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Sample records for peripheral vascular function

  1. Impaired cardiac response to exercise in post-menopausal women: relationship with peripheral vascular function.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, J; Node, K; Hasegawa, S; Paul, A K; Mu, X; Maruyama, K; Nakatani, D; Kitakaze, M; Hori, M; Nishimura, T

    2003-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been demonstrated in post-menopausal women. To assess the relationship between peripheral vascular reserve and cardiac function during exercise in post-menopausal women, 91 subjects, who had no ischaemic findings on myocardial SPECT, were assigned to four groups: pre-menopausal women (n=13), post-menopausal women (n=33), younger men aged < or =50 years (n=10), and older men aged >50 years (n=35). First-pass radionuclide angiography was performed before and during bicycle exercise to calculate ejection fraction (EF) and peripheral vascular resistance (VR). There were no differences in haemodynamic variables among the groups at baseline. The per cent increase in EF=(exercise EF - resting EF)x100/resting EF, and the per cent decrease in VR=(resting VR - exercise VR)x100/resting VR were depressed in the post-menopausal women (0.4+/-2% and 35+/-3%, respectively) compared to the pre-menopausal women (10+/-3% and 47+/-3%, respectively; P<0.05 each). Although the age dependent impairment is thought to cause this depression, neither the per cent increase in EF nor the per cent decrease in VR in the older men was significantly different from that in the younger men. Post-menopausal women exhibited depressed cardiac function during exercise, which may be related to the impairment of peripheral vascular function after menopause. PMID:12673166

  2. Impaired cardiac response to exercise in post-menopausal women: relationship with peripheral vascular function.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, J; Node, K; Hasegawa, S; Paul, A K; Mu, X; Maruyama, K; Nakatani, D; Kitakaze, M; Hori, M; Nishimura, T

    2003-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been demonstrated in post-menopausal women. To assess the relationship between peripheral vascular reserve and cardiac function during exercise in post-menopausal women, 91 subjects, who had no ischaemic findings on myocardial SPECT, were assigned to four groups: pre-menopausal women (n=13), post-menopausal women (n=33), younger men aged < or =50 years (n=10), and older men aged >50 years (n=35). First-pass radionuclide angiography was performed before and during bicycle exercise to calculate ejection fraction (EF) and peripheral vascular resistance (VR). There were no differences in haemodynamic variables among the groups at baseline. The per cent increase in EF=(exercise EF - resting EF)x100/resting EF, and the per cent decrease in VR=(resting VR - exercise VR)x100/resting VR were depressed in the post-menopausal women (0.4+/-2% and 35+/-3%, respectively) compared to the pre-menopausal women (10+/-3% and 47+/-3%, respectively; P<0.05 each). Although the age dependent impairment is thought to cause this depression, neither the per cent increase in EF nor the per cent decrease in VR in the older men was significantly different from that in the younger men. Post-menopausal women exhibited depressed cardiac function during exercise, which may be related to the impairment of peripheral vascular function after menopause.

  3. Stretching exercises enhance vascular endothelial function and improve peripheral circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kazuki; Kamiya, Kentaro; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Yokoyama, Misako; Nakamura-Ogura, Misao; Tabata, Minoru; Kamekawa, Daisuke; Akiyama, Ayako; Kato, Michitaka; Noda, Chiharu; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Masuda, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the acute effects of a single session of stretching exercises on vascular endothelial function and peripheral circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction. This study evaluated 32 patients (mean age, 66 ± 9 years) who received phase I cardiac rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction. Five types of stretching exercises were performed on the floor: wrist dorsiflexion, close-legged trunk flexion, open-legged trunk flexion, open-legged lateral trunk bending, and cross-legged trunk flexion. Each exercise entailed a 30-second stretching followed by a 30-second relaxation, and was repeated twice. Low- and high-frequency components (LF and HF) of heart rate variability (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz; HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) were analyzed, and HF and LF/HF were used as indices of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous activities, respectively. Reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) index was measured and used as a parameter for vascular endothelial function. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (tcPO2) on the right foot and chest was also measured, and the Foot-tcPO2/Chest-tcPO2 ratio was used as a parameter for peripheral circulation. The HF, RH-PAT index, and Foot-tcPO2/Chest-tcPO2 ratio were significantly higher after the exercises than before (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.05, respectively). There was no significant difference in the LF/HF ratio measured before and after stretching exercises. These findings demonstrate that stretching exercises improve vascular endothelial function and peripheral circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  4. Association Between Peripheral Vascular Endothelial Function and Progression of Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Hsiu; Su, Wei-Wen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Cheng, Shih-Tsung; Su, Cheng-Wen; Ho, Wang-Jing

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between Humphrey visual field progression and peripheral vascular endothelial function in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG), assessed by noninvasive endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD).Forty OAG patients, among which 22 had normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and 18 had primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) were enrolled. Each enrolled patient underwent a thorough ophthalmological examination including the Humphrey visual field test and measurement of FMD via high-resolution 2-dimensional ultrasonographic imaging of the brachial artery. Blood samples were evaluated for biochemistry and lipid profiles as well as levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). The annual change of threshold sensitivity of the visual field in each test location were analyzed with pointwise linear regression. The correlation between long-term visual field progression and FMD was evaluated.A mean follow-up of 7.47 ± 1.84 years revealed a faster progression rate over the superior visual field in all 40 OAG patients (superior field -0.24 ± 0.67 dB/y, inferior field -0.10 ± 0.59 dB/y, P = 0.37). However, only the annual sensitivity change of the inferior peripheral field showed correlation with baseline FMD. There was no significant difference in the change slope of visual field between NTG and POAG patients.A correlation between baseline brachial artery FMD and visual field progression was observed in the inferior peripheral field in patients with NTG and POAG. This result suggests that peripheral vascular endothelial dysfunction may be related to glaucoma progression.

  5. Association Between Peripheral Vascular Endothelial Function and Progression of Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Hsiu; Su, Wei-Wen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Cheng, Shih-Tsung; Su, Cheng-Wen; Ho, Wang-Jing

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between Humphrey visual field progression and peripheral vascular endothelial function in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG), assessed by noninvasive endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD).Forty OAG patients, among which 22 had normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and 18 had primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) were enrolled. Each enrolled patient underwent a thorough ophthalmological examination including the Humphrey visual field test and measurement of FMD via high-resolution 2-dimensional ultrasonographic imaging of the brachial artery. Blood samples were evaluated for biochemistry and lipid profiles as well as levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). The annual change of threshold sensitivity of the visual field in each test location were analyzed with pointwise linear regression. The correlation between long-term visual field progression and FMD was evaluated.A mean follow-up of 7.47 ± 1.84 years revealed a faster progression rate over the superior visual field in all 40 OAG patients (superior field -0.24 ± 0.67 dB/y, inferior field -0.10 ± 0.59 dB/y, P = 0.37). However, only the annual sensitivity change of the inferior peripheral field showed correlation with baseline FMD. There was no significant difference in the change slope of visual field between NTG and POAG patients.A correlation between baseline brachial artery FMD and visual field progression was observed in the inferior peripheral field in patients with NTG and POAG. This result suggests that peripheral vascular endothelial dysfunction may be related to glaucoma progression. PMID:26962832

  6. Effects of real and simulated weightlessness on the cardiac and peripheral vascular functions of humans: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Wang, Hanqing; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Weightlessness is an extreme environment that can cause a series of adaptive changes in the human body. Findings from real and simulated weightlessness indicate altered cardiovascular functions, such as reduction in left ventricular (LV) mass, cardiac arrhythmia, reduced vascular tone and so on. These alterations induced by weightlessness are detrimental to the health, safety and working performance of the astronauts, therefore it is important to study the effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular functions of humans. The cardiovascular functional alterations caused by weightlessness (including long-term spaceflight and simulated weightlessness) are briefly reviewed in terms of the cardiac and peripheral vascular functions. The alterations include: changes of shape and mass of the heart; cardiac function alterations; the cardiac arrhythmia; lower body vascular regulation and upper body vascular regulation. A series of conclusions are reported, some of which are analyzed, and a few potential directions are presented. PMID:26224491

  7. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Back to previous page En español Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy ... blockage including peripheral artery disease or PAD Aortic aneurysms Buerger's Disease Raynaud's Phenomenon Disease of the veins ...

  8. Dark chocolate and vascular function in patients with peripheral artery disease: a randomized, controlled cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Alexandra; Koppensteiner, Renate; Steiner, Sabine; Niessner, Alexander; Goliasch, Georg; Gschwandtner, Michael; Hoke, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoid-rich dark chocolate has positive effects on vascular function in healthy subjects and in patients at risk of atherosclerosis. The impact of dark chocolate on endothelial and microvascular function in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) has not been investigated so far. In an investigator blinded, randomized, controlled, cross-over trial we assessed the effect of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate and cocoa-free control chocolate on flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery and on microvascular function (assessed by Laser Doppler fluxmetry) in 21 patients with symptomatic (Fontaine stage II) PAD. Measurements were done in each patient on 2 single days, with an interval of 7 days, at baseline and at 2 hours after ingestion of 50 g dark chocolate or 50 g white chocolate, respectively. FMD remained unchanged after intake of dark chocolate (baseline and 2 hours after ingestion, %: 5.1 [IQR 4.4 to 7.3] and 5.5 [IQR 3.9 to 10.4]; p = 0.57, and after intake of white chocolate (baseline and 2 hours after ingestion, %: 6.4 [IQR 4.5 to 11.4] and 4.4 [IQR 2.6 to 8.7]; p = 0.14. Similarly, microcirculatory parameters were not significantly altered after intake of any chocolate compared with the respective baseline values. In conclusion, a single consumption of 50 g dark chocolate has no effect on endothelial and microvascular function in patients with symptomatic PAD.

  9. Surgical wound infections after peripheral vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Turtiainen, J; Hakala, T

    2014-12-01

    Surgical wound infection is one of the most common complications after peripheral vascular surgery. It increases the affected patient's risk for major amputation as well as mortality. Furthermore, surgical wound infection is an additional cost. Wound infections after vascular surgery are of multifactorial nature and generally result from the interplay of patient- and procedure-related factors. The use of systemic antibiotic prophylaxis may be the most important method in preventing surgical wound infections. In this review article, we report the current literature of surgical wound infections after peripheral vascular surgery.

  10. Peripheral vascular imaging and intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. ); Orron, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This reference addresses the entire clinical approach to the vascular system from the diagnosis of pathology to surgery or interventional radiological management. All diagnostic imaging modalities currently available are included with specific information on how to interpret various results. It features discussions of the latest therapeutic techniques, including laser angioplasty, intravascular stents, and transluminal embolization.

  11. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  12. Early experience on peripheral vascular application of the vascular plugs

    PubMed Central

    Rohit, Manoj Kumar; Sinha, Alok Kumar; Kamana, Naveen Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcatheter closure of various congenital and acquired vascular malformations with Amplatzer Vascular plugs I and II has been established. Here we present our experience with device closure. Materials and methods Between October 2006 and August 2012, nine (three males and six females) patients aged between 11 months and 62 years (mean age 19 years) underwent percutaneous device closure with AVP I and II vascular plugs for congenital and acquired arteriovenous malformation and cardiac diverticulum are presented here. Results One case of coronary cameral fistula, four cases of pulmonary arteriovenous fistula, one case of large major aortopulmonary collaterals (in tetralogy of Fallot closed before intracardiac repair), one case of congenital cardiac diverticulum, one case of fistula between external carotid artery and internal jugular vein and one case of iatrogenic carotid jugular fistula were successfully closed with AVP I and II plugs. Overall in nine cases, 16 AVP I and II plugs were deployed to occlude feeding vessels and one cardiac diverticulum. The technical success rate was 100%. No major complications were observed. Conclusion Amplatzer vascular plugs can be used successfully for closure of various congenital and acquired vascular malformations with good result. PMID:24206877

  13. Evaluation and percutaneous management of atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Widlus, D.M.; Osterman, F.A. Jr. )

    1989-06-02

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease (PVD) of the lower extremities deprives a person of the ability to exercise to their satisfaction, later of the ability to perform the activities of their daily life, and finally of their legs themselves. Peripheral vascular disease has long been managed by the vascular surgeon utilizing endarterectomy and peripheral arterial bypass. Patient acceptance of nonsurgical, percutaneous procedures such as percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) is high. Increased utilization of these procedures has led to improved techniques and adjuncts to therapy, as well as more critical review of long-term results. This article will review the evaluation and nonoperative management of PVD, with an emphasis on the newer modalities of management presently being investigated.

  14. The utility of digital subtraction arteriography in peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kubal, W S; Crummy, A B; Turnipseed, W D

    1983-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA), whether used in conjunction with intravenous or intraarterial injection techniques, has an established role in evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. Use of DSA can reduce the time, cost, and patient discomfort of the standard arteriographic study. While it is limited by field size and patient cooperation in some instances, the utility of noninvasive imaging using intravenous DSA and the added anatomic detail of intraarterial DSA for roadmapping and delineation of small distal vessels provide the basis for future integration of standard arteriographic and DSA methods in assessment of peripheral vascular disease. PMID:6228296

  15. Peripheral vascular diseases resulting from chronic arsenical poisoning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsin-Su; Lee, Chih-Hung; Chen, Gwo-Shing

    2002-03-01

    Drinking water contaminated by arsenic remains a major public health problem. Long-term arsenic exposure has been found to be associated with peripheral vascular diseases in a variety of studies. Reports of vascular effects of arsenic in drinking water, which span almost 100 years, have been published in Taiwan, Chile, Mexico, and China. This paper reviewed the association of peripheral vascular diseases resulting from arsenic exposure to drinking water from the clinical and pathological points of view. An endemic peripheral vascular disorder called "blackfoot disease" has been noticed in a limited area in Taiwan. This disease results in gangrene in the extremities. It has been associated with the ingestion of high concentrations of arsenic-tainted artesian well water. Epidemiological studies confirmed a dose-response relationship between long-term arsenic exposure and the occurrence of blackfoot disease. Whereas arsenic has induced various clinical manifestations of vascular effects in Chile, Mexico and China, they do not compare in magnitude or severity to the blackfoot disease found in Taiwan. The pathogenesis of vascular effects induced by arsenic is still controversial. The possible mechanisms include endothelial cell destruction, arsenic-associated atherogenesis, carotene and zinc deficiency, and/or some immunological mechanism. Microcirculatory assessments revealed that deficits of capillary blood flow and permeability exist in clinically normal skin of patients with chronic arsenical poisoning. The vascular effects of chronic arsenic poisoning may involve cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems as well. In view of the increasing public health problems caused by arsenic exposure, vascular effects should be included in the future study of health effects of arsenic.

  16. Prevention of cardiac complications in peripheral vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, B.S.

    1986-04-01

    The prevalence of severe coronary artery disease in peripheral vascular patients exceeds 50 per cent. Complications of coronary artery disease are the most common causes of mortality following peripheral vascular operations. To reduce the incidence of cardiac complications, it is first necessary to identify patients at risk through screening tests. Screening methods in current use include risk factor analysis, exercise testing, routine coronary angiography, and dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy. The risk factor approach has the advantage of being widely applicable since it makes use of historical, physical, and electrocardiographic findings that are already familiar to surgeons and anesthesiologists. It is also inexpensive. However, it may overlook the patient who has no symptoms of coronary artery disease, possibly as a result of the sedentary lifestyle imposed by complications of peripheral vascular disease. The electrocardiographically monitored stress test will identify the asymptomatic patient with occult coronary disease and is helpful in predicting operative risk. However, a meaningful test is dependent on the patient's ability to exercise--an activity that is frequently limited by claudication, amputation, or arthritis. Exercise testing also suffers from a lack of sensitivity and specificity when compared with coronary arteriography. Routine preoperative coronary angiography overcomes the exercise limitation of treadmill testing but is not widely applicable as a screening test for reasons of cost and inherent risk. Dipyridamole thallium-201 scanning, on the other hand, is safe and of relatively low cost and does not require exercise.

  17. Infrared thermal imaging for detection of peripheral vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bagavathiappan, S; Saravanan, T; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T; Raj, Baldev; Karunanithi, R; Panicker, T M R; Korath, M Paul; Jagadeesan, K

    2009-01-01

    Body temperature is a very useful parameter for diagnosing diseases. There is a definite correlation between body temperature and diseases. We have used Infrared Thermography to study noninvasive diagnosis of peripheral vascular diseases. Temperature gradients are observed in the affected regions of patients with vascular disorders, which indicate abnormal blood flow in the affected region. Thermal imaging results are well correlated with the clinical findings. Certain areas on the affected limbs show increased temperature profiles, probably due to inflammation and underlying venous flow changes. In general the temperature contrast in the affected regions is about 0.7 to 1 degrees C above the normal regions, due to sluggish blood circulation. The results suggest that the thermal imaging technique is an effective technique for detecting small temperature changes in the human body due to vascular disorders.

  18. A mathematical analysis of vasomotion in the peripheral vascular bed.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Fabbri, G; Belardinelli, E

    1992-03-01

    Arterioles and microvascular venules often show rhythmic spontaneous changes in diameter, called vasomotion. In this study, we analyze the possibility that vasomotion originates from the activity of the local myogenic mechanism. This analysis uses an original mathematical model of the peripheral circulation. The peripheral vascular bed has been represented as a series of three consecutive segments, each characterized by its value of vascular resistance per unit weight of tissue. The internal radius of the vessels in the last two segments, and hence their hydraulic resistance, has been assumed to be affected by the local myogenic response of the vascular smooth muscle. This dependence has been reproduced using the Laplace law. Both the static and dynamic (i.e. rate-dependent) components of the myogenic response have been included in the model, in accordance with recent experimental results. Simulations demonstrate that rhythmic, self-sustained oscillations can develop when the dynamic component of the myogenic response of terminal arterioles is much greater than that of more proximal microvessels. A moderate increase in arterial pressure favors the occurrence of oscillations, whereas vasodilatory stimuli tend to suppress vasomotion and contribute to the stabilization of vascular diameters.

  19. NT-proBNP levels, atherosclerosis and vascular function in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria: peripheral reactive hyperaemia index but not NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Intensive multifactorial treatment aimed at cardiovascular (CV) risk factor reduction in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria can diminish fatal and non-fatal CV. Plasma N-terminal (NT)-proBNP predicts CV mortality in diabetic patients but the utility of P-NT-proBNP in screening for atherosclerosis is unclear. We examined the interrelationship between P-NT-proBNP, presence of atherosclerosis and/or vascular dysfunction in the coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria that received intensive multifactorial treatment. Methods and Results P-NT-proBNP was measured in 200 asymptomatic type 2 patients without known cardiac disease that received intensive multifactorial treatment for CV risk reduction. Patients were examined for coronary, carotid and peripheral atherosclerosis, as defined by coronary calcium score ≥400, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) > 0.90 mm, ankle-brachial index < 0.90, and/or toe-brachial index < 0.64, respectively. Carotid artery compliance was also determined and the reactive hyperaemia index (RHI) measured by peripheral artery tonometry was used as a surrogate for endothelial function. P-NT-proBNP was associated with atherosclerosis in the unadjusted analysis, but not after adjustment for conventional risk factors. P-NT-proBNP was not associated with vascular dysfunction. The prevalence of atherosclerosis in the coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries was 35%, 10% and 21% of all patients, respectively. In total 49% had atherosclerosis in one territory and 15.6% and 1.0% in two and three territories. Low RHI was an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis (odds ratio [CI], 2.60 [1.15-5.88] and systolic blood pressure was the only independent determinant of CIMT (0.02 mm increase in CIMT per 10 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure [p = 0.003]). Conclusions Half of asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and microalbuminuria had significant

  20. Effect of Artificial Nerve Conduit Vascularization on Peripheral Nerve in a Necrotic Bed

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Yuki; Murayama, Akira; Takeshita, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several types of artificial nerve conduit have been used for bridging peripheral nerve gaps as an alternative to autologous nerves. However, their efficacy in repairing nerve injuries accompanied by surrounding tissue damage remains unclear. We fabricated a novel nerve conduit vascularized by superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) vessels and evaluated whether it could promote axonal regeneration in a necrotic bed. Methods: A 15-mm nerve conduit was implanted beneath the SIE vessels in the groin of a rat to supply it with blood vessels 2 weeks before nerve reconstruction. We removed a 13-mm segment of the sciatic nerve and then pressed a heated iron against the dorsal thigh muscle to produce a burn. The defects were immediately repaired with an autograft (n = 10), nerve conduit graft (n = 8), or vascularized nerve conduit graft (n = 8). Recovery of motor function was examined for 18 weeks after surgery. The regenerated nerves were electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Results: The vascularity of the nerve conduit implanted beneath the SIE vessels was confirmed histologically 2 weeks after implantation. Between 14 and 18 weeks after surgery, motor function of the vascularized conduit group was significantly better than that of the nonvascularized conduit group. Electrophysiological and histological evaluations revealed that although the improvement did not reach the level of reinnervation achieved by an autograft, the vascularized nerve conduit improved axonal regeneration more than did the conduit alone. Conclusion: Vascularization of artificial nerve conduits accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration, but further research is required to improve the quality of nerve regeneration. PMID:27257595

  1. Multi-Parametric Assessment of Vascular Function in Peripheral Artery Disease: Dynamic Measurement of Skeletal Muscle Perfusion, BOLD Signal, and Venous Oxygen Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Erin K.; Langham, Michael C.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Fanning, Molly; Wehrli, Felix W.; Mohler, Emile R.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction present in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) may be better understood by measuring the temporal dynamics of blood flow and oxygen saturation during reactive hyperemia than by conventional static measurements. Methods and Results Perfusion, Intravascular Venous Oxygen saturation, and T2* (PIVOT), a recently developed MRI technique, was used to measure the response to an ischemia-reperfusion paradigm in ninety-six patients with PAD of varying severity, and ten healthy controls. Perfusion, venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), and T2* were each quantified in the calf at two second temporal resolution, yielding a dynamic time course for each variable. Compared to healthy controls, patients had a blunted and delayed hyperemic response. Moreover, patients with lower ankle-brachial index had: 1) a more delayed reactive hyperemia response time, manifesting as an increase in time to peak perfusion in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and peroneus muscles, and in the anterior compartment; 2) an increase in the time to peak T2* measured in the soleus muscle; and 3) a prolongation of the posterior tibial vein SvO2 washout time. Intra- and inter-session repeatability was also assessed. Results indicated that time to peak perfusion and time to peak T2* were the most reliable extracted time course metrics. Conclusions Perfusion, dynamic SvO2, and T2* response times following induced ischemia are highly correlated with PAD disease severity. Combined imaging of peripheral microvascular blood flow and dynamics of oxygen saturation with PIVOT may be a useful tool to investigate the pathophysiology of PAD. PMID:25873722

  2. Pain and powerlessness: the experience of living with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gibson, J M; Kenrick, M

    1998-04-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a widespread condition, the most common manifestation being a gradual occlusion of the arteries of the legs due to atheroma, which results in symptoms of ischaemia such as intermittent claudication or rest pain, ulceration and gangrene. Treatment of the condition is palliative and reconstructive, and aims to salvage the limb, restore mobility and function, and relieve pain. It usually involves attempts to revascularize the affected limb, either by surgical procedures such as bypass grafting, or by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or thrombolysis. In some cases, it may be necessary to amputate the limb or part of it. Despite the chronicity of PVD, little is known about the ways in which individuals with vascular disease cope with their condition and about the effect it has on their life. In this context the aims of this study were to explore the lived experience of peripheral vascular disease, in order to identify key themes and categories, using a phenomenological grounded theory approach. A sample of nine individuals was drawn from patients who had had vascular bypass surgery within the past 18 months. Data were collected using audiotaped one-to-one interviews and the researcher's field notes, and were validated with a group of experienced vascular nurses. Transcripts were analysed using open and axial coding techniques, and major and minor categories were identified and related to other data collected. It appeared that vascular patients experienced powerlessness in relation to the direct effects of their condition and in relation to its treatment modalities. The findings suggested that the 'acute' style of management of PVD often led to unrealistic expectations on the patient's part, which gave rise to the experience of powerlessness. The implications of these findings for the management of patients with PVD are discussed.

  3. Human Peripheral Blood Eosinophils Express a Functional c-kit Receptor for Stem Cell Factor that Stimulates Very Late Antigen 4 (VLA-4)–mediated Cell Adhesion to Fibronectin and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM-1)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qian; Austen, K. Frank; Friend, Daniel S.; Heidtman, Matthew; Boyce, Joshua A.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated mature peripheral blood eosinophils for their expression of the surface tyrosine kinase, c-kit, the receptor for the stromal cell–derived cytokine, stem cell factor (SCF). Cytofluorographic analysis revealed that c-kit was expressed on the purified peripheral blood eosinophils from 8 of 8 donors (4 nonatopic and 4 atopic) (mean channel fluorescence intensity 2.0– 3.6-fold, average 2.8 ± 0.6-fold, greater than the negative control). The uniform and selective expression of c-kit by eosinophils was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis of peripheral blood buffy coats. The functional integrity of c-kit was demonstrated by the capacity of 100 ng/ml (5 nM) of recombinant human (rh) SCF to increase eosinophil adhesion to 3, 10, and 30 μg/ml of immobilized FN40, a 40-kD chymotryptic fragment of plasma fibronectin, in 15 min by 7.7 ± 1.4-, 5.3 ± 3.3-, and 5.4 ± 0.2-fold, respectively, and their adhesion to 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 μg/ml vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), by 12.7 ± 9.2-, 3.8 ± 2.5-, and 1.7 ± 0.6-fold, respectively. The SCF-stimulated adhesion occurred without concomitant changes in surface integrin expression, thereby indicating an avidity-based mechanism. rhSCF (100 ng/ml, 5 nM) was comparable to rh eotaxin (200 ng/ml, 24 nM) in stimulating adhesion. Cell adhesion to FN40 was completely inhibited with antibodies against the α4 and β1 integrin subunits, revealing that the SCF/c-kit adhesion effect was mediated by a single integrin heterodimer, very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). Thus, SCF represents a newly recognized stromal ligand for the activation of eosinophils for VLA-4–mediated adhesion, which could contribute to the exit of these cells from the blood, their tissue localization, and their prominence in inflammatory lesions. PMID:9221761

  4. Embolization of traumatic and non-traumatic peripheral vascular lesions with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Regine, Renato; De Siero, Michele; Rescigno, Antonio; Sica, Vincenzo; Cantarela, Raffaele; Villari, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of our study is to verify the feasibility and the efficacy of Onyx as embolization agent in the treatment of traumatic and non-traumatic peripheral vascular lesions. Materials and Methods In the period between September 2006 and March 2012, we treated with Onyx 26 patients (14 males/12 females; age range, 18–85 years old; mean age, 65 years old), 11 of which with traumatic peripheral vascular lesions and 15 with non-traumatic vascular lesions (9 neoplastic hemorrhagic lesions, 3 arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and 3 aneurysms). Follow-up controls were performed with clinical examination and by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) imaging 1, 6, and 12 months after the procedure. Results All peripheral vascular lesions were embolized with Onyx; 3 patients with aneurysms were treated with Onyx associated with endovascular coils. Four elective and 22 emergency embolization procedures were performed. In all patients, we obtained cessation of bleeding and the complete and permanent embolization of all vascular lesions. Conclusions Onyx is an effective and safe embolization agent for peripheral vascular lesions. PMID:25838923

  5. Exercise testing and training in patients with peripheral vascular disease and lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Priebe, M; Davidoff, G; Lampman, R M

    1991-05-01

    Patients with peripheral vascular disease have a high risk of coronary artery disease. The risk is even greater when the peripheral vascular disease leads to lower extremity amputation. Exercise testing using lower extremity exercise has been the "gold standard" for screening for coronary artery disease, but many patients with peripheral vascular disease and those with amputations have difficulty doing this type of exercise. Arm exercise ergometry has been shown to be a safe and effective alternative for the detection of coronary artery disease in patients who cannot do leg exercise. This test has also been used to determine safe exercise levels and may be able to predict the ultimate level of prosthetic use in amputees. Exercise training with arm ergometry also improves cardiovascular efficiency and upper body strength in poorly conditioned patients. Studies are needed to appreciate fully the role of exercise testing and training in the recovery of these patients after amputation. PMID:1866958

  6. Noninvasive techniques for evaluating peripheral vascular and extracranial cerebrovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Stanton, P E; Lamis, P A

    1978-05-01

    Five hundred and fifty-eight patients have been evaluated at the peripheral vascularocular pulse blood flow laboratory over a year. The accurate correlations with angiography in the peripheral arterial investigation has been 100%, the cerebrovascular investigation has been 75% and the venous correlation has been 86 2/3%. Even though the results from ocular testing are slightly lower than reported by Kartchner and McRae, we believe that the results emphasize the delicacy of instrumentation and the degree of refinement necessary in reading of the tests. We do think, however, that a 75% accuracy does indicate this method to be of significant benefit as a noninvasive stroke screening procedure.

  7. Altered peripheral nerve function resulting from haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Stanley, E; Brown, J C; Pryor, J S

    1977-01-01

    The amplitudes of muscle and nerve action potentials evoked median nerve stimulation were recorded just before and immediately after haemodialysis. These revealed a growht of action potential amplitude during dialysis. It is suggested that some component of the defective peripheral nerve function that inevitably accompanies uraemia is temporarily improved during dialysis. PMID:845605

  8. Laser Doppler flowmetry: in the assessment of peripheral vascular disorders? A preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, T; Sheriff, S B; Boulton, A J; Ward, J D; Atkins, R M

    1986-02-01

    Skin is a representative microvascular bed providing easy access for the study of capillary haemodynamics. In this preliminary evaluation we have used laser Doppler flowmetry to measure the response of skin capillary blood flow to local thermal stimulation. The purpose of our study was to see if such measurements can be used to derive useful clinical information. Thirty subjects, 15 male and 15 female, were selected to establish "normal' patterns of behaviour. All normal subjects studied showed similar patterns of response. There was a slight downward trend in red-blood-cell flux with age. Periods of vasomotor activity were present at rates ranging from 4-17 cycles/min. The mean temperature rise in the heated skin area was 4 degrees C. Blood flow over this range increased by a factor of 10 or more. Clinical cases studied were strictly limited to three categories of disease with known or suspected microvascular changes: algodystrophy, lower-limb ischaemia and diabetic neuropathy. All the clinical cases studied showed deviations from the normal pattern. Patients with algodystrophy had impaired peripheral vascular function in the affected area. Patients with lower-limb ischaemic problems all had poor peripheral perfusion. In the limited number of diabetic neuropathic feet studied two patterns emerged: patients with no evidence of ulceration displayed striking vasomotor activity; those with more severe problems had reduced red-blood-cell flux and little evidence of vasomotor control.

  9. Predicting stump healing following amputation for peripheral vascular disease using the transcutaneous oxygen monitor.

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, G. S.

    1987-01-01

    In patients with peripheral vascular disease requiring amputation, a below-knee stump is likely to result in improved function compared to above-knee. Unfortunately, clinical assessment of skin circulation is inaccurate, making the decision of amputation level difficult. The transcutaneous oxygen monitor has been investigated as a method of assessing skin circulation. A prospective study using the monitor in 51 amputations based on clinical assessment has shown that a transcutaneous oxygen tension (tcPO2) greater than 40 mm Hg is associated with stump healing, while measurements below that level lead to an unpredictable outcome. Half of the patients undergoing above-knee amputation had a tcPO2 level greater than 40 mm Hg at the below-knee site, suggesting that a successful distal amputation might have been performed. A further prospective study of 50 patients requiring amputation for peripheral gangrene showed that when amputations were performed at the lowest level in the limb with a tcPO2 greater than 40 mm Hg there was a higher rate of below-knee amputations (72%) and a higher rate of successful stump healing. Review of the literature confirms the potential of the monitor as a non-invasive, simple and accurate method of predicting stump healing. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3566115

  10. Central and peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance: Implications for who should undergo pulmonary thromboendarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Poullis, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy remains a technically challenging procedure with variable outcomes with regard to improvement in pulmonary function. Reducing the resistance to flow between the pulmonary valve and the pulmonary capillary bed is the key aim of surgery. The resistance to flow is due to the combination of resistance due to the central clot and distal capillary resistance. We hypothesise that the use of fluid mechanics in combination with modern radiology and electronic circuit theory can potentially predict who should or should not undergo a thromboendarterectomy. Electronic circuit theory of two resistors in series was utilised to demonstrate the concept of a model of a central clot and the peripheral pulmonary capillary bed. A simplified 2D model of the lungs utilising finite element analysis and Poiseuille's law was constructed for proof of principle. Modelling predicts that cardiac output and anatomical obstruction interplay and can have profound effects on the outcomes after thromboendarterectomy. Identical pulmonary artery pressures, due to differing cardiac outputs and identical anatomical obstructions due to thrombus can have very different physiological outcomes with regard to changes in pulmonary artery pressure. Modelling the pulmonary vasculature to determine central and peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance may help in predicting who should undergo pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Mathematical modelling can potentially predict which patients have haemodynamically significant clots in their pulmonary arteries that thromboendarterectomy may potentially help in the setting of pulmonary capillary disease. PMID:25997984

  11. Exercise performance and peripheral vascular insufficiency improve with AMPK activation in high-fat diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; White, Kathy; Li, Wei; Claypool, Mark D.; Lang, Wayne; Alcantara, Raniel; Singh, Baljit K.; Friera, Annabelle M.; McLaughlin, John; Hansen, Derek; McCaughey, Kelly; Nguyen, Henry; Smith, Ira J.; Godinez, Guillermo; Shaw, Simon J.; Goff, Dane; Singh, Rajinder; Markovtsov, Vadim; Sun, Tian-Qiang; Jenkins, Yonchu; Uy, Gerald; Li, Yingwu; Pan, Alison; Gururaja, Tarikere; Lau, David; Park, Gary; Hitoshi, Yasumichi; Payan, Donald G.

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent claudication is a form of exercise intolerance characterized by muscle pain during walking in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Endothelial cell and muscle dysfunction are thought to be important contributors to the etiology of this disease, but a lack of preclinical models that incorporate these elements and measure exercise performance as a primary end point has slowed progress in finding new treatment options for these patients. We sought to develop an animal model of peripheral vascular insufficiency in which microvascular dysfunction and exercise intolerance were defining features. We further set out to determine if pharmacological activation of 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) might counteract any of these functional deficits. Mice aged on a high-fat diet demonstrate many functional and molecular characteristics of PAD, including the sequential development of peripheral vascular insufficiency, increased muscle fatigability, and progressive exercise intolerance. These changes occur gradually and are associated with alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability. Treatment of animals with an AMPK activator, R118, increased voluntary wheel running activity, decreased muscle fatigability, and prevented the progressive decrease in treadmill exercise capacity. These functional performance benefits were accompanied by improved mitochondrial function, the normalization of perfusion in exercising muscle, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and decreased circulating levels of the endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine. These data suggest that aged, obese mice represent a novel model for studying exercise intolerance associated with peripheral vascular insufficiency, and pharmacological activation of AMPK may be a suitable treatment for intermittent claudication associated with PAD. PMID:24561866

  12. Ethanol Attenuates Peripheral NMDAR-Mediated Vascular Oxidative Stress and Pressor Response

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Marie A.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2015-01-01

    There are no studies on the acute effect of ethanol on peripheral N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood pressure (BP). We tested the hypothesis that ethanol antagonism of peripheral NMDAR dampens systemic NMDA-evoked increases in vascular ROS and BP. We investigated the effect of ethanol (1 g/kg) on BP and heart rate (HR) responses elicited by systemic bolus (125–1000 μg/kg, intra-venous [i.v.]) or infused (180 μg/kg/min) NMDA in conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats. We also hypothesized that peripheral NMDAR blockade with DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5; 5 mg/kg, i.v.) uncovers an ethanol- (1 or 1.5 g/kg) evoked hypotensive response. Ethanol attenuated the peripheral NMDAR-mediated pressor and bradycardic responses caused by NMDA infusion, and ex vivo studies revealed parallel ethanol attenuation of peripheral NMDAR-mediated increases in vascular ROS. While ethanol (1 or 1.5 g/kg) alone had no effect on BP, the higher dose caused a hypotensive response in the presence of NMDAR blockade (AP-5). Blood ethanol concentrations were not statistically different in the groups that received ethanol alone or along with NMDA or AP-5. These findings are the first to demonstrate ethanol attenuation of peripheral NMDAR-mediated pressor response, and the uncovering of ethanol-evoked hypotension in the presence of peripheral NMDAR blockade. PMID:25986731

  13. Increased peripheral vascular disease risk progressively constrains perfusion adaptability in the skeletal muscle microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Frisbee, Jefferson C; Butcher, Joshua T; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Olfert, I Mark; Chantler, Paul D; Tabone, Lawrence E; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C; Shrader, Carl D; Goodwill, Adam G; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Brooks, Steven D; Brock, Robert W; Lombard, Julian H

    2016-02-15

    To determine the impact of progressive elevations in peripheral vascular disease (PVD) risk on microvascular function, we utilized eight rat models spanning "healthy" to "high PVD risk" and used a multiscale approach to interrogate microvascular function and outcomes: healthy: Sprague-Dawley rats (SDR) and lean Zucker rats (LZR); mild risk: SDR on high-salt diet (HSD) and SDR on high-fructose diet (HFD); moderate risk: reduced renal mass-hypertensive rats (RRM) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR); high risk: obese Zucker rats (OZR) and Dahl salt-sensitive rats (DSS). Vascular reactivity and biochemical analyses demonstrated that even mild elevations in PVD risk severely attenuated nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and caused progressive shifts in arachidonic acid metabolism, increasing thromboxane A2 levels. With the introduction of hypertension, arteriolar myogenic activation and adrenergic constriction were increased. However, while functional hyperemia and fatigue resistance of in situ skeletal muscle were not impacted with mild or moderate PVD risk, blood oxygen handling suggested an increasingly heterogeneous perfusion within resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Analysis of in situ networks demonstrated an increasingly stable and heterogeneous distribution of perfusion at arteriolar bifurcations with elevated PVD risk, a phenomenon that was manifested first in the distal microcirculation and evolved proximally with increasing risk. The increased perfusion distribution heterogeneity and loss of flexibility throughout the microvascular network, the result of the combined effects on NO bioavailability, arachidonic acid metabolism, myogenic activation, and adrenergic constriction, may represent the most accurate predictor of the skeletal muscle microvasculopathy and poor health outcomes associated with chronic elevations in PVD risk. PMID:26702145

  14. Vascular function in children with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Patricia C E; Thijssen, Dick; Binkhorst, Matthijs; Green, Daniel J; Schokking, Michiel; Hopman, Maria T E

    2010-09-15

    We compared the endothelial function and vascular wall characteristics of 11 children with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) (age 13 +/- 3 years) with the characteristics of 17 age-matched peers (12 +/- 2 years). Echocardiographic Doppler measurements were performed under standardized conditions to assess (1) the carotid and femoral artery diameter and intima-media thickness, (2) brachial artery endothelial function using flow-mediated dilation, and (3) central and peripheral compliance using pulsewave velocity. In addition, the physical activity level was assessed using a validated questionnaire. We found that the physical activity level of the children with TOF was lower than that of the controls, but the difference did not reach statistical significance (4.5 vs 5.9 h/wk, p = 0.087). A significantly larger femoral artery intima-media thickness was observed in those with TOF, and the carotid and brachial artery diameter and intima-media thickness were comparable between groups. The children with TOF demonstrated a significantly lower brachial artery flow-mediated dilation than that of the controls. The central and peripheral compliance did not differ between the 2 groups. In conclusion, children with TOF demonstrated an impaired brachial artery endothelial function and increased intima-media thickness of the femoral artery compared to their healthy peers. In conclusion, our findings have, therefore, indicated that children with TOF, already at a young age, have changes in vascular function and structure.

  15. Mitochondria, endothelial cell function, and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Luo, Yu-Xuan; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are perhaps the most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems in eukaryotic cells. The role of mitochondria goes beyond their capacity to create molecular fuel and includes the generation of reactive oxygen species, the regulation of calcium, and the activation of cell death. In endothelial cells, mitochondria have a profound impact on cellular function under both healthy and diseased conditions. In this review, we summarize the basic functions of mitochondria in endothelial cells and discuss the roles of mitochondria in endothelial dysfunction and vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetic vascular dysfunction, pulmonary artery hypertension, and hypertension. Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in endothelial cells and vascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants and calorie restriction. PMID:24834056

  16. Optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging of vascular recovery in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Kristin M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) leads to an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life. The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is the most commonly used system for studying the mechanisms of collateral vessel formation and for testing new PAD therapies, but there is a lack of techniques for acquiring physiologically-relevant, quantitative data intravitally in this model. In this work, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were applied to the mouse HLI model over a time course. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaged changes in blood flow (Doppler OCT) and microvessel morphology (speckle variance OCT) through the skin of haired mice with high resolution. Hyperspectral imaging was also used to quantify blood oxygenation. In ischemic limbs, blood oxygenation in the footpad was substantially reduced after induction of ischemia followed by complete recovery by three weeks, consistent with standard measures. Three dimensional images of the vasculature distal to vessel occlusion acquired with speckle variance OCT revealed changes in OCT flow signal and vessel morphology. Taken together, OCT and hyperspectral imaging enable intravital acquisition of both functional and morphological data which fill critical gaps in understanding structure-function relationships that contribute to recovery in the mouse HLI model. Therefore, these optical imaging methods hold promise as tools for studying the mechanisms of vascular recovery and evaluating novel therapeutic treatments in preclinical studies.

  17. Ethanol attenuates peripheral NMDAR-mediated vascular oxidative stress and pressor response.

    PubMed

    McGee, Marie A; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2015-08-01

    There are no studies on the acute effect of ethanol on peripheral N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood pressure (BP). We tested the hypothesis that ethanol antagonism of peripheral NMDAR dampens systemic NMDA-evoked increases in vascular ROS and BP. We investigated the effect of ethanol (1 g/kg) on BP and heart rate (HR) responses elicited by systemic bolus (125-1000 μg/kg, intra-venous [i.v.]) or infused (180 μg/kg/min) NMDA in conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats. We also hypothesized that peripheral NMDAR blockade with DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5; 5 mg/kg, i.v.) uncovers an ethanol- (1 or 1.5 g/kg) evoked hypotensive response. Ethanol attenuated the peripheral NMDAR-mediated pressor and bradycardic responses caused by NMDA infusion, and ex vivo studies revealed parallel ethanol attenuation of peripheral NMDAR-mediated increases in vascular ROS. While ethanol (1 or 1.5 g/kg) alone had no effect on BP, the higher dose caused a hypotensive response in the presence of NMDAR blockade (AP-5). Blood ethanol concentrations were not statistically different in the groups that received ethanol alone or along with NMDA or AP-5. These findings are the first to demonstrate ethanol attenuation of peripheral NMDAR-mediated pressor response, and the uncovering of ethanol-evoked hypotension in the presence of peripheral NMDAR blockade.

  18. Acute Changes in Peripheral Vascular Tonus and Systemic Circulation during Static Stretching.

    PubMed

    Inami, Takayuki; Baba, Reizo; Nakagaki, Akemi; Shimizu, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute effect of static stretching (SS) on peripheral vascular tonus and to clarify the effect of SS on systemic circulation. Twenty healthy young male volunteers performed a 1-min SS motion of the right triceps surae muscle, repeated five times. The peripheral vascular tonus (|d/a| ratio) was obtained using second derivatives of the photoplethysmogram readings before, during, and after SS. Heart rate and blood pressure (BP) were also measured. The |d/a| ratio and BP were transiently, but significantly, elevated during SS and returned to baseline immediately after SS. Furthermore, we observed a significant correlation between the amount of change in the |d/a| ratio and the ankle range of motion during SS (r = 0.793 to 0.832, P = 0.01). These responses may be caused by mechanical stress during SS.

  19. Diacylglycerol Kinase Inhibition and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyehun; Allahdadi, Kyan J; Tostes, Rita C A; Webb, R Clinton

    2009-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), a family of lipid kinases, convert diacylglycerol (DG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). Acting as a second messenger, DG activates protein kinase C (PKC). PA, a signaling lipid, regulates diverse functions involved in physiological responses. Since DGK modulates two lipid second messengers, DG and PA, regulation of DGK could induce related cellular responses. Currently, there are 10 mammalian isoforms of DGK that are categorized into five groups based on their structural features. These diverse isoforms of DGK are considered to activate distinct cellular functions according to extracellular stimuli. Each DGK isoform is thought to play various roles inside the cell, depending on its subcellular localization (nuclear, ER, Golgi complex or cytoplasm). In vascular smooth muscle, vasoconstrictors such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and norepinephrine stimulate contraction by increasing inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)), calcium, DG and PKC activity. Inhibition of DGK could increase DG availability and decrease PA levels, as well as alter intracellular responses, including calcium-mediated and PKC-mediated vascular contraction. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate a role of DGK in vascular function. Selective inhibition of DGK isoforms may represent a novel therapeutic approach in vascular dysfunction. PMID:21547002

  20. Arm exercise testing with myocardial scintigraphy in asymptomatic patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, S.; Rubler, S.; Bryk, H.; Sklar, B.; Glasser, L.

    1989-04-01

    Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy and oxygen consumption determinations was performed by 33 men with peripheral vascular disease, 40 to 74 years of age (group 2). None had evidence of coronary disease. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects (group 1) were also tested to determine the normal endurance and oxygen consumption during arm exercise in their age group and to compare the results with those obtained during a standard treadmill performance. The maximal heart rate, systolic blood pressure, pressure rate product, and oxygen consumption were all significantly lower for arm than for leg exercise. However, there was good correlation between all these parameters for both types of exertion. The maximal heart rate, work load and oxygen consumption were greater for group 1 subjects than in patients with peripheral vascular disease despite similar activity status. None of the group 1 subjects had abnormal arm exercise ECGs, while six members of group 2 had ST segment changes. Thallium-201 scintigraphy performed in the latter group demonstrated perfusion defects in 25 patients. After nine to 29 months of follow-up, three patients who had abnormal tests developed angina and one of them required coronary bypass surgery. Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy may be an effective method of detecting occult ischemia in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Those with good exercise tolerance and no electrocardiographic changes or /sup 201/T1 defects are probably at lower risk for the development of cardiac complications, while those who develop abnormalities at low exercise levels may be candidates for invasive studies.

  1. Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy, and Lower Extremity Function

    PubMed Central

    Chiles, Nancy S.; Phillips, Caroline L.; Volpato, Stefano; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M.; Patel, Kushang V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diabetes among older adults causes many complications, including decreased lower extremity function and physical disability. Diabetes can cause peripheral nerve dysfunction, which might be one pathway through which diabetes leads to decreased physical function. The study aims were to determine: (1) whether diabetes and impaired fasting glucose are associated with objective measures of physical function in older adults, (2) which peripheral nerve function (PNF) tests are associated with diabetes, and (3) whether PNF mediates the diabetes-physical function relationship. Research Design and Methods This study included 983 participants, age 65 and older from the InCHIANTI Study. Diabetes was diagnosed by clinical guidelines. Physical performance was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), scored from 0-12 (higher values, better physical function) and usual walking speed (m/s). PNF was assessed via standard surface electroneurographic study of right peroneal nerve conduction velocity, vibration and touch sensitivity. Clinical cut-points of PNF tests were used to create a neuropathy score from 0-5 (higher values, greater neuropathy). Multiple linear regression models were used to test associations. Results and Conclusion 12.8% (n=126) of participants had diabetes. Adjusting for age, sex, education, and other confounders, diabetic participants had decreased SPPB (β= −0.99; p< 0.01), decreased walking speed (β= −0.1m/s; p< 0.01), decreased nerve conduction velocity (β= −1.7m/s; p< 0.01), and increased neuropathy (β= 0.25; p< 0.01) compared to non-diabetic participants. Adjusting for nerve conduction velocity and neuropathy score decreased the effect of diabetes on SPPB by 20%, suggesting partial mediation through decreased PNF. PMID:24120281

  2. Myocardial and peripheral vascular responses to behavioral challenges and their stability in black and white Americans.

    PubMed

    Saab, P G; Llabre, M M; Hurwitz, B E; Frame, C A; Reineke, L J; Fins, A I; McCalla, J; Cieply, L K; Schneiderman, N

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the short term stability of myocardial and peripheral vascular responses to behavioral challenges, and to compare the response patterns of Black and White men. Blood pressure and heart rate, as well as stroke volume, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, and systolic time interval measures derived from the impedance cardiogram were obtained in 12 Black and 12 White men. These measures were taken prior to and during an evaluative speech stressor, a mirror star tracing task, and a forehead cold pressor test presented during two laboratory sessions scheduled two weeks apart. In general, total peripheral resistance and impedance-derived baseline measures showed acceptable reproducibility (G greater than .85). With a few exceptions, adequate reliability was also demonstrated for change (delta) scores. All tasks raised blood pressure responses above resting levels. Blacks demonstrated significantly greater increases in total peripheral resistance responses across tasks. Whites but not Blacks also revealed increases above baseline in cardiac output and contractility as estimated by the Heather Index. These findings are consistent with the view that Blacks show greater vascular responsiveness than Whites across a variety of tasks, but reveal less myocardial responsiveness. PMID:1410171

  3. Effects of peripheral sympathectomy on thermoregulatory vascular control in the rabbit ear.

    PubMed

    Smith, T L; Koman, L A; Gordon, E S; Holden, M B; Smith, B P

    1998-01-01

    A rabbit ear model of the human digit was utilized to determine the vascular response to peripheral sympathectomy. Vascular responses were evaluated by subjecting chronically instrumented rabbits to a cold stress before and after sympathectomy surgery. The typical response to cold stress is for ear temperatures and auricular cutaneous perfusion to decrease during the cooling phase of the test and to increase toward baseline levels during the rewarming phase after cold exposure. Following peripheral sympathectomy, ear temperatures were significantly increased during both the cooling and rewarming phase of the cold stress test although overall ear perfusion and skin perfusion were not different from sham-operated rabbits. The responses observed in the rabbit ear following peripheral sympathectomy appear to mimic those noted in patients receiving digital peripheral sympathectomies for the treatment of refractory pain and ulceration. Peripheral sympathectomy may result in clinical improvements in patients because it improves both total digital and nutritional cutaneous blood flow. Peripheral sympathectomy in normal rabbit ears does not result in altered perfusion patterns with cold exposure although ear temperature is significantly higher. This pattern of changes suggests that the distribution of extremity perfusion is altered even though overall extremity perfusion and cutaneous perfusion per se are not significantly different from sham-operated controls. Complete sympathectomy was accompanied by a persistent increase in ear temperature and a dissociation between conductance and microvascular perfusion. Auricular conductance was transiently increased and then decreased to levels below preoperative control values. Microvascular perfusion is decreased immediately following amputation/replantation and thereafter increases. PMID:9674929

  4. Peripheral vascular damage in systemic lupus erythematosus: data from LUMINA, a large multi-ethnic U.S. cohort (LXIX).

    PubMed

    Burgos, P I; Vilá, L M; Reveille, J D; Alarcón, G S

    2009-12-01

    To determine the factors associated with peripheral vascular damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients and its impact on survival from Lupus in Minorities, Nature versus Nurture, a longitudinal US multi-ethnic cohort. Peripheral vascular damage was defined by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index (SDI). Factors associated with peripheral vascular damage were examined by univariable and multi-variable logistic regression models and its impact on survival by a Cox multi-variable regression. Thirty-four (5.3%) of 637 patients (90% women, mean [SD] age 36.5 [12.6] [16-87] years) developed peripheral vascular damage. Age and the SDI (without peripheral vascular damage) were statistically significant (odds ratio [OR] = 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.08; P = 0.0107 and OR = 1.30, 95% CI 0.09-1.56; P = 0.0043, respectively) in multi-variable analyses. Azathioprine, warfarin and statins were also statistically significant, and glucocorticoid use was borderline statistically significant (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.10-1.06; P = 0.0975). In the survival analysis, peripheral vascular damage was independently associated with a diminished survival (hazard ratio = 2.36; 95% CI 1.07-5.19; P = 0.0334). In short, age was independently associated with peripheral vascular damage, but so was the presence of damage in other organs (ocular, neuropsychiatric, renal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, musculoskeletal and integument) and some medications (probably reflecting more severe disease). Peripheral vascular damage also negatively affected survival. PMID:19850658

  5. Exercise training improves vascular mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Bharath, Leena P; Bauersachs, Johann; Richardson, Russell S; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David; Riehle, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Exercise training is recognized to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity; however, the impact of chronic exercise on vascular mitochondrial respiratory function is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise training concomitantly increases both vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and vascular function. Arteries from both sedentary (SED) and swim-trained (EX, 5 wk) mice were compared in terms of mitochondrial respiratory function, mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and vessel function. Mitochondrial complex I and complex I + II state 3 respiration and the respiratory control ratio (complex I + II state 3 respiration/complex I state 2 respiration) were greater in vessels from EX relative to SED mice, despite similar levels of arterial citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, compared with the SED mice, arteries from EX mice displayed elevated transcript levels of peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and the downstream targets cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1,isocitrate dehydrogenase(Idh)2, and Idh3a, increased manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, increased endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation (Ser(1177)), and suppressed reactive oxygen species generation (all P< 0.05). Although there were no differences in EX and SED mice concerning endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, phenylephrine-induced vasocontraction was blunted in vessels from EX compared with SED mice, and this effect was normalized by NOS inhibition. These training-induced increases in vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and evidence of improved redox balance, which may, at least in part, be attributable to elevated NO bioavailability, have the potential to protect against age- and disease-related challenges to arterial function.

  6. Exercise training improves vascular mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Bharath, Leena P; Bauersachs, Johann; Richardson, Russell S; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David; Riehle, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Exercise training is recognized to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity; however, the impact of chronic exercise on vascular mitochondrial respiratory function is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise training concomitantly increases both vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and vascular function. Arteries from both sedentary (SED) and swim-trained (EX, 5 wk) mice were compared in terms of mitochondrial respiratory function, mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and vessel function. Mitochondrial complex I and complex I + II state 3 respiration and the respiratory control ratio (complex I + II state 3 respiration/complex I state 2 respiration) were greater in vessels from EX relative to SED mice, despite similar levels of arterial citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, compared with the SED mice, arteries from EX mice displayed elevated transcript levels of peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and the downstream targets cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1,isocitrate dehydrogenase(Idh)2, and Idh3a, increased manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, increased endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation (Ser(1177)), and suppressed reactive oxygen species generation (all P< 0.05). Although there were no differences in EX and SED mice concerning endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, phenylephrine-induced vasocontraction was blunted in vessels from EX compared with SED mice, and this effect was normalized by NOS inhibition. These training-induced increases in vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and evidence of improved redox balance, which may, at least in part, be attributable to elevated NO bioavailability, have the potential to protect against age- and disease-related challenges to arterial function. PMID:26825520

  7. Vascular nitric oxide: formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Richard C; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a structurally simple, highly versatile molecule that was originally discovered over 30 years ago as an endothelium-derived relaxing factor. In addition to its vasorelaxing effects, NO is now recognized as a key determinant of vascular health, exerting antiplatelet, antithrombotic, and anti-inflammatory properties within the vasculature. This short-lived molecule exerts its inhibitory effect on vascular smooth muscle cells and platelets largely through cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent mechanisms, resulting in a multitude of molecular effects by which platelet activation and aggregation are prevented. The biosynthesis of NO occurs via the catalytic activity of NO synthase, an oxidoreductase found in many cell types. NO insufficiency can be attributed to limited substrate/cofactor availability as well as interactions with reactive oxygen species. Impaired NO bioavailability represents the central feature of endothelial dysfunction, a common abnormality found in many vascular diseases. In this review, we present an overview of NO synthesis and biochemistry, discuss the mechanisms of action of NO in regulating platelet and endothelial function, and review the effects of vascular disease states on NO bioavailability. PMID:21572574

  8. Defective adrenergic responses in patients with arsenic-induced peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Chang, Huoy-Rou; Chen, Jau-Shiuh; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2007-01-01

    Blackfoot disease is an endemic arsenic-induced peripheral vascular disease in southern Taiwan. The main pathologic feature is atherosclerosis, which may relate to imbalances of the adrenergic system. The purpose of this study is to investigate the peripheral adrenergic responses of patients with blackfoot disease. Eight patients with blackfoot disease and four age-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Baseline cutaneous perfusion was measured with a laser Doppler flowmeter. The response of alpha-adrenoceptors in the cutaneous microcirculation was assessed with laser Doppler flowmetry with iontophoresis of phenylephrine into the nailfold. In vitro binding with (125)I-cyanopindolol determined beta-adrenoceptor density in lymphocytes. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level at baseline and after isoproterenol stimulation reflects lymphocyte beta-adrenergic responsiveness. Results revealed persistently decreased skin perfusion in patients with blackfoot disease. In contrast, there was a transient decrease in skin perfusion in healthy controls after iontophoresis of phenylephrine. Both beta-2 receptor density and isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes decreased. Increased peripheral alpha-adrenergic response and decreased beta-2-adrenergic response are related to increased vascular tone and result in atherosclerosis. Our findings of accentuated alpha-adrenergic response in microcirculation and decreased lymphocyte beta-2-adrenoceptor response play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in blackfoot disease.

  9. Cilostazol prevents foot ulcers in diabetic patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; Gallelli, Luca; Battaglia, Luigi; Molinari, Vincenzo; Montemurro, Rossella; Stillitano, Domenico M; Buffone, Gianluca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic patients are at high risk of foot ulcerations that may lead to limb amputations with important socio-economic impact. Peripheral vascular disease may be frequently associated in diabetes mellitus type II with its main symptom, intermittent claudication. Many studies reported the known efficacy of cilostazol in treating vascular claudication. Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) seems to be a biochemical marker implicated in chronic wounds and in particular in diabetic foot ulcers. Cilostazol appears to have a lowering effect on MMP-9 levels and this may suggest a beneficial effect in order to prevent or retard the onset of foot ulcer in diabetic patients. In our study, two groups of diabetic patients with peripheral vascular disease were divided into two groups according to the presence of claudication in order to receive cilostazol. Group A (31 patients without claudication) were not eligible to receive cilostazol whereas Group B (47 patients with claudication) received cilostazol administration for 24 weeks (100 mg orally twice daily). Median follow up was of 16 months. During the follow up, 4·25% of patients of Group B and 35·48% of patients of Group A (P < 0·01) showed onset of foot ulceration. Although further randomised and controlled studies are required cilostazol seems to show beneficial effects for primary prevention of diabetic foot ulcers.

  10. Hemodynamics analysis of patient-specific carotid bifurcation: a CFD model of downstream peripheral vascular impedance.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingliang; Wong, Kelvin K L; Tu, Jiyuan

    2013-04-01

    The study of cardiovascular models was presented in this paper based on medical image reconstruction and computational fluid dynamics. Our aim is to provide a reality platform for the purpose of flow analysis and virtual intervention outcome predication for vascular diseases. By connecting two porous mediums with transient permeability at the downstream of the carotid bifurcation branches, a downstream peripheral impedance model was developed, and the effect of the downstream vascular bed impedance can be taken into consideration. After verifying its accuracy with a healthy carotid bifurcation, this model was implemented in a diseased carotid bifurcation analysis. On the basis of time-averaged wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, and the relative residence time, fractions of abnormal luminal surface were highlighted, and the atherosclerosis was assessed from a hemodynamic point of view. The effect of the atherosclerosis on the transient flow division between the two branches because of the existence of plaque was also analysed. This work demonstrated that the proposed downstream peripheral vascular impedance model can be used for computational modelling when the outlets boundary conditions are not available, and successfully presented the potential of using medical imaging and numerical simulation to provide existing clinical prerequisites for diagnosis and therapeutic treatment.

  11. Treatment of a High-Risk Diabetic Patient with Peripheral Vascular Disease and Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Latricia L; Kalmar, Garrett; Driver, Vickie R

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of calcaneal osteomyelitis that was surgically resected from a patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. A 91-year-old male with history of type 2 diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, balloon angioplasty, and recent (2 months ago) stent of the superficial femoral artery presented to the emergency department with a left heel wound infection probed to bone. The patient reported having been on intravenous Zosyn for several months via an outside infectious disease provider for clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis, but noted no improvement. This report includes information regarding the clinical examination and imaging findings, which were used to assess this high-risk patient. Our patient underwent a partial calcanectomy and completed a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotics. The purpose of this case report is to illustrate limb preservation in a high-risk patient with compromised vascular supply who underwent a partial calcanectomy for treatment of calcaneal osteomyelitis. The patient underwent surgical resection of the calcaneus without complications and healed unremarkably with the ability to ambulate while wearing an ankle foot orthosis with a custom shoe. This report was authorized for publication as an educational report to contribute to generalizable knowledge and does not include any patient health information. PMID:27423990

  12. Visualizing the Peripheral Primo Vascular System in Mice Skin by Using the Polymer Mercox

    PubMed Central

    Stefanov, Miroslav; Kim, Jungdae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: As the peripheral part of the primo vascular system (PVS) is difficult to visualize, we used a vascular casting material Mercox injected directly into the skin to take advantage of a simple procedure to visualize PVS structures as primo vessels (PVs) and primo nodes (PNs) in the skin. Methods: Two colors of the polymer Mercox were injected into mouse skin. After a partial maceration of the whole body with potassium hydroperoxide solution, we anatomized it under a stereomicroscope to trace the Mercox that had been injected into the PVS. Results: Injection of Mercox directly into the skin allowed the PVs and the PNs to be visualized. This approach can fill the PVS when the material is ejected out of the PVs or PNs. The shapes, sizes, and topographic positions of the nodes and the vessels are the hallmarks used to identify the PVS in skin when Mercox is used as a tracer. Conclusion: The direct injection of the casting material Mercox into skin, with modified partial maceration procedures, is a promising method for visualizing the PVs and the PNs in the peripheral part of the PVS in skin. The polymer Mercox can penetrate through the primo pores of the primo vascular wall and fill the PVs and the PNs. The data prove that PVs and PNs exist on the hypodermal layer of the skin. PMID:26389004

  13. WNTLESS IS REQUIRED FOR PERIPHERAL LUNG DIFFERENTIATION AND PULMONARY VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Cornett, Bridget; Snowball, John; Varisco, Brian M.; Lang, Richard; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2013-01-01

    Wntless (Wls), a gene highly conserved across the animal kingdom, encodes for a transmembrane protein that mediates Wnt ligand secretion. Wls is expressed in developing lung, wherein Wnt signaling is necessary for pulmonary morphogenesis. We hypothesize that Wls plays a critical role in modulating Wnt signaling during lung development and therefore affects processes critical for pulmonary morphogenesis. We generated conditional Wls mutant mice utilizing Shh-Cre and Dermo1-Cre mice to delete Wls in the embryonic respiratory epithelium and mesenchyme, respectively. Epithelial deletion of Wls disrupted lung branching morphogenesis, peripheral lung development and pulmonary endothelial differentiation. Epithelial Wls mutant mice died at birth due to respiratory failure caused by lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hemorrhage. In the lungs of these mice, VEGF and Tie2-angiopoietin signaling pathways, which mediate vascular development, were downregulated from early stages of development. In contrast, deletion of Wls in mesenchymal cells of the developing lung did not alter branching morphogenesis or early mesenchymal differentiation. In vitro assays support the concept that Wls acts in part via Wnt5a to regulate pulmonary vascular development. We conclude that epithelial Wls modulates Wnt ligand activities critical for pulmonary vascular differentiation and peripheral lung morphogenesis. These studies provide a new framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying normal pulmonary vasculature formation and the dysmorphic pulmonary vasculature development associated with congenital lung disease. PMID:23523683

  14. Mechanisms of Microgravity Effect on Vascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdy, Ralph E.

    1995-01-01

    The overall goal of the project is to characterize the effects of simulated microgravity on vascular function. Microgravity is simulated using the hindlimb unweighted (HU) rat, and the following vessels are removed from HU and paired control rats for in vitro analysis: abdominal aorta, carotid and femoral arteries, jugular and femoral veins. These vessels are cut into 3 mm long rings and mounted in tissue baths for the measurement of either isometric contraction, or relaxation of pre- contracted vessels. The isolated mesenteric vascular bed is perfused for the measurement of changes in perfusion pressure as an index of arteriolar constriction or dilation. This report presents, in addition to the statement of the overall goal of the project, a summary list of the specific hypotheses to be tested. These are followed by sections on results, conclusions, significance and plans for the next year.

  15. Increase in whole-body peripheral vascular resistance during three hours of air or oxygen prebreathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Conkin, J.; Dierlam, J. J.; Stanford, J., Jr.; Riddle, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Male and female subjects prebreathed air or 100% oxygen through a mask for 3.0 hours while comfortably reclined. Blood pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output were collected before and after the prebreathe. Peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) was calculated from these parameters and increased by 29% during oxygen prebreathing and 15% during air prebreathing. The oxygen contributed substantially to the increase in PVR. Diastolic blood pressure increased by 18% during the oxygen prebreathe while stystolic blood pressure showed no change under either procedure. The increase in PVR during air prebreathing was attributed to procedural stress common to air and oxygen prebreathing.

  16. Catheter Securement Systems for Peripherally Inserted and Nontunneled Central Vascular Access Devices

    PubMed Central

    Krenik, Karen M.; Smith, Graham E.

    2016-01-01

    Sutureless catheter securement systems are intended to eliminate risks associated with sutures. The clinical acceptability of a novel system was investigated compared with the current method of securement for peripherally inserted central catheters (19 facilities using StatLock or sutures) or nontunneled central vascular access devices (3 facilities using StatLock or sutures or HubGuard + Sorbaview Shield). More than 94% of respondents rated the novel system as same, better, or much better than their current product. More than 82% of respondents were willing to replace their current system with the new one. PMID:27379679

  17. Vascular function and ocular involvement in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Siasos, Gerasimos; Paraskevopoulos, Theodoros; Gialafos, Elias; Rapti, Aggeliki; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Zaromitidou, Marina; Mourouzis, Konstantinos; Siasou, Georgia; Gouliopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsalamandris, Sotiris; Vlasis, Konstantinos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    Ocular involvement occurs in sarcoidosis (Sar) patients mainly in the form of uveitis. This study was designed to determine if uveitis in Sar patients is associated with vascular impairment. We enrolled 82 Sar patients and 77, age and sex matched, control subjects (Cl). Sar patients were divided into those with ocular sarcoidosis (OS) and those without ocular sarcoidosis (WOS). Endothelial function was evaluated by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured as an index of aortic stiffness and augmentation index (AIx) as a measure of arterial wave reflections. Although there was no significant difference in sex, age and mean arterial pressure, patients with OS compared to WOS patients and Cl subjects had impaired FMD (p<0.001), increased AIx (p=0.02) and increased PWV (p=0.001). Interestingly, impaired FMD in Sar patients was independently, from possible covariates (age, sex, smoking habits, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia), associated with increased odds of ocular involvement (odds ratio=1.69, p=0.001). More precisely ROC curve analysis revealed that FMD had a significant diagnostic ability for the detection of OS (AUC=0.77, p<0.001) with a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 68% for an FMD value below 6.00%. To conclude in the present study we have shown that ocular involvement in Sar patients is associated with impaired endothelial function and increased arterial stiffness. These results strengthen the vascular theory which considers uveitis a consequence of vascular dysfunction in Sar patients and reveals a possible clinical importance of the use of endothelial function tests.

