who received chemotherapy. Results Patients who received chemotherapy reported significantly increased CIPN-sx from baseline to 1 month, with partial recovery by 1 year (P < .001). CIPN-sx increase from baseline to 1 month was significantly greater for patients who received chemotherapy compared with those who did not (P = .001). At 1 month, neuroimaging showed that for the group that received chemotherapy, CIPN-sx were positively associated with cerebral perfusion in the right superior frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus, regions associated with pain processing (P < .001). Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analysis in the group receiving chemotherapy indicated that CIPN-sx and associated perfusion changes from baseline to 1 month were also positively correlated with gray matter density change (P < .005). Conclusion Peripheral neuropathy symptoms after systemic chemotherapy for breast cancer are associated with

  20. Pro198Leu Polymorphism in the Glutathione Peroxidase 1 Gene Contributes to Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Buraczynska, Monika; Buraczynska, Kinga; Dragan, Michal; Ksiazek, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) is an endogenous antioxidant enzyme. The T allele of the Pro198Leu polymorphism in the Gpx1 (rs1050450, 198C > T) gene is associated with reduced enzyme activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Pro198Leu polymorphism and risk of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). We examined 1244 T2DM patients and 730 healthy controls. In the patient group, 33 % had diabetic peripheral neuropathy. All subjects were genotyped for the Gpx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction and restriction analysis. A significant increase in the T allele and TT genotype frequencies was observed in DPN patients compared to those without DPN (OR 1.55, 95 % CI 1.30-1.85 and 1.89, 95 % CI 1.30-2.74, respectively). The association remained significant after correction for age, disease duration, HbA1c and BMI. When distribution of T allele was compared between DPN+ and DPN- subgroups and controls, OR was 1.54 for DPN+ and 1.00 for DPN- patients. In conclusion, our findings suggest that Gpx1 Pro198Leu genotypes are significantly associated with the risk of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in patients with T2DM. The study provides new clinically relevant information regarding genetic determinants of susceptibility to diabetic neuropathy.

  1. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy by the small-molecule inhibitor pifithrin-μ.

    PubMed

    Krukowski, Karen; Nijboer, Cora H; Huo, XiaoJiao; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer treatment. It is the most frequent cause of dose reduction or treatment discontinuation in patients treated for cancer with commonly used drugs including taxanes and platinum-based compounds. No FDA-approved treatments for CIPN are available. In rodents, CIPN is represented by peripheral mechanical allodynia in association with retraction of intraepidermal nerve fibers. The mechanism of chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity is unclear, but it has been established that mitochondrial dysfunction is an important component of the dysregulation in peripheral sensory neurons. We have shown earlier that inhibition of mitochondrial p53 accumulation with the small compound pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ) prevents cerebral neuronal death in a rodent model of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. We now explore whether PFT-μ is capable of preventing neuronal mitochondrial damage and CIPN in mice. We demonstrate for the first time that PFT-μ prevents both paclitaxel- and cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Electron microscopic analysis of peripheral sensory nerves revealed that PFT-μ secured mitochondrial integrity in paclitaxel-treated mice. In addition, PFT-μ administration protects against chemotherapy-induced loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in the paw. To determine whether neuroprotective treatment with PFT-μ would interfere with the antitumor effects of chemotherapy, ovarian tumor cells were cultured in vitro with PFT-μ and paclitaxel. Pifithrin-μ does not inhibit tumor cell death but even enhances paclitaxel-induced tumor cell death. These data are the first to identify PFT-μ as a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention of CIPN to combat one of the most devastating side effects of chemotherapy.

  2. Locomotor adaptation and aftereffects in patients with reduced somatosensory input due to peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bunday, Karen L; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2009-12-01

    We studied 12 peripheral neuropathy patients (PNP) and 13 age-matched controls with the "broken escalator" paradigm to see how somatosensory loss affects gait adaptation and the release and recovery ("braking") of the forward trunk overshoot observed during this locomotor aftereffect. Trunk displacement, foot contact signals, and leg electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded while subjects walked onto a stationary sled (BEFORE trials), onto the moving sled (MOVING or adaptation trials), and again onto the stationary sled (AFTER trials). PNP were unsteady during the MOVING trials, but this progressively improved, indicating some adaptation. During the after trials, 77% of control subjects displayed a trunk overshoot aftereffect but over half of the PNP (58%) did not. The PNP without a trunk aftereffect adapted to the MOVING trials by increasing distance traveled; subsequently this was expressed as increased distance traveled during the aftereffect rather than as a trunk overshoot. This clear separation in consequent aftereffects was not seen in the normal controls suggesting that, as a result of somatosensory loss, some PNP use distinctive strategies to negotiate the moving sled, in turn resulting in a distinct aftereffects. In addition, PNP displayed earlier than normal anticipatory leg EMG activity during the first after trial. Although proprioceptive inputs are not critical for the emergence or termination of the aftereffect, somatosensory loss induces profound changes in motor adaptation and anticipation. Our study has found individual differences in adaptive motor performance, indicative that PNP adopt different feed-forward gait compensatory strategies in response to peripheral sensory loss.

  3. Prevalence of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy among patients with diabetes mellitus in the Middle East region.

    PubMed

    Jambart, S; Ammache, Z; Haddad, F; Younes, A; Hassoun, A; Abdalla, K; Selwan, C Abou; Sunna, N; Wajsbrot, D; Youseif, E

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) was evaluated in type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (n = 4097) attending outpatient clinics across the Middle East. Overall, 53.7% of 3989 patients with DN4 data met the criteria for painful DPN (Douleur Neuropathique-4 [DN4] scores ≥ 4). Significant predictors of painful DPN included long history (≥ 10 years) of diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 2.43), age ≥ 65 years (OR 2.13), age 50 - 64 years (OR 1.75), presence of type 1 versus type 2 diabetes (OR 1.59), body mass index > 30 kg/m(2) (OR 1.35) and female gender (OR 1.27). Living in one of the Gulf States was associated with the lowest odds of having painful DPN (OR 0.44). The odds of painful DPN were highest among patients with peripheral vascular disease (OR 4.98), diabetic retinopathy (OR 3.90) and diabetic nephropathy (OR 3.23). Because of the high prevalence and associated suffering, disability and economic burden of painful DPN, it is important that diabetic patients are periodically screened, using a simple instrument such as the DN4, and receive appropriate treatment if symptoms develop.

  4. Antibody responses to peptides of peripheral nerve myelin proteins P0 and P2 in patients with inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, H R; Csurhes, P A; McCombe, P A

    2007-01-01

    Background Antibodies with reactivity to peripheral nerve myelin have previously been found in the serum, and bound to peripheral nerves of patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Aim To investigate the presence of antibodies reactive to specific peptide sequences within the myelin proteins P0 and P2 in patients with GBS, in patients with CIDP, in healthy controls and in patients with other neuropathies (ON). Methods Blood was obtained from 48 patients with GBS, 36 with CIDP, 48 with ON and 38 controls. ELISA was used to detect antibody responses to peptides of the human peripheral myelin proteins P0 and P2. Blood samples were collected from patients with GBS in early, peak and recovery stages of GBS to analyse antibody levels throughout the course of the disease. Results Significantly increased total IgG levels were found in patients with GBS compared with other groups. A higher percentage of patients with GBS at the peak of disease had antibody reactivity to P214–25 compared with patients with CIDP and control groups. In patients with GBS and CIDP, the percentages of patients with antibody reactivity to P261–70, and peptides derived from P0, were comparable to the control groups. Although some individual patients with GBS had high titres of reactivity to the peptide antigens tested, most patients with GBS and CIDP had levels of antibody similar to controls. Conclusion Our data suggest that increased IgG levels and increased antibody reactivity to P2 14–25 in patients with GBS at the peak of disease may play a contributory role in the disease process in some patients with demyelinating forms of GBS. PMID:17158557

  5. Pathophysiology and treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy: the case for diabetic neurovascular function as an essential component.

    PubMed

    Kles, Keri A; Vinik, Aaron I

    2006-05-01

    Worldwide, diabetes and its complications are major causes of morbidity, decreased quality of life, mortality and increasing health care costs. Patients with diabetes attempt to control blood pressure, lipids and blood glucose levels to decrease their risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications, such as diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Even with control of these risk factors for vascular disease, many patients still develop complications. Targeted therapies to the underlying mechanisms of diabetic neuropathy are essential to slow the progression of the disease. This review describes the signs, symptoms and diagnosis of DPN. Additionally, new therapies and the complex etiology that contributes to the development of diabetic neuropathy are described (oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, advanced glycated end products, autoimmunity, neurotrophic factors and protein kinase C beta).

  6. Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis attenuates nociceptor sensitization in a murine model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Uhelski, Megan L.; Khasabova, Iryna A.

    2014-01-01

    Painful neuropathy frequently develops as a consequence of commonly used chemotherapy agents for cancer treatment and is often a dose-limiting side effect. Currently available analgesic treatments are often ineffective on pain induced by neurotoxicity. Although peripheral administration of cannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and inhibitors of endocannabinoid hydrolysis has been effective in reducing hyperalgesia in models of peripheral neuropathy, including chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), few studies have examined cannabinoid effects on responses of nociceptors in vivo. In this study we determined whether inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which slows the breakdown of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA), reduced sensitization of nociceptors produced by chemotherapy. Over the course of a week of daily treatments, mice treated with the platinum-based chemotherapy agent cisplatin developed robust mechanical allodynia that coincided with sensitization of cutaneous C-fiber nociceptors as indicated by the development of spontaneous activity and increased responses to mechanical stimulation. Administration of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 into the receptive field of sensitized C-fiber nociceptors decreased spontaneous activity, increased mechanical response thresholds, and decreased evoked responses to mechanical stimuli. Cotreatment with CB1 (AM281) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists showed that the effect of URB597 was mediated primarily by CB1 receptors. These changes following URB597 were associated with an increase in the endocannabinoid anandamide in the skin. Our results suggest that enhanced signaling in the peripheral endocannabinoid system could be utilized to reduce nociceptor sensitization and pain associated with CIPN. PMID:25505113

  7. Evaluation of PMI-5011, an ethanolic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L., on peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    WATCHO, PIERRE; STAVNIICHUK, ROMAN; TANE, PIERRE; SHEVALYE, HANNA; MAKSIMCHYK, YURY; PACHER, PAL; OBROSOVA, IRINA G.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that PMI-5011, an ethanolic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L., alleviates peripheral neuropathy in high fat diet-fed mice, a model of prediabetes and obesity developing oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory changes in the peripheral nervous system. This study evaluated PMI-5011 on established functional, structural, and biochemical changes associated with Type I diabetic peripheral neuropathy. C57BL6/J mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes of a 12-week duration, developed motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity deficits, thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and intra-epidermal nerve fiber loss. PMI-5011 (500 mg/kg/day for 7 weeks) alleviated diabetes-induced nerve conduction slowing, small sensory nerve fiber dysfunction, and increased intra-epidermal nerve fiber density. PMI-5011 blunted sciatic nerve and spinal cord 12/15-lipoxygenase activation and oxidative-nitrosative stress, without ameliorating hyperglycemia or reducing sciatic nerve sorbitol pathway intermediate accumulation. In conclusion, PMI-5011, a safe and non-toxic botanical extract, may find use in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:21225225

  8. Chlorpropamide-alcohol flushing in relation to macroangiopathy and peripheral neuropathy in non-insulin dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jerntorp, P; Almér, L O

    1981-01-01

    Seventy patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes (NIDD) were studied for the chlorpropamide-alcohol flush (CPAF), first degree family history of diabetes, macroangiopathy and for peripheral neuropathy. Positive CPAF challenge tests were found in 65% of the tested subjects and in 77% if there was a family history of diabetes. Signs of macroangiopathy (loss of foot pulses) were significantly (p less than 0.05) less common in the CPAF positive than in the CPAF negative diabetics with a duration of diabetes of ten years or less. With a longer duration this difference between the two groups was reduced. Also signs of peripheral neuropathy (abnormal vibration sense) were less common (p less than 0.05) in the CPAF positive diabetics than in the CPAF negative. Previously a low prevalence of retinopathy in teh CPAF positive non-insulin dependent diabetics has been reported. We have shown that this is also true of peripheral macroangiopathy and peripheral neuropathy. Chlorpropamide-alcohol flushing seems to be related to a relative protection against late complications in diabetes and the test might be used to find patients at risk.

  9. Advances in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Selvarajah, Dinesh

    2012-02-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) affects up to 50% of patients with diabetes and is a major cause of morbidity and increased mortality. Its clinical manifestations include painful neuropathic symptoms and insensitivity, which increases the risk for burns, injuries and foot ulceration. Several recent studies have implicated poor glycaemic control, duration of diabetes, hyperlipidaemia (particularly hypertryglyceridaemia), elevated albumin excretion rates and obesity as risk factors for the development of DPN. Although there is now strong evidence for the importance of nerve microvascular disease in the pathogenesis of DPN, the risk factors for painful DPN are not known. However, emerging evidence regarding the central correlates of painful DPN is now afforded by brain imaging. The diagnosis of DPN begins with a careful history of sensory and motor symptoms. The quality and severity of neuropathic pain if present should be assessed using a suitable scale. Clinical examination should include inspection of the feet and evaluation of reflexes and sensory responses to vibration, light touch, pinprick and the 10-g monofilament. Glycaemic control and addressing cardiovascular risk is now considered important in the overall management of the neuropathic patient. Pharmacological treatment of painful DPN includes tricyclic compounds, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (e.g. duloxetine), anticonvulsants (e.g. pregabalin), opiates, membrane stabilizers, the antioxidant alpha lipoic acid and others. Over the past 7 years, new agents with perhaps less side effect profiles have immerged. Management of patients with painful neuropathy must be tailored to individual requirements and will depend on the presence of other co-morbidities. There is limited literature with regard to combination treatment.

  10. Acquired midfoot deformity and function in individuals with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J.; Woodburn, James; Strube, Michael J; Commean, Paul; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; Cheuy, Victor; Sinacore, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus related medial column foot deformity is a major contributor to ulceration and amputation. However, little is known about the relationship between medial column alignment and function and the integrity of the soft tissues that support and move the medial column. The purposes of this study were to determine the predictors of medial column alignment and function in people with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. Methods 23 participants with diabetes and neuropathy had radiographs, heel rise kinematics, magnetic resonance imaging and isokinetic muscle testing to measure: 1) medial column alignment (Meary’s angle- the angle between the 1st metatarsal longitudinal axis and the talar head and neck), 2) medial column function (forefoot relative to hindfoot plantarflexion during heel rise), 3) intrinsic foot muscle and fat volume, ratio of posterior tibialis to flexor digitorum tendon volume, 4) plantar fascia function (Meary’s angle change from toes flat to extended) and 5) plantarflexor peak torque. Predictors of medial column alignment and function were determined using simultaneous entry multiple regression. Findings Posterior tibialis to flexor digitorum tendon volume ratio and intrinsic foot muscle volume were significant predictors of medial column alignment (p<.05), accounting for 44% of the variance. Intrinsic foot fat volume and plantarflexor peak torque were significant predictors of medial column function (p<.05), accounting for 37% of the variance. Interpretation Deterioration of medial column supporting structures predicted alignment and function. Prospective research is required to monitor alignment, structure, and function over time to inform early intervention strategies to prevent deformity, ulceration, and amputation. PMID:26588885

  11. Modulating molecular chaperones improves sensory fiber recovery and mitochondrial function in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael J; Pan, Pan; Farmer, Kevin L; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2012-05-01

    Quantification of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (iENFs) is an important approach to stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and is a promising clinical endpoint for identifying beneficial therapeutics. Mechanistically, diabetes decreases neuronal mitochondrial function and enhancing mitochondrial respiratory capacity may aid neuronal recovery from glucotoxic insults. We have proposed that modulating the activity and expression of heat shock proteins (Hsp) may be of benefit in treating DPN. KU-32 is a C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor that improved thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic C57Bl/6 mice but it was not determined if this was associated with an increase in iENF density and mitochondrial function. After 16 weeks of diabetes, Swiss Webster mice showed decreased electrophysiological and psychosensory responses and a >30% loss of iENFs. Treatment of the mice with ten weekly doses of 20mg/kg KU-32 significantly reversed pre-existing deficits in nerve conduction velocity and responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli. KU-32 therapy significantly reversed the pre-existing loss of iENFs despite the identification of a sub-group of drug-treated diabetic mice that showed improved thermal sensitivity but no increase in iENF density. To determine if the improved clinical indices correlated with enhanced mitochondrial activity, sensory neurons were isolated and mitochondrial bioenergetics assessed ex vivo using extracellular flux technology. Diabetes decreased maximal respiratory capacity in sensory neurons and this deficit was improved following KU-32 treatment. In conclusion, KU-32 improved physiological and morphologic markers of degenerative neuropathy and drug efficacy may be related to enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetics in sensory neurons.

  12. Modulating molecular chaperones improves sensory fiber recovery and mitochondrial function in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Michael J.; Pan, Pan; Farmer, Kevin L.; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S.J.; Dobrowsky, Rick T.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (iENFs) is an important approach to stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and is a promising clinical endpoint for identifying beneficial therapeutics. Mechanistically, diabetes decreases neuronal mitochondrial function and enhancing mitochondrial respiratory capacity may aid neuronal recovery from glucotoxic insults. We have proposed that modulating the activity and expression of heat shock proteins (Hsp) may be of benefit in treating DPN. KU-32 is a C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor that improved thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic C57Bl/6 mice but it was not determined if this was associated with an increase in iENF density and mitochondrial function. After 16 weeks of diabetes, Swiss Webster mice showed decreased electrophysiological and psychosensory responses and a >30% loss of iENFs. Treatment of the mice with ten weekly doses of 20 mg/kg KU-32 significantly reversed pre-existing deficits in nerve conduction velocity and responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli. KU-32 therapy significantly reversed the pre-existing loss of iENFs despite the identification of a sub-group of drug-treated diabetic mice that showed improved thermal sensitivity but no increase in iENF density. To determine if the improved clinical indices correlated with enhanced mitochondrial activity, sensory neurons were isolated and mitochondrial bioenergetics assessed ex vivo using extracellular flux technology. Diabetes decreased maximal respiratory capacity in sensory neurons and this deficit was improved following KU-32 treatment. In conclusion, KU-32 improved physiological and morphologic markers of degenerative neuropathy and drug efficacy may be related to enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetics in sensory neurons. PMID:22465570

  13. Amelioration of Cisplatin-Induced Experimental Peripheral Neuropathy by a Small Molecule Targeting p75NTR

    PubMed Central

    Friesland, Amy; Weng, Zhiying; Duenas, Maria; Massa, Stephen M.; Longo, Frank M.; Lu, Qun

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective and widely used first-line chemotherapeutic drug for treating cancers. However, many patients sustain cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), often leading to a reduction in drug dosages or complete cessation of treatment altogether. Therefore, it is important to understand cisplatin mechanisms in peripheral nerve tissue mediating its toxicity and identify signaling pathways for potential intervention. Rho GTPase activation is increased following trauma in several models of neuronal injury. Thus, we investigated whether components of the Rho signaling pathway represent important neuroprotective targets with the potential to ameliorate CIPN and thereby optimize current chemotherapy treatment regimens. We have developed a novel CIPN model in the mouse. Using this model and primary neuronal culture, we determined whether LM11A-31, a small-molecule, orally bioavailable ligand of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), can modulate Rho GTPase signaling and reduce CIPN. Von Frey filament analysis of sural nerve function showed that LM11A-31 treatment prevented decreases in peripheral nerve sensation seen with cisplatin treatment. Morphometric analysis of harvested sural nerves revealed that cisplatin-induced abnormal nerve fiber morphology and the decreases in fiber area were alleviated with concurrent LM11A-31 treatment. Cisplatin treatment increased RhoA activity accompanied by the reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP-2, which was reversed by LM11A-31. LM11A-31 also countered the effects of calpeptin, which activated RhoA by inhibiting SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase. Therefore, suppression of RhoA signaling by LM11A-31 that blocks proNGF binding to p75NTR or activates SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase downstream of NGF receptor enhances neuroprotection in experimental CIPN in mouse model. PMID:25277379

  14. MRI abnormalities of peripheral nerve and muscle are common in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and share features with multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Nathan P.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Howe, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction MRI of peripheral nerve and muscle in patients with ALS may be performed to investigate alternative diagnoses including multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). MRI findings of peripheral nerve and muscle are not well described in these conditions, making interpretation of results difficult. Methods We examined systematically the peripheral nerve and muscle MRI findings in patients with ALS (n=60) and MMN (n=8). Results In patients with ALS and MMN, abnormal MRIs were common (85% and 75%, respectively) but did not correlate with disease severity. Peripheral nerve MRI abnormalities were similar in frequency (ALS: 58% vs. MMN: 63%) with most changes being of mild-to-moderate severity. Muscle MRI changes were more common in ALS (57% vs. 33%), and no muscle atrophy was seen in patients with MMN. Discussion MRI abnormalities of peripheral nerve and muscle in ALS and MMN are common and share some features. PMID:25736373

  15. The influence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on local postural muscle and central sensory feedback balance control.

    PubMed

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Mohler, Jane; Armstrong, David G; Talal, Talal K; Najafi, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control) and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing). DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2) and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2) with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, P<0.01), which suggests a compromised local-control balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, P<0.02), which suggests an adaptation mechanism to reduce the overall body sway in DPN patients. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were observed between central-control rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, P<0.05) and the history of diabetes (rPearson = 0.58-071, P<0.05). Results suggest that in the lack of sensory feedback cueing, DPN participants were highly unstable compared to controls. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation mechanism

  16. Falls and functional impairments in cancer survivors with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN): a University of Rochester CCOP study

    PubMed Central

    Gewandter, J. S.; Fan, L.; Magnuson, A.; Mustian, K.; Peppone, L.; Heckler, C.; Hopkins, J.; Tejani, M.; Morrow, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted in order to characterize the prevalence of falls and functional impairments (FIs) and their association with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in cancer survivors. Methods We analyzed baseline assessments from a phase III RCT in cancer survivors with self-reported CIPN scores of ≥4 out of 10. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-CIPN-20 for neuropathy and reported falls in the previous 3 months. FIs were defined using the Activities of Daily Living subsection of the Vulnerable Elder’s Scale. Associations of baseline characteristics and CIPN with falls and FIs were examined using logistic regression. Results Of 421 patients, 11.9 % experienced recent falls and 26.6 % reported FIs. Motor neuropathy was the only factor associated with falls (OR=1.127, p=0.01). Factors associated with FIs included non-white race (OR=0.335 white relative to non-white, 0.781, p=0.01) and greater motor neuropathy scores (OR=1.262, p<0.0001). Conclusion CIPN, primarily motor, is associated with falls and FIs. Future prospective research should investigate the ability of motor neuropathy severity to predict falls. PMID:23446880

  17. Molecular, clinical and peripheral neuropathy study of Tunisian patients with ataxia with vitamin E deficiency.

    PubMed

    El Euch-Fayache, Ghada; Bouhlal, Yosr; Amouri, Rim; Feki, Moncef; Hentati, Fayçal

    2014-02-01

    Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by mutations in the α-tocopherol transfer protein coding gene localized on chromosome 8q, leading to lower levels of serum vitamin E. More than 91 patients diagnosed with ataxia with vitamin E deficiency have been reported worldwide. The majority of cases originated in the Mediterranean region, and the 744delA was the most common mutation among the 22 mutants previously described. We examined the clinical and molecular features of a large cohort of 132 Tunisian patients affected with ataxia with vitamin E deficiency. Of these patients, nerve conduction studies were performed on 45, and nerve biopsy was performed on 13. Serum vitamin E was dramatically reduced for 105 of the patients analysed. Molecular analysis revealed that 91.7% of the patients (n = 121) were homozygous for the 744delA mutation. Three other mutations were detected among the remaining patients (8.3%, n = 11) in the homozygous state. Two were previously reported (400C>T and 205-1G>T), and one was novel (553+1T>A). Age of onset was 13.2 ± 5.9 years, with extremes of 2 and 37 years. All described patients exhibited persistent progressive cerebellar ataxia with generally absent tendon reflexes. Deep sensory disturbances, pyramidal syndrome and skeletal deformities were frequent. Head tremor was present in 40% of the patients. Absence of neuropathy or mild peripheral neuropathy was noted in more than half of the cohort. This is the largest study of the genetic, clinical and peripheral neuropathic characteristics in patients with ataxia and vitamin E deficiency. The 744delA mutation represents the most common pathological mutation in Tunisia and worldwide, likely because of a Mediterranean founder effect. Our study led us to suggest that any patient displaying an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia phenotype with absent tendon reflexes and minor nerve abnormalities should first be screened for the 744delA mutation

  18. 12/15-Lipoxygenase inhibition counteracts MAPK phosphorylation in mouse and cell culture models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stavniichuk, Roman; Obrosov, Alexander A.; Drel, Viktor R.; Nadler, Jerry L.; Obrosova, Irina G.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation has been detected in peripheral nerve of human subjects and animal models with diabetes as well as high-glucose exposed human Schwann cells, and have been implicated in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In our recent studies, leukocytetype 12/15-lipoxygenase inhibition or gene deficiency alleviated large and small nerve fiber dysfunction, but not intraepidermal nerve fiber loss in streptozotocin-diabetic mice. Methods To address a mechanism we evaluated the potential for pharmacological 12/15-lipoxygenase inhibition to counteract excessive MAPK phosphorylation in mouse and cell culture models of diabetic neuropathy. C57Bl6/J mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin and maintained with or without the 12/15-lipoxygenase inhibitor cinnamyl-3,4-dihydroxy-α-cyanocinnamate (CDC). Human Schwann cells were cultured in 5.5 mM or 30 mM glucose with or without CDC. Results 12(S) HETE concentrations (ELISA), as well as 12/15-lipoxygenase expression and p38 MAPK, ERK, and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation (all by Western blot analysis) were increased in the peripheral nerve and spinal cord of diabetic mice as well as in high glucose-exposed human Schwann cells. CDC counteracted diabetes-induced increase in 12(S)HETE concentrations (a measure of 12/15-lipoxygenase activity), but not 12/15-lipoxygenase overexpression, in sciatic nerve and spinal cord. The inhibitor blunted excessive p38 MAPK and ERK, but not SAPK/ JNK, phosphorylation in sciatic nerve and high glucose exposed human Schwann cells, but did not affect MAPK, ERK, and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation in spinal cord. Conclusion 12/15-lipoxygenase inhibition counteracts diabetes related MAPK phosphorylation in mouse and cell culture models of diabetic neuropathy and implies that 12/15-lipoxygenase inhibitors may be an effective treatment for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24175152

  19. Long-Term Effects, Pathophysiological Mechanisms, and Risk Factors of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathies: A Comprehensive Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kerckhove, Nicolas; Collin, Aurore; Condé, Sakahlé; Chaleteix, Carine; Pezet, Denis; Balayssac, David

    2017-01-01

    Neurotoxic anticancer drugs, such as platinum-based anticancer drugs, taxanes, vinca alkaloids, and proteasome/angiogenesis inhibitors are responsible for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). The health consequences of CIPN remain worrying as it is associated with several comorbidities and affects a specific population of patients already impacted by cancer, a strong driver for declines in older adults. The purpose of this review is to present a comprehensive overview of the long-term effects of CIPN in cancer patients and survivors. Pathophysiological mechanisms and risk factors are also presented. Neurotoxic mechanisms leading to CIPNs are not yet fully understood but involve neuronopathy and/or axonopathy, mainly associated with DNA damage, oxidative stress, mitochondria toxicity, and ion channel remodeling in the neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Classical symptoms of CIPNs are peripheral neuropathy with a "stocking and glove" distribution characterized by sensory loss, paresthesia, dysesthesia and numbness, sometimes associated with neuropathic pain in the most serious cases. Several risk factors can promote CIPN as a function of the anticancer drug considered, such as cumulative dose, treatment duration, history of neuropathy, combination of therapies and genetic polymorphisms. CIPNs are frequent in cancer patients with an overall incidence of approximately 38% (possibly up to 90% of patients treated with oxaliplatin). Finally, the long-term reversibility of these CIPNs remain questionable, notably in the case of platinum-based anticancer drugs and taxanes, for which CIPN may last several years after the end of anticancer chemotherapies. These long-term effects are associated with comorbidities such as depression, insomnia, falls and decreases of health-related quality of life in cancer patients and survivors. However, it is noteworthy that these long-term effects remain poorly studied, and only limited data are available such as in the

  20. Long-Term Effects, Pathophysiological Mechanisms, and Risk Factors of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathies: A Comprehensive Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kerckhove, Nicolas; Collin, Aurore; Condé, Sakahlé; Chaleteix, Carine; Pezet, Denis; Balayssac, David

    2017-01-01

    Neurotoxic anticancer drugs, such as platinum-based anticancer drugs, taxanes, vinca alkaloids, and proteasome/angiogenesis inhibitors are responsible for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). The health consequences of CIPN remain worrying as it is associated with several comorbidities and affects a specific population of patients already impacted by cancer, a strong driver for declines in older adults. The purpose of this review is to present a comprehensive overview of the long-term effects of CIPN in cancer patients and survivors. Pathophysiological mechanisms and risk factors are also presented. Neurotoxic mechanisms leading to CIPNs are not yet fully understood but involve neuronopathy and/or axonopathy, mainly associated with DNA damage, oxidative stress, mitochondria toxicity, and ion channel remodeling in the neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Classical symptoms of CIPNs are peripheral neuropathy with a “stocking and glove” distribution characterized by sensory loss, paresthesia, dysesthesia and numbness, sometimes associated with neuropathic pain in the most serious cases. Several risk factors can promote CIPN as a function of the anticancer drug considered, such as cumulative dose, treatment duration, history of neuropathy, combination of therapies and genetic polymorphisms. CIPNs are frequent in cancer patients with an overall incidence of approximately 38% (possibly up to 90% of patients treated with oxaliplatin). Finally, the long-term reversibility of these CIPNs remain questionable, notably in the case of platinum-based anticancer drugs and taxanes, for which CIPN may last several years after the end of anticancer chemotherapies. These long-term effects are associated with comorbidities such as depression, insomnia, falls and decreases of health-related quality of life in cancer patients and survivors. However, it is noteworthy that these long-term effects remain poorly studied, and only limited data are available such as in

  1. Radix Astragali-Based Chinese Herbal Medicine for Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) remains a big challenge for oncologists. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Radix Astragali- (RA-) based Chinese herbal medicine in the prevention and treatment of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy, including the incidence and grading of neurotoxicity, effective percentage, and nerve conduction velocity. Methods. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were found using PubMed, Cochrane, Springer, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Wanfang Database of China Science Periodical Database (CSPD) by keyword search. Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.0. Results. A total of 1552 participants were included in 24 trials. Meta-analysis showed the incidence of all-grade neurotoxicity was significantly lower in experimental groups and high-grade neurotoxicity was also significantly less. Effective percentage was significantly higher and sensory nerve conduction velocity was improved significantly, but changes in motor nerve conduction velocity were not statistically significant. No adverse events associated with RA-based intervention were reported. Conclusion. RA-based intervention may be beneficial in relieving oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. However, more double-blind, multicenter, large-scale RCTs are needed to support this theory. Trial Registration. PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews has registration number  CRD42015019903. PMID:27795728

  2. Effects of thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy: a randomized parallel-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Plandee, Piyawan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-04-20

    BACKGROUND Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complications of diabetic patients and leads to loss of plantar cutaneous sensation, movement perception, and body balance. Thai foot massage is an alternative therapy to improve balance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty patients with type-2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned into either the Thai foot massage or control groups. The Thai foot massage group received a modified Thai traditional foot massage for 30 min, 3 days per week for 2 weeks. We measured timed up and go (TUG), one leg stance: OLS), the range of motion (ROM) of the foot, and foot sensation (SWMT) before treatment, after the first single session, and after the 2-week treatment. RESULTS After the single treatment session, only the Thai foot massage group showed a significant improvement in TUG. After the 2-week treatment, both Thai foot massage and control groups showed a significant improvement of TUG and OLS (P<0.05); however, when comparing between 2 groups, the Thai foot massage group showed better improvement in TUG than the control group (p<0.05). The Thai foot massage group also showed significant improvements in ROM and SWMT after the 2-week treatment. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study suggest that Thai foot massage is a viable alternative treatment for balance performance, ROM of the foot, and the foot sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.