  18. Cognitive Function in Peripheral Autonomic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldi, Pietro; Poda, Roberto; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Solieri, Laura; Sambati, Luisa; Gallassi, Roberto; Cortelli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Objective aims of the current study were 1) to evaluate global cognitive function in patients with autonomic failure (AF) of peripheral origin and 2) to investigate the effect of a documented fall in blood pressure (BP) fulfilling the criteria for orthostatic hypotension (OH) on cognitive performances. Methods we assessed 12 consecutive patients (10 males, 68±7 years old) with pure AF (PAF) or autoimmune autonomic neuropathy (AAN) and 12 age- and gender-matched controls. All patients had no clinical signs of central nervous system involvement and normal brain CT/MRI scan. Cognitive function was assessed on two consecutive days in 3 conditions: on day 1, while sitting, by means of a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests; on day 2, while tilted (HUT) and during supine rest (supine) in a randomized manner. BP and heart rate (HR) were continuously recorded non-invasively for the whole duration of the examination. Results patients with PAF or AAN displayed a preserved global cognitive function while sitting. However, compared to supine assessment, during HUT patients scored significantly worse during the Trail Making Test A and B, Barrage test, Analogies test, Immediate Visual Memory, Span Forward and Span Backward test. Pathological scores, with regard to Italian normative range values, were observed only during HUT in the Barrage test and in the Analogies test in 3 and 6 patients respectively. On the contrary, in healthy controls, results to neuropsychological tests were not significantly different, during HUT compared to supine rest. Conclusions these data demonstrate that patients with PAF and AAN present a normal sitting global cognitive evaluation. However, their executive functions worsen significantly during the orthostatic challenge, possibly because of transient frontal lobes hypoperfusion. PMID:24465471

  19. Long-term risk of vascular events after peripheral bypass surgery. A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Van Hattum, Eline S; Tangelder, Marco J D; Lawson, James A; Moll, Frans L; Algra, Ale

    2012-09-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are at high risk of major ischaemic events. Long-term data of all major ischaemic events in PAD patients are scarce and outdated, especially for patients with severe PAD requiring bypass surgery. Our objective was to define their long-term prognosis and develop a prediction model which quantifies this risk up to a decade after surgery. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in patients from the Dutch Bypass Oral anticoagulants or Aspirin (BOA) Study; a multicentre randomised trial comparing oral anticoagulants with aspirin after infrainguinal bypass surgery. The primary outcome was the composite event of non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal ischaemic stroke, major amputation, and vascular death. Cumulative risks were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and independent determinants by multivariable Cox regression models. From 1995 until 2009, 482 patients were followed for a median period of 7.8 years. Follow-up was complete in 94%. Overall 60% of patients experienced a primary outcome event, of which the majority was a vascular death (30%), followed by major amputations (12%). The primary cause of vascular death was a cardiovascular event (29%), whereas the minority was due to complications directly related to PAD (6%). Within five years after bypass surgery vascular death occurred in about a quarter of patients and within 10 years in nearly half of patients. This was double the rate as for non-vascular death. The primary outcome event occurred in over a third and over half of patients in 5 and 10 years after bypass surgery, respectively. From four independent determinants for the primary outcome event: age, diabetes, critical limb ischaemia, and prior vascular interventions, we developed a risk chart, which systematically classifies the 10-year risks of the primary outcome event, ranging from 25% to 85%. This study provided a detailed insight in the course of PAD long after peripheral bypass surgery and

  20. Exercise interventions and peripheral arterial function: implications for cardio-metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Shane A; Mahmoud, Abeer M; Brown, Michael D; Haus, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for the development of obesity and other cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Vascular endothelial dysfunction is a key event in the development of CVD and is associated with a sedentary lifestyle in otherwise healthy adults. In addition, vascular endothelial dysfunction may be exacerbated in sedentary individuals who are obese and insulin resistant, since excess body fat is associated with elevated levels of pro-atherogenic inflammatory adipokines and cytokines that reduce the nitric oxide (NO) and other upstream paracrine signaling substances which reduces vascular health. Since blood flow-related shear stress is a major stimulus to NO release from the endothelium, disturbed flow or low shear stress is the likely mechanism by which vascular endothelial function is altered with inactivity. Evidence shows that regular physical exercise has beneficial effects on CVD and the risk factors that promote peripheral arterial function and health. Both aerobic and resistance exercise training are generally believed to improve endothelial function and are commonly recommended for CV health, including the management of obesity, hypertension, and insulin resistance. However, many factors including age, disease status, and race appear to influence these outcomes. Although evidence supporting the health benefits of exercise is compelling, the optimum prescription (volume and intensity) and the exact mechanism underlying the effects of exercise training on arterial function and cardiometabolic risk has yet to be identified. The focus of this review will be on the evidence supporting exercise interventions for peripheral arterial function. PMID:25529367

  1. Exercise interventions and peripheral arterial function: implications for cardio-metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Shane A; Mahmoud, Abeer M; Brown, Michael D; Haus, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for the development of obesity and other cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Vascular endothelial dysfunction is a key event in the development of CVD and is associated with a sedentary lifestyle in otherwise healthy adults. In addition, vascular endothelial dysfunction may be exacerbated in sedentary individuals who are obese and insulin resistant, since excess body fat is associated with elevated levels of pro-atherogenic inflammatory adipokines and cytokines that reduce the nitric oxide (NO) and other upstream paracrine signaling substances which reduces vascular health. Since blood flow-related shear stress is a major stimulus to NO release from the endothelium, disturbed flow or low shear stress is the likely mechanism by which vascular endothelial function is altered with inactivity. Evidence shows that regular physical exercise has beneficial effects on CVD and the risk factors that promote peripheral arterial function and health. Both aerobic and resistance exercise training are generally believed to improve endothelial function and are commonly recommended for CV health, including the management of obesity, hypertension, and insulin resistance. However, many factors including age, disease status, and race appear to influence these outcomes. Although evidence supporting the health benefits of exercise is compelling, the optimum prescription (volume and intensity) and the exact mechanism underlying the effects of exercise training on arterial function and cardiometabolic risk has yet to be identified. The focus of this review will be on the evidence supporting exercise interventions for peripheral arterial function.

  2. An overview on peripheral vascular disease in blackfoot disease-hyperendemic villages in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2002-01-01

    The arsenic-related peripheral vascular disease found to be endemic along the southwestern coast of Taiwan is reviewed. In the early 20th century a strange disease involving the lower extremities characterized by typical clinical symptoms and signs of progressive arterial occlusion was reported in a confined area located along the southwestern coast of Taiwan. The disease was locally called "blackfoot disease" because of its gangrenous appearance involving the feet of the patients. The prevalence of this disease ranged from 6.51 to 18.85 per 1,000 population in different villages. Epidemiologic studies revealed that blackfoot disease was associated with the consumption of artesian well water containing high levels of arsenic. High co-occurrence of blackfoot disease and arsenic-related skin lesions such as hyperpigmentation, hyperkeratosis, and skin cancer was also observed. Recent studies also confirmed the association of preclinical peripheral vascular disease with arsenic exposure in a dose-response pattern. Subclinical arterial insufficiency and defects in cutaneous microcirculation can also be demonstrated in seemingly normal subjects living in the endemic villages. The incidence of clinical manifestation of blackfoot disease decreased dramatically after the implementation of tap water in these villages over the past 2-3 decades. The atherogenicity of arsenic could be associated with its effects on hypercoagulability, endothelial injury, smooth muscle cell proliferation, somatic mutation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. However, its interaction with some trace elements and its association with hypertension and diabetes mellitus could also explain part of its higher risk of developing atherosclerosis.

  3. Systemic heparinization during peripheral vascular surgery: thromboelastographic, activated coagulation time, and heparin titration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Greenstein, D; Gupta, N K; Walker, D R; Kester, R C

    1994-04-01

    Fifteen patients (9 male, 6 female) undergoing peripheral vascular surgery were monitored during surgery for evidence of subclinical anticoagulation using the activated coagulation time (ACT), thromboelastography (TEG), and heparin titration monitoring. Assessments were made at 30-minute intervals before and after the occlusion clamp. Mean (+/- SD) ACT values preoperatively were 111 (17) seconds, and 10 minutes after 5,000 IU of heparin, the ACT was 264 (57) seconds (P < 0.001). Intraoperatively, there was a significant decline in ACT values at 30 minutes (ACT 228 [50] sec, P < 0.005) and 60 minutes (200 [46] sec, P < 0.001) postheparin. No significant difference in ACT was observed between samples drawn distally and proximally to the clamp. TEG profiles were abolished in all patients immediately following heparinization. However, in 2 patients nearly complete return of the TEG coagulation profile was observed prior to the termination of the procedure and was associated with ACT values less than 160 seconds. The heparin device was unable to accurately monitor heparin elimination at these low doses. Variability of patient response to heparinization necessitates the use of intraoperative monitoring of anticoagulation during peripheral vascular surgery.

  4. [Effect of alcohol on vascular function].

    PubMed

    Kudo, Risa; Yuui, Katsuya; Kasuda, Shogo; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2015-06-01

    Vascular function is regulated by a balance of vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation. Disorder in this balance due to alcohol consumption causes various clinical conditions. In this review, we discuss the effects of acute and chronic ethanol consumption on vascular responses, including vasoconstriction, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and nerve-mediated vasorelaxation. Acute ethanol administration induces vasoconstriction in ethanol-naive animals in vitro. Furthermore, ethanol can both potentiate and suppress agonist-induced Ca(2+)-dependent vasoconstriction. Moreover, ethanol augments Ca(2+)-independent vasoconstriction by increasing Ca2+ sensitivity. Endothelium-dependent relaxation is mediated by the nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) pathway. Acute ethanol treatment inhibits both NO- and EDHF-mediated relaxation. Furthermore, acute ethanol ingestion can also potentiate and suppress calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-induced nerve-mediated relaxation. These opposing effects may be due to differences in species or vascular beds. Thus, acute ethanol treatment decreases vasorelaxation, thereby shifting the contraction-relaxation balance towards contraction. Combined, these effects are one mechanism by which acute heavy alcohol consumption causes circulatory disturbances such as vasospasms or ischemic heart disease. In contrast, chronic low-dose ethanol has no effect on vasoconstriction, whereas chronic high-dose ethanol increases vasoconstriction. Additionally, chronic ethanol intake has diminished, unchanged, and even increased effects on nerve-mediated relaxation; therefore, conclusions on these effects are not possible at present. Interestingly, chronic low-dose ethanol administration enhanced endothelium-dependent relaxation; however, higher doses inhibited these responses. Therefore, regular or light-to-moderate alcohol intake increases vasorelaxation and may suppress elevated blood pressure, whereas

  5. The Discovery of Novel Genomic, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Biomarkers in Cardiovascular and Peripheral Vascular Disease: The State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Stefano; Metzinger, Laurent; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in western countries and also responsible of a huge burden in terms of disability, functional decline, and healthcare costs. Biomarkers are measurable biological elements that reflect particular physiological or pathological states or predisposition towards diseases and they are currently widely studied in medicine and especially in CD. In this context, biomarkers can also be used to assess the severity or the evolution of several diseases, as well as the effectiveness of particular therapies. Genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics have opened new windows on disease phenomena and may permit in the next future an effective development of novel diagnostic and prognostic medicine in order to better prevent or treat CD. This review will consider the current evidence of novel biomarkers with clear implications in the improvement of risk assessment, prevention strategies, and medical decision making in the field of CD. PMID:27298828

  6. Preimplantation processing of ex vivo-derived vascular biomaterials: Effects on peripheral cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Uzarski, Joseph S.; Van De Walle, Aurore B.; McFetridge, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of ex vivo-derived scaffolds as vascular conduits has shown to be a clinically valid approach to repair or bypass occluded vessels. Implantation of allogeneic tissue grafts requires careful processing to lower immunogenicity and prevent bacterial infection. However, the mechanical/chemical treatments used to prepare biological scaffolds can result in significant alterations to the native structure and surface chemistry, which can affect in vivo performance. Of particular importance for vascular grafts are binding interactions between the implanted biomaterial and host cells from the circulation and adjacent vasculature. Here we present a comparison of four strategies used to decellularize allogeneic human umbilical vein (HUV) scaffolds: ethanol/acetone, sodium chloride, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), or Triton X-100. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that all four techniques achieved removal of native cells from both the lumenal and ablumenal surfaces of HUV grafts. Platelets and promyelocytic HL-60 cells showed preferential binding on the more loosely structured ablumenal surface, although low surface coverage was observed overall by peripheral blood cells. Vascular endothelial cell adhesion was highest on HUV decellularized using ethanol/acetone, and significantly higher than on SDS-processed grafts (p = 0.016). Primary cells showed high viability on the lumenal surface regardless of decellularization technique (over 95% in all cases). These results demonstrate the critical effects of various chemical processing strategies on the adhesive properties of ex vivo-derived vascular grafts. Careful application-specific consideration is warranted when selecting a processing strategy that minimizes innate responses (e.g. thrombosis, inflammation) that are often deleterious to graft survival. PMID:22825780

  7. Peripheral limb vascular malformations: an update of appropriate imaging and treatment options of a challenging condition

    PubMed Central

    Farrant, J; Chhaya, N; Anwar, I; Marmery, H; Platts, A; Holloway, B

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations encompass a wide spectrum of lesions that can present as an incidental finding or produce potentially life- or limb-threatening complications. They can have intra-articular and intraosseous extensions that will result in more diverse symptomology and present greater therapeutic challenges. Developments in classification, imaging and interventional techniques have helped to improve outcome. The onus is now placed on appropriate detailed preliminary imaging, diagnosis and classification to direct management and exclude other more common mimics. Radiologists are thus playing an increasingly important role in the multidisciplinary teams charged with the care of these patients. By fully understanding the imaging characteristics and image-guided procedures available, radiologists will be armed with the tools to meet these responsibilities. This review highlights the recent advances made in imaging and the options available in interventional therapy. PMID:25525685

  8. Detecting lower extremity vascular dynamics in patients with peripheral artery disease using diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun-Keol K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Dayal, Rajeev; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-02-01

    Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) affects over 10 million Americans and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While in many cases the ankle-brachial index (ABI) can be used for diagnosing the disease, this parameter is not dependable in the diabetic and elderly population. These populations tend to have calcified arteries, which leads to elevated ABI values. Dynamic optical tomography (DDOT) promises to overcome the limitations of the current diagnostic techniques and has the potential to initiate a paradigm shift in the diagnosis of vascular disease. We have performed initial pilot studies involving 5 PAD patients and 3 healthy volunteers. The time traces and tomographic reconstruction obtained from measurements on the feet show significant differences between healthy and affected vasculatures. In addition, we found that DOT is capable of identifying PAD in diabetic patients, who are misdiagnosed by the traditional ABI screening.

  9. Should Peripheral Vascular Disease- or Diabetes-related Amputation Contraindicate Renal Transplant?

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Nalani L

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with amputation secondary to peripheral vascular disease (PVD) or diabetes mellitus (DM) are appropriate candidates for renal transplant. Limb- or digit- amputees with ESRD on the renal transplant list from 1993–2008 were included. Comorbidities, amputation type, duration on the waitlist, and current transplant status were analyzed. Additionally, US renal transplant centers were surveyed regarding their views about amputees' transplant candidacy. Thirty-eight ESRD patients with amputations were identified; 3 patients underwent renal transplant, 14 expired on the waitlist, and 14 were removed for medical reasons. The survey indicated that centers generally don't consider amputation a contraindication to transplant listing. Few ESRD patients with amputations who are placed on the transplant list undergo renal transplant; most die or are removed for medical reasons. Amputation should be considered an indicator of severe PVD and possibly a relative contraindication to listing for renal transplant. PMID:22787569

  10. Peripheral vascular effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockade: comparison of two agents.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, E D; Maltz, M B; Smith, R E; Bowcock, S A; Watkins, C J; Camm, A J

    1987-01-01

    1. The effects of atenolol (100 mg), a beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker, and bevantolol (200 mg) were compared on heart rate, blood pressure, lung function and on the peripheral circulation in normal volunteers before and after isoprenaline infusion. Recordings were obtained 2 and 24 h following a single dose and 24 h after continuous dosage for 7 days. 2. The effect of atenolol on the blockade of beta-adrenergic stimuli, as measured by the ability to reduce isoprenaline-induced tachycardia, was greater than that of bevantolol. Though both drugs achieved a similar reduction in systolic pressure there was a significantly greater reduction in diastolic pressure with bevantolol. The lung function tests gave similar results to those with other beta-adrenoceptor blockers. 3. Atenolol produced a fall in peripheral blood flow consistent with unopposed peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The effect of bevantolol differs from that of atenolol, an initial fall in peripheral blood flow being followed by a rapid recovery to baseline or greater. This effect may be due to partial alpha-adrenoceptor agonist activity. PMID:2889459

  11. Peripheral vascular effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockade: comparison of two agents.

    PubMed

    Cooke, E D; Maltz, M B; Smith, R E; Bowcock, S A; Watkins, C J; Camm, A J

    1987-09-01

    1. The effects of atenolol (100 mg), a beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker, and bevantolol (200 mg) were compared on heart rate, blood pressure, lung function and on the peripheral circulation in normal volunteers before and after isoprenaline infusion. Recordings were obtained 2 and 24 h following a single dose and 24 h after continuous dosage for 7 days. 2. The effect of atenolol on the blockade of beta-adrenergic stimuli, as measured by the ability to reduce isoprenaline-induced tachycardia, was greater than that of bevantolol. Though both drugs achieved a similar reduction in systolic pressure there was a significantly greater reduction in diastolic pressure with bevantolol. The lung function tests gave similar results to those with other beta-adrenoceptor blockers. 3. Atenolol produced a fall in peripheral blood flow consistent with unopposed peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The effect of bevantolol differs from that of atenolol, an initial fall in peripheral blood flow being followed by a rapid recovery to baseline or greater. This effect may be due to partial alpha-adrenoceptor agonist activity.

  12. Serum Superoxide Dismutase Is Associated with Vascular Structure and Function in Hypertensive and Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Recio-Rodriguez, José I.; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with cardiac and vascular defects leading to hypertension and atherosclerosis, being superoxide dismutase (SOD) one of the main intracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms. Although several parameters of vascular function and structure have a predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in hypertensive patients, there are no studies on the involvement of SOD serum levels with these vascular parameters. Thus, we assessed if SOD serum levels are correlated with parameters of vascular function and structure and with cardiovascular risk in hypertensive and type 2 diabetic patients. We enrolled 255 consecutive hypertensive and diabetic patients and 52 nondiabetic and nonhypertensive controls. SOD levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Vascular function and structure were evaluated by pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and carotid intima-media thickness. We detected negative correlations between SOD and pressure wave velocity, peripheral and central augmentation index and ambulatory arterial stiffness index, pulse pressure, and plasma HDL-cholesterol, as well as positive correlations between SOD and plasma uric acid and triglycerides. Our study shows that SOD is a marker of cardiovascular alterations in hypertensive and diabetic patients, since changes in its serum levels are correlated with alterations in vascular structure and function. PMID:26635913

  13. Functional preservation of vascular smooth muscle tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. C.; Hutchins, P. M.; Kimzey, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic and cellular feedback relationships operating to effect the vascular decompensatory modifications were examined to reveal procedures for implementing protective measures guarding against vascular collapse when returning from a weightless environment to that of the earth's gravity. The surgical procedures for preparing the rat cremaster, and the fixation methods are described. Abstracts of publications resulting from this research are included.

  14. Mitochondrial Respiration after One Session of Calf Raise Exercise in Patients with Peripheral Vascular Disease and Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wohlwend, Martin; Rognmo, Øivind; Mattsson, Erney J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mitochondria are essential for energy production in the muscle cell and for this they are dependent upon a sufficient supply of oxygen by the circulation. Exercise training has shown to be a potent stimulus for physiological adaptations and mitochondria play a central role. Whether changes in mitochondrial respiration are seen after exercise in patients with a reduced circulation is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the time course and whether one session of calf raise exercise stimulates mitochondrial respiration in the calf muscle of patients with peripheral vascular disease. Methods One group of patients with peripheral vascular disease (n = 11) and one group of healthy older adults (n = 11) were included. Patients performed one session of continuous calf raises followed by 5 extra repetitions after initiation of pain. Healthy older adults performed 100 continuous calf raises. Gastrocnemius muscle biopsies were collected at baseline and 15 minutes, one hour, three hours and 24 hours after one session of calf raise exercise. A multi substrate (octanoylcarnitine, malate, adp, glutamate, succinate, FCCP, rotenone) approach was used to analyze mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers. Mixed-linear model for repeated measures was used for statistical analyses. Results Patients with peripheral vascular disease have a lower baseline respiration supported by complex I and they increase respiration supported by complex II at one hour post-exercise. Healthy older adults increase respiration supported by electron transfer flavoprotein and complex I at one hour and 24 hours post-exercise. Conclusion Our results indicate a shift towards mitochondrial respiration supported by complex II as being a pathophysiological component of peripheral vascular disease. Furthermore exercise stimulates mitochondrial respiration already after one session of calf raise exercise in patients with peripheral vascular disease and healthy older adults. Trial

  15. Segmental analysis of indocyanine green pharmacokinetics for the reliable diagnosis of functional vascular insufficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yujung; Lee, Jungsul; An, Yuri; Jeon, Jongwook; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-03-01

    Accurate and reliable diagnosis of functional insufficiency of peripheral vasculature is essential since Raynaud phenomenon (RP), most common form of peripheral vascular insufficiency, is commonly associated with systemic vascular disorders. We have previously demonstrated that dynamic imaging of near-infrared fluorophore indocyanine green (ICG) can be a noninvasive and sensitive tool to measure tissue perfusion. In the present study, we demonstrated that combined analysis of multiple parameters, especially onset time and modified Tmax which means the time from onset of ICG fluorescence to Tmax, can be used as a reliable diagnostic tool for RP. To validate the method, we performed the conventional thermographic analysis combined with cold challenge and rewarming along with ICG dynamic imaging and segmental analysis. A case-control analysis demonstrated that segmental pattern of ICG dynamics in both hands was significantly different between normal and RP case, suggesting the possibility of clinical application of this novel method for the convenient and reliable diagnosis of RP.

  16. Age and sex influence the balance between maximal cardiac output and peripheral vascular reserve.

    PubMed

    Ridout, Samuel J; Parker, Beth A; Smithmyer, Sandra L; Gonzales, Joaquin U; Beck, Kenneth C; Proctor, David N

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the influence of age and sex on the relationship between central and peripheral vasodilatory capacity. Healthy men (19 younger, 12 older) and women (17 younger, 17 older) performed treadmill and knee extensor exercise to fatigue on separate days while maximal cardiac output (Q, acetylene uptake) and peak femoral blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) were measured, respectively. Maximal Q was reduced with age similarly in men (Y: 23.6 +/- 2.7 vs. O: 17.4 +/- 3.5 l/min; P < 0.05) and women (Y: 17.7 +/- 1.9 vs. O: 12.3 +/- 1.6 l/min; P < 0.05). Peak FBF was similar between younger (Y) and older (O) men (Y: 2.1 +/- 0.5 vs. O: 2.2 +/- 0.7 l/min) but was lower in older women compared with younger women (Y: 1.9 +/- 0.4 vs. O: 1.4 +/- 0.4 l/min; P < 0.05). Maximal Q was positively correlated with peak FBF in men (Y: r = 0.55, O: r = 0.74; P < 0.05) but not in women (Y: r = 0.34, O: r = 0.10). Normalization of cardiac output to appendicular muscle mass and peak FBF to quadriceps mass reduced the correlation between these variables in younger men (r = 0.30), but the significant association remained in older men (r = 0.68; P < 0.05), with no change in women. These data suggest that 1) aerobic capacity is associated with peripheral vascular reserve in men but not women, and 2) aging is accompanied by a more pronounced sex difference in this relationship. PMID:19959767

  17. Abnormal peripheral circulation in type 2 diabetic patients with normal ankle-brachial index associates with coronary atherosclerosis, large artery stiffness, and peripheral vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masanobu; Suzuki, Eiji; Egawa, Katsuya; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Inubushi, Toshiro; Kashiwagi, Atsunori

    2005-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that impaired peripheral circulation in diabetes arises from different aspects of vascular abnormalities even when accompanied by a normal ankle-brachial index (ABI>0.9). One hundred fourteen type 2 diabetic patients with normal ABI and 33 age-matched non-diabetic subjects consecutively admitted to our hospital were enrolled. The Agatston coronary artery calcium score (CACS), as a marker of coronary atherosclerosis, was obtained using electron-beam computed tomography. An automatic device was used to measure brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) as an index of arterial distensibility. Total flow volume and resistive index (RI), as a marker of peripheral vascular resistance, at the popliteal artery were evaluated using gated two-dimensional cine-mode phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Diabetic patients had baPWV (P<0.001) and RI (P<0.001) higher than those in the non-diabetic subjects, indicating that those parameters are characteristically altered in diabetic patients. When diabetic patients were grouped into three subgroups according to their levels of total flow volume, those with the lowest range showed the highest log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), baPWV (P<0.001), and RI (P<0.001) among the groups. Total flow volume was negatively correlated with log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), baPWV (P<0.001), and RI (P<0.001). Waveform at the popliteal artery could be clearly separated into systolic and early and late diastolic blood flows, which were negatively correlated with log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), RI (P<0.001), and baPWV (P<0.001), respectively. These results suggest that impaired peripheral circulation in diabetes is attributable to coronary atherosclerosis, large artery stiffness, and peripheral vascular resistance even when ABI is normal.

  18. Wall shear stress and near-wall convective transport: Comparisons with vascular remodelling in a peripheral graft anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambaruto, A. M.; Doorly, D. J.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-08-01

    Fluid dynamic properties of blood flow are implicated in cardiovascular diseases. The interaction between the blood flow and the wall occurs through the direct transmission of forces, and through the dominating influence of the flow on convective transport processes. Controlled, in vitro testing in simple geometric configurations has provided much data on the cellular-level responses of the vascular walls to flow, but a complete, mechanistic explanation of the pathogenic process is lacking. In the interim, mapping the association between local haemodynamics and the vascular response is important to improve understanding of the disease process and may be of use for prognosis. Moreover, establishing the haemodynamic environment in the regions of disease provides data on flow conditions to guide investigations of cellular-level responses. This work describes techniques to facilitate comparison between the temporal alteration in the geometry of the vascular conduit, as determined by in vivo imaging, with local flow parameters. Procedures to reconstruct virtual models from images by means of a partition-of-unity implicit function formulation, and to align virtual models of follow-up scans to a common coordinate system, are outlined. A simple Taylor series expansion of the Lagrangian dynamics of the near-wall flow is shown to provide both a physical meaning to the directional components of the flow, as well as demonstrating the relation between near-wall convection in the wall normal direction and spatial gradients of the wall shear stress. A series of post-operative follow-up MRI scans of two patient cases with bypass grafts in the peripheral vasculature are presented. These are used to assess how local haemodynamic parameters relate to vascular remodelling at the location of the distal end-to-side anastomosis, i.e. where the graft rejoins the host artery. Results indicate that regions of both low wall shear stress and convective transport towards the wall tend to be

  19. Does arsenic exposure increase the risk of development of peripheral vascular diseases in humans?

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic has been well documented as a major risk factor in the development of blackfoot disease (BFD), a unique peripheral vascular disease (PVD) endemic to the southwestern coast of Taiwan, where residents imbibed artesian well water containing excessive amounts of arsenic for more than 50 yr. Long-term arsenic exposure was also reported to be associated with mortality attributed to PVD. A tap-water supply system was implemented in the early 1960s in the BFD endemic areas. Artesian well water was no longer used for drinking and cooking after the mid-1970s. The objective of this study was to examine whether mortality attributed to PVD decreased after the consumption of artesian well water containing high concentrations of arsenic ceased and, if so, when the reduction occurred. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for PVD were calculated for the BFD endemic area for the years 1971-2003. Cumulative-sum techniques were used to detect the occurrence of changes in the SMRs. Data showed that mortality due to PVD declined gradually for approximately 25 to 27 yr following cessation of consumption of this arsenic artesian well water. Based on the reversibility criterion, the association between arsenic exposure and PVD-attributed mortality is likely to be causal.

  20. Assessment of bilateral photoplethysmography for lower limb peripheral vascular occlusive disease using color relation analysis classifier.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung

    2011-09-01

    This paper proposes the assessment of bilateral photoplethysmography (PPG) for lower limb peripheral vascular occlusive disease (PVOD) using a color relation analysis (CRA) classifier. PPG signals are non-invasively recorded from the right and left sides at the big toe sites. With the time-domain technique, the right-to-left side difference is studied by comparing the subject's PPG data. The absolute bilateral differences construct various diminishing and damping patterns. These difference patterns in amplitude and shape distortion relate to the grades of PVOD, including the normal condition, lower-grade disease, and higher-grade disease. A CRA classifier is used to recognize the various patterns for PVOD assessment. Its concept is derived from the HSV color model and uses the hue, saturation, and value to depict the disease grades using the natural primary colors of red, green, and blue. PPG signals are obtained from 21 subjects aged 24-65 years using an optical measurement technique. The proposed CRA classifier is tested using the physiological measurements, and the tests reveal its practicality for monitoring PPG signals. PMID:20674063

  1. Assessment by dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy of coronary risk before peripheral vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, R.N.; Tellier, P.; Larmignat, P.; Azorin, J.; Fischbein, L.; Beaudet, B.; Cadilhac, P.; Cupa, M.; De Saint Florent, G.; Vulpillat, M.

    1988-05-01

    From October 1983 to January 1985, 46 patients (38 men and 8 women; average age, 60 years; range, 37 to 83 years) underwent peripheral vascular surgery of either the internal carotid artery or the arteries of the lower limbs. Each patient had a thorough clinical examination, an ECG, and a dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial scan before operation. On the basis of results, they were divided into two groups: 20 patients with and 26 patients without chronic ischemic heart disease. Three major cardiac events were noted during or after a period of 1 month after surgery: There were two deaths due to cardiac ischemic events and one patient had postoperative unstable angina pectoris. These three patients were classified in the coronary group (NS). When the patients were classified on the basis of whether or not there was thallium redistribution on serial images after infusion of dipyridamole, 14 with redistribution and 32 without redistribution were noted. The three patients who had major cardiac events were in the former group (p less than 0.04). Our data suggest that patients in whom redistribution occurs have a high incidence of postoperative ischemic events. These patients should be considered for particular preoperative coronary care to avoid major postoperative cardiac events and to increase chances of survival.

  2. A Methodological Approach to Non-invasive Assessments of Vascular Function and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Sandoo, Aamer; Kitas, George D.

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium is the innermost lining of the vasculature and is involved in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis. Damage to the endothelium may predispose the vessel to atherosclerosis and increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Assessments of peripheral endothelial function are good indicators of early abnormalities in the vascular wall and correlate well with assessments of coronary endothelial function. The present manuscript details the important methodological steps necessary for the assessment of microvascular endothelial function using laser Doppler imaging with iontophoresis, large vessel endothelial function using flow-mediated dilatation, and carotid atherosclerosis using carotid artery ultrasound. A discussion on the methodological considerations for each of the techniques is also presented, and recommendations are made for future research. PMID:25741637

  3. Vascular precursors: origin, regulation and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this miniseries, we discuss the phenotype, origin, and specialized microenvironment (niche) of distinct populations of stem and progenitor cells that exhibit vascular potential. Their usefulness and effectiveness for clinical therapies are also described. We have learned a great deal about post...

  4. Assessing vascular endothelial function using frequency and rank order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Hsu, Po-Chun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Liu, An-Bang; Lin, Zong-Lin; Tang, Chieh-Ju; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2013-08-01

    Using frequency and rank order statistics (FROS), this study analyzed the fluctuations in arterial waveform amplitudes recorded from an air pressure sensing system before and after reactive hyperemia (RH) induction by temporary blood flow occlusion to evaluate the vascular endothelial function of aged and diabetic subjects. The modified probability-weighted distance (PWD) calculated from the FROS was compared with the dilatation index (DI) to evaluate its validity and sensitivity in the assessment of vascular endothelial function. The results showed that the PWD can provide a quantitative determination of the structural changes in the arterial pressure signals associated with regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure by intact vascular endothelium after the application of occlusion stress. Our study suggests that the use of FROS is a reliable noninvasive approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial degeneration in aging and diabetes.

  5. Coculture of peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells on strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate scaffolds to generate vascularized engineered bone.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei-Li; Xiang, Zhou; Huang, Fu-Guo; Gu, Zhi-Peng; Yu, Xi-Xun; Cen, Shi-Qiang; Zhong, Gang; Duan, Xin; Liu, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization of engineered bone tissue is critical for ensuring its survival after implantation and it is the primary factor limiting its clinical use. A promising approach is to prevascularize bone grafts in vitro using endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) derived from peripheral blood. Typically, EPC are added together with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) that differentiate into osteoblasts. One problem with this approach is how to promote traditional tissue engineering bone survival with a minimally invasive method. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of administering to stimulate the release of peripheral blood stem cells and their co-culturing system for generating prevascularized engineered bone. Cells were isolated by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation and identified as EPC and MSC based on morphology, surface markers, and functional analysis. EPC and MSC were cocultured in several different ratios, and cell morphology and tube formation were assessed by microscopy. Expression of osteogenesis and vascularization markers was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), polymerase chain reaction, and histochemical and immunofluorescence staining. Increasing the proportion of EPC in the coculture system led to greater tube formation and greater expression of the endothelial cell marker CD31. An EPC:MSC ratio of 75:25 gave the highest expression of osteogenesis and angiogenesis markers. Cocultures adhered to a three-dimensional scaffold of strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate and proliferated well. Our findings show that coculturing peripheral blood-derived EPC and MSC may prove useful for generating prevascularized bone tissue for clinical use.

  6. Time-of-day variation in vascular function.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, G C; Denniff, M

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This report looks at the role of endothelial nitric oxide signalling in the time-of-day variation in vasoconstriction of resistance vessels. What advances does it highlight? It highlights a time-of-day variation in contraction of mesenteric arteries, characterized by a reduced contractile response to either phenylephrine or high K(+) and increased relaxation in response to acetylcholine during the active period. This time-of-day variation in contraction results from a difference in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signalling that correlates with levels of eNOS expression, which peak during the active period and may have far reaching physiological consequences beyond regulation of blood pressure. There is a strong time-of-day variation in the vasoconstriction in response to sympathetic stimulation that may contribute to the time-of-day variation in blood pressure, which is characterized by a dip in blood pressure during the individual's rest period when sympathetic activity is low. Vasoconstriction is known to be regulated tightly by nitric oxide signalling from the endothelial cells, so we have looked at the effect of time-of-day on levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular contractility. Mesenteric arteries isolated from the nocturnal rat exhibit a time-of-day variation in their contractile response to α1 -adrenoreceptor and muscarinic activation, which is characterized by a reduced vasoconstriction in response to phenylephrine and enhanced vasodilatation in response to acetylcholine during the rat's active period at night. An increase in eNOS signalling during the active period is responsible for this time-of-day difference in response to phenylephrine and acetylcholine and correlates with the large increase in eNOS expression (mRNA and protein) during the active period, possibly driven by the presence of a functioning peripheral circadian clock. This increase in eNOS signalling may function to

  7. [Peripheral, central and functional vertigo syndromes].

    PubMed

    Strupp, M; Dieterich, M; Zwergal, A; Brandt, T

    2015-12-01

    Depending on the temporal course, three forms of vertigo syndrome can be differentiated: 1) vertigo attacks, e.g. benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Menière's disease and vestibular migraine, 2) acute spontaneous vertigo lasting for days, e.g. acute unilateral vestibulopathy, brainstem or cerebellar infarction and 3) symptoms lasting for months or years, e.g. bilateral vestibulopathy and functional vertigo. The specific therapy of the various syndromes is based on three principles: 1) physical treatment with liberatory maneuvers for BPPV and balance training for vestibular deficits, 2) pharmacotherapy, e.g. for acute unilateral vestibulopathy (corticosteroids) and Menière's disease (transtympanic administration of gentamicin or steroids and high-dose betahistine therapy); placebo-controlled pharmacotherapy studies are currently being carried out for acute unilateral vestibulopathy, vestibular paroxysmia, prophylaxis of BPPV, vestibular migraine, episodic ataxia type 2 and cerebellar ataxia; 3) psychotherapy for functional dizziness.

  8. Inflammatory stimuli acutely modulate peripheral taste function.

    PubMed

    Kumarhia, Devaki; He, Lianying; McCluskey, Lynnette Phillips

    2016-06-01

    Inflammation-mediated changes in taste perception can affect health outcomes in patients, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In the present work, we hypothesized that proinflammatory cytokines directly modulate Na(+) transport in taste buds. To test this, we measured acute changes in Na(+) flux in polarized fungiform taste buds loaded with a Na(+) indicator dye. IL-1β elicited an amiloride-sensitive increase in Na(+) transport in taste buds. In contrast, TNF-α dramatically and reversibly decreased Na(+) flux in polarized taste buds via amiloride-sensitive and amiloride-insensitive Na(+) transport systems. The speed and partial amiloride sensitivity of these changes in Na(+) flux indicate that IL-1β and TNF-α modulate epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) function. A portion of the TNF-mediated decrease in Na(+) flux is also blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, although TNF-α further reduced Na(+) transport independently of both amiloride and capsazepine. We also assessed taste function in vivo in a model of infection and inflammation that elevates these and additional cytokines. In rats administered systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), CT responses to Na(+) were significantly elevated between 1 and 2 h after LPS treatment. Low, normally preferred concentrations of NaCl and sodium acetate elicited high response magnitudes. Consistent with this outcome, codelivery of IL-1β and TNF-α enhanced Na(+) flux in polarized taste buds. These results demonstrate that inflammation elicits swift changes in Na(+) taste function, which may limit salt consumption during illness. PMID:27009163

  9. Measurement of sodium fluorescein wash-in time constants in subjects with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, D K; Zhang, A; Magin, R L

    1997-01-01

    The authors developed a noninvasive two-channel dynamic dermofluorometer that can quantitatively follow the rapid skin wash-in kinetics of a fluorescent dye to provide an assessment of local skin perfusion. The dermofluorometer was tested in normal subjects and diabetic patients with and without peripheral vascular disease. After an intravenous injection of 1-2 mL of a 10% solution of sodium fluorescein (1.1-2.8 mg/kg), the fluorescent signal was monitored from two sites on the skin surfaces of the forearm and foot. A 3.2-mm-diameter glass fiberoptic bundle was used both to transmit the excitation light (489 nm) and to receive the fluorescent emission (517 nm). Dermofluorometer readings were recorded approximately every second for 10-15 minutes following the injection. The time course of the fluorescein signal intensity was fit to a single exponential curve characterized by a wash-in time constant. There was no significant difference in arm wash-in time constants. Foot wash-in time constants were increased in diabetic patients who had past histories of foot ulcers relative to diabetic patients without a history of foot ulcers (3.2 vs 1.6 min., p < 0.05). Foot wash-in time constants were decreased in diabetic patients who had active infected foot ulcers. This study demonstrates the ability of the dynamic dermofluorometer to measure wash-in constants that reflect the local skin perfusion in less than 15 minutes after a low intravenous dose of sodium fluorescein.

  10. Chronic Hindlimb Ischemia Impairs Functional Vasodilation and Vascular Reactivity in Mouse Feed Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Trevor R.; Struthers, Kyle R.; Kesler, Thomas J.; Yocum, Matthew D.; Kurjiaka, David T.; Hoying, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Vasodilation of lower leg arterioles is impaired in animal models of chronic peripheral ischemia. In addition to arterioles, feed arteries are a critical component of the vascular resistance network, accounting for as much as 50% of the pressure drop across the arterial circulation. Despite the critical importance of feed arteries in blood flow control, the impact of ischemia on feed artery vascular reactivity is unknown. At 14 days following unilateral resection of the femoral–saphenous artery–vein pair, functional vasodilation of the profunda femoris artery was severely impaired, 11 ± 9 versus 152 ± 22%. Although endothelial and smooth muscle-dependent vasodilation were both impaired in ischemic arteries compared to control arteries (Ach: 40 ± 14 versus 81 ± 11%, SNP: 43 ± 12 versus and 85 ± 11%), the responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were similar, implicating impaired smooth muscle-dependent vasodilation. Conversely, vasoconstriction responses to norepinephrine were not different between ischemic and control arteries, −68 ± 3 versus −66 ± 3%, indicating that smooth muscle cells were functional following the ischemic insult. Finally, maximal dilation responses to acetylcholine, ex vivo, were significantly impaired in the ischemic artery compared to control, 71 ± 9 versus 97 ± 2%, despite a similar generation of myogenic tone to the same intravascular pressure (80 mmHg). These data indicate that ischemia impairs feed artery vasodilation by impairing the responsiveness of the vascular wall to vasodilating stimuli. Future studies to examine the mechanistic basis for the impact of ischemia on vascular reactivity or treatment strategies to improve vascular reactivity following ischemia could provide the foundation for an alternative therapeutic paradigm for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. PMID:22164145

  11. Vascular function in health, hypertension, and diabetes: effect of physical activity on skeletal muscle microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, M; Gliemann, L; Hellsten, Y

    2015-12-01

    Regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow is a complex process, which involves an integration of multiple mechanisms and a number of vasoactive compounds. Overall, muscle blood flow is regulated through a balance between vasoconstrictor and vasodilator signals. In a healthy cardiovascular system, the increase in muscle blood flow required for oxygen supply during exercise is achieved through a substantial increase in vasodilators locally formed in the active muscle tissue that overcome the vasoconstrictor signals. Most of the vasodilator signals are mediated via endothelial cells, which lead to the formation of vasodilators such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin. In essential hypertension and type II diabetes, the endothelial function and regulation of vascular tone is impaired with consequent increases in peripheral vascular resistance and inadequate regulation of oxygen supply to the skeletal muscle, which can affect muscle function. Central aspects in the vascular impairments are alterations in the formation of prostacyclin, the bioavailability of NO and an increased formation of vasoconstrictors and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Regular physical activity effectively improves vascular function by enhancing vasodilator formation and reducing the levels of vasoconstrictors and ROS. PMID:26589119

  12. Macrophages in Vascular Inflammation: Origins and Functions.

    PubMed

    Decano, Julius L; Mattson, Peter C; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages influence various processes of cardiovascular inflammation. Whether they are of embryonic or post-natal hematopoietic origin, their balance in differential activation may direct the course of inflammation. Accelerated macrophage activation and accumulation through a pro-inflammatory signaling pathway may result in extensive tissue damage, adverse repair, and worsened clinical outcomes. Attenuation of such a mechanism and/or promotion of the anti-inflammatory macrophage activation may lead to early resolution of inflammation. Elucidating multiple novel mechanisms of monocyte and macrophage activation leads to a better understanding of their roles in vascular inflammation. In turn, this begets better therapeutic target identification and biomarker discovery. Combined with increasingly sensitive and specific imaging techniques, we continue to push back early detection and monitoring to provide us with a greater window for disease modification. The potential success of cytokine-targeted therapy will be solid proof of the inflammatory hypothesis of atherothrombosis. PMID:27125207

  13. Hybrid Therapy in Patients with Complex Peripheral Multifocal Steno-obstructive Vascular Disease: Two-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Cotroneo, Antonio Raffaele; Iezzi, Roberto Marano, Giuseppe; Fonio, Paolo; Nessi, Franco; Gandini, Giovanni

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. To report the 2-year results after hybrid (combined surgical-endovascular) therapy in patients with complex peripheral multifocal steno-obstructive vascular disease. Methods. From September 2001 through April 2003, 47 combined surgical-endovascular procedures were performed in a single session in 44 patients with peripheral occlusive artery disease. Although the common femoral artery is usually treated with open surgery, endoluminal procedures were performed upward in 23 patients (group A), distally in 18 patients (group B), and both upward and downward of the area treated with open surgery in 3 patients (group C). Patients underwent clinical assessment and color duplex ultrasonography examination at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after the procedure. Results. The technical success rate was 100%. Two patients died, at 2 and 19 months after treatment, respectively, both from myocardial infarction. Primary and primary-assisted patency rates were 86.2% and 90.8% at 6 months and 79.1% and 86.1% at 24 months, respectively. Thirty-three patients remained free of symptoms, without any secondary interventions, which corresponded to a primary patency rate of 78.6% (33 of 42). Conclusion. Combined therapy simplifies and allows the one-step treatment of patients with complex peripheral multifocal steno-obstructive vascular disease that has indications for revascularization, and it provides excellent long-term patency rates.

  14. Systemic vascular function is associated with muscular power in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-associated loss of muscular strength and muscular power are critical determinants of loss of physical function and progression to disability in older adults. In this study, we examined the association of systemic vascular function and measures of muscle strength and power in older adults. Measu...

  15. Functional Human Vascular Network Generated in Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Methacrylate Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Qi, Hao; Yang, Yunzhi; Bae, Hojae; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-05-23

    The generation of functional, 3D vascular networks is a fundamental prerequisite for the development of many future tissue engineering-based therapies. Current approaches in vascular network bioengineering are largely carried out using natural hydrogels as embedding scaffolds. However, most natural hydrogels present a poor mechanical stability and a suboptimal durability, which are critical limitations that hamper their widespread applicability. The search for improved hydrogels has become a priority in tissue engineering research. Here, the suitability of a photopolymerizable gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel to support human progenitor cell-based formation of vascular networks is demonstrated. Using GelMA as the embedding scaffold, it is shown that 3D constructs containing human blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) generate extensive capillary-like networks in vitro. These vascular structures contain distinct lumens that are formed by the fusion of ECFC intracellular vacuoles in a process of vascular morphogenesis. The process of vascular network formation is dependent on the presence of MSCs, which differentiate into perivascular cells occupying abluminal positions within the network. Importantly, it is shown that implantation of cell-laden GelMA hydrogels into immunodeficient mice results in a rapid formation of functional anastomoses between the bioengineered human vascular network and the mouse vasculature. Furthermore, it is shown that the degree of methacrylation of the GelMA can be used to modulate the cellular behavior and the extent of vascular network formation both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that GelMA hydrogels can be used for biomedical applications that require the formation of microvascular networks, including the development of complex engineered tissues.

  16. Dcc Mediates Functional Assembly of Peripheral Auditory Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young J.; Wang, Sheng-zhi; Tymanskyj, Stephen; Ma, Le; Tao, Huizhong W.; Zhang, Li I.

    2016-01-01

    Proper structural organization of spiral ganglion (SG) innervation is crucial for normal hearing function. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the developmental formation of this precise organization remain not well understood. Here, we report in the developing mouse cochlea that deleted in colorectal cancer (Dcc) contributes to the proper organization of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) within the Rosenthal’s canal and of SGN projections toward both the peripheral and central auditory targets. In Dcc mutant embryos, mispositioning of SGNs occurred along the peripheral auditory pathway with misrouted afferent fibers and reduced synaptic contacts with hair cells. The central auditory pathway simultaneously exhibited similar defective phenotypes as in the periphery with abnormal exit of SGNs from the Rosenthal’s canal towards central nuclei. Furthermore, the axons of SGNs ascending into the cochlear nucleus had disrupted bifurcation patterns. Thus, Dcc is necessary for establishing the proper spatial organization of SGNs and their fibers in both peripheral and central auditory pathways, through controlling axon targeting and cell migration. Our results suggest that Dcc plays an important role in the developmental formation of peripheral and central auditory circuits, and its mutation may contribute to sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:27040640

  17. Functional Integration of Acute Myeloid Leukemia into the Vascular Niche

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Ronald P.; Masri, Azzah Al; Clark, Hilary A.; Asbaghi, Steven A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Dunlap, Jennifer; Fan, Guang; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Liu, Qiuying; Meacham, Amy; Hamlin, Kimberly L.; Hromas, Robert A.; Scott, Edward W.; Fleming, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the hematopoietic microenvironment that regulates blood cell production. Recent studies suggest the existence of functional cross-talk between hematologic malignancies and vascular endothelium. Here, we show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) localizes to the vasculature in both patients and in a xenograft model. A significant number of vascular tissue-associated AML cells (V-AML) integrate into vasculature in vivo and can fuse with endothelial cells. V-AML cells acquire several endothelial cell-like characteristics, including the up-regulation of CD105, a receptor associated with activated endothelium. Remarkably, endothelial-integrated V-AML shows an almost 4-fold reduction in proliferative activity compared to non-vascular associated AML. Primary AML cells can be induced to down regulate the expression of their hematopoietic markers in vitro and differentiate into phenotypically and functionally-defined endothelial-like cells. After transplantation, these leukemia-derived endothelial cells are capable of giving rise to AML. Taken together, these novel functional interactions between AML cells and normal endothelium along with the reversible endothelial cell potential of AML suggest that vascular endothelium may serve as a previously unrecognized reservoir for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24637335

  18. [Search for Factors Related to Vascular Pain Expression upon Administration of Oxaliplatin into a Peripheral Vein].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Akiko; Yonemoto, Nao; Aoyama, Yuuya; Touma, Yuri; Kajiwara, Michiko; Watanabe, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Yoshiko; Koinuma, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between vascular pain and various characteristics (age, sex, cancer stage, performance status [PS], height, weight, body mass index [BMI], body surface area, oxaliplatin dose, and presence and absence of the initial administration of dexamethasone) in colorectal cancer patients who were administered initial doses of oxaliplatin intravenously. The study population included 29 patients treated at Higashi Totsuka Memorial Hospital between June 2010 and April 2014. One-way analysis of variance showed that vascular pain was significantly associated with weight (p=0.015), body surface area (p=0.013), and oxaliplatin doses (p=0.0026), where the significance level was p=0.05. Logistic regression analysis and the likelihood ratio test demonstrated that the likelihood of vascular pain increased with the increase in the oxaliplatin dose. According to the cut-off value of vascular pain determined using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, a single dose of oxaliplatin was determined to be 175 mg or more. According to the cut-off value established using the ROC analysis, a single dose of oxaliplatin at which vascular pain is expressed was determined to be 175 mg or more. At this dose, 13 patients complained of vascular pain and 8 did not. At doses less than 175 mg, none of the 8 patients complained of vascular pain. These results suggest that lowering the diluted concentration and reducing the infusion rate of intravenously administered oxaliplatin may reduce vascular pain.

  19. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  20. Silent myocardial ischemia and infarction in diabetics with peripheral vascular disease: Assessment by dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nesto, R.W.; Watson, F.S.; Kowalchuk, G.J.; Zarich, S.W.; Hill, T.; Lewis, S.M.; Lane, S.E. )

    1990-11-01

    We investigated the incidence of silent myocardial ischemia and infarction as assessed by dipyridamole thallium scintigraphy in 30 diabetic patients with peripheral vascular disease and without clinical suspicion of coronary artery disease. Seventeen patients (57%) had thallium abnormalities, with reversible thallium defects compatible with ischemia in 14 patients (47%) and evidence of prior, clinically silent myocardial infarction in 11 patients (37%). Thallium abnormalities were most frequent in patients with concomitant hypertension and cigarette smoking (p = 0.001). These results suggest that unsuspected coronary artery disease is common in this particular group of patients with diabetes mellitus.

  1. Catheter Securement Systems for Peripherally Inserted and Nontunneled Central Vascular Access Devices: Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Sutureless Device.

    PubMed

    Krenik, Karen M; Smith, Graham E; Bernatchez, Stéphanie F

    2016-01-01

    Sutureless catheter securement systems are intended to eliminate risks associated with sutures. The clinical acceptability of a novel system was investigated compared with the current method of securement for peripherally inserted central catheters (19 facilities using StatLock or sutures) or nontunneled central vascular access devices (3 facilities using StatLock or sutures or HubGuard + Sorbaview Shield). More than 94% of respondents rated the novel system as same, better, or much better than their current product. More than 82% of respondents were willing to replace their current system with the new one. PMID:27379679

  2. Engineering of human hepatic tissue with functional vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Takanori; Koike, Naoto; Sekine, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Ryoji; Amiya, Takeru; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Although absolute organ shortage highlights the needs of alternative organ sources for regenerative medicine, the generation of a three-dimensional (3D) and complex vital organ, such as well-vascularized liver, remains a challenge. To this end, tissue engineering holds great promise; however, this approach is significantly limited by the failure of early vascularization in vivo after implantation. Here, we established a stable 3D in vitro pre-vascularization platform to generate human hepatic tissue after implantation in vivo. Human fetal liver cells (hFLCs) were mixed with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and were implanted into a collagen/fibronectin matrix composite that was used as a 3-D carrier. After a couple of days, the fluorescent HUVECs developed premature vascular networks in vitro, which were stabilized by hMSCs. The establishment of functional vessels inside the pre-vascularized constructs was proven using dextran infusion studies after implantation under a transparency cranial window. Furthermore, dynamic morphological changes during embryonic liver cell maturation were intravitaly quantified with high-resolution confocal microscope analysis. The engineered human hepatic tissue demonstrated multiple liver-specific features, both structural and functional. Our new techniques discussed here can be implemented in future clinical uses and industrial uses, such as drug testing. PMID:24451152

  3. Engineering of human hepatic tissue with functional vascular networks

    PubMed Central

    Takebe, Takanori; Koike, Naoto; Sekine, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Ryoji; Amiya, Takeru; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Although absolute organ shortage highlights the needs of alternative organ sources for regenerative medicine, the generation of a three-dimensional (3D) and complex vital organ, such as well-vascularized liver, remains a challenge. To this end, tissue engineering holds great promise; however, this approach is significantly limited by the failure of early vascularization in vivo after implantation. Here, we established a stable 3D in vitro pre-vascularization platform to generate human hepatic tissue after implantation in vivo. Human fetal liver cells (hFLCs) were mixed with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and were implanted into a collagen/fibronectin matrix composite that was used as a 3-D carrier. After a couple of days, the fluorescent HUVECs developed premature vascular networks in vitro, which were stabilized by hMSCs. The establishment of functional vessels inside the pre-vascularized constructs was proven using dextran infusion studies after implantation under a transparency cranial window. Furthermore, dynamic morphological changes during embryonic liver cell maturation were intravitaly quantified with high-resolution confocal microscope analysis. The engineered human hepatic tissue demonstrated multiple liver-specific features, both structural and functional. Our new techniques discussed here can be implemented in future clinical uses and industrial uses, such as drug testing. PMID:24451152

  4. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sean X; Stevens, Jeff W; Lentz, Steven R

    2015-06-18

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis.

  5. Engineering of human hepatic tissue with functional vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Takanori; Koike, Naoto; Sekine, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Ryoji; Amiya, Takeru; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Although absolute organ shortage highlights the needs of alternative organ sources for regenerative medicine, the generation of a three-dimensional (3D) and complex vital organ, such as well-vascularized liver, remains a challenge. To this end, tissue engineering holds great promise; however, this approach is significantly limited by the failure of early vascularization in vivo after implantation. Here, we established a stable 3D in vitro pre-vascularization platform to generate human hepatic tissue after implantation in vivo. Human fetal liver cells (hFLCs) were mixed with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and were implanted into a collagen/fibronectin matrix composite that was used as a 3-D carrier. After a couple of days, the fluorescent HUVECs developed premature vascular networks in vitro, which were stabilized by hMSCs. The establishment of functional vessels inside the pre-vascularized constructs was proven using dextran infusion studies after implantation under a transparency cranial window. Furthermore, dynamic morphological changes during embryonic liver cell maturation were intravitaly quantified with high-resolution confocal microscope analysis. The engineered human hepatic tissue demonstrated multiple liver-specific features, both structural and functional. Our new techniques discussed here can be implemented in future clinical uses and industrial uses, such as drug testing.

  6. Role of Mitochondria in Cerebral Vascular Function: Energy Production, Cellular Protection, and Regulation of Vascular Tone.

    PubMed

    Busija, David W; Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V

    2016-06-13

    Mitochondria not only produce energy in the form of ATP to support the activities of cells comprising the neurovascular unit, but mitochondrial events, such as depolarization and/or ROS release, also initiate signaling events which protect the endothelium and neurons against lethal stresses via pre-/postconditioning as well as promote changes in cerebral vascular tone. Mitochondrial depolarization in vascular smooth muscle (VSM), via pharmacological activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels on the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP channels), leads to vasorelaxation through generation of calcium sparks by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and subsequent downstream signaling mechanisms. Increased release of ROS by mitochondria has similar effects. Relaxation of VSM can also be indirectly achieved via actions of nitric oxide (NO) and other vasoactive agents produced by endothelium, perivascular and parenchymal nerves, and astroglia following mitochondrial activation. Additionally, NO production following mitochondrial activation is involved in neuronal preconditioning. Cerebral arteries from female rats have greater mitochondrial mass and respiration and enhanced cerebral arterial dilation to mitochondrial activators. Preexisting chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and/or diabetes impair mitoKATP channel relaxation of cerebral arteries and preconditioning. Surprisingly, mitoKATP channel function after transient ischemia appears to be retained in the endothelium of large cerebral arteries despite generalized cerebral vascular dysfunction. Thus, mitochondrial mechanisms may represent the elusive signaling link between metabolic rate and blood flow as well as mediators of vascular change according to physiological status. Mitochondrial mechanisms are an important, but underutilized target for improving vascular function and decreasing brain injury in stroke patients. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1529-1548, 2016.

  7. Role of Mitochondria in Cerebral Vascular Function: Energy Production, Cellular Protection, and Regulation of Vascular Tone.

    PubMed

    Busija, David W; Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria not only produce energy in the form of ATP to support the activities of cells comprising the neurovascular unit, but mitochondrial events, such as depolarization and/or ROS release, also initiate signaling events which protect the endothelium and neurons against lethal stresses via pre-/postconditioning as well as promote changes in cerebral vascular tone. Mitochondrial depolarization in vascular smooth muscle (VSM), via pharmacological activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels on the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP channels), leads to vasorelaxation through generation of calcium sparks by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and subsequent downstream signaling mechanisms. Increased release of ROS by mitochondria has similar effects. Relaxation of VSM can also be indirectly achieved via actions of nitric oxide (NO) and other vasoactive agents produced by endothelium, perivascular and parenchymal nerves, and astroglia following mitochondrial activation. Additionally, NO production following mitochondrial activation is involved in neuronal preconditioning. Cerebral arteries from female rats have greater mitochondrial mass and respiration and enhanced cerebral arterial dilation to mitochondrial activators. Preexisting chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and/or diabetes impair mitoKATP channel relaxation of cerebral arteries and preconditioning. Surprisingly, mitoKATP channel function after transient ischemia appears to be retained in the endothelium of large cerebral arteries despite generalized cerebral vascular dysfunction. Thus, mitochondrial mechanisms may represent the elusive signaling link between metabolic rate and blood flow as well as mediators of vascular change according to physiological status. Mitochondrial mechanisms are an important, but underutilized target for improving vascular function and decreasing brain injury in stroke patients. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1529-1548, 2016. PMID:27347901

  8. Peripheral vascular response to inspiratory breath hold in paediatric homozygous sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    L’Esperance, Veline S; Cox, Sharon E; Simpson, David; Gill, Carolyn; Makani, Julie; Soka, Deogratias; Mgaya, Josephine; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clough, Geraldine F

    2013-01-01

    disease had a higher RBF (P= 0.005) and enhanced vasoconstrictor response to IBH (P= 0.002) compared with control children. In children with SS disease, higher RBF was associated with an increase in the sympathetic interval (r=−0.28, P= 0.022). The SS disease status, daytime and age explained 22% of the variance in vasoconstrictor response to IBH (P < 0.0001). Our findings suggest that blood flow and blood flow responses in the skin of young African children with SS disease differ from those of healthy control children, with increased resting peripheral blood flow and increased sympathetic stimulation from a young age in SS disease. They further suggest that the laser Doppler flowmetry technique with inspiratory breath hold manoeuvre appears to be robust for use in young children with SS disease, to explore interactions between , ABP and autonomic function with clinical complications, e.g. skin ulceration. PMID:22660812

  9. [Arsenous anhydride poisoning. Peripheral neuropathy and changes in cognitive functions].

    PubMed

    Danan, M; Conso, F; Dally, S; Bertaux, L; Chouraki, L; Balme, R

    1985-01-01

    The authors report the evolution over an 11 months period of a case of subacute intoxication with arsenic in a 30 years old woman. In addition to the classical peripheral neuropathy, we observed impairment of the superior neurological functions which improved together with the neuropathy. These malfunctions are rarely described in the literature although arsenic seems to cross the blood-brain barrier easily. There is no other explanation, and we believe arsenic to be responsible for these disturbances. We suggest systematic testing of the superior neurological functions in cases of arsenic intoxication.

  10. Potential benefits of exercise on blood pressure and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone; Ho, Suleen

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity seems to enhance cardiovascular fitness during the course of the lifecycle, improve blood pressure, and is associated with decreased prevalence of hypertension and coronary heart disease. It may also delay or prevent age-related increases in arterial stiffness. It is unclear if specific exercise types (aerobic, resistance, or combination) have a better effect on blood pressure and vascular function. This review was written based on previous original articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indexed on PubMed from years 1975 to 2012 to identify studies on different types of exercise and the associations or effects on blood pressure and vascular function. In summary, aerobic exercise (30 to 40 minutes of training at 60% to 85% of predicted maximal heart rate, most days of the week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure and reduce augmentation index. Resistance training (three to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions at 10 repetition maximum, 3 days a week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure, whereas combination exercise training (15 minutes of aerobic and 15 minutes of resistance, 5 days a week) is beneficial to vascular function, but at a lower scale. Aerobic exercise seems to better benefit blood pressure and vascular function.

  11. Vascular function in diabetic individuals in association with particulate matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to ambient air pollution has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular effects, especially in people with chronic diseases such as diabetes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the short-term effects of air pollution on vascular function in two pane...

  12. Abnormalities of vascular structure and function in pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Elaine M

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in adults. Measures of vascular structure and function, including increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and elevated arterial stiffness predict hard CV events in adulthood. Newer data suggest that abnormalities in target organ damage are occurring in adolescents and young adults with high blood pressure. In this review, we discuss the techniques for measuring vascular dysfunction in young people and the evidence linking blood pressure levels to this type of target organ damage.

  13. Distribution and function of peripheral alpha-adrenoceptors in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Ruffolo, R R

    1985-05-01

    alpha-Adrenoceptors may be subdivided based on their anatomical distribution within the synapse. Presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors are generally of the alpha 2-subtype and modulate neurotransmitter liberation via a negative feedback mechanism. Postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors are usually of the alpha 1-subtype and mediate the response of the effector organ. Although this "anatomical" subclassification is generally applicable, many exceptions exist. A more useful classification of alpha-adrenoceptor subtypes is based on a pharmacological characterization in which selective agonists and antagonists are used. Peripheral alpha-adrenoceptors are critical in the regulation of the cardiovascular system. Postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors in arteries and veins represent a mixed population of alpha 1/alpha 2-adrenoceptors, with both subtypes mediating vasoconstriction. In the peripheral arterial circulation, postsynaptic vascular alpha 1-adrenoceptors are found in the adrenergic neuroeffector junction, whereas postsynaptic vascular alpha 2-adrenoceptors are located extrajunctionally. In the venous circulation, it appears that alpha 2-adrenoceptors may be predominantly junctional, whereas alpha 1-adrenoceptors may be predominantly extrajunctional. It has been proposed that junctional alpha-adrenoceptors will respond predominantly to norepinephrine liberated from sympathetic neurons, whereas extrajunctional alpha-adrenoceptors likely respond to circulating catecholamines. The functional role of extrajunctional alpha-adrenoceptors may be more important in disease states such as hypertension and congestive heart failure where circulating levels of catecholamines may be high and contribute to the maintenance of elevated vascular resistance. alpha 2-Adrenoceptors are also associated with the intima and may play a role in the release of an endogenous relaxing factor from the endothelium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2989947

  14. Pressor response to intravenous tyramine is a marker of cardiac, but not vascular, adrenergic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Martin, David S.; D'Aunno, Dominick S.; Waters, Wendy W.

    2003-01-01

    Intravenous injections of the indirect sympathetic amine, tyramine, are used as a test of peripheral adrenergic function. The authors measured the time course of increases in ejection fraction, heart rate, systolic and diastolic pressure, popliteal artery flow, and greater saphenous vein diameter before and after an injection of 4.0 mg/m(2) body surface area of tyramine in normal human subjects. The tyramine caused moderate, significant increases in systolic pressure and significant decreases in total peripheral resistance. The earliest changes were a 30% increase in ejection fraction and a 16% increase in systolic pressure, followed by a 60% increase in popliteal artery flow and a later 11% increase in greater saphenous vein diameter. There were no changes in diastolic pressure or heart rate. These results suggest that pressor responses during tyramine injections are primarily due to an inotropic response that increases cardiac output and pressure and causes a reflex decrease in vascular resistance. Thus, tyramine pressor tests are a measure of cardiac, but not vascular, sympathetic function.

  15. Vascular Endothelial Function & Self-Reported Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Muskaan; Bliwise, Donald; Veledar, Emir; Cunningham, Lynn; Vazquez, Jennifer; Brigham, Kenneth; Quyyumi, Arshed

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the relationship between self-reported sleep characteristics and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in a community-based population. Prior studies document that sleep apnea may be related to endothelial dysfunction but disagree whether subjective reports of sleep may also reflect such associations. Methods In 684 subjects (32% male) between 37 and 60 years enrolled in the Emory-Georgia Tech Predictive Health Institute study, we measured reported sleep characteristics using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) along with cardiovascular risk factors. Endothelial function was assessed using brachial artery FMD. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to adjust for various cardiovascular risk factors including age, race, gender, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and body mass index. Results Lower brachial artery FMD values were correlated with higher ESS scores (p = 0.0275), even after adjustment for risk factors (p = 0.03). Total PSQI score was unrelated to brachial artery FMD. However, lower sleep quality (PSQI component 1) was associated with lower brachial artery FMD (multivariate p = 0.038), and participants who coughed or snored during sleep also had lower brachial artery FMD (6.24±3.42%) compared to those who did not (6.92±4.30%) (p = 0.056). This difference remained significant after adjustment for risk factors (p = 0.03). Conclusion In a community-based population, our analysis indicates a significant association between sleepiness and snoring assessed by questionnaires and endothelial function. Simple subjective reports about individuals’ sleep may be highly revealing indicators of endothelial function impairment and thus important indicators of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:23842206

  16. Mortality After Nontraumatic Major Amputation Among Patients With Diabetes and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Thorud, Jakob C; Plemmons, Britton; Buckley, Clifford J; Shibuya, Naohiro; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    High mortality rates have been reported after major amputations of a lower limb secondary to diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. However, the mortality rates have varied across studies. A systematic review of the 5-year mortality after nontraumatic major amputations of the lower extremity was conducted. A data search was performed of Medline using OVID, CINHAL, and Cochrane, 365 abstracts were screened, and 79 full text articles were assessed for eligibility. After review, 31 studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Overall, the 5-year mortality rate was very high among patients with any amputation (major and minor combined), ranging from 53% to 100%, and in patients with major amputations, ranging from 52% to 80%. Mortality after below-the-knee amputation ranged from 40% to 82% and after above-the-knee amputation from 40% to 90%. The risk factors for increased mortality included age, renal disease, proximal amputation, and peripheral vascular disease. Although our previous systematic review of the 5-year mortality after ulceration had much lower rates of death, additional studies are warranted to determine whether amputation hastens death or is a marker for underlying disease severity.

  17. Vascular Tree Reconstruction by Minimizing A Physiological Functional Cost

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yifeng; Zhuang, Zhenwu; Sinusas, Albert J.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2011-01-01

    The reconstruction of complete vascular trees from medical images has many important applications. Although vessel detection has been extensively investigated, little work has been done on how connect the results to reconstruct the full trees. In this paper, we propose a novel theoretical framework for automatic vessel connection, where the automation is achieved by leveraging constraints from the physiological properties of the vascular trees. In particular, a physiological functional cost for the whole vascular tree is derived and an efficient algorithm is developed to minimize it. The method is generic and can be applied to different vessel detection/segmentation results, e.g. the classic rigid detection method as adopted in this paper. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method on both 2D and 3D data. PMID:21755061

  18. Involvement of central and peripheral histamine H(3) receptors in the control of the vascular tone and oxygen uptake in the mesenteric circulation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Obuchowicz, R; Pawlik, M W; Brzozowski, T; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W

    2004-03-01

    Data concerning cardiovascular effects of peripherally and centrally located histamine H(3) receptor stimulation are contradictory, and despite excessive studies their role in the control of the cardiovascular function have not been cleared yet. Effect of histamine H(3) receptors activation have been attributed to modulation of sympathetic system activity but exact role of peripherally and centrally located histamine H(3) receptors stimulation in the modulation of vascular tone of the mesentery and intestinal metabolism remains unexplored. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of centrally and peripherally located histamine H(3) receptors in the modulation of vascular tone of the mesentery and metabolic activity of intestinal tissue. In anesthetized rats total mesenteric blood flow (MBF), mucosal intestinal blood flow (LDBF), intestinal oxygen uptake (VO(2)) and arterial pressure (AP) were determined. Intestinal arterial conductance (C) was also calculated. Administration of the selective histamine H(3) receptor agonist imetit (10 micromol/kg i.a) evoked marked changes in hemodynamic and metabolic parameters; MBF, LDBF, C and VO(2) were significantly increased, whereas AP was significantly decreased. Pretreatment with histamine H(3) receptor antagonist clobenpropit (4 micromol/kg i.a.) abolished imetit-induced circulatory and oxygen uptake responses. Clobenpropit (4 micromol/kg i.a.) alone failed to affect the MBF, LDBF, AP, C and VO(2) values. Central administration of imetit (0.1 micromol i.c.v.) markedly increased AP and decreased MBF, LDBF, C and VO(2). Pretreatment with histamine H(3) receptor antagonist clobenpropit (0,4 micromol i.c.v.) diminished circulatory and metabolic responses to centrally injected imetit. Central histamine H(3) receptors blockade by clobenpropit evoked no significant changes in the mesenteric arterial and mucosal microcirculatory blood flow, intestinal metabolism and mean arterial pressure. We conclude that, peripheral

  19. A Novel Protective Function of 5-Methoxytryptophan in Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yen-Chun; Wu, Meng-Ling; Su, Chen-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Huang; Ho, Hua-Hui; Lee, Guan-Lin; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Lin, Wen-Yu; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Wu, Kenneth K.; Yet, Shaw-Fang

    2016-01-01

    5-Methoxytryptophan (5-MTP), a 5-methoxyindole metabolite of tryptophan metabolism, was recently shown to suppress inflammatory mediator-induced cancer cell proliferation and migration. However, the role of 5-MTP in vascular disease is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether 5-MTP protects against vascular remodeling following arterial injury. Measurements of serum 5-MTP levels in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) showed that serum 5-MTP concentrations were inversely correlated with CAD. To test the role of 5-MTP in occlusive vascular disease, we subjected mice to a carotid artery ligation model of neointima formation and treated mice with vehicle or 5-MTP. Compared with vehicle-treated mice, 5-MTP significantly reduced intimal thickening by 40% 4 weeks after ligation. BrdU incorporation assays revealed that 5-MTP significantly reduced VSMC proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, 5-MTP reduced endothelial loss and detachment, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the ligated arterial wall, suggesting attenuation of endothelial dysfunction. Signaling pathway analysis indicated that 5-MTP mediated its effects predominantly via suppressing p38 MAPK signaling in endothelial and VSMCs. Our data demonstrate a novel vascular protective function of 5-MTP against arterial injury-induced intimal hyperplasia. 5-MTP might be a therapeutic target for preventing and/or treating vascular remodeling. PMID:27146795

  20. The plant vascular system: evolution, development and functions.

    PubMed

    Lucas, William J; Groover, Andrew; Lichtenberger, Raffael; Furuta, Kaori; Yadav, Shri-Ram; Helariutta, Ykä; He, Xin-Qiang; Fukuda, Hiroo; Kang, Julie; Brady, Siobhan M; Patrick, John W; Sperry, John; Yoshida, Akiko; López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Grusak, Michael A; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of the tracheophyte-based vascular system of land plants had major impacts on the evolution of terrestrial biology, in general, through its role in facilitating the development of plants with increased stature, photosynthetic output, and ability to colonize a greatly expanded range of environmental habitats. Recently, considerable progress has been made in terms of our understanding of the developmental and physiological programs involved in the formation and function of the plant vascular system. In this review, we first examine the evolutionary events that gave rise to the tracheophytes, followed by analysis of the genetic and hormonal networks that cooperate to orchestrate vascular development in the gymnosperms and angiosperms. The two essential functions performed by the vascular system, namely the delivery of resources (water, essential mineral nutrients, sugars and amino acids) to the various plant organs and provision of mechanical support are next discussed. Here, we focus on critical questions relating to structural and physiological properties controlling the delivery of material through the xylem and phloem. Recent discoveries into the role of the vascular system as an effective long-distance communication system are next assessed in terms of the coordination of developmental, physiological and defense-related processes, at the whole-plant level. A concerted effort has been made to integrate all these new findings into a comprehensive picture of the state-of-the-art in the area of plant vascular biology. Finally, areas important for future research are highlighted in terms of their likely contribution both to basic knowledge and applications to primary industry.

  1. BP and Vascular Function Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Chapman, Justin; Xue, Hong; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Roullet, Jean-Baptiste; Phanouvong, Thongchanh; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Otsuka, Keiichi; McCarron, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Blood pressure and mesenteric resistance artery function were assessed in 9-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats following an 18 day shuttle flight on STS-80. Blood pressure was measured twice, first in conscious animals using a tail-cuff method and then while the animals were anesthetized with 2% halothane in O2. Isolated mesenteric resistance artery responses to cumulative additions of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and calcium were measured within 17 hours of landing using wire myography. Blood pressure was slightly reduced in conscious animals following flight (p=0.056) but was significantly elevated (p less than.001) above vivarium control group values in anesthetized animals. Maximal contraction of mesenteric arteries to norepinephrine was attenuated in the flight animals (p less than.001)aswasrelaxationtoacetylcholine(p less than .001)andcalcium(p less than .05). There was no difference between flight and control animals in the vessel response to sodium nitroprusside (p greater than .05). The results suggest that there may have been an increase in synthesis and release of nitric oxide in the flight animals.

  2. Comparison of peripheral endothelial function in shift versus nonshift workers.

    PubMed

    Suessenbacher, Alois; Potocnik, Miriam; Dörler, Jakob; Fluckinger, Gabriele; Wanitschek, Maria; Pachinger, Otmar; Frick, Matthias; Alber, Hannes F

    2011-03-15

    Shift working is related to increased cardiovascular morbidity. Peripheral endothelial dysfunction, an inherent feature of early atherosclerosis, has been suggested as a surrogate marker of cardiovascular risk. Whether shift working is associated with peripheral endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated to date. A total of 48 male shift workers (SWs) and 47 male nonshift workers (NSWs) (mean age 43 ± 5 years) were recruited from a glass manufactory. The SWs and NSWs were matched according to age, body mass index, smoking habits, family history of premature coronary artery disease, prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, and work place. Their sport habits were also documented. Peripheral endothelial function was assessed using the EndoPAT technique to determine the peripheral arterial tone (PAT) index. According to the study design, no difference was found in the risk factor profiles between the SWs and NSWs. Despite a greater percentage of regular physical activity among the SWs (16.7 vs 4.3%, p = 0.05), shift working was associated with a reduced PAT index compared to working only on the day shift (PAT index 1.73 ± 0.4 vs 1.94 ± 0.5, p = 0.03). In the NSW group, the participants with regular physical training (n = 16) had a greater PAT index than those without regular physical activity (n = 12; PAT index 2.28 ± 0.45 vs 1.86 ± 0.51, p = 0.03). No such difference was found in the SWs. In conclusion, SWs had a reduced PAT index compared with NSWs, suggesting endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, the known increased cardiovascular risk in those shift working might be related to endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Oral nitrite therapy improves vascular function in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Sindler, Amy L; Cox-York, Kimberly; Reese, Lauren; Bryan, Nathan S; Seals, Douglas R; Gentile, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    Aim We tested the hypothesis that short-term oral sodium nitrite supplementation would improve vascular dysfunction in obese, diabetic mice. Methods and results Vascular function was determined in control mice and in db/db mice receiving drinking water with or without sodium nitrite (50 mg/L) for 5 weeks. Nitrite supplementation increased plasma nitrite concentrations in db/db mice (0.19±0.02 μM vs 0.80±0.26μM; p < 0.05). Db/db mice had lower endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) in response to increasing doses of acetylcholine versus heterozygous control mice (71.2% ± 14.3% vs 93% ± 7.0%; p < 0.05), and sodium nitrite supplementation restored endothelium-dependent dilation to control levels (92.9% ± 2.3% vs 93% ± 7.0%; p < 0.05). The improvement in endothelial function was accompanied by a reduction in intrinsic stiffness, but not by alterations in plasma or vascular markers of inflammation. Conclusion These data suggest that sodium nitrite may be a novel therapy for treating diabetes-related vascular dysfunction; however, the mechanisms of improvement are unknown. PMID:25696116

  4. Bioelectric impact of pathological angiogenesis on vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Puro, Donald G.; Kohmoto, Ryohsuke; Fujita, Yasushi; Gardner, Thomas W.; Padovani-Claudio, Dolly A.

    2016-01-01

    Pathological angiogenesis, as seen in many inflammatory, immune, malignant, and ischemic disorders, remains an immense health burden despite new molecular therapies. It is likely that further therapeutic progress requires a better understanding of neovascular pathophysiology. Surprisingly, even though transmembrane voltage is well known to regulate vascular function, no previous bioelectric analysis of pathological angiogenesis has been reported. Using the perforated-patch technique to measure vascular voltages in human retinal neovascular specimens and rodent models of retinal neovascularization, we discovered that pathological neovessels generate extraordinarily high voltage. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that voltage from aberrantly located preretinal neovascular complexes is transmitted into the intraretinal vascular network. With extensive neovascularization, this voltage input is substantial and boosts the membrane potential of intraretinal blood vessels to a suprahyperpolarized level. Coincident with this suprahyperpolarization, the vasomotor response to hypoxia is fundamentally altered. Instead of the compensatory dilation observed in the normal retina, arterioles constrict in response to an oxygen deficiency. This anomalous vasoconstriction, which would potentiate hypoxia, raises the possibility that the bioelectric impact of neovascularization on vascular function is a previously unappreciated pathophysiological mechanism to sustain hypoxia-driven angiogenesis. PMID:27551068

  5. Quantitative objective assessment of peripheral nociceptive C fibre function.

    PubMed Central

    Parkhouse, N; Le Quesne, P M

    1988-01-01

    A technique is described for the quantitative assessment of peripheral nociceptive C fibre function by measurement of the axon reflex flare. Acetylcholine, introduced by electrophoresis, is used to stimulate a ring of nociceptive C fibre endings at the centre of which the increase in blood flow is measured with a laser Doppler flowmeter. This flare (neurogenic vasodilatation) has been compared with mechanically or chemically stimulated non-neurogenic cutaneous vasodilation. The flare is abolished by local anaesthetic and is absent in denervated skin. The flare has been measured on the sole of the foot of 96 healthy subjects; its size decreases with age in males, but not in females. Images PMID:3351528

  6. Enzymatic regulation of functional vascular networks using gelatin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chia-Hui; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Tien, Han-Wen; Chu, Ya-Chun; Li, Yen-Cheng; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Chen, Ying-Chieh

    2015-06-01

    To manufacture tissue engineering-based functional tissues, scaffold materials that can be sufficiently vascularized to mimic the functionality and complexity of native tissues are needed. Currently, vascular network bioengineering is largely carried out using natural hydrogels as embedding scaffolds, but most natural hydrogels have poor mechanical stability and durability, factors that critically limit their widespread use. In this study, we examined the suitability of gelatin-phenolic hydroxyl (gelatin-Ph) hydrogels that can be enzymatically crosslinked, allowing tuning of the storage modulus and the proteolytic degradation rate, for use as injectable hydrogels to support the human progenitor cell-based formation of a stable and mature vascular network. Porcine gelatin-Ph hydrogels were found to be cytocompatible with human blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells and white adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in >87% viability, and cell proliferation and spreading could be modulated by using hydrogels with different proteolytic degradability and stiffness. In addition, gelatin was extracted from mouse dermis and murine gelatin-Ph hydrogels were prepared. Importantly, implantation of human cell-laden porcine or murine gelatin-Ph hydrogels into immunodeficient mice resulted in the rapid formation of functional anastomoses between the bioengineered human vascular network and the mouse vasculature. Furthermore, the degree of enzymatic crosslinking of the gelatin-Ph hydrogels could be used to modulate cell behavior and the extent of vascular network formation in vivo. Our report details a technique for the synthesis of gelatin-Ph hydrogels from allogeneic or xenogeneic dermal skin and suggests that these hydrogels can be used for biomedical applications that require the formation of microvascular networks, including the development of complex engineered tissues.

  7. Enzymatic regulation of functional vascular networks using gelatin hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chia-Hui; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Tien, Han-Wen; Chu, Ya-Chun; Li, Yen-Cheng; Melero-Martin, Juan M.; Chen, Ying-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    To manufacture tissue engineering-based functional tissues, scaffold materials that can be sufficiently vascularized to mimic the functionality and complexity of native tissues are needed. Currently, vascular network bioengineering is largely carried out using natural hydrogels as embedding scaffolds, but most natural hydrogels have poor mechanical stability and durability, factors that critically limit their widespread use. In this study, we examined the suitability of gelatin-phenolic hydroxyl (gelatin-Ph) hydrogels that can be enzymatically crosslinked, allowing tuning of the storage modulus and the proteolytic degradation rate, for use as injectable hydrogels to support the human progenitor cell-based formation of a stable and mature vascular network. Porcine gelatin-Ph hydrogels were found to be cytocompatible with human blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells and white adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in >87% viability, and cell proliferation and spreading could be modulated by using hydrogels with different proteolytic degradability and stiffness. In addition, gelatin was extracted from mouse dermis and murine gelatin-Ph hydrogels were prepared. Importantly, implantation of human cell-laden porcine or murine gelatin-Ph hydrogels into immunodeficient mice resulted in the rapid formation of functional anastomoses between the bioengineered human vascular network and the mouse vasculature. Furthermore, the degree of enzymatic crosslinking of the gelatin-Ph hydrogels could be used to modulate cell behavior and the extent of vascular network formation in vivo. Our report details a technique for the synthesis of gelatin-Ph hydrogels from allogeneic or xenogeneic dermal skin and suggests that these hydrogels can be used for biomedical applications that require the formation of microvascular networks, including the development of complex engineered tissues. PMID:25749296

  8. Vascular dilatory functions of ovo-lactovegetarians compared with omnivores.

    PubMed

    Lin, C L; Fang, T C; Gueng, M K

    2001-09-01

    Vegetarians have lower blood pressure and lower cardiovascular mortality. Vegetarian diets may have lower cardiovascular risks through positive influence on endothelium-dependent relaxation and related functions. The objectives of this study were to assess the differences of vascular dilatory functions between middle-aged vegetarians and sex and age-matched omnivores before they develop any clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis. Twenty healthy vegetarians over the age of 50 and 20 healthy omnivores over the age of 50 were recruited for this study. Subjects with known risk factors for atherosclerosis such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hypercholesteremia, cigarette smoking, family history of vascular diseases, or taking any regular medication were excluded. Medical history, body weight, height, and duration of vegetarian diet were recorded. Baseline CBC, urinalysis and biochemical data such as fasting blood glucose, thyroid function, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium and magnesium), lipid profiles [total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol] were obtained after a 14 h fast. Blood pressures and heart rate were recorded in supine position. Vascular dilatory functions, both flow-mediated (endothelium-dependent) and nitroglycerin-induced (endothelium-independent), were evaluated by using a non-invasive ultrasonographic method. The results show that there were no significant differences in the baseline characteristic between the vegetarians and the omnivores. There were also no significant differences in serum glucose, lipid profiles and thyroid function between these two groups. However, vasodilatation responses (both flow-mediated and nitroglycerin-induced) were significantly better in the vegetarian group and the degree of vasodilatation appeared to be correlated with years on vegetarian diets. Our findings suggest that

  9. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans.

  10. Short-term Physical Inactivity Impairs Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Nosova, Emily V.; Yen, Priscilla; Chong, Karen C.; Alley, Hugh F.; Stock, Eveline O.; Quinn, Alex; Hellmann, Jason; Conte, Michael S.; Owens, Christopher D.; Spite, Matthew; Grenon, S. Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sedentarism, also termed physical inactivity, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Mechanisms thought to be involved include insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and increased inflammation. It is unknown whether changes in vascular and endothelial function also contribute to this excess risk. We hypothesized that short-term exposure to inactivity would lead to endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and increased vascular inflammation. Methods Five healthy subjects (4 males and 1 female) underwent 5 days of bed rest (BR) to simulate inactivity. Measurements of vascular function [flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) to evaluate endothelial function; applanation tonometry to assess arterial resistance], inflammation and metabolism were made before BR, daily during BR and after 2 recovery days. Subjects maintained an isocaloric diet throughout. Results Bed rest led to significant decreases in brachial artery and femoral artery FMD [Brachial: 11 ± 3% pre-BR vs. 9 ± 2% end-BR, P=0.04; Femoral: 4 ± 1% vs. 2 ± 1%, P=0.04]. The central augmentation index increased with BR [−4 ± 9% vs. 5 ± 11%, P=0.03]. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) increased [58 ± 7 mmHg vs. 62 ± 7 mmHg, P=0.02], while neither systolic blood pressure nor heart rate changed. 15-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite, increased but the other inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers were unchanged. Conclusions Our findings show that acute exposure to sedentarism results in decreased endothelial function, arterial stiffening, increased DBP, and an increase in 15-HETE. We speculate that inactivity promotes a vascular “deconditioning” state characterized by impaired endothelial function, leading to arterial stiffness and increased arterial tone. Although physiologically significant, the underlying mechanisms and clinical relevance of these findings need to be further explored. PMID:24630521

  11. A biomaterials approach to peripheral nerve regeneration: bridging the peripheral nerve gap and enhancing functional recovery

    PubMed Central

    Daly, W.; Yao, L.; Zeugolis, D.; Windebank, A.; Pandit, A.

    2012-01-01

    Microsurgical techniques for the treatment of large peripheral nerve injuries (such as the gold standard autograft) and its main clinically approved alternative—hollow nerve guidance conduits (NGCs)—have a number of limitations that need to be addressed. NGCs, in particular, are limited to treating a relatively short nerve gap (4 cm in length) and are often associated with poor functional recovery. Recent advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering approaches are seeking to overcome the limitations associated with these treatment methods. This review critically discusses the advances in biomaterial-based NGCs, their limitations and where future improvements may be required. Recent developments include the incorporation of topographical guidance features and/or intraluminal structures, which attempt to guide Schwann cell (SC) migration and axonal regrowth towards their distal targets. The use of such strategies requires consideration of the size and distribution of these topographical features, as well as a suitable surface for cell–material interactions. Likewise, cellular and molecular-based therapies are being considered for the creation of a more conductive nerve microenvironment. For example, hurdles associated with the short half-lives and low stability of molecular therapies are being surmounted through the use of controlled delivery systems. Similarly, cells (SCs, stem cells and genetically modified cells) are being delivered with biomaterial matrices in attempts to control their dispersion and to facilitate their incorporation within the host regeneration process. Despite recent advances in peripheral nerve repair, there are a number of key factors that need to be considered in order for these new technologies to reach the clinic. PMID:22090283

  12. Nitrites derived from Foneiculum vulgare (fennel) seeds promotes vascular functions.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Akila; Sridhara, Sree Rama Chaitanya; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Siamwala, Jamila H; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-12-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that nitrites play an important role in the cardiovascular system. Fennel (Foneiculum vulgare) seeds are often used as mouth fresheners after a meal in both the Indian sub-continent and around the world. The present study aims to quantify the nitrite and nitrates in fennel seeds as well as elucidating the effect of fennel derived-nitrites on vascular functions. Results from our study show that fennel seeds contain significantly higher amount of nitrites when compared to other commonly used post-meal seeds. Furthermore our study confirmed the functional effects of fennel derived-nitrites using in vitro and ex vivo models that describe the promotion of angiogenesis, cell migration, and vasorelaxation. We also showed that chewing fennel seeds enhanced nitrite content of saliva. Thus our study indicates the potential role of fennel derived-nitrites on the vascular system.

  13. Microsecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma stimulation of tissue macrophages for treatment of peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, V. Lin, A.; Brettschneider, J.; Fridman, G.; Fridman, A.; Kako, F.; Gabunia, K.; Kelemen, S.; Autieri, M.

    2015-12-15

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels and normally occurs during the process of inflammatory reactions, wound healing, tissue repair, and restoration of blood flow after injury or insult. Stimulation of angiogenesis is a promising and an important step in the treatment of peripheral artery disease. Reactive oxygen species have been shown to be involved in stimulation of this process. For this reason, we have developed and validated a non-equilibrium atmospheric temperature and pressure short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma system, which can non-destructively generate reactive oxygen species and other active species at the surface of the tissue being treated. We show that this plasma treatment stimulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and CXCL 1 that in turn induces angiogenesis in mouse aortic rings in vitro. This effect may be mediated by the direct effect of plasma generated reactive oxygen species on tissue.

  14. Microsecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma stimulation of tissue macrophages for treatment of peripheral vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V.; Lin, A.; Kako, F.; Gabunia, K.; Kelemen, S.; Brettschneider, J.; Fridman, G.; Fridman, A.; Autieri, M.

    2015-12-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels and normally occurs during the process of inflammatory reactions, wound healing, tissue repair, and restoration of blood flow after injury or insult. Stimulation of angiogenesis is a promising and an important step in the treatment of peripheral artery disease. Reactive oxygen species have been shown to be involved in stimulation of this process. For this reason, we have developed and validated a non-equilibrium atmospheric temperature and pressure short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma system, which can non-destructively generate reactive oxygen species and other active species at the surface of the tissue being treated. We show that this plasma treatment stimulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and CXCL 1 that in turn induces angiogenesis in mouse aortic rings in vitro. This effect may be mediated by the direct effect of plasma generated reactive oxygen species on tissue.

  15. Gender Differences in Bed Rest: Preliminary Analysis of Vascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Martin, David S.; Freeman-Perez, Sondra A.; Phillips, Tiffany; Ribeiro, L. Christine

    2008-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a recognized consequence of spaceflight. Numerous studies have shown that women are more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight as well as bed rest, the most commonly used ground-based analog for spaceflight. One of the possible mechanisms proposed to account for this is a difference in vascular responsiveness between genders. We hypothesized that women and men would have differing vascular responses to 90 days of 6-degree head down tilt bed rest. Additionally, we hypothesized that vessels in the upper and lower body would respond differently, as has been shown in the animal literature. Thirteen subjects were placed in bedrest for 90 days (8 men, 5 women) at the Flight Analogs Unit, UTMB. Direct arterial and venous measurements were made with ultrasound to evaluate changes in vascular structure and function. Arterial function was assessed, in the arm and leg, during a reactive hyperemia protocol and during sublingual nitroglycerin administration to gauge the contributions of endothelial dependent and independent dilator function respectively. Venous function was assessed in dorsal hand and foot veins during the administration of pharmaceuticals to assess constrictor and dilator function. Both gender and day effects are seen in arterial dilator function to reactive hyperemia, but none are seen with nitroglycerin. There are also differences in the wall thickness in the arm vs the leg during bed rest, which return toward pre-bed rest levels by day 90. More subjects are required, especially females as there is not sufficient power to properly analyze venous function. Day 90 data are most underpowered.

  16. Impaired Right Ventricular-Pulmonary Vascular Function in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Emir C.; Park, Margaret M.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Thomas, James D.; Asosingh, Kewal; Kalaycio, Matt; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Farha, Samar

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased bone marrow hemangioblast numbers, alterations in erythroid/myeloid lineages, increased reticulin, and greater circulating bone marrow progenitor cells are present in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The data suggest that myeloid progenitors contribute to the pathogenesis of PAH, but there is little data on prevalence of pulmonary vascular disease among different forms of myeloid diseases. We hypothesized that there would be a higher prevalence of pulmonary vascular disease in myeloproliferative neoplasms that have high circulating progenitor cells, such as myelofibrosis and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), as compared to those with low circulating progenitors, as in aplastic anemia. Methods Patients with myelofibrosis, CML and aplastic anemia who underwent echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac function in preparation for bone marrow transplantation at the Cleveland Clinic between 1997–2012 were identified using electronic medical records for demographic data, blood cell counts, and pulmonary function tests. All echocardiograms were uniformly analyzed in a blinded fashion by an advanced sonographer and cardiologist for measures of right and left ventricular function and estimation of pulmonary vascular disease. Results Gender and race distribution between disease groups were similar. Myelofibrosis [N=19] and aplastic anemia [N=30] had increased right ventricle (RV) wall thickness compared to CML [N=82] [RV Thickness (cm): aplastic anemia 0.7 ± 0.1, CML 0.5 ± 0.1 and myelofibrosis 0.7 ± 0.1; p = 0.02]. Patients with myelofibrosis had higher levels of estimated RV systolic pressure as compared to the other groups [RVSP (mmHg): aplastic anemia 29.9 ± 1.5, CML 26.2 ± 1.1 and myelofibrosis 36.7 ± 3.7; p < 0.01]. Conclusion The findings suggest an important role for myeloid progenitors in maintenance of pulmonary-vascular health, in which abnormal myeloproliferative progenitors are associated with right ventricle

  17. Women With Peripheral Arterial Disease Experience Faster Functional Decline Than Men With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Liu, Kiang; Guralnik, Jack M.; Tian, Lu; Kibbe, Melina; Liao, Yihua; Tao, Huimin; Criqui, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that women with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) would have greater mobility loss and faster functional decline than men with PAD. Background Whether rates of mobility loss or functional decline differ between men and women with PAD is currently unknown. Methods Three hundred eighty men and women with PAD completed the 6-min walk, were assessed for mobility disability, and underwent measures of 4-m walking velocity at baseline and annually for up to 4 years. Computed tomography-assessed calf muscle characteristics were measured biannually. Outcomes included becoming unable to walk for 6 min continuously among participants who walked continuously for 6 min at baseline. Mobility loss was defined as becoming unable to walk for a quarter mile or to walk up and down 1 flight of stairs without assistance among those without baseline mobility disability. Results were adjusted for age, race, body mass index, physical activity, the ankle brachial index, comorbidities, and other confounders. Results At 4 years of follow-up, women were more likely to become unable to walk for 6 min continuously (hazard ratio: 2.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 4.06, p = 0.004), more likely to develop mobility disability (hazard ratio: 1.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 3.03, p = 0.030), and had faster declines in walking velocity (p = 0.022) and the distance achieved in the 6-min walk (p = 0.041) compared with men. Sex differences in functional decline were attenuated after additional adjustment for baseline sex differences in calf muscle area. Conclusions Women with PAD have faster functional decline and greater mobility loss than men with PAD. These sex differences may be attributable to smaller baseline calf muscle area among women with PAD. PMID:21292130

  18. Percutaneous Treatment of Peripheral Vascular Malformations in Children: Long-Term Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Edwin van der; Otoide-Vree, Marleen; Pattynama, Peter M. T.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the rate of complications and clinical failure at 3 and 12 months after percutaneous treatment of vascular malformations in children. Furthermore, we describe patient satisfaction of treatment results during 5 years of follow-up. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, we evaluated 26 patients younger than aged 19 years who were treated for symptomatic vascular malformations. Data on treatment outcomes and patient satisfactions were obtained with a precoded structured questionnaire. Patient files and imaging data were retrieved to obtain information regarding the vascular malformations and treatment. Clinical success was defined as disappearance or partial improvement of the complaints. Patient satisfaction was declared whenever patients answered in the questionnaire that they were satisfied with the treatment results. Results: Of 26 eligible patients, we included 23 (88%). The mean follow-up was 36 (range, 15-127) months. Posttreatment, 87% (20/23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 66-97%) of patients reported clinical success at 3 months. At 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years of follow-up this percentage was 74%, 59%, 59%, 59%, and 59%, respectively. Eleven (48%, 95% CI 27-69%) patients had experienced complications and 22% (95% CI 7-44%) had major complications, of which 5 had required additional treatment. In all, 83% (19/23) of the patients reported satisfaction with the treatment. Conclusions: Percutaneous treatment of vascular malformations improved clinical symptoms in 87% of the patients at 3 months and were sustainable for half of all patients during a 5-year follow-up period. However, major complications were seen in 22%.

  19. Clinical Trials in Peripheral Vascular Disease: Pipeline and Trial Designs: An Evaluation of the ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    PubMed Central

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R.; Chiswell, Karen; Tidemann-Miller, Beth A.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Conte, Michael S.; White, Christopher J.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Laird, John R.; Hiatt, William R.; Tasneem, Asba; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tremendous advances have occurred in therapies for peripheral vascular disease (PVD); however, until recently it has not been possible to examine the entire clinical trial portfolio of studies for treatment of PVD (both arterial and venous disease). Methods and Results We examined interventional trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov from October 2007 through September 2010 (n=40,970) and identified 676 (1.7%) PVD trials (n=493 arterial only, n=170 venous only, n=13 both arterial and venous). Most arterial studies investigated lower extremity peripheral artery disease and acute stroke (35% and 24%, respectively), while most venous studies examined deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prevention (42%) or venous ulceration (25%). A placebo-controlled trial design was used in 27% of the PVD trials, and 4% of the PVD trials excluded patients aged >65 years. Enrollment in at least 1 US site decreased from 51% in 2007 to 41% of trials in 2010. Compared with non-cardiology disciplines, PVD trials were more likely to be double-blinded, investigate use of devices and procedures, and have industry sponsorship and assumed funding source, and less likely to investigate drug and behavioral therapies. Geographic access to PVD clinical trials within the United States is limited to primarily large metropolitan areas. Conclusions PVD studies represent a small group of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, despite the high prevalence of vascular disease in the general population. This low number, compounded by the decreasing number of PVD trials in the United States, is concerning and may limit the ability to inform current clinical practice of patients with PVD. PMID:25239436

  20. Sustained release nitrite therapy results in myocardial protection in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome with peripheral vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jessica M.; Islam, Kazi N.; Polhemus, David J.; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P.; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Goodchild, Traci T.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) reduces endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and exacerbates vascular dysfunction in patients with preexisting vascular diseases. Nitrite, a storage form of NO, can mediate vascular function during pathological conditions when endogenous NO is reduced. The aims of the present study were to characterize the effects of severe MetS and obesity on dyslipidemia, myocardial oxidative stress, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) regulation in the obese Ossabaw swine (OS) model and to examine the effects of a novel, sustained-release formulation of sodium nitrite (SR-nitrite) on coronary vascular reactivity and myocardial redox status in obese OS subjected to critical limb ischemia (CLI). After 6 mo of an atherogenic diet, obese OS displayed a MetS phenotype. Obese OS had decreased eNOS functionality and NO bioavailability. In addition, obese OS exhibited increased oxidative stress and a significant reduction in antioxidant enzymes. The efficacy of SR-nitrite therapy was examined in obese OS subjected to CLI. After 3 wk of treatment, SR-nitrite (80 mg·kg−1·day−1 bid po) increased myocardial nitrite levels and eNOS function. Treatment with SR-nitrite reduced myocardial oxidative stress while increasing myocardial antioxidant capacity. Ex vivo assessment of vascular reactivity of left anterior descending coronary artery segments demonstrated marked improvement in vasoreactivity to sodium nitroprusside but not to substance P and bradykinin in SR-nitrite-treated animals compared with placebo-treated animals. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant, large-animal model of MetS and CLI, treatment with SR-nitrite enhanced myocardial NO bioavailability, attenuated oxidative stress, and improved ex vivo coronary artery vasorelaxation. PMID:25957218

  1. Sustained release nitrite therapy results in myocardial protection in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jessica M; Islam, Kazi N; Polhemus, David J; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Goodchild, Traci T; Lefer, David J

    2015-07-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) reduces endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and exacerbates vascular dysfunction in patients with preexisting vascular diseases. Nitrite, a storage form of NO, can mediate vascular function during pathological conditions when endogenous NO is reduced. The aims of the present study were to characterize the effects of severe MetS and obesity on dyslipidemia, myocardial oxidative stress, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) regulation in the obese Ossabaw swine (OS) model and to examine the effects of a novel, sustained-release formulation of sodium nitrite (SR-nitrite) on coronary vascular reactivity and myocardial redox status in obese OS subjected to critical limb ischemia (CLI). After 6 mo of an atherogenic diet, obese OS displayed a MetS phenotype. Obese OS had decreased eNOS functionality and NO bioavailability. In addition, obese OS exhibited increased oxidative stress and a significant reduction in antioxidant enzymes. The efficacy of SR-nitrite therapy was examined in obese OS subjected to CLI. After 3 wk of treatment, SR-nitrite (80 mg · kg(-1) · day(-1) bid po) increased myocardial nitrite levels and eNOS function. Treatment with SR-nitrite reduced myocardial oxidative stress while increasing myocardial antioxidant capacity. Ex vivo assessment of vascular reactivity of left anterior descending coronary artery segments demonstrated marked improvement in vasoreactivity to sodium nitroprusside but not to substance P and bradykinin in SR-nitrite-treated animals compared with placebo-treated animals. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant, large-animal model of MetS and CLI, treatment with SR-nitrite enhanced myocardial NO bioavailability, attenuated oxidative stress, and improved ex vivo coronary artery vasorelaxation.

  2. Biosynthesis and Functional Significance of Peripheral Node Addressin in Cancer-Associated TLO

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Aliyah M.; Storkus, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral node addressin (PNAd) marks high endothelial venules (HEV), which are crucial for the recruitment of lymphocytes into lymphoid organs in non-mucosal tissue sites. PNAd is a sulfated and fucosylated glycoprotein recognized by the prototypic monoclonal antibody, MECA-79. PNAd is the ligand for L-selectin, which is expressed on the surface of naive and central memory T cells, where it mediates leukocyte rolling on vascular endothelial surfaces. Although PNAd was first identified in the HEV of peripheral lymph nodes, recent work suggests a critical role for PNAd in the context of chronic inflammatory diseases, where it can be used as a marker for the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs). TLO form in tissues impacted by sustained inflammation, such as the tumor microenvironment where they function as local sites of adaptive immune cell priming. This allows for specific B- and T-cell responses to be initiated or reactivated in inflamed tissues without dependency on secondary lymphoid organs. Recent studies of cancer in mice and humans have identified PNAd as a biomarker of improved disease prognosis. Blockade of PNAd or its ligand, L-selectin, can abrogate protective antitumor immunity in murine models. This review examines pathways regulating PNAd biosynthesis by the endothelial cells integral to HEV and the formation and maintenance of lymphoid structures throughout the body, particularly in the setting of cancer. PMID:27555845

  3. Biosynthesis and Functional Significance of Peripheral Node Addressin in Cancer-Associated TLO.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Aliyah M; Storkus, Walter J

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral node addressin (PNAd) marks high endothelial venules (HEV), which are crucial for the recruitment of lymphocytes into lymphoid organs in non-mucosal tissue sites. PNAd is a sulfated and fucosylated glycoprotein recognized by the prototypic monoclonal antibody, MECA-79. PNAd is the ligand for L-selectin, which is expressed on the surface of naive and central memory T cells, where it mediates leukocyte rolling on vascular endothelial surfaces. Although PNAd was first identified in the HEV of peripheral lymph nodes, recent work suggests a critical role for PNAd in the context of chronic inflammatory diseases, where it can be used as a marker for the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs). TLO form in tissues impacted by sustained inflammation, such as the tumor microenvironment where they function as local sites of adaptive immune cell priming. This allows for specific B- and T-cell responses to be initiated or reactivated in inflamed tissues without dependency on secondary lymphoid organs. Recent studies of cancer in mice and humans have identified PNAd as a biomarker of improved disease prognosis. Blockade of PNAd or its ligand, L-selectin, can abrogate protective antitumor immunity in murine models. This review examines pathways regulating PNAd biosynthesis by the endothelial cells integral to HEV and the formation and maintenance of lymphoid structures throughout the body, particularly in the setting of cancer. PMID:27555845

  4. Melatonin membrane receptors in peripheral tissues: Distribution and functions

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Radomir M.; Reiter, Russel J.; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia; Ostrom, Rennolds S.; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2012-01-01

    Many of melatonin’s actions are mediated through interaction with the G-protein coupled membrane bound melatonin receptors type 1 and type 2 (MT1 and MT2, respectively) or, indirectly with nuclear orphan receptors from the RORα/RZR family. Melatonin also binds to the quinone reductase II enzyme, previously defined the MT3 receptor. Melatonin receptors are widely distributed in the body; herein we summarize their expression and actions in non-neural tissues. Several controversies still exist regarding, for example, whether melatonin binds the RORα/RZR family. Studies of the peripheral distribution of melatonin receptors are important since they are attractive targets for immunomodulation, regulation of endocrine, reproductive and cardiovascular functions, modulation of skin pigmentation, hair growth, cancerogenesis, and aging. Melatonin receptor agonists and antagonists have an exciting future since they could define multiple mechanisms by which melatonin modulates the complexity of such a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes. PMID:22245784

  5. [Peripheral vascular manifestations and osteoarticular changes in mine drillers and lumber workers].

    PubMed

    Lo Monaco, C; Cocco, P; Bario, P; Flore, C; Frau, P; Casula, D

    1984-01-01

    In order to find, inside the same vibration syndrome, likely differences of the pathology due to the different technological features of the vibrating tools, 42 forestry workers have been compared with 168 mine workers. No significant differences have been noticed, as concerns both osteoarticular lesions and photopletismography study of peripheral blood circulation; in mine workers a prevalence of lesions of the nail-folds capillaries has been noticed, according to the authors dependent on the higher energy of the vibrations brought out boring-machines.

  6. Effects of successive air and nitrox dives on human vascular function.

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Jasna; Ljubkovic, Marko; Breskovic, Toni; Gunjaca, Grgo; Obad, Ante; Modun, Darko; Bilopavlovic, Nada; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-06-01

    SCUBA diving is regularly associated with asymptomatic changes in cardiac, pulmonary and vascular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in vascular/endothelial function following SCUBA diving and to assess the potential difference between two breathing gases: air and nitrox 36 (36% oxygen and 64% nitrogen). Ten divers performed two 3-day diving series (no-decompression dive to 18 m with 47 min bottom time with air and nitrox, respectively), with 2 weeks pause in between. Arterial/endothelial function was assessed using SphygmoCor and flow-mediated dilation measurements, and concentration of nitrite before and after diving was determined in venous blood. Production of nitrogen bubbles post-dive was assessed by ultrasonic determination of venous gas bubble grade. Significantly higher bubbling was found after all air dives as compared to nitrox dives. Pulse wave velocity increased slightly (~6%), significantly after both air and nitrox diving, indicating an increase in arterial stiffness. However, augmentation index became significantly more negative after diving indicating smaller wave reflection. There was a trend for post-dive reduction of FMD after air dives; however, only nitrox diving significantly reduced FMD. No significant differences in blood nitrite before and after the dives were found. We found that nitrox diving affects systemic/vascular function more profoundly than air diving by reducing FMD response, most likely due to higher oxygen load. Both air and nitrox dives increased arterial stiffness, but decreased wave reflection suggesting a decrease in peripheral resistance due to exercise during diving. These effects of nitrox and air diving were not followed by changes in plasma nitrite.

  7. Marvels, Mysteries, and Misconceptions of Vascular Compensation to Peripheral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    ZIEGLER, MATTHEW A.; DISTASI, MATTHEW R.; BILLS, RANDALL G.; MILLER, STEVEN J.; ALLOOSH, MOUHAMAD; MURPHY, MICHAEL P.; AKINGBA, A. GEORGE; STUREK, MICHAEL; DALSING, MICHAEL C.; UNTHANK, JOSEPH L.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a major health problem and there is a significant need to develop therapies to prevent its progression to claudication and critical limb ischemia. Promising results in rodent models of arterial occlusion have generally failed to predict clinical success and led to questions of their relevance. While sub-optimal models may have contributed to the lack of progress, we suggest that advancement has also been hindered by misconceptions of the human capacity for compensation and the specific vessels which are of primary importance. We present and summarize new and existing data from humans, Ossabaw miniature pigs, and rodents which provide compelling evidence that natural compensation to occlusion of a major artery (i) may completely restore perfusion, (ii) occurs in specific pre-existing small arteries, rather than the distal vasculature, via mechanisms involving flow-mediated dilation and remodeling (iii) is impaired by cardiovascular risk factors which suppress the flow-mediated mechanisms and (iv) can be restored by reversal of endothelial dysfunction. We propose that restoration of the capacity for flow-mediated dilation and remodeling in small arteries represents a largely unexplored potential therapeutic opportunity to enhance compensation for major arterial occlusion and prevent the progression to critical limb ischemia in the peripheral circulation. PMID:20141596

  8. Coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease in chronic kidney disease: an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Stack, Austin G

    2005-08-01

    The enormous burden of CAD and PVD inpatients who have CKD contributes substantially to increased morbidity and mortality. The increased risk of vascular disease observed in CKD patients is likely to be multifactorial, with contributions from traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular factors. Given the overwhelming evidence on the known benefits of cardioprotective medications, their underuse remains puzzling in a population at enormous risk. During the past 5 years, the research community and national interest groups have made significant progress in organizing a concerted approach to improve the management of patients who have CKD and vascular disease. Much work remains to be done. The development of national guidelines in the management of these patients at high risk for future cardiovascular events will be a welcome step. The evaluation of multitargeted interventions for reduction of cardiovascular risk through randomized clinical trials is desperately needed. Finally, the low use of known cardioprotective strategies in this high-risk group is a serious issue and warrants immediate attention at local and national levels.

  9. Glycomimetic functionalized collagen hydrogels for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masand, Shirley Narain

    Despite the innate regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system, functional recovery is often limited. The goal of this dissertation was to develop a clinically relevant biomaterial strategy to (1) encourage the regrowth of axons and (2) direct them down their appropriate motor tracts. To this end, we use peptide mimics of two glycans, polysialic acid (PSA) and an epitope first discovered on human natural killer cells (HNK-1), to functionalize type I collagen hydrogels. Previous studies have shown that these molecules, in their glycan and glycomimetic form, are associated with acceleration of neurite outgrowth, glial cell proliferation, and motoneuron targeting. In vitro, we demonstrated the retained functionality of the peptide glycomimetics after conjugation to a type I collagen backbone. While HNK-functionalized collagen increased motor neurite outgrowth, PSA-functionalized collagen encouraged motor and sensory neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell extension and proliferation. When we introduce these glycomimetic-functionalized collagen hydrogels into a critical gap femoral nerve model, we show that both PSA and HNK-functionalized hydrogels yielded a significant increase in functional recovery when compared to saline, native and scramble-coupled hydrogels. However, there was an interesting divergence in the morphological results: PSA-functionalized hydrogels increased axon count and HNK-functionalized hydrogels increased motoneuron targeting and myelination. We believed that these differences may be attributed to distinct mechanisms by which the glycomimetics impart their benefit. Interestingly, however, we found no synergistic gain in recovery with the use of our composite hydrogels which we speculated may be due to an inadequate dose of the individual glycomimetic. To address this possibility, we show that increasing the amount of functionalized peptide functionalized in our composite hydrogels led to increases in axon count and area of regeneration

  10. Maternal Copper Deficiency Perpetuates Altered Vascular Function in Sprague-Dawley Rat Offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the consequences of maternal Cu (Cu) deficiency on the vascular function of offspring or on perpetuation of vascular effects to a second generation. We examined vascular functional responses in mesenteric arteries from Cu-deficient Sprague-Dawley rat dams and from offspring dir...

  11. The Toll of Vascular Insufficiency: Implications for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Sachdev, Ulka

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can result in limb loss within six months of diagnosis in a subset of patients who cannot undergo endovascular or surgical revascularization yet continues to maintain a marginal position in cardiovascular research. While a body of literature continues to grow describing the role of danger signaling and innate immunity in cardiac biology, the role of these pathways in the ischemic myopathy associated with PAD has not been extensively studied. The following report will review the current literature on the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in cardiovascular biology as well as in nonischemic myopathy. While attenuation of TLR signaling has not been shown to be clinically useful in the treatment of infectious inflammation, it may show promise in the management of severe arterial insufficiency. PMID:26998496

  12. The Development of Depressive Symptoms During Medical Internship Stress Predicts Worsening Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Ellingrod, Vicki L.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Sen, Srijan

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to prospectively determine whether the onset of internship stress and any subsequent depression alters physiological markers of early vascular disease Methods We explored potential mechanisms linking stress and depression to vascular disease in a prospective cohort of 37 participants exposed to medical internship stress, an established precipitant of depressive symptomatology. Results Change in depressive symptom score from baseline over one year of internship stress was inversely correlated with change in the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), a measure of peripheral endothelial function (r=0.41, p=0.01). The change in depressive symptoms in the first six months of internship was similarly related to change in RHI over one year (r=0.38, p=0.02). While the development of depressive symptoms did not significantly impact changes in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), EPCs did significantly decrease with the year of internship stress (11.9 to 3.4 cells/ml blood; p=0.01). Conclusion Endothelial function may be a critical link between stress, depression, and cardiovascular disease and a feasible surrogate outcome for prospective studies. PMID:26115588

  13. The functions of TRPP2 in the vascular system

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Fu, Jie; Xia, Xian-ming; Shen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    TRPP2 (polycystin-2, PC2 or PKD2), encoded by the PKD2 gene, is a non-selective cation channel with a large single channel conductance and high Ca2+ permeability. In cell membrane, TRPP2, along with polycystin-1, TRPV4 and TRPC1, functions as a mechanotransduction channel. In the endoplasmic reticulum, TRPP2 modulates intracellular Ca2+ release associated with IP3 receptors and the ryanodine receptors. Noteworthily, TRPP2 is widely expressed in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells of all major vascular beds, and contributes to the regulation of vessel function. The mutation of the PKD2 gene is a major cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), which is not only a common genetic disease of the kidney but also a systemic disorder associated with abnormalities in the vasculature; cardiovascular complications are the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in ADPKD patients. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the TRPP2 protein and its possible role in cardiovascular function and related diseases. PMID:26725733

  14. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  15. Vascular function and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: The functional capacity factor.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Mahmoud A; Khabour, Omar F; Maikano, Abubakar; Alawneh, Khaldoon

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for neurocognitive function. This study aims at establishing a plausible link between level of serum BDNF, functional capacity (FC), and vascular function in 181 young (age 25.5±9.1 years old), apparently healthy adults. Fasting blood samples were drawn from participants' antecubital veins into plain glass tubes while they were in a sitting position to evaluate serum BDNF using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mercury-in-silastic strain-gauge plethysmography was used to determine arterial function indices, blood flow and vascular resistance at rest and following 5 minutes of arterial ischemia. The 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) test was used to determine FC, according to the American Thoracic Society Committee on Proficiency Standards for Clinical Pulmonary Function Laboratories guidelines. It was conducted in an enclosed corridor on a flat surface with a circular track 33 meters long. The walking course was demarcated with bright colored cones. The 6MWD correlated with BDNF (r=0.3, p=0.000), as well as with forearm blood inflow (r=0.5, p=0.000) and vascular resistance (r = -0.4, p=0.000). Subsequent comparison showed that BDNF and blood inflow were greater (p<0.05) while vascular resistance was less (p<0.05) in participants who achieved a longer 6MWD. Similarly, BDNF correlated with forearm blood inflow (r=0.4, p=0.000) and vascular resistance (r = -0.4, p=0.000). Subsequent comparison showed improved vascular function (p<0.05) in the participants with greater BDNF. In conclusion, these findings might suggest that improved vascular function in individuals with greater FC is mediated, at least partially, by an enhanced serum BDNF level. PMID:26285588

  16. Vascular function and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: The functional capacity factor.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Mahmoud A; Khabour, Omar F; Maikano, Abubakar; Alawneh, Khaldoon

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for neurocognitive function. This study aims at establishing a plausible link between level of serum BDNF, functional capacity (FC), and vascular function in 181 young (age 25.5±9.1 years old), apparently healthy adults. Fasting blood samples were drawn from participants' antecubital veins into plain glass tubes while they were in a sitting position to evaluate serum BDNF using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mercury-in-silastic strain-gauge plethysmography was used to determine arterial function indices, blood flow and vascular resistance at rest and following 5 minutes of arterial ischemia. The 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) test was used to determine FC, according to the American Thoracic Society Committee on Proficiency Standards for Clinical Pulmonary Function Laboratories guidelines. It was conducted in an enclosed corridor on a flat surface with a circular track 33 meters long. The walking course was demarcated with bright colored cones. The 6MWD correlated with BDNF (r=0.3, p=0.000), as well as with forearm blood inflow (r=0.5, p=0.000) and vascular resistance (r = -0.4, p=0.000). Subsequent comparison showed that BDNF and blood inflow were greater (p<0.05) while vascular resistance was less (p<0.05) in participants who achieved a longer 6MWD. Similarly, BDNF correlated with forearm blood inflow (r=0.4, p=0.000) and vascular resistance (r = -0.4, p=0.000). Subsequent comparison showed improved vascular function (p<0.05) in the participants with greater BDNF. In conclusion, these findings might suggest that improved vascular function in individuals with greater FC is mediated, at least partially, by an enhanced serum BDNF level.

  17. Functional Imaging of Working Memory and Peripheral Endothelial Function in Middle-Aged Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Mitzi M.; Tarumi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sugawara, Jun; Swann-Sternberg, Tali; Goudarzi, Katayoon; Haley, Andreana P.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between a prognostic indicator of vascular health, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and working memory-related brain activation in healthy middle-aged adults. Forty-two participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing a 2-Back working memory task. Brachial artery…

  18. Results of a Peripheral Cutting Balloon Prospective Multicenter European Registry in Hemodialysis Vascular Access

    SciTech Connect

    Peregrin, Jan H. Rocek, Miloslav

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To report initial experience with the Peripheral Cutting Balloon (PCB) in treatment of failing hemodialysis shunts. Methods. A total of 190 patients (95 men, 95 women; average age 64.4 {+-} 11.9 years, range 32-87 years) who were treated with the PCB for pressure-resistant stenosis, restenosis or failed percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in the venous limb of an arteriovenous shunt were followed in seven European centers using a simple registry. The group consisted of 109 de novo lesions (57%) and 79 restenotic lesions (43%). Results. Technical success was achieved in 88.9% of cases. Primary patency was as follows (the results for whole group and simultaneous results for de novo lesions and restenoses are presented): 1 month (140 patients followed): 94%, 98%, and 93%; 3 months (116 patients followed): 93%, 98%, and 92%; 6 months (40 patients followed): 85%, 92%, and 79%; 12 months (27 patients followed): 74%, 87%, and 48%. No complication occurred. Patients experienced an equal or lower level of pain during the procedure compared with conventional PTA. Conclusion. The PCB proved to be successful in dilating pressure-resistant stenoses. We cannot conclude whether PCB angioplasty can lower the restenosis rate in hemodialysis access lesions, but the long-term patency for de novo lesions is high. A further randomized study is advisable.

  19. Adverse cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular effects of marijuana inhalation: what cardiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Grace; Kloner, Robert A; Rezkalla, Shereif

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Once illegal throughout the United States, cannabis is now legal for medicinal purposes in several states and for recreational use in 3 states. The current wave of decriminalization may lead to more widespread use, and it is important that cardiologists be made aware of the potential for marijuana-associated adverse cardiovascular effects that may begin to occur in the population at a greater frequency. In this report, the investigators focus on the known cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral effects of marijuana inhalation. Temporal associations between marijuana use and serious adverse events, including myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, cardiomyopathy, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and cannabis arteritis have been described. In conclusion, the potential for increased use of marijuana in the changing legal landscape suggests the need for the community to intensify research regarding the safety of marijuana use and for cardiologists to maintain an awareness of the potential for adverse effects.

  20. Load dependence of changes in forearm and peripheral vascular resistance after acute leg exercise in man.

    PubMed Central

    Piepoli, M; Isea, J E; Pannarale, G; Adamopoulos, S; Sleight, P; Coats, A J

    1994-01-01

    1. It is known that acute exercise is often followed by a reduction in arterial blood pressure. Little is known about the time course of the recovery of the blood pressure or the influence of the intensity of the exercise on this response. Controversy exists, in particular, concerning the changes in peripheral resistance that occur during this period. 2. Eight normal volunteers performed, in random order on separate days, voluntary upright bicycle exercise of three different intensities (maximal, moderate and minimal load) and, on another day, a control period of sitting on a bicycle. They were monitored for 60 min after each test. 3. Diastolic pressure fell after maximal exercise at 5 min (-15.45 mmHg) and 60 min (-9.45 mmHg), compared with the control day. Systolic and mean pressure also fell (non-significantly) after 45 min; heart rate was significantly elevated for the whole hour of recovery (at 60 min, +7.23 beats min-1). No changes in post-exercise blood pressure and heart rate were observed on the days of moderate and minimal exercises. 4. An increase in cardiac index was observed after maximal exercise compared with control (at 60 min, 2.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.2 l min-1 m-2). This was entirely accounted for by the persistent increase in heart rate, with no significant alteration in stroke volume after exercise on any day.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7965851

  1. Adverse cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular effects of marijuana inhalation: what cardiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Grace; Kloner, Robert A; Rezkalla, Shereif

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Once illegal throughout the United States, cannabis is now legal for medicinal purposes in several states and for recreational use in 3 states. The current wave of decriminalization may lead to more widespread use, and it is important that cardiologists be made aware of the potential for marijuana-associated adverse cardiovascular effects that may begin to occur in the population at a greater frequency. In this report, the investigators focus on the known cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral effects of marijuana inhalation. Temporal associations between marijuana use and serious adverse events, including myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, cardiomyopathy, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and cannabis arteritis have been described. In conclusion, the potential for increased use of marijuana in the changing legal landscape suggests the need for the community to intensify research regarding the safety of marijuana use and for cardiologists to maintain an awareness of the potential for adverse effects. PMID:24176069

  2. Studies on the possible contribution of a peripheral presynaptic action of clonidine and dopamine to their vascular effects under in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, G

    1976-12-01

    The functional consequences of drug-induced stimulation under in vivo conditions of alpha-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors at vascular adrenergic nerve endings (presynaptic receptors) was studied in the autoperfused hindquarters or hindlegs of cats anaesthetized with urethane. The changes in perfusion pressure in response to electrical stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain were taken as a measure of noradrenaline release from the vascular adrenergic nerves. Presynaptic inhibitory alpha-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors were activated by clonidine and dopamine, respectively. According to in vitro experiments these two drugs are more potent stimulants of peripheral presynaptic than postsynaptic receptors. The lowest frequency of stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain which yielded a reproducible pressor response was 4 HZ for the autoperfused hindquarters and 1 HZ for the hindlegs; Clonidine was tested over a wide dose range (1-100 mug/kg i;v). A reduction of the stimulation-induced pressor response in the autoperfused hindquarters or hindlegs was observed only after the rather high dose of 100 mug/kg of clonidine. The inhibition was marked at low frequencies of stimulation (1-4 HZ) and weak or absent at high frequencies (16 and 32 HZ). The dose of clonidine (100 mug/kg) which proved to be effective at presynaptic receptors produced a transient increase in blood pressure and in perfusion pressure of the hindquarters and hindlegs and virtually abolished spontaneous sympathetic nervous activity. In spinal cats, the clonidine-induced increases in blood pressure and perfusion pressure were very pronounced and of rather long duration. Thus, under in vivo conditions clonidine showed no selectivity for presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors in a blood-perfused vascular bed, and its presynaptic action was negligible as compared to its powerful central sympatho-inhibitory effect. Dopamine was constantly infused into the auto-perfused hindquarters or hindlegs at

  3. Intraoperative electrophysiological evaluations of macular function during peripheral scleral indentation

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Goichi; Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Terauchi, Gaku; Matsumoto, Harue; Watanabe, Emiko; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2016-01-01

    Scleral indentation is widely used to examine the peripheral fundus, however it can increase the intraocular pressure (IOP) to high levels which can then affect retinal function. We evaluated the effects of scleral indentation on the macular function electrophysiologically. Intraoperative focal macular electroretinograms (iFMERGs) were recorded with and without controlling the IOP in 7 eyes. Without IOP control, the IOP increased from 21.7 ± 4.9 to 92.7 ± 20.2 mmHg significantly (P = 0.020) and the amplitudes of the b-wave (from 6.29 ± 1.160 to 3.71 ± 1.98 uV, P = 0.007), on-photopic negative response (from 2.29 ± 0.99 to 0.72 ± 0.47 uV, on-PhNR, P = 0.005), and d-wave (from 2.57 ± 0.41 to 1.64 ± 0.69 uV, P = 0.007) decreased significantly soon after beginning the indentation. All values returned to the baseline levels after releasing the indentation. In the eyes with IOP controlled, the IOP and the amplitude of all components did not change significantly during and after the indentation except the on-PhNR amplitude which was significantly reduced during the indentation. The changes in the iFMERGs and macular function caused by scleral indentation were transient and reversible. The changes can be minimized by controlling the IOP. PMID:27762313

  4. Glycogen function in adult central and peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Evans, Richard D; Brown, Angus M; Ransom, Bruce R

    2013-08-01

    We studied the roles of glycogen in axonal pathways of the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). By using electrophysiological recordings, in combination with biochemical glycogen assay, it was possible to determine whether glycogen was crucial to axon function under different conditions. Glycogen was present both in mouse optic nerve (MON) and in mouse sciatic nerve (MSN). Aglycemia caused loss of the compound action potential (CAP) in both pathways after a latency of 15 min (MON) and 120 min for myelinated axons (A fibers) in the MSN. With the exception of unmyelinated axons (C fibers) in the MSN, CAP decline began when usable glycogen was exhausted. Glycogen was located in astrocytes in the MON and in myelinating Schwann cells in the MSN; it was absent from the Schwann cells surrounding unmyelinated C fibers. In MON, astrocytic glycogen is metabolized to lactate and "shuttled" to axons to support metabolism. The ability of lactate to support A fiber conduction in the absence of glucose suggests a common pathway in both the CNS and the PNS. Lactate is released from MON and MSN in substantial quantities. That lactate levels fall in MSN in the presence of diaminobenzidine, which inhibits glycogen phosphorylase, strongly suggests that glycogen metabolism contributes to lactate release under resting conditions. Glycogen is a "backup" energy substrate in both the CNS and the PNS and, beyond sustaining excitability during glucose deprivation, has the capacity to subsidize the axonal energy demands during times of intense activity in the presence of glucose.

  5. Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollution and Digital Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Ljungman, Petter L.; Wilker, Elissa H.; Rice, Mary B.; Schwartz, Joel; Gold, Diane R.; Koutrakis, Petros; Vita, Joseph A.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Hamburg, Naomi M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated associations between ambient air pollution and microvessel function measured by peripheral arterial tonometry between 2003 and 2008 in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation Cohorts. We measured particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5), black carbon, sulfates, particle number, nitrogen oxides, and ozone by using fixed monitors, and we determined moving averages for 1–7 days preceding vascular testing. We examined associations between these exposures and hyperemic response to ischemia and baseline pulse amplitude, a measure of arterial tone (n = 2,369). Higher short-term exposure to air pollutants, including PM2.5, black carbon, and particle number was associated with higher baseline pulse amplitude. For example, higher 3-day average PM2.5 exposure was associated with 6.3% higher baseline pulse amplitude (95% confidence interval: 2.0, 10.9). However, there were no consistent associations between the air pollution exposures assessed and hyperemic response. Our findings in a community-based sample exposed to relatively low pollution levels suggest that short-term exposure to ambient particulate pollution is not associated with vasodilator response, but that particulate air pollution is associated with baseline pulse amplitude, suggesting potentially adverse alterations in baseline vascular tone or compliance. PMID:25100647

  6. Vascular smooth muscle cell functional contractility depends on extracellular mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Steucke, Kerianne E.; Tracy, Paige V.; Hald, Eric S.; Hall, Jennifer L.; Alford, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells’ primary function is to maintain vascular homeostasis through active contraction and relaxation. In diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, this function is inhibited concurrent to changes in the mechanical environment surrounding vascular smooth muscle cells. It is well established that cell function and extracellular mechanics are interconnected; variations in substrate modulus affect cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. To date, it is unknown how the evolving extracellular mechanical environment of vascular smooth muscle cells affects their contractile function. Here, we have built upon previous vascular muscular thin film technology to develop a variable-modulus vascular muscular thin film that measures vascular tissue functional contractility on substrates with a range of pathological and physiological moduli. Using this modified vascular muscular thin film, we found that vascular smooth muscle cells generated greater stress on substrates with higher moduli compared to substrates with lower moduli. We then measured protein markers typically thought to indicate a contractile phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells and found that phenotype is unaffected by substrate modulus. These data suggest that mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells’ extracellular environment directly influence their functional behavior and do so without inducing phenotype switching. PMID:26283412

  7. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  8. Same-day discharge after angioplasty for peripheral vascular disease: is it a safe and feasible option?

    PubMed

    Maher, Paula

    2014-09-01

    Peripheral vascular disease affects 20% of the population >55 years of age. Patients who become symptomatic are managed by a number of technique's including medical management, percutaneous angioplasty, bypass surgery, and in nonreconstructable situations, limb amputation. Clinicians treating patients by means of angioplasty have traditionally carried out these procedures on an inpatient basis. Limited resources and pressure on the availability of inpatient beds has necessitated clinicians to reevaluate how many of these patients are managed. Treating suitable patients as day cases is an attractive option that frees up resources and is financially advantageous. This paper examines the feasibility of same-day discharge after angioplasty, with a particular emphasis on achieving safe patient outcomes. It explores how advances in endovascular technologies and techniques have contributed to making same-day discharge an ever more feasible option. Nurse led pre-admission clinics run by specialist nurses facilitate safe and appropriate patient selection, where patients at risk for postprocedural problems can be identified effectively based on predefined clinical criteria.

  9. Coffee polyphenols improve peripheral endothelial function after glucose loading in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Ryuji; Sugiura, Yoko; Shioya, Yasushi; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Katsuragi, Yoshihisa; Hashiguchi, Teruto

    2014-02-01

    Brewed coffee is a widely consumed beverage, and many studies have examined its effects on human health. We investigated the vascular effects of coffee polyphenols (CPPs), hypothesizing that a single ingestion of CPP during glucose loading would improve endothelial function. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized acute clinical intervention study with crossover design and measured reactive hyperemia index (RHI) to assess the acute effects of a 75-g glucose load with CPP in healthy, nondiabetic adult men. Blood glucose and insulin levels were elevated after glucose loading with and without CPP, with no significant differences between treatments. The RHI did not significantly decrease after glucose loading without CPP. With CPP, however, RHI significantly (P < .05) increased over baseline after glucose loading. The difference between treatments was statistically significant (P < .05). No significant changes were observed in an oxidative stress marker after glucose loading with or without CPP. These findings suggest that a single ingestion of CPP improves peripheral endothelial function after glucose loading in healthy subjects.

  10. Nitric oxide and passive limb movement: a new approach to assess vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Trinity, Joel D; Groot, H Jonathan; Layec, Gwenael; Rossman, Matthew J; Ives, Stephen J; Runnels, Sean; Gmelch, Ben; Bledsoe, Amber; Richardson, Russell S

    2012-01-01

    Passive limb movement elicits a robust increase in limb blood flow (LBF) and limb vascular conductance (LVC), but the peripheral vascular mechanisms associated with this increase in LBF and LVC are unknown. This study sought to determine the contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to movement-induced LBF and LVC and document the potential for passive-limb movement to assess NO-mediated vasodilatation and therefore NO bioavailability. Six subjects underwent passive knee extension with and without nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via intra-arterial infusion of NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). LBF was determined second-by-second by Doppler ultrasound, and central haemodynamics were measured by finger photoplethysmography. Although l-NMMA did not alter the immediate increase (initial ∼9 s) in LBF and LVC, NOS blockade attenuated the peak increase in LBF (control: 653 ± 81; l-NMMA: 399 ± 112 ml−1 min−1, P= 0.03) and LVC (control: 7.5 ± 0.8; l-NMMA: 4.1 ± 1.1 ml min−1 mmHg−1, P= 0.02) and dramatically reduced the overall vasodilatory and hyperaemic response (area under the curve) by nearly 80% (LBF: control: 270 ± 51; l-NMMA: 75 ± 32 ml, P= 0.001; LVC: control: 2.9 ± 0.5; l-NMMA: 0.8 ± 0.3 ml mmHg−1, P < 0.001). Passive movement in control and l-NMMA trials evoked similar increases in heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and a reduction in mean arterial pressure. As movement-induced increases in LBF and LVC are predominantly NO dependent, passive limb movement appears to have significant promise as a new approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function, an important predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:22310310

  11. Physiologically Modeled Pulse Dynamics to Improve Function in In Vitro-Endothelialized Small-Diameter Vascular Grafts.

    PubMed

    Uzarski, Joseph S; Cores, Jhon; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-11-01

    The lack of a functional endothelium on small-diameter vascular grafts leads to intimal hyperplasia and thrombotic occlusion. Shear stress conditioning through controlled hydrodynamics within in vitro perfusion bioreactors has shown promise as a mechanism to drive endothelial cell (EC) phenotype from an activated, pro-inflammatory wound state toward a quiescent functional state that inhibits responses that lead to occlusive failure. As part of an overall design strategy to engineer functional vascular grafts, we present a novel two-phase shear conditioning approach to improve graft endothelialization. Axial rotation was first used to seed uniform EC monolayers onto the lumenal surface of decellularized scaffolds derived from the human umbilical vein. Using computer-controlled perfusion circuits, a flow-ramping paradigm was applied to adapt endothelia to arterial levels of fluid shear stress and pressure without graft denudation. The effects of constant pulse frequencies (CF) on EC quiescence were then compared with pulse frequencies modeled from temporal fluctuations in blood flow observed in vivo, termed physiologically modeled pulse dynamics (PMPD). Constructs exposed to PMPD for 72 h expressed a more functional transcriptional profile, lower metabolic activity (39.8% ± 8.4% vs. 62.5% ± 11.5% reduction, p = 0.012), and higher nitric oxide production (80.42 ± 23.93 vs. 48.75 ± 6.93 nmol/10(5) cells, p = 0.028) than those exposed to CF. By manipulating in vitro flow conditions to mimic natural physiology, endothelialized vascular grafts can be stimulated to express a nonactivated phenotype that would better inhibit peripheral cell adhesion and smooth muscle cell hyperplasia, conditions that typically lead to occlusive failure. Development of robust, functional endothelia on vascular grafts by modulation of environmental conditions within perfusion bioreactors may ultimately improve clinical outcomes in vascular bypass grafting. PMID:25996580

  12. Relationships between retinal arteriole anatomy and aortic geometry and function and peripheral resistance in hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, David; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Koch, Edouard; Paques, Michel; Cluzel, Philippe; Redheuil, Alban; Girerd, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Microvascular remodeling and large artery stiffness are key determinants of cardiovascular hemodynamics and can now be studied with new non-invasive methods. Our objective was to study the relationships between retinal arteriole anatomy and aortic geometry and function and peripheral resistance (total peripheral resistance (TPR)) in hypertensives. In 80 subjects (age 52±13 years; 53% males; including 23 normotensives and 57 hypertensives, among which 29 were uncontrolled hypertensives), we used: (1) the new non-invasive RTX1 adaptive optics (AO) camera (Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France) to measure the wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) on retinal microvasculature; (2) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging to assess aortic stiffness, geometry and cardiac output; and (3) the validated SphymoCor Xcel device to measure central blood pressure (BP) and carotido-femoral pulse wave velocity (Cf-PWV). TPR was calculated as the central mean BP/cardiac output ratio. WLR and TPR were significantly higher and aortic distensibility was significantly lower in hypertensives. Aortic dilation and arch elongation were found in uncontrolled hypertensives. In the univariate analysis, WLR was positively correlated with central BP (P<0.001), TPR (P<0.001) and Cf-PWV (P<0.05), and it was negatively correlated with aortic distensibility (P=0.003); however, it was not correlated with age or cardiovascular risk factors. The multivariate analysis indicated that WLR was associated with TPR (P=0.002) independent of age, BMI, gender, antihypertensive treatments, aortic diameter and central SBP. As expected, age was the major correlate of ascending aorta distensibility and Cf-PWV. New non-invasive vascular imaging methods are complementary for the detection of the deleterious effects of aging or high BP on large and small arteries. AO examination could represent a useful tool for the study and follow-up of microvasculature anatomical changes.