  3. Metanx Alleviates Multiple Manifestations of Peripheral Neuropathy and Increases Intraepidermal Nerve Fiber Density in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shevalye, Hanna; Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Dyukova, Elena; Lupachyk, Sergey; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2012-01-01

    Metanx is a product containing l-methylfolate, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, and methylcobalamin for management of endothelial dysfunction. Metanx ingredients counteract endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium and peripheral nerve. This study evaluates Metanx on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in ZDF rats, a model of type 2 diabetes. Metanx was administered to 15-week-old ZDF and ZDF lean rats at either 4.87 mg ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ day−1 (a body weight–based equivalent of human dose) or 24.35 mg ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ day−1 by oral gavage two times a day for 4 weeks. Both doses alleviated hind limb digital sensory, but not sciatic motor, nerve conduction slowing and thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia in the absence of any reduction of hyperglycemia. Low-dose Metanx increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density but did not prevent morphometric changes in distal tibial nerve myelinated fibers. Metanx treatment counteracted endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation, and methylglyoxal-derived advanced glycation end product, nitrotyrosine, and nitrite/nitrate accumulation in the peripheral nerve. In conclusion, Metanx, at a body weight–based equivalent of human dose, increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density and improved multiple parameters of peripheral nerve function in ZDF rats. Clinical studies are needed to determine if Metanx finds use in management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22751692

  4. JZL184 is anti-hyperalgesic in a murine model of cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Khasabova Iryna, A; Yao, Xu; Paz, Justin; Lewandowski Cutler, T; Lindberg Amy, E; Coicou, Lia; Burlakova, Natasha; Simone Don, A; Seybold Virginia, S

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin has been used effectively to treat a variety of cancers but its use is limited by the development of painful peripheral neuropathy. Because the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG) is anti-hyperalgesic in several preclinical models of chronic pain, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of JZL184, an inhibitor of 2-AG hydrolysis, was tested in a murine model of cisplatin-induced hyperalgesia. Systemic injection of cisplatin (1 mg/kg) produced mechanical hyperalgesia when administered daily for 7 days. Daily peripheral administration of a low dose of JZL184 in conjunction with cisplatin blocked the expression of mechanical hyperalgesia. Acute injection of a cannabinoid (CB)-1 but not a CB2 receptor antagonist reversed the anti-hyperalgesic effect of JZL184 indicating that downstream activation of CB1 receptors suppressed the expression of mechanical hyperalgesia. Components of endocannabinoid signaling in plantar hind paw skin and lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) were altered by treatments with cisplatin and JZL184. Treatment with cisplatin alone reduced levels of 2-AG and AEA in skin and DRGs as well as CB2 receptor protein in skin. Combining treatment of JZL184 with cisplatin increased 2-AG in DRGs compared to cisplatin alone but had no effect on the amount of 2-AG in skin. Evidence that JZL184 decreased the uptake of [3H]AEA into primary cultures of DRGs at a concentration that also inhibited the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase, in conjunction with data that 2-AG mimicked the effect of JZL184 on [3H]AEA uptake support the conclusion that AEA most likely mediates the anti-hyperalgesic effect of JZL184 in this model. PMID:25304184

  5. Locomotor Adaptation and Aftereffects in Patients With Reduced Somatosensory Input Due to Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bunday, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    We studied 12 peripheral neuropathy patients (PNP) and 13 age-matched controls with the “broken escalator” paradigm to see how somatosensory loss affects gait adaptation and the release and recovery (“braking”) of the forward trunk overshoot observed during this locomotor aftereffect. Trunk displacement, foot contact signals, and leg electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded while subjects walked onto a stationary sled (BEFORE trials), onto the moving sled (MOVING or adaptation trials), and again onto the stationary sled (AFTER trials). PNP were unsteady during the MOVING trials, but this progressively improved, indicating some adaptation. During the after trials, 77% of control subjects displayed a trunk overshoot aftereffect but over half of the PNP (58%) did not. The PNP without a trunk aftereffect adapted to the MOVING trials by increasing distance traveled; subsequently this was expressed as increased distance traveled during the aftereffect rather than as a trunk overshoot. This clear separation in consequent aftereffects was not seen in the normal controls suggesting that, as a result of somatosensory loss, some PNP use distinctive strategies to negotiate the moving sled, in turn resulting in a distinct aftereffects. In addition, PNP displayed earlier than normal anticipatory leg EMG activity during the first after trial. Although proprioceptive inputs are not critical for the emergence or termination of the aftereffect, somatosensory loss induces profound changes in motor adaptation and anticipation. Our study has found individual differences in adaptive motor performance, indicative that PNP adopt different feed-forward gait compensatory strategies in response to peripheral sensory loss. PMID:19741105

  6. Peripheral neuropathy in Parkinson's disease: levodopa exposure and implications for duodenal delivery.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; van Laar, Teus; Cornblath, David R; Odin, Per; Klostermann, Fabian; Grandas, Francisco J; Ebersbach, Georg; Urban, Peter P; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Antonini, Angelo

    2013-05-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, continuous intra-duodenal infusion of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) is an established approach in the management of motor complications that cannot be further improved by conventional oral therapy. In general, tolerability of LCIG has resembled that of oral dopaminergic therapy; however, cases of symptomatic peripheral neuropathy (PN), sometimes severe, have been reported in patients receiving LCIG. Cases are generally a sensorimotor polyneuropathy with both subacute and chronic onsets, often associated with vitamin B12 and/or B6 deficiency. Rare cases clinically resemble Guillain-Barré syndrome. In the absence of prospectively collected data on possible associations between LCIG and PN, it is prudent to explore potential mechanisms that may explain a possible relationship. The PN may be linked to use of high-dose levodopa, promoting high levels of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid or reduced absorption of vitamins essential for homocysteine metabolism. Cases of LCIG-associated PN often have responded to vitamin supplementation without need for LCIG cessation, although LCIG cessation is sometimes necessary. It may be advisable to monitor vitamin B12/B6 status before and after patients start LCIG and be vigilant for signs of PN. Prospective, large-scale, long-term studies are needed to clarify whether vitamin supplementation and routine use of a catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitor may help prevent PN in LCIG recipients and whether these measures should be routine practice in patients with PD on high-dose oral levodopa.

  7. Severe leukoencephalopathy with cortical involvement and peripheral neuropathy due to FOLR1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yu; Tohyama, Jun; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Magara, Shinichi; Kawashima, Hideshi; Akasaka, Noriyuki; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency due to folate receptor 1 gene (FOLR1) mutations is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a brain-specific folate transport defect. It is characterized by late infantile onset, severe psychomotor regression, epilepsy, and leukodystrophy. We describe a consanguineous girl exhibiting severe developmental regression, intractable epilepsy, polyneuropathy, and profound hypomyelination with cortical involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical disturbances in addition to profound hypomyelination and cerebellar atrophy. Nerve conduction studies revealed both axonal degeneration and demyelinating features. A diagnosis of cerebral folate deficiency was confirmed by a homozygous c.466T>G (p.W156G) mutation in FOLR1, coupled with extremely low cerebrospinal fluid levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. Her symptoms, neuroradiological findings, and polyneuropathy were alleviated by oral folinic acid treatment in conjunction with intravenous and intramuscular administration therapy. Our patient shows that folinic acid therapy can ameliorate the clinical symptoms, white matter disturbances, cortical insults, and peripheral neuropathy of cerebral folate deficiency caused by FOLR1 mutation. It is important to recognize these clinical symptoms and make a precise diagnosis early on, because cerebral folate deficiency is treatable.

  8. Peripheral neuropathy reduces asymmetries in inter-limb transfer in a visuo-motor task.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhujun; Van Gemmert, Arend W A

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetry of inter-limb transfer has been associated with the specialization of the dominant and non-dominant motor system. Reductions of asymmetry have been interpreted as behavioural evidence showing a decline of hemispheric lateralization. A previous study showed that ageing did not qualitatively change the inter-limb transfer asymmetry of a visuo-motor task. The current study elaborates on these findings; it examines whether diminished somatosensory information as a result of peripheral neuropathy (PN) adversely affects inter-limb transfer asymmetry. Twenty individuals affected by PN and 20 older controls were recruited and divided equally across two groups. One group trained a visuo-motor task with the right hand while the other group trained it with the left hand. Performance (initial direction error) of the untrained hand before and after training was collected to determine learning effects from inter-limb transfer. Similar to previous studies, the current study showed asymmetric inter-limb transfer in older controls. In contrast, PN showed inter-limb transfer in both directions indicating that PN reduces inter-limb transfer asymmetry. Increased bilateral hemispheric recruitment is suggested to be responsible for this reduced asymmetry which may compensate for deteriorated tactile and/or proprioceptive inputs in PN. Two possible hypotheses are discussed explaining the relationship between declined somatosensory information and increases in bilateral hemispheric recruitment.

  9. Peripheral neuropathy experience in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma treated with carfilzomib.

    PubMed

    Martin, Thomas G

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is frequently seen in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and commonly arises as a consequence of the disease itself and as an adverse effect of anti-MM treatment. Treatment-induced PN may occur in up to 75% of patients receiving anti-MM treatment (particularly in those receiving a thalidomide- or bortezomib-based regimen), and its occurrence often leads to dose reductions or treatment discontinuation, which may ultimately affect response to therapy. Carfilzomib, a highly selective proteasome inhibitor, was recently approved in the United States for the treatment of patients with relapsed and refractory MM. Carfilzomib is associated with a low incidence of PN and minimal off-target effects. This article reviews the etiology and incidence of PN with current novel anti-myeloma therapies and includes clinical trial data with respect to PN in 526 patients treated with carfilzomib for relapsed and/or refractory MM. The use of carfilzomib in patients with a history of PN and the incidence of new-onset PN in carfilzomib-treated patients are considered, and a clinical perspective on the management of PN in these patients is provided.

  10. Bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy: A genome-wide association study on multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Campo, Chiara; da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio; Weinhold, Niels; Mahmoudpour, Seyed Hamidreza; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hemminki, Kari; Merz, Maximilian; Försti, Asta

    2017-03-20

    The proteasome-inhibitor bortezomib was introduced into the treatment of multiple myeloma more than a decade ago. It is clinically beneficial, but peripheral neuropathy (PNP) is a side effect that may limit its use in some patients. To examine the possible genetic predisposing factors to PNP, we performed a genome-wide association study on 646 bortezomib-treated German multiple myeloma patients. Our aim was to identify genetic risk variants associated with the development of PNP as a serious side effect of the treatment. We identified 4 new promising loci for bortezomib-induced PNP at 4q34.3 (rs6552496), 5q14.1 (rs12521798), 16q23.3 (rs8060632), and 18q21.2 (rs17748074). Even though the results did not reach genome-wide significance level, they support the idea of previous studies, suggesting a genetic basis for neurotoxicity. The identified single nucleotide polymorphisms map to genes or next to genes involved in the development and function of the nervous system (CDH13, DCC, and TENM3). As possible functional clues, 2 of the variants, rs12521798 and rs17748074, affect enhancer histone marks in the brain. The rs12521798 may also impact expression of THBS4, which affects specific signal trasduction pathways in the nervous system. Further research is needed to clarify the mechanism of action of the identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in the development of drug-induced PNP and to functionally validate our in silico predictions.

  11. Minoxidil is a potential neuroprotective drug for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Chen, Li-Hsien; Yeh, Yu-Min; Wu, Pei-Ying; Chen, Yih-Fung; Chang, Lian-Yun; Chang, Jang-Yang; Shen, Meng-Ru

    2017-03-28

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer treatment. No medication has been shown to be effective in the treatment of CIPN. This study aims to integrate the image-based high-content screening, mouse behavior models and mechanistic cell-based assays to discover potential neuroprotective drugs. Among screened compounds, minoxidil showed the most potent neuroprotective effect against paclitaxel, with regard to neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Minoxidil protected mice from thermal insensitivity and alleviated mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-treated mice. The ultrastructure and quantified G-ratio of myelin integrity of sciatic nerve tissues supported the observations in mouse behavioral tests. The mechanistic study on DRG neurons suggested that minoxidil suppressed neuroinflammation and remodeled the dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis provoked by paclitaxel. Importantly, minoxidil showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect with paclitaxel both in tumor xenograft models of cervical and breast cancer. Interestingly, the quantitative assays on hair length and hair growth both exhibited that minoxidil significantly improved the hair quality after chemotherapy. Since minoxidil is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the safety and biocompatibility are well documented. The immediate next step is to launch an early-stage clinical trial intending to prevent CIPN by minoxidil.

  12. Minoxidil is a potential neuroprotective drug for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Chen, Li-Hsien; Yeh, Yu-Min; Wu, Pei-Ying; Chen, Yih-Fung; Chang, Lian-Yun; Chang, Jang-Yang; Shen, Meng-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer treatment. No medication has been shown to be effective in the treatment of CIPN. This study aims to integrate the image-based high-content screening, mouse behavior models and mechanistic cell-based assays to discover potential neuroprotective drugs. Among screened compounds, minoxidil showed the most potent neuroprotective effect against paclitaxel, with regard to neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Minoxidil protected mice from thermal insensitivity and alleviated mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-treated mice. The ultrastructure and quantified G-ratio of myelin integrity of sciatic nerve tissues supported the observations in mouse behavioral tests. The mechanistic study on DRG neurons suggested that minoxidil suppressed neuroinflammation and remodeled the dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis provoked by paclitaxel. Importantly, minoxidil showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect with paclitaxel both in tumor xenograft models of cervical and breast cancer. Interestingly, the quantitative assays on hair length and hair growth both exhibited that minoxidil significantly improved the hair quality after chemotherapy. Since minoxidil is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the safety and biocompatibility are well documented. The immediate next step is to launch an early-stage clinical trial intending to prevent CIPN by minoxidil. PMID:28349969

  13. Measuring health-related quality of life in diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Smith, S C; Lamping, D L; Maclaine, G D H

    2012-06-01

    We undertook a systematic review of disease-specific measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL) in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) to appraise the scientific (psychometric) evidence and make recommendations about the best instrument(s) to use. DPN is a common complication of diabetes mellitus. A need to consider the broad impact of DPN, rather than just pain and the increasingly recognised need to assess patient-reported outcomes such as HRQL in evaluating healthcare has led to a demand for rigorous outcome measures. To identify appropriate disease-specific measures, we searched four databases: PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO and CINAHL Plus. Data were extracted from each article using a standard data extraction form and the psychometric properties of each HRQL measure were reviewed. We identified three DPN-specific measures of HRQL: PN-QOL-97, Norfolk QOL-DN, NeuroQoL. All three measures satisfy at least one criterion for both reliability and validity, though all also have some disadvantages. Where there is no requirement for multi-language versions, the PN-QOL-97 is a useful instrument. Studies that involve multiple languages would need to use the shorter QOL-DN but would also need to incorporate complementary instruments to address the psychological and emotional impact of DPN.

  14. Assessment of pain and impact of care among patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Christie; Glosner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess the prevalence of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), evaluate the impact of DPN on patients' function and quality of life, and assess patient satisfaction with their current DPN treatment. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Patient-centered medical home model at an internal medicine clinic in Chicago, from November 1, 2011, through November 1, 2012. PARTICIPANTS 71 patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes aged 45 to 85 years and receiving diabetes education and medication management from the clinic pharmacist. INTERVENTION Paper survey administered to patients during clinic visits. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES DPN history; DPN impact on activity level, sleep, and quality of life; and satisfaction with current DPN treatment. RESULTS Of the 71 participants, 22% (n = 15) reported a diagnosis of DPN from their providers; however, 54% (n = 37) reported burning, aching, or tenderness in their hands, arms, legs, or feet. More than 50% of patients with these symptoms had experienced them for more than 1 year. Fewer than one in five patients (14% [n = 5]) reporting symptoms indicative of painful DPN were receiving treatment. CONCLUSION DPN may be underdiagnosed and undertreated in this patient population, which represents a potential opportunity for pharmacists to help patients with diabetes meet their quality of care goals.

  15. Nailfold capillary abnormalities are associated with type 2 diabetes progression and correlated with peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Po-Chi; Liao, Pei-Yung; Chang, Hen-Hong; Chiang, John Y.; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Lo, Lun-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a state of chronic hyperglycemia with a highly increased risk of vascular complications. The current study aimed to investigate microcirculation abnormalities in patients with type 2 DM and those with pre-DM using nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) and evaluate the possible correlation with microvascular complications. A total of 115 patients with type 2 DM, 41 patients with pre-DM, and 37 healthy subjects without diabetes were enrolled. All subjects underwent NVC to evaluate capillary density, length, morphology, distribution, presence of enlarged loops or hemorrhages, and blood flow. NVC score was used to quantitate the aforementioned characteristics. Patients with type 2 DM showed significantly increased alterations including reduced capillary length (29.6%), irregular distribution (35.7%), and abnormal morphology (59.1%), while the corresponding NVC scores were comparable to those of control subjects. In addition, subjects with pre-DM had a significantly higher NVC score and greater alterations in distribution (26.8%) and morphology (48.8%) than control subjects. NVC score was positively correlated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and the number of microvascular complications. NVC identified a high frequency of microcirculation abnormalities in subjects with pre-DM or type 2 DM compared to those in the control group. NVC score was also capable of detecting microvascular complications in patients with type 2 DM and was correlated with DPN and the number of microvascular complications. PMID:28033273

  16. Efficacy of Contact Needle Therapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Masao; Nishijima, Koji; Tsuda, Masaki; Nishimura, Genichi

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) often results in discontinuation of treatment with potentially useful anticancer drugs and may deteriorate the patient's quality of life. This study investigated the effect of contact needle therapy (CNT) on CIPN caused by responsible chemotherapeutic agents as taxanes and oxaliplatin. Six patients with CIPN were treated with CNT. The severity of CIPN was evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4 and FACT/GOG-Ntx before and after CNT. After the treatment, all of the patients showed some improvement. Four patients showed apparent improvement in breakthrough pain. One of the cases had difficulty in walking because of CIPN in lower extremities, but after 2 times of CNT, he could walk without pain and could continue the chemotherapy. Although its putative mechanisms remain elusive, CNT has strong potential as an adjunctive therapy in CIPN. Well-designed clinical trials with adequate sample size and power are necessary to confirm the findings of this study. PMID:23762168

  17. Efficacy of contact needle therapy for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Keiko; Ogawa, Masao; Nishijima, Koji; Tsuda, Masaki; Nishimura, Genichi

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) often results in discontinuation of treatment with potentially useful anticancer drugs and may deteriorate the patient's quality of life. This study investigated the effect of contact needle therapy (CNT) on CIPN caused by responsible chemotherapeutic agents as taxanes and oxaliplatin. Six patients with CIPN were treated with CNT. The severity of CIPN was evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4 and FACT/GOG-Ntx before and after CNT. After the treatment, all of the patients showed some improvement. Four patients showed apparent improvement in breakthrough pain. One of the cases had difficulty in walking because of CIPN in lower extremities, but after 2 times of CNT, he could walk without pain and could continue the chemotherapy. Although its putative mechanisms remain elusive, CNT has strong potential as an adjunctive therapy in CIPN. Well-designed clinical trials with adequate sample size and power are necessary to confirm the findings of this study.

  18. Natural Products and Complementary Therapies for Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Brami, Cloé; Bao, Ting; Deng, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a serious dose-limiting side-effect without any FDA-approved treatment option. Prior reviews focus mostly on pharmacological interventions, but nonpharmaceutical interventions have also been evaluated. A Web of Science and PubMed database search to identify relevant RCTs from January 2005 to May 2015 included the terms: CIPN, cancer; and supplements, vitamin E, goshajinkigan, kampo, acetyl-L-carnitine, carnitine, alpha-lipoic acid, omega-3, glutamine, or glutamate; or massage, acupuncture, mind-body practice, yoga, meditation, Tai-Chi, physical activity, or exercise. Of 1465 publications screened, 12 RCTs evaluated natural products and one evaluated electroacupuncture. Vitamin E may help prevent CIPN. L-glutamine, goshajinkigan, and omega-3 are also promising. Acetyl-L-carnitine may worsen CIPN and alpha-lipoic acid activity is unknown. Electroacupuncture was not superior to placebo. No RCTs were published regarding other complementary therapies, although some studies mention positive incidental findings. Natural products and complementary therapies deserve further investigation, given the lack of effective CIPN interventions. PMID:26652982

  19. The role of foot morphology on foot function in diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of foot morphology, related with respect to diabetes and peripheral neuropathy in altering foot kinematics and plantar pressure during gait. Healthy and diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy with different foot types were analyzed. Three dimensional multisegment foot kinematics and plantar pressures were assessed on 120 feet: 40 feet (24 cavus, 20 with valgus heel and 11 with hallux valgus) in the control group, 80 feet in the diabetic (25 cavus 13 with valgus heel and 13 with hallux valgus) and the neuropathic groups (28 cavus, 24 with valgus heel and 18 with hallux valgus). Subjects were classified according to their foot morphology allowing further comparisons among the subgroups with the same foot morphology. When comparing neuropathic subjects with cavus foot, valgus heel with controls with the same foot morphology, important differences were noticed: increased dorsiflexion and peak plantar pressure on the forefoot (P<0.05), decreased contact surface on the hindfoot (P<0.03). While results indicated the important role of foot morphology in altering both kinematics and plantar pressure in diabetic subjects, diabetes appeared to further contribute in altering foot biomechanics. Surprisingly, all the diabetic subjects with normal foot arch or with valgus hallux were no more likely to display significant differences in biomechanics parameters than controls. This data could be considered a valuable support for future research on diabetic foot function, and in planning preventive interventions.

  20. Serum Phosphorylated Neurofilament-Heavy Chain, a Potential Biomarker, is Associated With Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xiaona; Zhang, Shuo; Zhao, Weiwei; Ye, Hongying; Yang, Yehong; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Miao, Qing; Hu, Renming; Li, Yiming; Lu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neurofilament (NF), one of the major axonal cytoskeletal proteins, plays a critical role in degenerative diseases in both the central and the peripheral nervous systems. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between serum phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain (pNF-H) and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Serum pNF-H concentrations were measured by ELISA in hospitalized patients with and without DPN (n = 118). DPN was assessed by clinical symptoms, signs, and electromyography. Compared with the non-DPN group (311.98 [189.59–634.12] pg/mL), the confirmed group (605.99 [281.17–1332.78] pg/mL) patients had the higher serum pNF-H levels (P = 0.007). DPN was significantly correlated with C-peptide (r = −0.269), total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.185), and pNF-H (r = 0.258). Serum pNF-H levels were independently associated with DPN (P = 0.004), even after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, fasting plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, TC, C-peptide, urinary albuminto/creatinine ratio, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Compared with pNF-H quartile 1 (referent), patients in quartile 3 (odds ratio [OR], 3.977; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.243–12.728; P = 0.021) and quartile 4 (OR, 10.488; 95% CI, 3.020–34.429; P = 0.000) had the higher risk of DPN after adjusting for the confounders. Serum pNF-H levels might be associated with the DPN, and the correlationship between serum pNF-H and DPN should be further studied. PMID:26554790

  1. Mitochondrial abnormality in sensory, but not motor, axons in paclitaxel-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Xiao, W H; Zheng, H; Zheng, F Y; Nuydens, R; Meert, T F; Bennett, G J

    2011-12-29

    The dose-limiting side effect of the anti-neoplastic agent, paclitaxel, is a chronic distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathy that produces sensory dysfunction (hypoesthesia and neuropathic pain) but little or no distal motor dysfunction. Similar peripheral neuropathies are seen with chemotherapeutics in the vinca alkaloid, platinum-complex, and proteasome inhibitor classes. Studies in rats suggest that the cause is a mitotoxic effect on axonal mitochondria. If so, then the absence of motor dysfunction may be due to mitotoxicity that affects sensory axons but spares motor axons. To investigate this, paclitaxel exposure levels in the dorsal root, ventral root, dorsal root ganglion, peripheral nerve, and spinal cord were measured, and the ultrastructure and the respiratory function of mitochondria in dorsal roots and ventral roots were compared. Sensory and motor axons in the roots and nerve had comparably low exposure to paclitaxel and exposure in the spinal cord was negligible. However, sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion had a very high and remarkably persistent (up to 10 days or more after the last injection) exposure to paclitaxel. Paclitaxel evoked a significant increase in the incidence of swollen and vacuolated mitochondria in the myelinated and unmyelinated sensory axons of the dorsal root (as seen previously in the peripheral nerve) but not in the motor axons of the ventral root. Stimulated mitochondrial respiration in the dorsal root was significantly depressed in paclitaxel-treated animals examined 2-4 weeks after the last injection, whereas respiration in the ventral root was normal. We conclude that the absence of motor dysfunction in paclitaxel-evoked peripheral neuropathy may be due to the absence of a mitotoxic effect in motor neuron axons, whereas the sensory dysfunction may be due to a mitotoxic effect resulting from the primary afferent neuron's cell body being exposed to high and persistent levels of paclitaxel.

  2. Characterisation of Immune and Neuroinflammatory Changes Associated with Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Makker, Preet G S; Duffy, Samuel S; Lees, Justin G; Perera, Chamini J; Tonkin, Ryan S; Butovsky, Oleg; Park, Susanna B; Goldstein, David; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and associated neuropathic pain is a debilitating adverse effect of cancer treatment. Current understanding of the mechanisms underpinning CIPN is limited and there are no effective treatment strategies. In this study, we treated male C57BL/6J mice with 4 cycles of either Paclitaxel (PTX) or Oxaliplatin (OXA) over a week and tested pain hypersensitivity and changes in peripheral immune responses and neuroinflammation on days 7 and 13 post 1st injection. We found that both PTX and OXA caused significant mechanical allodynia. In the periphery, PTX and OXA significantly increased circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell populations. OXA caused a significant increase in the percentage of interleukin-4+ lymphocytes in the spleen and significant down-regulation of regulatory T (T-reg) cells in the inguinal lymph nodes. However, conditional depletion of T-reg cells in OXA-treated transgenic DEREG mice had no additional effect on pain sensitivity. Furthermore, there was no leukocyte infiltration into the nervous system of OXA- or PTX-treated mice. In the peripheral nervous system, PTX induced expression of the neuronal injury marker activating transcription factor-3 in IB4+ and NF200+ sensory neurons as well as an increase in the chemokines CCL2 and CCL3 in the lumbar dorsal root ganglion. In the central nervous system, PTX induced significant astrocyte activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn, and both PTX and OXA caused reduction of P2ry12+ homeostatic microglia, with no measurable changes in IBA-1+ microglia/macrophages in the dorsal and ventral horns. We also found that PTX induced up-regulation of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, CCL11, CCL4, CCL3, IL-12p70 and GM-CSF) in the spinal cord. Overall, these findings suggest that PTX and OXA cause distinct pathological changes in the periphery and nervous system, which may contribute to chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

  3. Characterisation of Immune and Neuroinflammatory Changes Associated with Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Preet G. S.; Duffy, Samuel S.; Lees, Justin G.; Perera, Chamini J.; Tonkin, Ryan S.; Butovsky, Oleg; Park, Susanna B.; Goldstein, David

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and associated neuropathic pain is a debilitating adverse effect of cancer treatment. Current understanding of the mechanisms underpinning CIPN is limited and there are no effective treatment strategies. In this study, we treated male C57BL/6J mice with 4 cycles of either Paclitaxel (PTX) or Oxaliplatin (OXA) over a week and tested pain hypersensitivity and changes in peripheral immune responses and neuroinflammation on days 7 and 13 post 1st injection. We found that both PTX and OXA caused significant mechanical allodynia. In the periphery, PTX and OXA significantly increased circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell populations. OXA caused a significant increase in the percentage of interleukin-4+ lymphocytes in the spleen and significant down-regulation of regulatory T (T-reg) cells in the inguinal lymph nodes. However, conditional depletion of T-reg cells in OXA-treated transgenic DEREG mice had no additional effect on pain sensitivity. Furthermore, there was no leukocyte infiltration into the nervous system of OXA- or PTX-treated mice. In the peripheral nervous system, PTX induced expression of the neuronal injury marker activating transcription factor-3 in IB4+ and NF200+ sensory neurons as well as an increase in the chemokines CCL2 and CCL3 in the lumbar dorsal root ganglion. In the central nervous system, PTX induced significant astrocyte activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn, and both PTX and OXA caused reduction of P2ry12+ homeostatic microglia, with no measurable changes in IBA-1+ microglia/macrophages in the dorsal and ventral horns. We also found that PTX induced up-regulation of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, CCL11, CCL4, CCL3, IL-12p70 and GM-CSF) in the spinal cord. Overall, these findings suggest that PTX and OXA cause distinct pathological changes in the periphery and nervous system, which may contribute to chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:28125674

  4. Induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor CCR2 in primary sensory neurons contributes to paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Boyette-Davis, Jessica A.; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Li, Yan; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Walters, Edgar T.; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    The use of paclitaxel (Taxol®), a microtubule stabilizer, for cancer treatment is often limited by its associated peripheral neuropathy (chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, CIPN) which predominantly results in sensory dysfunction including chronic pain. Here we show that paclitaxel CIPN was associated with an induction of chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and its cognate receptor CCR2 in primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Immunostaining revealed that MCP-1 was mainly expressed in small nociceptive neurons while CCR2 was expressed in large and medium-sized myelinated neurons. Direct application of MCP-1 consistently induced intracellular calcium increases in DRG large and medium-sized but not small neurons mainly dissociated from paclitaxel- but not vehicle-treated animals. Paclitaxel also induced increased expression of MCP-1 in spinal astrocytes but no CCR2 signal was detected in spinal cord. Local blockade of MCP-1/CCR2 signaling by anti-MCP-1 antibody or CCR2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides significantly attenuated paclitaxel CIPN phenotypes including mechanical hypersensitivity and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) in hindpaw glabrous skin. These results suggest that activation of paracrine MCP-1/CCR2 signaling between DRG neurons plays a critical role in the development of paclitaxel CIPN and targeting MCP-1/CCR2 signaling could be a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:23726937

  5. Dioscorea Extract (DA-9801) Modulates Markers of Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eunjung; Lee, Sung Ok; Kang, Tong Ho; Kim, Hye Ju; Choi, Sang Zin; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of DA-9801, an optimized extract of Dioscorea species, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a type 2 diabetic animal model. In this study, db/db mice were treated with DA-9801 (30 and 100 mg/kg, daily, p.o.) for 12 weeks. DA-9801 reduced the blood glucose levels and increased the withdrawal latencies in hot plate tests. Moreover, it prevented nerve damage based on increased nerve conduction velocity and ultrastructural changes. Decrease of nerve growth factor (NGF) may have a detrimental effect on diabetic neuropathy. We previously reported NGF regulatory properties of the Dioscorea genus. In this study, DA-9801 induced NGF production in rat primary astrocytes. In addition, it increased NGF levels in the sciatic nerve and the plasma of type 2 diabetic animals. DA-9801 also increased neurite outgrowth and mRNA expression of Tieg1/Klf10, an NGF target gene, in PC12 cells. These results demonstrated the attenuation of diabetic peripheral neuropathy by oral treatment with DA-9801 via NGF regulation. DA-9801 is currently being evaluated in a phase II clinical study.