  13. Immunomodulation of vascular endothelium. 1. Ultrastructural changes following ultraviolet B irradiation of peripheral veins

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, M.L.; Gordon, R.E.; Hardy, M.A.; Reemtsma, K.; Benvenisty, A.I. )

    1990-02-01

    Immunologic function of endothelial cells is especially important in consideration of vein allografting for arterial reconstruction and in organ allotransplantation. Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) has previously been shown to modulate graft immunogenicity, and to alter cell surface receptor function. In this study, superficial epigastric veins were UVB irradiated with 10, 24, 40, 80, and 150 mJ/cm2 while control veins were not irradiated; all specimens were examined for endothelial ultrastructural changes. Veins were perfuse-fixed at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after irradiation, and were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Control veins had a normal appearing endothelial lining, composed of elongated, attenuated endothelial cells. Veins irradiated with more than 24 mJ/cm2 displayed injured endothelial cells characterized by altered microvilli, defects in the cell surface, and a change in cell shape. The degree of cell damage correlated closely with increasing UVB dose. At doses of 80 mJ/cm2 or greater there was moderate to severe endothelial cell separation from the underlying basement membrane and an increase in cellular lysosomes. The effects of UVB were maximal at 3 days with virtual recovery in resurfacing of all specimens with endothelium 28 days after irradiation. These data suggest that UVB has a dose-dependent effect on venous endothelium that is morphologically reversible with time. Cell membrane changes seen following exposure to UVB may contribute to altered cell surface receptor function.

  14. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pieringer, Herwig; Brummaier, Tobias; Piringer, Bettina; Auer-Hackenberg, Lorenz; Hartl, Andreas; Puchner, Rudolf; Pohanka, Erich; Schmid, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  15. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  16. Light and Dark of Reactive Oxygen Species for Vascular Function: 2014 ASVB (Asian Society of Vascular Biology).

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Satoh, Kimio

    2015-05-01

    Vascular-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) serves as an important signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system and contributes to vascular homeostasis. H2O2 is a second messenger, transducing the oxidative signal into biological responses through posttranslational protein modification. The balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems regulates intracellular redox status, and their imbalance causes oxidative or reductive stress, leading to cellular damage in cardiovascular systems. Excessive H2O2 deteriorates vascular functions and promotes vascular disease through multiple pathways. The RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway plays an important role in various fundamental cellular functions, including production of excessive reactive oxygen species, leading to the development of cardiovascular diseases. Rho-kinase (ROCK1 and ROCK2) belongs to the family of serine/threonine kinases and is an important downstream effector of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. Rho-kinase plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vasospasm, arteriosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion injury, hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, stroke, and heart failure. Thus, Rho-kinase inhibitors may be useful for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases in humans. In this review, we will briefly discuss the roles of vascular-derived H2O2 and review the recent progress in the translational research on the therapeutic importance of the Rho-kinase pathway in cardiovascular medicine.

  17. Efficacy and Safety of a Novel Vascular Closure Device (Glubran 2 Seal) After Diagnostic and Interventional Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Del Corso, Andrea; Bargellini, Irene Cicorelli, Antonio; Perrone, Orsola; Leo, Michele; Lunardi, Alessandro; Alberti, Aldo; Tomei, Francesca; Cioni, Roberto; Ferrari, Mauro; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate safety and efficacy of a novel vascular closure device (Glubran 2 Seal) after peripheral angiography in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). From December 2010 to June 2011, all consecutive patients with PAOD undergoing peripheral angiography were prospectively enrolled onto the study after percutaneous antegrade or retrograde puncture of the common femoral artery. After angiography, the Glubran 2 Seal device was used to achieve hemostasis. The following data were registered: technical success and manual compression duration, patients' discomfort (scale 0-5), operators' technical difficulty (scale 0-5), and vascular complications. The site of hemostasis was evaluated by clinical inspection and color-coded Duplex ultrasound performed 1 day and 1 month after the procedure. One hundred seventy-eight patients were enrolled (112 male, mean age 70.8 years) with a total of 206 puncture sites, including 104 (50.5 %) antegrade accesses. The device was successful in 198(96.1 %) of 206 procedures, with 8 cases of manual compression lasting longer than 5 min (maximum 20 min). No major vascular complications were observed, resulting in 100 % procedural success. Minor complications occurred in seven procedures (3.4 %), including two cases of pseudoaneurysms, successfully treated by ultrasound-guided glue injection. The mean {+-} standard deviation score for patients' discomfort was 0.9 {+-} 0.7, whereas the mean score for operators' difficulty was 1.2 {+-} 0.9. In patients with PAOD, the Glubran 2 Seal represents a simple, painless, and efficient vascular closure device, able to achieve hemostasis both in antegrade and retrograde accesses.

  18. Review of gestational diabetes mellitus effects on vascular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise A; Chik, Constance L; Ryan, Edmond A

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dysfunction has been described in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, previous gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes mellitus, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Factors contributing to vascular changes remain uncertain. The aim of this review was to summarize vascular structure and function changes found to occur in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus and to identify factors that contribute to vascular dysfunction. A systematic search of electronic databases yielded 15 publications from 1998 to March 2014 that met the inclusion criteria. Our review confirmed that previous gestational diabetes mellitus contributes to vascular dysfunction, and the most consistent risk factor associated with previous gestational diabetes mellitus and vascular dysfunction was elevated body mass index. Heterogeneity existed across studies in determining the relationship of glycaemic levels and insulin resistance to vascular dysfunction.

  19. Functional properties of ion channels and transporters in tumour vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Munaron, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization is crucial for solid tumour growth and invasion, providing metabolic support and sustaining metastatic dissemination. It is now accepted that ion channels and transporters play a significant role in driving the cancer growth at all stages. They may represent novel therapeutic, diagnostic and prognostic targets for anti-cancer therapies. On the other hand, although the expression and role of ion channels and transporters in the vascular endothelium is well recognized and subject of recent reviews, only recently has their involvement in tumour vascularization been recognized. Here, we review the current literature on ion channels and transporters directly involved in the angiogenic process. Particular interest will be focused on tumour angiogenesis in vivo as well as in the different steps that drive this process in vitro, such as endothelial cell proliferation, migration, adhesion and tubulogenesis. Moreover, we compare the ‘transportome’ system of tumour vascular network with the physiological one. PMID:24493751

  20. Childhood Obesity Associates Haemodynamic and Vascular Changes That Result in Increased Central Aortic Pressure with Augmented Incident and Reflected Wave Components, without Changes in Peripheral Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Juan M.; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Arana, Maite; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aims were to determine if childhood obesity is associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP) and to characterize haemodynamic and vascular changes associated with BP changes in obese children and adolescents by means of analyzing changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV), arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV), peripheral vascular resistances (PVR), and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse wave amplitude. We included 117 subjects (mean/range age: 10 (5–15) years, 49 females), who were obese (OB) or had normal weight (NW). Peripheral and central aortic BP, PWV, and pulse wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, amplitude of forward and backward components) were measured with tonometry (SphygmoCor) and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph). With independence of the presence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, or sedentarism, the aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in OB than in NW subjects. The increase in central BP could not be explained by the elevation in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave and higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP could be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflect wave components associated to augmented SV and/or PWV. PMID:26881081

  1. Arsenic exposure, urinary arsenic speciation, and peripheral vascular disease in blackfoot disease-hyperendemic villages in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao; Huang, Yung-Kai; Huang, Ya-Li; Chung, Chi-Jung; Yang, Mo-Hsiung; Chen, Chien-Jen; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2005-08-15

    Long-term exposure to ingested inorganic arsenic is associated with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in the blackfoot disease (BFD)-hyperendemic area in Taiwan. This study further examined the interaction between arsenic exposure and urinary arsenic speciation on the risk of PVD. A total of 479 (220 men and 259 women) adults residing in the BFD-hyperendemic area were studied. Doppler ultrasound was used to diagnose PVD. Arsenic exposure was estimated by an index of cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE). Urinary levels of total arsenic, inorganic arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) were determined. Primary methylation index [PMI = MMA(V)/(As(III) + As(V))] and secondary methylation index (SMI = DMA(V)/MMA(V)) were calculated. The association between PVD and urinary arsenic parameters was evaluated with consideration of the interaction with CAE and the confounding effects of age, sex, body mass index, total cholesterol, triglycerides, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results showed that aging was associated with a diminishing capacity to methylate inorganic arsenic and women possessed a more efficient arsenic methylation capacity than men did. PVD risk increased with a higher CAE and a lower capacity to methylate arsenic to DMA(V). The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios for CAE of 0, 0.1-15.4, and >15.4 mg/L x year were 1.00, 3.41 (0.74-15.78), and 4.62 (0.96-22.21), respectively (P < 0.05, trend test); and for PMI < or = 1.77 and SMI > 6.93, PMI > 1.77 and SMI > 6.93, PMI > 1.77 and SMI < or = 6.93, and PMI < or = 1.77 and SMI < or = 6.93 were 1.00, 2.93 (0.90-9.52), 2.85 (1.05-7.73), and 3.60 (1.12-11.56), respectively (P < 0.05, trend test). It was concluded that individuals with a higher arsenic exposure and a lower capacity to methylate inorganic arsenic to DMA(V) have a higher risk of developing PVD in the BFD-hyperendemic area in Taiwan.

  2. [Function of Aire in central and peripheral immune tolerance].

    PubMed

    Hanafusa, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Negative selection induces central tolerance in which self-reactive T cells are deleted by medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) to prevent autoimmunity. The transcriptional factor, autoimmune regulator (Aire), controls the expression of tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) by mTECs for negative selection. The mechanisms by which Aire targets loci which encode TSAs are unknown in detail; recently, however, the ATF7ip-MBD1 complex was identified as an Aire-interacting transcriptional protein complex required for its targeting the loci. Lineage tracing of Aire(+) mTECs identified that mTECs have a post-Aire stage during the development, where they lost maturation markers but maintained intermediate TSA expression, and Aire is required for the terminal differentiation of mTEC's. Extrathymic Aire-expressing cells (eTACs) are identified in murine and human secondary lymphoid organs. eTACs express major histocompatibility complex class II(hi), CD80(lo), CD86(lo), epithelial cell adhesion molecule(hi), CD45(lo) bone marrow-derived peripheral antigen-presenting cell population, which is distinct from mTECs and dendritic cells. They can induce activation-induced cell death of self-reactive CD8(+) T cells and unresponsiveness of self-reactive CD4(+) T cells through a mechanism that does not require regulatory T cells, suggesting that peripheral Aire plays a complementary role for central tolerance.

  3. A human model of platelet–leucocyte adhesive interactions during controlled ischaemia in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, L; Pirro, M; Lombardini, R; Ciuffetti, G; Dragani, P; Mannarino, E

    2002-01-01

    Aims: In humans, little is known about the effects of platelet–leucocyte interactions on blood viscosity and microvascular perfusion. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) activation and interactions between platelets and leucocytes may have an impact on microvascular blood viscosity and perfusion in patients with stage II peripheral arterial occlusive disease, and (2) a powerful antiplatelet drug such as Clopidogrel might help to improve microvascular perfusion by reducing platelet–leucocyte activation and blood viscosity. Methods: Plasma concentrations of certain markers of leucocyte and platelet activation, in addition to low and high shear rate blood viscosity, were measured before and after a repeated exercise treadmill test. Functional parameters including maximum walking time, transcutaneous oxygen pressure, and half recovery time were also measured. Results: Blocking platelet activation only with a single dose of Clopidogrel (300 mg) did not improve microvascular blood viscosity and perfusion after repeated exercise, but a significant improvement in microvascular perfusion during controlled ischaemia and a lack of post exercise increase in low shear rate blood viscosity was achieved when both platelet and leucocyte activation were suppressed by a relatively longer treatment with Clopidogrel (four days). Conclusions: Clopidogrel, by inhibiting platelet activation and aggregation, might also block the vicious cycle of leucocyte–platelet activation, thus improving the functioning of the microcirculation. PMID:12461065

  4. Mimicking Form and Function of Native Small Diameter Vascular Conduits Using Mulberry and Non-mulberry Patterned Silk Films.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prerak; Kumar, Manishekhar; Bhardwaj, Nandana; Kumar, Jadi Praveen; Krishnamurthy, C S; Nandi, Samit Kumar; Mandal, Biman B

    2016-06-29

    Autologous graft replacement as a strategy to treat diseased peripheral small diameter (≤6 mm) blood vessel is often challenged by prior vein harvesting. To address this issue, we fabricated native-tissue mimicking multilayered small diameter vascular graft (SDVG) using mulberry (Bombyx mori) and Indian endemic non-mulberry (Antheraea assama and Philosamia ricini) silk. Patterned silk films were fabricated on microgrooved PDMS mold, casted by soft lithography. The biodegradable patterned film templates with aligned cell sheets were rolled onto an inert mandrel to mimic vascular conduit. The hemocompatible and mechanically strong non-mulberry films with RGD motif supported ∼1.2 folds greater proliferation of vascular cells with aligned anchorage. Elicitation of minimal immune response on subcutaneous implantation of the films in mice was complemented by ∼45% lower TNF α secretion by in vitro macrophage culture post 7 days. Pattern-induced alignment favored the functional contractile phenotype of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), expressing the signature markers-calponin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). Endothelial cells (ECs) exhibited a typical punctuated pattern of von Willebrand factor (vWF). Deposition of collagen and elastin by the SMCs substantiated the aptness of the graft with desired biomechanical attributes. Furthermore, the burst strength of the fabricated conduit was in the range of ∼915-1260 mmHg, a prerequisite to withstand physiological pressure. This novel fabrication approach may eliminate the need of maturation in a pulsatile bioreactor for obtaining functional cellular phenotype. This work is thereby an attestation to the immense prospects of exploring non-mulberry silk for bioengineering a multilayered vascular conduit similar to a native vessel in "form and function", befitting for in vivo transplantation. PMID:27269821

  5. In vivo characterization of regenerative peripheral nerve interface function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursu, Daniel C.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Nedic, Andrej; Cederna, Paul S.; Gillespie, R. Brent

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces (RPNIs) are neurotized free autologous muscle grafts equipped with electrodes to record myoelectric signals for prosthesis control. Viability of rat RPNI constructs have been demonstrated using evoked responses. In vivo RPNI characterization is the next critical step for assessment as a control modality for prosthetic devices. Approach. Two RPNIs were created in each of two rats by grafting portions of free muscle to the ends of divided peripheral nerves (peroneal in the left and tibial in the right hind limb) and placing bipolar electrodes on the graft surface. After four months, we examined in vivo electromyographic signal activity and compared these signals to muscular electromyographic signals recorded from autologous muscles in two rats serving as controls. An additional group of two rats in which the autologous muscles were denervated served to quantify cross-talk in the electrode recordings. Recordings were made while rats walked on a treadmill and a motion capture system tracked the hind limbs. Amplitude and periodicity of signals relative to gait were quantified, correlation between electromyographic and motion recording were assessed, and a decoder was trained to predict joint motion. Main Results. Raw RPNI signals were active during walking, with amplitudes of 1 mVPP, and quiet during standing, with amplitudes less than 0.1 mVPP. RPNI signals were periodic and entrained with gait. A decoder predicted bilateral ankle motion with greater than 80% reliability. Control group signal activity agreed with literature. Denervated group signals remained quiescent throughout all evaluations. Significance. In vivo myoelectric RPNI activity encodes neural activation patterns associated with gait. Signal contamination from muscles adjacent to the RPNI is minimal, as demonstrated by the low amplitude signals obtained from the Denervated group. The periodicity and entrainment to gait of RPNI recordings suggests the

  6. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  7. Reliability of the vascular claudication reporting in diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease: a study with near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Fabio; Lamberti, Nicola; Malagoni, Anna Maria; Zambon, Christel; Basaglia, Nino; Mascoli, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Zamboni, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated whether altered reporting of ischemic symptoms occurs in diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and stable claudication. Patients (n = 152) with claudication were enrolled (120 males; mean age: 71.0 ± 8.6 years): 74 with diabetes (DM-PAD) and 78 without (DMfree-PAD). The degree of muscle oxygenation at symptom onset and maximal speed (Smax) during an incremental treadmill test was recorded at the gastrocnemius by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and quantified by area under the curve of oxygenated hemoglobin (AUC-Hbo 2) and area under the curve of differential hemoglobin (AUC-dHb). The DM-PAD and DMfree-PAD showed similar exercise capacities inversely correlated with the degree of muscle oxygenation but significantly lower values of AUC-Hbo 2 and AUC-dHb for DM-PAD at symptom onset and Smax (-356 vs -122 and -1200 vs -359, P < .0001). During a NIRS-assisted test, the report of claudication in the presence of diabetes was delayed, occurring at a lower degree of oxygenation than in patients with PAD only, with potential implications for testing, functional staging, and balance disorders.

  8. The plant vascular system: Evolution, development and functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence of the tracheophyte-based vascular system of land plants had major impacts on the evolution of terrestrial biology, in general, through its role in facilitating the development of plants with increased stature, photosynthetic output, and ability to colonize a greatly expanded range of ...

  9. Hippocampal structure and function are maintained despite severe innate peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Süß, Patrick; Kalinichenko, Liubov; Baum, Wolfgang; Reichel, Martin; Kornhuber, Johannes; Loskarn, Sandra; Ettle, Benjamin; Distler, Jörg H W; Schett, Georg; Winkler, Jürgen; Müller, Christian P; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M

    2015-10-01

    Chronic peripheral inflammation mediated by cytokines such as TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 is associated with psychiatric disorders like depression and anxiety. However, it remains elusive which distinct type of peripheral inflammation triggers neuroinflammation and affects hippocampal plasticity resulting in depressive-like behavior. We hypothesized that chronic peripheral inflammation in the human TNF-α transgenic (TNFtg) mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis spreads into the central nervous system and induces depressive state manifested in specific behavioral pattern and impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis. TNFtg mice showed severe erosive arthritis with increased IL-1β and IL-6 expression in tarsal joints with highly elevated human TNF-α levels in the serum. Intriguingly, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA levels were not altered in the hippocampus of TNFtg mice. In contrast to the pronounced monocytosis in joints and spleen of TNFtg mice, signs of hippocampal microgliosis or astrocytosis were lacking. Furthermore, locomotion was impaired, but there was no locomotion-independent depressive behavior in TNFtg mice. Proliferation and maturation of hippocampal neural precursor cells as well as survival of newly generated neurons were preserved in the dentate gyrus of TNFtg mice despite reduced motor activity and peripheral inflammatory signature. We conclude that peripheral inflammation in TNFtg mice is mediated by chronic activation of the innate immune system. However, severe peripheral inflammation, though impairing locomotor activity, does not elicit depressive-like behavior. These structural and functional findings indicate the maintenance of hippocampal immunity, cellular plasticity, and behavior despite peripheral innate inflammation.

  10. Relationship between endogenous concentrations of vasoactive substances and measures of peripheral vasodilator function in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Nichols, Wilmer W; Conti, C Richard; Braith, Randy W

    2010-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between plasma concentrations of nitrite/nitrate (NO(x)) and endothelin (ET)-1 and non-invasive measures of peripheral vasodilator function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). 2. Twenty-two patients with angiographic CAD underwent non-invasive measurement of peripheral vasodilator function in the brachial conduit artery (flow-mediated dilation (FMD) testing via ultrasound) and in the forearm resistance arteries (via venous occlusion plethysmography) during reactive hyperaemia after 5 min ischaemia. In addition, plasma NO(x) and ET-1 concentrations were determined. 3. The plasma concentration of NO(x) was related to the peak brachial FMD response when expressed as either the relative (%) or absolute (mm) change in diameter (r = 0.73, P < 0.001; and r = 0.64, P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, plasma concentrations of NO(x) demonstrated a relationship with forearm vasodilation estimated by total forearm blood flow following 5 min ischaemia (r = 0.63, P < 0.01) and the flow debt repayment of the forearm (r = 0.54, P < 0.01). Finally, ET-1 concentrations were inversely related to FMD% (r = -0.45, P < 0.05). 4. The findings of the present study demonstrate a relationship between the plasma concentrations of NO(x) and measures of vascular reactivity in conduit and resistance arteries in patients with CAD. Therefore, measurement of plasma NO(x) may serve as a reliable marker for peripheral vasodilator dysfunction in patients with CAD. PMID:19515062

  11. Bacterial expression of functional, biotinylated peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2.

    PubMed

    Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Wong, Karen; Gawrisch, Klaus; Yeliseev, Alexei

    2006-09-01

    A biotin-protein ligase recognition site (BRS) was inserted into a polypeptide comprised of the maltose-binding protein, the peripheral cannabinoid receptor (CB2), thioredoxin A, and a polyhistidine tag at the carboxy terminus. Expression levels of the recombinant receptor in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells were approximately 1mg per liter of bacterial culture. The biotinylated CB2-fusion fully retained its ligand-binding capacity. Introduction of the BRS at the C-terminus of the CB2 fusion protein (construct CB2-109) resulted in its complete in vivo biotinylation; the biotinylated protein was streptavidin-binding competent. Positioning of the BRS near the N-terminus of CB2 (CB2-112) resulted in a very low level of biotinylation in vivo. However, the detergent solubilized and purified CB2-112 fusion protein were successfully biotinylated in vitro by action of a BirA biotin-protein ligase. The biotinylated CB2-112 fusion protein was cleaved by the tobacco etch virus protease at specifically inserted sites, and deposited onto monomeric avidin agarose beads. Biotinylation of the recombinant CB2 receptor enabled not only purification but also immobilization of the GPCR on a solid support in homogeneous orientation which is beneficial for subsequent structural characterization.

  12. Vascular endothelium: functioning in norm, changes in atherosclerosis and current dietary approaches to improve endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Revin, Victor V; Sobenin, Igor A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium represents not only a simple cellular monolayer that lines the vascular tree in humans and other vertebrates. Depending on the location, the endothelium shows significant morphological and functional heterogeneity through differentiated expression of pro- and anticoagulant factors, presence and frequency of intercellular contacts, variable contractility, cell shape, and volume. Altogether, these properties are crucial for adjustment of the endothelial function and further maintenance of the adequate homeostasis in response in local microenvironmental changes. Endothelial cells (ECs) play a critical role in coordinated regulation of blood flow. This is achieved due to the capacity of ECs to create the active anti-thrombotic surface that supports blood fluidity and transfer of blood cells and biomolecules. However, in certain vascular regions that can occur in inflamed sites or in sites with high hydrodynamic shear stress, ECs could lost their anti-thrombotic properties and switch their normal quiescent phenotype towards the prothrombotic, proadhesion, and proinflammatory state. In such an athero-prone site, the proper endothelial function is impaired that increases risk for formation of the atherosclerotic plaque. The endothelial dysfunction not only precedes atherosclerosis but greatly contributes to atherogenesis in all disease stages. Healthy lifestyle and regular intake of correct antioxidant-rich diet such as fresh fruits, vegetables, olive oil, red wine, and tea have beneficial effects on endothelial function and could therefore reduce the cardiovascular risk. PMID:25723463

  13. GPR103b functions in the peripheral regulation of adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mulumba, Mukandila; Jossart, Christian; Granata, Riccarda; Gallo, Davide; Escher, Emanuel; Ghigo, Ezio; Servant, Marc J; Marleau, Sylvie; Ong, Huy

    2010-08-01

    The activation of G protein-coupled receptor 103 (GPR103) by its endogenous peptidic ligands, QRFPs, is involved in the central regulation of feeding by increasing food intake, body weight, and fat mass after intracerebroventricular injection in mice. However, the role of GPR103 in regulating peripheral metabolic pathways has not yet been explored. The present study aimed to investigate the role of GPR103 in adipogenesis and lipid metabolism using 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Our results show that differentiated 3T3-L1 cells expressed the GPR103b subtype mRNA and protein, as well as QRFP mRNA. QRFP-43 and -26 induced an increase in triglyceride accumulation of 50 and 41%, respectively, and elicited a dose-dependent increase in fatty acid uptake, by up to approximately 60% at the highest concentration, in 3T3-L1-differentiated cells. QRFP-43 and -26 inhibited isoproterenol (ISO)-induced lipolysis in a dose-dependent manner, with IC(50)s of 2.3 +/- 1.2 and 1.1 +/- 1.0 nm, respectively. The expression of genes involved in lipid uptake (FATP1, CD36, LPL, ACSL1, PPAR-gamma, and C/EBP-alpha), was increased by 2- to 3-fold after treatment with QRFP. The effects of QRFP on ISO-induced lipolysis and fatty acid uptake were abolished when GPR103b was silenced. In a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, the expression of GPR103b in epididymal fat pads was elevated by 16-fold whereas that of QRFP was reduced by 46% compared to lean mice. Furthermore, QRFP was bioactive in omental adipocytes from obese individuals, inhibiting ISO-induced lipolysis in these cells. Our results suggest that GPR103b and QRFP work in an autocrine/paracrine manner to regulate adipogenesis.

  14. Tie1 controls angiopoietin function in vascular remodeling and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Emilia A; Lampinen, Anita; Giri, Hemant; Anisimov, Andrey; Kim, Minah; Allen, Breanna; Fang, Shentong; D'Amico, Gabriela; Sipilä, Tuomas J; Lohela, Marja; Strandin, Tomas; Vaheri, Antti; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Koh, Gou Young; McDonald, Donald M; Alitalo, Kari; Saharinen, Pipsa

    2016-09-01

    The angiopoietin/Tie (ANG/Tie) receptor system controls developmental and tumor angiogenesis, inflammatory vascular remodeling, and vessel leakage. ANG1 is a Tie2 agonist that promotes vascular stabilization in inflammation and sepsis, whereas ANG2 is a context-dependent Tie2 agonist or antagonist. A limited understanding of ANG signaling mechanisms and the orphan receptor Tie1 has hindered development of ANG/Tie-targeted therapeutics. Here, we determined that both ANG1 and ANG2 binding to Tie2 increases Tie1-Tie2 interactions in a β1 integrin-dependent manner and that Tie1 regulates ANG-induced Tie2 trafficking in endothelial cells. Endothelial Tie1 was essential for the agonist activity of ANG1 and autocrine ANG2. Deletion of endothelial Tie1 in mice reduced Tie2 phosphorylation and downstream Akt activation, increased FOXO1 nuclear localization and transcriptional activation, and prevented ANG1- and ANG2-induced capillary-to-venous remodeling. However, in acute endotoxemia, the Tie1 ectodomain that is responsible for interaction with Tie2 was rapidly cleaved, ANG1 agonist activity was decreased, and autocrine ANG2 agonist activity was lost, which led to suppression of Tie2 signaling. Tie1 cleavage also occurred in patients with hantavirus infection. These results support a model in which Tie1 directly interacts with Tie2 to promote ANG-induced vascular responses under noninflammatory conditions, whereas in inflammation, Tie1 cleavage contributes to loss of ANG2 agonist activity and vascular stability. PMID:27548530

  15. Antenatal Hypoxia and Pulmonary Vascular Function and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G.; Blood, Arlin B.; Kim, Joon H.; Wilson, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides evidence that antenatal hypoxia, which represents a significant and worldwide problem, causes prenatal programming of the lung. A general overview of lung development is provided along with some background regarding transcriptional and signaling systems of the lung. The review illustrates that antenatal hypoxic stress can induce a continuum of responses depending on the species examined. Fetuses and newborns of certain species and specific human populations are well acclimated to antenatal hypoxia. However, antenatal hypoxia causes pulmonary vascular disease in fetuses and newborns of most mammalian species and humans. Disease can range from mild pulmonary hypertension, to severe vascular remodeling and dangerous elevations in pressure. The timing, length, and magnitude of the intrauterine hypoxic stress are important to disease development, however there is also a genetic-environmental relationship that is not yet completely understood. Determining the origins of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension and their associated effects is a challenging task, but is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for pulmonary hypertension in the newborn due to antenatal hypoxia that can both treat the symptoms and curtail or reverse disease progression. PMID:24063380

  16. Antenatal hypoxia and pulmonary vascular function and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Blood, Arlin B; Kim, Joon H; Wilson, Sean M

    2013-09-01

    This review provides evidence that antenatal hypoxia, which represents a significant and worldwide problem, causes prenatal programming of the lung. A general overview of lung development is provided along with some background regarding transcriptional and signaling systems of the lung. The review illustrates that antenatal hypoxic stress can induce a continuum of responses depending on the species examined. Fetuses and newborns of certain species and specific human populations are well acclimated to antenatal hypoxia. However, antenatal hypoxia causes pulmonary vascular disease in fetuses and newborns of most mammalian species and humans. Disease can range from mild pulmonary hypertension, to severe vascular remodeling and dangerous elevations in pressure. The timing, length, and magnitude of the intrauterine hypoxic stress are important to disease development, however there is also a genetic-environmental relationship that is not yet completely understood. Determining the origins of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension and their associated effects is a challenging task, but is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for pulmonary hypertension in the newborn due to antenatal hypoxia that can both treat the symptoms and curtail or reverse disease progression.

  17. Uteroplacental circulation and fetal vascular function and development.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, Kent L; Louey, Samantha

    2013-09-01

    Although blood flow in the placental vasculature is governed by the same physiological forces of shear, pressure and resistance as in other organs, it is also uniquely specialized on the maternal and fetal sides. At the materno-fetal interface, the independent uteroplacental and umbilicoplacental circulations must coordinate sufficiently to supply the fetus with the nutrients and substrates it needs to grow and develop. Uterine arterial flow must increase dramatically to accommodate the growing fetus. Recent evidence delineates the hormonal and endothelial mechanisms by which maternal vessels dilate and remodel during pregnancy. The umbilical circulation is established de novo during embryonic development but blood does not flow through the placenta until late in the first trimester. The umbilical circulation operates in the interest of maintaining fetal oxygenation over the course of pregnancy, and is affected differently by mechanical and chemical regulators of vascular tone compared to other organs. The processes that match placental vascular growth and fetal tissue growth are not understood, but studies of compromised pregnancies provide clues. The subtle changes that cause the failure of the normally regulated vascular processes during pregnancy have not been thoroughly identified. Likewise, practical and effective therapeutic strategies to reverse detrimental placental perfusion patterns have yet to be investigated.

  18. A single portion of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L) improves protection against DNA damage but not vascular function in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Del Bó, Cristian; Riso, Patrizia; Campolo, Jonica; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Brambilla, Ada; Rizzolo, Anna; Porrini, Marisa

    2013-03-01

    It has been suggested that anthocyanin-rich foods may exert antioxidant effects and improve vascular function as demonstrated mainly in vitro and in the animal model. Blueberries are rich sources of anthocyanins and we hypothesized that their intake could improve cell protection against oxidative stress and affect endothelial function in humans. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of one portion (300 g) of blueberries on selected markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant protection (endogenous and oxidatively induced DNA damage) and of vascular function (changes in peripheral arterial tone and plasma nitric oxide levels) in male subjects. In a randomized cross-over design, separated by a wash out period ten young volunteers received one portion of blueberries ground by blender or one portion of a control jelly. Before and after consumption (at 1, 2, and 24 hours), blood samples were collected and used to evaluate anthocyanin absorption (through mass spectrometry), endogenous and H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage in blood mononuclear cells (through the comet assay), and plasma nitric oxide concentrations (through a fluorometric assay). Peripheral arterial function was assessed by means of Endo-PAT 2000. Blueberries significantly reduced (P < .01) H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage (-18%) 1 hour after blueberry consumption compared to control. No significant differences were observed for endogenous DNA damage, peripheral arterial function and nitric oxide levels after blueberry intake. In conclusion, one portion of blueberries seems sufficient to improve cell antioxidant defense against DNA damage, but further studies are necessary to understand their role on vascular function.

  19. Vascular and cognitive functions associated with cardiovascular disease in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ronald A.; Poppas, Athena; Forman, Daniel E.; Hoth, Karin F.; Haley, Andreana P.; Gunstad, John; Jefferson, Angela L.; Tate, David F.; Paul, Robert H.; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Ono, Mokato; Jerskey, Beth A.; Gerhard-Herman, Marie

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between systemic vascular function, neurocognitive performance, and structural brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among geriatric outpatients with treated, stable cardiovascular disease and no history of neurological illness (n = 88, ages 56–85 years). Vascular function was assessed by cardiac ejection fraction and output, sequential systolic and diastolic blood pressures, flow mediated brachial artery reactivity (BAR), and carotid intima media thickness (IMT). White matter hyperintensities (WMH) on MRI were quantified and examined relative to cognitive and vascular function. Principal component analysis revealed two primary vascular components: one associated with cardiac function, the other with atherosclerotic burden/endothelial dysfunction. Both factors were significantly associated with cognitive function and WMH volume. Reduced systolic variability and increased IMT were most strongly related to reduced attention, executive function, and information-processing speed. These findings suggest the possibility that systemic vascular indices may provide proxy measures of cerebrovascular dysfunction and reinforce the importance of achieving greater understanding of interaction between systemic vascular disease and brain dysfunction among elderly people with cardiovascular disease. PMID:18608677

  20. Peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype and function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, P J; Compston, D A

    1988-01-01

    T suppressor cell function and phenotype are abnormal in patients with multiple sclerosis, especially during the chronic progressive phase but the sub-populations defined by mitogen stimulation and serological methods may not be identical. In this study, involving 45 patients with multiple sclerosis and 33 controls, there was no correlation between T suppressor function and CD8 cell phenotype in patients with multiple sclerosis or in controls. These phenotypic and functional studies cannot therefore be used interchangeably in the assessment of patients with multiple sclerosis since they provide different information about lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:2976082

  1. Interference with PPARγ Function in Smooth Muscle Causes Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Carmen M.; Beyer, Andreas M.; de Lange, Willem J.; Keen, Henry L.; Baumbach, Gary L.; Faraci, Frank M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand activated transcription factor playing a critical role in metabolism. Thiazolidinediones, high affinity PPARγ ligands used clinically to treat type-II diabetes, have been reported to lower blood pressure and provide other cardiovascular benefits. Some mutations in PPARγ cause type-II diabetes and severe hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that PPARγ in vascular muscle plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. Transgenic mice expressing dominant negative mutations in PPARγ under the control of a smooth muscle-specific promoter exhibit a loss of responsiveness to nitric oxide and striking alterations in contractility in the aorta, hypertrophy and inward remodeling in the cerebral microcirculation, and systolic hypertension. These results identify PPARγ as pivotal in vascular muscle as a regulator of vascular structure, vascular function and blood pressure, potentially explaining some of the cardioprotective effects of thiazolidinediones. PMID:18316027

  2. Biomechanical regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell functions: from in vitro to in vivo understanding

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Hu, Jianjun; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Guixue

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) have critical functions in vascular diseases. Haemodynamic factors are important regulators of VSMC functions in vascular pathophysiology. VSMCs are physiologically active in the three-dimensional matrix and interact with the shear stress sensor of endothelial cells (ECs). The purpose of this review is to illustrate how haemodynamic factors regulate VSMC functions under two-dimensional conditions in vitro or three-dimensional co-culture conditions in vivo. Recent advances show that high shear stress induces VSMC apoptosis through endothelial-released nitric oxide and low shear stress upregulates VSMC proliferation and migration through platelet-derived growth factor released by ECs. This differential regulation emphasizes the need to construct more actual environments for future research on vascular diseases (such as atherosclerosis and hypertension) and cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:24152813

  3. Association between smoking status and the parameters of vascular structure and function in adults: results from the EVIDENT study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study analyses the relation between smoking status and the parameters used to assess vascular structure and function. Methods This cross-sectional, multi-centre study involved a random sample of 1553 participants from the EVIDENT study. Measurements: The smoking status, peripheral augmentation index and ankle-brachial index were measured in all participants. In a small subset of the main population (265 participants), the carotid intima-media thickness and pulse wave velocity were also measured. Results After controlling for the effect of age, sex and other risk factors, present smokers have higher values of carotid intima-media thickness (p = 0.011). Along the same lines, current smokers have higher values of pulse wave velocity and lower mean values of ankle-brachial index but without statistical significance in both cases. Conclusions Among the parameters of vascular structure and function analysed, only the IMT shows association with the smoking status, after adjusting for confounders. PMID:24289208

  4. Creating perfused functional vascular channels using 3D bio-printing technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian K; Kim, Diana Y; Ngo, Haygan; Lee, Young; Seo, Lan; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A; Dai, Guohao

    2014-09-01

    We developed a methodology using 3D bio-printing technology to create a functional in vitro vascular channel with perfused open lumen using only cells and biological matrices. The fabricated vasculature has a tight, confluent endothelium lining, presenting barrier function for both plasma protein and high-molecular weight dextran molecule. The fluidic vascular channel is capable of supporting the viability of tissue up to 5 mm in distance at 5 million cells/mL density under the physiological flow condition. In static-cultured vascular channels, active angiogenic sprouting from the vessel surface was observed whereas physiological flow strongly suppressed this process. Gene expression analysis was reported in this study to show the potential of this vessel model in vascular biology research. The methods have great potential in vascularized tissue fabrication using 3D bio-printing technology as the vascular channel is simultaneously created while cells and matrix are printed around the channel in desired 3D patterns. It can also serve as a unique experimental tool for investigating fundamental mechanisms of vascular remodeling with extracellular matrix and maturation process under 3D flow condition. PMID:24965886

  5. Creating perfused functional vascular channels using 3D bio-printing technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian K; Kim, Diana Y; Ngo, Haygan; Lee, Young; Seo, Lan; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A; Dai, Guohao

    2014-09-01

    We developed a methodology using 3D bio-printing technology to create a functional in vitro vascular channel with perfused open lumen using only cells and biological matrices. The fabricated vasculature has a tight, confluent endothelium lining, presenting barrier function for both plasma protein and high-molecular weight dextran molecule. The fluidic vascular channel is capable of supporting the viability of tissue up to 5 mm in distance at 5 million cells/mL density under the physiological flow condition. In static-cultured vascular channels, active angiogenic sprouting from the vessel surface was observed whereas physiological flow strongly suppressed this process. Gene expression analysis was reported in this study to show the potential of this vessel model in vascular biology research. The methods have great potential in vascularized tissue fabrication using 3D bio-printing technology as the vascular channel is simultaneously created while cells and matrix are printed around the channel in desired 3D patterns. It can also serve as a unique experimental tool for investigating fundamental mechanisms of vascular remodeling with extracellular matrix and maturation process under 3D flow condition.

  6. Creating Perfused Functional Vascular Channels Using 3D Bio-Printing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vivian K.; Kim, Diana Y.; Ngo, Haygan; Lee, Young; Seo, Lan; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A.; Dai, Guohao

    2014-01-01

    We developed a methodology using 3D bio-printing technology to create a functional in vitro vascular channel with perfused open lumen using only cells and biological matrices. The fabricated vasculature has a tight, confluent endothelium lining, presenting barrier function for both plasma protein and high-molecular weight dextran molecule. The fluidic vascular channel is capable of supporting the viability of tissue up to 5mm in distance at 5 million cells/mL density under the physiological flow condition. In static-cultured vascular channels, active angiogenic sprouting from the vessel surface was observed whereas physiological flow strongly suppressed this process. Gene expression analysis were reported in this study to show the potential of this vessel model in vascular biology research. The methods have great potential in vascularized tissue fabrication using 3D bio-printing technology as the vascular channel is simultaneously created while cells and matrix are printed around the channel in desired 3D patterns. It can also serve as a unique experimental tool for investigating fundamental mechanisms of vascular remodeling with extracellular matrix and maturation process under 3D flow condition. PMID:24965886

  7. AFM combines functional and morphological analysis of peripheral myelinated and demyelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Alejandro; Bui, Chin Chu; Suter, Ueli; Young, Peter; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2007-10-01

    Demyelination of the myelinated peripheral or central axon is a common pathophysiological step in the clinical manifestation of several human diseases of the peripheral and the central nervous system such as the majority of Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndromes and multiple sclerosis, respectively. The structural degradation of the axon insulating myelin sheath has profound consequences for ionic conduction and nerve function in general, but also affects the micromechanical properties of the nerve fiber. We have for the first time investigated mechanical properties of rehydrated, isolated peripheral nerve fibers from mouse using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have generated quantitative maps of elastic modulus along myelinated and demyelinated axons, together with quantitative maps of axon topography. This study shows that AFM can combine functional and morphological analysis of neurological tissue at the level of single nerve fibers.

  8. Association of digital vascular function with cardiovascular risk factors: a population study

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Van Vlierberghe, Eline; Knez, Judita; Szczesny, Gregory; Thijs, Lutgarde; Jozeau, Dominique; Balestra, Costantino; D'hooge, Jan; Staessen, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Vasodilation of the peripheral arteries during reactive hyperaemia depends in part on release of nitric oxide from endothelial cells. Previous studies mainly employed a fingertip tonometric device to derive pulse wave amplitude (PWA) and PWA hyperaemic changes. An alternative approach is based on photoplethysmography (PPG). We sought to evaluate the correlates of digital PPG PWA hyperaemic responses as a measure of peripheral vascular function. Design The Flemish Study on Environment, Genes and Health Outcomes (FLEMENGHO) is a population-based cohort study. Setting Respondents were examined at one centre in northern Belgium. Participants For this analysis, our sample consisted of 311 former participants (53.5% women; mean age 52.6 years; 43.1% hypertensive), who were examined from January 2010 until March 2012 (response rate 85.1%). Primary outcome measures Using a fingertip PPG device, we measured digital PWA at baseline and at 30 s intervals for 4 min during reactive hyperaemia induced by a 5 min forearm cuff occlusion. We performed stepwise regression to identify correlates of the hyperaemic response ratio for each 30 s interval after cuff deflation. Results The maximal hyperaemic response was detected in the 30–60 s interval. The explained variance for the PPG PWA ratio ranged from 9.7% at 0–30 s interval to 22.5% at 60–90 s time interval. The hyperaemic response at each 30 s interval was significantly higher in women compared with men (p≤0.001). The PPG PWA changes at 0–90 s intervals decreased with current smoking (p≤0.0007) and at 0–240 s intervals decreased with higher body mass index (p≤0.035). These associations with sex, current smoking and body mass index were mutually independent. Conclusions Our study is the first to implement the new PPG technique to measure digital PWA hyperaemic changes in a general population. Hyperaemic response, as measured by PPG, is inversely associated with traditional

  9. Vascular quality of care pilot study: how admission to a vascular surgery service affects evidence-based pharmacologic risk factor modification in patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Steenhof, Naomi; Le Piane, Francesca; Leblanc, Kori; Eisenberg, Naomi R; Kwan, Yvonne; Malmberg, Christine; Papadopoulos, Alexandra; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) guidelines recommend aggressive risk factor modification to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Recommended pharmacologic therapies include antiplatelets, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins). Purpose We studied the degree to which patient admission to a vascular surgery service increased the use of these therapies. Patients and methods The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of 150 patients with PAD admitted to the vascular surgery service at a large Canadian tertiary care hospital. The use of recommended pharmacologic therapies at the time of admission and discharge were compared. A multidisciplinary clinical team established criteria by which patients were deemed ineligible to receive any of the recommended therapies. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) were considered an alternative to ACE inhibitors. Results Prior to hospital admission, 64% of patients were on antiplatelet therapy, 67% were on an ACE inhibitor or ARB, and 71% were on a statin. At the time of discharge, 91% of patients were on an antiplatelet (or not, with an acceptable reason), 77% were on an ACE inhibitor or an ARB (or not, with an acceptable reason), and 85% were on a statin (or not, with an acceptable reason). While new prescriptions were largely responsible for improved guideline adherence with antiplatelets and statins, most of the apparent improvement in ACE inhibitor and ARB use was the result of identifying an acceptable reason for not having them prescribed. Conclusion This hypothesis generating pilot study supports the findings of others that there is suboptimal prescription of pharmacologic risk reduction therapies in the PAD population. Admission to a vascular service increases these rates. Nevertheless, some patients are still not receiving evidence-based treatment at discharge even after consideration of acceptable reasons. Strategies are needed to improve PAD guideline

  10. Conditional gene deletion reveals functional redundancy of GABAB receptors in peripheral nociceptors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important inhibitory neurotransmitter which mainly mediates its effects on neurons via ionotropic (GABAA) and metabotropic (GABAB) receptors. GABAB receptors are widely expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system. Although there is evidence for a key function of GABAB receptors in the modulation of pain, the relative contribution of peripherally- versus centrally-expressed GABAB receptors is unclear. Results In order to elucidate the functional relevance of GABAB receptors expressed in peripheral nociceptive neurons in pain modulation we generated and analyzed conditional mouse mutants lacking functional GABAB(1) subunit specifically in nociceptors, preserving expression in the spinal cord and brain (SNS-GABAB(1)-/- mice). Lack of the GABAB(1) subunit precludes the assembly of functional GABAB receptor. We analyzed SNS-GABAB(1)-/- mice and their control littermates in several models of acute and neuropathic pain. Electrophysiological studies on peripheral afferents revealed higher firing frequencies in SNS-GABAB(1)-/- mice compared to corresponding control littermates. However no differences were seen in basal nociceptive sensitivity between these groups. The development of neuropathic and chronic inflammatory pain was similar across the two genotypes. The duration of nocifensive responses evoked by intraplantar formalin injection was prolonged in the SNS-GABAB(1)-/- animals as compared to their control littermates. Pharmacological experiments revealed that systemic baclofen-induced inhibition of formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors was not dependent upon GABAB(1) expression in nociceptors. Conclusion This study addressed contribution of GABAB receptors expressed on primary afferent nociceptive fibers to the modulation of pain. We observed that neither the development of acute and chronic pain nor the analgesic effects of a systematically-delivered GABAB agonist was significantly changed upon a specific

  11. Increased Expression of Tissue Factor and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Buchs, A. E.; Kornberg, A.; Zahavi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Zarfati, C.; Rapoport, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the correlation between the expression of tissue factor (TF) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGEs) and vascular complications in patients with longstanding uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2D). TF and RAGE mRNAs as well as TF antigen and activity were investigated in 21 T2D patients with and without vascular complications. mRNA expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in nonstimulated and advanced glycation end product (AGE) albumin–stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). TF antigen expression was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and TF activity by a modified prothrombin time assay. Basal RAGE mRNA expression was 0.2 ± 0.06 in patients with complications and 0.05 ± 0.06 patients without complications (P = .004). Stimulation did not cause any further increase in either group. TF mRNA was 0.58 ± 0.29 in patients with complications and 0.21 ± 0.18 in patients without complications (P = .003). Stimulation resulted in a nonsignificant increase in both groups. Basal TF activity (U/106 PBMCs) was 18.4 ± 13.2 in patients with complications and 6.96 ± 5.2 in patients without complications (P = .003). It increased 3-fold in both groups after stimulation (P = .001). TF antigen (pg/106 PBMCs) was 33.7 ± 28.6 in patients with complications, 10.4 ± 7.8 in patients without complications (P = .02). Stimulation tripled TF antigen in both groups of patients (P = .001). The RAGE/TF axis is up-regulated inT2Dpatients with vascular complications as compared to patients without complications. This suggests a role for this axis in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in T2D. PMID:15203887

  12. Peripheral Chemoreceptors: Function and Plasticity of the Carotid Body

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prem; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the sensory nature of the carotid body dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. Following these seminal discoveries, research into carotid body mechanisms moved forward progressively through the 20th century, with many descriptions of the ultrastructure of the organ and stimulus-response measurements at the level of the whole organ. The later part of 20th century witnessed the first descriptions of the cellular responses and electrophysiology of isolated and cultured type I and type II cells, and there now exist a number of testable hypotheses of chemotransduction. The goal of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of current concepts on sensory transduction and transmission of the hypoxic stimulus at the carotid body with an emphasis on integrating cellular mechanisms with the whole organ responses and highlighting the gaps or discrepancies in our knowledge. It is increasingly evident that in addition to hypoxia, the carotid body responds to a wide variety of blood-borne stimuli, including reduced glucose and immune-related cytokines and we therefore also consider the evidence for a polymodal function of the carotid body and its implications. It is clear that the sensory function of the carotid body exhibits considerable plasticity in response to the chronic perturbations in environmental O2 that is associated with many physiological and pathological conditions. The mechanisms and consequences of carotid body plasticity in health and disease are discussed in the final sections of this article. PMID:23728973

  13. Ciguatoxin reduces regenerative capacity of axotomized peripheral neurons and delays functional recovery in pre-exposed mice after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Kumar, Gajendra; Asthana, Pallavi; Tin, Chung; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) results from consumption of tropical reef fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). Pacific (P)-CTX-1 is among the most potent known CTXs and the predominant source of CFP in the endemic region responsible for the majority of neurological symptoms in patients. Chronic and persistent neurological symptoms occur in some CFP patients, which often result in incomplete functional recovery for years. However, the direct effects of exposure to CTXs remain largely unknown. In present study, we exposed mice to CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced from the Pacific region. P-CTX-1 was detected in peripheral nerves within hours and persisted for two months after exposure. P-CTX-1 inhibited axonal regrowth from axotomized peripheral neurons in culture. P-CTX-1 exposure reduced motor function in mice within the first two weeks of exposure before returning to baseline levels. These pre-exposed animals exhibited delayed sensory and motor functional recovery, and irreversible motor deficits after peripheral nerve injury in which formation of functional synapses was impaired. These findings are consistent with reduced muscle function, as assessed by electromyography recordings. Our study provides strong evidence that the persistence of P-CTX-1 in peripheral nerves reduces the intrinsic growth capacity of peripheral neurons, resulting in delayed functional recovery after injury. PMID:27229176

  14. Ciguatoxin reduces regenerative capacity of axotomized peripheral neurons and delays functional recovery in pre-exposed mice after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Kumar, Gajendra; Asthana, Pallavi; Tin, Chung; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) results from consumption of tropical reef fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). Pacific (P)-CTX-1 is among the most potent known CTXs and the predominant source of CFP in the endemic region responsible for the majority of neurological symptoms in patients. Chronic and persistent neurological symptoms occur in some CFP patients, which often result in incomplete functional recovery for years. However, the direct effects of exposure to CTXs remain largely unknown. In present study, we exposed mice to CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced from the Pacific region. P-CTX-1 was detected in peripheral nerves within hours and persisted for two months after exposure. P-CTX-1 inhibited axonal regrowth from axotomized peripheral neurons in culture. P-CTX-1 exposure reduced motor function in mice within the first two weeks of exposure before returning to baseline levels. These pre-exposed animals exhibited delayed sensory and motor functional recovery, and irreversible motor deficits after peripheral nerve injury in which formation of functional synapses was impaired. These findings are consistent with reduced muscle function, as assessed by electromyography recordings. Our study provides strong evidence that the persistence of P-CTX-1 in peripheral nerves reduces the intrinsic growth capacity of peripheral neurons, resulting in delayed functional recovery after injury. PMID:27229176

  15. Modular Small Diameter Vascular Grafts with Bioactive Functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong; Tolba, Emad; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Schröder, Heinz C.; Link, Thorben; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a novel type of artificial small diameter blood vessels, termed biomimetic tissue-engineered blood vessels (bTEBV), with a modular composition. They are composed of a hydrogel scaffold consisting of two negatively charged natural polymers, alginate and a modified chitosan, N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan (N,O-CMC). Into this biologically inert scaffold two biofunctionally active biopolymers are embedded, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) and silica, as well as gelatin which exposes the cell recognition signal, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD). These materials can be hardened by exposure to Ca2+ through formation of Ca2+ bridges between the polyanions, alginate, N,O-CMC, and polyP (alginate-Ca2+-N,O-CMC-polyP). The bTEBV are formed by pressing the hydrogel through an extruder into a hardening solution, containing Ca2+. In this universal scaffold of the bTEBV biomaterial, polycations such as poly(l-Lys), poly(d-Lys) or a His/Gly-tagged RGD peptide (three RGD units) were incorporated, which promote the adhesion of endothelial cells to the vessel surface. The mechanical properties of the biopolymer material (alginate-Ca2+-N,O-CMC-polyP-silica) revealed a hardness (elastic modulus) of 475 kPa even after a short incubation period in CaCl2 solution. The material of the artificial vascular grafts (bTEBVs with an outer size 6 mm and 1.8 mm, and an inner diameter 4 mm and 0.8 mm, respectively) turned out to be durable in 4-week pulsatile flow experiments at an alternating pressure between 25 and 100 mbar (18.7 and 75.0 mm Hg). The burst pressure of the larger (smaller) vessels was 850 mbar (145 mbar). Incorporation of polycationic poly(l-Lys), poly(d-Lys), and especially the His/Gly-tagged RGD peptide, markedly increased the adhesion of human, umbilical vein/vascular endothelial cells, EA.HY926 cells, to the surface of the hydrogel. No significant effect of the polyP samples on the clotting of human plasma is measured. We propose that the metabolically degradable

  16. Effect of lower limb preference on local muscular and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Christopher A; Thiebaud, Robert S; Rossow, Lindy M; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Kim, Daeyeol; Abe, Takashi; Bemben, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral physical training can enhance muscular size and function as well as vascular function in the trained limb. In non-athletes, the preferred arm for use during unilateral tasks may exhibit greater muscular strength compared to the non-preferred arm. It is unclear if lower limb preference affects lower limb vascular function or muscular endurance and power in recreationally active adults. To examine the effect of lower limb preference on quadriceps muscle size and function and on lower limb vascular function in middle-aged adults. Twenty (13 men, 7 women) recreationally-active middle-aged (55 ± 7 yrs) adults underwent measurements of quadriceps muscle thickness, strength, mean power, endurance, and arterial stiffness, calf venous compliance, and calf blood flow in the preferred and non-preferred lower limb. The preferred limb exhibited greater calf vascular conductance (31.6 ± 15.5 versus 25.8 ± 13.0 units flow/mmHg; p = 0.011) compared to the non-preferred limb. The interlimb difference in calf vascular conductance was negatively related to weekly aerobic activity (hrs/week) (r = -0.521; p = 0.019). Lower limb preference affects calf blood flow but not quadriceps muscle size or function. Studies involving unilateral lower limb testing procedures in middle-aged individuals should consider standardizing the testing to either the preferred or non-preferred limb rather than the right or left limb.

  17. Gpr116 Receptor Regulates Distinctive Functions in Pneumocytes and Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Niaudet, Colin; Vanlandewijck, Michael; Ekvärn, Elisabet; Salvado, M. Dolores; Mehlem, Annika; Al Sayegh, Sahar; He, Liqun; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Castro-Freire, Marco; Katayama, Kan; Hultenby, Kjell; Moessinger, Christine; Tannenberg, Philip; Cunha, Sara; Pietras, Kristian; Laviña, Bàrbara; Hong, JongWook; Berg, Tove; Betsholtz, Christer

    2015-01-01

    Despite its known expression in both the vascular endothelium and the lung epithelium, until recently the physiological role of the adhesion receptor Gpr116/ADGRF5 has remained elusive. We generated a new mouse model of constitutive Gpr116 inactivation, with a large genetic deletion encompassing exon 4 to exon 21 of the Gpr116 gene. This model allowed us to confirm recent results defining Gpr116 as necessary regulator of surfactant homeostasis. The loss of Gpr116 provokes an early accumulation of surfactant in the lungs, followed by a massive infiltration of macrophages, and eventually progresses into an emphysema-like pathology. Further analysis of this knockout model revealed cerebral vascular leakage, beginning at around 1.5 months of age. Additionally, endothelial-specific deletion of Gpr116 resulted in a significant increase of the brain vascular leakage. Mice devoid of Gpr116 developed an anatomically normal and largely functional vascular network, surprisingly exhibited an attenuated pathological retinal vascular response in a model of oxygen-induced retinopathy. These data suggest that Gpr116 modulates endothelial properties, a previously unappreciated function despite the pan-vascular expression of this receptor. Our results support the key pulmonary function of Gpr116 and describe a new role in the central nervous system vasculature. PMID:26394398

  18. Endovascular balloon-assisted embolization of high-flow peripheral vascular lesions using dual-lumen coaxial balloon microcatheter and Onyx: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, Bharathi D; Mortazavi, Shabnam; Hunter, David W; Duran-Castro, Olga L; Snyder, Gregory B; Siedel, Glen F; Golzarian, Jafar

    2014-04-01

    Balloon-assisted embolization performed by delivering Onyx ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer through a dual-lumen coaxial balloon microcatheter is a new technique for the management of peripheral vascular lesions. This technique does not require an initial reflux of Onyx to form around the tip of the microcatheter before antegrade flow of Onyx can commence. In a series of four patients who were treated with the use of this technique, the absence of significant reflux of Onyx was noted, as were excellent navigability and easy retrieval of the balloon microcatheter. However, in one patient, there was inadvertent adverse embolization of a digital artery, which was not caused by reflux of Onyx but could still be related to balloon inflation. PMID:24674217

  19. Endovascular balloon-assisted embolization of high-flow peripheral vascular lesions using dual-lumen coaxial balloon microcatheter and Onyx: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, Bharathi D; Mortazavi, Shabnam; Hunter, David W; Duran-Castro, Olga L; Snyder, Gregory B; Siedel, Glen F; Golzarian, Jafar

    2014-04-01

    Balloon-assisted embolization performed by delivering Onyx ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer through a dual-lumen coaxial balloon microcatheter is a new technique for the management of peripheral vascular lesions. This technique does not require an initial reflux of Onyx to form around the tip of the microcatheter before antegrade flow of Onyx can commence. In a series of four patients who were treated with the use of this technique, the absence of significant reflux of Onyx was noted, as were excellent navigability and easy retrieval of the balloon microcatheter. However, in one patient, there was inadvertent adverse embolization of a digital artery, which was not caused by reflux of Onyx but could still be related to balloon inflation.

  20. Ultrasound in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy: structure meets function in the neuromuscular clinic.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Elena; Noto, Yu-Ichi; Simon, Neil G

    2015-10-01

    Peripheral nerve ultrasound (US) has emerged as a promising technique for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. While most experience with US has been reported in the context of nerve entrapment syndromes, the role of US in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy (PN) has recently been explored. Distinctive US findings have been reported in patients with hereditary, immune-mediated, infectious and axonal PN; US may add complementary information to neurophysiological studies in the diagnostic work-up of PN. This review describes the characteristic US findings in PN reported to date and a classification of abnormal nerve US patterns in PN is proposed. Closer scrutiny of nerve abnormalities beyond assessment of nerve calibre may allow for more accurate diagnostic classification of PN, as well as contribute to the understanding of the intersection of structure and function in PN.

  1. Adiponectin in Fresh Frozen Plasma Contributes to Restoration of Vascular Barrier Function After Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiyun; Cao, Yanna; Huby, Maria P; Duan, Chaojun; Baer, Lisa; Peng, Zhanglong; Kozar, Rosemary A; Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Holcomb, John B; Wade, Charles E; Ko, Tien C

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of preventable deaths in civilian and military trauma. Use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in patients requiring massive transfusion is associated with improved outcomes. FFP contains significant amounts of adiponectin, which is known to have vascular protective function. We hypothesize that FFP improves vascular barrier function largely via adiponectin. Plasma adiponectin levels were measured in 19 severely injured patients in hemorrhagic shock (HS). Compared with normal individuals, plasma adiponectin levels decreased to 49% in HS patients before resuscitation (P < 0.05) and increased to 64% post-resuscitation (but not significant). In a HS mouse model, we demonstrated a similar decrease in plasma adiponectin to 54% but a significant increase to 79% by FFP resuscitation compared with baseline (P < 0.05). HS disrupted lung vascular barrier function, leading to an increase in permeability. FFP resuscitation reversed these HS-induced effects. Immunodepletion of adiponectin from FFP abolished FFP's effects on blocking endothelial hyperpermeability in vitro, and on improving lung vascular barrier function in HS mice. Replenishment with adiponectin rescued FFP's effects. These findings suggest that adiponectin is an important component in FFP resuscitation contributing to the beneficial effects on vascular barrier function after HS.

  2. Smooth muscle architecture within cell-dense vascular tissues influences functional contractility.

    PubMed

    Win, Zaw; Vrla, Geoffrey D; Steucke, Kerianne E; Sevcik, Emily N; Hald, Eric S; Alford, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    The role of vascular smooth muscle architecture in the function of healthy and dysfunctional vessels is poorly understood. We aimed at determining the relationship between vascular smooth muscle architecture and contractile output using engineered vascular tissues. We utilized microcontact printing and a microfluidic cell seeding technique to provide three different initial seeding conditions, with the aim of influencing the cellular architecture within the tissue. Cells seeded in each condition formed confluent and aligned tissues but within the tissues, the cellular architecture varied. Tissues with a more elongated cellular architecture had significantly elevated basal stress and produced more contractile stress in response to endothelin-1 stimulation. We also found a correlation between the contractile phenotype marker expression and the cellular architecture, contrary to our previous findings in non-confluent tissues. Taken with previous results, these data suggest that within cell-dense vascular tissues, smooth muscle contractility is strongly influenced by cell and tissue architectures.

  3. [Research progress in reanimation of peripheral facial paralysis by use of functional electrical stimulation].

    PubMed

    Deng, Simin; Shen, Guofang

    2010-08-01

    With the development of electronics and information technology, the application of functional electrical stimulation in the medical field has been expanding. However, the use of functional electrical stimulation to treat patients with peripheral facial paralysis is still in its infancy. The main problems include: (1) Finding in the signals which could fire the stimulator; (2) Exploring the parameters for the stimulator; (3) The effects on the muscle attributed to the electrical stimulation. A review on these problems is presented.

  4. Episomal Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Promote Functional Recovery of Transected Murine Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Cardona, Esteban; Chuang, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic peripheral nerve neurotmesis occurs frequently and functional recovery is often slow and impaired. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have shown much promise in recent years due to its regenerative properties similar to that of embryonic stem cells. However, the potential of iPSCs in promoting the functional recovery of a transected peripheral nerve is largely unknown. This study is the first to investigate in vivo effects of episomal iPSCs (EiPSCs) on peripheral nerve regeneration in a murine sciatic nerve transection model. Episomal iPSCs refer to iPSCs that are generated via Oct3/4-Klf4-Sox2 plasmid reprogramming instead of the conventional viral insertion techniques. It represents a relatively safer form of iPSC production without permanent transgene integration which may raise questions regarding risks of genomic mutation. A minimal number of EiPSCs were added directly to the transected nerve. Functional recovery of the EiPSC group was significantly improved compared to the negative control group when assessed via serial five-toe spread measurement and gait analysis of ankle angles. EiPSC promotion of nerve regeneration was also evident on stereographic analysis of axon density, myelin thickness, and axonal cross-sectional surface area. Most importantly, the results observed in EiPSCs are similar to that of the embryonic stem cell group. A roughly ten-fold increase in neurotrophin-3 levels was seen in EiPSCs which could have contributed to peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery. No abnormal masses or adverse effects were noted with EiPSC administration after one year of follow-up. We have hence shown that functional recovery of the transected peripheral nerve can be improved with the use of EiPSC therapy, which holds promise for the future of nerve regeneration. PMID:27736950

  5. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo...

  6. Abnormal Vascular Function and Hypertension in Mice Deficient in Estrogen Receptor β

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan; Bian, Zhao; Lu, Ping; Karas, Richard H.; Bao, Lin; Cox, Daniel; Hodgin, Jeffrey; Shaul, Philip W.; Thorén, Peter; Smithies, Oliver; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Mendelsohn, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    Blood vessels express estrogen receptors, but their role in cardiovascular physiology is not well understood. We show that vascular smooth muscle cells and blood vessels from estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-deficient mice exhibit multiple functional abnormalities. In wild-type mouse blood vessels, estrogen attenuates vasoconstriction by an ERβ-mediated increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. In contrast, estrogen augments vasoconstriction in blood vessels from ERβ-deficient mice. Vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from ERβ-deficient mice show multiple abnormalities of ion channel function. Furthermore, ERβ-deficient mice develop sustained systolic and diastolic hypertension as they age. These data support an essential role for ERβ in the regulation of vascular function and blood pressure.