  6. Does the epidermal nerve fibre density measured by skin biopsy in patients with peripheral neuropathies correlate with neuropathic pain?

    PubMed

    Truini, A; Biasiotta, A; Di Stefano, G; Leone, C; La Cesa, S; Galosi, E; Piroso, S; Pepe, A; Giordano, C; Cruccu, G

    2014-04-01

    The different neuropathic pain types (e.g., ongoing burning pain and allodynia) are frequent and disabling complaints in patients with peripheral neuropathies. Although the reference standard technique for diagnosing painful small-fibre neuropathies is nerve fibre density assessment by skin biopsy, the relationship between the epidermal nerve fibre (ENF) density and neuropathic pain is still unclear. In a clinical and skin biopsy study designed to investigate whether changes in ENF density are directly related to pain, we enrolled 139 consecutive patients with distal symmetric peripheral neuropathy. All patients underwent clinical examination. The Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory was used to distinguish the different neuropathic pain types. A skin biopsy was conducted, and ENFs were immunostained with the antiprotein gene product 9.5, and their linear density was quantified with bright-field microscopy. No difference was found in ENF density between patients with and without neuropathic pain, nor between patients with and without ongoing burning pain. Conversely, ENF density was higher in patients with provoked pains (including mechanical dynamic allodynia) than in those without. The variable association between ENF density and symptoms of neuropathic pain supports the idea that neuropathic pain symptoms arise through distinct underlying mechanisms. The lack of relationship between ongoing burning pain and ENF density suggests that this type of pain reflects factors other than loss of nociceptive afferents. The association between ENF density and provoked pain (including mechanical dynamic allodynia) suggests that this type of pain might be mediated by spared and sensitised nociceptive afferents.

  7. Genetic Prion Disease Caused by PRNP Q160X Mutation Presenting with an Orbitofrontal Syndrome, Cyclic Diarrhea, and Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jamie C.; Rojas, Julio C.; Bang, Jee; Legati, Andrea; Rankin, Katherine P.; Forner, Sven; Miller, Zachary A.; Karydas, Anna M.; Coppola, Giovanni; Grouse, Carrie K.; Ralph, Jeffrey; Miller, Bruce L.; Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pathogenic truncating mutations in the prion gene (PRNP) usually present with prolonged disease courses with severe neurofibrillary tangle and cerebral amyloidosis pathology, but more atypical phenotypes also occur, including those with dysautonomia and peripheral neuropathy. We describe the neurological, cognitive, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological features of a 31-year-old man presenting with an orbitofrontal syndrome, gastrointestinal symptoms, and peripheral neuropathy associated with PRNP Q160X nonsense mutation, with symptom onset at age 27. The mutation was also detected in his asymptomatic father and a symptomatic paternal cousin; several members of prior generations died from early onset dementia. This is the first report of a family affected with the nonsense PRNP mutation Q160X displaying clear autosomal dominant disease in multiple family members and reduced penetrance. This case strengthens the evidence suggesting an association between PRNP truncating mutations and prion systemic amyloidosis. PRNP gene testing should be considered in any patient with atypical dementia, especially with early onset and neuropathy, even in the absence of a family history. PMID:27716661

  8. An Inherited Genetic Variant in CEP72 Promoter Predisposes to Vincristine-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Adults With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stock, W; Diouf, B; Crews, K R; Pei, D; Cheng, C; Laumann, K; Mandrekar, S J; Luger, S; Advani, A; Stone, R M; Larson, R A; Evans, W E

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a major toxicity of vincristine, yet no strategies exist for identifying adult patients at high-risk. We used a case-control design of 48 adults receiving protocol therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who developed vincristine-induced neuropathy (NCI grade 2-4) during treatment, and 48 matched controls who did not develop grade 2-4 neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy was prospectively graded by National Cancer Institute (NCI) criteria. CEP72 promoter genotype (rs924607) was determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. Frequency of the CEP72 T/T genotype was higher in cases (31% vs. 10%, P = 0.0221) and the incidence of vincristine-induced neuropathy (grades 2-4) was significantly higher in patients homozygous for the CEP72 T/T genotype. 75% of the 20 patients homozygous for the CEP72 T allele developed grade 2-4 neuropathy, compared to 44% of patients with CEP72 CC or CT genotype (P = 0.0221). The CEP72 polymorphism can identify adults at increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  9. Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients attending a diabetes center in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Börü, Ulkü Türk; Alp, Recep; Sargin, Haluk; Koçer, Abdulkadir; Sargin, Mehmet; Lüleci, Arda; Yayla, Ali

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients attending a major Turkish diabetes center. Eight hundred and sixty-six consecutive type 2 diabetic patients were included in the study. A single observer performed biothesiometry studies on these patients. The presence of diabetic neuropathy was investigated using neurological symptom scale (NSS) and neurological disability score (NDS) performed. Neuropathy was determined with standardized neurological examinations and defined as the presence of abnormal NSS and NDS together with abnormal sensory or motor signs and symptoms as well as decreased great toe vibration perception. Overall, 60% (n = 520) of the patients were diagnosed as having neuropathy. The prevalence of neuropathy increased with age (p < 0.001) and duration of diabetes (p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed the duration of diabetes (p < 0.001) and HbA1c levels (p < 0.001) as the risk factors for neuropathy. The overall prevalence of neuropathy in Turkish type 2 diabetic population was 60%. Age, duration of diabetes, and poor glycemic control were considered to be the risk factors for neuropathy.

  10. SUDOSCAN: A Simple, Rapid, and Objective Method with Potential for Screening for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Dinesh; Cash, Tom; Davies, Jennifer; Sankar, Adithya; Rao, Ganesh; Grieg, Marni; Pallai, Shillo; Gandhi, Rajiv; Wilkinson, Iain D; Tesfaye, Solomon

    2015-01-01

    Clinical methods of detecting diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) are not objective and reproducible. We therefore evaluated if SUDOSCAN, a new method developed to provide a quick, non-invasive and quantitative assessment of sudomotor function can reliably screen for DPN. 70 subjects (45 with type 1 diabetes and 25 healthy volunteers [HV]) underwent detailed assessments including clinical, neurophysiological and 5 standard cardiovascular reflex tests (CARTs). Using the American Academy of Neurology criteria subjects were classified into DPN and No-DPN groups. Based on CARTs subjects were also divided into CAN, subclinical-CAN and no-CAN. Sudomotor function was assessed with measurement of hand and foot Electrochemical Skin Conductance (ESC) and calculation of the CAN risk score. Foot ESC (μS) was significantly lower in subjects with DPN [n = 24; 53.5(25.1)] compared to the No-DPN [77.0(7.9)] and HV [77.1(14.3)] groups (ANCOVA p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of foot ESC for classifying DPN were 87.5% and 76.2%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.85. Subjects with CAN had significantly lower foot [55.0(28.2)] and hand [53.5(19.6)] ESC compared to No-CAN [foot ESC, 72.1(12.2); hand ESC 64.9(14.4)] and HV groups (ANCOVA p<0.001 and 0.001, respectively). ROC analysis of CAN risk score to correctly classify CAN revealed a sensitivity of 65.0% and specificity of 80.0%. AUC was 0.75. Both foot and hand ESC demonstrated strong correlation with individual parameters and composite scores of nerve conduction and CAN. SUDOSCAN, a non-invasive and quick test, could be used as an objective screening test for DPN in busy diabetic clinics, insuring adherence to current recommendation of annual assessments for all diabetic patients that remains unfulfilled.

  11. SUDOSCAN: A Simple, Rapid, and Objective Method with Potential for Screening for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Selvarajah, Dinesh; Cash, Tom; Davies, Jennifer; Sankar, Adithya; Rao, Ganesh; Grieg, Marni; Pallai, Shillo; Gandhi, Rajiv; Wilkinson, Iain D.; Tesfaye, Solomon

    2015-01-01

    Clinical methods of detecting diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) are not objective and reproducible. We therefore evaluated if SUDOSCAN, a new method developed to provide a quick, non-invasive and quantitative assessment of sudomotor function can reliably screen for DPN. 70 subjects (45 with type 1 diabetes and 25 healthy volunteers [HV]) underwent detailed assessments including clinical, neurophysiological and 5 standard cardiovascular reflex tests (CARTs). Using the American Academy of Neurology criteria subjects were classified into DPN and No-DPN groups. Based on CARTs subjects were also divided into CAN, subclinical-CAN and no-CAN. Sudomotor function was assessed with measurement of hand and foot Electrochemical Skin Conductance (ESC) and calculation of the CAN risk score. Foot ESC (μS) was significantly lower in subjects with DPN [n = 24; 53.5(25.1)] compared to the No-DPN [77.0(7.9)] and HV [77.1(14.3)] groups (ANCOVA p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of foot ESC for classifying DPN were 87.5% and 76.2%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.85. Subjects with CAN had significantly lower foot [55.0(28.2)] and hand [53.5(19.6)] ESC compared to No-CAN [foot ESC, 72.1(12.2); hand ESC 64.9(14.4)] and HV groups (ANCOVA p<0.001 and 0.001, respectively). ROC analysis of CAN risk score to correctly classify CAN revealed a sensitivity of 65.0% and specificity of 80.0%. AUC was 0.75. Both foot and hand ESC demonstrated strong correlation with individual parameters and composite scores of nerve conduction and CAN. SUDOSCAN, a non-invasive and quick test, could be used as an objective screening test for DPN in busy diabetic clinics, insuring adherence to current recommendation of annual assessments for all diabetic patients that remains unfulfilled. PMID:26457582

  12. Structural Basis for Induction of Peripheral Neuropathy by Microtubule-Targeting Cancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer A; Slusher, Barbara S; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Farah, Mohamed H; Smiyun, Gregoriy; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a serious, dose-limiting side effect of cancer treatment with microtubule-targeting drugs. Symptoms present in a "stocking-glove" distribution, with longest nerves affected most acutely, suggesting a length-dependent component to the toxicity. Axonal transport of ATP-producing mitochondria along neuronal microtubules from cell body to synapse is crucial to neuronal function. We compared the effects of the drugs paclitaxel and ixabepilone that bind along the lengths of microtubules and the drugs eribulin and vincristine that bind at microtubule ends, on mitochondrial trafficking in cultured human neuronal SK-N-SH cells and on axonal transport in mouse sciatic nerves. Antiproliferative concentrations of paclitaxel and ixabepilone significantly inhibited the anterograde transport velocity of mitochondria in neuronal cells, whereas eribulin and vincristine inhibited transport only at significantly higher concentrations. Confirming these observations, anterogradely transported amyloid precursor protein accumulated in ligated sciatic nerves of control and eribulin-treated mice, but not in paclitaxel-treated mice, indicating that paclitaxel inhibited anterograde axonal transport, whereas eribulin did not. Electron microscopy of sciatic nerves of paclitaxel-treated mice showed reduced organelle accumulation proximal to the ligation consistent with inhibition of anterograde (kinesin based) transport by paclitaxel. In contrast, none of the drugs significantly affected retrograde (dynein based) transport in neuronal cells or mouse nerves. Collectively, these results suggest that paclitaxel and ixabepilone, which bind along the lengths and stabilize microtubules, inhibit kinesin-based axonal transport, but not dynein-based transport, whereas the microtubule-destabilizing drugs, eribulin and vincristine, which bind preferentially to microtubule ends, have significantly less effect on all microtubule-based axonal transport. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5115-23.

  13. MAPK signaling downstream to TLR4 contributes to paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Hongmei; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Cassidy, Ryan M.; Zhang, Haijun; Kennamer-Chapman, Ross M.; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Colomand, Cecilia M.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been implicated as a locus for initiation of paclitaxel related chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). This project explores the involvement of the immediate down-stream signal molecules in inducing paclitaxel CIPN. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) were measured in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal cord over time using Western blot and immunohistochemistry in a rat model of paclitaxel CIPN. The effects of MAPK inhibitors in preventing and reversing behavioral signs of CIPN were also measured (group sizes 4–9). Extracellular signal related kinase (ERK1/2) and p38 but not c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) or PI3K-Akt signaling expression was increased in DRG. Phospho-ERK1/2 staining was co-localized to small CGRP-positive DRG neurons in cell profiles surrounding large DRG neurons consistent with satellite glial cells. The expression of phospho-P38 was co-localized to small IB4-positive and CGRP-positive DRG neurons. The TLR4 antagonist LPS derived from R. sphaeroides (LPS-RS) inhibited paclitaxel-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and P38. The MAPK inhibitors PD98059 (MEK1/2), U0126 (MEK1/2) and SB203580 (P38) prevented but did not reverse paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. Paclitaxel treatment resulted in phosphorylation of Inhibitor α of NFκB (IκBα) in DRG resulting in an apparent release of NFκB from the IκBα-NFκB complex as increased expression of nuclear NFκB was also observed. LPS-RS inhibited paclitaxel-induced translocation of NFκB in DRG. No change was observed in spinal NFκB. These results implicate TLR4 signaling via MAP kinases and NFκB in the induction and maintenance of paclitaxel-related CIPN. PMID:26065826

  14. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy: consensus recommendations on diagnosis, assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, S; Vileikyte, L; Rayman, G; Sindrup, S H; Perkins, B A; Baconja, M; Vinik, A I; Boulton, A J M

    2011-10-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is common, is associated with significant reduction in quality of life and poses major treatment challenges to the practising physician. Although poor glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors have been proven to contribute to the aetiology of DPN, risk factors specific for painful DPN remain unknown. A number of instruments have been tested to assess the character, intensity and impact of painful DPN on quality of life, activities of daily living and mood. Management of the patient with DPN must be tailored to individual requirements, taking into consideration the co-morbidities and other factors. Pharmacological agents with proven efficacy for painful DPN include tricyclic anti-depressants, the selective serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitors, anti-convulsants, opiates, membrane stabilizers, the anti-oxidant alpha-lipoic acid and topical agents including capsaicin. Current first-line therapies for painful DPN include tricyclic anti-depressants, the serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor duloxetine and the anti-convulsants pregabalin and gabapentin. When prescribing any of these agents, other co-morbidities and costs must be taken into account. Second-line approaches include the use of opiates such as synthetic opioid tramadol, morphine and oxycodone-controlled release. There is a limited literature with regard to combination treatment. In extreme cases of painful DPN unresponsive to pharmacotherapy, occasional use of electrical spinal cord stimulation might be indicated. There are a number of unmet needs in the therapeutic management of painful DPN. These include the need for randomized controlled trials with active comparators and data on the long-term efficacy of agents used, as most trials have lasted for less than 6 months. Finally, there is a need for appropriately designed studies to investigate non-pharmacological approaches.

  15. Multi-joint foot kinetics during walking in people with Diabetes Mellitus and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    DiLiberto, Frank E; Tome, Josh; Baumhauer, Judith F; Quinn, Jill R; Houck, Jeff; Nawoczenski, Deborah A

    2015-10-15

    Neuropathic tissue changes can alter muscle function and are a primary reason for foot pathologies in people with Diabetes Mellitus and peripheral neuropathy (DMPN). Understanding of foot kinetics in people with DMPN is derived from single-segment foot modeling approaches. This approach, however, does not provide insight into midfoot power and work. Gaining an understanding of midfoot kinetics in people with DMPN prior to deformity or ulceration may help link foot biomechanics to anticipated pathologies in the midfoot and forefoot. The purpose of this study was to evaluate midfoot (MF) and rearfoot (RF) power and work in people with DMPN and a healthy matched control group. Thirty people participated (15 DMPN and 15 Controls). An electro-magnetic tracking system and force plate were used to record multi-segment foot kinematics and ground reaction forces during walking. MF and RF power, work, and negative work ratios were calculated and compared between groups. Findings demonstrated that the DMPN group had greater negative peak power and reduced positive peak power at the MF and RF (all p≤0.05). DMPN group negative work ratios were also greater at the MF and RF [Mean difference MF: 9.9%; p=0.24 and RF: 18.8%; p<0.01]. In people with DMPN, the greater proportion of negative work may negatively affect foot structures during forward propulsion, when positive work and foot stability should predominate. Further study is recommended to determine how both MF and RF kinetics influence the development of deformity and ulceration in people with DMPN.

  16. Therapeutic Effects of Fenofibrate on Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy by Improving Endothelial and Neural Survival in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Young; Kim, Tae Woo; Hong, Bo Young; Kim, Yong-Soo; Chang, Yoon Sik; Kim, Hye Won; Park, Cheol Whee

    2014-01-01

    Neural vascular insufficiency plays an important role in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor (PPAR)α has an endothelial protective effect related to activation of PPARγ coactivator (PGC)-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but its role in DPN is unknown. We investigated whether fenofibrate would improve DPN associated with endothelial survival through AMPK-PGC-1α-eNOS pathway. Fenofibrate was given to db/db mice in combination with anti-flt-1 hexamer and anti-flk-1 heptamer (VEGFR inhibition) for 12 weeks. The db/db mice displayed sensory-motor impairment, nerve fibrosis and inflammation, increased apoptotic cells, disorganized myelin with axonal shrinkage and degeneration, fewer unmyelinated fibers, and endoneural vascular rarefaction in the sciatic nerve compared to db/m mice. These findings were exacerbated with VEGFR inhibition in db/db mice. Increased apoptotic cell death and endothelial dysfunction via inactivation of the PPARα-AMPK-PGC-1α pathway and their downstream PI3K-Akt-eNOS-NO pathway were noted in db/db mice, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human Schwann cells (HSCs) in high-glucose media. The effects were more prominent in response to VEGFR inhibition. In contrast, fenofibrate treatment ameliorated neural and endothelial damage by activating the PPARα-AMPK-PGC-1α-eNOS pathway in db/db mice, HUVECs and HSCs. Fenofibrate could be a promising therapy to prevent DPN by protecting endothelial cells through VEGF-independent activation of the PPARα-AMPK-PGC-1α-eNOS-NO pathway. PMID:24392081

  17. Sensory, psychological, and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy: A cross-sectional deep profiling study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tudor J C; Brown, Matthew; Ramirez, Juan D; Perkins, James; Woldeamanuel, Yohannes W; Williams, Amanda C de C; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L H; Bodi, Istvan; Cox, Sarah; Maier, Christoph; Krumova, Elena K; Rice, Andrew S C

    2014-09-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a frequent complication of HIV infection and a major source of morbidity. A cross-sectional deep profiling study examining HIV-SN was conducted in people living with HIV in a high resource setting using a battery of measures which included the following: parameters of pain and sensory symptoms (7day pain diary, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI] and Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sensory innervation (structured neurological examination, quantitative sensory testing [QST] and intraepidermal nerve fibre density [IENFD]), psychological state (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 [PASS-20], Depression Anxiety and Positive Outlook Scale [DAPOS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), and quality of life (Short Form (36) Health Survey [SF-36]). The diagnostic utility of the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (BPNS), Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), and Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) were evaluated. Thirty-six healthy volunteers and 66 HIV infected participants were recruited. A novel triumvirate case definition for HIV-SN was used that required 2 out of 3 of the following: 2 or more abnormal QST findings, reduced IENFD, and signs of a peripheral neuropathy on a structured neurological examination. Of those with HIV, 42% fulfilled the case definition for HIV-SN (n=28), of whom 75% (n=21) reported pain. The most frequent QST abnormalities in HIV-SN were loss of function in mechanical and vibration detection. Structured clinical examination was superior to QST or IENFD in HIV-SN diagnosis. HIV-SN participants had higher plasma triglyceride, concentrations depression, anxiety and catastrophizing scores, and prevalence of insomnia than HIV participants without HIV-SN.

  18. Sensory, psychological, and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy: A cross-sectional deep profiling study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tudor J.C.; Brown, Matthew; Ramirez, Juan D.; Perkins, James; Woldeamanuel, Yohannes W.; Williams, Amanda C. de C.; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L.H.; Bodi, Istvan; Cox, Sarah; Maier, Christoph; Krumova, Elena K.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a frequent complication of HIV infection and a major source of morbidity. A cross-sectional deep profiling study examining HIV-SN was conducted in people living with HIV in a high resource setting using a battery of measures which included the following: parameters of pain and sensory symptoms (7 day pain diary, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI] and Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sensory innervation (structured neurological examination, quantitative sensory testing [QST] and intraepidermal nerve fibre density [IENFD]), psychological state (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 [PASS-20], Depression Anxiety and Positive Outlook Scale [DAPOS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), and quality of life (Short Form (36) Health Survey [SF-36]). The diagnostic utility of the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (BPNS), Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), and Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) were evaluated. Thirty-six healthy volunteers and 66 HIV infected participants were recruited. A novel triumvirate case definition for HIV-SN was used that required 2 out of 3 of the following: 2 or more abnormal QST findings, reduced IENFD, and signs of a peripheral neuropathy on a structured neurological examination. Of those with HIV, 42% fulfilled the case definition for HIV-SN (n = 28), of whom 75% (n = 21) reported pain. The most frequent QST abnormalities in HIV-SN were loss of function in mechanical and vibration detection. Structured clinical examination was superior to QST or IENFD in HIV-SN diagnosis. HIV-SN participants had higher plasma triglyceride, concentrations depression, anxiety and catastrophizing scores, and prevalence of insomnia than HIV participants without HIV-SN. PMID:24973717

  19. The efficacy of pregabalin in patients with moderate and severe pain due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Bruce; Li, Chunming

    2016-05-01

    Objective To compare the therapeutic response to pregabalin in patients with moderate or severe painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN). Research design and methods Data were pooled from 11 placebo-controlled trials to evaluate the efficacy of pregabalin flexible or fixed dose (150, 300 or 600 mg/day) in pDPN patients with mean baseline pain scores of ≥4 to <7 (moderate) or ≥7 to ≤10 (severe). Last observation carried forward imputation was used. Study number/ClinicalTrials.gov identifier 1008-014/-, 1008-029/-, 1008-040/-, 1008-131/-, 1008-149/-, 1008-000-155/-, A0081030/NCT00156078, A0081060/NCT00159679, A0081071/NCT00143156, A0081081/NCT00301223, A0081163/NCT00553475. Main outcome measures Pregabalin-mediated change in pain, pain-related sleep interference (PRSI) and patient global impression of change (PGIC) were compared versus placebo and between moderate and severe pain cohorts. Adverse events (AEs) were reported. Results At baseline, 1816 patients had moderate pain (pregabalin, n = 1189) and 1119 patients had severe pain (pregabalin, n = 720). Pregabalin significantly reduced pain scores at endpoint compared with placebo when patients of all pain levels were combined (all doses; p < 0.05). In the moderate and severe pain cohorts, pregabalin treatment (300, 600 mg/day or flexible) significantly reduced mean pain scores at endpoint compared with placebo (p < 0.01). Pain reduction was greatest in patients with severe baseline pain compared with moderate baseline pain (pregabalin 300, 600 mg/day or flexible; p < 0.0001). Pregabalin improved PRSI and PGIC in the moderate and severe cohorts compared with placebo. The greatest improvement in PRSI also occurred in the severe cohort. Treatment-emergent AEs, most commonly dizziness, somnolence and peripheral edema, occurred more frequently in patients treated with pregabalin compared with placebo. Conclusions Pregabalin was effective in pDPN patients with both moderate and severe

  20. Validation of a modified version of the brief pain inventory for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zelman, Diane C; Gore, Mugdha; Dukes, Ellen; Tai, Kei-Sing; Brandenburg, Nancy

    2005-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is the focus of current clinical research, clinical identification, and treatment. It is unique from nociceptive pain and requires evaluation of the relevance and utility of common pain measures created for other painful conditions. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of a modified Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) for patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (BPI-DPN). Participants were patients with painful DPN (n=255) enrolled in a DPN Burden of Illness survey referred through 17 outpatient settings (primary care physicians, endocrinologists, neurologists, and anesthesiologists). Patients completed the BPI-DPN, and self-report measures of health-related quality of life, mood sleep, and healthcare utilization. Construct, criterion and discriminant validity, and internal consistency reliability were evaluated. Principal axis factoring with oblimin rotation revealed two interpretable factors (eigenvalues>1.0), consistent with most published BPI validation studies; a severity scale comprising the four BPI Severity items and an interference scale comprising the seven Interference items, which satisfied criteria for interpretability and model fit. Cronbach's alpha was high (0.94) for both scales. Mean pain Severity was highly correlated with Bodily Pain from the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12, version 2 (rs=0.63, P < 0.001), the Pain/Discomfort item in the Euro-QoL (rs=0.58, P < 0.001), and a verbal rating scale measure of pain severity (rs=0.74, P < 0.001). Individual BPI-DPN Interference domains were moderately correlated (rs's >0.5, P < 0.001) with analogous measures, and the Sleep Interference item had a high, significant association with the three primary Medical Outcome Study-Sleep scale subscales (rs's=0.66-71, P < 0.001). Worst Pain and Interference ratings were significantly associated with hospital utilization and outpatient visits due to DPN. These results replicate, in a pure peripheral neuropathic pain condition

  1. AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Susan C.; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, or clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This chapter reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. PMID:23239211

  2. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Response of Peripheral Neuropathy in the Presence of Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss Syndrome): Experience at a Single Tertiary Center

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hye-Jin; Yune, Sehyo; Seok, Jin Myoung; Cho, Eun Bin; Min, Ju-Hong; Seo, Yeon Lim; Lee, Byung-Jae

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) is a rare systemic small-vessel vasculitis accompanied by asthma, eosinophilia, and eosinophilic inflammation of various tissues including the peripheral nerves. This study investigated the clinical course and long-term outcomes of peripheral neuropathy in patients with EGPA. Methods Seventy-one patients with physician-diagnosed EGPA were identified at Samsung Medical Center between January 1995 and April 2014. Sixty-one of these patients were followed-up for more than 1 year and received corticosteroid therapy with or without intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for 6 to 18 months. Medical records of the 61 patients including demographic data, clinical features, laboratory and pathological findings, treatments, and outcomes were reviewed. Results Peripheral neuropathy as a manifestation of EGPA was present in 46 (75%) of the 61 patients. The mean follow-up duration of the patients with neuropathy was 6.4 years (range 1.2–18.8 years). The scores on the neurological functional disability scale before and after the combination treatment with corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide were 2.43±0.86 and 0.54±0.95 (mean±SD; p<0.001), respectively. The peripheral neuropathy relapsed in one patient. Conclusions The long-term clinical outcome of peripheral neuropathy in patients with EGPA receiving initial corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide combination therapy was favorable with a very low relapse rate. PMID:28079316

  3. Inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Jackie

    2010-09-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies are acquired disorders of peripheral nerves and occasionally of the central nervous system that can affect individuals at any age. The course can be monophasic, relapsing, or progressive. Inflammatory neuropathies are classified as acute or chronic. The acute form reaches a nadir by 4 weeks and the chronic form over 8 weeks or greater. The most common example of an acute inflammatory neuropathy is acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), which is part of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The most common chronic inflammatory neuropathy is chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP). Other chronic inflammatory neuropathies are multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome. The Fisher syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis occur acutely and have clinical overlap with AIDP.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1, a novel target for the treatment of diabetic complications: focus on diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Negi, Geeta; Nakkina, Vanaja; Kamble, Pallavi; Sharma, Shyam S

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a complex disorder induced by long standing diabetes. Many signaling pathways and transcription factors have been proposed to be involved in the development and progression of related processes. Years of research points to critical role of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis in the pathogenesis of neuropathy in diabetes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is heat-shock protein induced under conditions of different kinds of stress and has been implicated in cellular defense against oxidative stress. HO-1 degrades heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO) and free iron. Biliverdin and CO are gaining particular interest because these two have been found to mediate most of anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects of HO-1. Although extensively studied in different kinds of cancers and cardiovascular conditions, role of HO-1 in diabetic neuropathy is still under investigation. In this paper, we review the unique therapeutic potential of HO-1 and its role in mitigating various pathological processes that lead to diabetic neuropathy. This review also highlights the therapeutic approaches such as pharmacological and natural inducers of HO-1, gene delivery of HO-1 or its reaction products that in future, could lead to progression of HO-1 activators through the preclinical stages of drug development to clinical trials.

  5. Incidence of repeat amputation after partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy: an 11-year review.

    PubMed

    Borkosky, Sara L; Roukis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    The reliability and durability of partial first ray amputation in patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy has recently been questioned. In an effort to determine the repeat amputation rate after a partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy at our institution, we performed an 11-year retrospective review. A total of 59 patients (40 males and 19 females), with a mean age of 63 (range 39 to 97) years, were included. The mean follow-up was 33.8 (range 1 to 123) months, with initial incision healing occurring in all 59 patients. Despite the initial healing, 69% developed a mean of 3.1 subsequent foot ulcerations at a mean of 10.5 months, 36% required ancillary surgical procedures, and more than 90% of patients were prescribed multiple courses of antibiotics at a mean of 26.6 clinic visits during the follow-up period. A total of 25 patients (42.4%) underwent more proximal repeat amputation at a mean of 25 (range 1 to 97) months after the initial partial first ray amputation. The results of our retrospective review revealed that nearly 1 of every 2 patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy who undergo a partial first ray amputation will progress to a more proximal repeat amputation, despite initial healing. These data question the reliability and durability of this level of amputation as a primary procedure in this patient population. A more proximal level amputation, such as a balanced transmetatarsal, might provide a better functional and reliable residual weightbearing foot and should be considered at the initial presentation. This is especially true given that nearly one half of the patients died during the follow-up period. However, this remains a matter for conjecture because of the limited data available; therefore, additional prospective investigations are warranted.

  6. Effects of Thai Foot Massage on Balance Performance in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized Parallel-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Plandee, Piyawan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complications of diabetic patients and leads to loss of plantar cutaneous sensation, movement perception, and body balance. Thai foot massage is an alternative therapy to improve balance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. Material/Methods Sixty patients with type-2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned into either the Thai foot massage or control groups. The Thai foot massage group received a modified Thai traditional foot massage for 30 min, 3 days per week for 2 weeks. We measured timed up and go (TUG), one leg stance: OLS), the range of motion (ROM) of the foot, and foot sensation (SWMT) before treatment, after the first single session, and after the 2-week treatment. Results After the single treatment session, only the Thai foot massage group showed a significant improvement in TUG. After the 2-week treatment, both Thai foot massage and control groups showed a significant improvement of TUG and OLS (P<0.05); however, when comparing between 2 groups, the Thai foot massage group showed better improvement in TUG than the control group (p<0.05). The Thai foot massage group also showed significant improvements in ROM and SWMT after the 2-week treatment. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that Thai foot massage is a viable alternative treatment for balance performance, ROM of the foot, and the foot sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25892354

  7. Further Data Supporting that the Paclitaxel-Associated Acute Pain Syndrome is Associated with the Development of Peripheral Neuropathy: NCCTG Trial N08C11

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Brandi N.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Wolf, Sherry L.; Burger, Kelli N.; Kamal, Arif; Le-Lindqwister, Nguyet A.; Soori, Gamini S.; Jaslowski, Anthony J.; Kelaghan, Joseph; Novotny, Paul J.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel causes an acute pain syndrome (P-APS), occurring within days after each dose and usually abating within days. Paclitaxel also causes a more classic peripheral neuropathy, which steadily increases in severity with increasing paclitaxel total doses. Little detail is available regarding the natural history of these two syndromes, or any relationship between them, although a recent publication does provide natural history data about weekly paclitaxel, supporting an association between the severity of P-APS and eventual peripheral neuropathy symptoms. Methods Patients entering this study were about to receive paclitaxel and carboplatin every 3 weeks. Daily questionnaires were completed for the first week after every chemotherapy dose and EORTC QLQ-CIPN 20 instruments were completed weekly. Results The P-APS severity peaked on day 4 after the initial chemotherapy dose, with 12%, 29%, 23%, and 36% of patients having maximal pain scores of 0, 1–4, 5–6, or 7–10 during the first week after the first dose of therapy, respectively. Patients with P-APS scores of 0–4 with the first dose of chemotherapy had less eventual sensory neuropathy than did patients with P-APS scores of 5–10 (p=0.001). With regard to the more peripheral neuropathy, sensory neuropathy was more problematic than was either motor or autonomic neuropathy. Numbness and tingling were more common components of the sensory neuropathy, than was pain. Conclusions Patients with worse P-APS severities appear to have more eventual chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy. This provides support for the concept that the P-APS is a form of nerve pathology. PMID:22415454

  8. Idiopathic neuropathy, prediabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gordon Smith, A; Robinson Singleton, J

    2006-03-15

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common problem encountered by neurologists and primary care physicians. While there are many causes for peripheral neuropathy, none can be identified in a large percentage of patients ("idiopathic neuropathy"). Despite its high prevalence, idiopathic neuropathy is poorly studied and understood. There is evolving evidence that impaired glucose tolerance (prediabetes) is associated with idiopathic neuropathy. Preliminary data from a multicenter study of diet and exercise in prediabetes (the Impaired Glucose Tolerance Neuropathy Study) suggests a diet and exercise counseling regimen based on the Diabetes Prevention Program results in improved metabolic measures and small fiber function. Prediabetes is part of the Metabolic Syndrome, which also includes hypertension, hyperlipidemia and obesity. Individual aspects of the Metabolic Syndrome influence risk and progression of diabetic neuropathy and may play a causative role in neuropathy both for those with prediabetes, and those with otherwise idiopathic neuropathy. Thus, a multifactorial treatment approach to individual components of Metabolic Syndrome may slow prediabetic neuropathy progression or result in improvement.

  9. The prevalence, patterns and predictors of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Katulanda, Prasad; Ranasinghe, Priyanga; Jayawardena, Ranil; Constantine, Godwin R; Sheriff, M H Rezvi; Matthews, David R

    2012-05-29

    Prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) has reached epidemic proportions in Sri Lanka. Presently there are studies on the community prevalence of distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in Sri Lanka. We describe prevalence, patterns and predictors of DPN in patients with DM in Sri Lanka. Data were collected as part of a national study on DM. In new cases DPN was assessed using the Diabetic-Neuropathy-Symptom (DNS) score, while in those with established diabetes both DNS and Toronto-Clinical-Scoring-System (TCSS) were used. A binary logistic-regression analysis was performed with 'presence of DPN' as the dichomatous dependent variable and other independent co-variants. The study included 528 diabetic patients (191-new cases), with a mean age of 55.0 ± 12.4 years and 37.3% were males, while 18% were from urban areas. Prevalence of DPN according to DNS score among all patients, patients with already established diabetes and newly diagnosed patients were 48.1%, 59.1% and 28.8% respectively. Prevalence of DPN in those with established DM as assessed by TCSS was 24% and the majority had mild DPN (16.6%). The remainder of the abstract is based on subjects with established DM. The prevalence of DPN in males and female was 20.0% and 26.4% respectively. The mean age of those with and without DPN was 62.1 ± 10.8 and 55.1 ± 10.8 years respectively (p < 0.001). The majority of those with DPN were from rural-areas (75.3%) and earned a monthly income < Sri Lankan Rupees 12,000 (87.6%). In the binary logistic-regression presence of foot ulcers (OR:10.4; 95%CI 1.8-16.7), female gender (OR:6.7; 95%CI 2.0-9.8) and smoking (OR:5.9; 95%CI 1.4-9.7) were the strongest predictors followed by insulin treatment (OR:4.3; 95%CI 1.3-6.9), diabetic retinopathy (OR:2.7; 95%CI 1.3-5.4), treatment with sulphonylureas (OR:1.8; 95%CI 1.1-3.2), increasing height (OR:1.8; 95%CI 1.2-2.4), rural residence (OR:1.8; 95%CI 1.1-2.5), higher levels of triglycerides (OR:1.6; 95%CI 1

  10. The Relationship Between Brain Volume and Walking Outcomes in Older Adults With and Without Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Brad; Newton, Elizabeth; Abduljalil, Amir; Novak, Vera

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) alters walking. Yet, the compensatory role of central locomotor circuits remains unclear. We hypothesized that walking outcomes would be more closely related to regional gray matter volumes in older adults with DPN as compared with nonneuropathic diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Clinically important outcomes of walking (i.e., speed, stride duration variability, and double support time) were measured in 29 patients with DPN (type 2 diabetes with foot-sole somatosensory impairment), 68 diabetic (DM) patients (type 2 diabetes with intact foot-sole sensation), and 89 control subjects. Global and regional gray matter volumes were calculated from 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS DPN subjects walked more slowly (P = 0.005) with greater stride duration variability (P < 0.001) and longer double support (P < 0.001) as compared with DM and control subjects. Diabetes was associated with less cerebellar gray matter volume (P < 0.001), but global gray matter volume was similar between groups. DPN subjects with lower gray matter volume globally (P < 0.004) and regionally (i.e., cerebellum, right-hemisphere dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, P < 0.005) walked more slowly with greater stride duration variability and/or longer double support. Each relationship was stronger in DPN than DM subjects. In control subjects, brain volumes did not relate to walking patterns. CONCLUSIONS Strong relationships between brain volumes and walking outcomes were observed in the DPN group and to a lesser extent the DM group, but not in control subjects. Individuals with DPN may be more dependent upon supraspinal elements of the motor control system to regulate several walking outcomes linked to poor health in elderly adults. PMID:22665216

  11. Effects of Common Polymorphisms in the MTHFR and ACE Genes on Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Progression: a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuai; Han, Yan; Hu, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaojie; Cui, Guangcheng; Li, Zezhi; Guan, Yangtai

    2017-05-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677 C>T and ACE I/D polymorphisms in the development of DPN. We systematically reviewed published studies on MTHFR 677 C>T and ACE I/D polymorphisms and DPN found in various types of electronic databases. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) quality score systems were used to determine the quality of the articles selected for inclusion. Odds ratios (ORs) and its corresponding 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) were calculated. We used STATA statistical software (version 12.0, Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA) to deal with statistical data. Our results indicated an association of ACE D>I mutation (OR = 1.43, 95 % CI 1.12-1.83, P = 0.004) and MTHFR 677 C>T mutation (OR = 1.43, 95 % CI 1.08-1.90, P = 0.014) with DPN under the allele model, and similar results were also found under the dominant model (all P < 0.05). Subgroup analysis by country indicated that the MTHFR 677 C>T polymorphism may be the main risk factor for DPN in Turkey under four genetic models. ACE D>I mutation was correlated with DPN in Japanese and Pakistani populations in the majority of groups. The relationships of MTHFR 677 C>T and ACE I/D polymorphisms with DPN patients presented in this meta-analyses support the view that the MTHFR and ACE genes might play an important role in the development of DPN.

  12. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Cancer Patients: A Four-Arm Randomized Trial on the Effectiveness of Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Rostock, M.; Jaroslawski, K.; Guethlin, C.; Ludtke, R.; Schröder, S.; Bartsch, H. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common and dose-limiting side effect of cytostatic drugs. Since there are no proven therapeutic procedures against CIPN, we were interested to define the role of electroacupuncture (EA) from which preliminary data showed promising results. Methods. In a randomized trial with a group sequential adaptive design in patients with CIPN, we compared EA (LV3, SP9, GB41, GB34, LI4, LI11, SI3, and HT3; n = 14) with hydroelectric baths (HB, n = 14), vitamin B1/B6 capsules (300/300 mg daily; VitB, n = 15), and placebo capsules (n = 17). The statistical power in this trial was primarily calculated for proving EA only, so results of HB and VitB are pilot data. Results. CIPN complaints improved by 0.8 ± 1.2 (EA), 1.7 ± 1.7 (HB), 1.6 ± 2.0 (VitB), and 1.3 ± 1.3 points (placebo) on a 10-point numeric rating scale without significant difference between treatment groups or placebo. In addition no significant differences in sensory nerve conduction studies or quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) were found. Conclusions. The used EA concept, HB, and VitB were not superior to placebo. Since, contrary to our results, studies with different acupuncture concepts showed a positive effect on CIPN, the effect of acupuncture on CIPN remains unclear. Further randomized, placebo controlled studies seem necessary. This trial is registered with DRKS00004448. PMID:24066010

  13. Evaluation of the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst Fe(III) tetra-mesitylporphyrin octasulfonate on peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    DREL, VIKTOR R.; PACHER, PAL; VARENIUK, IGOR; PAVLOV, IVAN A.; ILNYTSKA, OLGA; LYZOGUBOV, VALERIY V.; BELL, SETH R.; GROVES, JOHN T.; OBROSOVA, IRINA G.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas the important role of free radicals in diabetes-associated complications is well established, the contributions of the highly reactive oxidant peroxynitrite have not been properly explored. The present study used a pharmacological approach to evaluate the role of peroxynitrite in peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Control and STZ-diabetic mice were maintained with or without treatment with the potent peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst Fe(III) tetra-mesitylporphyrin octasulfonate (FeTMPS), at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg/day in the drinking water for 3 weeks after an initial 3 weeks without treatment. Mice with a 6-week duration of diabetes developed clearly manifest motor (MNCV) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) deficits, thermal hypoalgesia (paw withdrawal, tail-flick, and hot plate tests), mechanical hypoalgesia (tail pressure Randall-Sellito test), tactile allodynia (flexible von Frey filament test), and ~44% loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers. They also had increased nitrotyrosine and poly(ADP-ribose) immunofluorescence in sciatic nerve, grey matter of the spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglion neurons. FeTMPS treatment alleviated or essentially corrected (at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day) MNCV and SNCV deficits, and was associated with less severe small sensory nerve fiber dysfunction and degeneration. Nitrotyrosine and poly(ADP-ribose) immunofluorescence in sciatic nerve, spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglion neurons in peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst-treated diabetic mice was markedly reduced. In conclusion, peroxynitrite contributes to large motor, large sensory, and small sensory fiber neuropathy in streptozotocin-diabetic mice. The findings provide rationale for development of potent peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:17982684

  14. Peripheral and Autonomic Neuropathy in South Asians and White Caucasians with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Possible Explanations for Epidemiological Differences

    PubMed Central

    Altaf, Q. A.; Piya, Milan K.; Barnett, Anthony H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and that of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) between South Asians and White Caucasians with type 2 diabetes and to explore reasons for observed differences. Methods. A cross-sectional study of casually selected South Asian and White Caucasian adults attending a hospital-based diabetes clinic in the UK. DPN and CAN were assessed using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) and heart rate variability testing, respectively. Results. Patients (n = 266) were recruited (47.4% South Asians). DPN was more common in White Caucasians compared to South Asians (54.3% versus 38.1%, p = 0.008). Foot insensitivity as assessed by 10 g monofilament perception was more common in White Caucasians (43.9% versus 23.8%, p = 0.001). After adjustment for confounders, White Caucasians remained twice as likely to have DPN as South Asians, but the impact of ethnicity became nonsignificant after adjusting for adiposity measures or height. No difference in prevalence of standardized CAN test abnormalities was detected between ethnicities. Skin microvascular assessment demonstrated that South Asians had reduced heating flux but preserved acetylcholine response. Conclusions. South Asians with type 2 diabetes have fewer clinical signs of DPN compared to White Caucasians. Differences in adiposity (and its distribution) and height appear to explain these differences.

  15. Pilot Testing a Web-Based System for the Assessment and Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Knoerl, Robert; Dudley, William N; Smith, Gloria; Bridges, Celia; Kanzawa-Lee, Grace; Lavoie Smith, Ellen M

    2017-04-01

    Because numerous barriers hinder the assessment and management of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in clinical practice, the Carevive Care Planning System, a novel Web-based platform, was developed to address these barriers. It provides patients an opportunity to report their symptoms before their clinic visit and generates customizable care plans composed of evidence-based management strategies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient and provider perspectives of feasibility, usability, acceptability, and satisfaction with the Carevive platform. We used a single-arm, pretest/posttest, prospective design and recruited 25 women with breast cancer who were receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy and six advanced practice providers from an academic hospital. At three consecutive clinical visits, patients reported their neuropathy symptoms on a tablet via the Carevive system. The Diffusion of Innovations Theory served as an overarching evaluation framework. The Carevive platform was feasible to use. However, patients had higher ratings of usability, acceptability, and satisfaction with the platform than did the providers, who disliked the amount of time required to use the platform and had difficulty logging into Carevive. If issues regarding provider dissatisfaction can be addressed, the Carevive platform may aid in the screening of neuropathy symptoms and facilitate the use of evidence-based management strategies.

  16. Sonographic evaluation of the peripheral nerves in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hwa; Yang, Seung Nam; Yoon, Joon Shik; Park, Bum Jun

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that affects peripheral nerves by repeated focal pressure. HNPP can be diagnosed by clinical findings, electrodiagnostic studies, histopathological features, and genetic analysis. Ultrasonography is increasingly used for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases; however, sonographic features of HNPP have not been clearly defined. We report the sonographic findings and comparative electrodiagnostic data in a 73-year-old woman with HNPP, confirmed by genetic analysis. The cross-sectional areas of peripheral nerves were enlarged at typical nerve entrapment sites, but enlargement at non-entrapment sites was uncommon. These sonographic features may be helpful for diagnosis of HNPP when electrodiagnostic studies are suspicious of HNPP and/or gene study is not compatible.

  17. Sonographic Evaluation of the Peripheral Nerves in Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hwa; Yoon, Joon Shik; Park, Bum Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that affects peripheral nerves by repeated focal pressure. HNPP can be diagnosed by clinical findings, electrodiagnostic studies, histopathological features, and genetic analysis. Ultrasonography is increasingly used for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases; however, sonographic features of HNPP have not been clearly defined. We report the sonographic findings and comparative electrodiagnostic data in a 73-year-old woman with HNPP, confirmed by genetic analysis. The cross-sectional areas of peripheral nerves were enlarged at typical nerve entrapment sites, but enlargement at non-entrapment sites was uncommon. These sonographic features may be helpful for diagnosis of HNPP when electrodiagnostic studies are suspicious of HNPP and/or gene study is not compatible. PMID:24639934

  18. Specific Contactin N-Glycans Are Implicated in Neurofascin Binding and Autoimmune Targeting in Peripheral Neuropathies*

    PubMed Central

    Labasque, Marilyne; Hivert, Bruno; Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Querol, Luis; Illa, Isabel; Faivre-Sarrailh, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play a crucial role in the formation of the nodes of Ranvier and in the rapid propagation of the nerve impulses along myelinated axons. These CAMs are the targets of autoimmunity in inflammatory neuropathies. We recently showed that a subgroup of patients with aggressive chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) shows autoantibodies to contactin (1). The complex of contactin·Caspr·neurofascin-155 (NF155) enables the formation of paranodal junctions, suggesting that antibody attack against paranodes may participate in the severity of CIDP. In the present study, we mapped the molecular determinants of contactin targeted by the autoantibodies. In three patients, immunoreactivity was directed against the Ig domains of contactin and was dependent on N-glycans. The serum of one patient was selectively directed against contactin bearing mannose-rich N-glycans. Strikingly, the oligomannose type sugars of contactin are required for association with its glial partner NF155 (2). To investigate precisely the role of contactin N-glycans, we have mutated each of the nine consensus N-glycosylation sites independently. We found that the mutation of three sites (N467Q/N473Q/N494Q) in Ig domain 5 of contactin prevented soluble NF155-Fc binding. In contrast, these mutations did not abolish cis-association with Caspr. Next, we showed that the cluster of N-glycosylation sites (Asn-467, Asn-473, and Asn-494) was required for immunoreactivity in one patient. Using cell aggregation assays, we showed that the IgGs from the four CIDP patients prevented adhesive interaction between contactin·Caspr and NF155. Importantly, we showed that the anti-contactin autoantibodies induced alteration of paranodal junctions in myelinated neuronal culture. These results strongly suggest that antibodies to CAMs may be pathogenic and induce demyelination via functional blocking activity. PMID:24497634

  19. Study of Vitamin B12 deficiency and peripheral neuropathy in metformin-treated early Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rudra Prasad; Ghosh, Kaushik; Ghosh, Manas; Acharyya, Amitava; Bhattacharya, Ambarish; Pal, Mrinal; Chakraborty, Sisir; Sengupta, Nilanjan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term therapy with metformin was shown to decrease the Vitamin B12 level and manifested as peripheral neuropathy. Aim: The aim of this study is to define the prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency in early Type 2 diabetic patients (duration ≤5 years or drug treatment ≤3 years) and the relationship among metformin exposure and levels of cobalamin (Cbl), folic acid, and homocysteine (Hcy) with severity of peripheral neuropathy. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study involving randomly selected ninety patients (male 56, female 34) between age groups of 35 and 70 years, comparing those who had received >6 months of metformin (Group A) (n = 35) with those without metformin (Group B) (n = 35) and patients taking metformin with other oral hypoglycemic agent (Group C) (n = 20). Comparisons were made clinically, biochemically (serum Cbl, fasting Hcy, and folic acid), and with electrophysiological measures (nerve conduction studies of all four limbs). Comorbidities contributing to neuropathy were excluded from the study. Results: Group A patients (54.28%) were prone to develop peripheral neuropathy comparing Group B (28.57%) and Group C (35%). There was significantly low plasma level of Cbl in Group A (mean 306.314 pg/ml) than in Group B (mean 627.543 pg/ml) and Group C (mean 419.920 pg/ml). There was insignificant low-level plasma folic acid in Group A (16.47 ng/ml) than in Group B (16.81 ng/ml) and Group C (22.50 ng/ml). There was significantly high level of Hcy in Group A (mean 17.35 µmol/L) and Group C (mean 16.99 µmol/L) than in Group B (mean 13.22 µmol/L). Metformin users even for 2 years showed evidence of neuropathy on nerve conduction velocity though their body mass index and postprandial blood sugar were maintained. There was significant difference in between groups regarding plasma Cbl, folic acid, and Hcy level as significance level <0.05 in all three groups (F [2, 87] = 28.1, P = 0.000), (F [2, 87] = 7.43, P = 0.001), (F [2, 87] = 9

  20. Characterization of the peripheral neuropathy associated with brentuximab vedotin treatment of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Zachary A; Nguyen-Lin, Annie; Li, Shufeng; Rahbar, Ziba; Tavallaee, Mahkam; Vogel, Hannes; Salva, Katrin A; Wood, Gary S; Kim, Youn H; Nagpal, Seema

    2017-03-07

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common, frequently limits chemotherapy dosing, and negatively impacts quality of life. The National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 4.0, and the Total Neuropathy Score clinical version (TNSc) are both validated scores to quantify peripheral neuropathy (PN), with the TNSc being more sensitive to clinical changes. Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) are characterized by a chronic course, where current therapies are generally non-curative and treatment toxicities have the potential for significant lasting effects. Brentuximab vedotin (BV) is an antibody-drug-conjugate composed of an anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody linked to the microtubule-disrupting agent, monomethyl auristatin E, with a known associated CIPN. In our phase II clinical trial of BV in MF/SS, 25 (69%) of 36 patients developed PN, with 18 (50%) developing Clinically Significant PN, CTCAE v4.0 grade 2 or higher. The median time to grade 2 PN was 15 weeks (range 0.4-48) after the initial dose. By Kaplan-Meier calculation, the median time to improvement from Clinically Significant PN was 30 weeks from the last BV dose. Seventy-four percent had improvement by 24 months. We found that TNSc scores significantly correlated with CTCAE grade, with Spearman correlation coefficient 0.68 (p < 0.001). By logistic regression, for each 100 mg increase in BV total dose, the likelihood of developing Clinically Significant PN increased by 23% (95% CI 4-46%). Improved monitoring of CIPN associated with BV is of paramount importance in the MF/SS population.

  1. Identification of two novel KIF5A mutations in hereditary spastic paraplegia associated with mild peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    López, Eva; Casasnovas, Carlos; Giménez, Javier; Santamaría, Raúl; Terrazas, Jesús M; Volpini, Víctor

    2015-11-15

    Spastic paraplegia type 10 (SPG10) is a rare form of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) due to mutations in KIF5A, a gene encoding the neuronal kinesin heavy-chain involved in axonal transport. KIF5A mutations have been associated with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from pure HSP to isolated peripheral nerve involvement or complicated HSP phenotypes. Most KIF5A mutations are clustered in the motor domain of the protein that is necessary for microtubule interaction. Here we describe two Spanish families with an adult onset complicated AD-HSP in which neurological studies revealed a mild sensory neuropathy. Intention tremor was also present in both families. Molecular genetic analysis identified two novel mutations c.773 C>T and c.833 C>T in the KIF5A gene resulting in the P258L and P278L substitutions respectively. Both were located in the highly conserved kinesin motor domain of the protein which has previously been identified as a hot spot for KIF5A mutations. This study adds to the evidence associating the known occurrence of mild peripheral neuropathy in the adult onset SPG10 type of AD-HSP.

  2. Severity of Demyelinating and Axonal Neuropathy Mouse Models Is Modified by Genes Affecting Structure and Function of Peripheral Nodes.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Kathryn H; Seburn, Kevin L; Schroeder, David G; Spaulding, Emily L; Dionne, Loiuse A; Cox, Gregory A; Burgess, Robert W

    2017-03-28

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited polyneuropathies. Mutations in 80 genetic loci can cause forms of CMT, resulting in demyelination and axonal dysfunction. The clinical presentation, including sensory deficits, distal muscle weakness, and atrophy, can vary greatly in severity and progression. Here, we used mouse models of CMT to demonstrate genetic interactions that result in a more severe neuropathy phenotype. The cell adhesion molecule Nrcam and the Na(+) channel Scn8a (NaV1.6) are important components of nodes. Homozygous Nrcam and heterozygous Scn8a mutations synergized with both an Sh3tc2 mutation, modeling recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4C, and mutations in Gars, modeling dominant axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D. We conclude that genetic variants perturbing the structure and function of nodes interact with mutations affecting the cable properties of axons by thinning myelin or reducing axon diameter. Therefore, genes integral to peripheral nodes are candidate modifiers of peripheral neuropathy.

  3. Prediction of peripheral neuropathy in multiple myeloma patients receiving bortezomib and thalidomide: a genetic study based on a single nucleotide polymorphism array.

    PubMed

    García-Sanz, Ramón; Corchete, Luis Antonio; Alcoceba, Miguel; Chillon, María Carmen; Jiménez, Cristina; Prieto, Isabel; García-Álvarez, María; Puig, Noemi; Rapado, Immaculada; Barrio, Santiago; Oriol, Albert; Blanchard, María Jesús; de la Rubia, Javier; Martínez, Rafael; Lahuerta, Juan José; González Díaz, Marcos; Mateos, María Victoria; San Miguel, Jesús Fernando; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Sarasquete, María Eugenia

    2016-09-08

    Bortezomib- and thalidomide-based therapies have significantly contributed to improved survival of multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, treatment-induced peripheral neuropathy (TiPN) is a common adverse event associated with them. Risk factors for TiPN in MM patients include advanced age, prior neuropathy, and other drugs, but there are conflicting results about the role of genetics in predicting the risk of TiPN. Thus, we carried out a genome-wide association study based on more than 300 000 exome single nucleotide polymorphisms in 172 MM patients receiving therapy involving bortezomib and thalidomide. We compared patients developing and not developing TiPN under similar treatment conditions (GEM05MAS65, NCT00443235). The highest-ranking single nucleotide polymorphism was rs45443101, located in the PLCG2 gene, but no significant differences were found after multiple comparison correction (adjusted P = .1708). Prediction analyses, cytoband enrichment, and pathway analyses were also performed, but none yielded any significant findings. A copy number approach was also explored, but this gave no significant results either. In summary, our study did not find a consistent genetic component associated with TiPN under bortezomib and thalidomide therapies that could be used for prediction, which makes clinical judgment essential in the practical management of MM treatment.

  4. Peripheral neuropathy: the importance of history and examination for correct diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with hematemesis and a 6-month history of unsteady gait and falls due to tripping. Because of a history of alcohol abuse, the initial diagnosis was upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to alcoholic gastritis or gastric ulcer, with the neuropathy likely due to alcoholism or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. After further neurological examination and careful review of nerve conduction studies, however, an inherited neuropathy was suspected. Despite denial by the patient and her daughter of a family history of neuropathy, both had a pes cavus deformity with muscle atrophy and partial foot drop gait. Subsequent testing of the daughter revealed the same nerve conduction findings as the patient's. Genetic testing showed that both women had the myelin PMP22 repeat defect characteristic of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Endoscopy revealed that the patient had Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, which accounted for the hematemesis.

  5. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  6. A critical appraisal of the mild axonal peripheral neuropathy of late neurologic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Wormser, Gary P; Strle, Franc; Shapiro, Eugene D; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Auwaerter, Paul G

    2017-02-01

    In older studies, a chronic distal symmetric sensory neuropathy was reported as a relatively common manifestation of late Lyme disease in the United States. However, the original papers describing this entity had notable inconsistencies and certain inexplicable findings, such as reports that this condition developed in patients despite prior antibiotic treatment known to be highly effective for other manifestations of Lyme disease. More recent literature suggests that this entity is seen rarely, if at all. A chronic distal symmetric sensory neuropathy as a manifestation of late Lyme disease in North America should be regarded as controversial and in need of rigorous validation studies before acceptance as a documented clinical entity.

  7. The Peripheral Neuropathy-Linked Trembler and Trembler-J Mutant Forms of Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 are Folding-Destabilized†

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeffrey K.; Mobley, Charles K.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the tetraspan membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are known to result in peripheral neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A (CMT1A) disease via mechanisms that appear to be closely linked to misfolding of PMP22 in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To characterize the molecular defects in PMP22, we examined the structure and folding stability of two human disease mutant forms of PMP22 that are also the basis for mouse models of peripheral neuropathies: G150D (Trembler phenotype), and L16P (Trembler-J phenotype). Circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopic studies indicated that, when folded, the 3-D structures of these disease-linked mutants are similar to the folded wild type protein. However, the folded forms of the mutants were observed to be destabilized relative to the wild type protein, with the L16P mutant being particularly unstable. The rate of refolding from an unfolded state was observed to be very slow for the wild type protein, and no refolding was observed for either mutant. These results lead to the hypothesis that ER quality control recognizes the G150D and L16P mutant forms of PMP22 as defective through mechanisms closely related to their conformational instability and/or slow folding. It was also seen that wild type PMP22 binds Zn(II) and Cu(II) with micromolar affinity, a property that may be important to the stability and function of this protein. Zn(II) was able to rescue the stability defect of the Tr mutant. PMID:18795802

  8. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Said, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy in the world. Both type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 diabetes are commonly complicated by peripheral nerve disorders. Two main types of neuropathy are observed: the most common is a nerve fiber length-dependent, distal symmetrical sensory polyneuropathy with little motor involvement but frequent, and potentially life threatening, autonomic dysfunction. Alteration of temperature and pain sensations in the feet is an early manifestation of diabetic polyneuropathy. The second pattern is a focal neuropathy, which more commonly complicates or reveals type 2 diabetes. Poor diabetic control increases the risk of neuropathy with subsequent neuropathic pains and trophic changes in the feet, which can be prevented by education of patients.

  9. Acute peripheral neuropathy in adults. Guillain-Barré syndrome and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Pascuzzi, R M; Fleck, J D

    1997-08-01

    Acute paralysis in adults has an extensive assortment of etiologies. Guillian-Barré syndrome is the most common cause of acute neuropathy in adults. This review emphasizes pathophysiology, clinical features, differential diagnosis, and a practical approach to the laboratory work-up for patients with suspected Guillian-Barré syndrome. The current status of immunotherapy is reviewed.