  7. Acute impact of intermittent pneumatic leg compression frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression in humans.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Ryan D; Roseguini, Bruno T; Thyfault, John P; Crist, Brett D; Laughlin, M H; Newcomer, Sean C

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms by which intermittent pneumatic leg compression (IPC) treatment effectively treats symptoms associated with peripheral artery disease remain speculative. With the aim of gaining mechanistic insight into IPC treatment, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of IPC frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression. In this two study investigation, healthy male subjects underwent an hour of either high-frequency (HF; 2-s inflation/3-s deflation) or low-frequency (LF; 4-s inflation/16-s deflation) IPC treatment of the foot and calf. In study 1 (n = 11; 23.5 ± 4.7 yr), subjects underwent both HF and LF treatment on separate days. Doppler/ultrasonography was used to measure popliteal artery diameter and blood velocity at baseline and during IPC treatment. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and peak reactive hyperemia blood flow (RHBF) were determined before and after IPC treatment. In study 2 (n = 19; 22.0 ± 4.6 yr), skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from the lateral gastrocnemius of the treated and control limb at baseline and at 30- and 150-min posttreatment. Quantitative PCR was used to assess mRNA concentrations of genes associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. No treatment effect on vascular function was observed. Cuff deflation resulted in increased blood flow (BF) and shear rate (SR) in both treatments at the onset of treatment compared with baseline (P < 0.01). BF and SR significantly diminished by 45 min of HF treatment only (P < 0.01). Both treatments reduced BF and SR and elevated oscillatory shear index compared with baseline (P < 0.01) during cuff inflation. IPC decreased the mRNA expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 from baseline and controls (P <0 .01) and connective tissue growth factor from baseline (P < 0.05) in a frequency-dependent manner. In conclusion, a single session of IPC acutely impacts limb hemodynamics and skeletal muscle gene expression in a frequency

  8. Analyzing Structure and Function of Vascularization in Engineered Bone Tissue by Video-Rate Intravital Microscopy and 3D Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yonggang; Tsigkou, Olga; Spencer, Joel A; Lin, Charles P; Neville, Craig; Grottkau, Brian

    2015-10-01

    Vascularization is a key challenge in tissue engineering. Three-dimensional structure and microcirculation are two fundamental parameters for evaluating vascularization. Microscopic techniques with cellular level resolution, fast continuous observation, and robust 3D postimage processing are essential for evaluation, but have not been applied previously because of technical difficulties. In this study, we report novel video-rate confocal microscopy and 3D postimage processing techniques to accomplish this goal. In an immune-deficient mouse model, vascularized bone tissue was successfully engineered using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffold. Video-rate (30 FPS) intravital confocal microscopy was applied in vitro and in vivo to visualize the vascular structure in the engineered bone and the microcirculation of the blood cells. Postimage processing was applied to perform 3D image reconstruction, by analyzing microvascular networks and calculating blood cell viscosity. The 3D volume reconstructed images show that the hMSCs served as pericytes stabilizing the microvascular network formed by HUVECs. Using orthogonal imaging reconstruction and transparency adjustment, both the vessel structure and blood cells within the vessel lumen were visualized. Network length, network intersections, and intersection densities were successfully computed using our custom-developed software. Viscosity analysis of the blood cells provided functional evaluation of the microcirculation. These results show that by 8 weeks, the blood vessels in peripheral areas function quite similarly to the host vessels. However, the viscosity drops about fourfold where it is only 0.8 mm away from the host. In summary, we developed novel techniques combining intravital microscopy and 3D image processing to analyze the vascularization in engineered bone. These techniques have broad

  9. Peripheral and central arterial pressure and its relationship to vascular target organ damage in carotid artery, retina and arterial stiffness. Development and validation of a tool. The Vaso risk study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) shows a better correlation to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality than office blood pressure. A loss of arterial elasticity and an increase in carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity-mortality. Tools have been developed that allow estimation of the retinal arteriovenous index but not all studies coincide and there are contradictory results in relation to the evolution of the arteriosclerotic lesions and the caliber of the retinal vessels. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between peripheral and central arterial pressure (clinic and ambulatory) and vascular structure and function as evaluated by the carotid artery intima-media thickness, retina arteriovenous index, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and ankle-brachial index in patients with and without type 2 diabetes. In turn, software is developed and validated for measuring retinal vessel thickness and automatically estimating the arteriovenous index. Methods/Design A cross-sectional study involving a control group will be made, with a posterior 4-year follow-up period in primary care. The study patients will be type 2 diabetics, with a control group of non-diabetic individuals. Consecutive sampling will be used to include 300 patients between 34-75 years of age and no previous cardiovascular disease, one-half being assigned to each group. Main measurements: age, gender, height, weight and abdominal circumference. Lipids, creatinine, microalbuminuria, blood glucose, HbA1c, blood insulin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and endothelial dysfunction markers. Clinic and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Carotid ultrasound to evaluate IMT, and retinography to evaluate the arteriovenous index. ECG to assess left ventricle hypertrophy, ankle-brachial index, and pulse wave analysis (PWA) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) with the Sphigmocor System. Discussion We

  10. Maternal Hyperleptinemia Is Associated with Male Offspring’s Altered Vascular Function and Structure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Kelly E.; Talton, Omonseigho O.; Foote, Christopher A.; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino C.; Wu, Ho-Hsiang; Ji, Tieming; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Schulz, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Children of mothers with gestational diabetes have greater risk of developing hypertension but little is known about the mechanisms by which this occurs. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that high maternal concentrations of leptin during pregnancy, which are present in mothers with gestational diabetes and/or obesity, alter blood pressure, vascular structure and vascular function in offspring. Wildtype (WT) offspring of hyperleptinemic, normoglycemic, Leprdb/+ dams were compared to genotype matched offspring of WT-control dams. Vascular function was assessed in male offspring at 6, and at 31 weeks of age after half the offspring had been fed a high fat, high sucrose diet (HFD) for 6 weeks. Blood pressure was increased by HFD but not affected by maternal hyperleptinemia. On a standard diet, offspring of hyperleptinemic dams had outwardly remodeled mesenteric arteries and an enhanced vasodilatory response to insulin. In offspring of WT but not Leprdb/+ dams, HFD induced vessel hypertrophy and enhanced vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine, while HFD reduced insulin responsiveness in offspring of hyperleptinemic dams. Offspring of hyperleptinemic dams had stiffer arteries regardless of diet. Therefore, while maternal hyperleptinemia was largely beneficial to offspring vascular health under a standard diet, it had detrimental effects in offspring fed HFD. These results suggest that circulating maternal leptin concentrations may interact with other factors in the pre- and post -natal environments to contribute to altered vascular function in offspring of diabetic pregnancies. PMID:27187080

  11. Differential and synergistic effects of mechanical stimulation and growth factor presentation on vascular wall function

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mao-Shih; Koobatian, Maxwell T.; Lei, Pedro; Swartz, Daniel D.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that immobilizing TGF-β1 within fibrin hydrogels may act in synergy with cyclic mechanical stimulation to enhance the properties of vascular grafts. To this end, we engineered a fusion TGF-β1 protein that can covalently anchor to fibrin during polymerization upon the action of factor XIII. We also developed a 24-well based bioreactor in which vascular constructs can be mechanically stimulated by distending the silastic mandrel in the middle of each well. TGF-β1 was either conjugated to fibrin or supplied in the culture medium and the fibrin based constructs were cultured statically for a week followed by cyclic distention for another week. The tissues were examined for myogenic differentiation, vascular reactivity, mechanical properties and ECM content. Our results showed that some aspects of vascular function were differentially affected by growth factor presentation vs. pulsatile force application, while others were synergistically enhanced by both. Overall, this two-prong biomimetic approach improved ECM secretion, vascular reactivity and mechanical properties of vascular constructs. These findings may be applied in other tissue engineering applications such as cartilage, tendon or cardiac regeneration where growth factors TGF-β1 and mechano-stimulation play critical roles. PMID:23810080

  12. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-Chen; Liu, Han-Qiu; Hua, Xu-Yun; Shen, Yun-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is difficult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function. PMID:27212933

  13. Age-related changes in the function and structure of the peripheral sensory pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Canta, Annalisa; Chiorazzi, Alessia; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Meregalli, Cristina; Oggioni, Norberto; Bossi, Mario; Rodriguez-Menendez, Virginia; Avezza, Federica; Crippa, Luca; Lombardi, Raffaella; de Vito, Giuseppe; Piazza, Vincenzo; Cavaletti, Guido; Marmiroli, Paola

    2016-09-01

    This study is aimed at describing the changes occurring in the entire peripheral nervous system sensory pathway along a 2-year observation period in a cohort of C57BL/6 mice. The neurophysiological studies evidenced significant differences in the selected time points corresponding to childhood, young adulthood, adulthood, and aging (i.e., 1, 7, 15, and 25 months of age), with a parabolic course as function of time. The pathological assessment allowed to demonstrate signs of age-related changes since the age of 7 months, with a remarkable increase in both peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia at the subsequent time points. These changes were mainly in the myelin sheaths, as also confirmed by the Rotating-Polarization Coherent-Anti-stokes-Raman-scattering microscopy analysis. Evident changes were also present at the morphometric analysis performed on the peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglia neurons, and skin biopsies. This extensive, multimodal characterization of the peripheral nervous system changes in aging provides the background for future mechanistic studies allowing the selection of the most appropriate time points and readouts according to the investigation aims. PMID:27459934

  14. Doxycycline-regulated GDNF expression promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery in transected peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Shakhbazau, Antos; Mohanty, Chandan; Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Bryszewska, Maria; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Alant, Jacob; Midha, Rajiv

    2013-12-28

    Increased production of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is one of the key responses seen following peripheral nerve injury, making them an attractive choice for pro-regenerative gene therapies. However, the downside of over-expression of certain NTFs, including glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), was earlier found to be the trapping and misdirection of regenerating axons, the so-called 'candy-store' effect. We report a proof-of-principle study on the application of conditional GDNF expression system in injured peripheral nerve. We engineered Schwann cells (SCs) using dendrimers or lentiviral transduction with the vector providing doxycycline-regulated GDNF expression. Injection of GDNF-modified cells into the injured peripheral nerve followed by time-restricted administration of doxycycline demonstrated that GDNF expression in SCs can also be controlled locally in the peripheral nerves of the experimental animals. Cell-based GDNF therapy was shown to increase the extent of axonal regeneration, while controlled deactivation of GDNF effectively prevented trapping of regenerating axons in GDNF-enriched areas, and was associated with improved functional recovery.

  15. Peripheral nerve: from the microscopic functional unit of the axon to the biomechanically loaded macroscopic structure.

    PubMed

    Topp, Kimberly S; Boyd, Benjamin S

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are composed of motor and sensory axons, associated ensheathing Schwann cells, and organized layers of connective tissues that are in continuity with the tissues of the central nervous system. Nerve fiber anatomy facilitates conduction of electrical impulses to convey information over a distance, and the length of these polarized cells necessitates regulated axonal transport of organelles and structural proteins for normal cell function. Nerve connective tissues serve a protective function as the limb is subjected to the stresses of myriad limb positions and postures. Thus, the tissues are uniquely arranged to control the local nerve fiber environment and modulate physical stresses. In this brief review, we describe the microscopic anatomy and physiology of peripheral nerve and the biomechanical properties that enable nerve to withstand the physical stresses of everyday life. PMID:22133662

  16. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids and 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid on Endothelial and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Imig, J D

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial and vascular smooth cells generate cytochrome P450 (CYP) arachidonic acid metabolites that can impact endothelial cell function and vascular homeostasis. The objective of this review is to focus on the physiology and pharmacology of endothelial CYP metabolites. The CYP pathway produces two types of eicosanoid products: epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), formed by CYP epoxygenases, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), formed by CYP hydroxylases. Advances in CYP enzymes, EETs, and 20-HETE by pharmacological and genetic means have led to a more complete understanding of how these eicosanoids impact on endothelial cell function. Endothelial-derived EETs were initially described as endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors. It is now well recognized that EETs importantly contribute to numerous endothelial cell functions. On the other hand, 20-HETE is the predominant CYP hydroxylase synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells. Like EETs, 20-HETE acts on endothelial cells and impacts importantly on endothelial and vascular function. An important aspect for EETs and 20-HETE endothelial actions is their interactions with hormonal and paracrine factors. These include interactions with the renin-angiotensin system, adrenergic system, puringeric system, and endothelin. Alterations in CYP enzymes, 20-HETE, or EETs contribute to endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases such as ischemic injury, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Recent advances have led to the development of potential therapeutics that target CYP enzymes, 20-HETE, or EETs. Thus, future investigation is required to obtain a more complete understanding of how CYP enzymes, 20-HETE, and EETs regulate endothelial cell function.

  17. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor regulates vascular endothelial activations via suppression of the voltage-dependent anion channel-1.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yu Ran; Lim, Sun Young; Lee, Eun Ji; Choi, Sunga; Cho, Eun Jung; Park, Myoung Soo; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2012-05-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a multifunctional protein mainly found on the outer mitochondrial membrane. PBR expression is increased by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in endothelial cells. Adenoviral overexpression of PBR inhibits monocyte adhesion, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 expression in TNF-α-activated endothelial cells. Rotenone, cyclosporine A, and bongkrekic acid suppress TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression. Overexpression of PBR inhibits voltage-dependent anion channel-1 (VDAC-1) expression and the silencing of PBR increases VDAC-1 expression in endothelial cells. Moreover, TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression is suppressed by VDAC-1 gene silencing. PBR overexpression significantly decreases TNF-α-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and MnSOD expression. These results suggest that PBR can inhibit endothelial activation and this action is related to the inhibition of mitochondrial ROS and/or VDAC-1 expression in endothelial cells.

  18. Generation of a functional liver tissue mimic using adipose stromal vascular fraction cell-derived vasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, S. S.; Maijub, J. G.; Krishnan, L.; Ramakrishnan, V. M.; Clayton, L. R.; Williams, S. K.; Hoying, J. B.; Boyd, N. L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in cell implantation therapies is to promote integration of the microcirculation between the implanted cells and the host. We used adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells to vascularize a human liver cell (HepG2) implant. We hypothesized that the SVF cells would form a functional microcirculation via vascular assembly and inosculation with the host vasculature. Initially, we assessed the extent and character of neovasculatures formed by freshly isolated and cultured SVF cells and found that freshly isolated cells have a higher vascularization potential. Generation of a 3D implant containing fresh SVF and HepG2 cells formed a tissue in which HepG2 cells were entwined with a network of microvessels. Implanted HepG2 cells sequestered labeled LDL delivered by systemic intravascular injection only in SVF-vascularized implants demonstrating that SVF cell-derived vasculatures can effectively integrate with host vessels and interface with parenchymal cells to form a functional tissue mimic. PMID:23828203

  19. Combining Peripheral Nerve Grafts and Chondroitinase Promotes Functional Axonal Regeneration in the Chronically Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Veronica J.; Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R.; Miller, Kassi; Santi, Lauren; Connors, Theresa; Lemay, Michel A.; Houlé, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Because there currently is no treatment for spinal cord injury, most patients are living with long-standing injuries. Therefore, strategies aimed at promoting restoration of function to the chronically injured spinal cord have high therapeutic value. For successful regeneration, long-injured axons must overcome their poor intrinsic growth potential as well as the inhibitory environment of the glial scar established around the lesion site. Acutely injured axons that regenerate into growth-permissive peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) reenter host tissue to mediate functional recovery if the distal graft– host interface is treated with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to cleave inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the scar matrix. To determine whether a similar strategy is effective for a chronic injury, we combined grafting of a peripheral nerve into a highly relevant, chronic, cervical contusion site with ChABC treatment of the glial scar and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) stimulation of long-injured axons. We tested this combination in two grafting paradigms: (1) a peripheral nerve that was grafted to span a chronic injury site or (2) a PNG that bridged a chronic contusion site with a second, more distal injury site. Unlike GDNF–PBS treatment, GDNF–ChABC treatment facilitated axons to exit the PNG into host tissue and promoted some functional recovery. Electrical stimulation of axons in the peripheral nerve bridge induced c-Fos expression in host neurons, indicative of synaptic contact by regenerating fibers. Thus, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that administering ChABC to a distal graft interface allows for functional axonal regeneration by chronically injured neurons. PMID:19940184

  20. Combining peripheral nerve grafts and chondroitinase promotes functional axonal regeneration in the chronically injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tom, Veronica J; Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R; Miller, Kassi; Santi, Lauren; Connors, Theresa; Lemay, Michel A; Houlé, John D

    2009-11-25

    Because there currently is no treatment for spinal cord injury, most patients are living with long-standing injuries. Therefore, strategies aimed at promoting restoration of function to the chronically injured spinal cord have high therapeutic value. For successful regeneration, long-injured axons must overcome their poor intrinsic growth potential as well as the inhibitory environment of the glial scar established around the lesion site. Acutely injured axons that regenerate into growth-permissive peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) reenter host tissue to mediate functional recovery if the distal graft-host interface is treated with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to cleave inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the scar matrix. To determine whether a similar strategy is effective for a chronic injury, we combined grafting of a peripheral nerve into a highly relevant, chronic, cervical contusion site with ChABC treatment of the glial scar and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) stimulation of long-injured axons. We tested this combination in two grafting paradigms: (1) a peripheral nerve that was grafted to span a chronic injury site or (2) a PNG that bridged a chronic contusion site with a second, more distal injury site. Unlike GDNF-PBS treatment, GDNF-ChABC treatment facilitated axons to exit the PNG into host tissue and promoted some functional recovery. Electrical stimulation of axons in the peripheral nerve bridge induced c-Fos expression in host neurons, indicative of synaptic contact by regenerating fibers. Thus, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that administering ChABC to a distal graft interface allows for functional axonal regeneration by chronically injured neurons.

  1. Beyond the brain-Peripheral kisspeptin signaling is essential for promoting endometrial gland development and function

    PubMed Central

    León, Silvia; Fernadois, Daniela; Sull, Alexandra; Sull, Judith; Calder, Michele; Hayashi, Kanako; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Power, Stephen; Vilos, George A.; Vilos, Angelos G.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Babwah, Andy V.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine growth and endometrial gland formation (adenogenesis) and function, are essential for fertility and are controlled by estrogens and other regulators, whose nature and physiological relevance are yet to be elucidated. Kisspeptin, which signals via Kiss1r, is essential for fertility, primarily through its central control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, but also likely through peripheral actions. Using genetically modified mice, we addressed the contributions of central and peripheral kisspeptin signaling in regulating uterine growth and adenogenesis. Global ablation of Kiss1 or Kiss1r dramatically suppressed uterine growth and almost fully prevented adenogenesis. However, while uterine growth was fully rescued by E2 treatment of Kiss1−/− mice and by genetic restoration of kisspeptin signaling in GnRH neurons in Kiss1r−/− mice, functional adenogenesis was only marginally restored. Thus, while uterine growth is largely dependent on ovarian E2-output via central kisspeptin signaling, peripheral kisspeptin signaling is indispensable for endometrial adenogenesis and function, essential aspects of reproductive competence. PMID:27364226

  2. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3+ Tregs and CD39+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4+ T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39+ Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4+ Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3+CD39+ Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  3. Progressive Vascular Functional and Structural Damage in a Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Model in Preterm Rabbits Exposed to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Julio; Richter, Jute; Nagatomo, Taro; Salaets, Thomas; Quarck, Rozenn; Wagennar, Allard; Wang, Hongmei; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Deprest, Jan; Toelen, Jaan

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is caused by preterm neonatal lung injury and results in oxygen dependency and pulmonary hypertension. Current clinical management fails to reduce the incidence of BPD, which calls for novel therapies. Fetal rabbits have a lung development that mimics humans and can be used as a translational model to test novel treatment options. In preterm rabbits, exposure to hyperoxia leads to parenchymal changes, yet vascular damage has not been studied in this model. In this study we document the early functional and structural changes of the lung vasculature in preterm rabbits that are induced by hyperoxia after birth. Pulmonary artery Doppler measurements, micro-CT barium angiograms and media thickness of peripheral pulmonary arteries were affected after seven days of hyperoxia when compared to controls. The parenchyma was also affected both at the functional and structural level. Lung function testing showed higher tissue resistance and elastance, with a decreased lung compliance and lung capacity. Histologically hyperoxia leads to fewer and larger alveoli with thicker walls, less developed distal airways and more inflammation than normoxia. In conclusion, we show that the rabbit model develops pulmonary hypertension and developmental lung arrest after preterm lung injury, which parallel the early changes in human BPD. Thus it enables the testing of pharmaceutical agents that target the cardiovascular compartment of the lung for further translation towards the clinic. PMID:27783043

  4. The bimodal regulation of vascular function by superoxide anion: role of endothelium.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Buket; McKeown, Pascal P; Dvm, Ulvi Bayraktutan

    2008-03-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in vascular homeostasis. This study investigated whether O(2) (*-), the foundationmolecule of all ROS, regulates vasomotor function. Hence, vascular reactivity was measured using rat thoracic aortas exposed to an O(2) (*-) generator (pyrogallol) which dose-dependently regulated both alpha-adrenergic agonist-mediated contractility to phenylephrine and endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine. Pyrogallol improved and attenuated responses to acetylcholine at its lower (10 nM - 1 microM) and higher (10 - 100 microM) concentrations, respectively while producing the inverse effects with phenylephrine. The endothelial inactivation by L-NAME abolished acetylcholine-induced vasodilatations but increased phenylephrine and KCl-induced vasoconstrictions regardless of the pyrogallol dose used. Relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide donor, were not affected by pyrogallol. Other ROS i.e. peroxynitrite and H(2)O(2) that may be produced during experiments did not alter vascular functions. These findings suggest that the nature of O(2) (*-)-evoked vascular function is determined by its local concentration and the presence of a functional endothelium.

  5. Dietary saturated and unsaturated fats as determinants of blood pressure and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wendy L

    2009-06-01

    The amount and type of dietary fat have long been associated with the risk of CVD. Arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction are important risk factors in the aetiology of CHD. A range of methods exists to assess vascular function that may be used in nutritional science, including clinic and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity, flow-mediated dilatation and venous occlusion plethysmography. The present review focuses on the quantity and type of dietary fat and effects on blood pressure, arterial compliance and endothelial function. Concerning fat quantity, the amount of dietary fat consumed habitually appears to have little influence on vascular function independent of fatty acid composition, although single high-fat meals postprandially impair endothelial function compared with low-fat meals. The mechanism is related to increased circulating lipoproteins and NEFA which may induce pro-inflammatory pathways and increase oxidative stress. Regarding the type of fat, cross-sectional data suggest that saturated fat adversely affects vascular function whereas polyunsaturated fat (mainly linoleic acid (18 : 2n-6) and n-3 PUFA) are beneficial. EPA (20 : 5n-3) and DHA (22 : 6n-3) can reduce blood pressure, improve arterial compliance in type 2 diabetics and dyslipidaemics, and augment endothelium-dependent vasodilation. The mechanisms for this vascular protection, and the nature of the separate physiological effects induced by EPA and DHA, are priorities for future research. Since good-quality observational or interventional data on dietary fatty acid composition and vascular function are scarce, no further recommendations can be suggested in addition to current guidelines at the present time.

  6. [Primary Study on Noninvasive Detection of Vascular Function Based on Finger Temperature Change].

    PubMed

    Dong, Qing; Li, Xia; Wan, Yungao; Lu, Gaoquan; Wang, Xinxin; Zhang, Kuan

    2016-02-01

    By studying the relationship between fingertip temperature changes and arterial function during vascular reactivity test, we established a new non-invasive method for detecting vascular function, in order to provide an assistance for early diagnosis and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. We customized three modules respectively for blood occlusion, measurement of finger temperature and blood oxygen acquisition, and then we established the hardware of data acquisition system. And the software was programmed with Labview. Healthy subjects [group A, n = 24, (44.6 ± 9.0) years] and subjects with cardiovascular diseases [group B, n = 33, (57.2 ± 9.9) years)] were chosen for the study. Subject's finger temperature, blood oxygen and occlusion pressure of block side during and after unilateral arm brachial artery occlusion were recorded, as well as some other regular physiological indexes. By time-domain analysis, we extracted 12 parameters from fingertip temperature signal, including the initial temperature (Ti), temperature rebound (TR), the time of the temperature recovering to initial status (RIt) and other parameters from the finger temperature signal. We in the experiment also measured other regular physiological body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastiolic blood pressure (DBP) and so on. Results showed that 8 parameters difference between the two group of data were significant. based on the statistical results. A discriminant function of vascular function status was established afterwards. We found in the study that the changes of finger temperature during unilateral arms brachial artery occlusion and open were closely related to vascular function. We hope that the method presented in this article could lay a foundation of early detection of vascular function. PMID:27382755

  7. Does high-density lipoprotein protect vascular function in healthy pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Wan N Wan; Caslake, Muriel J; Delles, Christian; Karlsson, Helen; Mulder, Monique T; Graham, Delyth; Freeman, Dilys J

    2016-04-01

    The maternal adaptation to pregnancy includes hyperlipidaemia, oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. In non-pregnant individuals, these processes are usually associated with poor vascular function. However, maternal vascular function is enhanced in pregnancy. It is not understood how this is achieved in the face of the adverse metabolic and inflammatory environment. Research into cardiovascular disease demonstrates that plasma HDL (high-density lipoprotein), by merit of its functionality rather than its plasma concentration, exerts protective effects on the vascular endothelium. HDL has vasodilatory, antioxidant, anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects, and can protect against endothelial cell damage. In pregnancy, the plasma HDL concentration starts to rise at 10 weeks of gestation, peaking at 20 weeks. The initial rise in plasma HDL occurs around the time of the establishment of the feto-placental circulation, a time when the trophoblast plugs in the maternal spiral arteries are released, generating oxidative stress. Thus there is the intriguing possibility that new HDL of improved function is synthesized around the time of the establishment of the feto-placental circulation. In obese pregnancy and, to a greater extent, in pre-eclampsia, plasma HDL levels are significantly decreased and maternal vascular function is reduced. Wire myography studies have shown an association between the plasma content of apolipoprotein AI, the major protein constituent of HDL, and blood vessel relaxation. These observations lead us to hypothesize that HDL concentration, and function, increases in pregnancy in order to protect the maternal vascular endothelium and that in pre-eclampsia this fails to occur.

  8. Lower extremity manifestations of peripheral artery disease: the pathophysiologic and functional implications of leg ischemia.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary McGrae

    2015-04-24

    Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is frequently underdiagnosed, in part because of the wide variety of leg symptoms manifested by patients with PAD and in part because of the high prevalence of asymptomatic PAD. In primary care medical practices, 30% to 60% of patients with PAD report no exertional leg symptoms and ≈45% to 50% report exertional leg symptoms that are not consistent with classic intermittent claudication. The prevalence and extent of functional impairment and functional decline in PAD may also be underappreciated. Functional impairment and functional decline are common in PAD, even among those who are asymptomatic. Lower extremity ischemia is also associated with pathophysiologic changes in calf skeletal muscle, including smaller calf muscle area, increased calf muscle fat content, impaired leg strength, and impaired metabolic function. People with severe PAD have poorer peroneal nerve conduction velocity compared with people with mild PAD or no PAD. The degree of ischemia-related pathophysiologic changes in lower extremity muscles and peripheral nerves of people with PAD are associated with the degree of functional impairment. New interventions are needed to improve functional performance and prevent mobility loss in the large number of patients with PAD, including in those who are asymptomatic or who have exertional leg symptoms other than claudication.

  9. Sequential measurement of peripheral blood allogeneic microchimerism levels and association with pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    McSherry, C; Jackson, A; Hertz, M I; Bolman, R M; Savik, K; Reinsmoen, N L

    1996-12-27

    We have shown in lung recipients that high levels of peripheral blood allogeneic microchimerism at 12 to 18 months posttransplant correlated with donor antigen-specific hyporeactivity (i.e., decreased proliferative response to donor antigen in MLC while response to 3rd-party cells remains unchanged); both parameters correlated with an obliterative bronchiolitis (OB)-free state. We have expanded these studies to determine any association of sequential microchimerism levels with concomitant clinical events. In this preliminary study of 7 lung recipients, we used limiting-dilution PCR to quantify peripheral blood microchimerism at serial timepoints ranging from 3 to >48 months posttransplant. These levels were compared with a variety of immunologic and clinical parameters: acute rejection, CMV infection, OB, donor antigen-specific hyporeactivity, and pulmonary function. Pulmonary function was measured per the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation: "current FEV1/ baseline FEV1" (FEV1: forced expiratory volume in 1 second). Of the clinical parameters, the association between microchimerism and pulmonary function was the most striking. We observed dynamic patterns of peripheral microchimerism, which reflected the general rise and fall of FEV1. In all 7 recipients, chimerism and FEV1 were high very early posttransplant, then dropped at various rates and to various degrees. After its initial decline, microchimerism increased with FEV1 for the 1 hyporesponsive recipient; for the other 6 recipients, both values declined. These results illustrate, for the first time, that the fluctuation of peripheral blood microchimerism levels is associated with the recipient's clinical condition. PMID:8990369

  10. Vascular Hyperpermeability and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Ryan; Tharakan, Binu

    2014-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability, the excessive leakage of fluid and proteins from blood vessels to the interstitial space, commonly occurs in traumatic and ischemic injuries. This hyperpermeability causes tissue vasogenic edema, which often leads to multiple organ failure resulting in patient death. Vascular hyperpermeability occurs most readily in small blood vessels as their more delicate physical constitution makes them an easy target for barrier dysfunction. A single layer of endothelial cells, linked to one another by cell adhesion molecules, covers the interior surface of each blood vessel. The cell adhesion molecules play a key role in maintaining barrier functions like the regulation of permeability. Aging is a major risk factor for microvascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability. Apart from age-related remodeling of the vascular wall, endothelial barrier integrity and function declines with the advancement of age. Studies that address the physiological and molecular basis of vascular permeability regulation in aging are currently very limited. There have been many cellular and molecular mechanisms proposed to explain aging-related endothelial dysfunction but their true relationship to barrier dysfunction and hyperpermeability is not clearly known. Among the several mechanisms that promote vascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability, the following are considered major contributors: oxidative stress, inflammation, and the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways. In this review we highlighted (a) the physiological, cellular and molecular changes that occur in the vascular system as a product of aging; (b) the potential mechanisms by which aging leads to barrier dysfunction and vascular hyperpermeability in the peripheral and the blood-brain barrier; (c) the mechanisms by which the age-related increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory markers and apoptotic signaling etc. cause endothelial dysfunction and their relationship to hyperpermeability; and (d) the

  11. Fabrication of modified and functionalized polycaprolactone nanofibre scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, J.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Ramakrishna, S.

    2005-10-01

    Electrospun polymer nanofibres were originally developed for their durability and resistance to all forms of degradation and biodegradation. Some polymer nanofibres are biocompatible and biodegradable and therefore suitable for replacement of structurally or physiologically deficient tissues and organs in humans. Here, biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibre scaffolds modified with collagen types I and III were used for vascular tissue engineering. Coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were grown on PCL nanofibres, modified PCL/collagen biocomposite nanofibres and collagen nanofibres. The results show that the modified PCL/collagen biocomposite nanofibre scaffolds provide required mechanical properties for regulation of normal cell function in vascular tissue engineering.

  12. Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke: Functional and Vascular Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hong-Kyun; Kim, Beom Joon; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Yang, Mi Hwa; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction, developed in relation to myocardial dysfunction and remodeling, is documented in 15%-25% of the population. However, its role in functional recovery and recurrent vascular events after acute ischemic stroke has not been thoroughly investigated. Methods In this retrospective observational study, we identified 2,827 ischemic stroke cases with adequate echocardiographic evaluations to assess LV diastolic dysfunction within 1 month after the index stroke. The peak transmitral filling velocity/mean mitral annular velocity during early diastole (E/e’) was used to estimate LV diastolic dysfunction. We divided patients into 3 groups according to E/e’ as follows: <8, 8-15, and ≥15. Recurrent vascular events and functional recovery were prospectively collected at 3 months and 1 year. Results Among included patients, E/e’ was 10.6±6.4: E/e’ <8 in 993 (35%), 8-15 in 1,444 (51%), and ≥15 in 378 (13%) cases. Functional dependency or death (modified Rankin Scale score ≥2) and composite vascular events were documented in 1,298 (46%) and 187 (7%) patients, respectively, at 3 months. In multivariable analyses, ischemic stroke cases with E/e’ ≥15 had increased odds of functional dependence or death at 3 months (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 1.73 [1.27-2.35]) or 1 year (1.47 [1.06-2.06]) and vascular events within 1 year (1.65 [1.08-2.51]). Subgroups with normal ejection fraction or sinus rhythm exhibited a similar overall pattern and direction. Conclusions LV diastolic dysfunction was associated with poor functional outcomes and composite vascular events up to 1 year. PMID:27283279

  13. Functional evidence of inverse agonism in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, M. A.; Ivorra, M. D.; D'Ocon, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. In the present study, depletion of internal Ca2+ stores sensitive to noradrenaline (1 microM) in rat aorta, is the signal for the entry of extracellular Ca2+, not only to refill the stores but also, in our experimental conditions, to activate the contractile proteins. This induces an increase in the resting tone that constitutes, the first functional evidence of this Ca2+ entry. 2. The fact that methoxamine (100 microM) reproduces the same processes as noradrenaline but clonidine (1 microM) does not, indicates that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor activation is related to the increase in the resting tone observed after depletion of adrenoceptor-sensitive internal Ca2+-stores. 3. Benoxathian and WB 4101 (alpha(1A)- and alpha(1D)-adrenoceptor antagonists) selectively inhibit, in a concentration-dependent manner, this mechanical response observed in absence of the agonist, which suggests that these agents can act as inverse agonists and provide a functional model for studying this phenomenon. Since chloroethylclonidine (100 microM) has no effect on this response, the participation of alpha(1B)-adrenoceptors can be ruled out. 4. Contractile responses to noradrenaline (1 microM) in Ca2+-free medium were selectively blocked by chloroethylclonidine. This suggests that the response to noradrenaline in Ca2+-free medium mainly depends on the activation of the alpha(1B)-adrenoceptor subtype. PMID:8872369

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factors: multitasking functionality in metabolism, health and disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Harrison, Michael A; Tomlinson, Darren C; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) bind to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs). The VEGF and VEGFR gene products regulate diverse regulatory pathways in mammalian development, health and disease. The interaction between a particular VEGF and its cognate VEGFR activates multiple signal transduction pathways which regulate different cellular responses including metabolism, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and survival. The family of VEGF isoforms regulate vascular physiology and promote tissue homeostasis. VEGF dysfunction is implicated in major chronic disease states including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. More recent studies implicate a strong link between response to VEGF and regulation of vascular metabolism. Understanding how this family of multitasking cytokines regulates cell and animal function has implications for treating many different diseases.

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factors: multitasking functionality in metabolism, health and disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Harrison, Michael A; Tomlinson, Darren C; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) bind to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs). The VEGF and VEGFR gene products regulate diverse regulatory pathways in mammalian development, health and disease. The interaction between a particular VEGF and its cognate VEGFR activates multiple signal transduction pathways which regulate different cellular responses including metabolism, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and survival. The family of VEGF isoforms regulate vascular physiology and promote tissue homeostasis. VEGF dysfunction is implicated in major chronic disease states including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. More recent studies implicate a strong link between response to VEGF and regulation of vascular metabolism. Understanding how this family of multitasking cytokines regulates cell and animal function has implications for treating many different diseases. PMID:25868665

  16. Preeclampsia and Vascular Function: A Window to Future Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Enkhmaa, Davaasambuu; Wall, Danielle; Mehta, Puja K; Stuart, Jennifer J; Rich-Edwards, Janet Wilson; Merz, C Noel Bairey; Shufelt, Chrisandra

    2016-03-01

    Preeclampsia affects ∼3%-7% of all pregnancies and is the third leading cause of maternal mortality globally. Growing evidence indicates that preeclampsia results from vascular dysfunction, which also increases the risk for future cardiovascular events. Until recently, preeclampsia was considered a disorder limited to pregnancy, which fully resolved with the delivery of the placenta; however, it is now clear that women with a history of preeclampsia have approximately double the risk of future cardiovascular events compared to women with normotensive pregnancies. The aims of this review were to describe the hemodynamic and vascular changes that occur in normal and preeclamptic pregnancies, to review noninvasive methods to test vascular function, and to discuss the associated increased cardiovascular disease risk related to preeclampsia. PMID:26779584

  17. Functional Modification of Fibrous PCL Scaffolds with Fusion Protein VEGF-HGFI Enhanced Cellularization and Vascularization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liqiang; Ma, Shaoyang; Pan, Yiwa; Zhang, Qiuying; Wang, Kai; Song, Dongmin; Wang, Xiangxiang; Feng, Guowei; Liu, Ruming; Xu, Haijin; Zhang, Jun; Qiao, Mingqiang; Kong, Deling

    2016-09-01

    The lack of efficient vascularization within frequently used poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds has hindered their application in tissue engineering. Hydrophobin HGFI, an amphiphilic protein, can form a self-assembly layer on the surface of PCL scaffolds and convert their wettability. In this study, a fusion protein consisting of HGFI and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is prepared by Pichia pastoris expression system. Sodium dodecyl sulface-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blotting confirm that the VEGF-HGFI is successfully isolated and purified. Transmission electron microscope and water contact angle measurement demonstrate that VEGF-HGFI can form a self-assembly layer with about 25 nm in thickness on electrospun PCL fibers and increase their hydrophilicity. VEGF-HGFI modification can effectively enhance the adhesion, migration, and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging shows that the VEGF-HGFI modification on PCL scaffolds can exist at least 21 d in vitro and at least 14 d in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging shows that VEGF-HGFI can effectively activate vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 receptors. Subcutaneous implantation in mice and rats reveal that cellularization and vascularization are significantly improved in VEGF-HGFI modified PCL scaffolds. These results suggest that VEGF-HGFI is a useful molecule for functional modification of scaffolds to enhance cellularization and vascularization in tissue engineering. PMID:27391702

  18. Clinical Correlates of Hachinski Ischemic Score and Vascular Factors in Cognitive Function of Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn Ho

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between Hachinski ischemic score (HIS) and vascular factors as well as between HIS and the cognitive function in elderly community. Demographic characteristics, such as sex, age, education, history of drinking and smoking, family history of dementia and stroke, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and dementia, were surveyed. Neurological examination was administered to every subject and HIS was checked by a neurologist. From a total of 392 participants aged 65 and over in a rural community, 348 completed the survey and were finally enrolled. Among the vascular factors, history of hypertension (P = 0.008), history of stroke (P < 0.001), family history of dementia (P = 0.01), and history of cardiac diseases (P = 0.012) showed a significant relationship with HIS. In the cognitive function tests, both Korean version of the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Clinical Dementia Rating (Global and Sum of Boxes) had a significant relationship with HIS. Our study suggested HIS may have an association with some vascular factors and cognitive scales in community dwelling elderly. In this study, the HIS seemed to contribute to the evaluation of the quantity of vascular factors and to the prediction of status of cognitive function. PMID:25247189

  19. The effect of ozone inhalation on metabolic functioning of vascular endothelium and on ventilatory function

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.B.; White, H.J.; Sargent, N.E. )

    1991-06-15

    The primary purpose of this research was to determine the effect of ozone inhalation on pulmonary vascular endothelium. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed to 0.5 or 0.7 ppm ozone, 20 hr/day for 7 days. Lungs were excised and perfused with Krebs medium containing (14C)serotonin or (14C)hippurylhistidylleucine (HHL). When compared to controls, the animals exposed to the lower ozone concentration showed no statistically significant changes in serotonin removal. In contrast, the higher ozone concentration resulted in a 32% decrease (p less than 0.0001) in serotonin removal, but had no effect on HHL. Rats similarly exposed to 0.7 ppm ozone but allowed to recover for 14 days in clean air showed no decrease in serotonin removal compared to their controls. Animals exposed sequentially to 0.5 ppm ozone for 7 days and then to 0.7 ppm for 7 days showed no alteration in serotonin metabolism, suggesting the development of tolerance initiated by the lower dose. After 7 days exposure to 0.7 ppm ozone, lung ventilatory function measurements revealed small though significant decreases in several parameters. Electron microscopic evaluation of lung capillary endothelium from animals exposed to the 0.7 ppm ozone showed no changes. Positive control animals exposed to greater than 95% oxygen, 20 hr/day for 2 days showed a 23% decrease in serotonin removal (p less than 0.03) and a 12% decrease in HHL removal (p less than 0.017). These studies indicate that inhalation of ozone can induce functional alterations in the lung endothelium, and that this effect occurs at a dosage of ozone that produces minimal ventilatory changes and no observable endothelial ultrastructural changes.

  20. 3D multi-channel bi-functionalized silk electrospun conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dinis, T M; Elia, R; Vidal, G; Dermigny, Q; Denoeud, C; Kaplan, D L; Egles, C; Marin, F

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological advances over the past 25 years, a complete recovery from peripheral nerve injuries remains unsatisfactory today. The autograft is still considered the "gold standard" in clinical practice; however, postoperative complications and limited availability of nerve tissue have motivated the development of alternative approaches. Among them, the development of biomimetic nerve graft substitutes is one of the most promising strategies. In this study, multichanneled silk electrospun conduits bi-functionalized with Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Ciliary Neurotropic Factor (CNTF) were fabricated to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. These bioactive guides consisting of longitudinally oriented channels and aligned nanofibers were designed in order to mimic the fascicular architecture and fibrous extracellular matrix found in native nerve. The simple use of the electrospinning technique followed by a manual manipulation to manufacture these conduits provides tailoring of channel number and diameter size to create perineurium-like structures. Functionalization of the silk fibroin nanofiber did not affect its secondary structure and chemical property. ELISA assays showed the absence of growth factors passive release from the functionalized fibers avoiding the topical accumulation of proteins. In addition, our biomimetic multichanneled functionalized nerve guides displayed a mechanical behavior comparable to that of rat sciatic nerve with an ultimate peak stress of 4.0 ± 0.6 MPa and a corresponding elongation at failure of 156.8 ± 46.7%. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time our ability to design and characterize a bi-functionalized nerve conduit consisting of electrospun nanofibers with multichannel oriented and nanofibers aligned for peripheral regeneration. Our bioactive silk tubes thus represent a new and promising technique towards the creation of a biocompatible nerve guidance conduit. PMID:25460402

  1. Culpability and pain management/control in peripheral vascular disease using the ethics of principles and care.

    PubMed

    Omery, A

    1991-09-01

    The purposes of this article were to provide insight into the process of ethics and ethical inquiry and to explore the ethical issues of culpability and pain management/control. Critical care nurses who currently care for vascular patients identified these issues as occurring frequently in their practice. Authors in critical care nursing generally have limited the process of ethical inquiry to a theoretical framework built around an ethic of principles. The message many critical care nurses heard was that this one type of theoretical ethical framework was the totality of ethics. The application of these principles was ethical inquiry. For some nurses, the ethic of principles is sufficient. For others, an ethic of principles is either incomplete or foreign. This second group of nurses may believe that they have no moral voice if the language of ethics is only the language of principles. The language of principles, however, is not the only theoretical framework available. There is also the ethic of care, and ethical inquiry can include the application of that framework. Indeed, the language of the ethic of care may give a voice to nurses who previously felt morally mute. In fact, these two theoretical frameworks are not the only frameworks available to nurses. There is also virtue ethics, a framework not discussed in this article. A multiplicity of ethical frameworks is available for nurses to use in analyzing their professional and personal dilemmas. Recognizing that multiplicity, nurses can analyze their ethical dilemmas more comprehensively and effectively. Applying differing ethical frameworks can result in the same conclusions. This was the case for the issue of culpability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Ductal Injection Does Not Increase the Islet Yield or Function after Cold Storage in a Vascular Perfusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Wataru; Imura, Takehiro; Inagaki, Akiko; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Fujimori, Keisei; Satomi, Susumu; Goto, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported that pancreatic ductal preservation greatly improved the islet yield and function after cold storage. However, these studies were devoid of appropriate controls, such as vascular perfusion, which is routinely performed to preserve organs in the clinical setting. In this study, we created a vascular perfusion model using inbred rats, and investigated the effect of ductal injection on the islet yield and function after cold storage. Rat pancreases after 10 h cold ischemia were classified as follows: without ductal/vascular perfusion; with ductal injection; with vascular perfusion; and with ductal/vascular perfusion. The islet yield, function, viability, release of inflammatory mediators, and pathological changes in the exocrine tissues were assessed in the Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) model. The islet yield was also assesed by introducing University of Wisconsin Solution (UWS) and Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate solution (HTK), which are the standard clinical preservation solutions. In the HBSS model, ductal injection and vascular perfusion significantly improved the islet yield compared with the control group. However, ductal injection showed no additional effects on the islet yield, function, viability and suppressing the release of inflammatory mediators when vascular perfusion was performed. Although ductal injection significantly decreased the apoptosis of exocrine cells, no beneficial effect on vacuolation was observed. In contrast, vascular perfusion significantly suppressed vacuolation in the exocrine tissues. Likewise, in the UWS and HTK model, ductal injection and vascular perfusion improved the islet yield compared with the control group. Nevertheless, the combination group showed no additional effects. These data suggest that ductal injection has no additional effect on islet yield and function after cold storage in a vascular perfusion model. We propose that ductal injection can be an effective and simple

  3. Functional genomics indicate that schizophrenia may be an adult vascular-ischemic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moises, H W; Wollschläger, D; Binder, H

    2015-01-01

    In search for the elusive schizophrenia pathway, candidate genes for the disorder from a discovery sample were localized within the energy-delivering and ischemia protection pathway. To test the adult vascular-ischemic (AVIH) and the competing neurodevelopmental hypothesis (NDH), functional genomic analyses of practically all available schizophrenia-associated genes from candidate gene, genome-wide association and postmortem expression studies were performed. Our results indicate a significant overrepresentation of genes involved in vascular function (P<0.001), vasoregulation (that is, perivascular (P<0.001) and shear stress (P<0.01), cerebral ischemia (P<0.001), neurodevelopment (P<0.001) and postischemic repair (P<0.001) among schizophrenia-associated genes from genetic association studies. These findings support both the NDH and the AVIH. The genes from postmortem studies showed an upregulation of vascular-ischemic genes (P=0.020) combined with downregulated synaptic (P=0.005) genes, and ND/repair (P=0.003) genes. Evidence for the AVIH and the NDH is critically discussed. We conclude that schizophrenia is probably a mild adult vascular-ischemic and postischemic repair disorder. Adult postischemic repair involves ND genes for adult neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, glutamate and increased long-term potentiation of excitatory neurotransmission (i-LTP). Schizophrenia might be caused by the cerebral analog of microvascular angina. PMID:26261884

  4. Functional genomics indicate that schizophrenia may be an adult vascular-ischemic disorder.

    PubMed

    Moises, H W; Wollschläger, D; Binder, H

    2015-08-11

    In search for the elusive schizophrenia pathway, candidate genes for the disorder from a discovery sample were localized within the energy-delivering and ischemia protection pathway. To test the adult vascular-ischemic (AVIH) and the competing neurodevelopmental hypothesis (NDH), functional genomic analyses of practically all available schizophrenia-associated genes from candidate gene, genome-wide association and postmortem expression studies were performed. Our results indicate a significant overrepresentation of genes involved in vascular function (P < 0.001), vasoregulation (that is, perivascular (P < 0.001) and shear stress (P < 0.01), cerebral ischemia (P < 0.001), neurodevelopment (P < 0.001) and postischemic repair (P < 0.001) among schizophrenia-associated genes from genetic association studies. These findings support both the NDH and the AVIH. The genes from postmortem studies showed an upregulation of vascular-ischemic genes (P = 0.020) combined with downregulated synaptic (P = 0.005) genes, and ND/repair (P = 0.003) genes. Evidence for the AVIH and the NDH is critically discussed. We conclude that schizophrenia is probably a mild adult vascular-ischemic and postischemic repair disorder. Adult postischemic repair involves ND genes for adult neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, glutamate and increased long-term potentiation of excitatory neurotransmission (i-LTP). Schizophrenia might be caused by the cerebral analog of microvascular angina.

  5. Pathophysiology and burden of infection in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral vascular disease: focus on skin and soft-tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Dryden, M; Baguneid, M; Eckmann, C; Corman, S; Stephens, J; Solem, C; Li, J; Charbonneau, C; Baillon-Plot, N; Haider, S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects 284 million adults worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus contributes an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Immune dysfunction, diabetic neuropathy and poor circulation in patients with diabetes mellitus, especially those with PVD, place these patients at high risk for many types of typical and atypical infections. Complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs) are of particular concern because skin breakdown in patients with advanced diabetes mellitus and PVD provides a portal of entry for bacteria. Patients with diabetes mellitus are more likely to be hospitalized with cSSTIs and to experience related complications than patients without diabetes mellitus. Patients with PVD requiring lower extremity bypass are also at high risk of surgical site and graft infections. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent causative pathogen in cSSTIs, and may be a significant contributor to surgical site infections, especially in patients who are colonized with MRSA on hospital admission. Patients with cSSTIs and diabetes mellitus or PVD experience lower clinical success rates than patients without these comorbidities, and may also have a longer length of hospital stay and higher risk of adverse drug events. Clinicians should be vigilant in recognizing the potential for infection with multi-drug-resistant organisms, especially MRSA, in these populations and initiating therapy with appropriate antibiotics.

  6. Nonoccupational environmental exposure to manganese is linked to deficits in peripheral and central olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Guarneros, Marco; Ortiz-Romo, Nahum; Alcaraz-Zubeldia, Mireya; Drucker-Colín, René; Hudson, Robyn

    2013-11-01

    Manganese is of growing concern as a toxic air pollutant. It is readily transported from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb, and unlike other metals, it is transported transynaptically to structures deep within the brain. However, little is known regarding the possible effect of nonoccupational exposure to manganese on olfactory function. Using the Sniffin' Sticks test battery, we compared the olfactory performance of subjects from a manganese mining district living <1 km from a manganese processing plant, with nonexposed subjects living 50 km from the closest source of exposure (N = 30/group). Groups were matched for age, sex, and schooling, and none had ever worked in mining-related activities. Concentrations of manganese in hair were measured as a biomarker of exposure; exposed subjects had significantly higher concentrations than nonexposed subjects. They were also significantly outperformed by the nonexposed subjects on all olfactory measures (threshold, discrimination, and identification), indicating adverse effects of manganese exposure on a range of olfactory functions, including those involving higher order cognitive processes. This contrasts with previous findings showing adverse peripheral but not central effects on olfactory function of big city air pollution, which mostly consists of toxicants known to affect the olfactory epithelium but with lower transynaptic transport capacity compared with manganese. We conclude that nonoccupational exposure to airborne manganese is associated with decrements in both peripheral and central olfactory function. PMID:24097266

  7. Mobility-Related Consequences of Reduced Lower-Extremity Peripheral Nerve Function with Age: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rachel E; Caserotti, Paolo; Cauley, Jane A; Boudreau, Robert M; Goodpaster, Bret H; Vinik, Aaron I; Newman, Anne B; Strotmeyer, Elsa S

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically review the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility in older adults. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) was searched on March 23, 2015 with no limits on publication dates. One reviewer selected original research studies of older adults (≥65 years) that assessed the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility-related outcomes. Participants, study design and methods of assessing peripheral nerve impairment were evaluated and results were reported and synthesized. Eight articles were identified, including 6 cross-sectional and 2 longitudinal studies. These articles investigated 6 elderly cohorts (4 from the U.S. and 2 from Italy): 3 community-dwelling (including 1 with only disabled women and 1 without mobility limitations at baseline), 1 with both community-dwelling and institutionalized residents, 1 from a range of residential locations, and 1 of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Mean ages ranged from 71-82 years. Nerve function was assessed by vibration threshold (n=2); sensory measures and clinical signs and symptoms of neuropathy (n=2); motor nerve conduction (n=1); and a combination of both sensory measures and motor nerve conduction (n=3). Each study found that worse peripheral nerve function was related to poor mobility, although relationships varied based on the nerve function measure and mobility domain assessed. Six studies found that the association between nerve function and mobility persisted despite adjustment for diabetes. Evidence suggests that peripheral nerve function impairment at various levels of severity is related to poor mobility independent of diabetes. Relationships varied depending on peripheral nerve measure, which may be particularly important when investigating specific biological mechanisms. Future research needs to identify risk factors for peripheral nerve decline beyond diabetes, especially those

  8. Mobility-Related Consequences of Reduced Lower-Extremity Peripheral Nerve Function with Age: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rachel E; Caserotti, Paolo; Cauley, Jane A; Boudreau, Robert M; Goodpaster, Bret H; Vinik, Aaron I; Newman, Anne B; Strotmeyer, Elsa S

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically review the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility in older adults. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) was searched on March 23, 2015 with no limits on publication dates. One reviewer selected original research studies of older adults (≥65 years) that assessed the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility-related outcomes. Participants, study design and methods of assessing peripheral nerve impairment were evaluated and results were reported and synthesized. Eight articles were identified, including 6 cross-sectional and 2 longitudinal studies. These articles investigated 6 elderly cohorts (4 from the U.S. and 2 from Italy): 3 community-dwelling (including 1 with only disabled women and 1 without mobility limitations at baseline), 1 with both community-dwelling and institutionalized residents, 1 from a range of residential locations, and 1 of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Mean ages ranged from 71-82 years. Nerve function was assessed by vibration threshold (n=2); sensory measures and clinical signs and symptoms of neuropathy (n=2); motor nerve conduction (n=1); and a combination of both sensory measures and motor nerve conduction (n=3). Each study found that worse peripheral nerve function was related to poor mobility, although relationships varied based on the nerve function measure and mobility domain assessed. Six studies found that the association between nerve function and mobility persisted despite adjustment for diabetes. Evidence suggests that peripheral nerve function impairment at various levels of severity is related to poor mobility independent of diabetes. Relationships varied depending on peripheral nerve measure, which may be particularly important when investigating specific biological mechanisms. Future research needs to identify risk factors for peripheral nerve decline beyond diabetes, especially those

  9. Netrin-1 overexpression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes functional recovery in a rat model of peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xianjin; Li, Qian; Xu, Li; Zhang, Ying; Li, Dongmei; Ma, Jianhua; Mao, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has been developed as a new method of treating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. While netrin-1 is a critical molecule for axonal path finding and nerve growth, it may also affect vascular network formation. Here, we investigated the effect of transplanting BMSCs that produce netrin-1 in a rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury. We introduced a sciatic nerve crush injury, and then injected 1×106 BMSCs infected by a recombinant adenovirus expressing netrin-1 Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP or culture medium into the injured part in the next day. At day 7, 14 and 28 after injection, we measured motor nerve conduction and detected mRNA expressions of netrin-1 receptors UNC5B and Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC), and neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) by real-time PCR. We also detected protein expressions of BDNF and NGF by Western blotting assays and examined BMSCs that incorporated into myelin and vascellum. The results showed that BMSCs infected by Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP significantly improved the function of the sciatic nerve, and led to increased expression of BDNF and NGF (P<0.05). Moreover, 28 days after injury, more Schwann cells were found in BMSCs infected by Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP compared to control BMSCs. In conclusion, transplantation of BMSCs that produce netrin-1 improved the function of the sciatic nerve after injury. This method may be a new treatment of nerve injury. PMID:26445571

  10. Exercise training improves vascular endothelial function in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Pleiner, Johannes; Wiesinger, Günther F; Sieder, Anna E; Quittan, Michael; Nuhr, Martin J; Francesconi, Claudia; Seit, Hans-Peter; Francesconi, Mario; Schmetterer, Leopold; Wolzt, Michael

    2002-10-01

    OBJECTIVE-Impaired endothelial function of resistance and conduit arteries can be detected in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied whether a persistent improvement of endothelial function can be achieved by regular physical training. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-The study included 26 patients with type 1 diabetes of 20 +/- 10 years' duration and no overt angiopathy; 18 patients (42 +/- 10 years old) participated in a bicycle exercise training program, and 8 patients with type 1 diabetes (33 +/- 11 years old) served as control subjects. Vascular function of conduit arteries was assessed by flow-mediated and endothelium-independent dilation of the brachial artery and of resistance vessels by the response of ocular fundus pulsation amplitudes to intravenous N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) at baseline, after 2 and 4 months of training, and 8 months after cessation of regular exercise. RESULTS-Training increased peak oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) by 13% after 2 months and by 27% after 4 months (P = 0.04). Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery increased from 6.5 +/- 1.1 to 9.8 +/- 1.1% (P = 0.04) by training. L-NMMA administration decreased fundus pulsation amplitude (FPA) by 9.1 +/- 0.9% before training and by 13.4 +/- 1.5% after 4 months of training (P = 0.02). VO(2max), FMD, and FPA were unchanged in the control group. Vascular effects from training were abrogated 8 months after cessation of exercise. CONCLUSIONS-Our study demonstrates that aerobic exercise training can improve endothelial function in different vascular beds in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes, who are at considerable risk for diabetic angiopathy. However, the beneficial effect on vascular function is not maintained in the absence of exercise.

  11. Peripheral circulation monitored by surface temperature and autonomic nervous function in hypobaric hypoxic environment: effects of submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Fukuda-Matsuda, Eri; Yamada, Makiko; Tanobe, Kyoko; Saito, Shigeru

    2007-02-01

    Hypothermia and frostbite are frequently seen in accidents in remote wilderness environment, especially in hypobaric hypoxic conditions. The aim of this study was to clarify how hypobaric hypoxic conditions affects peripheral circulation. Peripheral skin temperature and autonomic nervous functions were assessed in two 1000-m ascent exercises. Subjects (n = 15) ascended from 1000 m above sea level in Study 1, and ascended from 2400 m in Study 2. Conditions other than environmental oxygen pressure were mostly identical in both studies. The autonomic nervous activities were decreased solely in Study 2. The relative sympathetic activity was significantly increased in the lower barometric pressure in Study 2 (p < 0.01). Peripheral skin temperature was significantly decreased after the exercise in Study 2 (p < 0.01). In conclusion, hypobaric hypoxia itself induced peripheral low temperature during exercise at high altitudes. Relative sympathetic hyperactivity may be responsible for the compromised peripheral circulation.

  12. ECM-mimetic heparin glycosamioglycan-functionalized surface favors constructing functional vascular smooth muscle tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimin; Wang, Jianing; Wei, Yongzhen; Gao, Cheng; Chen, Xuejiao; Kong, Wei; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    Contractile vascular smooth muscle accounts for the normal physiological function of artery. Heparin, as a native glycosaminoglycan, has been well known for its important function in promoting or maintaining the contractile phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, heparin-functionalized non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) mat was fabricated by a facile and efficient surface modification protocol, which enables the control of surface heparin density within a broad range. Surface heparization remarkably increased the hydrophilicity of PCL, and reduced platelet adhesion. MTT assay showed that VSMC proliferation was evidently inhibited on the heparin-functionalized PCL surface in a dose-dependent manner. Gene analysis confirmed that surface heparization also promoted the transition of VSMCs from synthetic phenotype to contractile one. Furthermore, with a proper surface density of heparin, it allowed VSMCs to grow in a certain rate, while exhibiting contractile phenotype. Culture of VSMCs on a modified PCL mat with moderate heparin density (PCL-Hep-20) for 2 days resulted in a confluent layer of contractile smooth muscle cells. These data suggest that the heparin-modified PCL scaffolds may be a promising candidate to generate functional vascular tissues in vitro. PMID:27351139

  13. Engineering micropatterned surfaces to modulate the function of vascular stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jennifer; Wu, Michelle; Chu, Julia; Sochol, Ryan; Patel, Shyam

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • We examine vascular stem cell function on microgrooved and micropost patterned polymer substrates. • 10 μm microgrooved surfaces significantly lower VSC proliferation but do not modulate calcified matrix deposition. • Micropost surfaces significantly lower VSC proliferation and decrease calcified matrix deposition. - Abstract: Multipotent vascular stem cells have been implicated in vascular disease and in tissue remodeling post therapeutic intervention. Hyper-proliferation and calcified extracellular matrix deposition of VSC cause blood vessel narrowing and plaque hardening thereby increasing the risk of myocardial infarct. In this study, to optimize the surface design of vascular implants, we determined whether micropatterned polymer surfaces can modulate VSC differentiation and calcified matrix deposition. Undifferentiated rat VSC were cultured on microgrooved surfaces of varied groove widths, and on micropost surfaces. 10 μm microgrooved surfaces elongated VSC and decreased cell proliferation. However, microgrooved surfaces did not attenuate calcified extracellular matrix deposition by VSC cultured in osteogenic media conditions. In contrast, VSC cultured on micropost surfaces assumed a dendritic morphology, were significantly less proliferative, and deposited minimal calcified extracellular matrix. These results have significant implications for optimizing the design of cardiovascular implant surfaces.

  14. Construction of a fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to direction vascular cell fate and promotion hemocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Ye, Changrong; Wang, Yan; Su, Hong; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan; F Maitz, Manfred; Zhao, Anshan

    2016-07-01

    Surface biofunctional modification of cardiovascular stents is a versatile approach to reduce the adverse effects after implantation. In this work, a novel multifunctional coating was fabricated by coimmobilization of the sulfated polysaccharide of brown algae fucoidan and laminin to biomimic the vascular intimal conditions in order to support rapid endothelialization, prevent restenosis and improve hemocompatibility. The surface properties of the coating such as hydrophilicity, bonding density of biomolecules and stability were evaluated and optimized. According to the biocompatibility tests, the fucoidan/laminin multilayer coated surface displayed less platelet adhesion with favorable anticoagulant property. In addition, the fucoidan/laminin complex showed function to selectively regulate vascular cells growth behavior. The proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) on the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. For the smooth muscle cells (SMCs), inhibitory effects on cell adhesion and proliferation were observed. In conclusion, the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was successfully fabricated with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization properties which show a promising application in the vascular devices such as vascular stents or grafts surface modification. PMID:27127049

  15. Construction of a fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to direction vascular cell fate and promotion hemocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Ye, Changrong; Wang, Yan; Su, Hong; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan; F Maitz, Manfred; Zhao, Anshan

    2016-07-01

    Surface biofunctional modification of cardiovascular stents is a versatile approach to reduce the adverse effects after implantation. In this work, a novel multifunctional coating was fabricated by coimmobilization of the sulfated polysaccharide of brown algae fucoidan and laminin to biomimic the vascular intimal conditions in order to support rapid endothelialization, prevent restenosis and improve hemocompatibility. The surface properties of the coating such as hydrophilicity, bonding density of biomolecules and stability were evaluated and optimized. According to the biocompatibility tests, the fucoidan/laminin multilayer coated surface displayed less platelet adhesion with favorable anticoagulant property. In addition, the fucoidan/laminin complex showed function to selectively regulate vascular cells growth behavior. The proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) on the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. For the smooth muscle cells (SMCs), inhibitory effects on cell adhesion and proliferation were observed. In conclusion, the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was successfully fabricated with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization properties which show a promising application in the vascular devices such as vascular stents or grafts surface modification.

  16. Angiogenesis and vascular functions in modulation of obesity, adipose metabolism, and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yihai

    2013-10-01

    White and brown adipose tissues are hypervascularized and the adipose vasculature displays phenotypic and functional plasticity to coordinate with metabolic demands of adipocytes. Blood vessels not only supply nutrients and oxygen to nourish adipocytes, they also serve as a cellular reservoir to provide adipose precursor and stem cells that control adipose tissue mass and function. Multiple signaling molecules modulate the complex interplay between the vascular system and the adipocytes. Understanding fundamental mechanisms by which angiogenesis and vasculatures modulate adipocyte functions may provide new therapeutic options for treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders by targeting the adipose vasculature.

  17. Vascular Function, Inflammation, and Variations in Cardiac Autonomic Responses to Particulate Matter Among Welders

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Mittleman, Murray A.; Christiani, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with health conditions associated with impaired vascular function and inflammation may be more susceptible to the adverse health effects of fine particulate (particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5)) exposure. In 2006, the authors conducted a panel study to investigate directly whether vascular function and inflammation (assessed by C-reactive protein) modify PM2.5-associated reductions in heart rate variability among 23 young male workers (mean age, 40 years) from Massachusetts. Concurrent 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram and personal PM2.5 exposure information was collected over a total of 36 person-days, including either or both welding and nonwelding days. Linear mixed models were used to examine the 5-minute standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) in relation to the moving PM2.5 averages in the preceding 1–4 hours. C-reactive protein levels and 3 measures of vascular function (augmentation index, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure) were determined at baseline. The authors observed an inverse association between the 1-hour PM2.5 and 5-minute SDNN. Greater SDNN declines were observed among those with C-reactive protein (Pinteraction < 0.001) and augmentation index (P = 0.06) values at or above the 75th percentile and pulse pressure values below the 75th percentile (P < 0.001). Systemic inflammation and poorer vascular function appear to aggravate particle-related declines in heart rate variability among workers. PMID:19153215

  18. Central nervous system and peripheral immune functions and the sleep-wake system.

    PubMed Central

    Moldofsky, H

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the relationship of aspects of the immune system to the sleep-wake system in animals and humans. In addition to the influence of certain cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) on the sleeping-waking brain, circadian measures of plasma IL-1 and peripheral immune cellular functions, for example, natural killer cell activities and cortisol are related to the sleep-wake system in humans. Changes in the circadian patterns of immune functions over the menstrual cycle are associated with the amount of progesterone and slow wave sleep. The harmonious inter-relationship of the circadian pattern of the immune, endocrine and sleep-wake systems may be important in the cause and functions of sleep. PMID:7803370

  19. Central pain processing in chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Boland, Elaine G; Selvarajah, Dinesh; Hunter, Mike; Ezaydi, Yousef; Tesfaye, Solomon; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Snowden, John A; Wilkinson, Iain D

    2014-01-01

    Life expectancy in multiple myeloma has significantly increased. However, a high incidence of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) can negatively influence quality of life during this period. This study applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare areas associated with central pain processing in patients with multiple myeloma who had chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (MM-CIPN) with those from healthy volunteers (HV). Twenty-four participants (n = 12 MM-CIPN, n = 12 HV) underwent Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent (BOLD) fMRI at 3T whilst noxious heat-pain stimuli were applied to the foot and then thigh. Patients with MM-CIPN demonstrated greater activation during painful stimulation in the precuneus compared to HV (p = 0.014, FWE-corrected). Patients with MM-CIPN exhibited hypo-activation of the right superior frontal gyrus compared to HV (p = 0.031, FWE-corrected). Significant positive correlation existed between the total neuropathy score (reduced version) and activation in the frontal operculum (close to insular cortex) during foot stimulation in patients with MM-CIPN (p = 0.03, FWE-corrected; adjusted R2 = 0.87). Painful stimuli delivered to MM-CIPN patients evoke differential activation of distinct cortical regions, reflecting a unique pattern of central pain processing compared with healthy volunteers. This characteristic activation pattern associated with pain furthers the understanding of the pathophysiology of painful chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy. Functional MRI provides a tool for monitoring cerebral changes during anti-cancer and analgesic treatment.

  20. Association of Fitness Level With Cardiovascular Risk and Vascular Function in Older Nonexercising Individuals.

    PubMed

    Oudegeest-Sander, Madelijn H; Thijssen, Dick H J; Smits, Paul; van Dijk, Arie P J; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Hopman, Maria T E

    2015-07-01

    It is currently unknown whether differences in physical fitness in older, nonexercising individuals affect cardiovascular risk profile and vascular function. To examine this, 40 healthy older individuals (age 69 ± 4 years) who were classified as nonexercising for the past 5-10 years were allocated to a lower physical fitness (LF; VO2max 20.7 ± 2.4 mlO2/min/kg) or higher physical fitness group (HF; VO2max 29.1 ± 2.8 mlO2/ min/kg, p < .001). Cardiovascular risk profile was calculated using the Lifetime Risk Score (LRS). Vascular function was examined using the gold standard venous occlusion plethysmography to assess blood flow changes in response to intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and L-NNMA. Daily life activity level of the HF group was higher compared with the LF group (p = .04). LRS was higher (p < .001) and blood flow ratio response to acetylcholine was lower (p = .04) in the LF group. This study shows that a higher physical fitness level is associated with better cardiovascular health and vascular function in nonexercising older individuals. PMID:25222970

  1. Lifestyle changes in free-living patients with peripheral vascular disease (Fontaine stage II) related to plasma and LDL lipid composition: a 15 month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Tortosa, M C; Urbano, G; López-Jurado, M; Nestares, T; Gomez, M C; González, J; Mir, A; Ros, E; Mataix, J; Gil, A

    1999-10-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is characterized by arteriosclerosis and lower extremity ischemia which cause intermittent claudication. Patients grouped in the Fontaine stage II have more than 75% organic stenosis in their large coronary arteries and exhibit a number of alterations in blood coagulation and plasma lipids. The aim of this study was to evaluate an intervention program of lifestyle habits including dietary recommendations, moderate exercise and decreased smoking in a population of patients with PVD for a period of 15 months, with respect to plasma-lipid and lipoprotein composition as well as LDL susceptibility to peroxidation. These parameters are well known risk indicators of arteriosclerosis and coronary heart disease. A total 13 subjects diagnosed with PVD (Fontaine stage II) were selected, while a healthy age-matched group (n=20) was used as a reference. This study design was an uncontrolled trial of lifestyle interventions. The group of patients was examined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 months. Patients smoking one or more packets of cigarettes per day at the beginning of the study (54.2%) decreased smoking by as much as 7.7% 15 months later. In addition, physical activity intensified significantly (walking > 1 km: 13.1-77%) and treadmill running increased over the study period while the energy intake decreased by 10%. The percentage of saturated fat in the diet decreased by 10% while the intake of polyunsaturated fat rose, and monounsaturated-fat intake showed a parallel trend to increase; the average intake of cholesterol also fell by 10% and plasma triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol showed a trend to decrease and increase, respectively. No permanent changes in LDL lipid fractions for patients were detected during the follow-up period and no differences between patients and the age-matched reference group were found. The macrophage uptake of plasma-oxidized LDL was significantly higher in patients than in the reference group and no differences due

  2. Assessment of vascular function in Mexican women exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from wood smoke.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia G; Ochoa-Martínez, Ángeles C; Ramírez-GarcíaLuna, José L; Pierdant-Pérez, Mauricio; Gordillo-Moscoso, Antonio A; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2015-09-01

    The use of solid fuels for cooking and heating is likely to be the largest source of indoor air pollution on a global scale; these fuels emit substantial amounts of toxic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) when used in simple cooking stoves (such as open "three-stone" fires). Moreover, indoor air pollution from biomass fuels is considered an important risk factor for human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between exposure to PAHs from wood smoke and vascular dysfunction; in a group of Mexican women that use biomass combustion as their main energy source inside their homes. We used 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) as an exposure biomarker to PAHs and it was assessed using high performance liquid chromatography. The endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed through a vascular reactivity compression test performed with a pneumatic cuff under visualization of the brachial artery using high resolution ultrasonography (HRU). Assessment of the carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) was used as an atherosclerosis biomarker (also assessed using HRU); and clinical parameters such as anthropometry, blood pressure, glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, among others were also evaluated. The mean concentration of urinary 1-OHP found in exposed women was 0.46±0.32μmol/mol Cr (range: 0.086-1.23μmol/mol Cr). Moreover, vascular dysfunction (diminished endothelium dependent vasodilation) was found in 45% of the women participating in the study. Association between vascular function and 1-OHP levels was found to be significant through a logistic regression analysis (p=0.034; r(2)=0.1329). Furthermore, no association between CIMT and clinical parameters, urinary 1-OHP levels or vascular dysfunction was found. Therefore, with the information obtained in this study, we advocate for the need to implement programs to reduce the risk of exposure to PAHs in communities that use biomass fuels as a main

  3. The role of vascular biomarkers for primary and secondary prevention. A position paper from the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on peripheral circulation: Endorsed by the Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology (ARTERY) Society.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Xaplanteris, Panagiotis; Aboyans, Victor; Brodmann, Marianne; Cífková, Renata; Cosentino, Francesco; De Carlo, Marco; Gallino, Augusto; Landmesser, Ulf; Laurent, Stéphane; Lekakis, John; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Naka, Katerina K; Protogerou, Athanasios D; Rizzoni, Damiano; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Van Bortel, Luc; Weber, Thomas; Yamashina, Akira; Zimlichman, Reuven; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Cockcroft, John; O'Rourke, Michael; Park, Jeong Bae; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Sillesen, Henrik; Townsend, Raymond R

    2015-08-01

    While risk scores are invaluable tools for adapted preventive strategies, a significant gap exists between predicted and actual event rates. Additional tools to further stratify the risk of patients at an individual level are biomarkers. A surrogate endpoint is a biomarker that is intended as a substitute for a clinical endpoint. In order to be considered as a surrogate endpoint of cardiovascular events, a biomarker should satisfy several criteria, such as proof of concept, prospective validation, incremental value, clinical utility, clinical outcomes, cost-effectiveness, ease of use, methodological consensus, and reference values. We scrutinized the role of peripheral (i.e. not related to coronary circulation) noninvasive vascular biomarkers for primary and secondary cardiovascular disease prevention. Most of the biomarkers examined fit within the concept of early vascular aging. Biomarkers that fulfill most of the criteria and, therefore, are close to being considered a clinical surrogate endpoint are carotid ultrasonography, ankle-brachial index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity; biomarkers that fulfill some, but not all of the criteria are brachial ankle pulse wave velocity, central haemodynamics/wave reflections and C-reactive protein; biomarkers that do no not at present fulfill essential criteria are flow-mediated dilation, endothelial peripheral arterial tonometry, oxidized LDL and dysfunctional HDL. Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether a specific vascular biomarker is overly superior. A prospective study in which all vascular biomarkers are measured is still lacking. In selected cases, the combined assessment of more than one biomarker may be required.