  10. Rikkunshito prevents paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy through the suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) phosphorylation in spinal cord of mice.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Sakai, Akane; Nakanishi, Yuki; Kai, Misa; Ikegami, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the major side effect caused by paclitaxel, a microtubule-binding antineoplastic drug. Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy causes a long-term negative impact on the patient's quality of life. However, the mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is still unknown, and there is no established treatment. Ghrelin is known to attenuate thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, and inhibit the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) in the spinal dorsal horn. Rikkunshito (RKT), a kampo medicine, increases the secretion of ghrelin in rodents and humans. Thus, RKT may attenuate paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by inhibiting phosphorylated NFκB (pNFκB) in the spinal cord. We found that paclitaxel dose-dependently induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Paclitaxel increased the protein levels of spinal pNFκB, but not those of spinal NFκB. NFκB inhibitor attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia suggesting that the activation of NFκB mediates paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia. RKT dose-dependently attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Ghrelin receptor antagonist reversed the RKT-induced attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. RKT inhibited the paclitaxel-induced increase in the protein levels of spinal pNFκB. Taken together, the present study indicates that RKT exerts an antihyperalgesic effect in paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing the activation of spinal NFκB.

  11. Rikkunshito prevents paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy through the suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) phosphorylation in spinal cord of mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Junzo; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Sakai, Akane; Nakanishi, Yuki; Kai, Misa; Ikegami, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the major side effect caused by paclitaxel, a microtubule-binding antineoplastic drug. Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy causes a long-term negative impact on the patient's quality of life. However, the mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is still unknown, and there is no established treatment. Ghrelin is known to attenuate thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, and inhibit the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) in the spinal dorsal horn. Rikkunshito (RKT), a kampo medicine, increases the secretion of ghrelin in rodents and humans. Thus, RKT may attenuate paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by inhibiting phosphorylated NFκB (pNFκB) in the spinal cord. We found that paclitaxel dose-dependently induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Paclitaxel increased the protein levels of spinal pNFκB, but not those of spinal NFκB. NFκB inhibitor attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia suggesting that the activation of NFκB mediates paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia. RKT dose-dependently attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Ghrelin receptor antagonist reversed the RKT-induced attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. RKT inhibited the paclitaxel-induced increase in the protein levels of spinal pNFκB. Taken together, the present study indicates that RKT exerts an antihyperalgesic effect in paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing the activation of spinal NFκB. PMID:28182729

  12. Association of Thymidylate Synthase Polymorphisms with Acute Pancreatitis and/or Peripheral Neuropathy in HIV-Infected Patients on Stavudine-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ferran; Salazar, Juliana; Gutierrez, Maria del Mar; Mateo, Maria Gracia; Martínez, Esteban; Domingo, Joan Carles; Fernandez, Irene; Villarroya, Francesc; Ribera, Esteban; Vidal, Francesc; Baiget, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Background Low expression thymidylate synthase (TS) polymorphism has been associated with increased stavudine triphosphate intracellular (d4T-TP) levels and the lipodystrophy syndrome. The use of d4T has been associated with acute pancreatitis and peripheral neuropathy. However, no relationship has ever been proved between TS polymorphisms and pancreatitis and/or peripheral neuropathy. Methods We performed a case-control study to assess the relationship of TS and methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms with acute pancreatitis and/or peripheral neuropathy in patients exposed to d4T. Student’s t test, Pearson’s correlations, one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction and stepwise logistic regression analyses were done. Results Forty-three cases and 129 controls were studied. Eight patients (18.6%) had acute pancreatitis, and 35 (81.4%) had peripheral neuropathy. Prior AIDS was more frequent in cases than in controls (OR = 2.36; 95%CI 1.10–5.07, P = 0.0247). L7ow expression TS and MTHFR genotype associated with increased activity were more frequent in patients with acute pancreatitis and/or peripheral neuropathy than in controls (72.1% vs. 46.5%, OR = 2.97; 95%CI: 1.33–6.90, P = 0.0062, and 79.1% vs. 56.6%, OR = 2.90, 95%CI: 1.23–7.41, P = 0.0142, respectively). Independent positive or negative predictors for the development of d4T-associated pancreatitis and/or peripheral neuropathy were: combined TS and MTHFR genotypes (reference: A+A; P = 0.002; ORA+B = 0.34 [95%CI: 0.08 to 1.44], ORB+A = 3.38 [95%CI: 1.33 to 8.57], ORB+B = 1.13 [95%CI: 0.34 to 3.71]), nadir CD4 cell count >200 cells/mm3 (OR = 0.38; 95%CI: 0.17–0.86, P = 0.021), and HALS (OR = 0.39 95%CI: 0.18–0.85, P = 0.018). Conclusions Low expression TS plus a MTHFR genotype associated with increased activity is associated with the development of peripheral neuropathy in d4T-exposed patients. PMID:23468971

  13. A 52-year-old woman with disabling peripheral neuropathy: review of diabetic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rutkove, Seward B

    2009-10-07

    Ms Q is a 52-year-old woman who has had progressive polyneuropathy in the setting of diabetes for the past 8 years. Ms Q's major disability is that of increasingly severe neuropathic pain and cramps that have been poorly responsive to a variety of therapies, including gabapentin and topiramate. The diagnosis of and differential diagnosis for diabetic polyneuropathy are reviewed herein. In general, treatment options for diabetic polyneuropathy remain primarily symptomatic. Improving the metabolic profile through weight loss, exercise, and if necessary, medications may help slow neuropathy progression. Many medications are effective in reducing pain, and newly developed ones, such as pregabalin and duloxetine, while specifically marketed for diabetic neuropathy, are likely to be no better and are considerably more expensive than older ones. Alpha-lipoic acid appears to be effective as well.

  14. Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L. Z.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass-Angioplasty-Revascularization-Investigation-2-Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing versus insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. 2368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD were evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression, adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, HbA1c, diabetes duration. 51% BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR1.57, 1.15, 2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea or combination of sulfonylurea/metformin/TZD had marginally higher rates of DPN than the metformin/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN. PMID:19335534

  15. Plantar fascia enthesopathy is highly prevalent in diabetic patients without peripheral neuropathy and correlates with retinopathy and impaired kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Arturi, Franco; Nicolosi, Kassandra; Ammendolia, Antonio; D’Angelo, Salvatore; Russo, Emilio; Naty, Saverio; Bruno, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Olivieri, Ignazio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Background Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of plantar fascia (PF) enthesopathy in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients without distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods We recruited 50 T2DM patients without DPN and 50 healthy controls. DPN was excluded using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). All patients underwent a bilateral sonographicevaluation of the enthesealportion of the PF. Results PF thickness was significantly higher in T2DM patients (p<0.0001). T2DM patients presented a higher prevalence of entheseal thickening (p = 0.002), enthesophyte (p = 0.02) and cortical irregularity (p = 0.02). The overall sum of abnormalities was higher in T2DM patients (p<0.0001), as was the percentage of bilateral involvement (p = 0.005). In a logistic regression analysis, retinopathy predicted entheseal thickening (OR 3.5, p = 0.05) and enthesophytes (OR 5.13, p = 0.001); reduced eGFR predicted enthesophytes (OR 2.93, p = 0.04); body mass index (BMI) predicted cortical irregularity (OR 0.87, p = 0.05); mean glucose predicted enthesophyte (OR 1.01, p = 0.03); LDL cholesterol predicted cortical irregularity (OR 0.98, p = 0.02). Conclusions Our data suggest that T2DM is associated with PF enthesopathyindependently of DPN. PMID:28358891

  16. Disruptive SCYL1 Mutations Underlie a Syndrome Characterized by Recurrent Episodes of Liver Failure, Peripheral Neuropathy, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M.; Rutledge, S. Lane; Schüle, Rebecca; Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Züchner, Stephan; Boltshauser, Eugen; Bittner, Reginald E.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias comprise a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by clinically variable cerebellar dysfunction and accompanied by involvement of other organ systems. The molecular underpinnings for many of these diseases are widely unknown. Previously, we discovered the disruption of Scyl1 as the molecular basis of the mouse mutant mdf, which is affected by neurogenic muscular atrophy, progressive gait ataxia with tremor, cerebellar vermis atrophy, and optic-nerve thinning. Here, we report on three human individuals, from two unrelated families, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute liver failure in early infancy and are affected by cerebellar vermis atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. By whole-exome sequencing, compound-heterozygous mutations within SCYL1 were identified in all affected individuals. We further show that in SCYL1-deficient human fibroblasts, the Golgi apparatus is massively enlarged, which is in line with the concept that SCYL1 regulates Golgi integrity. Thus, our findings define SCYL1 mutations as the genetic cause of a human hepatocerebellar neuropathy syndrome. PMID:26581903

  17. Histopathological and behavioral evaluations of the effects of crocin, safranal and insulin on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Farshid, Amir Abbas; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Crocin and safranal, the major constituents of saffron, exert neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of crocin and safranal (alone or in combination with insulin) on peripheral neuropathy in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 60 mg/kg of streptozotocin (STZ) and confirmed by blood glucose level higher than 250 mg/dl. After confirmation of diabetes, crocin (30 mg/kg, i.p.), safranal (1 mg/kg, i.p.) (alone or in combination with insulin) and insulin (5 IU/kg, s.c.) were administered for eight weeks. Neuropathic pain was evaluated using acetone drop test. Histopathological changes of sciatic nerve were evaluated using light microscope. Blood glucose levels and sciatic nerve malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were also measured. Results: STZ caused cold allodynia, edema and degenerative changes of sciatic nerve, hyperglycemia and an elevation of sciatic nerve MDA levels. Crocin, safranal and insulin improved STZ-induced behavioral, histopathological and biochemical changes. Combined treatments produced more documented improving effects. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed neuroprotective effects of crocin, safranal and insulin in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy. In addition, crocin and safranal enhanced the neuroprotective effect of insulin. The neuroprotective effects of theses chemical compounds could be associated with their anti-hyperglycemic and antioxidant properties. PMID:26468467

  18. A prospective surveillance model for physical rehabilitation of women with breast cancer: chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Michael D; McNeely, Margaret L; Alfano, Catherine M; Mayer, Deborah K

    2012-04-15

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) results from damage to or dysfunction of the peripheral nerves. The development of CIPN is anticipated for the majority of breast cancer patients who receive neurotoxic chemotherapy, depending on the agent used, dose, and schedule. Sensory symptoms often predominate and include numbness, tingling, and distal extremity pain. Weakness, gait impairment, loss of functional abilities, and other deficits may develop with more severe CIPN. This article outlines a prospective surveillance model for physical rehabilitation of women with breast cancer who develop CIPN. Rehabilitative efforts for CIPN start at the time of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. The prechemotherapy evaluation identifies patients with preexisting peripheral nervous system disorders that may place them at higher risk for the development of CIPN. This clinical evaluation should include a history focusing on symptoms and functional activities as well as a physical examination that objectively assesses the patient's strength, sensation, reflexes, and gait. Ongoing surveillance following the initiation of a neurotoxic agent is important to monitor for the development and progression of symptoms associated with CIPN, and to ensure its resolution over the long term. CIPN is managed best by a multidisciplinary team approach. Early identification of symptoms will ensure appropriate referral and timely symptom management. The prospective surveillance model promotes a patient-centered approach to care, from pretreatment through survivorship and palliative care. In this way, the model offers promise in addressing and minimizing both the acute and long-term morbidity associated with CIPN.

  19. Central or peripheral delivery of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist improves mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, N K; Ryals, J M; Wright, D E

    2015-01-29

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8 weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of

  20. [Combination Therapy of Pregabalin with Tramadol for Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Gynecological Cancer Receiving Taxane Containing Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Tadaaki; Hasegawa, Kosei; Shintani, Daisuke; Yano, Yuri; Sato, Sho; Yabuno, Akira; Kurosaki, Akira; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Keiichi

    2017-03-01

    Taxane-based regimens are often used in gynecologic cancer chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy( CIPN)is one of the typical side effects caused by taxanes. Grade 2 or higher CIPN is observed in 5% to 30% of ovarian cancer patients who are treated with paclitaxel, which is recognized as one of the unmanageable side effects leading to treatment interruption. We retrospectively investigated the significance of combination therapy of pregabalin with tramadol for CIPN in patients with gynecological cancer. In the current study, 19 patients(19/22; 86%)were administered pregabalin with tramadol orally for at least 1week, and we observed improvement of the CIPN in 15 patients(15/19; 79%).We suggest that the combination therapy of pregabalin with tramadol has a positive impact on the CIPN in patients under a taxane-based chemotherapy.

  1. Do all neuropathy patients need an EMG at least once?

    PubMed

    Smith, A Gordon

    2014-10-01

    EMG, which consists of nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography, is an essential diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected peripheral neuropathy. Many neurologists order an EMG for all patients with suspected peripheral neuropathy. Not surprisingly, evidence now exists that shows EMG is a major driver of health care costs associated with neuropathy diagnoses. As neurologic practice evolves from fee for service to value-based compensation, neurologists will need to justify the diagnostic utility of EMG (outcome) relative to its cost. While carefully performed studies of diagnostic utility in many patient populations are lacking, a robust literature provides guidance regarding the potential role and limitations of EMG in neuropathy diagnosis as well as the pitfalls referring providers and electrodiagnostic consultants must consider. Do all neuropathy patients need an EMG at least once? This article attempts to answer this question using an illustrative case to highlight critical factors every neurologist must consider before ordering an EMG for neuropathy diagnosis.

  2. A Trial-Based Economic Evaluation Comparing Spinal Cord Stimulation With Best Medical Treatment in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Slangen, Rachel; Faber, Catharina G; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Joosten, Elbert A; van Dongen, Robert T; Kessels, Alfons G; van Kleef, Maarten; Dirksen, Carmen D

    2017-04-01

    The objective was to perform an economic evaluation comparing spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in combination with best medical treatment (BMT) with BMT in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. Alongside a prospective 2-center randomized controlled trial, involving 36 painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with severe lower limb pain not responding to conventional therapy, an economic evaluation was performed. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were based on: 1) societal costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and 2) direct health care costs and the number of successfully treated patients, respectively, both with a time horizon of 12 months. Bootstrap and secondary analyses were performed to address uncertainty. Total societal cost amounted to €26,539.18 versus €5,313.45 per patient in the SCS and BMT group, respectively. QALYs were .58 versus .36 and the number of successfully treated patients was 55% versus 7% for the SCS and BMT group, respectively. This resulted in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of €94,159.56 per QALY and €34,518.85 per successfully treated patient, respectively. Bootstrap analyses showed that the probability of SCS being cost-effective ranges from 0 to 46% with willingness to pay threshold values ranging between €20,000 and €80,000 for a QALY. Secondary analyses showed that cost-effectiveness of SCS became more favorable after correcting for baseline cost imbalance between the 2 groups, extending the depreciation period of SCS material to 4 years, and extrapolation of the data up to 4 years. Although SCS was considerably more effective compared with BMT, the substantial initial investment that is required resulted in SCS not being cost-effective in the short term. Cost-effectiveness results were sensitive to baseline cost imbalances between the groups and the depreciation period of the SCS material.

  3. A systematic review of the role of renin angiotensin aldosterone system genes in diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: The renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a vital role in regulating glucose metabolism and blood pressure, electrolyte and fluid homeostasis. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the association of the RAAS genes with diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications of retinopathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Materials and Methods: The relevant English-language studies were identified using the key words of DM, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), T2DM, renin angiotensin aldosterone polymorphisms or genotypes and RAAS from the search engines of MEDLINE/PubMed, and Scopus from January 1, 1995 to July 30, 2014. Inclusion criteria for selecting relevant studies were reporting the role of RAAS gene variants in the pathogenesis of T1DM or T2DM, diabetic retinopathy (DR), diabetic neuropathy and cardiovascular complication of DM. Results: The reviewers identified 204 studies of which 73 were eligible for inclusion in the present systematic review. The review indicates the angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T polymorphism might not affect the risk of DM. The role of angiotensin converting enzyme insertion/deletion (ACE I/D) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene (AT1R) A1166C polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of DM could not be established. Studies indicate the absence of an association between three polymorphisms of AGT M235T, ACE I/D and AT1R A1166C and DR in DM patients. A protective role for ACE II genotype against diabetic peripheral neuropathy has been suggested. Also, the ACE I/D polymorphism might be associated with the risk of CVD in DM patients. Conclusion: More studies with adequate sample size that investigate the influence of all RAAS gene variants together on the risk of DM and its complications are necessary to provide a more clear picture of the RAAS genes polymorphisms involvement in the pathogenesis of DM and its complications. PMID:25657757

  4. Case study: use of vibration therapy in the treatment of diabetic peripheral small fiber neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Junggi; Barnes, Meredith; Kessler, Nathan

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to describe a case of type II diabetic peripheral small fiber neuropathic pain treated with whole body vibration therapy after a failed trial of conventional drugs and interventional pain management. A 64-year-old male had chronic diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain in his both feet for about 2 years. The patient tried multiple pain medications and various interventional pain treatments without significant pain relief. After 4 weeks of vibration treatment, which targeted the feet the patient's pain level and gait patterns significantly improved. These findings illustrate the importance of considering whole body vibration as a complimentary treatment in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

  5. Not all neuropathy in diabetes is of diabetic etiology: differential diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2009-12-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the most common peripheral neuropathy in the developed world; however, not all patients with diabetes and peripheral nerve disease have a peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. Several (although not all) studies have drawn attention to the presence of other potential causes of a neuropathy in individuals with diabetes; 10% to 50% of individuals with diabetes may have an additional potential cause of a peripheral neuropathy and some may have more than one cause. Neurotoxic medications, alcohol abuse, vitamin B(12) deficiency, renal disease, chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, inherited neuropathy, and vasculitis are the most common additional potential causes of a peripheral neuropathy in these series. The most common disorders in the differential diagnosis of a generalized diabetic peripheral neuropathy are discussed in this article. Prospective studies to investigate the prevalence of other disorders that might be responsible for a peripheral neuropathy in individuals with diabetes are warranted.

  6. Huangqi Guizhi Wuwu Decoction for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a meta-analysis of 16 randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Bing; Zhao, Tian-yu; Zhao, Lin-hua; Wan, Fang; Ye, Ru; Zhou, Qiang; Tian, Feng; Tong, Xiao-lin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This meta-analysis was performed to systematically assess the efficacy and safety of the Chinese herbal medicine Huangqi Guizhi Wuwu Decoction (HGWWD) for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy. DATA SOURCES: Six electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE database, Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database, Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database, and the Wanfang Database, were searched on the internet for randomized controlled trials published up until 1 December 2015. The search terms included “Chinese herbal medicine”, “diabetic peripheral neuropathy” and “randomized controlled trials” in Chinese and in English. DATA SELECTION: We included randomized controlled trials using HGWWD/modified HGWWD for the treatment group, without restriction for the control group. We assessed literature quality in accordance with the Cochrane Review Handbook. A random or a fixed effects model was used to analyze outcomes using RevMan 5.2 software. OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcomes were changes in symptoms and nerve conduction velocities. The secondary outcomes were fasting blood glucose and hemorheological indexes. RESULTS: Sixteen randomized controlled trials, with a total of 1,173 patients, were included. Meta-analysis revealed that the efficacy of HGWWD for diabetic peripheral neuropathy was significantly superior compared with the control treatment (i.e., control group) (risk ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.29–0.46, Z =8.33, P < 0.00001) Compared with the control group, there was an increase in median motor nerve conduction velocity (mean difference (MD) = 3.46, 95%CI: 1.88–5.04, Z = 4.30, P < 0.01) and median sensory nerve conduction velocity (MD = 3.30, 95%CI: 2.04–4.56, Z = 5.14, P < 0.01). There was also an increase in peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (MD = 3.22, 95%CI: 2.45–3.98, Z = 8.21, P < 0.01) and peroneal sensory nerve conduction velocity (MD

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    MedlinePlus

    ... by nerve abnormalities in the legs and feet (peripheral neuropathy). Many people with this condition experience prickling or ... Research Network: Inherited Neuropathies Consortium The Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic ...

  8. Role of macrophages in Wallerian degeneration and axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiwen; Piao, Xianhua; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) has remarkable regenerative abilities after injury. Successful PNS regeneration relies on both injured axons and non-neuronal cells, including Schwann cells and immune cells. Macrophages are the most notable immune cells that play key roles in PNS injury and repair. Upon peripheral nerve injury, a large number of macrophages are accumulated at the injury sites, where they not only contribute to Wallerian degeneration, but also are educated by the local microenvironment and polarized to an anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2), thus contributing to axonal regeneration. Significant progress has been made in understanding how macrophages are educated and polarized in the injured microenvironment as well as how they contribute to axonal regeneration. Following the discussion on the main properties of macrophages and their phenotypes, in this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of macrophage infiltration after PNS injury. Moreover, we will discuss the recent findings elucidating how macrophages are polarized to M2 phenotype in the injured PNS microenvironment, as well as the role and underlying mechanisms of macrophages in peripheral nerve injury, Wallerian degeneration and regeneration. Furthermore, we will highlight the potential application by targeting macrophages in treating peripheral nerve injury and peripheral neuropathies.

  9. A longitudinal study of sensory biomarkers of progression in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy using skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, H; Facer, P; Misra, V P; Timmers, M; Byttebier, G; Meert, T; Anand, P

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to identify biomarkers in skin punch biopsies that could be used to monitor progression of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and, in future studies, to assess the efficacy of agents that may reduce progression. Patients with DPN were studied with clinical assessments, skin biopsies, quantitative sensory testing (QST), histamine-induced skin flare, nerve conduction studies and contact heat-evoked potentials (CHEPS). Skin biopsies were performed on two visits with a 6 month interval (n=29 patients) to quantify intraepidermal (IENF) and subepidermal (SENF) nerve fibres immunoreactive for: protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5), a pan-neuronal marker; transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), the heat and capsaicin receptor; and growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43), a marker of regenerating fibres. The IENF were counted along the length of four non-consecutive sections, and results were expressed as fibres per millimetre length of section. SENF were measured by image analysis, and the area of highlighted immunoreactivity was obtained as a percentage (% area) of the field scanned. QST, skin flare and CHEPS were also performed at the two visits. We found that IENF and SENF were significantly reduced for both PGP9.5 and TRPV1 between the first and second skin biopsy over 6months. The annual rate ± standard error of the mean of IENF loss was 3.76 ± 1.46 fibres/mm for PGP9.5, and 3.13 ± 0.58 fibres/mm for TRPV1. The other tests did not show significant changes. Strongly positive GAP-43 nerve fibres were found in deep dermis in the patients with diabetes, even in those with an absence of IENF. We conclude that PGP9.5 and TRPV1 IENF and SENF in skin biopsies are useful markers of progression in DPN, whereas GAP-43 SENF could potentially help detect nerve regeneration in severe neuropathy.

  10. Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort.

    PubMed

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L Z

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing vs. insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. A total of 2,368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD was evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and diabetes duration. Fifty-one percent of BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.15-2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea (SU) or combination of SU/metformin (Met)/thiazolidinediones (TZD) had marginally higher rates of DPN than the Met/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control, and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN.

  11. Incidence, prevalence, and predictors of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Seretny, Marta; Currie, Gillian L; Sena, Emily S; Ramnarine, Sabrina; Grant, Robin; MacLeod, Malcolm R; Colvin, Leslie A; Fallon, Marie

    2014-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a disabling pain condition resulting from chemotherapy for cancer. Severe acute CIPN may require chemotherapy dose reduction or cessation. There is no effective CIPN prevention strategy; treatment of established chronic CIPN is limited, and the prevalence of CIPN is not known. Here we used a systematic review to identify studies reporting the prevalence of CIPN. We searched Embase, Medline, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, PubMed central, Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge for relevant references and used random-effects meta-regression to estimate overall prevalence. We assessed study quality using the CONSORT and STROBE guidelines, and we report findings according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidance. We provide a qualitative summary of factors reported to alter the risk of CIPN. We included 31 studies with data from 4179 patients in our analysis. CIPN prevalence was 68.1% (57.7-78.4) when measured in the first month after chemotherapy, 60.0% (36.4-81.6) at 3months and 30.0% (6.4-53.5) at 6months or more. Different chemotherapy drugs were associated with differences in CIPN prevalence, and there was some evidence of publication bias. Genetic risk factors were reported in 4 studies. Clinical risk factors, identified in 4 of 31 studies, included neuropathy at baseline, smoking, abnormal creatinine clearance, and specific sensory changes during chemotherapy. Although CIPN prevalence decreases with time, at 6months 30% of patients continue to suffer from CIPN. Routine CIPN surveillance during post-chemotherapy follow-up is needed. A number of genetic and clinical risk factors were identified that require further study.

  12. Comparison of Nerve Excitability Testing, Nerve Conduction Velocity, and Behavioral Observations for Acrylamide Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nerve excitability (NE) testing is a sensitive method to test for peripheral neurotoxicity in humans,and may be more sensitive than compound nerve action potential (CNAP) or nerve conduction velocity (NCV).We used acrylamide to compare the NE and CNAP/NCV methods. Behavioral test...

  13. Botulinum toxin effects on gasatrocnemius strength and plantar pressure in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and forefoot ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J.; Sinacore, David R.; Strube, Michael J.; Crowner, Beth; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; Racette, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Background High forefoot plantar pressure is associated with plantar ulcers in people with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin A injected into the gastrocnemius-soleus muscles to reduce muscle strength and plantar pressure. Materials and Methods This double blind, randomized clinical trial studied 17 people with diabetes mellitus, peripheral neuropathy and forefoot plantar ulcer. Subjects were randomized into one of three groups receiving gastrocnemius-soleus muscle injections on the involved side with; 1) Saline (n=5, weight = 99 ± 21 kg), 2) 200 units of Botox® (n=7, weight = 101 ± 5 kg), or 3) 300 units of Botox® (n=5, weight=129 ± 22 kg). Botox® dose was converted to units/kg, the majority received between 1.9 and 2.4 units/kg (n=11) and one 3.2 units/kg. Plantarflexor peak torque and forefoot peak plantar pressure were quantified prior and two weeks post injection. Results There were no complications from the injections. Plantarflexor peak torque on the involved side increased in the placebo and 300 groups (3 ± 4 Nm and 6 ± 10 Nm respectively) and decreased −8 ± 11 Nm in the 200 group. There was no relationship between units/kg of Botox® for each subject and change in plantarflexor peak torque. Forefoot peak plantar pressure did not change in the placebo and 300 groups (0 ± 11 and 0 ± 5 N/cm2 respectively) and decreased −4 ± 16 N/cm2 (4%) for the 200 group. Conclusions There were no adverse events associated with the Botox® injections. This study was unable to determine the dose to consistently reduce plantarflexor strength and forefoot plantar pressure. Additional research is needed to investigate diabetes mellitus specific physiological changes and their impact of BoNT-A effectiveness in order to guide appropriate dosing. PMID:22735277

  14. A prospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral acetyl-L-carnitine for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanjue; Shu, Yongqian; Liu, Baorui; Liu, Ping; Wu, Changping; Zheng, Rongsheng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Deng, Yongchuan; Zheng, Leizhen; Xu, Qing; Jiang, Bin; Ouyang, Xuenong; Gao, Jianfei; Xu, Nong; Li, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Su; Liang, Chaofan; Yao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). The study was carried out as a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and paralleled clinical study. A total of 239 patients with CIPN were selected as the study subjects. Of the 239 subjects, 118 subjects received 3 g/day ALC orally for 8 weeks and 121 received a placebo. The primary endpoint was improvement of peripheral neuropathy by at least one grade. Patient status was assessed at week 4, 8 and 12 after enrollment into the study. In both the full analysis set (FAS) and the per-protocol set (PPS), peripheral sensory neuropathy was significantly ameliorated in the ALC group with 50.5 and 51.6% patients meeting the primary endpoint at week 8, compared with 24.1 and 23.1% of patients in the placebo group (P<0.001 in both sets). Secondary endpoints, such as the nerve electrophysiological examination and the Karnofsky physical score were also significantly improved in patients receiving ALC treatment, as compared with the placebo group (FAS, P=0.0463 and P=0.022; PPS, P=0.0076 and P=0.0064, respectively). Cancer-associated fatigue was significantly alleviated following ALC treatment in the PPS (P=0.0135). In the safety analysis set, the difference in adverse events incidence between the two groups was not statistically significant (P=0.3903). There were only two severe adverse events in the ALC group, which were not associated with the effect of ALC. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that in Chinese patients with cancer, oral administration of ALC is effective at ameliorating peripheral sensory neuropathy induced by chemotherapy, as well as reducing of cancer-associated fatigue and improving physical conditions.

  15. A prospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral acetyl-L-carnitine for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuanjue; Shu, Yongqian; Liu, Baorui; Liu, Ping; Wu, Changping; Zheng, Rongsheng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Deng, Yongchuan; Zheng, Leizhen; Xu, Qing; Jiang, Bin; Ouyang, Xuenong; Gao, Jianfei; Xu, Nong; Li, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Su; Liang, Chaofan; Yao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). The study was carried out as a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and paralleled clinical study. A total of 239 patients with CIPN were selected as the study subjects. Of the 239 subjects, 118 subjects received 3 g/day ALC orally for 8 weeks and 121 received a placebo. The primary endpoint was improvement of peripheral neuropathy by at least one grade. Patient status was assessed at week 4, 8 and 12 after enrollment into the study. In both the full analysis set (FAS) and the per-protocol set (PPS), peripheral sensory neuropathy was significantly ameliorated in the ALC group with 50.5 and 51.6% patients meeting the primary endpoint at week 8, compared with 24.1 and 23.1% of patients in the placebo group (P<0.001 in both sets). Secondary endpoints, such as the nerve electrophysiological examination and the Karnofsky physical score were also significantly improved in patients receiving ALC treatment, as compared with the placebo group (FAS, P=0.0463 and P=0.022; PPS, P=0.0076 and P=0.0064, respectively). Cancer-associated fatigue was significantly alleviated following ALC treatment in the PPS (P=0.0135). In the safety analysis set, the difference in adverse events incidence between the two groups was not statistically significant (P=0.3903). There were only two severe adverse events in the ALC group, which were not associated with the effect of ALC. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that in Chinese patients with cancer, oral administration of ALC is effective at ameliorating peripheral sensory neuropathy induced by chemotherapy, as well as reducing of cancer-associated fatigue and improving physical conditions. PMID:28105133

  16. The response of spinal microglia to chemotherapy-evoked painful peripheral neuropathies is distinct from that evoked by traumatic nerve injuries

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, F. Y.; Xiao, W.-H.; Bennett, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathies produced by nerve trauma are accompanied by substantial axonal degeneration and by a response in spinal cord microglia that is characterized by hypertrophy and increased expression of several intracellular and cell-surface markers, including ionizing calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) and Cd11b (a complement receptor 3 antigen recognized by the OX42 antibody). The microglia response has been hypothesized to be essential for the pathogenesis of the neuropathic pain state. In contrast, the painful peripheral neuropathies produced by low doses of cancer chemotherapeutics do not produce degeneration of axons in the peripheral nerve, although they do cause partial degeneration of the sensory axons’ distal-most tips, i.e. the intraepidermal nerve fibers that form the axons’ terminal receptor arbors. The question thus arises as to whether the relatively minor and distal axonal injury characterizing the chemotherapy-evoked neuropathies is sufficient to evoke the microglial response that is seen after traumatic nerve injury. We examined the lumbar spinal cord of rats with painful peripheral neuropathies due to the anti-neoplastic agents, paclitaxel, vincristine, and oxaliplatin, and the anti-retroviral agent, 2′,3′-dideoxycytidine (ddC), and compared them to rats with a complete sciatic nerve transection and the partial sciatic nerve injury produced in the chronic constriction injury model (CCI). As expected, microglia hypertrophy and increased expression of Iba1 were pronounced in the nerve transection and CCI animals. However, there was no microglia hypertrophy or increased Iba1 staining in the animals treated with paclitaxel, vincristine, oxaliplatin, or ddC. These results suggest that the mechanisms that produce neuropathic pain after exposure to chemotherapeutics may be fundamentally different than those operating after nerve trauma. PMID:21195745

  17. Paraneoplastic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Koike, Haruki; Sobue, Gen

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in serological screening of paraneoplastic antibodies and in diagnostic imaging techniques to detect malignancies has enabled a broadening of the concept of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes by integrating nonclassic clinical features. The peripheral nervous system is frequently involved in patients with paraneoplastic syndrome and may be seen alone or in combination with involvement of other areas of the nervous system. Destruction of dorsal root ganglion cells due to lymphocytic infiltration, especially with CD8-positive cytotoxic T cells, has been postulated to mediate the classic syndrome of subacute sensory neuronopathy. However, the motor and autonomic nervous systems are frequently affected. Indeed, patients can develop clinical features compatible with Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, or brachial plexopathy. Other forms of paraneoplastic neuropathy are vasculitic neuropathy, autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy, and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Various onconeural antibodies, including anti-Hu, anti-CV2/CRMP-5, and anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies, are associated with neuropathy. Somatic neuropathy is the most common manifestation in patients with anti-Hu and anti-CV2/CRMP-5 antibodies, while anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibody is associated with autonomic neuropathies. A whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan may be useful to detect malignancy in patients with unremarkable conventional radiological findings. Recognition and diagnosis of paraneoplastic neuropathy is important, as neuropathic symptoms usually precede the identification of the primary tumor, and treatment at an earlier stage provides better chances of good outcomes.