  4. Electrical stimulation accelerates axonal and functional peripheral nerve regeneration across long gaps.

    PubMed

    Haastert-Talini, Kirsten; Schmitte, Ruth; Korte, Nele; Klode, Dorothee; Ratzka, Andreas; Grothe, Claudia

    2011-04-01

    Short-term low-frequency electrical stimulation (ESTIM) of proximal peripheral nerve stumps prior to end-to-end coaptation or tubular bridging of small distances has been reported to increase preferential motor reinnervation and functional motor recovery in animal models and human patients undergoing carpal tunnel release surgery. We investigated the effects of ESTIM on regeneration across rat sciatic nerve gaps, which exceed distances that allow spontaneous regeneration. Three different reconstruction approaches were combined with ESTIM in the experimental groups. Nerve gaps (13 mm) were bridged using (I) nerve autotransplantation, (II) transplantation of differentially filled silicone tubes, or (III) transplantation of tubular grafts containing fibroblast growth factor-2 overexpressing Schwann cells (SCs) for gene therapy. The regeneration outcome was followed for up to 8 weeks, and functionally as well as histomorphometrically analyzed in comparison to non-stimulated control groups. Combining ESTIM with nerve autotransplantation significantly increased the nerve fiber density in the regenerated nerve, and the grade of functional recovery as detected by electrodiagnostic recordings from the gastrocnemius muscle. The combination of ESTIM with transplantation of naïve SCs increased the regeneration of gap-bridging nerve tissue. Although macroscopic tissue regeneration was not further improved after combining ESTIM with FGF-2(21/23-kD) gene therapy, the latter resulted in a high rate of regenerated nerves that functionally reconnected to the target muscle. Based on our results, brief ESTIM shows high potential to accelerate axonal as well as functional (motor and sensory) outcomes in the clinical setting of peripheral nerve gap reconstruction in human patients. PMID:21265597

  5. Differences in Gait Characteristics Between Persons With Bilateral Transtibial Amputations, Due to Peripheral Vascular Disease and Trauma, and Able-Bodied Ambulators

    PubMed Central

    Su, Po-Fu; Gard, Steven A.; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine differences in gait characteristics between persons with bilateral transtibial amputations due to trauma and peripheral vascular disease (PVD); and to compare that with data from able-bodied controls that were previously collected and maintained in a laboratory database. Design Observational study of persons with bilateral transtibial amputations. Setting A motion analysis laboratory. Participants Nineteen bilateral transtibial amputees. Intervention No experimental intervention was performed. To standardize the effect of prosthetic foot type, subjects were fitted with Seattle Lightfoot II feet 2 weeks prior to quantitative gait analyses. Main Outcome Measures Temporospatial, kinematic, and kinetic gait data were recorded and analyzed. Results Results showed that the PVD and trauma subjects’ freely selected walking speeds were 0.69m/s and 1.11m/s, respectively, while that of able-bodied control subjects was 1.20m/s. When data were compared on the basis of freely selected walking speed, numerous differences were found in temporospatial, kinematic, and kinetic parameters between the PVD and trauma groups. However, when data from similar speeds were compared, the temporospatial, kinematic, and kinetic gait data demonstrated no statistically significant differences between the 2 amputee groups. Though not statistically significant, the PVD group displayed increased knee (P=.09) and hip (P=.06) flexion during swing phase, while the trauma group displayed increased pelvic obliquity (P=.06). These actions were believed to represent different strategies to increase swing phase foot clearance. Also, the PVD group exhibited slightly greater hip power (P=.05) prior to toe-off. Conclusions Many of the differences observed in the quantitative gait data between the trauma and PVD groups appeared to be directly associated with their freely selected walking speed; the trauma group walked at significantly faster freely selected speeds than the PVD group

  6. Functions of Müller cell-derived vascular endothelial growth factor in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Zhu, Meili; Le, Yun-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Müller cells are macroglia and play many essential roles as supporting cells in the retina. To respond to pathological changes in diabetic retinopathy (DR), a major complication in the eye of diabetic patients, retinal Müller glia produce a high level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or VEGF-A). As VEGF is expressed by multiple retinal cell-types and Müller glia comprise only a small portion of cells in the retina, it has been a great challenge to reveal the function of VEGF or other globally expressed proteins produced by Müller cells. With the development of conditional gene targeting tools, it is now possible to dissect the function of Müller cell-derived VEGF in vivo. By using conditional gene targeting approach, we demonstrate that Müller glia are a major source of retinal VEGF in diabetic mice and Müller cell-derived VEGF plays a significant role in the alteration of protein expression and peroxynitration, which leads to retinal inflammation, neovascularization, vascular leakage, and vascular lesion, key pathological changes in DR. Therefore, Müller glia are a potential cellular target for the treatment of DR, a leading cause of blindness. PMID:26069721

  7. Degree of bioresorbable vascular scaffold expansion modulates loss of essential function

    PubMed Central

    Ferdous, Jahid; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; Shazly, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Drug-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVSs) have the potential to restore lumen patency, enable recovery of the native vascular environment, and circumvent late complications associated with permanent endovascular devices. To ensure therapeutic effects persist for sufficient times prior to scaffold resorption and resultant functional loss, many factors dictating BVS performance must be identified, characterized and optimized. While some factors relate to BVS design and manufacturing, others depend on device deployment and intrinsic vascular properties. Importantly, these factors interact and cannot be considered in isolation. The objective of this study is to quantify the extent to which degree of radial expansion modulates BVS performance, specifically in the context of modifying device erosion kinetics and evolution of structural mechanics and local drug elution. We systematically varied degree of radial expansion in model BVS constructs composed of poly DL-lactide-glycolide and generated in-vitro metrics of device microstructure, degradation, erosion, mechanics and drug release. Experimental data permitted development of computational models that predicted transient concentrations of scaffold-derived soluble species and drug in the arterial wall, thus enabling speculation on the short- and long-term effects of differential expansion. We demonstrate degree of expansion significantly affects scaffold properties critical to functionality, underscoring its relevance in BVS design and optimization. PMID:26277377

  8. Functional regeneration of severed peripheral nerve using an implantable electrical stimulator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hyung; Pan, Hui; Kim, In Sook; Hwang, Soon Jung; Kim, Sung June

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents functional regeneration of severed peripheral nerve using a polymer-based implantable electrical stimulator. A polyimide based conduit electrode was made by micro-fabrication and a stimulation chip was designed to generate biphasic current pulse for electrical stimulation. The stimulation chip was packaged with a battery using silicone elastomer, and integrated with the electrode. The implantable electrical stimulator was implanted in the rat sciatic nerve with 7 mm gap. The electrical stimulation was applied for periods of one, two and four weeks between the proximal and the distal nerve stumps. After four weeks of post-operations, the degree of regeneration was evaluated through walking track assessments and by measuring neural response of the regenerated nerve. Based on these results, electrical stimulation, especially for two weeks of stimulation, could accelerate functional regeneration of the severed nerve.

  9. Extracellular functional noncoding nucleic acid bioaptamers and angiotropin RNP ribokines in vascularization and self-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wissler, Josef H; Wissler, Joerg E; Logemann, Enno

    2008-08-01

    Endogenous extracellular and circulating functional small noncoding nucleic acids (ncNAs; <200 nucleotides) and complexes with proteins (ribonucleoproteins; RNPs) make up varying biolibraries of molecular imprints of cellular histories. They are nascently formed upon cellular activation by extrinsic (environmental) factors, including mitogens, cell-mediated immune memory reactions (Landsteiner-Chase-Lawrence transfer factors), and metabolic (hypoxia) and (physical) shear stress forces. Those factors are conventional models for epigenetic (non-Mendelian) vascular remodeling variations directed rather to proteinaceous gene expression and regulation than genomic DNA sequence changes. Structurally defined ncNAs are described as small hairpin nc-shRNA bioaptamers in interaction with proteins forming functional (Cu,Ca,Na,K)-metalloregulated complexes (CuRNP; angiotropins). As nonmitogenic angiomorphogen cytokines (ribokines), they may reprogram confluent quiescent (contact-inhibited) endothelial cell types to migratory, phagokinetically active phenotypes in the morphogenesis of tolerated neovascular patterns. Their functions in organized and mess-chaotic vascular patterns were investigated with regard to master gene, information, epigenetic, vascular, and tumor factors. Some ncNAs feature three-dimensional codes (3D episcripts) for distinct protein conformer phases. They are suggested as being specific recognition types, the estimated repertoires of which are superior in diversity and specificity to conventional immune (glyco-)proteins. For episcription of phenotype variations, they may address and integrate information flow on molecular shapes to protein-mediated nucleic acid processing and [post-]translational modification mechanisms in ncNA-, redox, and metalloregulated conformation phase pathway-locked loops (CPLL). Several vascular and cancer epigenetic regulator proteins are shown to be entangled by sharing helix-nucleating structural (proteomic) domains for

  10. Peripheral haemodynamics in newborns: best practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Weindling, Michael; Paize, Fauzia

    2010-03-01

    Peripheral haemodynamics refers to blood flow, which determines oxygen and nutrient delivery to the tissues. Peripheral blood flow is affected by vascular resistance and blood pressure, which in turn varies with cardiac function. Arterial oxygen content depends on the blood haemoglobin concentration (Hb) and arterial pO2; tissue oxygen delivery depends on the position of the oxygen-dissociation curve, which is determined by temperature and the amount of adult or fetal haemoglobin. Methods available to study tissue perfusion include near-infrared spectroscopy, Doppler flowmetry, orthogonal polarisation spectral imaging and the peripheral perfusion index. Cardiac function, blood gases, Hb, and peripheral temperature all affect blood flow and oxygen extraction. Blood pressure appears to be less important. Other factors likely to play a role are the administration of vasoactive medications and ventilation strategies, which affect blood gases and cardiac output by changing the intrathoracic pressure.

  11. Functional spectroscopy approach to the assessment of nitric oxide storage in vascular tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan; Feelisch, Martin

    2003-10-01

    Much attention has been devoted to the enzymatic production of nitric oxide (NO) by the endothelial layer lining blood vessel walls, which regulates among other things local vasodilatation and platelet adhesion. Considerably less attention, however, has been paid to the accumulation of NO-related products in the vascular wall itself. Such local storage of NO products could conceivably contribute to the local regulation of blood flow and provide additional anti-adhesive protection, if biochemically activated to regenerate NO. Since little is known about their chemical nature, concentrations, and possible role in vascular biology we sought to characterize those species basally resent in rat aorta. To this end we developed a functional form of optical spectroscopy that allows us not only to identify NO-stores in intact tissues but also to monitor their production and disappearance in real-time. The method is based on the ability of NO stores to reversibly release NO when illuminated with light of particular wavelengths, which can be detected as a robust relaxation of vascular smooth muscle (photorelaxation). Characterization of NO-stores is achieved through a careful assessment of photorelaxation action spectra, taking into account the light scattering properties of the tissue, and of depletion of the NO-stores induced by exposure to controlled levels of light. This functional form of optical spectroscopy is applied to rat aortic tissue where the results suggest that the NO photolytically released from tissue stores originated from a low-molecular-weight RSNO as well as from nitrite. The significance of these findings to vascular physiology and pathophysiology is discussed.

  12. Pulmonary vascular function and exercise capacity in black sub-Saharan Africans.

    PubMed

    Simaga, Bamodi; Vicenzi, Marco; Faoro, Vitalie; Caravita, Sergio; Di Marco, Giovanni; Forton, Kevin; Deboeck, Gael; Lalande, Sophie; Naeije, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Sex and age affect the pulmonary circulation. Whether there may be racial differences in pulmonary vascular function is unknown. Thirty white European Caucasian subjects (15 women) and age and body-size matched 30 black sub-Saharan African subjects (15 women) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test and exercise stress echocardiography with measurements of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and cardiac output (CO). A pulmonary vascular distensibility coefficient α was mathematically determined from the natural curvilinearity of multipoint mean PAP (mPAP)-CO plots. Maximum oxygen uptake (V̇o2max) and workload were higher in the whites, while maximum respiratory exchange ratio and ventilatory equivalents for CO2 were the same. Pulmonary hemodynamics were not different at rest. Exercise was associated with a higher maximum total pulmonary vascular resistance, steeper mPAP-CO relationships, and lower α-coefficients in the blacks. These differences were entirely driven by higher slopes of mPAP-CO relationships (2.5 ± 0.7 vs. 1.4 ± 0.7 mmHg·l(-1)·min; P < 0.001) and lower α-coefficients (0.85 ± 0.33 vs. 1.35 ± 0.51%/mmHg; P < 0.01) in black men compared with white men. There were no differences in any of the hemodynamic variables between black and white women. In men only, the slopes of mPAP-CO relationships were inversely correlated to V̇o2max (P < 0.01). Thus the pulmonary circulation is intrinsically less distensible in black sub-Saharan African men compared with white Caucasian Europeans men, and this is associated with a lower exercise capacity. This study did not identify racial differences in pulmonary vascular function in women.

  13. Long-term Successful Weight Loss Improves Vascular Endothelial Function in Severely Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bigornia, Sherman J.; Mott, Melanie M.; Hess, Donald T.; Apovian, Caroline M.; McDonnell, Marie E.; Duess, Mai-Ann; Kluge, Matthew A.; Fiscale, Antonino J.; Vita, Joseph A.; Gokce, Noyan

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Although short-term weight loss improves vascular endothelial function, longer term outcomes have not been widely investigated. We examined brachial artery endothelium-dependent vasodilation and metabolic parameters in 29 severely obese subjects who lost ≥10% body weight (age 45 ± 13 years; BMI 48 ± 9 kg/m2) at baseline and after 12 months of dietary and/or surgical intervention. We compared these parameters to 14 obese individuals (age 49 ± 11 years; BMI 39 ± 7 kg/m2) who failed to lose weight. For the entire group, mean brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was impaired at 6.7 ± 4.1%. Following sustained weight loss, FMD increased significantly from 6.8 ± 4.2 to 10.0 ± 4.7%, but remained blunted in patients without weight decline from 6.5 ± 4.0 to 5.7 ± 4.1%, P = 0.013 by ANOVA. Endothelium-independent, nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD) was unaltered. BMI fell by 13 ± 7 kg/m2 following successful weight intervention and was associated with reduced total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP). Vascular improvement correlated most strongly with glucose levels (r = −0.51, P = 0.002) and was independent of weight change. In this cohort of severely obese subjects, sustained weight loss at 1 year improved vascular function and metabolic parameters. The findings suggest that reversal of endothelial dysfunction and restoration of arterial homeostasis could potentially reduce cardiovascular risk. The results also demonstrate that metabolic changes in association with weight loss are stronger determinants of vascular phenotype than degree of weight reduction. PMID:20057371

  14. Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral vascular disease - self-care; Intermittent claudication - self-care ... may prescribe the following medicines to control your peripheral artery disease. DO NOT stop taking these medicines ...

  15. Role of Vitamin C in the Function of the Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Fiona E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, has long been known to participate in several important functions in the vascular bed in support of endothelial cells. These functions include increasing the synthesis and deposition of type IV collagen in the basement membrane, stimulating endothelial proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis, scavenging radical species, and sparing endothelial cell-derived nitric oxide to help modulate blood flow. Although ascorbate may not be able to reverse inflammatory vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, it may well play a role in preventing the endothelial dysfunction that is the earliest sign of many such diseases. Recent Advances: Beyond simply preventing scurvy, evidence is mounting that ascorbate is required for optimal function of many dioxygenase enzymes in addition to those involved in collagen synthesis. Several of these enzymes regulate the transcription of proteins involved in endothelial function, proliferation, and survival, including hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and histone and DNA demethylases. More recently, ascorbate has been found to acutely tighten the endothelial permeability barrier and, thus, may modulate access of ascorbate and other molecules into tissues and organs. Critical Issues: The issue of the optimal cellular content of ascorbate remains unresolved, but it appears that low millimolar ascorbate concentrations are normal in most animal tissues, in human leukocytes, and probably in the endothelium. Although there may be little benefit of increasing near maximal cellular ascorbate concentrations in normal people, many diseases and conditions have either systemic or localized cellular ascorbate deficiency as a cause for endothelial dysfunction, including early atherosclerosis, sepsis, smoking, and diabetes. Future Directions: A key focus for future studies of ascorbate and the vascular endothelium will likely be to determine the mechanisms and clinical relevance of ascorbate effects on endothelial

  16. Assessment of the peripheral, central, and autonomic nervous system function in styrene workers

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K.; Araki, S.; Yokoyama, K. )

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the effects of styrene exposure on peripheral, central, and autonomic nervous system functions in man, we measured the distribution of nerve conduction velocities (DCV), short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), and variability in electrocardiographic R-R interval (CVRR) as well as conventional sensory and motor median nerve conduction velocities (SCV and MCV) in eleven styrene-exposed workers. The styrene workers' urinary phenylglyoxylic acid levels ranged from 31 to 419 (mean 169) mg/g creatinine at the end of the work shift on the examination day (estimated exposure to styrene of 22 ppm in air). Control subjects, matched to each styrene worker by sex and age, were selected from healthy adults without cardiovascular, neurologic and other potentially confounding disorders. In the styrene workers, we found that the V80 velocity of the DCV, below which 80% of active nerve fibers lie, and the SCV were both significantly slowed; the CVRR was also significantly reduced. There were no significant differences in SSEP latencies, MCV, or heart rate between the exposed workers and controls. These data, despite the small sample size, suggest that styrene affects the faster myelinated fibers of the peripheral sensory nerves, and that it also affects autonomic nervous activity.

  17. Functional importance of a peripheral pocket in mammalian cytochrome P450 2B enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Hee; Liu, Jingbao; Lee, Ga-Young; Halpert, James R; Wilderman, P Ross

    2015-10-15

    The functional importance of a peripheral pocket found in previously published X-ray crystal structures of CYP2B4 and CYP2B6 was probed using a biophysical approach. Introduction of tryptophan within the pocket of CYP2B4 at F202 or I241 leads to marked impairment of 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC) or 7-benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylation efficiency; a similar substitution at F195, near the surface access to the pocket, does not affect these activities. The analogous CYP2B6 F202W mutant is inactive in the 7-EFC O-dealkylation assay. The stoichiometry of 7-EFC deethylation suggested that the decreased activity of F202W and I241W in CYP2B4 and lack of activity of F202W in CYP2B6 coincided with a sharp increase in the flux of reducing equivalents through the oxidase shunt to produce excess water. The results indicate that the chemical identity of residues within this peripheral pocket, but not at the mouth of the pocket, is important in substrate turnover and redox coupling, likely through effects on active site topology.

  18. Peripheral, functional and postural asymmetries related to the preferred chewing side in adults with natural dentition.

    PubMed

    Rovira-Lastra, B; Flores-Orozco, E I; Ayuso-Montero, R; Peraire, M; Martinez-Gomis, J

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the preferred chewing side and whether chewing side preference is related to peripheral, functional or postural lateral preferences. One hundred and forty-six adults with natural dentition performed three masticatory assays, each consisting of five trials of chewing three pieces of silicon placed into a latex bag for 20 cycles, either freestyle or unilaterally on the right- or left-hand side. Occlusal contact area in the intercuspal position, maximum bite force, masticatory performance and cycle duration were measured and the lateral asymmetry of these variables was calculated. Laterality tests were performed to determine handedness, footedness, earedness and eyedness as functional preferences, and hand-clasping, arm-folding and leg-crossing as postural lateral preferences. The preferred chewing side was determined using three different methods: assessment of the first chewing cycle for each trial, calculation of the asymmetry index from all cycles and application of a visual analogue scale. Bivariate relationship and multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Among unilateral chewers, 77% of them preferred the right side for chewing. The factors most closely related to the preferred chewing side were asymmetry of bite force, asymmetry of masticatory performance and earedness, which explained up to 16% of the variance. Although several functional or postural lateral preferences seem to be related to the preferred chewing side, peripheral factors such as asymmetry of bite force and of masticatory performance are the most closely related to the preferred chewing side in adults with natural dentition. PMID:26549578

  19. A correlation study of telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes and kidney function with age.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Guang; Wang, Yong; Hou, Kai; Jia, Lin-Pei; Ma, Jie; Zhao, De-Long; Zhu, Shu-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Juan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Wang, Yan-Ping; Sun, Xue-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2015-06-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the association between telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes and kidney function in various age groups of a healthy population. A total of 139 healthy individuals were divided into five groups according to their age: 35‑44, 45‑54, 55‑64, 65‑74 and >75 years old. Peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained and the telomere restriction fragment (TRF) length was assayed using a digoxigenin‑labeled hybridization probe in Southern blot assays. Laboratory assays of kidney function were also performed. A correlation was observed between TRF length and age (r=‑0.314, P<0.001), with the telomere length of the individuals >75 years group being significantly shorter than the telomere length of the 35‑44, 45‑54 and 55‑64 years age groups (P<0.05). By contrast, the TRF length for males versus females did not differ for any of the age groups, while a correlation was observed between TRF length and serum levels of cystatin C (r=‑0.195, P<0.05). There was also a correlation between TRF length and glomerular filtration rate (r=‑0.184, P<0.05). The current study demonstrated that in this cohort, leukocyte telomere length reduced with age and was correlated with serum levels of cystatin C and glomerular filtration rate. Therefore, TRF length is associated with kidney function and may serve as a marker of aging.

  20. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Tikka, Saara

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  1. External Volume Expansion Modulates Vascular Growth and Functional Maturation in a Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Chih; Chen, Bin; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Guo, Lifei

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing application of the pre-grafting expansion during autologous fat transplantation in breast reconstruction, little is known about its mechanism of action. To address that, ventral skins of miniature pigs were treated over a 10-day or 21-day period, with continuous suction at -50 mm Hg via a 7-cm diameter rubber-lined suction-cup device. Soft tissue thickness increased immediately after this external volume expansion (EVE) treatment, such increase completely disappeared by the next day. In the dermis and subcutaneous fat, the EVE treated groups showed significant increases in blood vessel density evident by CD31 staining as well as in vascular networks layered with smooth muscle cells when compared with the control group. This finding was corroborated by the increased percentage of endothelial cells present in the treatment groups. There was no significant difference in the percentages of proliferating basal keratinocytes or adipocytes, nor in epidermal thickness. Moreover, the EVE had no effect on proliferation or differentiation potential of adipose stem cells. Taken together, the major effects of EVE appeared to be vascular remodeling and maturation of functional blood vessels. This understanding may help clinicians optimize the vascularity of the recipient bed to further improve fat graft survival. PMID:27174509

  2. On Cross-Sectional Associations of Leukocyte Telomere Length with Cardiac Systolic, Diastolic and Vascular Function: The Asklepios Study

    PubMed Central

    De Buyzere, Marc L.; Van daele, Caroline M.; Segers, Patrick; De Bacquer, Dirk; Van Criekinge, Wim; Bekaert, Sofie; Gillebert, Thierry C.; De Meyer, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic telomere length has been associated with measures of diastolic function, vascular stiffness and left ventricular mass mainly in smaller, patient-specific settings and not in a general population. In this study we describe the applicability of these findings in a large, representative population. Methods and Results Peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length (PBL TL) was measured using telomere restriction fragment analysis in the young to middle-aged (>2500 volunteers, ∼35 to 55 years old) Asklepios study population, free from overt cardiovascular disease. Subjects underwent extensive echocardiographic, hemodynamic and biochemical phenotyping. After adjusting for relevant confounders (age, sex, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, body mass index and use of antihypertensive drugs) we found no associations between PBL TL and left ventricular mass index (P = 0.943), ejection fraction (P = 0.933), peak systolic septal annular motion (P = 0.238), pulse wave velocity (P = 0.971) or pulse pressure (P = 0.999). In contrast, our data showed positive associations between PBL TL and parameters of LV filling: the transmitral flow early (E) to late (A) velocity ratio (E/A-ratio; P<0.001), the ratio of early (e′) to late (a′) mitral annular velocities (e′/a′-ratio; P = 0.012) and isovolumic relaxation time (P = 0.015). Interestingly, these associations were stronger in women than in men and were driven by associations between PBL TL and the late diastolic components (A and a′). Conclusions In a generally healthy, young to middle-aged population, PBL TL is not related to LV mass or systolic function, but might be associated with an altered LV filling pattern, especially in women. PMID:25506937

  3. What is the effect of peripheral muscle fatigue, pulmonary function, and body composition on functional exercise capacity in acromegalic patients?

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Agnaldo José; Guedes da Silva, Débora Pedroza; Ferreira, Arthur de Sá; Kasuki, Leandro; Gadelha, Mônica Roberto; Guimarães, Fernando Silva

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The six-minute walk test (6MWT) is increasingly being used as an important tool for analyzing functional capacity in patients with multisystem disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of body composition, peripheral muscle function, and pulmonary function on the six-minute walk distance (6MWD) in acromegalic patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two patients with active acromegaly, with a mean age of 48.6 ± 12.1 years, underwent an evaluation of body composition using electrical bioimpedance, isometric dynamometry with surface electromyography, tests of pulmonary function, and the 6MWT. [Results] The mean ± SD values for the 6MWD, fat-free mass (FFM), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were 65.5 ± 11.7% predicted, 55.1 ± 10.6 kg, and 55.2 ± 16.8% predicted, respectively. There was a significant correlation between the 6MWD and the following parameters: the angle of the linear regression line obtained using the values of the median frequency electromyography signal over time during the fatigability test for the vastus medialis muscle (MDF, r=0.65), FFM (r=0.62), MEP (r=0.60), height(2)/resistance index (r=0.52), resistance (r=−0.50), and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (r=0.50). Multivariate analysis showed that MDF, FFM, and MEP were independent predictors of the 6MWD (R2=0.52). [Conclusion] The fatigability of the peripheral muscles, FFM, and MEP are the primary determinants of the 6MWD in acromegalics. PMID:25931716

  4. Rho guanine exchange factors in blood vessels: fine-tuners of angiogenesis and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Kroll, Jens

    2013-05-15

    The angiogenic cascade is a multi-step process essential for embryogenesis and other physiological and pathological processes. Rho family GTPases are binary molecular switches and serve as master regulators of various basic cellular processes. Rho GTPases are known to exert important functions in angiogenesis and vascular physiology. These functions demand a tight and context-specific control of cellular processes requiring superordinate control by a multitude of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). GEFs display various features enabling them to fine-tune the actions of Rho GTPases in the vasculature: (1) GEFs regulate specific steps of the angiogenic cascade; (2) GEFs show a spatio-temporally specific expression pattern; (3) GEFs differentially regulate endothelial function depending on their subcellular location; (4) GEFs mediate crosstalk between complex signaling cascades and (5) GEFs themselves are regulated by another layer of interacting proteins. The aim of this review is to provide an overview about the role of GEFs in regulating angiogenesis and vascular function and to point out current limitations as well as clinical perspectives.

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is essential for physiological Beta cell function and islet vascularization in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Christoffersson, Gustaf; Waldén, Tomas; Sandberg, Monica; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Phillipson, Mia

    2015-04-01

    The availability of paracrine factors in the islets of Langerhans, and the constitution of the beta cell basement membrane can both be affected by proteolytic enzymes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp-9) on islet function in mice. Islet function of Mmp9-deficient (Mmp9(-/-)) mice and their wild-type littermates was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. The pancreata of Mmp9(-/-) mice did not differ from wild type in islet mass or distribution. However, Mmp9(-/-) mice had an impaired response to a glucose load in vivo, with lower serum insulin levels. The glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was reduced also in vitro in isolated Mmp9(-/-) islets. The vascular density of Mmp9(-/-) islets was lower, and the capillaries had fewer fenestrations, whereas the islet blood flow was threefold higher. These alterations could partly be explained by compensatory changes in the expression of matrix-related proteins. This in-depth investigation of the effects of the loss of MMP-9 function on pancreatic islets uncovers a deteriorated beta cell function that is primarily due to a shift in the beta cell phenotype, but also due to islet vascular aberrations. This likely reflects the importance of a normal islet matrix turnover exerted by MMP-9, and concomitant release of paracrine factors sequestered on the matrix.

  6. Dissociation between neural and vascular responses to sympathetic stimulation : contribution of local adrenergic receptor function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Costa, F.; Shannon, J.; Robertson, D.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    Sympathetic activation produced by various stimuli, eg, mental stress or handgrip, evokes regional vascular responses that are often nonhomogeneous. This phenomenon is believed to be the consequence of the recruitment of differential central neural pathways or of a sympathetically mediated vasodilation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a similar heterogeneous response occurs with cold pressor stimulation and to test the hypothesis that local differences in adrenergic receptor function could be in part responsible for this diversity. In 8 healthy subjects, local norepinephrine spillover and blood flow were measured in arms and legs at baseline and during sympathetic stimulation induced by baroreflex mechanisms (nitroprusside infusion) or cold pressor stimulation. At baseline, legs had higher vascular resistance (27+/-5 versus 17+/-2 U, P=0.05) despite lower norepinephrine spillover (0.28+/-0.04 versus 0.4+/-0.05 mg. min(-1). dL(-1), P=0.03). Norepinephrine spillover increased similarly in both arms and legs during nitroprusside infusion and cold pressor stimulation. On the other hand, during cold stimulation, vascular resistance increased in arms but not in legs (20+/-9% versus -7+/-4%, P=0.03). Increasing doses of isoproterenol and phenylephrine were infused intra-arterially in arms and legs to estimate beta-mediated vasodilation and alpha-induced vasoconstriction, respectively. beta-Mediated vasodilation was significantly lower in legs compared with arms. Thus, we report a dissociation between norepinephrine spillover and vascular responses to cold stress in lower limbs characterized by a paradoxical decrease in local resistance despite increases in sympathetic activity. The differences observed in adrenergic receptor responses cannot explain this phenomenon.

  7. Incorporation of Bone Marrow Cells in Pancreatic Pseudoislets Improves Posttransplant Vascularization and Endocrine Function

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Christine; Laschke, Matthias W.; Scheuer, Claudia; Menger, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Failure of revascularization is known to be the major reason for the poor outcome of pancreatic islet transplantation. In this study, we analyzed whether pseudoislets composed of islet cells and bone marrow cells can improve vascularization and function of islet transplants. Pancreatic islets isolated from Syrian golden hamsters were dispersed into single cells for the generation of pseudoislets containing 4×103 cells. To create bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets 2×103 islet cells were co-cultured with 2×103 bone marrow cells. Pseudoislets and bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets were transplanted syngeneically into skinfold chambers to study graft vascularization by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Native islet transplants served as controls. Bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets showed a significantly improved vascularization compared to native islets and pseudoislets. Moreover, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets but not pseudoislets normalized blood glucose levels after transplantation of 1000 islet equivalents under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals, although the bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets contained only 50% of islet cells compared to pseudoislets and native islets. Fluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets composed of bone marrow cells from GFP-expressing mice showed a distinct fraction of cells expressing both GFP and insulin, indicating a differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells to an insulin-producing cell-type. Thus, enrichment of pseudoislets by bone marrow cells enhances vascularization after transplantation and increases the amount of insulin-producing tissue. Accordingly, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets may represent a novel approach to increase the success rate of islet transplantation. PMID:23875013

  8. 77 FR 34964 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Toshiba E-Studio Multi-Function Peripherals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... 20007-5109 RE: U.S. Government Procurement; Country of Origin of Toshiba e-Studio Multi-function... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Toshiba E... certain Toshiba e-Studio Multi-function Peripherals (MFPs), which perform imaging, scanning, faxing,...

  9. Diverse functional roles of monosaccharide transporters and their homologs in vascular plants: a physiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Slewinski, Thomas L

    2011-07-01

    Vascular plants contain two gene families that encode monosaccharide transporter proteins. The classical monosaccharide transporter(-like) gene superfamily is large and functionally diverse, while the recently identified SWEET transporter family is smaller and, thus far, only found to transport glucose. These transporters play essential roles at many levels, ranging from organelles to the whole plant. Many family members are essential for cellular homeostasis and reproductive success. Although most transporters do not directly participate in long-distance transport, their indirect roles greatly impact carbon allocation and transport flux to the heterotrophic tissues of the plant. Functional characterization of some members from both gene families has revealed their diverse roles in carbohydrate partitioning, phloem function, resource allocation, plant defense, and sugar signaling. This review highlights the broad impacts and implications of monosaccharide transport by describing some of the functional roles of the monosaccharide transporter(-like) superfamily and the SWEET transporter family.

  10. Kv7.2 regulates the function of peripheral sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    King, Chih H.; Lancaster, Eric; Salomon, Daniela; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) family of voltage-gated K+ channels regulates cellular excitability. The functional role of Kv7.2 has been hampered by the lack of a viable Kcnq2-null animal model. In this study, we generated homozygous Kcnq2-null sensory neurons using the Cre-Lox system; in these mice, Kv7.2 expression is absent in the peripheral sensory neurons, whereas the expression of other molecular components of nodes (including Kv7.3), paranodes, and juxtaparanodes is not altered. The conditional Kcnq2-null animals exhibit normal motor performance, but have increased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Whole cell patch recording technique demonstrates that Kcnq2-null sensory neurons have increased excitability and reduced spike frequency adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of Kv7.2 activity increases the excitability of primary sensory neurons. PMID:24687876

  11. Kv7.2 regulates the function of peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    King, Chih H; Lancaster, Eric; Salomon, Daniela; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S

    2014-10-01

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) family of voltage-gated K(+) channels regulates cellular excitability. The functional role of Kv7.2 has been hampered by the lack of a viable Kcnq2-null animal model. In this study, we generated homozygous Kcnq2-null sensory neurons using the Cre-Lox system; in these mice, Kv7.2 expression is absent in the peripheral sensory neurons, whereas the expression of other molecular components of nodes (including Kv7.3), paranodes, and juxtaparanodes is not altered. The conditional Kcnq2-null animals exhibit normal motor performance but have increased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Whole-cell patch recording technique demonstrates that Kcnq2-null sensory neurons have increased excitability and reduced spike frequency adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of Kv7.2 activity increases the excitability of primary sensory neurons. PMID:24687876

  12. Branding of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Perler, Bruce A

    2008-03-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery surveyed primary care physicians (PCPs) to understand how PCPs make referral decisions for their patients with peripheral vascular disease. Responses were received from 250 PCPs in 44 states. More than 80% of the respondents characterized their experiences with vascular surgeons as positive or very positive. PCPs perceive that vascular surgeons perform "invasive" procedures and refer patients with the most severe vascular disease to vascular surgeons but were more than twice as likely to refer patients to cardiologists, believing they are better able to perform minimally invasive procedures. Nevertheless, PCPs are receptive to the notion of increasing referrals to vascular surgeons. A successful branding campaign will require considerable education of referring physicians about the totality of traditional vascular and endovascular care increasingly provided by the contemporary vascular surgical practice and will be most effective at the local grassroots level.

  13. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chen; Zhao, Weijing; Zhang, Yinan; Li, Lu; Lu, Jingyi; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Congrong; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between serum magnesium and peripheral nerve function in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A total of 978 T2DM patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into tertiles according to serum magnesium concentration (low tertile: ≤0.85 mmol/L; medium tertile: 0.85 to 0.92 mmol/L; and high tertile: >0.92 mmol/L). All participants underwent nerve conduction (NC) studies. Composite z scores of conduction velocity, latency, and amplitude were constructed, respectively. The serum magnesium levels were significantly lower in patients with abnormal NC than in those with normal NC (0.87 [0.82, 0.92] vs. 0.88 [0.83, 0.93] mmol/L, P = 0.048). The composite z score of amplitude significantly increased with increasing tertiles of magnesium (−0.60 ± 0.02 vs. −0.57 ± 0.02 vs. −0.48 ± 0.03, P for trend = 0.001). After adjusting for all potential confounders, lower serum magnesium levels were still associated with lower composite z score of amplitude (β = 0.095, P = 0.014). In patients with T2DM, lower serum magnesium levels were significantly associated with lower composite z score of amplitude, indicating magnesium might affect peripheral nerve function through axonal degeneration. PMID:27601013

  14. Superficial Femoral Artery Plaque and Functional Performance in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Liu, Kiang; Carroll, Timothy J.; Tian, Lu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Li, Debiao; Carr, James; Guralnik, Jack M.; Kibbe, Melina; Pearce, William H.; Yuan, Chun; McCarthy, Walter; Kramer, Christopher M.; Tao, Huimin; Liao, Yihua; Clark, Elizabeth Talley; Xu, Dongxiang; Berry, Jarett; Orozco, Jennifer; Sharma, Leena; Criqui, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We studied associations of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of plaque area and relative percent lumen reduction in the proximal superficial femoral artery with functional performance among participants with peripheral arterial disease. BACKGROUND The clinical significance of directly imaged plaque characteristics in lower extremity arteries is not well established. METHODS A total of 454 participants with an ankle brachial index <1.00 underwent magnetic resonance cross-sectional imaging of the proximal superficial femoral artery and completed a 6-min walk test, measurement of 4-m walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, and measurement of physical activity with a vertical accelerometer. RESULTS Adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, statin use, comorbidities, and other covariates, higher mean plaque area (1st quintile [least plaque]: 394 m, 2nd quintile: 360 m, 3rd quintile: 359 m, 4th quintile: 329 m, 5th quintile [greatest plaque]: 311 m; p trend <0.001) and smaller mean percent lumen area (1st quintile [greatest plaque]: 319 m, 2nd quintile: 330 m, 3rd quintile: 364 m, 4th quintile: 350 m, 5th quintile: 390 m; p trend <0.001) were associated with shorter distance achieved in the 6-min walk test. Greater mean plaque area was also associated with slower usual-paced walking velocity (p trend = 0.006) and slower fastest-paced 4-m walking velocity (p trend = 0.003). Associations of mean plaque area and mean lumen area with 6-min walk distance remained statistically significant even after additional adjustment for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Among participants with peripheral arterial disease, greater plaque burden and smaller lumen area in the proximal superficial femoral artery are associated independently with poorer functional performance, even after adjusting for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. PMID:21757163

  15. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chen; Zhao, Weijing; Zhang, Yinan; Li, Lu; Lu, Jingyi; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Congrong; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between serum magnesium and peripheral nerve function in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A total of 978 T2DM patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into tertiles according to serum magnesium concentration (low tertile: ≤0.85 mmol/L; medium tertile: 0.85 to 0.92 mmol/L; and high tertile: >0.92 mmol/L). All participants underwent nerve conduction (NC) studies. Composite z scores of conduction velocity, latency, and amplitude were constructed, respectively. The serum magnesium levels were significantly lower in patients with abnormal NC than in those with normal NC (0.87 [0.82, 0.92] vs. 0.88 [0.83, 0.93] mmol/L, P = 0.048). The composite z score of amplitude significantly increased with increasing tertiles of magnesium (-0.60 ± 0.02 vs. -0.57 ± 0.02 vs. -0.48 ± 0.03, P for trend = 0.001). After adjusting for all potential confounders, lower serum magnesium levels were still associated with lower composite z score of amplitude (β = 0.095, P = 0.014). In patients with T2DM, lower serum magnesium levels were significantly associated with lower composite z score of amplitude, indicating magnesium might affect peripheral nerve function through axonal degeneration. PMID:27601013

  16. Functional Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate ICAM-1 Expression and Promote Leukocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Newfell, Brenna G.; la Sala, Andrea; Baur, Wendy; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Mendelsohn, Michael E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists decrease cardiovascular mortality and ischemia by unknown mechanisms. The steroid hormone aldosterone acts by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. In humans, aldosterone causes MR-dependent endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and in animal models, aldosterone increases vascular macrophage infiltration and atherosclerosis. MR antagonists inhibit these effects without changing blood pressure, suggesting a direct role for vascular MR in EC function and atherosclerosis. Whether human vascular EC express functional MR is not known. Here we show that human coronary artery and aortic EC express MR mRNA and protein and that EC MR mediates aldosterone-dependent gene transcription. Human EC also express the enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2(11βHSD2) and inhibition of 11βHSD2 in aortic EC enhances gene transactivation by cortisol, supporting that EC 11βHSD2 is functional. Furthermore, aldosterone stimulates transcription of the proatherogenic leukocyte-EC adhesion molecule Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM1) gene and protein expression on human coronary artery EC, an effect inhibited by the MR antagonist spironolactone and by MR knock-down with siRNA. Cell adhesion assays demonstrate that aldosterone promotes leukocyte-EC adhesion, an effect that is inhibited by spironolactone and ICAM1 blocking antibody, supporting that aldosterone induction of EC ICAM1 surface expression via MR mediates leukocyte-EC adhesion. These data show that aldosterone activates endogenous EC MR and proatherogenic gene expression in clinically important human EC. These studies describe a novel mechanism by which aldosterone may influence ischemic cardiovascular events and support a new explanation for the decrease in ischemic events in patients treated with aldosterone antagonists. PMID:18467630

  17. Proton pump inhibitors and vascular function: A prospective cross-over pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T.; Cooke, John P.; Khan, Fouzia; Thakker, Rahul N.; Chang, Peter; Shah, Nigam H.; Nead, Kevin T.; Leeper, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of gastric reflux. Recent retrospective cohorts and large database studies have raised concern that the use of PPIs is associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. However, there is no prospective clinical study evaluating whether the use of PPIs directly causes CV harm. Methods We conducted a controlled open-label cross-over pilot study among 21 adults aged 18 and older who are healthy (n = 11) or have established clinical cardiovascular disease (n = 10). Study subjects were assigned to receive a PPI (Prevacid; 30 mg) or a placebo pill once daily for 4 weeks. After a 2 week washout period, participants were crossed-over to receive the alternate treatment for the ensuing 4 weeks. Subjects underwent evaluation of vascular function (by the EndoPAT technique) and had plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial function previously implicated in PPI-mediated risk) measured prior to and after each treatment interval. Results We observed a marginal inverse correlation between the EndoPAT score and plasma levels of ADMA (r = −0.364). Subjects experienced a greater worsening in plasma ADMA levels while on PPI than on placebo, and this trend was more pronounced amongst those subjects with a history of vascular disease. However, these trends did not reach statistical significance, and PPI use was also not associated with an impairment in flow mediated vasodilation during the course of this study. Conclusions In this open-label, cross-over pilot study conducted among healthy subjects and coronary disease patients, PPI use did not significantly influence vascular endothelial function. Larger, long-term and blinded trials are needed to mechanistically explain the correlation between PPI use and adverse clinical outcomes, which has recently been reported in retrospective cohort studies. PMID:25835348

  18. Validation of the transfer function technique for generating central from peripheral upper limb pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, David; Adji, Audrey; O'Rourke, Michael F

    2004-11-01

    Central aortic pressure waveforms can be calculated from the radial artery pressure waveform using a generalized transfer function to correct for pressure wave distortion in the upper limb. Although validated to standards conventionally applied, reservations are still expressed on use of this process, because of the relatively small number of patients from whom appropriate invasive data were obtained. The study described here supplemented such data with noninvasive data obtained from carotid and radial artery tonometry in 439 patients and normal subjects. The carotid-radial artery transfer function was similar to the aortic-radial when allowance was made for wave travel from aorta to carotid artery. The carotid-radial transfer function was identical in male and female individuals, was similar at different arterial pressures and in mature adults. Differences are relatively small, are seen at frequencies where central pressure wave components are small and are similar to those seen with vasodilator agents in invasive studies. Findings provide further support for use of a generalized transfer function to calculate aortic from upper limb pressure and conform with previously established views on vascular impedance. PMID:15533735

  19. Identification of Chemical Vascular Disruptors During Development Using An Integrative Predictive Toxicity Model and Zebrafish and in Vitro Functional Angiogenesis Assays.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of chemical vascular disruptors during development using an integrative predictive toxicity model and zebrafish and in vitro functional angiogenesis assays Chemically-induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse pre...

  20. Performance-based physical functioning and peripheral neuropathy in a population-based cohort of women at midlife.

    PubMed

    Ylitalo, Kelly R; Herman, William H; Harlow, Siobán D

    2013-04-15

    Peripheral neuropathy is underappreciated as a potential cause of functional limitations. In the present article, we assessed the cross-sectional association between peripheral neuropathy and physical functioning and how the longitudinal association between age and functioning differed by neuropathy status. Physical functioning was measured in 1996-2008 using timed performances on stair-climb, walking, sit-to-stand, and balance tests at the Michigan site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation, a population-based cohort study of women at midlife (n = 396). Peripheral neuropathy was measured in 2008 and defined as having an abnormal monofilament test result or 4 or more symptoms. We used linear mixed models to determine whether trajectories of physical functioning differed by prevalent neuropathy status. Overall, 27.8% of the women had neuropathy. Stair-climb time differed by neuropathy status (P = 0.04), and for every 1-year increase in age, women with neuropathy had a 1.82% (95% confidence interval: 1.42, 2.21) increase compared with a 0.95% (95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.20) increase for women without neuropathy. Sit-to-stand time differed by neuropathy status (P = 0.01), but the rate of change did not differ. No differences between neuropathy groups were observed for the walk test. For some performance-based tasks, poor functioning was maintained or exacerbated for women who had prevalent neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy may play a role in physical functioning limitations and future disability.

  1. Neutrophils as sources of extracellular nucleotides: Functional consequences at the vascular interface

    PubMed Central

    Eltzschig, Holger K.; MacManus, Christopher F.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleotide signaling is currently an area of intense investigation. Extracellular ATP liberated during hypoxia or inflammation can either signal directly to purinergic receptors or, following phosphohydrolytic metabolism, can activate surface adenosine (Ado) receptors. Given the association of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with adenine nucleotide / nucleoside signaling in the inflammatory milieu, it was recently demonstrated that PMN actively release ATP via a connexin 43 (Cx43) hemichannel-dependent mechanism. Here we review the mechanisms of ATP release and subsequent functional implications of ATP metabolism at the interface between PMN and vascular endothelial cells during inflammation and in hypoxia. PMID:18436149

  2. Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kothiya, Milankumar; Galvani, Sylvain; Obinata, Hideru; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Giordano, Frank J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Hla, Timothy; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Although lipid signaling has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, specific molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, regulates endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis with direct effects on vascular function and blood pressure. Nogo-B inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, thereby controlling production of endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate and autocrine, G protein–coupled receptor–dependent signaling by this metabolite. Mice lacking Nogo-B either systemically or specifically in endothelial cells are hypotensive, resistant to angiotensin II–induced hypertension and have preserved endothelial function and nitric oxide release. In mice that lack Nogo-B, pharmacological inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase with myriocin reinstates endothelial dysfunction and angiotensin II–induced hypertension. Our study identifies Nogo-B as a key inhibitor of local sphingolipid synthesis and shows that autocrine sphingolipid signaling within the endothelium is critical for vascular function and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26301690

  3. Curcumin ingestion and exercise training improve vascular endothelial function in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Choi, Youngju; Miyaki, Asako; Tanabe, Yoko; Sugawara, Jun; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Seiji

    2012-10-01

    Vascular endothelial function is declines with aging and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle modification, particularly aerobic exercise and dietary adjustment, has a favorable effect on vascular aging. Curcumin is a major component of turmeric with known anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects. We investigated the effects of curcumin ingestion and aerobic exercise training on flow-mediated dilation as an indicator endothelial function in postmenopausal women. A total of 32 postmenopausal women were assigned to 3 groups: control, exercise, and curcumin groups. The curcumin group ingested curcumin orally for 8 weeks. The exercise group underwent moderate aerobic exercise training for 8 weeks. Before and after each intervention, flow-mediated dilation was measured. No difference in baseline flow-mediated dilation or other key dependent variables were detected among the groups. Flow-mediated dilation increased significantly and equally in the curcumin and exercise groups, whereas no changes were observed in the control group. Our results indicated that curcumin ingestion and aerobic exercise training can increase flow-mediated dilation in postmenopausal women, suggesting that both can potentially improve the age-related decline in endothelial function.

  4. Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Anna; Zhang, Yi; Kothiya, Milankumar; Galvani, Sylvain; Obinata, Hideru; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Giordano, Frank J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Hla, Timothy; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Although lipid signaling has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, specific molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, regulates endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis with direct effects on vascular function and blood pressure. Nogo-B inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, thereby controlling production of endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate and autocrine, G protein-coupled receptor-dependent signaling by this metabolite. Mice lacking Nogo-B either systemically or specifically in endothelial cells are hypotensive, resistant to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and have preserved endothelial function and nitric oxide release. In mice that lack Nogo-B, pharmacological inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase with myriocin reinstates endothelial dysfunction and angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Our study identifies Nogo-B as a key inhibitor of local sphingolipid synthesis and shows that autocrine sphingolipid signaling within the endothelium is critical for vascular function and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26301690

  5. Upslope treadmill exercise enhances motor axon regeneration but not functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Cannoy, Jill; Crowley, Sam; Jarratt, Allen; Werts, Kelly LeFevere; Osborne, Krista; Park, Sohee; English, Arthur W

    2016-09-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury, moderate daily exercise conducted on a level treadmill results in enhanced axon regeneration and modest improvements in functional recovery. If the exercise is conducted on an upwardly inclined treadmill, even more motor axons regenerate successfully and reinnervate muscle targets. Whether this increased motor axon regeneration also results in greater improvement in functional recovery from sciatic nerve injury was studied. Axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation were studied in Lewis rats over an 11 wk postinjury period using stimulus evoked electromyographic (EMG) responses in the soleus muscle of awake animals. Motor axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation were enhanced in slope-trained rats. Direct muscle (M) responses reappeared faster in slope-trained animals than in other groups and ultimately were larger than untreated animals. The amplitude of monosynaptic H reflexes recorded from slope-trained rats remained significantly smaller than all other groups of animals for the duration of the study. The restoration of the amplitude and pattern of locomotor EMG activity in soleus and tibialis anterior and of hindblimb kinematics was studied during treadmill walking on different slopes. Slope-trained rats did not recover the ability to modulate the intensity of locomotor EMG activity with slope. Patterned EMG activity in flexor and extensor muscles was not noted in slope-trained rats. Neither hindblimb length nor limb orientation during level, upslope, or downslope walking was restored in slope-trained rats. Slope training enhanced motor axon regeneration but did not improve functional recovery following sciatic nerve transection and repair. PMID:27466130

  6. Deficient immune function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Gardner syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R P; Stembridge, A M; Gardner, E J

    1985-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to certain cancers is recognized as a contributor to malignancy in man and experimental animals. Colorectal adenocarcinoma associated with Gardner syndrome is considered to be a hereditary form of cancer in which family members are at increased risk because they inherit an autosomal dominant gene for adenomas of the colorectum. The adenomas, if untreated, transform into adenocarcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to characterize immune function in patients with Gardner syndrome since reports exist of immune defects in patients with other forms of hereditary cancer. An analysis of the ability of lymphocytes from the patients to be stimulated by the T cell mitogens, phytohaemmaglutinin and concanavalin A, revealed severely depressed responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from all of the patients studied. A depressed response by patient PBMC to the B cell mitogen, pokeweed mitogen, also was observed but the extent of depression was not statistically significant. Natural killer (NK) cell activity of the patients was studied to determine if a possible genetic defect in this function is associated with Gardner syndrome. PBMC from half of the patients had marginally depressed NK cell function. An enumeration of patient cells revealed a significantly lower ratio of T4 (helper) to T8 (suppressor) T cells, but normal percentages of rosette forming, 7.2 (Ia) positive and Leu 11 positive (NK) cells. PMID:3160513

  7. Widespread Decreased Expression of Immune Function Genes in Human Peripheral Blood Following Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a large-scale reduced expression of genes in pathways related to cell-type specific immunity functions that emerges from microarray analysis 48 h after ex vivo γ-ray irradiation (0, 0.5, 2, 5, 8 Gy) of human peripheral blood from five donors. This response is similar to that seen in patients at 24 h after the start of total-body irradiation and strengthens the rationale for the ex vivo model as an adjunct to human in vivo studies. The most marked response was in genes associated with natural killer (NK) cell immune functions, reflecting a relative loss of NK cells from the population. T- and B-cell mediated immunity genes were also significantly represented in the radiation response. Combined with our previous studies, a single gene expression signature was able to predict radiation dose range with 97% accuracy at times from 6–48 h after exposure. Gene expression signatures that may report on the loss or functional deactivation of blood cell subpopulations after radiation exposure may be particularly useful both for triage biodosimetry and for monitoring the effect of radiation mitigating treatments. PMID:24168352

  8. Progenitor cell release plus exercise to improve functional performance in peripheral artery disease: the PROPEL Study.

    PubMed

    Domanchuk, Kathryn; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Criqui, Michael H; Tian, Lu; Liu, Kiang; Losordo, Douglas; Stein, James; Green, David; Kibbe, Melina; Zhao, Lihui; Annex, Brian; Perlman, Harris; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Pearce, William; Taylor, Doris; McDermott, Mary M

    2013-11-01

    Functional impairment, functional decline, and mobility loss are major public health problems in people with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). Few medical therapies significantly improve walking performance in PAD. We describe methods for the PROgenitor cell release Plus Exercise to improve functionaL performance in PAD (PROPEL) Study, a randomized controlled clinical trial designed to determine whether granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) combined with supervised treadmill walking exercise improves six-minute walk distance more than GM-CSF alone, more than supervised treadmill exercise alone, and more than placebo plus attention control in participants with PAD, respectively. PROPEL Study participants are randomized to one of four arms in a 2 by 2 factorial design. The four study arms are GM-CSF plus supervised treadmill exercise, GM-CSF plus attention control, placebo plus supervised exercise therapy, or placebo plus attention control. The primary outcome is change in six-minute walk distance at 12-week follow-up. Secondary outcomes include change in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), change in maximal treadmill walking time, and change in circulating CD34+ cells at 12-week follow-up. Outcomes are also measured at six-week and six-month follow-up. Results of the PROPEL Study will have important implications for understanding mechanisms of improving walking performance and preventing mobility loss in the large and growing number of men and women with PAD.

  9. Effects of Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning on Function of Peripheral Nerves: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Sudheera S.; Pathirana, Kithsiri D.; Buckley, Nick A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Following acute organophosphorus (OP) poisoning patients complain of numbness without objective sensory abnormalities or other features of OP induced delayed polyneuropathy. The aim of this study was to measure peripheral nerve function after acute exposure to OP. Methods A cohort study was conducted with age, gender and occupation matched controls. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), amplitude and area of compound muscle action potential (CMAP), sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV), F- waves and electromyography (EMG) on the deltoid and the first dorsal interosseous muscles on the dominant side were performed, following acute OP poisoning. All neurophysiological assessments except EMG were performed on the controls. Assessments were performed on the day of discharge from the hospital (the first assessment) and six weeks (the second assessment) after the exposure. The controls were assessed only once. Results There were 70 patients (50 males) and 70 controls. Fifty-three patients attended for the second assessment. In the first assessment MNCV of all the motor nerves examined, CMAP amplitude and SNCV of ulnar nerve, median and ulnar F-wave occurrence in the patients were significantly reduced compared to the controls. In the second assessment significant reduction was found in SNCV of both sensory nerves examined, MNCV of ulnar nerve, CMAP amplitude of common peroneal nerve, F-wave occurrence of median and ulnar nerves. No abnormalities were detected in the patients when compared to the standard cut-off values of nerve conduction studies except F-wave occurrence. EMG studies did not show any abnormality. Conclusion There was no strong evidence of irreversible peripheral nerve damage following acute OP poisoning, however further studies are required. PMID:23185328

  10. Peripheral ammonia and blood brain barrier structure and function after methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Northrop, Nicole A; Halpin, Laura E; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2016-08-01

    An effect of the widely abuse psychostimulant, methamphetamine (Meth), is blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption; however, the mechanism by which Meth causes BBB disruption remains unclear. Recently it has been shown that Meth produces liver damage and consequent increases in plasma ammonia. Ammonia can mediate oxidative stress and inflammation, both of which are known to cause BBB disruption. Therefore, the current studies examined the role of peripheral ammonia in Meth-induced disruption of BBB structure and function. A neurotoxic Meth regimen (10 mg/kg, ip, q 2 h, ×4) administered to rats increased plasma ammonia and active MMP-9 in the cortex 2 h after the last Meth injection, compared to saline treated rats. At 24 h after Meth treatment, decreased immunoreactivity of BBB structural proteins, occludin and claudin-5, and increased extravasation of 10,000 Da FITC-dextran were observed, as compared to saline controls. Pretreatment with lactulose (5.3 g/kg, po, q 12 h), a drug that remains in the lumen of the intestine and promotes ammonia excretion, prevented the Meth-induced increases in plasma ammonia. These results were paralleled by the prevention of decreases in BBB structural proteins, increases in extravasation of 10,000 Da FITC-dextran and increases in active MMP-9. The results indicate that Meth-induced increases in ammonia produce BBB disruption and suggest that MMP-9 activation mediates the BBB disruption. These findings identify a novel mechanism of Meth-induced BBB disruption that is mediated by plasma ammonia and are the first to identify a peripheral contribution to Meth-induced BBB disruption. PMID:26972828

  11. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  12. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  13. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  14. Peripheral circulation.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, M Harold; Davis, Michael J; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Simmons, Grant H; Bender, Shawn B; Padilla, Jaume; Bache, Robert J; Merkus, Daphne; Duncker, Dirk J

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow (BF) increases with increasing exercise intensity in skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscle. In humans during maximal exercise intensities, 85% to 90% of total cardiac output is distributed to skeletal and cardiac muscle. During exercise BF increases modestly and heterogeneously to brain and decreases in gastrointestinal, reproductive, and renal tissues and shows little to no change in skin. If the duration of exercise is sufficient to increase body/core temperature, skin BF is also increased in humans. Because blood pressure changes little during exercise, changes in distribution of BF with incremental exercise result from changes in vascular conductance. These changes in distribution of BF throughout the body contribute to decreases in mixed venous oxygen content, serve to supply adequate oxygen to the active skeletal muscles, and support metabolism of other tissues while maintaining homeostasis. This review discusses the response of the peripheral circulation of humans to acute and chronic dynamic exercise and mechanisms responsible for these responses. This is accomplished in the context of leading the reader on a tour through the peripheral circulation during dynamic exercise. During this tour, we consider what is known about how each vascular bed controls BF during exercise and how these control mechanisms are modified by chronic physical activity/exercise training. The tour ends by comparing responses of the systemic circulation to those of the pulmonary circulation relative to the effects of exercise on the regional distribution of BF and mechanisms responsible for control of resistance/conductance in the systemic and pulmonary circulations.

  15. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Structural and Functional Effects on the Vascular Wall

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Michela; Grillo, Andrea; Losurdo, Pasquale; Panizon, Emiliano; Mearelli, Filippo; Cattin, Luigi; Barazzoni, Rocco; Carretta, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. Increasing evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect of n-3 PUFA on arterial wall properties is progressively emerging. We reviewed the recent available evidence for the cardiovascular effects of n-3 PUFA focusing on structural and functional properties of the vascular wall. In experimental studies and clinical trials n-3 PUFA have shown the ability to improve arterial hemodynamics by reducing arterial stiffness, thus explaining some of its cardioprotective properties. Recent studies suggest beneficial effects of n-3 PUFA on endothelial activation, which are likely to improve vascular function. Several molecular, cellular, and physiological pathways influenced by n-3 PUFA can affect arterial wall properties and therefore interfere with the atherosclerotic process. Although the relative weight of different physiological and molecular mechanisms and the dose-response on arterial wall properties have yet to be determined, n-3 PUFA have the potential to beneficially impact arterial wall remodeling and cardiovascular outcomes by targeting arterial wall stiffening and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26301252

  16. AMP-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE ACTIVATION AS A STRATEGY FOR PROTECTING VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ming-Hui; Wu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in the regulation of cellular and organismal metabolism. AMPK has a heterotrimeric structure, consisting of a catalytic α-subunit and regulatory β- and γ-subunits, each of which has two or more isoforms that are differentially expressed in various tissues and that arise from distinct genes. The AMPK system acts as a sensor of cellular energy status that is conserved in all eukaryotic cells. In addition, AMPK is activated by physiological stimuli and oxidants. 2. The importance of AMPK in cardiovascular functions is best demonstrated by recent studies showing that widely used drugs, including statins, metformin and rosiglitazone, execute cardiovascular protective effects at least partly through the activation of AMPK. As a consequence, AMPK has been proposed as a candidate target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of both Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome owing to its central role in the regulation of energy balance; it may also have a role in weight control. 3. In the present brief review, we summarize the recent progress of AMPK signalling and regulation focusing on vascular endothelial cells. We further hypothesize that AMPK is a dual sensor for energy and redox status within a cell and AMPK may be a therapeutic target for protecting vascular endothelial function. PMID:18177481

  17. Immortalized functional endothelial progenitor cell lines from umbilical cord blood for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sobhan, Praveen K; Seervi, Mahendra; Joseph, Jeena; Varghese, Saneesh; Pillai, Prakash Rajappan; Sivaraman, Divya Mundackal; James, Jackson; George, Roshin Elizabeth; Elizabeth, K E; Santhoshkumar, T R; Pillai, M Radhakrishna

    2012-11-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in multiple biological processes such as vascular homeostasis, regeneration, and tumor angiogenesis. This makes them a promising cell of choice for studying a variety of biological processes, toxicity assays, biomaterial-cell interaction studies, as well as in tissue-engineering applications. In this study, we report the generation of two clones of SV40-immortalized EPCs from umbilical cord blood. These cells retained most of the functional features of mature endothelial cells and showed no indication of senescence after repeated culture for more than 240 days. Extensive functional characterization of the immortalized cells by western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence studies substantiated that these cells retained their ability to synthesize nitric oxide, von Willebrand factor, P-Selectin etc. These cells achieved unlimited proliferation potential subsequent to inactivation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, but failed to form colonies on soft agar. We also show their enhanced growth and survival on vascular biomaterials compared to parental cultures in late population doubling. These immortalized EPCs can be used as a cellular model system for studying the biology of these cells, gene manipulation experiments, cell-biomaterial interactions, as well as a variety of tissue-engineering applications.

  18. Endothelial PECAM-1 and its function in vascular physiology and atherogenic pathology.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-06-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) is highly expressed in vascular cells such as endothelial cells (ECs) and blood-borne cells like platelets and leukocytes. In ECs, this molecule controls junctional and adhesive properties. In physiological conditions, PECAM-1 supports the endothelial barrier function. In inflammation that is observed in vessels affected by atherosclerosis, the function of PECAM-1 is impaired, an event that leads to increased adhesion of neutrophils and other leukocytes to ECs, decreased vascular integrity, and higher leukocyte transmigration to the intima media. PECAM-1 has six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains that support attraction and adhesion of leukocytes to ECs. The cytoplasmic tail of PECAM-1 contains two tyrosine residues (Tyr-663 and Tyr-686) that could be phosphorylated by Src family protein kinases is involved in the intracellular signaling. Actually, those tyrosines are the part of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs) that inhibit inflammation. However, in atherosclerosis, the PECAM-1-dependent immune suppression is disturbed. This in turn facilitates recruitment of leukocytes and supports proatherogenic inflammation. PMID:27079772

  19. Immortalized Functional Endothelial Progenitor Cell Lines from Umbilical Cord Blood for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sobhan, Praveen K.; Seervi, Mahendra; Joseph, Jeena; Varghese, Saneesh; Pillai, Prakash Rajappan; Sivaraman, Divya Mundackal; James, Jackson; George, Roshin Elizabeth; Elizabeth, K.E.; Pillai, M. Radhakrishna

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in multiple biological processes such as vascular homeostasis, regeneration, and tumor angiogenesis. This makes them a promising cell of choice for studying a variety of biological processes, toxicity assays, biomaterial–cell interaction studies, as well as in tissue-engineering applications. In this study, we report the generation of two clones of SV40-immortalized EPCs from umbilical cord blood. These cells retained most of the functional features of mature endothelial cells and showed no indication of senescence after repeated culture for more than 240 days. Extensive functional characterization of the immortalized cells by western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence studies substantiated that these cells retained their ability to synthesize nitric oxide, von Willebrand factor, P-Selectin etc. These cells achieved unlimited proliferation potential subsequent to inactivation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, but failed to form colonies on soft agar. We also show their enhanced growth and survival on vascular biomaterials compared to parental cultures in late population doubling. These immortalized EPCs can be used as a cellular model system for studying the biology of these cells, gene manipulation experiments, cell–biomaterial interactions, as well as a variety of tissue-engineering applications. PMID:22889128

  20. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function in older persons.

    PubMed

    Lauretani, F; Bandinelli, S; Bartali, B; Benedetta, B; Cherubini, A; Iorio, A D; Blè, A; Giacomini, V; Corsi, A M; Guralnik, J M; Ferrucci, L

    2007-07-01

    Pre-clinical studies suggest that both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on peripheral nerve function. Rats feed a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed modification of phospholipid fatty acid composition in nerve membranes and improvement of sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function. Changes between baseline and the 3-year follow-up in peripheral nerve function was assessed by standard surface ENG of the right peroneal nerve in 384 male and 443 female participants of the InCHIANTI study (age range: 24-97 years). Plasma concentrations of selected fatty acids assessed at baseline by gas chromatography. Independent of confounders, plasma omega-6 fatty acids and linoleic acid were significantly correlated with peroneal NCV at enrollment. Lower plasma PUFA, omega-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid, ratio omega-6/omega-3, arachidonic acid and docosahexanoic acid levels were significantly predicted a steeper decline in nerve function parameters over the 3-year follow-up. Low plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels were associated with accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function with aging.