  18. Current status of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Korea: report of a hospital-based study of type 2 diabetic patients in Korea by the diabetic neuropathy study group of the korean diabetes association.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Chul; Kim, Sang Soo; Ko, Kyung Soo; Cha, Bong-Yun

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication associated with diabetes. DPN can present as a loss of sensation, may lead to neuropathic ulcers, and is a leading cause of amputation. Reported estimates of the prevalence of DPN vary due to differences in study populations and diagnostic criteria. Furthermore, the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of DPN in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are not as well understood as those of other complications of diabetes such as retinal and renal disease. Recently, the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the Korean Diabetes Association (KDA) conducted a study investigating the impact of DPN on disease burden and quality of life in patients with T2DM and has published some data that are representative of the nation. This review investigated the prevalence and associated clinical implications of DPN in Korean patients with diabetes based on the KDA study.

  19. Sensory neuron subpopulation-specific dysregulation of intracellular calcium in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Gold, M S

    2015-08-06

    The purpose of the present study was to test the prediction that the unique manifestation of chemotherapeutic-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) would be reflected in a specific pattern of changes in the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in subpopulations of cutaneous neurons. To test this prediction, we characterized the pattern of changes in mechanical nociceptive threshold associated with paclitaxel administration (2mg/kg, iv, every other day for four days), as well as the impact of target of innervation and paclitaxel treatment on the regulation of [Ca(2+)]i in subpopulations of putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons. Neurons innervating the glabrous and hairy skin of the hindpaw as well as the thigh were identified with retrograde tracers, and fura-2 was used to assess changes in [Ca(2+)]i. Paclitaxel was associated with a persistent decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold in response to stimuli applied to the glabrous skin of the hindpaw, but not the hairy skin of the hindpaw or the thigh. However, in both putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, resting [Ca(2+)]i was significantly lower in neurons innervating the thigh after treatment. The magnitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transient was also lower in putative non-nociceptive thigh neurons. More interestingly, while paclitaxel had no detectable influence on either resting or depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative non-nociceptive neurons, in putative nociceptive neurons there was a subpopulation-specific decrease in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient that was largely restricted to neurons innervating the glabrous skin. These results suggest that peripheral nerve length alone, does not account for the selective distribution of CIPN symptoms. Rather, they suggest the symptoms of CIPN reflect an interaction between the toxic actions of the therapeutic and unique properties of the neurons deleteriously impacted.

  20. Sensory neuron subpopulation-specific dysregulation of intracellular calcium in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, E; Gold, MS

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the prediction that the unique manifestation of chemotherapeutic-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) would be reflected in a specific pattern of changes in the regulation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in subpopulations of cutaneous neurons. To test this prediction, we characterized the pattern of changes in mechanical nociceptive threshold associated with paclitaxel administration (2 mg/kg, iv, every other day for four days), as well as the impact of target of innervation and paclitaxel treatment on the regulation of [Ca2+]i in subpopulations of putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons. Neurons innervating the glabrous and hairy skin of the hindpaw as well as the thigh were identified with retrograde tracers, and fura-2 was used to assess changes in [Ca2+]i. Paclitaxel was associated with a persistent decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold in response to stimuli applied to the glabrous skin of the hindpaw, but not the hairy skin of the hindpaw or the thigh. However, in both putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, resting [Ca2+]i was significantly lower in neurons innervating the thigh after treatment. The magnitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca2+ transient was also lower in putative non-nociceptive thigh neurons. More interestingly, while paclitaxel had no detectable influence on either resting or depolarization-evoked Ca2+ transients in putative non-nociceptive neurons, in putative nociceptive neurons there was a subpopulation- specific decrease in the duration of the evoked Ca2+ transient that was largely restricted to neurons innervating the glabrous skin. These results suggest that peripheral nerve length alone, does not account for the selective distribution of CIPN symptoms. Rather, they suggest the symptoms of CIPN reflect an interaction between the toxic actions of the therapeutic and unique properties of the neurons deleteriously impacted. PMID:25982563

  1. Lifestyle-Related Factors in the Self-Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Derksen, Tess M E; Bours, Martijn J L; Mols, Floortje; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2017-01-01

    Background. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy treatment in colorectal cancer (CRC), negatively affecting the daily functioning and quality of life of CRC patients. Currently, there are no established treatments to prevent or reduce CIPN. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify lifestyle-related factors that can aid in preventing or reducing CIPN, as such factors may promote self-management options for CRC patients suffering from CIPN. Methods. A literature search was conducted through PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar. Original research articles investigating oxaliplatin-related CIPN in CRC were eligible for inclusion. Results. In total, 22 articles were included, which suggested that dietary supplements, such as antioxidants and herbal extracts, as well as physical exercise and complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, may have beneficial effects on preventing or reducing CIPN symptoms. However, many of the reviewed articles presented various limitations, including small sample sizes and heterogeneity in study design and measurements of CIPN. Conclusions. No strong conclusions can be drawn regarding the role of lifestyle-related factors in the management of CIPN in CRC patients. Certain dietary supplements and physical exercise may be beneficial for the management of CIPN, but further research is warranted.

  2. Lifestyle-Related Factors in the Self-Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Derksen, Tess M. E.; Mols, Floortje; Weijenberg, Matty P.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy treatment in colorectal cancer (CRC), negatively affecting the daily functioning and quality of life of CRC patients. Currently, there are no established treatments to prevent or reduce CIPN. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify lifestyle-related factors that can aid in preventing or reducing CIPN, as such factors may promote self-management options for CRC patients suffering from CIPN. Methods. A literature search was conducted through PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar. Original research articles investigating oxaliplatin-related CIPN in CRC were eligible for inclusion. Results. In total, 22 articles were included, which suggested that dietary supplements, such as antioxidants and herbal extracts, as well as physical exercise and complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, may have beneficial effects on preventing or reducing CIPN symptoms. However, many of the reviewed articles presented various limitations, including small sample sizes and heterogeneity in study design and measurements of CIPN. Conclusions. No strong conclusions can be drawn regarding the role of lifestyle-related factors in the management of CIPN in CRC patients. Certain dietary supplements and physical exercise may be beneficial for the management of CIPN, but further research is warranted.

  3. Rho Kinase Inhibitor Y-27632 Facilitates Recovery from Experimental Peripheral Neuropathy Induced by Anti-Cancer Drug Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    James, Sarah E.; Dunham, Mayisha; Carrion-Jones, Monica; Murashov, Alexander; Lu, Qun

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy drugs have neurotoxicity associated with treatment, which can become a dose-limiting problem when clinical presentation is severe. However, there is no effective therapy to circumvent the neurotoxicity of anti-cancer drug treatment. In this study, we utilized a newly designed mouse model of cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy to determine both the severity of neurotoxicity induced by drug treatment and the effectiveness of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 in post-treatment recovery. Sensory nerve conduction studies revealed a significant increase in mean distal (peak) latency with cisplatin treatment, indicating a deterioration of sensory nerve function. Also, hind paw touch sensitivity decreased steadily with increasing cumulative dose of cisplatin. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of the sural nerve using neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) demonstrated abnormal nerve fiber morphology in cisplatin-treated mice. Remarkably, post-treatment with Y-27632 improved the sural nerve distal (peak) latency and sensory threshold to return to pre-treatment levels. Sural nerve histology worsened in the absence of Y-27632 during recovery. These studies suggest that Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 can initiate regeneration of damaged nerves following cisplatin treatment. PMID:20060419

  4. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  5. Electrophysiological follow-up of patients with chronic peripheral neuropathy induced by occupational intoxication with n-hexane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Chen, Shijiu; Wang, Zengtao

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize and dynamically monitor the progress of peripheral neuropathy induced by n-hexane by electromyography and nerve conduction velocity (NCV-EMG). Twenty-five patients with n-hexane poisoning from an electronic company were investigated in the year 2009. The occupational history of these workers was collected, and toxic substance exposure was identified. Neurologic inspection and regular NCV-EMG inspection were performed for all patients upon hospital admission and after 3, 6, and 12 months of treatment. NCV-EMG results shown that patients with n-hexane poisoning have simultaneous damage on motor and sensory nerves, of which sensory nerve damage was more severe. Motor nerves of the lower limbs were severe damaged than those of the upper limbs; whereas injury of sensory nerve in the upper limbs was more severe than that of the lower limbs. After treatment, clinical signs and symptoms of the patients were significantly improved. NCV-EMG result showed a delayed worsening at 3 months then gradually recovered after 12 months. Recovery of the motor nerve was better compared with sensory nerve, with upper limbs faster than that of the lower limbs.

  6. Capsaicin 8% Patch in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Van, Joanna; Stoker, Malcolm; Jacobs, Hélène; Snijder, Robert J; Schregardus, Diederik S; Long, Stephen K; Lambourg, Bruno; Katz, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    This 12-week study evaluated the efficacy and safety of capsaicin 8% patch versus placebo patch in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN). Patients aged 18 years or older with PDPN were randomized (1:1) to one 30-minute treatment (capsaicin 8% patch or placebo patch) to painful areas of the feet. Overall, 369 patients were randomized (capsaicin 8% patch, n = 186; placebo patch, n = 183). Percentage reduction in average daily pain score from baseline to between weeks 2 through 8 (the primary end point) was statistically significant for capsaicin 8% patch versus placebo (-27.4% vs -20.9%; P = .025); improvements in pain were observed from week 2 onward. Versus placebo, patients treated with capsaicin 8% patch had a shorter median time to treatment response (19 vs 72 days) and modest improvements in sleep interference scores from baseline to between weeks 2 through 8 (P = .030) and weeks 2 through 12 (P = .020). Apart from application site reactions, treatment-emergent adverse events were similar between groups. No indications of deterioration in sensory perception of sharp, cold, warm, or vibration stimuli were observed. In patients with PDPN, capsaicin 8% patch treatment provided modest pain relief and sleep quality improvements versus a placebo patch, similar in magnitude to other treatments with known efficacy, but without systemic side effects or sensory deterioration.

  7. Serum folate, vitamin B12 levels and diabetic peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Zhai, Jun-Xia; Liu, Dian-Wu

    2017-03-05

    The association between serum folate and vitamin B12 levels and the risk of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) remains unclear. This meta-analysis included 16 studies of serum folate levels (1190 cases and 1501 controls) and 18 studies of serum vitamin B12 levels (1239 cases and 1562 controls) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Reduced serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were found in patients with T2DM and DPN compared with patients with T2DM but without DPN; weighted mean difference (WMD) = -1.64 (95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.46, -0.81) and WMD = -70.86 (95% CI = -101.55, -40.17), respectively. A subgroup analysis confirmed these associations in the Chinese population, but not in the Caucasian and mixed populations. In conclusion, these findings support the need for further controlled studies in defined patient populations and the importance of monitoring serum folate and vitamin B12 levels in patients with T2DM.

  8. Static and Dynamic Predictors of Foot Progression Angle in Individuals with and without Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Merriwether, Ericka N.; Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J.; Bohnert, Kathryn L.; Strube, Michael J.; Snozek, Darrah R.; Sinacore, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Foot progression angle (FPA) is a predictor of elevated regional plantar stresses and loads, which are indicators of dermal injury risk in individuals with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy (DMPN). FPA accounts for 15–45% of the variance in plantar stresses and loads in adults with DMPN. However, the biomechanical factors underlying an “out-toeing” gait pattern in this clinical population have not been examined. The primary purpose of this study was to identify static and dynamic predictors of foot progression angle magnitude in adults with and without DMPN. Methods Thirty-three adults with and 12 adults without diabetes mellitus participated. Hip rotation, ankle dorsiflexion, and resting calcaneal stance position were measured using a standard goniometer. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected during walking. Results and Discussion Static predictor variables did not significantly predict foot progression angle magnitude using multiple regression analysis. Of the dynamic predictor variables, thigh and shank lateral rotation accounted for 37% of foot progression angle variance (p<.01). Conclusions Our results show that dynamic measures of external rotation of proximal segments (thigh, shank) during gait are strong predictors of foot progression angle. Static measures of limited joint mobility and joint position do not predict foot progression angle. These findings suggest that targeting the thigh and shank rotation using verbal or tactile cueing may be a potential strategy when trying to alter walking movement patterns towards decreasing external (lateral) FPA to minimize risk of elevated regional plantar stresses in adults with DMPN at risk for ulceration. PMID:27882360

  9. Heterogeneous responses of dorsal root ganglion neurons in neuropathies induced by peripheral nerve trauma and the antiretroviral drug stavudine

    PubMed Central

    Boateng, EK; Novejarque, A; Pheby, T; Rice, ASC; Huang, W

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterogeneity is increasingly recognized in clinical presentation of neuropathic pain (NP), but less often recognized in animal models. Neurochemical dysregulation in rodent dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is associated with peripheral nerve trauma, but poorly studied in non-traumatic NP conditions. Methods This study aimed to investigate the temporal expressions of activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and galanin in traumatic and non-traumatic rat models of neuropathies associated with NP. Expressions of these markers were examined in the DRG at different time points following tibial nerve transection (TNT) injury and antiretroviral drug stavudine (d4T) administration using immunohistochemistry. The development of sensory gain following these insults was assessed by measuring limb withdrawal to a punctate mechanical stimulus. Results Both TNT-injured and d4T-treated rats developed hindpaw mechanical hypersensitivity. Robust expressions of ATF-3, GAP-43, NPY and galanin in both small- and large-sized L5 DRG neurons were observed in the DRG from TNT-injured rats. In contrast, d4T-treated rats did not exhibit any significant neurochemical changes in the DRG. Conclusions Taken together, the results suggest that ATF-3, GAP-43, NPY and galanin are likely indicators of nerve trauma-associated processes and not generic markers for NP. These experiments also demonstrate distinct expression patterns of neurochemical markers in the DRG and emphasize the mechanistic difference between nerve trauma and antiretroviral drug-associated NP. PMID:25070481

  10. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause–effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy. PMID:27608006

  11. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-09-05

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause-effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy.

  12. Cycloserine Induced Late Onset Psychosis and Ethambutol Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Associated with MDR-TB Treatment in an Indian Patient- A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Holla, Sadhana; Bhandarypanambur, Rajeshkrishna; Kamalkishore, Meenakumari; Janardhanan, Manju

    2015-01-01

    Adverse reactions and toxicity inevitably accompany all treatment courses for drug-resistant TB. Our case underscores the importance of awareness regarding neuropsychiatric adverse reactions due to MDR-TB therapy and reversible nature of it. Cycloserine induced psychosis is most life threatening complication and sometimes could be fatal. A 42-year-old male on MDR-TB therapy got admitted for his persistent psychotic complaints like hallucinations, delusions and suicidal ideations, despite being treated with quetiapine/olanzapine. Eventually patient was rehabilitated, cycloserine was stopped and psychotic events regressed slowly. Other culprit drugs like ethambutol and levofloxacin causing psychosis was ruled out because there was no relapse of psychotic events despite being continued with these drugs. He also complained of tingling, numbness, swaying, pain and weakness. On examination, he had distal motor weakness in lower limbs, tandem gait positive, altered position sense, and tenderness over toes and positive Romberg’s sign with ataxia. He was diagnosed to have drug induced sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy. All these symptoms persisted after stopping cycloserine and patient continued to have neuropathy with ethambutol and ethionamide. Considering the nature of neuropathy which was mild, mixed sensorimotor and resolved completely after 2-3 weeks of stopping, it was more in favour of ethambutol. However, we could not rule out the possibility of ethionamide or (ethionamide + ethambutol) causing neuropathy or both could have accelerated the neurotoxic effects of cycloserine which remained elusive. PMID:25859468

  13. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease: the spectrum of peripheral neuropathy in 30 affected patients.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Barbara E; Logigian, Eric L; Kolodny, Edwin H; Pastores, Gregory M

    2008-08-01

    Late-onset Tay-Sachs (LOTS) disease is a chronic, progressive, lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A (HEXA) activity. Deficient levels of HEXA result in the intracellular accumulation of GM2-ganglioside, resulting in toxicity to nerve cells. Clinical manifestations primarily involve the central nervous system (CNS) and lower motor neurons, and include ataxia, weakness, spasticity, dysarthria, dysphagia, dystonia, seizures, psychosis, mania, depression, and cognitive decline. The prevalence of peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement in LOTS has not been well documented, but it has traditionally been thought to be very low. We examined a cohort of 30 patients with LOTS who underwent clinical and electrophysiologic examination, and found evidence of a predominantly axon loss polyneuropathy affecting distal nerve segments in the lower and upper extremities in eight patients (27%).

  14. The role of sodium channels in painful diabetic and idiopathic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Giuseppe; Ziegler, Dan; Malik, Rayaz; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-10-01

    Painful neuropathies are frequently encountered in clinical practice as an early or late complication of several systemic disorders. Among them, diabetes is one of the most important due to its epidemiology and the relevance for regulatory agencies in the assessment of efficacy of new analgesics. However, the presentation and course of painful neuropathies, as well as the response to available drugs, are highly variable and unpredictable, posing significant challenges in the management of patients. Experimental and clinical studies have suggested that polymorphisms and mutations in pain-related genes are involved in the facilitation or inhibition of nociception, and might modulate neuropathic pain and the response to analgesics in patients. Voltage-gated sodium channel genes are among the most relevant, due to the key role of these membrane proteins in the physiology of nociception and their involvement in the pathogenesis of idiopathic painful small fiber neuropathies. These compelling features make sodium channel candidate targets for a novel approach to painful diabetic and idiopathic neuropathies, which will hopefully allow a new classification of patients and more effective targeted treatments.

  15. HDAC6 Inhibitors Rescued the Defective Axonal Mitochondrial Movement in Motor Neurons Derived from the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with HSPB1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Heesun; Kim, Jisoo; Choi, Hyunjung; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Ha, Nina; Kyung, Jangbeen; Koo, Soo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2F (CMT2F) and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2B (dHMN2B) are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of the heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1) gene and there are no specific therapies available yet. Here, we assessed the potential therapeutic effect of HDAC6 inhibitors on peripheral neuropathy with HSPB1 mutation using in vitro model of motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of CMT2F and dHMN2B patients. The absolute velocity of mitochondrial movements and the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons were lower both in CMT2F-motor neurons and in dHMN2B-motor neurons than those in controls, and the severity of the defective mitochondrial movement was different between the two disease models. CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons also showed reduced α-tubulin acetylation compared with controls. The newly developed HDAC6 inhibitors, CHEMICAL X4 and CHEMICAL X9, increased acetylation of α-tubulin and reversed axonal movement defects of mitochondria in CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons. Our results suggest that the neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs can be used in drug screening including HDAC6 inhibitors targeting peripheral neuropathy. PMID:28105056

  16. HDAC6 Inhibitors Rescued the Defective Axonal Mitochondrial Movement in Motor Neurons Derived from the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with HSPB1 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yon; Woo, So-Youn; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Heesun; Kim, Jisoo; Choi, Hyunjung; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Ha, Nina; Kyung, Jangbeen; Koo, Soo Kyung; Jung, Sung-Chul; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2F (CMT2F) and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2B (dHMN2B) are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of the heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1) gene and there are no specific therapies available yet. Here, we assessed the potential therapeutic effect of HDAC6 inhibitors on peripheral neuropathy with HSPB1 mutation using in vitro model of motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of CMT2F and dHMN2B patients. The absolute velocity of mitochondrial movements and the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons were lower both in CMT2F-motor neurons and in dHMN2B-motor neurons than those in controls, and the severity of the defective mitochondrial movement was different between the two disease models. CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons also showed reduced α-tubulin acetylation compared with controls. The newly developed HDAC6 inhibitors, CHEMICAL X4 and CHEMICAL X9, increased acetylation of α-tubulin and reversed axonal movement defects of mitochondria in CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons. Our results suggest that the neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs can be used in drug screening including HDAC6 inhibitors targeting peripheral neuropathy.

  17. Targeted Sequencing Reveals Low-Frequency Variants in EPHA Genes as Markers of Paclitaxel-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Apellániz-Ruiz, María; Tejero, Héctor; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Sánchez-Barroso, Lara; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Gerardo; Calvo, Isabel; Castelo, Beatriz; Redondo, Andrés; García-Donás, Jesús; Romero-Laorden, Nuria; Sereno, María; Merino, María; Currás-Freixes, María; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Mancikova, Veronika; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Green, Henrik; Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Cascón, Alberto; Robledo, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Neuropathy is the dose-limiting toxicity of paclitaxel and a major cause for decreased quality of life. Genetic factors have been shown to contribute to paclitaxel neuropathy susceptibility; however, the major causes for interindividual differences remain unexplained. In this study, we identified genetic markers associated with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy through massive sequencing of candidate genes.Experimental Design: We sequenced the coding region of 4 EPHA genes, 5 genes involved in paclitaxel pharmacokinetics, and 30 Charcot-Marie-Tooth genes, in 228 cancer patients with no/low neuropathy or high-grade neuropathy during paclitaxel treatment. An independent validation series included 202 paclitaxel-treated patients. Variation-/gene-based analyses were used to compare variant frequencies among neuropathy groups, and Cox regression models were used to analyze neuropathy along treatment.Results: Gene-based analysis identified EPHA6 as the gene most significantly associated with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Low-frequency nonsynonymous variants in EPHA6 were present exclusively in patients with high neuropathy, and all affected the ligand-binding domain of the protein. Accumulated dose analysis in the discovery series showed a significantly higher neuropathy risk for EPHA5/6/8 low-frequency nonsynonymous variant carriers [HR, 14.60; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.33-91.62; P = 0.0042], and an independent cohort confirmed an increased neuropathy risk (HR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.14-3.77; P = 0.017). Combining the series gave an estimated 2.5-fold higher risk of neuropathy (95% CI, 1.46-4.31; P = 9.1 × 10(-4)).Conclusions: This first study sequencing EPHA genes revealed that low-frequency variants in EPHA6, EPHA5, and EPHA8 contribute to the susceptibility to paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Furthermore, EPHA's neuronal injury repair function suggests that these genes might constitute important neuropathy markers for many neurotoxic drugs. Clin Cancer Res; 23

  18. The slipping slipper sign: a simple test with high specificity and positive predictive value for peripheral neuropathy among diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Gayle, Krystal A T; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-03-30

    This study evaluated the ability of the slipping slipper sign (defined as unknowingly losing a slipper while walking) to identify diabetic neuropathy in Jamaican patients. A single question was used to ascertain the presence of the slipping slipper sign (SSS) among 69 patients attending a diabetes clinic. Nurses assessed pain, vibration and pressure perception among the same patients in order to detect diabetic neuropathy. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value for the SSS were calculated. Eight participants (men=5, women=3) reported positive SSS. The SSS had a sensitivity of 28.6%, specificity of 100% and positive predictive value (PPV) 100% for neuropathy on at least one of the three tests. These findings indicate that the SSS has high specificity and PPV for diabetic neuropathy but the sensitivity is low. The sign may be a useful adjuvant to conventional methods of screening for severe neuropathy.

  19. Altered Antinociceptive Efficacy of Tramadol Over Time in Rats with Painful Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Aldric; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Pain due to peripheral nerve injury or disease is a dynamic process, such that the mechanism that underlies it alters over time. Tramadol has been reported to be analgesic in clinical neuropathic pain, with varying levels of efficacy due to a patient population that has had neuropathic pain for a wide range of time. In order to address examine issue, the antinociceptive efficacy of tramadol over time was tested in rats with a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the left sciatic nerve. Rats developed a robust hind paw hypersensitivity to innocuous mechanical stimulation ipsilateral to CCI surgery. Subcutaneous injection of tramadol in rats two weeks after CCI surgery dose-dependently attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity, which was abolished with the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone but not the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine. Systemic tramadol also attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity four weeks after CCI surgery, but the efficacy significantly diminished at this time point. In addition, the effect of tramadol at this later time point could be reduced with yohimbine as well as naloxone. These data demonstrate that the efficacy of tramadol depends in part on the duration of nerve injury-evoked nociception, and that its antinociceptive mechanism changes over time. Alteration in antinociceptive mechanism over time may explain the inconsistency in efficacy of this and other analgesic drugs in chronic pain patients. PMID:17207479

  20. Weight-Bearing Versus Nonweight-Bearing Exercise for Persons With Diabetes and Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Michael J.; Tuttle, Lori J.; LeMaster, Joseph W.; Strube, Michael J; McGill, Janet B.; Hastings, Mary K.; Sinacore, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of weight-bearing (WB) versus nonweight-bearing (NWB) exercise for persons with diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral neuropathy (PN). Design Randomized controlled trial with evaluations at baseline and after intervention. Setting University-based physical therapy research clinic. Participants Participants with DM and PN (N=29) (mean age ± SD, 64.5±12.5y; mean body mass index [kg/m2] ± SD, 35.5±7.3) were randomly assigned to WB (n=15) and NWB (n=14) exercise groups. All participants (100%) completed the intervention and follow-up evaluations. Interventions Group-specific progressive balance, flexibility, strengthening, and aerobic exercise conducted sitting or lying (NWB) or standing and walking (WB) occurred 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Main Outcome Measures Measures included the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and daily step counts. Secondary outcome measures represented domains across the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Results The WB group showed greater gains than the NWB group over time on the 6MWD and average daily step count (P<.05). The mean and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between-group difference over time was 29m (95% CI, 6–51) for the 6MWD and 1178 (95% CI, 150–2205) steps for the average daily step count. The NWB group showed greater improvements than the WB group over time in hemoglobin A1c values (P<.05). Conclusions The results of this study indicate the ability of this population with chronic disease to increase 6MWD and daily step count with a WB exercise program compared with an NWB exercise program. PMID:23276801

  1. ViibraTip for Testing Vibration Perception to Detect Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

    PubMed

    Willits, Iain; Cole, Helen; Jones, Roseanne; Dimmock, Paul; Arber, Mick; Craig, Joyce; Sims, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    VibraTip™ was selected by the Medical Technologies Advisory Committee (MTAC) to undergo evaluation through the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). VibraTip™ provides a vibratory stimulus for the purpose of detecting diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, and is intended to replace the current practice of using the 128 Hz tuning fork or 10 g monofilament (comparators). The sponsor (McCallan Medical) provided clinical and economic submissions which were evaluated by an External Assessment Centre (EAC). Of six diagnostic studies identified, the EAC considered that only one was directly relevant to the assessment. This study indicated VibraTip™ had a sensitivity of 0.79 (95 % CI 0.69-0.90) and specificity of 0.82 (95 % CI 0.74-0.90) for DPN using a neurothesiometer at 25 V as a reference standard. This was non-inferior to the comparators, but the sample size (n = 141) was too small to draw unequivocal conclusions and it is unclear how generalisable results were to clinical practice. The sponsor presented a de facto cost-minimisation model that in the base case showed minimal cost savings and, in sensitivity analysis which assumed diagnostic superiority of VibraTip™, showed large savings. The EAC appraised this model and concluded it was flawed as it was not evidence based and costs were likely to be unrealistic. The MTAC considered that the technology showed promise but decided the case for adoption was not proven, and therefore made a research recommendation as is reflected in NICE Medical Technology Guidance 22.

  2. Clinical utility of a DNA probe to 17p11.2 in screening of patients with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Blancato, J.; Precht, K.; Meck, J.

    1994-09-01

    We assessed the usefulness of in situ hybridization with a DNA probe to the area of chromosome 17 at p11.2 as a diagnostic tool for screening for Charcot Marte Tooth 1A (CMT 1A). In situ hybridization with a probe to 17p11.2 was performed on fixed lymphocytes from the following groups of individuals: (1) normal controls; (2) patients evoking a strong clinical suspicion of CMT 1A; and (3) 3 families with an apparent autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy of unknown diagnoses. Group 2 patients had evidence of demyelination as defined by nerve conduction of less that 50% of the normal mean or terminal latency greater than 50% of the normal mean in conduction studies. Analysis of interphase cells hybridized with a cosmid DNA probe to 17p11.2 requires inclusion of a normal control with each trial and masked observer. Due to the size of the target DNA and the nature of the centromeric heterochromatin, the scoring of this probe is more subjective than centromere probes. For example, if the two 17 chromosomes are decondensed as in interphase, two tandem signals may be visualized as one. Results from duplication positive patients demonstrate a large proportion of cells with two closely aligned, but separate, signals with an additional single signal. Normal results demonstrate a majority of cells with two separate signals representing both normal homologues. None of the 3 families with questionable diagnosis revealed a duplication at the region, reinforcing our belief that a clinical diagnosis is the most discriminating tool available for diagnosis of CMT 1A. We concur with Boylan that molecular analysis for CMT 1A is useful for establishing a diagnosis of CMT 1A, but is not a primary differential diagnostic test. The yield in screening patients without physiologic evidence of demyelination is likely to be low. We further find that the use of in situ hybridization is a simple method of performing the duplication analysis.

  3. Balance and mobility assessment for ruling-out the peripheral neuropathy of the lower limbs in older adults.

    PubMed

    Caronni, Antonio; Cattalini, Claudio; Previtera, Antonino Michele

    2016-10-01

    The peripheral neuropathy of the lower limbs (PNLL) is an important cause of balance and mobility impairment in older adults. The nerve conduction study (NCS) is the gold standard for PNLL diagnosis. Aim of this work is to establish the sensitivity (Sn) and the specificity (Sp) of the balance and mobility examination for the PNLL in older adults. This study consecutively recruited 72 participants (>65years) who accessed to the clinical neurophysiology outpatient clinic for suspected PNLL. Participants were given the NCS and four clinical tests. Mobility was evaluated by the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA) and the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI). In addition the Clinical Evaluation of Static Upright Stance (CELSIUS) scale was developed for a selective evaluation of static balance. Based on the NCS, 36% of participants had PNLL. The CELSIUS scale (cutoff: 19.5/24), the TUG test (cutoff: 9.6s) and the DEMMI scale (cutoff: 17.5/19) have high Sn (0.92÷0.96), but low Sp (0.28÷0.43) for the PNLL in the older adult. POMA scale (cutoff: 14.5/16) has low Sn (0.73), but acceptable Sp (0.85). In addition, CELSIUS, DEMMI and TUG negative likelihood ratios are 0.13, 0.17 and 0.12, respectively. Balance and mobility examination have high sensitivity for PNLL. CELSIUS score>19/24, DEMMI score>17/19 or TUG time≤9.6s substantially reduce PNLL likelihood. These clinical measures are thus recommended for ruling-out PNLL in the older adult.

  4. Predictors of Barefoot Plantar Pressure during Walking in Patients with Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy and a History of Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Barn, Ruth; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans; Woodburn, James; Bus, Sicco A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated dynamic plantar foot pressures significantly increase the risk of foot ulceration in diabetes mellitus. The aim was to determine which factors predict plantar pressures in a population of diabetic patients who are at high-risk of foot ulceration. Methods Patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and a history of ulceration were eligible for inclusion in this cross sectional study. Demographic data, foot structure and function, and disease-related factors were recorded and used as potential predictor variables in the analyses. Barefoot peak pressures during walking were calculated for the heel, midfoot, forefoot, lesser toes, and hallux regions. Potential predictors were investigated using multivariate linear regression analyses. 167 participants with mean age of 63 years contributed 329 feet to the analyses. Results The regression models were able to predict between 6% (heel) and 41% (midfoot) of the variation in peak plantar pressures. The largest contributing factor in the heel model was glycosylated haemoglobin concentration, in the midfoot Charcot deformity, in the forefoot prominent metatarsal heads, in the lesser toes hammer toe deformity and in the hallux previous ulceration. Variables with local effects (e.g. foot deformity) were stronger predictors of plantar pressure than global features (e.g. body mass, age, gender, or diabetes duration). Conclusion The presence of local deformity was the largest contributing factor to barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in high-risk diabetic patients and should therefore be adequately managed to reduce plantar pressure and ulcer risk. However, a significant amount of variance is unexplained by the models, which advocates the quantitative measurement of plantar pressures in the clinical risk assessment of the patient. PMID:25647421

  5. Genome-wide association studies for taxane-induced peripheral neuropathy (TIPN) in ECOG-5103 and ECOG-1199

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fei; Miller, Kathy D.; Flockhart, David A.; Jiang, Guanglong; Vance, Gail; Gardner, Laura; Vatta, Matteo; Bai, Shaochun; Lai, Dongbing; Koller, Daniel; Zhao, Fengmin; O'Neill, Anne; Smith, Mary Lou; Railey, Elda; White, Carol; Partridge, Ann; Sparano, Joseph; Davidson, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Taxane induced peripheral neuropathy (TIPN) is an important survivorship issue for many cancer patients. Currently, there are no clinically implemented biomarkers to predict which patients might be at increased risk for TIPN. We present a comprehensive approach to identification of genetic variants to predict TIPN. Experimental Design We performed a genome wide association study (GWAS) in 3431 patients from the phase III adjuvant breast cancer trial, ECOG-5103 to compare genotypes with TIPN. We performed candidate validation of top SNPs for TIPN in another phase III adjuvant breast cancer trial, ECOG-1199. Results When evaluating for Grade 3-4 TIPN, 120 SNPs had a p-value <10−4 from patients of European descent (EA) in ECOG-5103. 30 candidate SNPs were subsequently tested in ECOG-1199 and SNP rs3125923 was found to be significantly associated with Grade 3-4 TIPN (p=1.7×10−3; OR=1.8). Race was also a major predictor of TIPN, with patients of African descent (AA) experiencing increased risk of Grade 2-4 TIPN (HR=2.1; p=5.6×10−16) and Grade 3-4 TIPN (HR=2.6; p=1.1×10−11) compared with others. A SNP in FCAMR, rs1856746, had a trend toward an association with Grade 2-4 TIPN in AA patients from the GWAS in ECOG-5103 (OR=5.5; p=1.6×10−7). Conclusion rs3125923 represents a validated SNP to predict Grade 3-4 TIPN. Genetically determined AA race represents the most significant predictor of TIPN. PMID:26138065

  6. Examining the Time to Improvement of Sleep Interference With Pregabalin in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and Postherpetic Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Bruce; Emir, Birol; Knapp, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin has been shown to be a safe, effective treatment for neuropathic pain associated with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), with average time to reduction in pain of 2 days. Pain-related sleep interference is commonly reported in both painful DPN and PHN. These post hoc analyses examined the time to improvement in sleep with pregabalin in patients with painful DPN or PHN, measured by reduction in daily sleep interference (DSI) scores on an 11-point numeric rating scale. A total of 4527 patients from 16 placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin for treatment of painful DPN or PHN were included in the analysis. In these trials, there were a total of 16 pregabalin treatment arms for painful DPN (75-600 mg/d), 10 for PHN (150-600 mg/d), and 3 for painful DPN/PHN (150-600 mg/d). Time to improvement in DSI scores was calculated for all treatment arms that demonstrated statistically significant reductions in DSI scores during the first 14 days of treatment compared with placebo (23 of 29; 79.3%) and was defined as the first day DSI scores for that day and the following day were significantly lower than placebo (P < 0.001). Mean (SD) time to improvement in DSI scores was 1.6 (1.3) days. Sustained improvement (≥1-point improvement in mean DSI score) was seen significantly earlier for pregabalin DSI responders than patients receiving placebo. These findings demonstrate that statistically significant and sustained improvement in sleep occurs rapidly (within 1 day for some patients) in response to treatment with pregabalin.

  7. Prevalence and correlates of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a Saudi Arabic population: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong D; Bakhotmah, Balkees A; Hu, Frank B; Alzahrani, Hasan Ali

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence and correlates of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in a Saudi population. The study population consisted of 552 diabetic participants with an average age of 53.4 years. Among this population, 62.7% were male and 94.9% had type 2 diabetes. The average body mass index was 31.1 kg/m2. DPN was diagnosed based on a combination of reduced vibration perception measured by neurothesiometer and/or reduced light touch perception evaluated by the 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament, as well as neurological symptoms. Information on socio-demographic variables, smoking status, duration of diabetes, and medications was obtained through interviews by physicians. Body weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure and clinical markers were assessed following standard procedures. The prevalence of DPN in this population was 19.9% (95% CI, 16.7%-23.5%). In the multivariable analyses, longer duration of diabetes [odds ratio (OR) for every 5-year increase, 2.49, 95% CI, 1.75-3.53], abdominal obesity (OR, 2.53, 95% CI, 1.41-4.55), and higher levels of fasting blood glucose (OR for every 1 mmol/L increase, 1.05, 95% CI, 0.99-1.12), creatinine (OR for every 10 µmol/L increase, 1.07, 95% CI, 0.99-1.14) and white blood cell count (OR for every 106/L increase, 1.08, 95% CI, 1.01-1.16) were associated with higher odds of DPN, while oral hypoglycemic medication use was associated with a lower odds of DPN (OR, 0.47, 95% CI, 0.26-0.85). In this large Saudi population, several correlates for DPN, in addition to glycemic control and diabetes duration, were identified, including abdominal obesity, creatinine and white blood cell count.

  8. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a managed care setting: patient identification, prevalence estimates, and pharmacy utilization patterns.

    PubMed

    Hartsfield, Cynthia L; Korner, Eli J; Ellis, Jennifer L; Raebel, Marsha A; Merenich, John; Brandenburg, Nancy

    2008-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to validate an algorithm for identifying patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN) and demonstrate its practical applications. Using the Kaiser Permanente Colorado Diabetes Registry, an algorithm was developed with selected ICD-9 diagnosis codes combined with automated pharmacy data for medications prescribed for pDPN symptoms. Medical records were reviewed to confirm pDPN presence and to inform algorithm refinement. Prevalence was estimated with a numerator of members with diabetes who had inclusion but no exclusion codes in 2003 (Method 1) and with a numerator of diabetes patients with inclusion codes between 1998 and 2003 who had no subsequent exclusion codes and who remained members in 2003 (Method 2); the denominator was all members with diabetes in 2003. Medication utilization was compared between patients with and without pDPN. A total of 19,577 members with diabetes were identified; 2612 met initial inclusion criteria. Medical record review (n = 298) demonstrated sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 55%, and positive predictive value (PPV) of 64%. Inclusion criteria were modified and pharmacy data eliminated. The revised algorithm identified 1754 additional patients meeting inclusion criteria. Medical record review (n = 190) demonstrated sensitivity of 99%, specificity of 49%, and PPV of 79%. Using the validated algorithm, pDPN prevalence was 113 (Method 1) and 208 (Method 2) per 1000 persons with diabetes. Significant differences were observed in medication prescriptions between patients with and without pDPN. Estimated pDPN prevalence among persons with diabetes was 11%-21% and pDPN patients had greater utilization of selected medications than those without pDPN. Identifying patients with pDPN is a fundamental step for improving disease management and understanding the economic impact of pDPN.

  9. Reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the daily sleep interference scale among diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia patients.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Margaret K; Brandenburg, Nancy A; Alvir, Jose Ma J; Griesing, Teresa; Revicki, Dennis A

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the Daily Sleep Interference Scale (DSIS) in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a post hoc secondary analysis of data from eight randomized clinical trials (four DPN and four PHN) was performed. Data were pooled within patient populations when assessment weeks were the same. The DSIS was completed by 1,124 DPN and 1,034 PHN patients. Patient-reported outcomes, including a Daily Pain Diary, the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, SF-36 Health Survey, Profile of Mood States, MOS-Sleep Scale (MOS-SS), EQ-5D, and Patient Global Impression of Change, were used to validate the DSIS. Test-retest reliability was high for both samples (intraclass correlation coefficient>0.90). The DSIS showed good construct validity, with moderate to high correlations between the DSIS and weekly mean pain scores (r=0.48-0.80), MOS-SS sleep disturbance subscale (r=0.45-0.64), MPQ-SF Pain Experience (r=0.37-0.61), and VAS (r=0.42-0.72). The DSIS showed good discriminant validity in both groups; high and low MOS-SS sleep disturbance groups had significantly different DSIS scores (P<0.001). DPN patients who improved minimally on the Patient Global Impression of Change and in pain scores improved 1.5-2 DSIS points on average; for PHN, patient scores improved an average of 1-2 points. The DSIS demonstrated robust test-retest reliability, good construct and discriminant validity and responsiveness in painful DPN and PHN patients. A 1-2 point change on the DSIS might be interpreted as an important difference.

  10. Cross-national burden of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Deborah L; Sadosky, Alesia; Alvir, Jose

    2009-01-01

    The burden of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes. This study expanded on the human burden of painful DPN by quantifying functional and health status impairments among international patients from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of painful DPN. Evaluated outcomes measures included: Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (mBPI-sf), EuroQOL 5D, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale. Outcomes were stratified by pain severity using cut-points: 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) for average pain (0 to 3: none/mild, 4 to 6: moderate, 7 to 10: severe). Study sample is: 401 patients (163 in Asia, 110 in Latin America and 128 in the Middle East), mostly female (61%) (+/- standard deviation, SD), age of 57 +/- 10 years. Participants reported at least moderate levels of pain severity (mean [+/- SD] scores on a 0 to 10 NRS for average pain of 5.9 +/- 1.8 for Asia, 6.7 +/- 1.6 for Latin America, and 6.6 +/- 1.7 for the Middle East). Mean (+/- SD) values on the mBPI-sf Pain Interference Index were 4.7 +/- 2.3 for Asia, 5.6 +/- 2.1 for Latin America, and 5.5 +/- 2.3 for the Middle East. Patients in all 3 regions reported difficulties with functioning, sleep, and overall health status, which increased with higher pain severity levels. Patients in Asia had substantial impairments; however, they reported less serious problems than the other regions. These data are consistent with painful DPN being a burdensome condition worldwide: people with poorly managed neuropathic pain report a substantial burden of disease.

  11. Efficacy of Japanese traditional (Kampo) medicine for treating chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: A retrospective case series study

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, Yumiko; Ogawa, Keiko; Okamoto, Hideki; Chino, Atsushi; Namiki, Takao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate Japanese traditional (Kampo) medicine’s effectiveness on cancer chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), we carried out this retrospective study. METHODS By searching our outpatient database of 3154 patients who consulted our outpatient clinic of Japanese-Oriental (Kampo) Medicine at Chiba University Hospital from November 2005 to December 2010, a total of 281 patients diagnosed with cancer were identified. Twenty-four patients out of the 281 patients identified met the following three conditions and were eligible for further investigation of the effectiveness of Kampo treatment: At least one course of cancer chemotherapy had been administered; numbness and pain appeared after the chemotherapy; and CIPN was diagnosed before they were given Kampo treatment. RESULTS The 24 patients included 6 males and 18 females and ranged in age from 39 to 86 (mean 61.2 ± 11.5) years old. Kampo formulas were individually chosen by Kampo expert doctors based on Kampo-specific diagnostics. Beneficial outcomes were obtained by Kampo treatment in 20 out of the 24 cases (83.3%). Nine out 20 cases had a major response (the numbness and pain showed improvement or reduction by 50% or more), with 7 of 9 cases showing a more than 70% symptom reduction. Eleven out of 20 cases showed a minor response (less than 50% symptom reduction), and 4 out of the 24 cases had no beneficial response. The most frequently used formula was goshajinkigan (GJG), followed by hachimijiogan (HJG) and keishibukuryogan. Thirteen of the 24 cases (54.2%) were prescribed aconite root-containing formulas including GJG and HJG. Aconite root has “warming” effects and ameliorates pain and numbness; 21 out of 24 cases (87.5%) in total used warming formulas such as aconite root-containing formulas to reduce CIPN. CONCLUSION Our current study suggested that Kampo formulas chosen based on Kampo-specific diagnostics could be for treating CIPN that is refractory to conventional medicine. PMID

  12. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Updated Meta-Analysis of 10 High-Quality Randomized Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Chi-zi; Wu, Fan; Lu, Lin; Wang, Juan; Guo, Yi; Liu, Ai-ju; Liao, Wei-jing; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is very common in people with diabetes. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) therapy has been developed for DPN empirically over the years. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy and safety of CHMs for patients suffering from DPN. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy and safety of CHM on DPN. Six databases were searched up to November 2012. The primary outcome measures were the absolute values or changing of motor or sensory nerve conduction velocity (NCV), and the secondary outcome measurements were clinical symptoms improvements and adverse events. The methodological quality was assessed by Jadad scale and the twelve criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Results One hundred and sixty-three studies claimed RCTs. Ten studies with 653 individuals were further identified based on the Jadad score ≥3. These 10 studies were all of high methodological quality with a low risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed the effects of NCV favoring CHMs when compared with western conventional medicines (WCM) (P<0.05 or P<0.01). There is a significant difference in the total efficacy rate between the two groups (P<0.001). Adverse effects were reported in all of the ten included studies, and well tolerated in all patients with DPN. Conclusion Despite of the apparently positive findings and low risk of bias, it is premature to conclude the efficacy of CHMs for the treatment of DPN because of the high clinical heterogeneity and small sample sizes of the included studies. However, CHM therapy was safe for DPN. Further standardized preparation, large sample-size and rigorously designed RCTs are required. PMID:24146822

  13. Associations between anthropometric factors and peripheral neuropathy defined by vibrotactile perception threshold among industrial vibrating tool operators in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Shigeki; Yoshimasu, Kouichi; Tsuno, Kanami; Fukumoto, Jin; Kuroda, Mototsugu; Miyashita, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The effect of anthropometric factors on the fingertip vibrotactile perception threshold (VPT) of industrial vibrating tool operators (IVTOs) is not well known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between anthropometric factors and fingertip VPT. Methods: We included for analysis two groups of IVTOs: Group 1, predominantly forestry workers (n=325); and Group 2, public servants (n=68). These IVTOs regularly received medical examinations to evaluate hand-arm vibration syndrome. In the examination, measurements of their fingertip VPTs were taken before and after cold-water immersion (10 minutes at 10°C for Group 1 and 5 minutes at 12°C for Group 2). Their body height and weight were measured to calculate the body mass index (BMI). The presence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) was defined as a VPT ≥17.5 dB at 10 minutes after finishing immersion. Results: In the univariate analysis, weight and BMI were associated with a decreased risk of PN in both Groups 1 and 2. The negative association between BMI and PN remained in the multivariate analysis consistently, but weight reached marginal significance only in the multivariate analysis without BMI in both the groups. Age was positively associated with PN consistently in Group 1 but not in Group 2. Years exposed to vibration showed positive association with PN only in the univariate analysis of Group 1. Conclusions: Among IVTOs, factors reflecting body heat production, such as weight and BMI, were associated with a decreased risk of VPT-defined PN, regardless of the task engaged. PMID:27010084

  14. WNK1/HSN2 mutation in human peripheral neuropathy deregulates KCC2 expression and posterior lateral line development in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Valérie; Brustein, Edna; Liao, Meijiang; Dion, Patrick A; Lafrenière, Ronald G; Rouleau, Guy A; Drapeau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSNAII) is a rare pathology characterized by an early onset of severe sensory loss (all modalities) in the distal limbs. It is due to autosomal recessive mutations confined to exon "HSN2" of the WNK1 (with-no-lysine protein kinase 1) serine-threonine kinase. While this kinase is well studied in the kidneys, little is known about its role in the nervous system. We hypothesized that the truncating mutations present in the neural-specific HSN2 exon lead to a loss-of-function of the WNK1 kinase, impairing development of the peripheral sensory system. To investigate the mechanisms by which the loss of WNK1/HSN2 isoform function causes HSANII, we used the embryonic zebrafish model and observed strong expression of WNK1/HSN2 in neuromasts of the peripheral lateral line (PLL) system by immunohistochemistry. Knocking down wnk1/hsn2 in embryos using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides led to improper PLL development. We then investigated the reported interaction between the WNK1 kinase and neuronal potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, as this transporter is a target of WNK1 phosphorylation. In situ hybridization revealed kcc2 expression in mature neuromasts of the PLL and semi-quantitative RT-PCR of wnk1/hsn2 knockdown embryos showed an increased expression of kcc2 mRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of human KCC2 mRNA in embryos replicated the wnk1/hsn2 knockdown phenotype. We validated these results by obtaining double knockdown embryos, both for wnk1/hsn2 and kcc2, which alleviated the PLL defects. Interestingly, overexpression of inactive mutant KCC2-C568A, which does not extrude ions, allowed a phenocopy of the PLL defects. These results suggest a pathway in which WNK1/HSN2 interacts with KCC2, producing a novel regulation of its transcription independent of KCC2's activation, where a loss-of-function mutation in WNK1 induces an overexpression of KCC2 and hinders proper peripheral sensory nerve development, a

  15. Relationships between presynaptic inhibition and static postural sway in subjects with and without diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jihyun; Hong, Junggi

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can often lead to balance impairment. The spinal reflex is a mechanism that is reportedly important for balance, but it has not been investigated in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. Moreover, inhibitory or facilitatory behavior of the spinal reflex-known as presynaptic inhibition-is essential for controlling postural sway. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in as presynaptic inhibition and balance in subjects with and without diabetic peripheral neuropathy to determine the influence of presynaptic inhibition on balance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. [Subjects and Methods] Presynaptic inhibition and postural sway were tested in eight patients (mean age, 58±6 years) and eight normal subjects (mean age, 59±7 years). The mean percent difference in conditioned reflex amplitude relative to the unconditioned reflex amplitude was assessed to calculate as presynaptic inhibition. The single-leg balance index was measured using a computerized balance-measuring device. [Results] The diabetic peripheral neuropathy group showed lower presynaptic inhibition (47±30% vs. 75±22%) and decreased balance (0.65±0.24 vs. 0.38±0.06) as compared with the normal group. No significant correlation was found between as presynaptic inhibition and balance score (R=0.37). [Conclusion] Although the decreased as presynaptic inhibition observed in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients may suggest central nervous system involvement, further research is necessary to explore the role of presynaptic inhibition in decreased balance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients.

  16. [Diagnostic value of autoantibodies to MAG by ELISA Bühlmann in 117 immune-mediated peripheral neuropathies associated with monoclonal IgM to SGPG/SGLPG].

    PubMed

    Caudie, C; Kaygisiz, F; Jaquet, P; Petiot, P; Gonnaud, P-M; Antoine, J-C; Vial, C

    2006-01-01

    The neuropathies associated with monoclonal IgM gammopathy reacted with glycoconjugated targets on a very antigenic epitope on the sulfated glucuronic glycolipids corresponding to SGPG and SGLPG (sulfoglucuronyl paragloboside and sulfoglucuronyl lactosaminyl paragloboside), myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and sulfatide. Sometimes monoclonal IgM binds to a broad spectrum of gangliosides. The detection of targets of autoantibodies has considerable importance in the diagnosis and management of patients. It is not known whether the results of antibody tests are equally sensitive and specific for identification of involved auto-antigens. In this study we evaluated the results obtained using IgM reactivity against MAG by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA Bühlmann) with IgM reactivity against SGPG/SGLPG obtained by overlay thin-layer chromatography. We selected 117 patients with anti-SGPG/SGLPG monoclonal gammopathy and peripheral neuropathy and a control group of 102 peripheral neuropathies with 24 having IgM high titres of monoclonal IgM anti-ganglioside antibodies. The anti-MAG sensitivity was 0.97, specificity was 0.86. There is a crossreactivity between 8 (57%) monoclonal IgM antibodies anti-MAG and anti-ganglioside GM1 and 2 (28%) anti-disialylated gangliosides. These results indicate that in clinical practice, anti-MAG ELISA is useful for eliminating anti-MAG neuropathy, as well as for positive diagnosis for titres upper than 10,000 BTU. It is also alpha good test to appreciate clinical improvement after Rituximab treatment.

  17. Oxidative stress and nerve damage: Role in chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy☆

    PubMed Central

    Areti, Aparna; Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Naidu, VGM; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a severe dose limiting toxicity associated with cancer chemotherapy. Ever since it was identified, the clear pathological mechanisms underlying chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) remain sparse and considerable involvement of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation has been realized recently. Despite the empirical use of antioxidants in the therapy of CIPN, the oxidative stress mediated neuronal damage in peripheral neuropathy is still debatable. The current review focuses on nerve damage due to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction as key pathogenic mechanisms involved in CIPN. Oxidative stress as a central mediator of apoptosis, neuroinflammation, metabolic disturbances and bioenergetic failure in neurons has been highlighted in this review along with a summary of research on dietary antioxidants and other nutraceuticals which have undergone prospective controlled clinical trials in patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:24494204

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of pain in plexopathy, radiculopathy, peripheral neuropathy and phantom limb pain. Evidence and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain on Neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Francesco; Jacopetti, Marco; Spallone, Vincenza; Padua, Luca; Traballesi, Marco; Brunelli, Stefano; Cantarella, Cristina; Ciotti, Cristina; Coraci, Daniele; Dalla Toffola, Elena; Mandrini, Silvia; Morone, Giovanni; Pazzaglia, Costanza; Romano, Marcello; Schenone, Angelo; Togni, Rossella; Tamburin, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Pain may affect all aspects of social life and reduce the quality of life. Neuropathic pain (NP) is common in patients affected by plexopathy, radiculopathy, mononeuropathy, peripheral neuropathy. Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a painful sensation that is common after amputation, and its pathophysiological mechanisms involve changes in the peripheral and central nervous system. Given the lack of conclusive evidence and specific guidelines on these topics, the aim of the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain on Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN) was to collect evidence and offer recommendations to answer currently open questions on the assessment and treatment of NP associated with the above conditions and PLP. When no evidence was available, recommendations were based on consensus between expert opinions. Current guidelines on the assessment and pharmacological treatment of NP can be applied to plexopathy, radiculopathy, mononeuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, while evidence for invasive treatments and physical therapy is generally poor because of the low quality of studies. Treatment of PLP is still unsatisfactory. Data on the functional outcome and impact of pain on neurorehabilitation outcome in these conditions are lacking. In most cases, a multidisciplinary approach is recommended to offer a better outcome and reduce side effects. High quality studies are requested to address the unmet needs in this field.

  19. Effect of levetiracetam versus gabapentin on peripheral neuropathy and sciatic degeneration in streptozotocin-diabetic mice: Influence on spinal microglia and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Reda, Heba M; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-01-15

    Peripheral diabetic neuropathy develops in diabetic patients. The current study tested the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of the anticonvulsant drug, levetiracetam compared with the standard drug, gabapentin, in a model of streptozotocin-induced peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Male albino mice were injected intraperitoneally with streptozotocin (40mg/kg) for five consecutive days to induce type 1 diabetes mellitus. After development of peripheral diabetic neuropathy, mice were then treated orally with 10 doses of levetiracetam or gabapentin (or vehicle). The effect of multiple doses of levetiracetam on the histopathology of sciatic nerve and spinal cord was tested. Furthermore, the effect of levetiracetam on the spinal expression of microglia and astrocytes was examined in comparison with gabapentin. Results indicated that the highest dose of levetiracetam and all doses of gabapentin increased the withdrawal threshold in von Frey test. Furthermore, all doses of levetiracetam and gabapentin prolonged the reaction time exhibited by diabetic mice tested in hot plate test. Both drugs provided protection for the sciatic nerve and the spinal cord. In addition, levetiracetam (20 and 40mg/kg) decreased spinal immunostaining for CD11b (microglia marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, astrocytes marker) however; the high dose of gabapentin (40mg/kg) reduced the spinal immunostaining for GFAP only. In conclusion, levetiracetam produced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effect in diabetic mice with favorable effects on sciatic nerve and spinal cord that were accompanied by downregulation of the spinal expression of microglia and astrocytes. Thus, levetiracetam may have promise in alleviating neuropathic pain in diabetic patients.

  20. Association Between Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mu, Ze-Peng; Wang, Yan-Gang; Li, Cheng-Qian; Lv, Wen-Shan; Wang, Bin; Jing, Zhao-Hai; Song, Xue-Jia; Lun, Yu; Qiu, Ming-Yue; Ma, Xiao-Long

    2017-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cell signaling protein involved in systemic inflammation, and is also an important cytokine in the acute phase reaction. Several studies suggested a possible association between TNF-α and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in type 2 diabetic patients, but no accurate conclusion was available. A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies was performed to comprehensively assess the association between serum TNF-α levels and DPN in type 2 diabetic patients. We searched Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase, and China Biology Medicine (CMB) databases for eligible studies. Study-specific data were combined using meta-analysis. Fourteen studies were finally included into the meta-analysis, which involved a total of 2650 participants. Meta-analysis showed that there were obviously increased serum TNF-α levels in DPN patients compared with type 2 diabetic patients without DPN (standard mean difference [SMD] = 1.203, 95 % CI 0.795-1.611, P < 0.001). There were also obviously increased levels of serum TNF-α in diabetic patients with DPN when compared with healthy controls (SMD = 2.364, 95 % CI 1.333-3.394, P < 0.001). In addition, there were increased serum TNF-α levels in painful DPN patients compared with painless DPN patients (SMD = 0.964, 95 % CI 0.237-1.690, P = 0.009). High level of serum TNF-α was significantly associated with increased risk of DPN in patients with type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 2.594, 95 % CI 1.182-5.500, P = 0.017). Increased serum levels of TNF-α was not associated with increased risk of painful DPN in patients with type 2 diabetes (OR = 2.486, 95 % CI 0.672-9.193, P = 0.172). Sensitivity analysis showed that there was no obvious change in the pooled estimates when omitting single study by turns. Type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy have obviously increased serum TNF-α levels than type 2 diabetic patients without peripheral

  1. Towards a functional pathology of hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Weis, Joachim; Claeys, Kristl G; Roos, Andreas; Azzedine, Hamid; Katona, Istvan; Schröder, J Michael; Senderek, Jan

    2017-04-01

    A growing number of hereditary neuropathies have been assigned to causative gene defects in recent years. The study of human nerve biopsy samples has contributed substantially to the discovery of many of these neuropathy genes. Genotype-phenotype correlations based on peripheral nerve pathology have provided a comprehensive picture of the consequences of these mutations. Intriguingly, several gene defects lead to distinguishable lesion patterns that can be studied in nerve biopsies. These characteristic features include the loss of certain nerve fiber populations and a large spectrum of distinct structural changes of axons, Schwann cells and other components of peripheral nerves. In several instances the lesion patterns are directly or indirectly linked to the known functions of the mutated gene. The present review is designed to provide an overview on these characteristic patterns. It also considers other aspects important for the manifestation and pathology of hereditary neuropathies including the role of inflammation, effects of chemotherapeutic agents and alterations detectable in skin biopsies.

  2. Spinal astrocytic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation as counteracting mechanism to the amitriptyline analgesic efficacy in painful peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2017-03-05

    Several drugs and agents are currently used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Among them amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant drug, represent a first line treatment. Despite its well-documented clinical efficacy, amitriptyline is ineffective in some animal models of neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to investigate into amitriptyline poor efficacy in neuropathic pain and to determine the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation as counteracting mechanism to the analgesic effects of this drug. Experiments were performed in mice with painful peripheral neuropathies due to the antiretroviral agent 2,3-dideoxycytidine (ddC), and with the partial sciatic nerve injury produced in the spared nerve injury model (SNI). In mice subjected to SNI and antiretroviral treatment, amitriptyline did not attenuate mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Conversely, intrathecal injection of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 prevented SNI and ddC-induced nociceptive behavior and, its inactive dose co-administrated with amitriptyline induced an antinociceptive effect. Western blotting analysis showed an upregulation of p-JNK in the lumbar spinal cord of SNI and ddC-exposed mice, that was further enhanced after amitriptyline administration. Additionally, amitriptyline further promoted astrocyte activation in neuropathic mice, as illustrated by the increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), that was attenuated by intrathecal injection of the JNK inhibitor. These data indicate astrocyte JNK activation as counteracting pathway to amitriptyline analgesic response. Targeting the JNK pathway in spinal astroglia may present an efficient way to improve the analgesic efficacy of amitriptyline in the neuropathic pain treatment.