  1. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  2. Exercise training improves vascular function in adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Louise H; Davis, Elizabeth A; Kalic, Rachelle J; Paramalingam, Niru; Abraham, Mary B; Jones, Timothy W; Green, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The impact of exercise training on vascular health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes has not been previously studied. We hypothesized that exercise training would improve micro- and macrovascular health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes. Thirteen adolescents (13-21 years, 10F) with type 2 diabetes were recruited from Princess Margaret Hospital. Participants were randomized to receive either an exercise program along with standard clinical care (n = 8) or standard care alone (n = 5). Those in the intervention group received 12 weeks of gym-based, personalized, and supervised exercise training. Those in the control group were instructed to maintain usual activity levels. Assessments were conducted at baseline and following week 12. The exercise group was also studied 12 weeks following the conclusion of their program. Assessments consisted of conduit artery endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) and microvascular function (cutaneous laser Doppler). Secondary outcomes included body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, DXA), glycemic control (whole body insulin sensitivity, M) assessed using the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp protocol, cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙O2peak), and muscular strength (1RM). Exercise training increased FMD (P < 0.05), microvascular function (P < 0.05), total lean mass (P < 0.05), and muscle strength (P < 0.001). There were no changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, body weight, BMI, or M. In the control group, body weight (P < 0.01), BMI (P < 0.01), and total fat mass (P < 0.05) increased. At week 24, improvements in vascular function were reversed. This study indicates that exercise training can improve both conduit and microvascular endothelial function and health, independent of changes in insulin sensitivity in adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Exercise training improves vascular function in adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Louise H; Davis, Elizabeth A; Kalic, Rachelle J; Paramalingam, Niru; Abraham, Mary B; Jones, Timothy W; Green, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The impact of exercise training on vascular health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes has not been previously studied. We hypothesized that exercise training would improve micro- and macrovascular health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes. Thirteen adolescents (13-21 years, 10F) with type 2 diabetes were recruited from Princess Margaret Hospital. Participants were randomized to receive either an exercise program along with standard clinical care (n = 8) or standard care alone (n = 5). Those in the intervention group received 12 weeks of gym-based, personalized, and supervised exercise training. Those in the control group were instructed to maintain usual activity levels. Assessments were conducted at baseline and following week 12. The exercise group was also studied 12 weeks following the conclusion of their program. Assessments consisted of conduit artery endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) and microvascular function (cutaneous laser Doppler). Secondary outcomes included body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, DXA), glycemic control (whole body insulin sensitivity, M) assessed using the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp protocol, cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙O2peak), and muscular strength (1RM). Exercise training increased FMD (P < 0.05), microvascular function (P < 0.05), total lean mass (P < 0.05), and muscle strength (P < 0.001). There were no changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, body weight, BMI, or M. In the control group, body weight (P < 0.01), BMI (P < 0.01), and total fat mass (P < 0.05) increased. At week 24, improvements in vascular function were reversed. This study indicates that exercise training can improve both conduit and microvascular endothelial function and health, independent of changes in insulin sensitivity in adolescents with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26887327

  4. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers Improve Peripheral Endothelial Function: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Wu, Yan; Yu, Ge; Xia, Qing; Xu, Yawei

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Several studies have assessed the effect of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) on peripheral endothelial dysfunction as measured by flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD), a widely-used indicator for endothelial function. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the effect in comparison to placebo or no treatment and other antihypertensives. Methods MEDLINE, Cochrane library and EMBASE were searched to September 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the effect of ARBs versus placebo or no treatment and other antihypertensives (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), β-blockers, diuretics) by forearm FMD. Furthermore, we also use meta-regression to analyze the relationship between the endothelial function and the duration of ARBs treatments. Results In 11 trials including 590 patients, ARBs (n = 315) significantly improved FMD (1.36%, 95% confidence internal [CI]:1.28 to 1.44) versus placebo or no treatment (n = 275). In 16 trials that included 1028 patients, ARBs (n = 486) had a significant effect (0.59%, 95% CI: 0.25 to 0.94) on FMD when compared with other antihypertensives (n = 542). In 8 trials, ARBs (n = 174) had no significant effect (−0.14%, 95% CI: −0.32 to 0.03) compared with ACEI (n = 173). Compared with others, the benefits of ARBs, respectively, were 1.67% (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.93) in 7 trials with CCBs, 0.79% (95% CI: 0.42 to 1.01) with β-blockers in 3 trials and 0.9% (95% CI: 0.77 to 1.03) with diuretics in 3 trials. Importantly, we found ARBs were less effective in a long time span (95% CI: −1.990 to −0.622) than the first 6 months (95% CI: −0.484 to 0.360). Conclusions This study shows that ARBs improve peripheral endothelial function and are superior to CCBs, β-blockers and diuretics. However, the effect couldn't be maintained for a long time. In addition, there was no significant difference between ARBs and ACEI. PMID:24595033

  5. Aldosterone receptor antagonism normalizes vascular function in liquorice-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Quaschning, T; Ruschitzka, F; Shaw, S; Lüscher, T F

    2001-02-01

    The enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD2) provides mineralocorticoid receptor specificity for aldosterone by metabolizing glucocorticoids to their receptor-inactive 11-dehydro derivatives. The present study investigated the effects of the aldosterone receptor antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone on endothelial function in liquorice-induced hypertension. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a recognized inhibitor of 11beta-HSD2, was supplemented to the drinking water (3 g/L) of Wistar-Kyoto rats over a period of 21 days. From days 8 to 21, spironolactone (5.8+/-0.6 mg. kg(-1). d(-1)), eplerenone (182+/-13 mg. kg(-1). d(-1)), or placebo was added to the chow (n=7 animals per group). Endothelium-dependent or -independent vascular function was assessed as the relaxation of preconstricted aortic rings to acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside, respectively. In addition, aortic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein content, nitrate tissue levels, and endothelin-1 (ET-1) protein levels were determined. GA increased systolic blood pressure from 142+/-8 to 185+/-9 mm Hg (P<0.01). In the GA group, endothelium-dependent relaxation was impaired compared with that in controls (73+/-6% versus 99+/-5%), whereas endothelium-independent relaxation remained unchanged. In the aortas of 11beta-HSD2-deficient rats, eNOS protein content and nitrate tissue levels decreased (1114+/-128 versus 518+/-77 microgram/g protein, P<0.05). In contrast, aortic ET-1 protein levels were enhanced by GA (308+/-38 versus 497+/-47 pg/mg tissue, P<0.05). Both spironolactone and eplerenone normalized blood pressure in animals on GA (142+/-9 and 143+/-9 mm Hg, respectively, versus 189+/-8 mm Hg in the placebo group; P<0.01), restored endothelium-dependent relaxation (96+/-3% and 97+/-3%, respectively, P<0.01 versus placebo), blunted the decrease in vascular eNOS protein content and nitrate tissue levels, and normalized vascular ET-1 levels. This is the first study to demonstrate that

  6. Association of Hypertension With Erectile Function in Chronic Peripheral Arterial Insufficiency Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spessoto, Luis Cesar Fava; Facio, Fernando Nestor; de Arruda, Jose Germano Ferraz; Arruda, Pedro Francisco F.; Gatti, Marcio; Antoniassi, Thiago Silveira; Facio, Maria Fernanda Warick; de Godoy, Jose Maria Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk factors may influence the improvement or worsening of erectile dysfunction (ED). The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of systemic hypertension on ED in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Methods The effect of hypertension on ED was assessed in 125 consecutive patients in a cross-sectional quantitative study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 88 years old (mean: 59.82 ± 10.48 years). The only exclusion criterion was the amputation of one or both legs. The ankle-arm index was assessed and the international index of ED questionnaire was applied to all participants in the study. Results Of the 125 patients, 22 (17.6%) had mild (grade 1), 50 (40.0%) had moderate (grade 2) and 53 (42.4%) had severe (grade 3) ED. Hypertensive patients have more ED, with ED in hypertensive patients being associated to chronic arterial disease. However, in comparison with normotensive patients, hypertension exerts an immediate protective effect on erectile function. Conclusions In conclusion, although erectile function is initially protected by systemic arterial hypertension in patients with chronic arterial disease, both chronic arterial disease and ED deteriorate over the long term in hypertensive patients. PMID:27429678

  7. Exogenous tissue plasminogen activator enhances peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery after injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tie; Ling, Changchun; Xiao, Yao; Tao, Xianmei; Ma, Duan; Chen, Zu-Lin; Strickland, Sidney; Song, Houyan

    2006-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an essential component of the proteolytic cascade that lyses blood clots. Various studies also suggest that tPA plays important roles in the nervous system. We show that exogenous tPA or tPA/plasminogen (plg) promotes axonal regeneration, remyelination, and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in the mouse. Local application of tPA or tPA/plg 7 days after sciatic nerve crush significantly increased the total number of axons and myelinated axons, which is accompanied by enhanced expression of neurofilament. Treatment with tPA or tPA/plg reduced the deposition of fibrin(ogen) after nerve injury. Moreover, tPA or tPA/plg increased the number of macrophages and induced MMP-9 expression at the injury site, coincident with reduced collagen scar formation and accelerated clearance of myelin and lipid debris after treatment. Consequently, tPA or tPA/plg treatment protected muscles from atrophy after nerve injury, indicating better functional recovery. These results suggest that administration of exogenous tPA or tPA/plg promotes axonal regeneration and remyelination through removal of fibrin deposition and activation of MMP-9-positive macrophages, which may be responsible for myelin debris clearance and preventing collagen scar formation. Therefore, tPA may be useful for treatment of peripheral nerve injury.

  8. Small-World Brain Network and Dynamic Functional Distribution in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongqiang; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Haibao; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the topological properties of the functional connectivity and their relationships with cognition impairment in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI) patients, resting-state fMRI and graph theory approaches were employed in 23 SVCI patients and 20 healthy controls. Functional connectivity between 90 brain regions was estimated using bivariate correlation analysis and thresholded to construct a set of undirected graphs. Moreover, all of them were subjected to a battery of cognitive assessment, and the correlations between graph metrics and cognitive performance were further analyzed. Our results are as follows: functional brain networks of both SVCI patients and controls showed small-world attributes over a range of thresholds(0.15≤sparsity≤0.40). However, global topological organization of the functional brain networks in SVCI was significantly disrupted, as indicated by reduced global and local efficiency, clustering coefficients and increased characteristic path lengths relative to normal subjects. The decreased activity areas in SVCI predominantly targeted in the frontal-temporal lobes, while subcortical regions showed increased topological properties, which are suspected to compensate for the inefficiency of the functional network. We also demonstrated that altered brain network properties in SVCI are closely correlated with general cognitive and praxis dysfunction. The disruption of whole-brain topological organization of the functional connectome provides insight into the functional changes in the human brain in SVCI. PMID:26132397

  9. Phenotypic, ultra-structural and functional characterization of bovine peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are multifunctional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets...

  10. Functional Vascular Study in Hypertensive Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Using Losartan or Amlodipine

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Cesar Romaro; Gismondi, Ronaldo A. O. C.; Bedirian, Ricardo; Ladeira, Marcia Cristina; Neves, Mario Fritsch; Oigman, Wille

    2014-01-01

    Background Antihypertensive drugs are used to control blood pressure (BP) and reduce macro- and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. Objectives The present study aimed to compare the functional vascular changes in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after 6 weeks of treatment with amlodipine or losartan. Methods Patients with a previous diagnosis of hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly divided into 2 groups and evaluated after 6 weeks of treatment with amlodipine (5 mg/day) or losartan (100 mg/day). Patient evaluation included BP measurement, ambulatory BP monitoring, and assessment of vascular parameters using applanation tonometry, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Results A total of 42 patients were evaluated (21 in each group), with a predominance of women (71%) in both groups. The mean age of the patients in both groups was similar (amlodipine group: 54.9 ± 4.5 years; losartan group: 54.0 ± 6.9 years), with no significant difference in the mean BP [amlodipine group: 145 ± 14 mmHg (systolic) and 84 ± 8 mmHg (diastolic); losartan group: 153 ± 19 mmHg (systolic) and 90 ± 9 mmHg (diastolic)]. The augmentation index (30% ± 9% and 36% ± 8%, p = 0.025) and augmentation pressure (16 ± 6 mmHg and 20 ± 8 mmHg, p = 0.045) were lower in the amlodipine group when compared with the losartan group. PWV and FMD were similar in both groups. Conclusions Hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with amlodipine exhibited an improved pattern of pulse wave reflection in comparison with those treated with losartan. However, the use of losartan may be associated with independent vascular reactivity to the pressor effect. PMID:25014057

  11. Improved Glycemic Control and Vascular Function in Overweight and Obese Subjects by Glyoxalase 1 Inducer Formulation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mingzhan; Weickert, Martin O; Qureshi, Sheharyar; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Anwar, Attia; Waldron, Molly; Shafie, Alaa; Messenger, David; Fowler, Mark; Jenkins, Gail; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Risk of insulin resistance, impaired glycemic control, and cardiovascular disease is excessive in overweight and obese populations. We hypothesized that increasing expression of glyoxalase 1 (Glo1)-an enzyme that catalyzes the metabolism of reactive metabolite and glycating agent methylglyoxal-may improve metabolic and vascular health. Dietary bioactive compounds were screened for Glo1 inducer activity in a functional reporter assay, hits were confirmed in cell culture, and an optimized Glo1 inducer formulation was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial in 29 overweight and obese subjects. We found trans-resveratrol (tRES) and hesperetin (HESP), at concentrations achieved clinically, synergized to increase Glo1 expression. In highly overweight subjects (BMI >27.5 kg/m(2)), tRES-HESP coformulation increased expression and activity of Glo1 (27%, P < 0.05) and decreased plasma methylglyoxal (-37%, P < 0.05) and total body methylglyoxal-protein glycation (-14%, P < 0.01). It decreased fasting and postprandial plasma glucose (-5%, P < 0.01, and -8%, P < 0.03, respectively), increased oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (42 mL ⋅ min(-1) ⋅ m(-2), P < 0.02), and improved arterial dilatation Δbrachial artery flow-mediated dilatation/Δdilation response to glyceryl nitrate (95% CI 0.13-2.11). In all subjects, it decreased vascular inflammation marker soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (-10%, P < 0.01). In previous clinical evaluations, tRES and HESP individually were ineffective. tRES-HESP coformulation could be a suitable treatment for improved metabolic and vascular health in overweight and obese populations. PMID:27207552

  12. Peripheral Nerve Damage Facilitates Functional Innervation of Brain Grafts in Adult Sensory Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Ford F.; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Lee, Stefan M.

    1989-01-01

    The neuralb pathways that relay information from cutaneous receptors to the cortex provide the somatic sensory information needed for cortical function. The last sensory relay neurons in this pathway have cell bodies in the thalamus and axons that synapse on neurons in the somatosensory cortex. After cortical lesions that damage mature thalamocortical fibers in the somatosensory cortex, we have attempted to reestablish somatosensory cortical function by grafting embryonic neocortical cells into the lesioned area. Such grafts survive in adult host animals but are not innervated by thalamic neurons, and consequently the grafted neurons show little if any spontaneous activity and no responses to cutaneous stimuli. We have reported that transection of peripheral sensory nerves prior to grafting ``conditions'' or ``primes'' the thalamic neurons in the ventrobasal complex so that they extend axons into grafts subsequently placed in the cortical domain of the cut nerve. In this report we present evidence that the ingrowth of ventrobasal fibers leads to graft neurons that become functionally integrated into the sensory circuitry of the host brain. Specifically, the conditioning lesions made prior to grafting produce graft neurons that are spontaneously active and can be driven by natural activation of cutaneous receptors or electrical stimulation of the transected nerve after it regenerates. Furthermore, oxidative metabolism in these grafts reaches levels that are comparable to normal cortex, whereas without prior nerve cut, oxidative metabolism is abnormally low in neocortical grafts. We conclude that damage to the sensory periphery transsynaptically stimulates reorganization of sensory pathways through mechanisms that include axonal elongation and functional synaptogenesis.

  13. MicroRNA-147b Regulates Vascular Endothelial Barrier Function by Targeting ADAM15 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Victor; Beard, Richard S.; Reynolds, Jason J.; Haines, Ricci; Guo, Mingzhang; Rubin, Matthew; Guido, Jenny; Wu, Mack H.; Yuan, Sarah Y.

    2014-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase15 (ADAM15) has been shown to be upregulated and mediate endothelial hyperpermeability during inflammation and sepsis. This molecule contains multiple functional domains with the ability to modulate diverse cellular processes including cell adhesion, extracellular matrix degradation, and ectodomain shedding of transmembrane proteins. These characteristics make ADAM15 an attractive therapeutic target in various diseases. The lack of pharmacological inhibitors specific to ADAM15 prompted our efforts to identify biological or molecular tools to alter its expression for further studying its function and therapeutic implications. The goal of this study was to determine if ADAM15-targeting microRNAs altered ADAM15-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction during septic challenge by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). An in silico analysis followed by luciferase reporter assay in human vascular endothelial cells identified miR-147b with the ability to target the 3′ UTR of ADAM15. Transfection with a miR-147b mimic led to decreased total, as well as cell surface expression of ADAM15 in endothelial cells, while miR-147b antagomir produced an opposite effect. Functionally, LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, evidenced by a reduction in transendothelial electric resistance and increase in albumin flux across endothelial monolayers, was attenuated in cells treated with miR-147b mimics. In contrast, miR-147b antagomir exerted a permeability-increasing effect in vascular endothelial cells similar to that caused by LPS. Taken together, these data suggest the potential role of miR147b in regulating endothelial barrier function by targeting ADAM15 expression. PMID:25333931

  14. Cardiac and Vascular Function in Bedrested Volunteers: Effects of Artificial Gravity Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, M.; Platts, S.; Stenger, M.; Diedrich, A.; Schlegel, T.; Natapoff, A.; Knapp, C.; Evans, J.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of an artificial gravity (AG) countermeasure on deconditioned male volunteers were studied. In two groups of men we measured cardiovascular parameters at rest and in response to 30 minutes of 80 deg. head up tilt (HUT) before, at the end of, and four days following 21 days of 6 deg. head down bed rest (HDBR). One group (N=7) underwent no countermeasure while the other (N=8) received a daily, one hour, dose (2.5 gz at the foot, decreasing to 1.0 gz at the heart) of AG training on the Johnson Space Center short radius centrifuge. Cardiovascular parameters measured included heart rate, blood pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, peripheral vascular resistance, plasma volume shifts, and vasoactive hormones. Untrained subjects exhibited shorter tilt survival (on average 8 minutes shorter) compared to trained subjects. By the end of bed rest, mean heart rate (MHR) was elevated in both groups (both supine and during tilt). In addition, treated subjects demonstrated lower, tilt-induced, increases in MHR four days following HDBR, indicating a more rapid return to pre bed rest conditions. Results from an index of autonomic balance (percentage of MHR spectral power in the respiratory frequency range) in control of heart rate are consistent with the interpretation that parasympathetic nervous system withdrawal was responsible for both tilt- and bed rest-induced increases in MHR. Our data support our pre-study hypothesis that AG treatment would lessen cardiovascular effects of deconditioning in bed rested men and suggest that AG should be further pursued as a space flight countermeasure.

  15. Xyloglucan endotransglycosylases have a function during the formation of secondary cell walls of vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Veronica; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Abe, Hisashi; Brumer, Harry; Denman, Stuart; Eklund, Marlin; Christiernin, Maria; Teeri, Tunla T; Sundberg, Björn; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2002-12-01

    Xyloglucan transglycosylases (XETs) have been implicated in many aspects of cell wall biosynthesis, but their function in vascular tissues, in general, and in the formation of secondary walls, in particular, is less well understood. Using an in situ XET activity assay in poplar stems, we have demonstrated XET activity in xylem and phloem fibers at the stage of secondary wall formation. Immunolocalization of fucosylated xylogucan with CCRC-M1 antibodies showed that levels of this species increased at the border between the primary and secondary wall layers at the time of secondary wall deposition. Furthermore, one of the most abundant XET isoforms in secondary vascular tissues (PttXET16A) was cloned and immunolocalized to fibers at the stage of secondary wall formation. Together, these data strongly suggest that XET has a previously unreported role in restructuring primary walls at the time when secondary wall layers are deposited, probably creating and reinforcing the connections between the primary and secondary wall layers. We also observed that xylogucan is incorporated at a high level in the inner layer of nacreous walls of mature sieve tube elements.

  16. VEGFR signaling during lymphatic vascular development: From progenitor cells to functional vessels.

    PubMed

    Secker, Genevieve A; Harvey, Natasha L

    2015-03-01

    Lymphatic vessels are an integral component of the cardiovascular system, serving important roles in fluid homeostasis, lipid absorption, and immune cell trafficking. Defining the mechanisms by which the lymphatic vasculature is constructed and remodeled into a functional vascular network not only provides answers to fascinating biological questions, but is fundamental to understanding how lymphatic vessel growth and development goes awry in human pathologies. While long recognized as dysfunctional in lymphedema and exploited as a route of tumor metastasis, recent work has highlighted important roles for lymphatic vessels in modulating immune responses, regulating salt-sensitive hypertension and important for lung inflation at birth. Substantial progress in our understanding of the signaling pathways important for development and morphogenesis of the lymphatic vasculature has been made in recent years. Here, we review advances in our knowledge of the best characterized of these signaling pathways, that involving the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members VEGF-C and VEGF-D, together with their receptors VEGFR2 and VEGFR3. Recent work has defined multiple levels at which signal transduction by means of this key axis is regulated; these include control of ligand processing and bioavailability, modulation of receptor activation by interacting proteins, and regulation of receptor endocytosis and trafficking.

  17. Nitric oxide producing coating mimicking endothelium function for multifunctional vascular stents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilu; Yang, Ying; Xiong, Kaiqin; Li, Xiangyang; Qi, Pengkai; Tu, Qiufen; Jing, Fengjuan; Weng, Yajun; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2015-09-01

    The continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) by the native endothelium of blood vessels plays a substantial role in the cardiovascular physiology, as it influences important pathways of cardiovascular homeostasis, inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, inhibits platelet activation and aggregation, and prevents atherosclerosis. In this study, a NO-catalytic bioactive coating that mimics this endothelium functionality was presented as a hemocompatible coating with potential to improve the biocompatibility of vascular stents. The NO-catalytic bioactive coating was obtained by covalent conjugation of 3,3-diselenodipropionic acid (SeDPA) with glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like catalytic activity to generate NO from S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) via specific catalytic reaction. The SeDPA was immobilized to an amine bearing plasma polymerized allylamine (PPAam) surface (SeDPA-PPAam). It showed long-term and continuous ability to catalytically decompose endogenous RSNO and generate NO. The generated NO remarkably increased the cGMP synthesis both in platelets and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). The surface exhibited a remarkable suppression of collagen-induced platelet activation and aggregation. It suppressed the adhesion, proliferation and migration of HUASMCs. Additionally, it was found that the NO catalytic surface significantly enhanced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesion, proliferation and migration. The in vivo results indicated that the NO catalytic surface created a favorable microenvironment of competitive growth of HUVECs over HUASMCs for promoting re-endothelialization and reducing restenosis of stents in vivo.

  18. Effects of 4-hydroxynonenal on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell redox signaling and function in health and disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Sarah J.; Cheng, Xinghua; Mann, Giovanni E.

    2013-01-01

    4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is a lipid hydroperoxide end product formed from the oxidation of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The relative abundance of HNE within the vasculature is dependent not only on the rate of lipid peroxidation and HNE synthesis but also on the removal of HNE adducts by phase II metabolic pathways such as glutathione-S-transferases. Depending on its relative concentration, HNE can induce a range of hormetic effects in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, including kinase activation, proliferation, induction of phase II enzymes and in high doses inactivation of enzymatic processes and apoptosis. HNE also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders and in utero diseases such as pre-eclampsia. This review examines the known production, metabolism and consequences of HNE synthesis within vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, highlighting alterations in mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum function and their association with various vascular pathologies. PMID:24024167

  19. Variability of residual platelet function despite clopidogrel treatment in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Schwonberg, Jan; Toennes, Stefan W; Mani, Helen; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2010-04-01

    Residual platelet function despite treatment with clopidogrel may predict an unfavourable cardiovascular outcome. The majority of studies have investigated the effects of clopidogrel administration in conjunction with aspirin in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the platelet response to clopidogrel in the absence of aspirin in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and to investigate whether non-responsiveness to clopidogrel is reproducible during long-term follow-up. Fifty-four clinically stable PAOD patients on a maintenance dose of 75 mg/d clopidogrel were enrolled in this study. Platelet function was assessed at baseline and after a median follow-up of 18 months using light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) with 2 microM ADP as an agonist. HPLC-coupled mass spectrometry was used to detect clopidogrel and clopidogrel carboxylic acid, the main metabolite of clopidogrel. Residual platelet function, as defined by late aggregation values within the reference range (i.e., >43%), was observed in 35.2% of patients at baseline and 17.6% during follow-up. During the observation period, 26.5% had switched from responder to non-responder status or vice versa. Among non-responders, either clopidogrel or its metabolite was detected in 89.5% and 83.3% of patients at baseline and at follow-up, respectively. We conclude that non-responsiveness to clopidogrel as determined by ADP-induced LTA is not stable over time. This phenomenon cannot be attributed to non-compliance alone. PMID:20153859

  20. Functional and phenotypic characterization of distinct porcine dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Paillot, R; Laval, F; Audonnet, J-C; Andreoni, C; Juillard, V

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells that have an exquisite capacity to interact with T cells and modulate their responses. Little is known about porcine DCs despite the fact that they represent an important target in strategies that are aimed at modulating resistance to infection in pigs and may be of major importance in transplantation biology. We generated immature monocyte-derived porcine dendritic cells (MoDCs) directly from adherent peripheral blood cells treated with porcine granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). The cells were observed via electron microscopy and their phenotype was characterized using monoclonal antibodies. The functionality of the porcine MoDCs was demonstrated showing that the cells were capable of different specialized functions relevant to antigen capture and were potent stimulators in a primary allo-mixed leucocyte reaction. Treatment of the MoDCs with porcine cell line-derived necrotic factors resulted in the phenotypic and functional maturation of MoDCs. We confirmed also that monocyte-derived DCs were differentially regulated by cytokines, showing that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is able to redirect monocytic precursors into the differentiation pathway of Langerhans' cells presenting typical Birbeck granules. Interestingly, and in contrast to the human and murine model, we showed that the monocyte-derived porcine Langerhans'-type cells (MoLCs) were much more potent activators of allogeneic T cells than MoDCs obtained without TGF-β1. PMID:11328373

  1. Functionality, growth and accelerated aging of tissue engineered living autologous vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Jens M; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Zürcher, Armin; Schmidt, Dörthe; Begus Nahrmann, Yvonne; Rudolph, Karl L; Weber, Benedikt; Brokopp, Chad E; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Leschka, Sebastian; Odermatt, Bernhard; Jenni, Rolf; Falk, Volkmar; Zünd, Gregor; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2012-11-01

    Living autologous tissue engineered vascular-grafts (TEVGs) with growth-capacity may overcome the limitations of contemporary artificial-prostheses. However, the multi-step in vitro production of TEVGs requires extensive ex vivo cell-manipulations with unknown effects on functionality and quality of TEVGs due to an accelerated biological age of the cells. Here, the impact of biological cell-age and tissue-remodeling capacity of TEVGs in relation to their clinical long-term functionality are investigated. TEVGs were implanted as pulmonary-artery (PA) replacements in juvenile sheep and followed for up to 240 weeks (∼4.5years). Telomere length and telomerase activity were compared amongst TEVGs and adjacent native tissue. Telomerase-activity of in vitro expanded autologous vascular-cells prior to seeding was <5% as compared to a leukemic cell line, indicating biological-aging associated with decreasing telomere-length with each cellular-doubling. Up to 100 weeks, the cells in the TEVGs had consistently shorter telomeres compared to the native counterpart, whereas no significant differences were detectable at 240 weeks. Computed tomography (CT) analysis demonstrated physiological wall-pressures, shear-stresses, and flow-pattern comparable to the native PA. There were no signs of degeneration detectable and continuous native-analogous growth was confirmed by vessel-volumetry. TEVGs exhibit a higher biological age compared to their native counterparts. However, despite of this tissue engineering technology related accelerated biological-aging, growth-capacity and long-term functionality was not compromised. To the contrary, extensive in-vivo remodeling processes with substantial endogenous cellular turnover appears to result in "TEVG rejuvenation" and excellent clinical performance. As these large-animal results can be extrapolated to approximately 20 human years, this study suggests long-term clinical-safety of cardiovascular in vitro tissue engineering and may

  2. Selective IgM deficiency in adults: phenotypically and functionally altered profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, T; Inaba, M; Kuribayashi, K; Masuda, T; Kanoh, T; Uchino, H

    1987-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from four patients with selective IgM deficiency were examined phenotypically and functionally. Although B cell subpopulations determined by surface immunoglobulins were within normal or nearly normal range, T8+ cells were significantly increased and T4/T8 ratios were inverted in three patients. IgM specific hyporesponsiveness in the PWM-driven immunoglobulin production system was observed in all four patients. Ia-like antigen positive T cells were increased in two patients; both had increased Leu2a+ Leu15+ suppressor-effector cells. In addition, Leu3a+ Leu8+ suppressor-inducer cells were increased in one of these two patients. Excessive (either IgM-specific or isotype non-specific) suppressor activity of T cells and IgM specific hyporesponsiveness of non-T cells were observed in these two patients in the recombination plaque assay. Although these results showed the complexity of the pathogenesis of this syndrome, they suggested that suppressor-associated T cells may play a role in some patients with selective IgM deficiency. PMID:2958191

  3. Cortical Brain Mapping of Peripheral Nerves Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Younghoon R.; Jones, Seth R.; Pawela, Christopher P.; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis S.; Schulte, Marie L.; Runquist, Matthew L.; Yan, Ji-Geng; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Jaradeh, Safwan S.; Hyde, James S.; Matloub, Hani S.

    2008-01-01

    The regions of the body have cortical and subcortical representation in proportion to their degree of innervation. The rat forepaw has been studied extensively in recent years using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)—typically by stimulation using electrodes directly inserted into the skin of the forepaw. Here, we stimulate using surgically implanted electrodes. A major distinction is that stimulation of the skin of the forepaw is mostly sensory, whereas direct nerve stimulation reveals not only the sensory system but also deep brain structures associated with motor activity. In this paper, we seek to define both the motor and sensory cortical and subcortical representations associated with the four major nerves of the rodent upper extremity. We electrically stimulated each nerve (median, ulnar, radial, and musculocutaneous) during fMRI acquisition using a 9.4T Bruker scanner. A current level of 0.5-1.0 mA and a frequency of 5 Hz were used while keeping the duration constant. A distinct pattern of cortical activation was found for each nerve that can be correlated with known sensorimotor afferent and efferent pathways to the rat forepaw. This direct nerve stimulation rat model can provide insight into peripheral nerve injury. PMID:18924070

  4. Anchorage and lymphocyte function. Spreading-capacity distinguishes common thymocytes and peripheral T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Otteskog, P; Sundqvist, K G

    1983-01-01

    Contact of T-enriched human blood lymphocytes with an adhesive surface in the presence of Concanavalin A (Con A) almost immediately induced a sequence of motile changes in virtually all cells. The initial event in this spreading process was the formation of filopodia distinct from the microvilli of lymphocytes in suspension. The filopodia were accompanied by lamellipodia, ruffles and flattening of the nucleus. Contact with a nonadhesive substratum in the presence of Con A did not trigger this sequence of changes. Cytochalasin B and D or low temperature inhibited the contact-induced changes. With the exception of a small number of cells (5-15%), T-enriched lymphocytes that were allowed to settle in the absence of Con A showed a radius of action (area occupied by the cells/translational movement per hr) of 39 micrometers 2/ less than 1 micrometer. The small 'motile' population showed a radius of action of 74 micrometers 2/8 micrometers. The Con-A-mediated spreading-process yielded a radius of action of the lymphocytes of 117 micrometers 2/6 micrometers. This augmented radius of action markedly facilitated cell-cell interaction in a high frequency of the cells and appeared to be a prerequisite for such interactions at 'low' cell density. Thymocytes reactive with OKT 6 antibodies or belonging to the 'high-density' fraction of cells attached to a Con-A-coated surface to the same extent as peripheral OKT 3 positive lymphocytes, but did not exhibit the morphological changes characteristic of a spreading-process. In contrast, OKT 6 negative thymocytes or thymocytes with a relatively low density showed spreading indistinguishable from that of OKT 3 positive peripheral lymphocytes. These results characterize the spreading-process in human T lymphocytes and demonstrate its functional importance for interactions with the environment. Spreading-capacity appears to reflect the stage of maturation of T cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4b Figure 4c Figure 7 PMID

  5. Relations of Digital Vascular Function, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Arterial Stiffness: The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA‐Brasil) Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Brant, Luisa C. C.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Barreto, Sandhi M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Ribeiro, Antonio L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction is an early expression of atherosclerosis and predicts cardiovascular (CV) events. Peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) evaluates basal pulse amplitude (BPA), endothelial function (PAT ratio), and wave reflection (PAT‐AIx) in the digital microvessels. In Brazilian adults, we investigated the correlations of PAT responses to CV risk factors and to carotid‐femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness. Methods and Results In a cross‐sectional study, 1535 participants of the ELSA‐Brasil cohort underwent PAT testing (52±9 years; 44% women). In multivariable analyses, more‐impaired BPA and PAT ratios were associated with male sex, higher body mass index (BMI), and total cholesterol/high‐density lipoprotein. Higher age and triglycerides were related to higher BPA, whereas lower systolic blood pressure, hypertension (HTN) treatment, and prevalent CV disease (CVD) were associated with lower PAT ratio. PAT‐AIx correlated positively with female sex, advancing age, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and smoking and inversely to heart rate, height, BMI, and prevalent CVD. Black race was associated with lower BPA, higher PAT ratio, and PAT‐AIx. Microvessel vasodilator function was not associated with PWV. Higher PAT‐AIx was modestly correlated to higher PWV and PAT ratio and inversely correlated to BPA. Conclusion Metabolic risk factors are related to impaired microvessel vasodilator function in Brazil. However, in contrast to studies from the United States, black race was not associated with an impaired microvessel vasodilator response, implying that vascular function may vary by race across populations. PAT‐AIx relates to HTN, may be a valid measure of wave reflection, and provides distinct information from arterial stiffness. PMID:25510401

  6. [Peripheral ulcerative keratitis].

    PubMed

    Stamate, Alina-cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative keratitis is frequently associated with collagen vascular diseases and presents a predilection for peripheral corneal localization, due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic features of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for the circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates an immune-mediated vasculitis process, with inflammatory cells and mediators involvement by alteration of the vascular permeability. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis generally correlates with exacerbations of the background autoimmune systemic disease. Associated sceritis, specially the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may evolve in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although the first-line of treatment in acute phases is represented by systemic administration of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are necessary for the treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic diseases.

  7. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  8. Functional role of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Manabu; Ono, Kyoichi; Munehisa, Yoshiko; Koyama, Takashi; Nobori, Kiyoshi; Iijima, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2007-10-05

    We investigated the functional role of STIM1, a Ca{sup 2+} sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that regulates store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE), in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). STIM1 was mainly localized at the ER and plasma membrane. The knockdown of STIM1 expression by small interfering (si) RNA drastically decreased SOCE. In contrast, an EF-hand mutant of STIM1, STIM1{sup E87A}, produced a marked increase in SOCE, which was abolished by co-transfection with siRNA to transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). In addition, transfection with siRNA against STIM1 suppressed phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and cell growth. These results suggest that STIM1 is an essential component of SOCE and that it is involved in VSMC proliferation.

  9. Acute exercise improves endothelial function despite increasing vascular resistance during stress in smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Cherie R; McCully, Kevin K; Dishman, Rod K

    2011-09-01

    The present study examined the effect of acute exercise on flow mediated dilation (FMD) and reactivity to neurovascular challenges among female smokers and nonsmokers. FMD was determined by arterial diameter, velocity, and blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography after forearm occlusion. Those measures and blood pressure and heart rate were also assessed in response to forehead cold and the Stroop Color-Word Conflict Test (CWT) before and after 30 min of rest or an acute bout of cycling exercise (∼50% VO₂ peak). Baseline FMD and stress responses were not different between smokers and nonsmokers. Compared to passive rest, exercise increased FMD and decreased arterial velocity and blood flow responses during the Stroop CWT and forehead cold in both groups. Overall, acute exercise improved endothelial function among smokers and nonsmokers despite increasing vascular resistance and reducing limb blood flow during neurovascular stress. PMID:21457274

  10. Role of olmesartan in combination therapy in blood pressure control and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Carlos M; Smith, Ronald D

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers have emerged as a first-line therapy in the management of hypertension and hypertension-related comorbidities. Since national and international guidelines have stressed the need to control blood pressure to <140/90 mmHg in uncomplicated hypertension and <130/80 mmHg in those with associated comorbidities such as diabetes or chronic kidney disease, these goal blood pressures can only be achieved through combination therapy. Of several drugs that can be effectively combined to attain the recommended blood pressure goals, fixed-dose combinations of angiotensin receptor blockers and the calcium channel blocker amlodipine provide additive antihypertensive effects associated with a safe profile and increased adherence to therapy. In this article, we review the evidence regarding the beneficial effects of renin–angiotensin system blockade with olmesartan medoxomil and amlodipine in terms of blood pressure control and improvement of vascular function and target organ damage. PMID:20859541

  11. The oxidase activity of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is essential for function.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Thomas; Lukas, Susan; Peet, Gregory W; Pelletier, Josephine; Panzenbeck, Mark; Hanidu, Adedayo; Mazurek, Suzanne; Wasti, Ruby; Rybina, Irina; Roma, Teresa; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Shoultz, Alycia; Souza, Donald; Jiang, Huiping; Nabozny, Gerald; Modis, Louise Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and is suggested to play a role in immune cell trafficking. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated by the oxidase activity or by other features of the protein such as direct adhesion. In order to study the role of VAP-1 oxidase activity in vivo, we have generated mice carrying an oxidase activity-null VAP-1 protein. We demonstrate that the VAP-1 oxidase null mutant mice have a phenotype similar to the VAP-1 null mice in animal models of sterile peritonitis and antibody induced arthritis suggesting that the oxidase activity is responsible for the inflammatory function of VAP-1.

  12. [Monitoring by non-flowmeter vascular function tests following lumbar sympathectomy].

    PubMed

    Becker, F; Davinroy, M

    1985-01-01

    Postoperative follow up examinations were conducted using vascular functional explorations (V.F.E.) including thermometry, Doppler, irrigraphy, digital plethysmography and tread mill. Immediate and long-term effects of lumbar sympathectomy have to be distinguished: the majority of hemodynamic variations noted are not due exclusively to lumbar sympathectomy, except for the iatrogenic development of vasomotor inertia (R.H.T. indifferent or negative) and perhaps values with time of the digital flow curve. Results of V.F.E. after lumbar sympathectomy are discussed in relation to three modalities and taking into account the efficacy and extent of the sympathetic chain resection. The question is raised as to the usefulness of lumbar sympathectomy when the pretreatment V.F.E. findings show hemodynamic elements of the type that would be expected after lumbar sympathectomy.

  13. Lower Extremity Ischemia, Calf Skeletal Muscle Characteristics, and Functional Impairment in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Hoff, Frederick; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pearce, William H.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Tian, Lu; Liu, Kiang; Schneider, Joseph R.; Sharma, Leena; Tan, Jin; Criqui, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether lower ankle brachial index (ABI) levels are associated with lower calf skeletal muscle area and higher calf muscle percentage fat in persons with and without lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD). DESIGN Cross-sectional. SETTING Three Chicago-area medical centers. PARTICIPANTS Four hundred thirty-nine persons with PAD (ABI<0.90) and 265 without PAD (ABI 0.90–1.30). MEASUREMENTS Calf muscle cross-sectional area and the percentage of fat in calf muscle were measured using computed tomography at 66.7% of the distance between the distal and proximal tibia. Physical activity was measured using an accelerometer. Functional measures included the 6-minute walk, 4-meter walking speed, and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). RESULTS Adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, and other potential confounders, lower ABI values were associated with lower calf muscle area (ABI<0.50, 5,193 mm2; ABI 0.50–0.90, 5,536 mm2; ABI 0.91–1.30, 5,941 mm2; P for trend <.001). These significant associations remained after additional adjustment for physical activity. In participants with PAD, lower calf muscle area in the leg with higher ABI was associated with significantly poorer performance in usual- and fast-paced 4-meter walking speed and on the SPPB, adjusting for ABI, physical activity, percentage fat in calf muscle, muscle area in the leg with lower ABI, and other confounders (P<.05 for all comparisons). CONCLUSION These data support the hypothesis that lower extremity ischemia has a direct adverse effect on calf skeletal muscle area. This association may mediate previously established relationships between PAD and functional impairment. PMID:17341243

  14. Study of the functional state of peripheral vessels in fingers of rheumatological patients by means of laser Doppler flowmetry and cutaneous thermometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Podmasteryev, Konstantin V.; Pilipenko, Olga V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Khakhicheva, Lyudmila S.; Muradyan, Vadim F.

    2016-04-01

    Vasospastic disorders are a common class of rheumatic disease. These include syndromes such as vegetative dystonia, Raynaud's syndrome, vibration disease and rheumatoid arthritis among others. The aim of this work is to develop an original method of diagnosing the functional state of peripheral vessels of the fingers, based on the simultaneous recording of LDF- and thermograms during the occlusion test, for determining vascular disorders of rheumatological patients. A diagnostic method was developed for assessing the functional state of the peripheral vessels of fingers, based on carrying out occlusion test in a thermally stabilized environment, with simultaneous recording of signals of laser Doppler flowmetry and skin thermometry. To verify the diagnostic value of the proposed method, a series of experiments were carried out on 41 rheumatological patients: 5 male and 36 females (average age 56.0+/-12.2 years). The most common diagnoses in the patient group were rheumatoid arthritis, arthrosis, gout and systemic lupus erythematosus. The laser analyser of blood microcirculation "LAKK-02" (SPE "LAZMA" Ltd, Russia) and a custom developed multi-channel thermometry device for low inertia thermometry were used for experimental measurements. The measurements of cutaneous temperature and the index of microcirculation were performed on the distal phalanx of the third finger of the right hand. Occlusion tests were performed with water baths at 25 and 42 °C and a tonometer cuff with a pressure of 200-220 mmHg for 3 min on the upper arm. The results of experimental studies are presented and interpreted. These data indicate a violation of the blood supply regulation in the form of a pronounced tendency towards microvascular vasoconstriction in the fingers. Thus, the response displaying a tendency toward angiospasm among patients in the rheumatological diseases profile group was observed mainly in the most severe cases (49 % of this group). The prospects of the developed

  15. Coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia associated with impaired vascular endothelial function in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Jokura, Hiroko; Watanabe, Isamu; Umeda, Mika; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that habitual coffee consumption lowers the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Postprandial hyperglycemia is a direct and independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We previously demonstrated that coffee polyphenol ingestion increased secretion of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which has been shown to exhibit anti-diabetic and cardiovascular effects. We hypothesized coffee polyphenol consumption may improve postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function by increasing GLP-1 release and/or reducing oxidative stress. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized, acute, crossover, intervention study in healthy male adults, measuring blood parameters and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after ingestion of a meal with or without coffee polyphenol extract (CPE). Nineteen subjects consumed a test meal with either a placebo- or CPE-containing beverage. Blood biomarkers and FMD were measured at fasting and up to 180 minutes postprandially. The CPE beverage led to a significantly lower peak postprandial increase in blood glucose and diacron-reactive oxygen metabolite, and significantly higher postprandial FMD than the placebo beverage. Postprandial blood GLP-1 increase tended to be higher after ingestion of the CPE beverage, compared with placebo. Subclass analysis revealed that the CPE beverage significantly improved postprandial blood GLP-1 response and reduced blood glucose increase in the subjects with a lower insulinogenic index. Correlation analysis showed postprandial FMD was negatively associated with blood glucose increase after ingestion of the CPE beverage. In conclusion, these results suggest that coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function, which is associated with increased GLP-1 secretion and decreased oxidative stress in healthy humans.

  16. The Plant-Specific Dof Transcription Factors Family: New Players Involved in Vascular System Development and Functioning in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Le Hir, Rozenn; Bellini, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    In higher plants phloem and xylem are responsible for long-distance transport of water, nutrients, and signals that act systemically at short or long-distance to coordinate developmental processes. The formation of the plant vascular system is a complex process that integrates signaling events and gene regulation at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Thanks to transcriptomic and proteomic analysis we start to better understand the mechanisms underlying the formation and the functioning of the vascular system. The role of the DNA-binding with one finger (Dof TFs), a group of plant-specific transcription factors, recently emerged as part of the transcriptional regulatory networks acting on the formation and functioning of the vascular tissues. More than half of the members of this TF family are expressed in the vascular system. In addition some of them have been proposed to be mobile proteins, suggesting a possible role in the control of short- or long-distance signaling as well. This review summarizes the current knowledge on Dof TFs family in Arabidopsis with a special focus on their role in vascular development and functioning. PMID:23755058

  17. Low-level X-radiation effects on functional vascular changes in Syrian hamster cheek pouch epithelium during hydrocarbon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, A.G.; Coghill, J.E.; Rippey, R.M.

    1985-07-01

    Effects of repeated low-level X radiation on functional microvascular changes in hamster cheek pouch epithelium during and following carcinogenesis by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were studied. Hamsters were treated with either radiation, DMBA, radiation + DMBA, or no treatment. Animals were sacrificed at 3-week intervals from 0 to 39 weeks after treatments began. Pouch vascular volume and permeability changes were studied by fractional distributions of radiotracers and were analyzed by a variety of statistical methods which explored the vascular parameters, treatment types, elapsed time, presence of the carcinogen, and histopathologic changes. All treatments resulted in significant changes in vascular volume with time, while only DMBA treatments alone resulted in significant changes in vascular permeability with time. As in prior studies, there were significant vascular volume differences between DMBA and DMBA + radiation groups of tumor-bearing cheek pouches. Radiation significantly affected DMBA-associated vascular volume and permeability changes during carcinogenesis. Several possible explanations for the relationship of these changes to the enhancement of DMBA carcinogenesis are discussed.

  18. A Critical Role for the Vascular Endothelium in Functional Neurovascular Coupling in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brenda R.; Kozberg, Mariel G.; Bouchard, Matthew B.; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The functional modulation of blood flow in the brain is critical for brain health and is the basis of contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging. There is evident coupling between increases in neuronal activity and increases in local blood flow; however, many aspects of this neurovascular coupling remain unexplained by current models. Based on the rapid dilation of distant pial arteries during cortical functional hyperemia, we hypothesized that endothelial signaling may play a key role in the long‐range propagation of vasodilation during functional hyperemia in the brain. Although well characterized in the peripheral vasculature, endothelial involvement in functional neurovascular coupling has not been demonstrated. Methods and Results We combined in vivo exposed‐cortex multispectral optical intrinsic signal imaging (MS‐OISI) with a novel in vivo implementation of the light‐dye technique to record the cortical hemodynamic response to somatosensory stimulus in rats before and after spatially selective endothelial disruption. We demonstrate that discrete interruption of endothelial signaling halts propagation of stimulus‐evoked vasodilation in pial arteries, and that wide‐field endothelial disruption in pial arteries significantly attenuates the hemodynamic response to stimulus, particularly the early, rapid increase and peak in hyperemia. Conclusions Involvement of endothelial pathways in functional neurovascular coupling provides new explanations for the spatial and temporal features of the hemodynamic response to stimulus and could explain previous results that were interpreted as evidence for astrocyte‐mediated control of functional hyperemia. Our results unify many aspects of blood flow regulation in the brain and body and prompt new investigation of direct links between systemic cardiovascular disease and neural deficits. PMID:24926076

  19. Pharmacological separation between peripheral and central functions of cyclooxygenase-2 with CIAA, a novel cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takako; Murata, Yoko; Hizue, Masanori; Matsuura, Tomomi; Naganeo, Rie; Kanai, Yoshihito; Murase, Akio; Sakakibara, Ayano; Fujita, Isami; Nakao, Kazunari

    2006-06-01

    There are many reports concerning the physiological and pathological involvement of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in the central nervous system and peripheral tissue cells. Selective COX-2 inhibitors that mainly distribute peripherally have not been reported thus far. Therefore central and peripheral roles of COX-2 remain classified pharmacologically. In this study, in vivo pharmacological profiles of CIAA ([6-chloro-2-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]acetic acid), a novel selective COX-2 inhibitor which distributes at higher concentrations in plasma than in brain, were compared with those of well-known selective COX-2 inhibitors, celecoxib and rofecoxib. Additionally, the possibility of pharmacological separation between peripheral and central actions of COX-2 with the inhibitors was investigated. CIAA selectively inhibited COX-2 activity compared with COX-1 in in vitro assays with rat whole blood. The compound exhibited lower brain penetration and higher plasma concentration (the brain/plasma concentration ratio was approximately 0.02) than celecoxib and rofecoxib after oral administration. Therefore, CIAA is mainly expected to act peripherally. Edema and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in Carrageenan-injected rat paws, and pyrexia and PGE2 production in the brain in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected rats were measured in in vivo experiments. CIAA exhibited lower ratios of anti-pyretic/anti-edematous activities and of inhibitory activities of PGE2 production in brain/paw than those of celecoxib and rofecoxib, and these ratios well-reflected brain/plasma concentration ratios. In conclusion, we discovered a novel selective COX-2 inhibitor, CIAA, which distributes at higher concentrations in plasma than in brain, which would make possible the pharmacological separation of the peripheral and central functions of COX-2. PMID:16690052

  20. Changes of Number and Function of Late Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Peripheral Blood of COPD Patients Combined with Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Hongmei; Liu, Jianxin; Sheng, Chunfeng; Zhang, Linlin; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-06-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the changes of number and function of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in peripheral blood of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients combined with pulmonary hypertension. Subjects and Methods The study enrolled 120 cases including 40 non-COPD and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients (non-COPD group), 40 COPD non-PAH patients (COPD group), and 40 COPD patients combined with PAH (COPD + PAH group). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation, cultured for 21 days, and then identified as late endothelial progenitor cells. The cell colonies were counted. MTT assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and human fibronectin plates were used to measure the proliferation, migration, and adhesion functions of the late endothelial progenitor cells, respectively. Results Compared with non-COPD and COPD groups, the number of peripheral blood late EPCs in COPD + PAH group was significantly reduced, and the proliferation, adhesion, and migration capacities were significantly lowered; the differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The number and function of late EPCs decreased with the increase of pulmonary artery pressure (p < 0.05). Conclusion The number of late EPCs in COPD patients combined with pulmonary hypertension was reduced, which implies the impaired cell functions. The changes of number and function were negatively correlated with the severity of pulmonary hypertension.

  1. S-glutathionylation uncouples eNOS and regulates its cellular and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-An; Wang, Tse-Yao; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Reyes, Levy A.; Hemann, Craig; Hassan Talukder, M. A.; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Druhan, Lawrence J.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is critical in the regulation of vascular function, and can generate both nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2•−), which are key mediators of cellular signalling. In the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, eNOS produces NO, endothelial-derived relaxing factor, from L-arginine (L-Arg) by means of electron transfer from NADPH through a flavin containing reductase domain to oxygen bound at the haem of an oxygenase domain, which also contains binding sites for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-Arg1–3. In the absence of BH4, NO synthesis is abrogated and instead O2•− is generated4–7. While NOS dysfunction occurs in diseases with redox stress, BH4 repletion only partly restores NOS activity and NOS-dependent vasodilation7. This suggests that there is an as yet unidentified redox-regulated mechanism controlling NOS function. Protein thiols can undergo S-glutathionylation, a reversible protein modification involved in cellular signalling and adaptation8,9. Under oxidative stress, S-glutathionylation occurs through thiol–disulphide exchange with oxidized glutathione or reaction of oxidant-induced protein thiyl radicals with reduced glutathione10,11. Cysteine residues are critical for the maintenance of eNOS function12,13; we therefore speculated that oxidative stress could alter eNOS activity through S-glutathionylation. Here we show that S-glutathionylation of eNOS reversibly decreases NOS activity with an increase in O2•− generation primarily from the reductase, in which two highly conserved cysteine residues are identified as sites of S-glutathionylation and found to be critical for redox-regulation of eNOS function. We show that eNOS S-glutathionylation in endothelial cells, with loss of NO and gain of O2•− generation, is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In hypertensive vessels, eNOS S-glutathionylation is increased with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation that is restored by thiol

  2. Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... P. Peripheral arterial diseases. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... noncoronary obstructive vascular disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  3. Peripheral chemoreceptor control of cardiovascular function at rest and during exercise in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Edgell, Heather; McMurtry, M Sean; Haykowsky, Mark J; Paterson, Ian; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Dyck, Jason R B; Stickland, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptor activity/sensitivity is enhanced in chronic heart failure (HF), and sensitivity is linked to greater mortality. This study aimed to determine the role of the peripheral chemoreceptor in cardiovascular control at rest and during exercise in HF patients and controls. Clinically stable HF patients (n = 11; ejection fraction: 39 ± 5%) and risk-matched controls (n = 10; ejection fraction: 65 ± 2%) performed randomized trials with or without dopamine infusion (2 μg·min(-1)·kg(-1)) at rest and during 40% maximal voluntary contraction handgrip (HG) exercise, and a resting trial of 2 min of inspired 100% oxygen. Both dopamine and hyperoxia were used to inhibit the peripheral chemoreceptor. At rest in HF patients, dopamine decreased ventilation (P = 0.02), decreased total peripheral resistance index (P = 0.003), and increased cardiac and stroke indexes (P ≤ 0.01), yet there was no effect of dopamine on these variables in controls (P ≥ 0.7). Hyperoxia lowered ventilation in HF (P = 0.01), but not in controls (P = 0.9), indicating suppression of the peripheral chemoreceptors in HF. However, no decrease of total peripheral resistance index was observed in HF. As expected, HG increased heart rate, ventilation, and brachial conductance of the nonexercising arm in controls and HF patients. During dopamine infusion, there were no changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, or ventilation responses to HG in either group (P ≥ 0.26); however, brachial conductance increased with dopamine in the control group (P = 0.004), but decreased in HF (P = 0.02). Our findings indicate that the peripheral chemoreceptor contributes to cardiovascular control at rest in HF patients and during exercise in risk-matched controls.

  4. Heat acclimation improves cutaneous vascular function and sweating in trained cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore heat acclimation effects on cutaneous vascular responses and sweating to local ACh infusions and local heating. We also sought to examine whether heat acclimation altered maximal skin blood flow. ACh (1, 10, and 100 mM) was infused in 20 highly trained cyclists via microdialysis before and after a 10-day heat acclimation program [two 45-min exercise bouts at 50% maximal O2 uptake (V̇o2max) in 40°C (n = 12)] or control conditions [two 45-min exercise bouts at 50% V̇o2max in 13°C (n = 8)]. Skin blood flow was monitored via laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF), and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF ÷ mean arterial pressure. Sweat rate was measured by resistance hygrometry. Maximal brachial artery blood flow (forearm blood flow) was obtained by heating the contralateral forearm in a water spray device and measured by Doppler ultrasound. Heat acclimation increased %CVCmax responses to 1, 10, and 100 mM ACh (43.5 ± 3.4 vs. 52.6 ± 2.6% CVCmax, 67.7 ± 3.4 vs. 78.0 ± 3.0% CVCmax, and 81.0 ± 3.8 vs. 88.5 ± 1.1% CVCmax, respectively, all P < 0.05). Maximal forearm blood flow remained unchanged after heat acclimation (290.9 ± 12.7 vs. 269.9 ± 23.6 ml/min). The experimental group showed significant increases in sweating responses to 10 and 100 mM ACh (0.21 ± 0.03 vs. 0.31 ± 0.03 mg·cm−2·min−1 and 0.45 ± 0.05 vs. 0.67 ± 0.06 mg·cm−2·min−1, respectively, all P < 0.05), but not to 1 mM ACh (0.13 ± 0.02 vs. 0.18 ± 0.02 mg·cm−2·min−1, P = 0.147). No differences in any of the variables were found in the control group. Heat acclimation in highly trained subjects induced local adaptations within the skin microcirculation and sweat gland apparatus. Furthermore, maximal skin blood flow was not altered by heat acclimation, demonstrating that the observed changes were attributable to improvement in cutaneous vascular function and not to structural changes that limit maximal vasodilator capacity

  5. Isocyanate-functional adhesives for biomedical applications. Biocompatibility and feasibility study for vascular closure applications.

    PubMed

    Hadba, Ahmad R; Belcheva, Nadya; Jones, Fatima; Abuzaina, Ferass; Calabrese, Allison; Kapiamba, Mbiya; Skalla, Walter; Taylor, Jack L; Rodeheaver, George; Kennedy, John

    2011-10-01

    Biodegradable isocyanate-functional adhesives based on poly(ethylene glycol)-adipic acid esters were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Two types of formulations, P2TT and P2MT, were developed by functionalization with 2,4-tolylene diisocyanate (TDI) or 4,4'-methylene-bis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI), respectively, and branching with 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane (TMP). The biocompatibility of the synthesized adhesive formulations was evaluated as per ISO 10993. Cytotoxicity, systemic toxicity, pyrogenicity, genotoxicity (reverse mutation of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli), hemolysis, intracutaneous reactivity, and delayed-type hypersensitivity were evaluated. All formulations met the requirements of the conducted standard tests. The biological behavior and ability of the adhesive formulations to close an arteriotomy and withstand arterial pressure following partial approximation with a single suture were evaluated in a rat abdominal aorta model. Animals were evaluated at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after surgery. Macroscopic and histopathologic evaluation of explanted arteries suggested that the P2TT formulation had better in vivo performance than the P2MT formulation. Additionally, the P2TT formulation resulted in less tissue reaction than P2MT formulation. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the potential of this new class of isocyanate-functional degradable adhesives for vascular applications.

  6. Construction of Large-Volume Tissue Mimics with 3D Functional Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae-Yun; Hong, Jung Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We used indirect stereolithography (SL) to form inner-layered fluidic networks in a porous scaffold by introducing a hydrogel barrier on the luminal surface, then seeded the networks separately with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human lung fibroblasts to form a tissue mimic containing vascular networks. The artificial vascular networks provided channels for oxygen transport, thus reducing the hypoxic volume and preventing cell death. The endothelium of the vascular networks significantly retarded the occlusion of channels during whole-blood circulation. The tissue mimics have the potential to be used as an in vitro platform to examine the physiologic and pathologic phenomena through vascular architecture. PMID:27228079

  7. Hydrogen sulfide replacement therapy protects the vascular endothelium in hyperglycemia by preserving mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kunihiro; Olah, Gabor; Modis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Kulp, Gabriella; Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Chang, Tuanjie; Zhou, Zongmin; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of changes in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) homeostasis in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemic endothelial dysfunction. Exposure of bEnd3 microvascular endothelial cells to elevated extracellular glucose (in vitro “hyperglycemia”) induced the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted in an increased consumption of endogenous and exogenous H2S. Replacement of H2S or overexpression of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced enhancement of ROS formation, attenuated nuclear DNA injury, reduced the activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and improved cellular viability. In vitro hyperglycemia resulted in a switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, an effect that was partially corrected by H2S supplementation. Exposure of isolated vascular rings to high glucose in vitro induced an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, which was prevented by CSE overexpression or H2S supplementation. siRNA silencing of CSE exacerbated ROS production in hyperglycemic endothelial cells. Vascular rings from CSE−/− mice exhibited an accelerated impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to in vitro hyperglycemia, compared with wild-type controls. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats resulted in a decrease in the circulating level of H2S; replacement of H2S protected from the development of endothelial dysfunction ex vivo. In conclusion, endogenously produced H2S protects against the development of hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesize that, in hyperglycemic endothelial cells, mitochondrial ROS production and increased H2S catabolism form a positive feed-forward cycle. H2S replacement protects against these alterations, resulting in reduced ROS formation, improved endothelial metabolic state, and maintenance of normal endothelial function. PMID:21808008

  8. Hydrogen sulfide replacement therapy protects the vascular endothelium in hyperglycemia by preserving mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kunihiro; Olah, Gabor; Modis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Kulp, Gabriella; Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Chang, Tuanjie; Zhou, Zongmin; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-08-16

    The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of changes in hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) homeostasis in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemic endothelial dysfunction. Exposure of bEnd3 microvascular endothelial cells to elevated extracellular glucose (in vitro "hyperglycemia") induced the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted in an increased consumption of endogenous and exogenous H(2)S. Replacement of H(2)S or overexpression of the H(2)S-producing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced enhancement of ROS formation, attenuated nuclear DNA injury, reduced the activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and improved cellular viability. In vitro hyperglycemia resulted in a switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, an effect that was partially corrected by H(2)S supplementation. Exposure of isolated vascular rings to high glucose in vitro induced an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, which was prevented by CSE overexpression or H(2)S supplementation. siRNA silencing of CSE exacerbated ROS production in hyperglycemic endothelial cells. Vascular rings from CSE(-/-) mice exhibited an accelerated impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to in vitro hyperglycemia, compared with wild-type controls. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats resulted in a decrease in the circulating level of H(2)S; replacement of H(2)S protected from the development of endothelial dysfunction ex vivo. In conclusion, endogenously produced H(2)S protects against the development of hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesize that, in hyperglycemic endothelial cells, mitochondrial ROS production and increased H(2)S catabolism form a positive feed-forward cycle. H(2)S replacement protects against these alterations, resulting in reduced ROS formation, improved endothelial metabolic state, and maintenance of normal endothelial function.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide replacement therapy protects the vascular endothelium in hyperglycemia by preserving mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kunihiro; Olah, Gabor; Modis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Kulp, Gabriella; Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Chang, Tuanjie; Zhou, Zongmin; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-08-16

    The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of changes in hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) homeostasis in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemic endothelial dysfunction. Exposure of bEnd3 microvascular endothelial cells to elevated extracellular glucose (in vitro "hyperglycemia") induced the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted in an increased consumption of endogenous and exogenous H(2)S. Replacement of H(2)S or overexpression of the H(2)S-producing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced enhancement of ROS formation, attenuated nuclear DNA injury, reduced the activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and improved cellular viability. In vitro hyperglycemia resulted in a switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, an effect that was partially corrected by H(2)S supplementation. Exposure of isolated vascular rings to high glucose in vitro induced an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, which was prevented by CSE overexpression or H(2)S supplementation. siRNA silencing of CSE exacerbated ROS production in hyperglycemic endothelial cells. Vascular rings from CSE(-/-) mice exhibited an accelerated impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to in vitro hyperglycemia, compared with wild-type controls. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats resulted in a decrease in the circulating level of H(2)S; replacement of H(2)S protected from the development of endothelial dysfunction ex vivo. In conclusion, endogenously produced H(2)S protects against the development of hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesize that, in hyperglycemic endothelial cells, mitochondrial ROS production and increased H(2)S catabolism form a positive feed-forward cycle. H(2)S replacement protects against these alterations, resulting in reduced ROS formation, improved endothelial metabolic state, and maintenance of normal endothelial function. PMID:21808008

  10. Structural and Functional Vascular Alterations and Incident Hypertension in Normotensive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Carmen A.; Adeney, Kathryn L.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Jacobs, David; Duprez, Daniel; Bluemke, David; Polak, Joseph; Psaty, Bruce; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities may exist before clinical hypertension. Using Poisson regression, the authors studied the association of coronary artery calcium (CAC), common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), aortic distensibility, and large and small arterial elasticity with incident hypertension among 2,512 normotensive US adults free of cardiovascular disease. Incidence rate ratios for incident hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg or new antihypertensive medication) were calculated. Increased CAC was associated with incident hypertension in demographics-adjusted models (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.75; IRR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.78; and IRR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.12, 2.25 for CAC scores of 30–99, 100–399, and ≥400, respectively) but was attenuated after further adjustment. Increased common CIMT was associated with incident hypertension (IRR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.28, 2.46 for quintile 4; IRR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.28, 2.53 for quintile 5). Participants with the lowest, compared with the highest, aortic distensibility had an increased risk of hypertension (IRR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.79), as did those with the lowest large arterial elasticity (IRR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.99). Lower small arterial elasticity was incrementally associated with incident hypertension starting at quintile 2 (IRR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.39, 2.91; IRR = 2.47, 95% CI: 1.71, 3.57; IRR = 2.73, 95% CI: 1.88, 3.95; and IRR = 2.85, 95% CI: 1.95, 4.16). Structural and functional vascular abnormalities are independent predictors of incident hypertension. These findings are important for understanding the pathogenesis of hypertension. PMID:19951938

  11. Smooth Muscle-Targeted Overexpression of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-γ Disrupts Vascular Wall Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhenz, Jennifer M.; Murphy, Tamara C.; Pokutta-Paskaleva, Anastassia P.; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Taylor, W. Robert; Blount, Mitsi A.; Cheng, Juan; Yang, Qinglin; Sutliff, Roy L.; Hart, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the nuclear hormone receptor, PPARγ, with pharmacological agonists promotes a contractile vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype and reduces oxidative stress and cell proliferation, particularly under pathological conditions including vascular injury, restenosis, and atherosclerosis. However, pharmacological agonists activate both PPARγ-dependent and -independent mechanisms in multiple cell types confounding efforts to clarify the precise role of PPARγ in smooth muscle cell structure and function in vivo. We, therefore, designed and characterized a mouse model with smooth muscle cell-targeted PPARγ overexpression (smPPARγOE). Our results demonstrate that smPPARγOE attenuated contractile responses in aortic rings, increased aortic compliance, caused aortic dilatation, and reduced mean arterial pressure. Molecular characterization revealed that compared to littermate control mice, aortas from smPPARγOE mice expressed lower levels of contractile proteins and increased levels of adipocyte-specific transcripts. Morphological analysis demonstrated increased lipid deposition in the vascular media and in smooth muscle of extravascular tissues. In vitro adenoviral-mediated PPARγ overexpression in human aortic smooth muscle cells similarly increased adipocyte markers and lipid uptake. The findings demonstrate that smooth muscle PPARγ overexpression disrupts vascular wall structure and function, emphasizing that balanced PPARγ activity is essential for vascular smooth muscle homeostasis. PMID:26451838

  12. Mechanics and Function of the Pulmonary Vasculature: Implications for Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Right Ventricular Function

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Steven; Scott, Devon; Hunter, Kendall; Tan, Wei; Shandas, Robin; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between cardiac function and the afterload against which the heart muscle must work to circulate blood throughout the pulmonary circulation is defined by a complex interaction between many coupled system parameters. These parameters range broadly and incorporate system effects originating primarily from three distinct locations: input power from the heart, hydraulic impedance from the large conduit pulmonary arteries, and hydraulic resistance from the more distal microcirculation. These organ systems are not independent, but rather, form a coupled system in which a change to any individual parameter affects all other system parameters. The result is a highly nonlinear system which requires not only detailed study of each specific component and the effect of disease on their specific function, but also requires study of the interconnected relationship between the microcirculation, the conduit arteries, and the heart in response to age and disease. Here, we investigate systems-level changes associated with pulmonary hypertensive disease progression in an effort to better understand this coupled relationship. PMID:23487595

  13. Exploration of the Rapid Effects of Personal Fine Particulate Matter Exposure on Hemodynamics and Vascular Function during the Same Day

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Levels of fine particulate matter [≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] are associated with alterations in arterial hemodynamics and vascular function. However, the characteristics of the same-day exposure–response relationships remain unclear. Object...

  14. Integrin-specific hydrogels functionalized with VEGF for vascularization and bone regeneration of critical-size bone defects.

    PubMed

    García, José R; Clark, Amy Y; García, Andrés J

    2016-04-01

    Vascularization of bone defects is considered a crucial component to the successful regeneration of large bone defects. Although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been delivered to critical-size bone defect models to augment blood vessel infiltration into the defect area, its potential to increase bone repair remains ambiguous. In this study, we investigated whether integrin-specific biomaterials modulate the effects of VEGF on bone regeneration. We engineered protease-degradable, VEGF-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels functionalized with either a triple-helical, α2 β1 integrin-specific peptide GGYGGGP(GPP)5 GFOGER(GPP)5 GPC (GFOGER) or an αv β3 integrin-targeting peptide GRGDSPC (RGD). Covalent incorporation of VEGF into the PEG hydrogel allowed for protease degradation-dependent release of the protein while maintaining VEGF bioactivity. When applied to critical-size segmental defects in the murine radius, GFOGER-functionalized VEGF-free hydrogels exhibited significantly increased vascular volume and density and resulted in a larger number of thicker blood vessels compared to RGD-functionalized VEGF-free hydrogels. VEGF-loaded RGD hydrogels increased vascularization compared to VEGF-free RGD hydrogels, but the levels of vascularization for these VEGF-containing RGD hydrogels were similar to those of VEGF-free GFOGER hydrogels. VEGF transiently increased bone regeneration in RGD hydrogels but had no effect at later time points. In GFOGER hydrogels, VEGF did not show an effect on bone regeneration. However, VEGF-free GFOGER hydrogels resulted in increased bone regeneration compared to VEGF-free RGD hydrogels. These findings demonstrate the importance of integrin-specificity in engineering constructs for vascularization and associated bone regeneration.

  15. Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of: (1) peripheral leukocyte distribution, (2) plasma cytokine levels and (3) cytokine production profiles following whole blood mitogenic stimulation

  16. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui; Wen, Jin-kun

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  17. Effect of sulodexide on vascular responses and liver mitochondrial function in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dobiaš, L; Petrová, M; Vojtko, R; Uličná, O; Vančová, O; Kristová, V

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of long-term treatment with sulodexide (SLX) on norepinephrine (NE)-induced contractions, acetylcholine(Ach)-induced relaxations, acute cyclooxygenase blockade by diclofenac (DIC) in isolated femoral arteries (FA) and the parameters of oxidative phosporylation in liver mitochondria. 15-weeks old Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control (C; injected with saline solution), treated control (C+SLX), diabetic (DM) and treated diabetic (DM+SLX). Diabetes was induced with a single i.v. dose of streptozotocin (STZ) 45 mg.kg(-1). SLX was administered i.p., at dose 100 IU.kg(-1) daily for 5 weeks. Vascular responses of isolated femoral arteries were measured using Mulvany-Halpern myograph. Respiratory function of the mitochondria was determined using voltamperometric method on oxygraph Gilson. In diabetic rats the amplitude of maximal response to NE was elevated. DIC pretreatment decreased the amplitudes of NE-induced contractions in all groups of rats. SLX treatment decreased sensitivity of FA to NE and caused higher relaxatory responses to Ach in C and DM. Oxygen consumption and phosphorylation rates ([QO(2)(S(3))], [QO(2)(S(4))] and (OPR)) and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were decreased in the mitochondria of DM rats. Mitochondria of C rats were not affected with SLX treatment. Administration of SLX in DM rats was associated with increase of RCR, other parameters were not affected. Our findings suggest that SLX treatment might be associated with vasculoprotective effects during diabetes and improvement of mitochondrial function.

  18. Vascular functioning and the water balance of ripening kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) berries

    PubMed Central

    Clearwater, Michael J.; Luo, Zhiwei; Ong, Sam Eng Chye; Blattmann, Peter; Thorp, T. Grant

    2012-01-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that water supply to fleshy fruits during the final stages of development occurs through the phloem, with the xylem providing little water, or acting as a pathway for water loss back to the plant. This inference was tested by examining the water balance and vascular functioning of ripening kiwifruit berries (Actinidia chinensis var. chinensis ‘Hort16A’) exhibiting a pre-harvest ‘shrivel’ disorder in California, and normal development in New Zealand. Dye labelling and mass balance experiments indicated that the xylem and phloem were both functional and contributed approximately equally to the fruit water supply during this stage of development. The modelled fruit water balance was dominated by transpiration, with net water loss under high vapour pressure deficit (Da) conditions in California, but a net gain under cooler New Zealand conditions. Direct measurement of pedicel sap flow under controlled conditions confirmed inward flows in both the phloem and xylem under conditions of both low and high Da. Phloem flows were required for growth, with gradual recovery after a step increase in Da. Xylem flows alone were unable to support growth, but did supply transpiration and were responsive to Da-induced pressure fluctuations. The results suggest that the shrivel disorder was a consequence of a high fruit transpiration rate, and that the perception of complete loss or reversal of inward xylem flows in ripening fruits should be re-examined. PMID:22155631

  19. Vascular functioning and the water balance of ripening kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) berries.

    PubMed

    Clearwater, Michael J; Luo, Zhiwei; Ong, Sam Eng Chye; Blattmann, Peter; Thorp, T Grant

    2012-03-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that water supply to fleshy fruits during the final stages of development occurs through the phloem, with the xylem providing little water, or acting as a pathway for water loss back to the plant. This inference was tested by examining the water balance and vascular functioning of ripening kiwifruit berries (Actinidia chinensis var. chinensis 'Hort16A') exhibiting a pre-harvest 'shrivel' disorder in California, and normal development in New Zealand. Dye labelling and mass balance experiments indicated that the xylem and phloem were both functional and contributed approximately equally to the fruit water supply during this stage of development. The modelled fruit water balance was dominated by transpiration, with net water loss under high vapour pressure deficit (D(a)) conditions in California, but a net gain under cooler New Zealand conditions. Direct measurement of pedicel sap flow under controlled conditions confirmed inward flows in both the phloem and xylem under conditions of both low and high D(a). Phloem flows were required for growth, with gradual recovery after a step increase in D(a). Xylem flows alone were unable to support growth, but did supply transpiration and were responsive to D(a)-induced pressure fluctuations. The results suggest that the shrivel disorder was a consequence of a high fruit transpiration rate, and that the perception of complete loss or reversal of inward xylem flows in ripening fruits should be re-examined.

  20. Influence of Vascular Variant of the Posterior Cerebral Artery (PCA) on Cerebral Blood Flow, Vascular Response to CO2 and Static Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Kirsten; Zöller, Daniela; Preti, Maria Giulia; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Haller, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery (fPCA) is a frequent vascular variant in 11–29% of the population. For the fPCA, blood flow in the PCA originates from the anterior instead of the posterior circulation. We tested whether this blood supply variant impacts the cerebral blood flow assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL), cerebrovascular reserve as well as resting-state static functional connectivity (sFC) in the sense of a systematic confound. Methods The study included 385 healthy, elderly subjects (mean age: 74.18 years [range: 68.9–90.4]; 243 female). Participants were classified into normal vascular supply (n = 296, 76.88%), right fetal origin (n = 23, 5.97%), left fetal origin (n = 16, 4.16%), bilateral fetal origin (n = 4, 1.04%), and intermediate (n = 46, 11.95%, excluded from further analysis) groups. ASL-derived relative cerebral blood flow (relCBF) maps and cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) maps derived from a CO2 challenge with blocks of 7% CO2 were compared. Additionally, sFC between 90 regions of interest (ROIs) was compared between the groups. Results CVR was significantly reduced in subjects with ipsilateral fPCA, most prominently in the temporal lobe. ASL yielded a non-significant trend towards reduced relCBF in bilateral posterior watershed areas. In contrast, conventional atlas-based sFC did not differ between groups. Conclusions In conclusion, fPCA presence may bias the assessment of cerebrovascular reserve by reducing the response to CO2. In contrast, its effect on ASL-assessed baseline perfusion was marginal. Moreover, fPCA presence did not systematically impact resting-state sFC. Taken together, this data implies that perfusion variables should take into account the vascularization patterns. PMID:27532633

  1. [The specific features of the vestibular function in the patients presenting with sensorineural hearing loss of vascular genesis].

    PubMed

    Kirichenko, I M; Popadyuk, V I; Tuzhilina, K V

    2016-01-01

    The authors consider the specific features of the vestibular function in the patients with sensorineural hearing loss of vascular genesis. The study included 60 patients at the age from 28 to 75 years presenting with sensorineural impairment of hearing of vascular genesis. All of them were examined with the use of the extended otoneurological method. The data obtained were compared with the structural changes and hemodynamic characteristics of vertebral arteries (VA) and internal carotid arteries (ICA) and with the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain.

  2. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptors Differentially Contribute to Coronary and Mesenteric Vascular Function Without Modulating Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Katelee Barrett; Bender, Shawn B; Hong, Kwangseok; Yang, Yan; Aronovitz, Mark; Jaisser, Frederic; Hill, Michael A; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2015-11-01

    Arteriolar vasoreactivity tightly regulates tissue-specific blood flow and contributes to systemic blood pressure (BP) but becomes dysfunctional in the setting of cardiovascular disease. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is known to regulate BP via the kidney and by vasoconstriction in smooth muscle cells. Although endothelial cells (EC) express MR, the contribution of EC-MR to BP and resistance vessel function remains unclear. To address this, we created a mouse with MR specifically deleted from EC (EC-MR knockout [EC-MR-KO]) but with intact leukocyte MR expression and normal renal MR function. Telemetric BP studies reveal no difference between male EC-MR-KO mice and MR-intact littermates in systolic, diastolic, circadian, or salt-sensitive BP or in the hypertensive responses to aldosterone±salt or angiotensin II±l-nitroarginine methyl ester. Vessel myography demonstrated normal vasorelaxation in mesenteric and coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice. After exposure to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation was prevented in EC-MR-KO mice in mesenteric vessels but not in coronary vessels. Mesenteric vessels from angiotensin II-exposed EC-MR-KO mice showed increased maximum responsiveness to acetylcholine when compared with MR-intact vessels, a difference that is lost with indomethacin+l-nitroarginine methyl ester pretreatment. These data support that EC-MR plays a role in regulating endothelial function in hypertension. Although there was no effect of EC-MR deletion on mesenteric vasoconstriction, coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice showed decreased constriction to endothelin-1 and thromboxane agonist at baseline and also after exposure to hypertension. These data support that EC-MR participates in regulation of vasomotor function in a vascular bed-specific manner that is also modulated by risk factors, such as hypertension.

  3. Effects of black raspberry on lipid profiles and vascular endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Han Saem; Hong, Soon Jun; Lee, Tae-Bum; Kwon, Ji-Wung; Jeong, Jong Tae; Joo, Hyung Joon; Park, Jae Hyoung; Ahn, Chul-Min; Yu, Cheol Woong; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-10-01

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) has been known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. However, short-term effects of black raspberry on lipid profiles and vascular endothelial function have not been investigated in patients with metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome (n = 77) were prospectively randomized into a group with black raspberry (n = 39, 750 mg/day) and a placebo group (n = 38) during a 12-week follow-up. Lipid profiles, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (baFMD), and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, C-reactive protein, adiponectin, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1 were measured at the baseline and at the 12-week follow-up. Decreases from the baseline in the total cholesterol level (-22.8 ± 30.4 mg/dL vs. -1.9 ± 31.8 mg/dL, p < 0.05, respectively) and total cholesterol/HDL ratio (-0.31 ± 0.64 vs. 0.07 ± 0.58, p < 0.05, respectively) were significantly greater in the group with black raspberry than in the placebo group. Increases in baFMD at the 12-week follow-up were significantly greater in the group with black raspberry than in the placebo group (0.33 ± 0.44 mm vs. 0.10 ± 0.35 mm, p < 0.05, respectively). Decreases from the baseline in IL-6 (-0.4 ± 1.5 pg/mL vs. -0.1 ± 1.0 pg/mL, p < 0.05, respectively) and TNF-α (-2.9 ± 4.7 pg/mL vs. 0.1 ± 3.6 pg/mL, p < 0.05, respectively) were significantly greater in the group with black raspberry. The use of black raspberry significantly decreased serum total cholesterol level and inflammatory cytokines, thereby improving vascular endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome during the 12-week follow-up.

  4. Dissecting the functional significance of endothelin A receptors in peripheral nociceptors in vivo via conditional gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Stösser, Sebastian; Agarwal, Nitin; Tappe-Theodor, Anke; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Kuner, Rohini

    2010-02-01

    The peptide endothelin-1 (ET1), which was originally identified as a vasoconstrictor, has emerged as a critical regulator of a number of painful conditions, including inflammatory pain and tumor-associated pain. There is considerable pharmacological evidence supporting a role for endothelin A receptors (ET(A)) in mediating ET1-induced pro-algesic functions. ET(A) receptors are expressed in small-diameter nociceptive neurons, but also found in a variety of other cell types in peripheral tissues, including immune cells, keratinocytes, endothelial cells, which have the potential to modulate nociception. To elucidate the functional contribution of ET(A) receptors expressed in sensory neurons towards the functions of the ET1 axis in pathological pain states, we undertook a conditional gene deletion approach to selectively deplete expression of ET(A) in sensory nerves, preserving expression in non-neural peripheral tissues; the expression of ET(B) remained unchanged. Behavioural and pharmacological experiments showed that only late nociceptive hypersensitivity caused by ET1 is abrogated upon a loss of ET(A) receptors on nociceptors and further suggest that ET1-induced early nociceptive hypersensitivity involves activation of ET(A) as well as ET(B) receptors in non-neural peripheral cells. Furthermore, in the context of alleviation of cancer pain and chronic inflammatory pain by ET(A) receptor antagonists, we observed in corresponding mouse models that the contribution of ET(A) receptors expressed in nociceptors is most significant. These results help understand the role of ET(A) receptors in complex biological processes and peripheral cell-cell interactions involved in inflammatory and tumor-associated pain.

  5. Pioglitazone treatment increases COX-2-derived prostacyclin production and reduces oxidative stress in hypertensive rats: role in vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Hernanz, Raquel; Martín, Ángela; Pérez-Girón, Jose V; Palacios, Roberto; Briones, Ana M; Miguel, Marta; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE PPARγ agonists, glitazones, have cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory actions associated with gene transcription interference. In this study, we determined whether chronic treatment of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with pioglitazone alters BP and vascular structure and function, and the possible mechanisms involved. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mesenteric resistance arteries from untreated or pioglitazone-treated (2.5 mg·kg−1·day−1, 28 days) SHR and normotensive [Wistar Kyoto (WKY)] rats were used. Vascular structure was studied by pressure myography, vascular function by wire myography, protein expression by Western blot and immunohistochemistry, mRNA levels by RT-PCR, prostanoid levels by commercial kits and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by dihydroethidium-emitted fluorescence. KEY RESULTS In SHR, pioglitazone did not modify either BP or vascular structural and mechanical alterations or phenylephrine-induced contraction, but it increased vascular COX-2 levels, prostacyclin (PGI2) production and the inhibitory effects of NS 398, SQ 29,548 and tranylcypromine on phenylephrine responses. The contractile phase of the iloprost response, which was reduced by SQ 29,548, was greater in pioglitazone-treated and pioglitazone-untreated SHR than WKY. In addition, pioglitazone abolished the increased vascular ROS production, NOX-1 levels and the inhibitory effect of apocynin and allopurinol on phenylephrine contraction, whereas it did not modify eNOS expression but restored the potentiating effect of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester on phenylephrine responses. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Although pioglitazone did not reduce BP in SHR, it increased COX-2-derived PGI2 production, reduced oxidative stress, and increased NO bioavailability, which are all involved in vasoconstrictor responses in resistance arteries. These effects would contribute to the cardioprotective effect of glitazones reported in several pathologies. PMID

  6. The effects of temperature on peripheral neuronal function in eurythermal and stenothermal crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Young, John S; Peck, Lloyd S; Matheson, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    To determine whether neuronal function in Antarctic crustaceans is adapted to the low and narrow range of temperatures at which these animals live, we have compared conduction velocities in the peripheral nervous systems of two temperate species, the decapod Carcinus maenas and the isopod Ligia oceanica, and two Antarctic species, the isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus and the amphipod Paraceradocus gibber. Neuronal conduction velocity differs among the species in the order C. maenas > G. antarcticus > P. gibber > L. oceanica. When measured at the normal environmental temperatures characteristic of each species, conduction velocity of the Antarctic peracarid P. gibber is greater than that of its similar sized temperate relative L. oceanica, demonstrating complete thermal compensation. The temperate decapod C. maenas has a higher thermal dependence of neuronal conduction velocity than either of the Antarctic species, G. antarcticus and P. gibber, but the temperate L. oceanica does not. These data, when collated with published values, indicate that peracarid crustaceans (L. oceanica, G. antarcticus and P. gibber) have lower neuronal conduction velocities and a lower thermal dependence of neuronal conduction velocity than do other arthropods, irrespective of habitat. There is a linear dependence of conduction velocity on temperature down to -1.8 degrees C in all three species. Our data extend by more than 10 degrees the lower range of temperatures at which conduction velocities have been tested systematically in previous studies. The upper thermal block of neuronal conduction is similar in C. maenas, G. antarcticus, P. gibber and L. oceanica at 24.5, 19.5, 21.5 and 19.5 degrees C, respectively. This suggests that failure to conduct action potentials is not what determines the mortality of Antarctic invertebrates at approximately 10 degrees C. The excitability of axons in the leg nerve of G. antarcticus is not affected by temperatures ranging from -1.8 to +18 degrees C

  7. Is active sweating during heat acclimation required for improvements in peripheral sweat gland function?

    PubMed Central

    Numan, Travis R.; Claros, Ryan M.; Brodine, Stephanie K.; Kolkhorst, Fred W.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether the eccrine sweat glands must actively produce sweat during heat acclimation if they are to adapt and increase their capacity to sweat. Eight volunteers received intradermal injections of BOTOX, to prevent neural stimulation and sweat production of the sweat glands during heat acclimation, and saline injections as a control in the contralateral forearm. Subjects performed 90 min of moderate-intensity exercise in the heat (35°C, 40% relative humidity) on 10 consecutive days. Heat acclimation decreased end-exercise heart rate (156 ± 22 vs. 138 ± 17 beats/min; P = 0.0001) and rectal temperature (38.2 ± 0.3 vs. 37.9 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.0003) and increased whole body sweat rate (0.70 ± 0.29 vs. 1.06 ± 0.50 l/h; P = 0.030). During heat acclimation, there was no measurable sweating in the BOTOX-treated forearm, but the control forearm sweat rate during exercise increased 40% over the 10 days (P = 0.040). Peripheral sweat gland function was assessed using pilocarpine iontophoresis before and after heat acclimation. Before heat acclimation, the pilocarpine-induced sweat rate of the control and BOTOX-injected forearms did not differ (0.65 ± 0.20 vs. 0.66 ± 0.22 mg·cm−2·min−1). However, following heat acclimation, the pilocarpine-induced sweat rate in the control arm increased 18% to 0.77 ± 0.21 mg·cm−2·min−1 (P = 0.021) but decreased 52% to 0.32 ± 0.18 mg·cm−2·min−1 (P < 0.001) in the BOTOX-treated arm. Using complete chemodenervation of the sweat glands, coupled with direct cholinergic stimulation via pilocarpine iontophoresis, we demonstrated that sweat glands must be active during heat acclimation if they are to adapt and increase their capacity to sweat. PMID:19657101

  8. Endothelin B receptor contribution to peripheral microvascular function in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wenner, Megan M; Taylor, Hugh S; Stachenfeld, Nina S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Endothelin-1 is elevated in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and may play a role in the endothelial dysfunction associated with PCOS. Endothelin-1 binds two receptor subtypes, endothelin A (ET-A) and endothelin B (ET-B). We hypothesized that ET-A mediates vasoconstriction in the cutaneous microvasculature in women with and without PCOS. We further hypothesized that while the ET-B receptors mediate vasodilatation in both groups of women, this response would be blunted in women with PCOS. During local skin warming, we used laser Doppler flowmetry combined with intradermal microdialysis to measure skin blood flow (SkBF) during graded ET-A (BQ-123) and ET-B (BQ-788) antagonist infusions in women with (n = 6) and without (n = 8) PCOS. In both groups, SkBF increased during local heating. The percentage of maximal SkBF–[BQ123] sigmoidal dose–response curve indicated a vasodilatory response as the concentration of the antagonist increased (Hill slope 4.96 ± 4.77, 4.74 ± 5.01; logED50 2.53 ± 0.09, 2.49 ± 0.09 nm, for PCOS and Control, respectively). In contrast, the % max SkBF–[BQ788] curve indicated a vasoconstrictive response (Hill slope –4.69 ± 3.85, –4.03 ± 3.85; logED50, 2.56 ± 0.09, 2.41 ± 0.12 nm, in PCOS and Control). Moreover, the SkBF–[BQ788] curve shifted to the right in women with PCOS, suggesting attenuated ET-B receptor mediated vasodilatation during local skin warming compared to Controls. Thus, the endothelium located ET-B receptors function similarly in women with and without PCOS, although with blunted responsiveness in women with PCOS. Our studies suggest that the lower ET-B receptor responsiveness associated with PCOS may reflect lower endothelial-mediated vasodilatation independent of generally lower vascular reactivity. PMID:21825025

  9. A divergent route to core- and peripherally functionalized diazacoronenes that act as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors

    SciTech Connect

    He, Bo; Dai, Jing; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Chen, Teresa L.; Zhang, Benjamin A.; Teat, Simon J.; Zhang, Qichun; Wang, Linwang; Liu, Yi

    2015-03-31

    Combining core annulation and peripheral group modification, we have demonstrated a divergent synthesis of a family of highly functionalized coronene derivatives from a readily accessible dichlorodiazaperylene intermediate. Various reactions, such as aromatic nucleophilic substitution, Kumada coupling and Suzuki coupling proceed effectively on α-positions of the pyridine sites, giving rise to alkoxy, thioalkyl, alkyl or aryl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In addition to peripheral group modulation, the aromatic core structures can be altered by annulation with thiophene or benzene ring systems. Corresponding single crystal X-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that the heteroatom linkages not only impact the solid state packing, but also significantly influence the optoelectronic properties. Moreover, these azacoronene derivatives display significant acid-induced spectroscopic changes, suggesting their great potential as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors.

  10. A divergent route to core- and peripherally functionalized diazacoronenes that act as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors

    DOE PAGES

    He, Bo; Dai, Jing; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Chen, Teresa L.; Zhang, Benjamin A.; Teat, Simon J.; Zhang, Qichun; Wang, Linwang; Liu, Yi

    2015-03-31

    Combining core annulation and peripheral group modification, we have demonstrated a divergent synthesis of a family of highly functionalized coronene derivatives from a readily accessible dichlorodiazaperylene intermediate. Various reactions, such as aromatic nucleophilic substitution, Kumada coupling and Suzuki coupling proceed effectively on α-positions of the pyridine sites, giving rise to alkoxy, thioalkyl, alkyl or aryl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In addition to peripheral group modulation, the aromatic core structures can be altered by annulation with thiophene or benzene ring systems. Corresponding single crystal X-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that the heteroatom linkages not only impact the solid state packing,more » but also significantly influence the optoelectronic properties. Moreover, these azacoronene derivatives display significant acid-induced spectroscopic changes, suggesting their great potential as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors.« less

  11. Dark chocolate consumption improves leukocyte adhesion factors and vascular function in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Esser, Diederik; Mars, Monica; Oosterink, Els; Stalmach, Angelique; Müller, Michael; Afman, Lydia A

    2014-03-01

    Flavanol-enriched chocolate consumption increases endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Most research so far has focused on flow-mediated dilation (FMD) only; the effects on other factors relevant to endothelial health, such as inflammation and leukocyte adhesion, have hardly been addressed. We investigated whether consumption of regular dark chocolate also affects other markers of endothelial health, and whether chocolate enrichment with flavanols has additional benefits. In a randomized double-blind crossover study, the effects of acute and of 4 wk daily consumption of high flavanol chocolate (HFC) and normal flavanol chocolate (NFC) on FMD, augmentation index (AIX), leukocyte count, plasma cytokines, and leukocyte cell surface molecules in overweight men (age 45-70 yr) were investigated. Sensory profiles and motivation scores to eat chocolate were also collected. Findings showed that a 4 wk chocolate intake increased FMD by 1%, which was paralleled by a decreased AIX of 1%, decreased leukocyte cell count, decreased plasma sICAM1 and sICAM3, and decreased leukocyte adhesion marker expression (P<0.05 for time effect), with no difference between HFC and NFC consumption. Flavanol enrichment did affect taste and negatively affected motivation to consume chocolate. This study provides new insights on how chocolate affects endothelial health by demonstrating that chocolate consumption, besides improving vascular function, also lowers the adherence capacity of leukocytes in the circulation.

  12. Leukocyte trafficking-associated vascular adhesion protein 1 is expressed and functionally active in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Silvola, Johanna M. U.; Virtanen, Helena; Siitonen, Riikka; Hellberg, Sanna; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Metsälä, Olli; Ståhle, Mia; Saanijoki, Tiina; Käkelä, Meeri; Hakovirta, Harri; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Saukko, Pekka; Jauhiainen, Matti; Veres, Tibor Z.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Knuuti, Juhani; Saraste, Antti; Roivainen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Given the important role of inflammation and the potential association of the leukocyte trafficking-associated adhesion molecule vascular adhesion protein 1 (VAP-1) with atherosclerosis, this study examined whether functional VAP-1 is expressed in atherosclerotic lesions and, if so, whether it could be targeted by positron emission tomography (PET). First, immunohistochemistry revealed that VAP-1 localized to endothelial cells of intra-plaque neovessels in human carotid endarterectomy samples from patients with recent ischemic symptoms. In low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice expressing only apolipoprotein B100 (LDLR−/−ApoB100/100), VAP-1 was expressed on endothelial cells lining inflamed atherosclerotic lesions; normal vessel walls in aortas of C57BL/6N control mice were VAP-1-negative. Second, we discovered that the focal uptake of VAP-1 targeting sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 based PET tracer [68Ga]DOTA-Siglec-9 in atherosclerotic plaques was associated with the density of activated macrophages (r = 0.58, P = 0.022). As a final point, we found that the inhibition of VAP-1 activity with small molecule LJP1586 decreased the density of macrophages in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques in mice. Our results suggest for the first time VAP-1 as a potential imaging target for inflamed atherosclerotic plaques, and corroborate VAP-1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27731409

  13. Vascular endothelial cells express a functional fas-receptor due to lack of hemodynamic forces.

    PubMed

    Freyberg, M A; Kaiser, D; Graf, R; Friedl, P

    2001-10-01

    The fas system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. However, its role in the initiation and progression is still unclear. Here we show that in endothelial cells (EC) the expression of the fas receptor is regulated by flow conditions. The EC of the vascular system are regularly exposed to a range of hemodynamic forces with great impact on cellular structures and functions. Recently it was reported that in endothelial cells the lack of hemodynamic forces as well as irregular flow conditions trigger apoptosis by induction of a mechanosensitive autocrine loop of thrombospondin-1 and the alpha(V)beta(3) integrin/integrin-associated protein complex. Here we show that EC cultivated under regular laminar flow conditions are devoid of the fas-receptor whereas cultivation under static conditions as well as under turbulence leads to its expression. Stimulation of the fas-receptor by its ligand increases the amount of apoptotic cells by twofold; the increase can be prevented by blocking the fas-receptor. The availability of the expressed fas receptor for stimulation by its ligand hints at a role as a tool for progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:11483857

  14. Non-invasive functional imaging of Cerebral Blood Volume with Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Hua, Jun; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) based on changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) can directly probe vasodilatation and vasoconstriction during brain activation or physiologic challenges, and can provide important insights into the mechanism of Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD) signal changes. At present, the most widely used CBV fMRI technique in humans is called Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI and this article provides a technical review of this method. VASO MRI utilizes T1 differences between blood and tissue to distinguish these two compartments within a voxel and uses blood-nulling inversion recovery sequence to yield an MR signal proportional to 1-CBV. As such, vasodilatation will result in a VASO signal decrease and vasoconstriction will have the reverse effect. The VASO technique can be performed dynamically with a temporal resolution comparable to several other fMRI methods such as BOLD or Arterial-Spin-Labeling (ASL), and is particularly powerful when conducted in conjunction with these complementary techniques. The pulse sequence and imaging parameters of VASO can be optimized such that the signal change is predominantly of CBV origin, but careful considerations should be taken to minimize other contributions, such as those from the BOLD effect, CBF, and CSF. Sensitivity of the VASO technique remains to be the primary disadvantage when compared to BOLD, but this technique is increasingly demonstrating utility in neuroscientific and clinical applications. PMID:23355392

  15. Nitinol-based Nanotubular and Nanowell Coatings for the Modulation of Human Vascular Cell Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Phin Peng

    Current approaches to reducing restenosis do not balance the reduction of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with the increase in the healing of the endothelium. Here, I present my study on the synthesis and characterization of a nanotubular coating on Nitinol substrates. I found that the coating demonstrated 'pro-healing' properties by increasing primary human aortic endothelial cell spreading, migration and collagen and elastin production. Certain cellular functions such as collagen and elastin production were also found to be affected by changes in nanotube diameter. The coating also reduced the proliferation and mRNA expression of collagen I and MMP2 for primary human aortic smooth muscle cells. I will also demonstrate the synthesis of a nanowell coating on Nitinol stents as well as an additional poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) coating on top of the nanowells that has the potential for controlling drug release. These findings demonstrate the potential for the coatings to aid in the prevention of restenosis and sets up future explorations of ex vivo and in vivo studies.

  16. Dark chocolate consumption improves leukocyte adhesion factors and vascular function in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Esser, Diederik; Mars, Monica; Oosterink, Els; Stalmach, Angelique; Müller, Michael; Afman, Lydia A

    2014-03-01

    Flavanol-enriched chocolate consumption increases endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Most research so far has focused on flow-mediated dilation (FMD) only; the effects on other factors relevant to endothelial health, such as inflammation and leukocyte adhesion, have hardly been addressed. We investigated whether consumption of regular dark chocolate also affects other markers of endothelial health, and whether chocolate enrichment with flavanols has additional benefits. In a randomized double-blind crossover study, the effects of acute and of 4 wk daily consumption of high flavanol chocolate (HFC) and normal flavanol chocolate (NFC) on FMD, augmentation index (AIX), leukocyte count, plasma cytokines, and leukocyte cell surface molecules in overweight men (age 45-70 yr) were investigated. Sensory profiles and motivation scores to eat chocolate were also collected. Findings showed that a 4 wk chocolate intake increased FMD by 1%, which was paralleled by a decreased AIX of 1%, decreased leukocyte cell count, decreased plasma sICAM1 and sICAM3, and decreased leukocyte adhesion marker expression (P<0.05 for time effect), with no difference between HFC and NFC consumption. Flavanol enrichment did affect taste and negatively affected motivation to consume chocolate. This study provides new insights on how chocolate affects endothelial health by demonstrating that chocolate consumption, besides improving vascular function, also lowers the adherence capacity of leukocytes in the circulation. PMID:24302679

  17. Synergistic Effects of Matrix Nanotopography and Stiffness on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Chaterji, Somali; Kim, Peter; Choe, Seung H.; Tsui, Jonathan H.; Lam, Christoffer H.; Ho, Derek S.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) retain the ability to undergo modulation in their phenotypic continuum, ranging from a mature contractile state to a proliferative, secretory state. vSMC differentiation is modulated by a complex array of microenvironmental cues, which include the biochemical milieu of the cells and the architecture and stiffness of the extracellular matrix. In this study, we demonstrate that by using UV-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) to engineer a polyurethane substratum of defined nanotopography and stiffness, we can facilitate the differentiation of cultured vSMCs, reduce their inflammatory signature, and potentially promote the optimal functioning of the vSMC contractile and cytoskeletal machinery. Specifically, we found that the combination of medial tissue-like stiffness (11 MPa) and anisotropic nanotopography (ridge width_groove width_ridge height of 800_800_600 nm) resulted in significant upregulation of calponin, desmin, and smoothelin, in addition to the downregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, tissue factor, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Further, our results allude to the mechanistic role of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and caveolin-1 in altered cellular mechanotransduction pathways via differential matrix nanotopography and stiffness. Notably, the nanopatterning of the stiffer substrata (1.1 GPa) resulted in the significant upregulation of RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2. This indicates that nanopatterning an 800_800_600 nm pattern on a stiff substratum may trigger the mechanical plasticity of vSMCs resulting in a hypercontractile vSMC phenotype, as observed in diabetes or hypertension. Given that matrix stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that CFL can create different matrix nanotopographic patterns with high pattern fidelity, we are poised to create a combinatorial library of arterial test beds, whether they are healthy, diseased, injured, or aged. Such

  18. Synergistic effects of matrix nanotopography and stiffness on vascular smooth muscle cell function.

    PubMed

    Chaterji, Somali; Kim, Peter; Choe, Seung H; Tsui, Jonathan H; Lam, Christoffer H; Ho, Derek S; Baker, Aaron B; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) retain the ability to undergo modulation in their phenotypic continuum, ranging from a mature contractile state to a proliferative, secretory state. vSMC differentiation is modulated by a complex array of microenvironmental cues, which include the biochemical milieu of the cells and the architecture and stiffness of the extracellular matrix. In this study, we demonstrate that by using UV-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) to engineer a polyurethane substratum of defined nanotopography and stiffness, we can facilitate the differentiation of cultured vSMCs, reduce their inflammatory signature, and potentially promote the optimal functioning of the vSMC contractile and cytoskeletal machinery. Specifically, we found that the combination of medial tissue-like stiffness (11 MPa) and anisotropic nanotopography (ridge width_groove width_ridge height of 800_800_600 nm) resulted in significant upregulation of calponin, desmin, and smoothelin, in addition to the downregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, tissue factor, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Further, our results allude to the mechanistic role of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and caveolin-1 in altered cellular mechanotransduction pathways via differential matrix nanotopography and stiffness. Notably, the nanopatterning of the stiffer substrata (1.1 GPa) resulted in the significant upregulation of RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2. This indicates that nanopatterning an 800_800_600 nm pattern on a stiff substratum may trigger the mechanical plasticity of vSMCs resulting in a hypercontractile vSMC phenotype, as observed in diabetes or hypertension. Given that matrix stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that CFL can create different matrix nanotopographic patterns with high pattern fidelity, we are poised to create a combinatorial library of arterial test beds, whether they are healthy, diseased, injured, or aged. Such

  19. Olive oil- and fish oil-enriched diets modify plasma lipids and susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification in free-living male patients with peripheral vascular disease: the Spanish Nutrition Study.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Tortosa, C; López-Pedrosa, J M; Suarez, A; Ros, E; Mataix, J; Gil, A

    1999-07-01

    The present study describes a clinical trial in which Spanish patients suffering from peripheral vascular disease (Fontaine stage II) were given specific lipid supplements. Designed as a longitudinal intervention study, patients were provided with olive oil for 3 months, followed by a 3 month wash-out period, then supplemented with a combination of fish oil and olive oil for the final 3 months. Changes in plasma and lipoprotein fatty acid composition and susceptibility of LDL to in vitro oxidation were examined. Furthermore, lipid-supplement-induced changes in LDL properties were measured as relative electrophoretic mobility and macrophage uptake. In addition, thirteen patients not provided with olive oil and fish oil were included as a control group and twenty healthy age-matched individuals were used as a reference group. A complete clinical study and a nutritional survey concerning food habits and lifestyle were performed every 3 months. Yao indices and claudicometry did not change significantly with dietary intervention although changes in plasma lipid composition suggested an improvement in the condition of the patients. The intake of the fish-oil supplement resulted in significantly increased plasma levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) in comparison with baseline concentrations, olive-oil and control groups. Fish-oil consumption significantly decreased plasma triacylglycerol levels compared with the olive-oil period, control and reference groups. The susceptibility of LDL to Cu-mediated oxidation was lower in the patients consuming olive oil and the fish-oil supplement than in the control group, and the uptake of LDL by macrophages was significantly lower in the group supplemented with fish oil. In conclusion, consumption of olive oil together with a dietary supplement of fish oil may be useful in the nutritional management of patients suffering from peripheral vascular disease in terms of increasing plasma n-3 long

  20. A Functional Role for VEGFR1 Expressed in Peripheral Sensory Neurons in Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Deepitha; Gangadharan, Vijayan; Michalski, Christoph W; Kurejova, Martina; Stösser, Sebastian; Srivastava, Kshitij; Schweizerhof, Matthias; Waltenberger, Johannes; Ferrara, Napoleone; Heppenstall, Paul; Shibuya, Masabumi; Augustin, Hellmut G; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-06-01

    Cancer pain is a debilitating disorder and a primary determinant of the poor quality of life. Here, we report a non-vascular role for ligands of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) family in cancer pain. Tumor-derived VEGF-A, PLGF-2, and VEGF-B augment pain sensitivity through selective activation of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) expressed in sensory neurons in human cancer and mouse models. Sensory-neuron-specific genetic deletion/silencing or local or systemic blockade of VEGFR1 prevented tumor-induced nerve remodeling and attenuated cancer pain in diverse mouse models in vivo. These findings identify a therapeutic potential for VEGFR1-modifying drugs in cancer pain and suggest a palliative effect for VEGF/VEGFR1-targeting anti-angiogenic tumor therapies.

  1. A Functional Role for VEGFR1 Expressed in Peripheral Sensory Neurons in Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Deepitha; Gangadharan, Vijayan; Michalski, Christoph W.; Kurejova, Martina; Stösser, Sebastian; Srivastava, Kshitij; Schweizerhof, Matthias; Waltenberger, Johannes; Ferrara, Napoleone; Heppenstall, Paul; Shibuya, Masabumi; Augustin, Hellmut G.; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer pain is a debilitating disorder and a primary determinant of the poor quality of life. Here, we report a non-vascular role for ligands of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) family in cancer pain. Tumor-derived VEGF-A, PLGF-2, and VEGF-B augment pain sensitivity through selective activation of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) expressed in sensory neurons in human cancer and mouse models. Sensory-neuron-specific genetic deletion/silencing or local or systemic blockade of VEGFR1 prevented tumor-induced nerve remodeling and attenuated cancer pain in diverse mouse models in vivo. These findings identify a therapeutic potential for VEGFR1-modifying drugs in cancer pain and suggest a palliative effect for VEGF/VEGFR1-targeting anti-angiogenic tumor therapies. PMID:26058077

  2. Differential Effects of Hormone Therapy on Serotonin, Vascular Function and Mood in the KEEPS

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Limor; Hunter, Larry; Dowling, N. Maritza; Wharton, Whitney; Gleason, Carey; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Anderson, Layne; Asthana, Sanjay; Miller, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Background Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is modulated by sex steroid hormones and affects vascular function and mood. In the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Cognitive and Affective Ancillary Study (KEEPS-Cog), women randomized to oral conjugated equine estrogens (oCEE) showed greater benefit on affective mood states than women randomized to transdermal 17β-estradiol (tE2) or placebo (PL). This study examined the effect of these treatments on the platelet content of 5-HT as a surrogate measure of 5-HT synthesis and uptake in the brain. Methods The following were measured in a subset (n = 79) of women enrolled in KEEPS-Cog: 5-HT by ELISA, carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT) by ultrasound, endothelial function by reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and self-reported symptoms of affective mood states by the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire. Results Mean platelet content of 5-HT increased by 107.0%, 84.5% and 39.8%, in tE2, oCEE and PL groups, respectively. Platelet 5-HT positively correlated with estrone in the oCEE group and with 17β- estradiol in the tE2 group. Platelet 5-HT showed a positive association with RHI, but not CIMT, in the PL and oCEE groups. Reduction in mood scores for depression-dejection and anger-hostility associated with elevations in platelet 5-HT only in the oCEE group (r = −0.5, p = 0.02). Conclusions Effects of oCEE compared to tE2 on RHI and mood may be related to mechanisms involving platelet, and perhaps neuronal, uptake and release of 5-HT and reflect conversion of estrone to bioavailable 17β- estradiol in platelets and the brain. PMID:26652904

  3. The influence of whole body vibration on the central and peripheral cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Dan; Yoganathan, Priya; Goss-Sampson, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological changes of the cardiovascular system in response to whole body vibration during quiet standing and identify whether there is a greater influence on the central or peripheral cardiovascular system. Twenty healthy participants (12 male and 8 female) were assessed over two separate testing sessions for changes in peripheral skin temperature, peripheral venous function, blood flow velocity in the dorsalis pedis artery, blood pressure and heart rate during quiet standing with 40 Hz 1·9 mm synchronous vibration. Vibration exposure totalled 5 min in 1 min increments with 5 min recovery during each testing session. There were no significant changes in heart rate, blood pressure or peripheral skin temperature. Significant results were obtained for blood flow velocity with increases from 0·5 + 0·2 cm·s(-1) at baseline to 1 + 0·2 cm·s(-1) during vibration, returning to baseline levels during the recovery period. Due to the absence of changes in heart rate, blood pressure or lower leg and foot temperature, the change in blood flow velocity can be attributed to changes in peripheral vascular function. The results suggest a high level of sensitivity of the peripheral vascular system to vibration exposure; therefore, further studies should be completed to ascertain the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of vibration on the peripheral vascular system.

  4. Study of the Structure, Oxygen-Transporting Functions, and Ionic Composition of Erythrocytes at Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Revin, Viktor V.; Gromova, Natalia V.; Revina, Elvira S.; Mel'nikova, Natalya A.; Balykova, Larisa A.; Solomadin, Ilia N.; Tychkov, Alexander Yu.; Revina, Nadezhda V.; Gromova, Oksana Yu.; Anashkina, Irina V.; Yakushkin, Viktor A.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper explores the role of erythrocytes in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. The state of erythrocytes, their ionic composition and structure, and properties of erythrocytes hemoglobin were studied by using laser interference microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, and capillary electrophoresis. In patients suffering from vascular disorders we identified statistically significant changes in the shape of erythrocytes, their ionic composition, and redistribution of hemoglobin throughout cells. PMID:26601112

  5. Local administration of icariin contributes to peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Niu, Su-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Zhen-Wei; Deng, Jiu-Xu; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na; Kou, Yu-Hui; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that systemic administration of the traditional Chinese medicine Epimedium extract promotes peripheral nerve regeneration. Here, we sought to explore the therapeutic effects of local administration of icariin, a major component of Epimedium extract, on peripheral nerve regeneration. A poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) biological conduit sleeve was used to bridge a 5 mm right sciatic nerve defect in rats, and physiological saline, nerve growth factor, icariin suspension, or nerve growth factor-releasing microsphere suspension was injected into the defect. Twelve weeks later, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the number of myelinated fibers were notably greater in the rats treated with icariin suspension or nerve growth factor-releasing microspheres than those that had received nerve growth factor or physiological saline. The effects of icariin suspension were similar to those of nerve growth factor-releasing microspheres. These data suggest that icariin acts as a nerve growth factor-releasing agent, and indicate that local application of icariin after spinal injury can promote peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25788925

  6. α4-Integrin Antibody Treatment Blocks Monocyte/Macrophage Traffic to, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression in, and Pathology of the Dorsal Root Ganglia in an SIV Macaque Model of HIV-Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lakritz, Jessica R; Thibault, Derek M; Robinson, Jake A; Campbell, Jennifer H; Miller, Andrew D; Williams, Kenneth C; Burdo, Tricia H

    2016-07-01

    Traffic of activated monocytes into the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is critical for pathology in HIV peripheral neuropathy. We have shown that accumulation of recently recruited (bromodeoxyuridine(+) MAC387(+)) monocytes is associated with severe DRG pathology and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in SIV-infected macaques. Herein, we blocked leukocyte traffic by treating animals with natalizumab, which binds to α4-integrins. SIV-infected CD8-depleted macaques treated with natalizumab either early (the day of infection) or late (28 days after infection) were compared with untreated SIV-infected animals sacrificed at similar times. Histopathology showed diminished DRG pathology with natalizumab treatment, including decreased inflammation, neuronophagia, and Nageotte nodules. Natalizumab treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of bromodeoxyuridine(+) (early), MAC387(+) (late), CD68(+) (early and late), and SIVp28(+) (late) macrophages in DRG tissues. The number of CD3(+) T lymphocytes in DRGs was not affected by natalizumab treatment. Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, an adhesion molecule that mediates leukocyte traffic, was diminished in DRGs of all natalizumab-treated animals. These data show that blocking monocyte, but not T lymphocyte, traffic to the DRG results in decreased inflammation and pathology, supporting a role for monocyte traffic and activation in HIV peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27157989

  7. ACCF/ACR/AIUM/ASE/ASN/ICAVL/SCAI/SCCT/SIR/SVM/SVS 2012 Appropriate Use Criteria for Peripheral Vascular Ultrasound and Physiological Testing Part I: Arterial Ultrasound and Physiological Testing

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, Emile R.; Gornik, Heather L.; Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Misra, Sanjay; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Zierler, R. Eugene; Wolk, Michael J.; Mohler, Emile R.; Dixon, Bradley S.; Driver, Vickie R.; Fail, Peter S.; Fazel, Reza; Findeiss, Laura; Fuchs, Richard; Gillespie, John; Hughes, Joseph P.; Jaigobin, Cheryl; Leers, Steven A.; Moore, Colleen; Pellerito, John S.; Robbin, Michelle L.; Shugart, Rita E.; Weaver, Fred A.; White, Christopher J.; Yevzlin, Alexander S.; Wolk, Michael J.; Bailey, Steven R.; Douglas, Pamela S.; Hendel, Robert C.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Min, James K.; Patel, Manesh R.; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F.; Allen, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), in partnership with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where noninvasive vascular testing (ultrasound and physiological testing) is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of the original appropriate use criteria (AUC). The 159 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). A total of 255 indications (with the inclusion of surveillance timeframes) were rated. One hundred and seventeen indications were rated as appropriate, 84 were rated as uncertain, and 54 were rated as inappropriate. The AUC for peripheral vascular disease have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:22694840

  8. ACCF/ACR/AIUM/ASE/ASN/ICAVL/SCAI/SCCT/SIR/SVM/SVS 2012 appropriate use criteria for peripheral vascular ultrasound and physiological testing part I: Arterial ultrasound and physiological testing

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, Emile R.; Gornik, Heather L.; Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Misra, Sanjay; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Zierler, R. Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), in partnership with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where noninvasive vascular testing (ultrasound and physiological testing) is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of the original appropriate use criteria (AUC). The 159 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). A total of 255 indications (with the inclusion of surveillance timeframes) were rated. One hundred and seventeen indications were rated as appropriate, 84 were rated as uncertain, and 54 were rated as inappropriate. The AUC for peripheral vascular disease have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:22694919

  9. Atomic resolution view into the structure–function relationships of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    SciTech Connect

    Ruskamo, Salla; Yadav, Ravi P.; Sharma, Satyan; Lehtimäki, Mari; Laulumaa, Saara; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S.; Juffer, André H.; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2 has been refined at 0.93 Å resolution. In combination with functional experiments in vitro, in vivo and in silico, the fine details of the structure–function relationships in P2 are emerging. P2 is a fatty acid-binding protein expressed in vertebrate peripheral nerve myelin, where it may function in bilayer stacking and lipid transport. P2 binds to phospholipid membranes through its positively charged surface and a hydrophobic tip, and accommodates fatty acids inside its barrel structure. The structure of human P2 refined at the ultrahigh resolution of 0.93 Å allows detailed structural analyses, including the full organization of an internal hydrogen-bonding network. The orientation of the bound fatty-acid carboxyl group is linked to the protonation states of two coordinating arginine residues. An anion-binding site in the portal region is suggested to be relevant for membrane interactions and conformational changes. When bound to membrane multilayers, P2 has a preferred orientation and is stabilized, and the repeat distance indicates a single layer of P2 between membranes. Simulations show the formation of a double bilayer in the presence of P2, and in cultured cells wild-type P2 induces membrane-domain formation. Here, the most accurate structural and functional view to date on P2, a major component of peripheral nerve myelin, is presented, showing how it can interact with two membranes simultaneously while going through conformational changes at its portal region enabling ligand transfer.

  10. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Takayuki; Murata, Kazuko; Murata, Ryo; Sun, Shu-lan; Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi; Moriya, Kunihiko; Kasai, Noriyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs{sup flox/flox};mb1{sup cre/+}:Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes.

  11. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Drew L; Bergen, Jamie M; Johnson, Russell N; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M; Horner, Philip J; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-03-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics.

  12. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Drew L.; Bergen, Jamie M.; Johnson, Russell N.; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M.; Horner, Philip J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2016-01-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics. PMID:26888285

  13. Treadmill exercise induced functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair is associated with increased levels of neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Sung; Höke, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Benefits of exercise on nerve regeneration and functional recovery have been reported in both central and peripheral nervous system disease models. However, underlying molecular mechanisms of enhanced regeneration and improved functional outcomes are less understood. We used a peripheral nerve regeneration model that has a good correlation between functional outcomes and number of motor axons that regenerate to evaluate the impact of treadmill exercise. In this model, the median nerve was transected and repaired while the ulnar nerve was transected and prevented from regeneration. Daily treadmill exercise resulted in faster recovery of the forelimb grip function as evaluated by grip power and inverted holding test. Daily exercise also resulted in better regeneration as evaluated by recovery of compound motor action potentials, higher number of axons in the median nerve and larger myofiber size in target muscles. Furthermore, these observations correlated with higher levels of neurotrophic factors, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), in serum, nerve and muscle suggesting that increase in muscle derived neurotrophic factors may be responsible for improved regeneration. PMID:24618564

  14. Neurophysiological assessment of auditory, peripheral nerve, somatosensory, and visual system functions after developmental exposure to ethanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Boyes, William K; Degn, Laura L; Martin, Sheppard A; Lyke, Danielle F; Hamm, Charles W; Herr, David W

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-blended gasoline entered the market in response to demand for domestic renewable energy sources, and may result in increased inhalation of ethanol vapors in combination with other volatile gasoline constituents. It is important to understand potential risks of inhalation of ethanol vapors by themselves, and also as a baseline for evaluating the risks of ethanol combined with a complex mixture of hydrocarbon vapors. Because sensory dysfunction has been reported after developmental exposure to ethanol, we evaluated the effects of developmental exposure to ethanol vapors on neurophysiological measures of sensory function as a component of a larger project evaluating developmental ethanol toxicity. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to target concentrations 0, 5000, 10,000, or 21,000 ppm ethanol vapors for 6.5h/day over GD9-GD20. Sensory evaluations of male offspring began between PND106 and PND128. Peripheral nerve function (compound action potentials, nerve conduction velocity (NCV)), somatosensory (cortical and cerebellar evoked potentials), auditory (brainstem auditory evoked responses), and visual evoked responses were assessed. Visual function assessment included pattern elicited visual evoked potentials (VEPs), VEP contrast sensitivity, and electroretinograms recorded from dark-adapted (scotopic), light-adapted (photopic) flashes, and UV flicker and green flicker. No consistent concentration-related changes were observed for any of the physiological measures. The results show that gestational exposure to ethanol vapor did not result in detectable changes in peripheral nerve, somatosensory, auditory, or visual function when the offspring were assessed as adults.

  15. Neurophysiological assessment of auditory, peripheral nerve, somatosensory, and visual system functions after developmental exposure to ethanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Boyes, William K; Degn, Laura L; Martin, Sheppard A; Lyke, Danielle F; Hamm, Charles W; Herr, David W

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-blended gasoline entered the market in response to demand for domestic renewable energy sources, and may result in increased inhalation of ethanol vapors in combination with other volatile gasoline constituents. It is important to understand potential risks of inhalation of ethanol vapors by themselves, and also as a baseline for evaluating the risks of ethanol combined with a complex mixture of hydrocarbon vapors. Because sensory dysfunction has been reported after developmental exposure to ethanol, we evaluated the effects of developmental exposure to ethanol vapors on neurophysiological measures of sensory function as a component of a larger project evaluating developmental ethanol toxicity. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to target concentrations 0, 5000, 10,000, or 21,000 ppm ethanol vapors for 6.5h/day over GD9-GD20. Sensory evaluations of male offspring began between PND106 and PND128. Peripheral nerve function (compound action potentials, nerve conduction velocity (NCV)), somatosensory (cortical and cerebellar evoked potentials), auditory (brainstem auditory evoked responses), and visual evoked responses were assessed. Visual function assessment included pattern elicited visual evoked potentials (VEPs), VEP contrast sensitivity, and electroretinograms recorded from dark-adapted (scotopic), light-adapted (photopic) flashes, and UV flicker and green flicker. No consistent concentration-related changes were observed for any of the physiological measures. The results show that gestational exposure to ethanol vapor did not result in detectable changes in peripheral nerve, somatosensory, auditory, or visual function when the offspring were assessed as adults. PMID:24607749

  16. Altered Functional Connectivity in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment—A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao; Sun, Yawen; Chen, Xue; Xu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that people with subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (sVCI) have structural and functional abnormalities in the frontal lobe and subcortical brain sites. In this study, we used seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis and voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) techniques to investigate the alteration of rsFC in patients with sVCI. rsFC and structural magnetic resonance images were acquired for 51 patients with subcortical cerebrovascular disease. All patients were subdivided based on cognitive status into 29 with sVCI and 22 controls; patient characteristics were matched. rsFC of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and VMHC were calculated separately, and rsFC of the PCC and VMHC between the two groups were compared. The regions showing abnormal rsFC of the PCC or VMHC in sVCI patients were adopted as regions of interest for correlation analyses. Our results are as follows: The patients with sVCI exhibited increases in rsFC in the left middle temporal lobe, right inferior temporal lobe and left superior frontal gyrus, and significant decreases in rsFC of the left thalamus with the PCC. sVCI patients showed a significant deficit in VMHC between the bilateral lingual gyrus, putamen, and precentral gyrus. Additionally, the z-memory score was significantly positively associated with connectivity between the left thalamus and the PCC (r = 0.41, p = 0.03, uncorrected) in the sVCI group. Our findings suggest that the frontal lobe and subcortical brain sites play an important role in the pathogenesis of sVCI. Furthermore, rsFC between the left thalamus and the PCC might indicate the severity of sVCI. PMID:26376180

  17. [INTERRELATION BETWEEN THE PREOPERATIVE MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PERIPHERAL BLOOD AND THE QUALITY OF ENGRAFTMENT OF VASCULARIZED ADIPO-FASCIO-CUTANEOUS FLAPS IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Shchudlo, N A; Shchudlo, M M; Sbrodova, L I

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the interrelation between the preoperative blood counts and the quality of vascularized adipo-fascio-cutaneous flap survival. In 10 adult male Wistar rats, a flap with the area of 18 cm2 was formed on the basis of superficial inferior epigastric artery; after a 90 min ischemic period it was replanted. 12 days after operation the quality of flap survival was assessed with computer-assisted planimetry. It was found that the combination of preoperative leukocyte, thrombocyte, neutrophil and eosinophil counts as well as reactive lymphocyte counts close to the maximal reference values increased the probability of epidermolysis. PMID:27487668

  18. [INTERRELATION BETWEEN THE PREOPERATIVE MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PERIPHERAL BLOOD AND THE QUALITY OF ENGRAFTMENT OF VASCULARIZED ADIPO-FASCIO-CUTANEOUS FLAPS IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Shchudlo, N A; Shchudlo, M M; Sbrodova, L I

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the interrelation between the preoperative blood counts and the quality of vascularized adipo-fascio-cutaneous flap survival. In 10 adult male Wistar rats, a flap with the area of 18 cm2 was formed on the basis of superficial inferior epigastric artery; after a 90 min ischemic period it was replanted. 12 days after operation the quality of flap survival was assessed with computer-assisted planimetry. It was found that the combination of preoperative leukocyte, thrombocyte, neutrophil and eosinophil counts as well as reactive lymphocyte counts close to the maximal reference values increased the probability of epidermolysis.

  19. Prevention of Hippocampal Neuronal Damage and Cognitive Function Deficits in Vascular Dementia by Dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Bin; Lu, Kaili; Deng, Jiangshan; Zhao, Fei; Zhao, Bing-Qiao; Zhao, Yuwu

    2016-07-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors and a widely used component of cough medicine. Recently, its indication has been extended experimentally to a wide range of disorders including inflammation-mediated central nervous system disorders such as Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we investigate whether DM treatment has protective effects on the hippocampal neuron damage induced by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion [2VO]), an animal model of vascular dementia (VaD). Sprague-Dawley (SD) (10 weeks of age) rats were subjected to the 2VO, and DM was injected intraperitoneally once per day for 37 days. Neuron death, glial activation, and cognitive function were assessed at 37 days after 2VO (0.2 mg/kg, i.p., "DM-0.2" and 2 mg/kg, i.p., "DM-2"). DM-2 treatment provided protection against neuronal death and glial activation in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and reduced cognitive impairment induced by 2VO in rats. The study also demonstrates that activation of the Nrf2-HO-1 pathway and upregulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) play important roles in these effects. These results suggest that DM is effective in treating VaD and protecting against oxidative stress, which is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of VaD. Therefore, the present study suggests that DM treatment may represent a new and promising protective strategy for treating VaD. PMID:26887382

  20. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  1. Changes in vascular plant functional types drive carbon cycling in peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeh, Lilli; Bragazza, Luca; Erhagen, Björn; Limpens, Juul; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Northern peatlands store a large organic carbon (C) pool that is highly exposed to future environmental changes with consequent risk of releasing enormous amounts of C. Biotic changes in plant community structure and species abundance might have an even stronger impact on soil organic C dynamics in peatlands than the direct effects of abiotic changes. Therefore, a sound understanding of the impact of vegetation dynamics on C cycling will help to better predict the response of peatlands to environmental changes. Here, we aimed to assess the role of plant functional types (PFTs) in affecting peat decomposition in relation to climate warming. To this aim, we selected two peatlands at different altitude (i.e. 1300 and 1700 m asl) on the south-eastern Alps of Italy. The two sites represent a contrast in temperature, overall vascular plant biomass and relative ericoids abundance, with the highest biomass and ericoids occurrence at the low latitude. Within the sites we selected 20 plots of similar microtopographical position and general vegetation type (hummocks). All plots contained both graminoids and ericoids and had a 100% cover of Sphagnum mosses. The plots were subjected to four treatments (control, and three clipping treatments) in which we selectively removed aboveground biomass of ericoids, graminoids or both to explore the contribution of the different PFTs for soil respiration (n=5) and peat chemistry. Peat chemical composition was determined by the analysis of C and N and their stable isotopes in association with pyrolysis GC/MS. Soil respiration was measured after clipping with a Licor system. Preliminary findings suggest that peat decomposition pathway and rate depend on plant species composition and particularly on differences in root activity between PFTs. Finally, this study underlines the importance of biotic drivers to predict the effects of future environmental changes on peatland C cycling.

  2. IL-33 and IL-4 impair barrier functions of human vascular endothelium via different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chalubinski, Maciej; Wojdan, Katarzyna; Luczak, Emilia; Gorzelak, Paulina; Borowiec, Maciej; Gajewski, Adrian; Rudnicka, Karolina; Chmiela, Magdalena; Broncel, Marlena

    2015-10-01

    The vascular endothelium forms a barrier that controls flow of solutes and proteins and the entry of leukocytes into tissue. Injured tissue releases IL-33, which then alarms the immune system and attracts Th2 cells, thus increasing local concentration of IL-4. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of IL-33 and IL-4 on barrier functions of the human endothelium, expression of tight and adherent junction proteins, apoptosis and adhesive molecule surface expression in human endothelium in order to describe the mechanism of this effect. IL-33 and IL-4 decreased endothelial integrity and increased permeability. When added together, both cytokines lowered the endothelial integrity twice as much as used alone. This effect was accompanied by the down-regulation of occludin and VE-cadherin mRNA expression. Additionally, IL-4, but not IL-33, induced cell apoptosis. Both IL-33 and IL-4 showed the additive potency to down-regulate VE-cadherin mRNA expression. IL-33, unlike IL-4, increased the surface expression of ICAM-1, but not PECAM-1 in endothelial cells. Our results indicate that IL-33 may reversibly destabilize the endothelial barrier, thus accelerating the supply with immunomodulators and assisting leukocytes to reach wounded tissue. However, extended and less-controlled down-regulation of endothelial barrier, which may be a consequence of IL-33-initiated, but in fact IL-4-induced apoptosis of endothelial cells, may be deleterious and may eventually lead to the aggravation of inflammatory processes and the prolongation of tissue dysfunction. PMID:26231284

  3. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  4. In vitro modeling of endothelial interaction with macrophages and pericytes demonstrates Notch signaling function in the vascular microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Ian W; Du, Jing; Cong, Zhuangzhuang; Cho, Bennet S; Klein, Alyssa M; Dieck, Chelsea L; Chaudhri, Reyhaan A; Cuervo, Henar; Herts, James H; Kitajewski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by complex interactions between endothelial cells and support cells of the vascular microenvironment, such as tissue myeloid cells and vascular mural cells. Multicellular interactions during angiogenesis are difficult to study in animals and challenging in a reductive setting. We incorporated stromal cells into an established bead-based capillary sprouting assay to develop assays that faithfully reproduce major steps of vessel sprouting and maturation. We observed that macrophages enhance angiogenesis, increasing the number and length of endothelial sprouts, a property we have dubbed "angiotrophism." We found that polarizing macrophages toward a pro-inflammatory profile further increased their angiotrophic stimulation of vessel sprouting, and this increase was dependent on macrophage Notch signaling. To study endothelial/pericyte interactions, we added vascular pericytes directly to the bead-bound endothelial monolayer. These pericytes formed close associations with the endothelial sprouts, causing increased sprout number and vessel caliber. We found that Jagged1 expression and Notch signaling are essential for the growth of both endothelial cells and pericytes and may function in their interaction. We observed that combining endothelial cells with both macrophages and pericytes in the same sprouting assay has multiplicative effects on sprouting. These results significantly improve bead-capillary sprouting assays and provide an enhanced method for modeling interactions between the endothelium and the vascular microenvironment. Achieving this in a reductive in vitro setting represents a significant step toward a better understanding of the cellular elements that contribute to the formation of mature vasculature.

  5. Tertiary structure and function of an RNA motif required for plant vascular entry to initiate systemic trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xuehua; Tao, Xiaorong; Stombaugh, Jesse; Leontis, Neocles; Ding, Biao

    2007-01-01

    Vascular entry is a decisive step for the initiation of long-distance movement of infectious and endogenous RNAs, silencing signals and developmental/defense signals in plants. However, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. We used Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) as a model to investigate the direct role of the RNA itself in vascular entry. We report here the identification of an RNA motif that is required for PSTVd to traffic from nonvascular into the vascular tissue phloem to initiate systemic infection. This motif consists of nucleotides U/C that form a water-inserted cis Watson–Crick/Watson–Crick base pair flanked by short helices that comprise canonical Watson–Crick/Watson–Crick base pairs. This tertiary structural model was inferred by comparison with X-ray crystal structures of similar motifs in rRNAs and is supported by combined mutagenesis and covariation analyses. Hydration pattern analysis suggests that water insertion induces a widened minor groove conducive to protein and/or RNA interactions. Our model and approaches have broad implications to investigate the RNA structural motifs in other RNAs for vascular entry and to study the basic principles of RNA structure–function relationships. PMID:17660743

  6. You're Only as Old as Your Arteries: Translational Strategies for Preserving Vascular Endothelial Function with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; LaRocca, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction develops with age and increases the risk of age-associated vascular disorders. Nitric oxide insufficiency, oxidative stress, and chronic low-grade inflammation, induced by upregulation of adverse cellular signaling processes and imbalances in stress resistance pathways, mediate endothelial dysfunction with aging. Healthy lifestyle behaviors preserve endothelial function with aging by inhibiting these mechanisms, and novel nutraceutical compounds that favorably modulate these pathways hold promise as a complementary approach for preserving endothelial health. PMID:24985329

  7. [Vascular dementia].

    PubMed

    Peters, N; Dichgans, M

    2010-10-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) constitutes the second most frequent cause of dementia following Alzheimer's disease (AD). In contrast to AD, VaD encompasses a variety of conditions and dementia mechanisms including multiple and strategic infarcts, widespread white matter lesions and hemorrhages. The diagnosis of VaD is based on the patient history, the clinical evaluation and neuroimaging. Treatment of VaD should account for the underlying vascular condition and is directed towards the control of vascular risk factors and stroke prevention. The need for early diagnosis and preventive treatment has promoted the concept of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Harmonization standards for the description and study of VCI have recently been published. A common and distinct subtype of VaD is subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) which is related to cerebral small vessel disease. SIVD is clinically characterized by impairment of executive functions and processing speed with relatively preserved memory. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic variant of SIVD, represents an important differential diagnosis and may serve as a model of SIVD.

  8. Donor-derived peripheral mononuclear cell DNA is associated with stable kidney allograft function: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Solgi, Ghasem; Mytilineos, Joannis; Gadi, Vijayakrishna; Paul, Biswajit; Pourmand, Gholamreza; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Nikbin, Behrouz; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar

    2011-01-01

    A large body of literature has documented an inconsistent relationship of peripheral donor cell chimerism with alloimmune tolerance following kidney transplantation. We revisit this association with assays capable of quantifying cellular microchimerism with 150-1500-fold greater sensitivity than previously utilized allo-antibody based flow cytometric approaches. Forty renal transplant patients, 20 with concurrent donor bone marrow infusion (DBMI) and 20 control participants without infusion were prospectively monitored for peripheral blood microchimerism using donor polymorphism-specific quantitative real-time PCR. Thirty-eight patients were evaluated for microchimerism, 19 in each group. The frequency of testing positive for (95% vs. 58%, p = 0.02) and mean concentrations of microchimerism (115 ± 66 vs. 13 ± 3 donor genomes/million recipient genomes, p = 0.007), respectively, were higher in infused patients compared with controls. Thirty-one patients maintained stable graft function; 17 in the DBMI group vs. 14 in controls. Patients with stable graft function in the DBMI group compared with control patients harbored microchimerism more frequently (94 vs. 50%, p = 0.01) and at higher concentrations (123 ± 67 vs. 11 ± 4, p = 0.007), respectively. Significant correlation between dose of infused cells and microchimerism levels was found post-transplant (p = 0.01). Using very sensitive assays, our findings demonstrate associations between the presence and quantity of microchimerism with stable graft function in infused patients.

  9. The effect of acute administration of Vitamin D on micro vascular endothelial function in Caucasians and South Asian Indians

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Alshammari, Faris; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Rodrigues, Sophia; Potnis, Pooja; Akerkar, Siddhesh; Shah, Jinal; Chung, Guyeon; Save, Rakhi

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is a modulator of the immune system. There is some limited evidence that it also increases local blood flow in response to stress. Material/Methods In the present study, we examined 20 age matched subjects; 10 whom were from India and 10 Caucasians from the United States. Subjects were administered 4000 IU of Vitamin D3 for 3 weeks at breakfast. The function of the endothelial cells was evaluated in 2 ways; first, the response to 4 minutes of vascular occlusion was measured with a laser Doppler flow meter and second, the blood flow response to local heat at 42°C for 6 minutes. Results The results of the experiments showed that, as reported previously, the endothelial function in people from India was less than their Caucasian counterparts. The blood flow response to heat was reduced after 3 weeks administration of vitamin D in both groups and the response to vascular occlusion in the Caucasian group. But there was only a 20% reduction in the blood flow response to heat in the Caucasian group and a 50% reduction in the group from India. Conclusions Thus acute doses of vitamin D may increase vascular tone and reduce blood flow to tissue during stressors. Dosages administered for a longer duration may have beneficial effects on endothelial function but this was not examined here. PMID:23917403

  10. PEDF improves cardiac function in rats with acute myocardial infarction via inhibiting vascular permeability and cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Zheng; Feng, Shou-Jie; Xu, Lei; Shi, He-Xian; Chen, Li-Li; Yuan, Guang-Da; Yan, Wei; Zhuang, Wei; Zhang, Yi-Qian; Zhang, Zhong-Ming; Dong, Hong-Yan

    2015-03-11

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a pleiotropic gene with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-angiogenic properties. However, recent reports about the effects of PEDF on cardiomyocytes are controversial, and it is not known whether and how PEDF acts to inhibit hypoxic or ischemic endothelial injury in the heart. In the present study, adult Sprague-Dawley rat models of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were surgically established. PEDF-small interfering RNA (siRNA)-lentivirus (PEDF-RNAi-LV) or PEDF-LV was delivered into the myocardium along the infarct border to knockdown or overexpress PEDF, respectively. Vascular permeability, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, myocardial infarct size and animal cardiac function were analyzed. We also evaluated PEDF's effect on the suppression of the endothelial permeability and cardiomyocyte apoptosis under hypoxia in vitro. The results indicated that PEDF significantly suppressed the vascular permeability and inhibited hypoxia-induced endothelial permeability through PPARγ-dependent tight junction (TJ) production. PEDF protected cardiomyocytes against ischemia or hypoxia-induced cell apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro via preventing the activation of caspase-3. We also found that PEDF significantly reduced myocardial infarct size and enhanced cardiac function in rats with AMI. These data suggest that PEDF could protect cardiac function from ischemic injury, at least by means of reducing vascular permeability, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and myocardial infarct size.

  11. Relevance of laser Doppler and laser speckle techniques for assessing vascular function: state of the art and future trends.

    PubMed

    Humeau-Heurtier, A; Guerreschi, E; Abraham, P; Mahé, G

    2013-03-01

    In clinical and research applications, the assessment of vascular function has become of major importance to evaluate and follow the evolution of cardiovascular pathologies, diabetes, hypertension, or foot ulcers. Therefore, the development of engineering methodologies able to monitor noninvasively blood vessel activities-such as endothelial function-is a significant and emerging challenge. Laser-based techniques have been used to respond-as much as possible-to these requirements. Among them, laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and laser Doppler imaging (LDI) were proposed a few decades ago. They provide interesting vascular information but possess drawbacks that prevent an easy use in some clinical situations. Recently, the laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique, a noninvasive camera-based tool, was commercialized and overcomes some of the LDF and LDI weaknesses. O