  3. Muscle-specific function of the centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy-associated dynamin 2 is required for proper lipid metabolism, mitochondria, muscle fibers, neuromuscular junctions and peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Tinelli, Elisa; Pereira, Jorge A; Suter, Ueli

    2013-11-01

    The ubiquitously expressed large GTPase Dynamin 2 (DNM2) plays a critical role in the regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking through its crucial function in membrane fission, particularly in endocytosis. Autosomal-dominant mutations in DNM2 cause tissue-specific human disorders. Different sets of DNM2 mutations are linked to dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type B, a motor and sensory neuropathy affecting primarily peripheral nerves, or autosomal-dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) presenting with primary damage in skeletal muscles. To understand the underlying disease mechanisms, it is imperative to determine to which degree the primary affected cell types require DNM2. Thus, we used cell type-specific gene ablation to examine the consequences of DNM2 loss in skeletal muscle cells, the major relevant cell type involved in CNM. We found that DNM2 function in skeletal muscle is required for proper mouse development. Skeletal muscle-specific loss of DNM2 causes a reduction in muscle mass and in the numbers of muscle fibers, altered muscle fiber size distributions, irregular neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and isolated degenerating intramuscular peripheral nerve fibers. Intriguingly, a lack of muscle-expressed DNM2 triggers an increase of lipid droplets (LDs) and mitochondrial defects. We conclude that loss of DNM2 function in skeletal muscles initiates a chain of harmful parallel and serial events, involving dysregulation of LDs and mitochondrial defects within altered muscle fibers, defective NMJs and peripheral nerve degeneration. These findings provide the essential basis for further studies on DNM2 function and malfunction in skeletal muscles in health and disease, potentially including metabolic diseases such as diabetes.

  4. Can Medical Herbs Stimulate Regeneration or Neuroprotection and Treat Neuropathic Pain in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Sven; Beckmann, Kathrin; Franconi, Giovanna; Greten, Henry Johannes; Rostock, Matthias; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIPN) has a relevant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. There are no curative conventional treatments, so further options have to be investigated. We conducted a systematic review in English and Chinese language databases to illuminate the role of medical herbs. 26 relevant studies on 5 single herbs, one extract, one receptor-agonist, and 8 combinations of herbs were identified focusing on the single herbs Acorus calamus rhizoma, Cannabis sativa fructus, Chamomilla matricaria, Ginkgo biloba, Salvia officinalis, Sweet bee venom, Fritillaria cirrhosae bulbus, and the herbal combinations Bu Yang Huan Wu, modified Bu Yang Huan Wu plus Liuwei Di Huang, modified Chai Hu Long Gu Mu Li Wan, Geranii herba plus Aconiti lateralis praeparata radix , Niu Che Sen Qi Wan (Goshajinkigan), Gui Zhi Jia Shu Fu Tang (Keishikajutsubuto), Huang Qi Wu Wu Tang (Ogikeishigomotsuto), and Shao Yao Gan Cao Tang (Shakuyakukanzoto). The knowledge of mechanism of action is still limited, the quality of clinical trials needs further improvement, and studies have not yielded enough evidence to establish a standard practice, but a lot of promising substances have been identified. While CIPN has multiple mechanisms of neuronal degeneration, a combination of herbs or substances might deal with multiple targets for the aim of neuroprotection or neuroregeneration in CIPN. PMID:23983777

  5. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Clinical Research Network: The Inherited Neuropathies Consortium Educational Resources (2 links) Orphanet: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 University of Chicago Center for Peripheral Neuropathy Patient Support ...

  6. Efficacy of Administration of an Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor for Two Years on Autonomic and Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Margaritidis, Charalambos; Kontoninas, Zisis; Stergiou, Ioannis; Tsotoulidis, Stefanos; Karlafti, Eleni; Mourouglakis, Alexandros; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I.

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the effect of quinapril on diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Patients and Methods. Sixty-three consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus [43% males, 27 with type 1 DM, mean age 52 years (range 22–65)], definite DCAN [abnormal results in 2 cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests (CARTs)], and DPN were randomized to quinapril 20 mg/day (group A, n = 31) or placebo (group B, n = 32) for 2 years. Patients with hypertension or coronary heart disease were excluded. To detect DPN and DCAN, the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument Questionnaire and Examination (MNSIQ and MNSIE), measurement of vibration perception threshold with biothesiometer (BIO), and CARTs [R-R variation during deep breathing [assessed by expiration/inspiration ratio (E/I), mean circular resultant (MCR), and standard deviation (SD)], Valsalva maneuver (Vals), 30 : 15 ratio, and orthostatic hypotension (OH)] were used. Results. In group A, E/I, MCR, and SD increased (p for all comparisons < 0.05). Other indices (Vals, 30 : 15, OH, MNSIQ, MNSIE, and BIO) did not change. In group B, all CART indices deteriorated, except Vals, which did not change. MNSIQ, MNSIE, and BIO did not change. Conclusions. Treatment with quinapril improves DCAN (mainly parasympathetic dysfunction). Improved autonomic balance may improve the long-term outcome of diabetic patients. PMID:28373993

  7. Responses of spinothalamic tract neurons to mechanical and thermal stimuli in an experimental model of peripheral neuropathy in primates.

    PubMed

    Palecek, J; Dougherty, P M; Kim, S H; Palecková, V; Lekan, H; Chung, J M; Carlton, S M; Willis, W D

    1992-12-01

    1. An experimental peripheral neuropathy (EPN) was induced in three monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) by ligation of spinal nerve L7. Behavioral responses to innocuous mechanical stimuli were tested before and after the surgery. Two weeks after the nerve ligation, the activity of spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons was recorded on both sides of the spinal cord with the animal under general anesthesia. Responses of the STT neurons to the following stimuli applied to the skin were recorded: graded mechanical stimuli (brush, press, pinch and squeeze), von Frey filaments of different bending forces (0.077-19.05 g), 5-s heat stimuli ranging from 39 to 53 degrees C, and 15 s cold stimuli (32-8 degrees C). 2. Innocuous mechanical stimulation of the foot did not evoke hindlimb withdrawal in the animals before surgery. Within 24-48 h after nerve ligation, the animals showed hindlimb withdrawal to the same innocuous stimuli. This behavior was more pronounced on the side of the ligation than on the sham-operated side and more frequent during the second week after the surgery. 3. Responses of 51 STT neurons recorded on the side of the ligation (EPN all group) were compared with responses of 33 STT cells recorded on the sham-operated side (control group) and with records from STT neurons in unoperated animals obtained earlier (reference group). Neurons from the EPN all group were divided into two sets according to their rostrocaudal location (EPN R, rostral to L6/7 border, n = 40; EPN C, caudal to L6/7 border, n = 11). 4. Neurons from the EPN all and EPN R groups had significantly higher background frequencies than those from the control and reference groups. Innocuous brush stimuli evoked mean discharge frequencies of approximately 35 Hz in EPN R neurons and only approximately 15 Hz in both control and reference groups. Increased responsiveness of EPN R neurons to innocuous stimuli was also demonstrated by lower thresholds and higher discharge frequencies to von Frey filament

  8. Peripheral Nerve Society Guideline on the classification, diagnosis, investigation, and immunosuppressive therapy of non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael P; Dyck, P James B; Gronseth, Gary S; Guillevin, Loïc; Hadden, Robert D M; Heuss, Dieter; Léger, Jean-Marc; Notermans, N C; Pollard, John D; Said, Gérard; Sobue, Gen; Vrancken, A F J E; Kissel, John T

    2010-09-01

    Non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy (NSVN) is routinely considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive axonal neuropathies, especially those with asymmetric or multifocal features. Diagnostic criteria for vasculitic neuropathy, classification criteria for NSVN, and therapeutic approaches to NSVN are not standardized. The aim of this guideline was to derive recommendations on the classification, diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of NSVN based on the available evidence and, where evidence was not available, expert consensus. Experts on vasculitis, vasculitic neuropathy, and methodology systematically reviewed the literature for articles addressing diagnostic issues concerning vasculitic neuropathy and NSVN as well as treatment of NSVN and the small-to-medium vessel primary systemic vasculitides using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. The selected articles were analyzed and classified. The group initially reached consensus on a classification of vasculitides associated with neuropathy. Non-diabetic radiculoplexus neuropathy was incorporated within NSVN. The consensus definition of pathologically definite vasculitic neuropathy required that vessel wall inflammation be accompanied by vascular damage. Diagnostic criteria for pathologically probable vasculitic neuropathy included five predictors of definite vasculitic neuropathy: vascular deposits of IgM, C3, or fibrinogen by direct immunofluorescence; hemosiderin deposits; asymmetric nerve fiber loss; prominent active axonal degeneration; and myofiber necrosis, regeneration, or infarcts in peroneus brevis muscle biopsy (Good Practice Points from class II/III evidence). A case definition of clinically probable vasculitic neuropathy in patients lacking biopsy proof incorporated clinical features typical of vasculitic neuropathy: sensory or sensory-motor involvement, asymmetric/multifocal pattern, lower-limb predominance, distal-predominance, pain, acute relapsing course, and non

  9. A meta-analysis of trials on aldose reductase inhibitors in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The Italian Study Group. The St. Vincent Declaration.

    PubMed

    Nicolucci, A; Carinci, F; Cavaliere, D; Scorpiglione, N; Belfiglio, M; Labbrozzi, D; Mari, E; Benedetti, M M; Tognoni, G; Liberati, A

    1996-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common and disabling long-term sequelae of diabetes mellitus. Aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) have been proposed and are increasingly used in many countries for the prevention and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to review existing evidence on the effectiveness of ARIs in the treatment of peripheral diabetic neuropathy, with particular reference to the type and clinical relevance of the end point used and to the consistency of results across studies. Thirteen randomized clinical trials (RTCs) comparing ARIs with placebo, published between 1981 and 1993 were included in the meta-analysis. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was the only end point reported in all trials. Treatment effect was thus evaluated in terms of NCV mean difference in four different nerves: median motor, median sensory, peroneal motor, and sural sensory. A statistically significant reduction in decline of median motor NCV was present in the treated group as compared to the control group (mean 0.91 ms-1; 95% CI 0.41-1.42 ms-1). For peroneal motor, median sensory, and sural sensory nerves results did not show any clear benefit for patients treated with ARIs. When the analysis was limited to trials with at least 1-year treatment duration, a significant effect was present for peroneal motor NCV (mean 1.24 ms-1; 95% CI 0.32-2.15 ms-1) and a benefit of borderline statistical significance was also present for median motor NCV (mean 0.69 ms-1; 95% CI-0.07-1.45 ms-1). A heterogeneous picture emerged when looking at the results of different studies and serious inconsistencies were also present in the direction of treatment effects among nerves in the same studies. Although the results of 1-year treatment on motor NCV seem encouraging, the uncertainty about the reliability of the end-point employed and the short treatment duration do not allow any clear conclusion about the efficacy of ARIs in the treatment of peripheral diabetic

  10. Enriching the diet with menhaden oil improves peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Coppey, Lawrence J; Davidson, Eric P; Obrosov, Alexander; Yorek, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of supplementing the diet of type 1 diabetic rats with menhaden oil on diabetic neuropathy. Menhaden oil is a natural source for n-3 fatty acids, which have been shown to have beneficial effects in cardiovascular disease and other morbidities. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were used to examine the influence of supplementing their diet with 25% menhaden oil on diabetic neuropathy. Both prevention and intervention protocols were used. Endpoints included motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity, thermal and mechanical sensitivity, and innervation and sensitivity of the cornea and hindpaw. Diabetic neuropathy as evaluated by the stated endpoints was found to be progressive. Menhaden oil did not improve elevated HbA1C levels or serum lipid levels. Diabetic rats at 16-wk duration were thermal hypoalgesic and had reduced motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, and innervation and sensitivity of the cornea and skin were impaired. These endpoints were significantly improved with menhaden oil treatment following the prevention or intervention protocol. We found that supplementing the diet of type 1 diabetic rats with menhaden oil improved a variety of endpoints associated with diabetic neuropathy. These results suggest that enriching the diet with n-3 fatty acids may be a good treatment strategy for diabetic neuropathy.

  11. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of multifocal motor neuropathy. Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society--first revision.

    PubMed

    2010-12-01

    A European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society consensus guideline on the definition, investigation, and treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) was published in 2006. The aim is to revise this guideline. Disease experts considered references retrieved from MEDLINE and Cochrane Systematic Reviews published between August 2004 and July 2009 and prepared statements that were agreed to in an iterative fashion. The Task Force agreed on Good Practice Points to define clinical and electrophysiological diagnostic criteria for MMN, investigations to be considered, and principal recommendations for treatment.

  12. A novel mutation m.8561C>G in MT-ATP6/8 causing a mitochondrial syndrome with ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Kytövuori, Laura; Lipponen, Joonas; Rusanen, Harri; Komulainen, Tuomas; Martikainen, Mika H; Majamaa, Kari

    2016-11-01

    Defects in the respiratory chain or mitochondrial ATP synthase (complex V) result in mitochondrial dysfunction that is an important cause of inherited neurological disease. Two of the subunits of complex V are encoded by MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8 in the mitochondrial genome. Pathogenic mutations in MT-ATP6 are associated with the Leigh syndrome, the syndrome of neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), as well as with non-classical phenotypes, while MT-ATP8 is less frequently mutated in patients with mitochondrial disease. We investigated two adult siblings presenting with features of cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes mellitus, sensorineural hearing impairment, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. As the phenotype was suggestive of mitochondrial disease, mitochondrial DNA was sequenced and a novel heteroplasmic mutation m.8561C>G in the overlapping region of the MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8 was found. The mutation changed amino acids in both subunits. Mutation heteroplasmy correlated with the disease phenotype in five family members. An additional assembly intermediate of complex V and increased amount of subcomplex F1 were observed in myoblasts of the two patients, but the total amount of complex V was unaffected. Furthermore, intracellular ATP concentration was lower in patient myoblasts indicating defective energy production. We suggest that the m.8561C>G mutation in MT-ATP6/8 is pathogenic, leads biochemically to impaired assembly and decreased ATP production of complex V, and results clinically in a phenotype with the core features of cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism.

  13. Nonrecurrent PMP22-RAI1 contiguous gene deletions arise from replication-based mechanisms and result in Smith-Magenis syndrome with evident peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Neira, Juanita; Gu, Shen; Harel, Tamar; Liu, Pengfei; Briceño, Ignacio; Elsea, Sarah H; Gómez, Alberto; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) are genomic disorders associated with deletion copy number variants involving chromosome 17p12 and 17p11.2, respectively. Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR)-mediated recurrent deletions are responsible for the majority of HNPP and SMS cases; the rearrangement products encompass the key dosage-sensitive genes PMP22 and RAI1, respectively, and result in haploinsufficiency for these genes. Less frequently, nonrecurrent genomic rearrangements occur at this locus. Contiguous gene duplications encompassing both PMP22 and RAI1, i.e., PMP22-RAI1 duplications, have been investigated, and replication-based mechanisms rather than NAHR have been proposed for these rearrangements. In the current study, we report molecular and clinical characterizations of six subjects with the reciprocal phenomenon of deletions spanning both genes, i.e., PMP22-RAI1 deletions. Molecular studies utilizing high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization and breakpoint junction sequencing identified mutational signatures that were suggestive of replication-based mechanisms. Systematic clinical studies revealed features consistent with SMS, including features of intellectual disability, speech and gross motor delays, behavioral problems and ocular abnormalities. Five out of six subjects presented clinical signs and/or objective electrophysiologic studies of peripheral neuropathy. Clinical profiling may improve the clinical management of this unique group of subjects, as the peripheral neuropathy can be more severe or of earlier onset as compared to SMS patients having the common recurrent deletion. Moreover, the current study, in combination with the previous report of PMP22-RAI1 duplications, contributes to the understanding of rare complex phenotypes involving multiple dosage-sensitive genes from a genetic mechanistic standpoint.

  14. Effect of diet induced obesity or type 1 or type 2 diabetes on corneal nerves and peripheral neuropathy in C57Bl/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Yorek, Matthew S.; Obrosov, Alexander; Shevalye, Hanna; Holmes, Amey; Harper, Matthew M.; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    We determined the impact diet induced obesity (DIO) and types 1 and 2 diabetes has on peripheral neuropathy with emphasis on corneal nerve structural changes in C57Bl/6J mice. Endpoints examined included nerve conduction velocity, response to thermal and mechanical stimuli and innervation of the skin and cornea. DIO mice and to a greater extent type 2 diabetic mice were insulin resistant. DIO and both types 1 and 2 diabetic mice developed motor and sensory nerve conduction deficits. In the cornea of DIO and type 2 diabetic mice there was a decrease in sub-epithelial corneal nerves, innervation of the corneal epithelium and corneal sensitivity. Type 1 diabetic mice did not present with any significant changes in corneal nerve structure until after 20 weeks of hyperglycemia. DIO and type 2 diabetic mice developed corneal structural damage more rapidly than type 1 diabetic mice even though hemoglobin A1C values were significantly higher in type 1 diabetic mice. This suggests that DIO with or without hyperglycemia contributes to development and progression of peripheral neuropathy and nerve structural damage in the cornea. PMID:25858759

  15. The gene responsible for a severe form of peripheral neuropathy and agenesis of the corpus callosum maps to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Casaubon, L.K.; Melanson, M.; Marineau, C. |

    1996-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACCPN) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Genealogical studies in a large number of affected French Canadian individuals suggest that ACCPN results from a single founder mutation. A genomewide search using 120 microsatellite DNA markers in 14 French Canadian families allowed the mapping of the ACCPN gene to a 5-cM region on chromosome 15q13-q15 that is flanked by markers D15S1040 and D15S118. A maximum two-point LOD score of 11.1 was obtained with the marker D15S971 at a recombination fraction of 0. Haplotype analysis and linkage disequilibrium support a founder effect. These findings are the first step in the identification of the gene responsible for ACCPN, which may shed some light on the numerous conditions associated with progressive peripheral neuropathy or agenesis of the corpus callosum. 28 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Phase 1/2 open-label dose-escalation study of plasmid DNA expressing two isoforms of hepatocyte growth factor in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Christiansen, Mark; Allen, Jeffrey A; Kessler, John A

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of intramuscular injections of plasmid DNA (VM202) expressing two isoforms of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in subjects with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN). Twelve patients in three cohorts (4, 8, and 16 mg) received two sets of VM202 injections separated by two weeks. Safety and tolerability were evaluated and the visual analog scale (VAS), the short form McGill questionnaire (SF-MPQ), and the brief pain inventory for patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (BPI-DPN) measured pain level throughout 12 months after treatment. No serious adverse events (AEs) were observed. The mean VAS was reduced from baseline by 47.2% (P = 0.002) at 6 months and by 44.1% (P = 0.005) at 12 months after treatment. The VAS scores for the 4, 8, and 16 mg dose cohorts at 6 months follow-up decreased in a dose-responsive manner, by 21% (P = 0.971), 53% (P = 0.014), and 62% (P = 0.001), respectively. The results with the BPI-DPN and SF-MPQ showed patterns similar to the VAS scores. In conclusion, VM202 treatment appeared to be safe, well tolerated, and sufficient to provide long term symptomatic relief and improvement in the quality of life in patients with PDPN.

  17. The gene responsible for a severe form of peripheral neuropathy and agenesis of the corpus callosum maps to chromosome 15q.

    PubMed Central

    Casaubon, L. K.; Melanson, M.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Marineau, C.; Andermann, E.; Andermann, F.; Weissenbach, J.; Prévost, C.; Bouchard, J. P.; Mathieu, J.; Rouleau, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACCPN) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Genealogical studies in a large number of affected French Canadian individuals suggest that ACCPN results from a single founder mutation. A genomewide search using 120 microsatellite DNA markers in 14 French Canadian families allowed the mapping of the ACCPN gene to a 5-cM region on chromosome 15q13-q15 that is flanked by markers D15S1040 and D15S118. A maximum two-point LOD score of 11.1 was obtained with the marker D15S971 at a recombination fraction of 0. Haplotype analysis and linkage disequilibrium support a founder effect. These findings are the first step in the identification of the gene responsible for ACCPN, which may shed some light on the numerous conditions associated with the progressive peripheral neuropathy or agenesis of the corpus callosum. PMID:8554065

  18. Fibered fluorescence microscopy (FFM) of intra epidermal nerve fibers--translational marker for peripheral neuropathies in preclinical research: processing and analysis of the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Frans; De Backer, Steve; Lemeire, Jan; Torfs, Berf; Nuydens, Rony; Meert, Theo; Schelkens, Peter; Scheunders, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by diabetes or AIDS or be a side-effect of chemotherapy. Fibered Fluorescence Microscopy (FFM) is a recently developed imaging modality using a fiber optic probe connected to a laser scanning unit. It allows for in-vivo scanning of small animal subjects by moving the probe along the tissue surface. In preclinical research, FFM enables non-invasive, longitudinal in vivo assessment of intra epidermal nerve fibre density in various models for peripheral neuropathies. By moving the probe, FFM allows visualization of larger surfaces, since, during the movement, images are continuously captured, allowing to acquire an area larger then the field of view of the probe. For analysis purposes, we need to obtain a single static image from the multiple overlapping frames. We introduce a mosaicing procedure for this kind of video sequence. Construction of mosaic images with sub-pixel alignment is indispensable and must be integrated into a global consistent image aligning. An additional motivation for the mosaicing is the use of overlapping redundant information to improve the signal to noise ratio of the acquisition, because the individual frames tend to have both high noise levels and intensity inhomogeneities. For longitudinal analysis, mosaics captured at different times must be aligned as well. For alignment, global correlation-based matching is compared with interest point matching. Use of algorithms working on multiple CPU's (parallel processor/cluster/grid) is imperative for use in a screening model.

  19. The Role of Peripheral Nerve Function in Age-Related Bone Loss and Changes in Bone Adaptation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    and peripheral neuropathy has been identified as an in- dependent predictor of low bone mass in the affected limb of diabetic subjects26. Despite...radial and sural nerves. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1968;31:464-70. 9. Swallow M. Fibre size and content of the anterior tibial nerve of the foot ...Rix M, Andreassen H, Eskildsen P. Impact of peripheral neuropathy on bone density in patients with type 1 dia- betes. Diabetes Care 1999;22:827-31

  20. Involvement of high mobility group box 1 in the development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Takeshi; Tsubota, Maho; Kawaishi, Yudai; Yamanishi, Hiroki; Kamitani, Natsuki; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-07-15

    Given that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, once released to the extracellular space, promotes nociception, we asked if inactivation of HMGB1 prevents or reverses chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy in rats and also examined possible involvement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation endproduct (RAGE), known as targets for HMGB1. Painful neuropathy was produced by repeated i.p. administration of paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. Nociceptive threshold was determined by the paw pressure method and/or von Frey test in the hindpaw. Tissue protein levels were determined by immunoblotting. Repeated i.p. administration of the anti-HMGB1-neutralizing antibody or recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rhsTM), known to inactivate HMGB1, prevented the development of hyperalgesia and/or allodynia induced by paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. A single i.p. or intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of the antibody or rhsTM reversed the chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A single i.pl. administration of a TLR4 antagonist or low molecular weight heparin, known to inhibit RAGE, attenuated the hyperalgesia caused by i.pl. HMGB1 and also the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. Paclitaxel or vincristine treatment significantly decreased protein levels of HMGB1 in the dorsal root ganglia, but not sciatic nerves. HMGB1 thus participates in both development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy, in part through RAGE and TLR4. HMGB1 inactivation is considered useful to prevent and treat the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... with neuromyotonia is a rare form of inherited peripheral neuropathy. This group of conditions affects an estimated 1 ... Page National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet Educational Resources (2 links) Merck Manual ...

  2. Use of an alpha lipoic, methylsulfonylmethane and bromelain dietary supplement (Opera(®)) for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy management, a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Isacco; Francolini, Giulio; Becherini, Carlotta; Terziani, Francesca; Delli Paoli, Camilla; Olmetto, Emanuela; Loi, Mauro; Perna, Marco; Meattini, Icro; Scotti, Vieri; Greto, Daniela; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Sulprizio, Susanna; Livi, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a major clinical problem associated with a number of cytotoxic agents. OPERA(®) (GAMFARMA srl, Milan, Italy) is a new dietary supplement where α-lipoic acid, Boswellia Serrata, methylsulfonylmethane and bromelain are combined in a single capsule. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the efficacy and safety of OPERA(®) supplementation in a series of patients affected by CIPN. We selected 25 subjects with CIPN evolving during or after chemotherapy with potentially neurotoxic agents. Patients were enrolled at the first clinical manifestation of neuropathy. CIPN was assessed at the enrollment visit and subsequently repeated every 3 weeks until 12 weeks. Primary endpoint was the evaluation of changes of measured scores after 12 weeks of therapy compared to baseline evaluation. Secondary endpoints were the evaluation of neuropathy reduction at 12 weeks after beginning of therapy with OPERA(®). Analysis of VAS data showed reduction in pain perceived by patients. According to NCI-CTC sensor and motor score, mISS scale and TNSc scale, both pain and both sensor and motor neuropathic impairment decreased after 12 weeks of treatments. Treatment with OPERA supplement was well tolerated; no increase in the toxicity profile of any of the therapeutic regimen that the patients were undergoing was reported. OPERA(®) was able to improve CIPN symptoms in a prospective series of patients treated with neurotoxic chemotherapy, with no significant toxicity or interaction. Prospective RCT in a selected patients' population is warranted to confirm its promising activity.

  3. Prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy by a polyamine-reduced diet—NEUROXAPOL: protocol of a prospective, randomised, controlled, single-blind and monocentric trial

    PubMed Central

    Balayssac, David; Ferrier, Jérémy; Pereira, Bruno; Gillet, Brigitte; Pétorin, Caroline; Vein, Julie; Libert, Frédéric; Eschalier, Alain; Pezet, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oxaliplatin remains the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent for treating advanced colorectal cancer but its efficacy is hampered by dose-limiting neurotoxicity manifested by a painful polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN) is characterised by acute and transient cold hyperaesthesia in the hours and days following oxaliplatin infusion (>90% of patients), but also by retarded chronic neuropathy due to the repetition of chemotherapy cycles (30–50% of patients). OIPN impairs the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients and no preventive or curative strategies have as yet proven effective. A polyamine-reduced diet (PRD) has recently demonstrated its efficacy to prevent OIPN in animals without adverse effects. Methods and analysis The NEUROXAPOL trial is a prospective, randomised, controlled, single-blind, monocentric and interventional study. This trial is aimed at evaluating the efficacy and feasibility of a PRD compared to a normal polyamine containing diet to prevent OIPN in patients treated by oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients (n=40 per group) will be randomly assigned to receive either a PRD or a normal diet before and during the chemotherapy regimen. The main objectives are to improve the cold pain thresholds, neuropathic pain symptoms, comorbidities (anxiety and depression) and HRQOL of patients. The primary end point is the assessment of cold pain thresholds 2 weeks after the third cycle of chemotherapy. The secondary end points are the evaluation of thermal pain thresholds, the grade of neuropathy, neuropathic pain, symptoms of anxiety and depression and HRQOL, until the 12th cycle of chemotherapy. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by an independent medical ethics committee 1 (CPP Sud Est 1, Saint Etienne, France) and registered by the competent French authority (ANSM, Saint Denis, France). The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international

  4. Diabetic neuropathy: electrophysiological and morphological study of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration in transgenic mice that express IFNbeta in beta cells.

    PubMed

    Serafín, Anna; Molín, Jessica; Márquez, Merce; Blasco, Ester; Vidal, Enric; Foradada, Laia; Añor, Sonia; Rabanal, Rosa M; Fondevila, Dolors; Bosch, Fàtima; Pumarola, Martí

    2010-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most frequent complications in diabetes but there are no treatments beyond glucose control, due in part to the lack of an appropriate animal model to assess an effective therapy. This study was undertaken to characterize the degenerative and regenerative responses of peripheral nerves after induced sciatic nerve damage in transgenic rat insulin I promoter / human interferon beta (RIP/IFNbeta) mice made diabetic with a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) as an animal model of diabetic complications. In vivo, histological and immunohistological studies of cutaneous and sciatic nerves were performed after left sciatic crush. Functional tests, cutaneous innervation, and sciatic nerve evaluation showed pronounced neurological reduction in all groups 2 weeks after crush. All animals showed a gradual recovery but this was markedly slower in diabetic animals in comparison with normoglycemic animals. The delay in regeneration in diabetic RIP/IFNbeta mice resulted in an increase in active Schwann cells and regenerating neurites 8 weeks after surgery. These findings indicate that diabetic-RIP/IFNbeta animals mimic human diabetic neuropathy. Moreover, when these animals are submitted to nerve crush they have substantial deficits in nerve regrowth, similar to that observed in diabetic patients. When wildtype animals were treated with the same dose of STZ, no differences were observed with respect to nontreated animals, indicating that low doses of STZ and the transgene are not implicated in development of the degenerative and regenerative events observed in our study. All these findings indicate that RIP/IFNbeta transgenic mice are a good model for diabetic neuropathy.

  5. Impact of Genetic Reduction of NMNAT2 on Chemotherapy-Induced Losses in Cell Viability In Vitro and Peripheral Neuropathy In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Slivicki, Richard A; Ali, Yousuf O; Lu, Hui-Chen; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferases (NMNATs) are essential neuronal maintenance factors postulated to preserve neuronal function and protect against axonal degeneration in various neurodegenerative disease states. We used in vitro and in vivo approaches to assess the impact of NMNAT2 reduction on cellular and physiological functions induced by treatment with a vinca alkaloid (vincristine) and a taxane-based (paclitaxel) chemotherapeutic agent. NMNAT2 null (NMNAT2-/-) mutant mice die at birth and cannot be used to probe functions of NMNAT2 in adult animals. Nonetheless, primary cortical cultures derived from NMNAT2-/- embryos showed reduced cell viability in response to either vincristine or paclitaxel treatment whereas those derived from NMNAT2 heterozygous (NMNAT2+/-) mice were preferentially sensitive to vincristine-induced degeneration. Adult NMNAT2+/- mice, which survive to adulthood, exhibited a 50% reduction of NMNAT2 protein levels in dorsal root ganglia relative to wildtype (WT) mice with no change in levels of other NMNAT isoforms (NMNAT1 or NMNAT3), NMNAT enzyme activity (i.e. NAD/NADH levels) or microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP2) or neurofilament protein levels. We therefore compared the impact of NMNAT2 knockdown on the development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy induced by vincristine and paclitaxel treatment using NMNAT2+/- and WT mice. NMNAT2+/- did not differ from WT mice