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Sample records for peripheral venous thrombosis

  1. Risk factors for venous thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Pan, Longfang; Zhao, Qianru; Yang, Xiangmei

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk factors associated with an increased risk of symptomatic peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC)-related venous thrombosis. Retrospective analyses identified 2313 patients who received PICCs from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2013. All 11 patients with symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis (thrombosis group) and 148 who did not have thromboses (non-thrombosis group) were selected randomly. The medical information of 159 patients (age, body mass index (BMI), diagnosis, smoking history, nutritional risk score, platelet count, leucocyte count as well as levels of D-dimer, fibrinogen, and degradation products of fibrin) were collected. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to determine the risk factors for thrombosis. Of 2313 patients, 11 (0.47%) were found to have symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis by color Doppler ultrasound. Being bedridden for a long time (odds ratio [(OR]), 17.774; P=0.0017), D-dimer >5 mg/L (36.651; 0.0025) and suffering from one comorbidity (8.39; 0.0265) or more comorbidities (13.705; 0.0083) were the major risk factors for PICC-catheter related venous thrombosis by stepwise logistic regression analysis. Among 159 patients, the prevalence of PICC-associated venous thrombosis in those with ≥1 risk factor was 10.34% (12/116), in those with ≥2 risk factors was 20.41% (10/49), and in those with >3 risk factors was 26.67% (4/15). Being bedridden >72 h, having increased levels of D-dimer (>5 mg/L) and suffering from comorbidities were independent risk factors of PICC-related venous thrombosis.

  2. Diagnosing Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, D. Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Patients often present with unexplained lower limb pain and swelling. It is important to exclude deep venous thrombosis in the diagnosis because of the threat of sudden death. Simple clinical diagnosis is unacceptable, and noninvasive tests should be used initially. Serial testing detects proximal extension of isolated calf thrombi. Multiple diagnostic modalities are employed to diagnose a new deep venous thrombosis in patients with postphlebitic syndrome. PMID:21221369

  3. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  4. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  5. CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS AND TURNER SYNDROME: A RARE REPORTED ASSOCIATION.

    PubMed

    Guler, A; Alpaydin, S; Bademkiran, F; Sirin, H; Celebisoy, N

    2015-01-01

    Turner Syndrome is the only known viable chromosomal monosomy, characterised by the complete or partial absence of an X chromosome. It's the most common chromosomal abnormality in females. Apart from the well known dysmorphic features of the syndrome, it has been associated with a number of vascular pathologies; mainly involving the cardiovascular, renovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular system. It seems striking that thromboembolism is not considered as a feature of the syndrome. Most of the thromboembolism cases are related to the arterial vascular system; except for some rare reported portal venous thrombosis cases, peripheral venous thrombosis cases and to the best of our knowledge a single case of cerebral venous thrombosis with Dandy Walker malformation and polymicrogyria. We herein report a cerebral venous thrombosis case with Turner Syndrome. With no other found underlying etiology, we want to highlight that Turner Syndrome, itself, may have a relationship not only with the cerebral arterial vascular system pathologies but also with the cerebral venous thrombosis.

  6. Deep venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22315257 . Kline JA. Pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 88. ... Instructions Deep vein thrombosis - discharge ...

  7. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Deep Vein Thrombosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ... to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein ...

  8. Venous and arterial thrombosis in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Gurbey; Vossen, Carla Y; Rotmans, Joris I; Lijfering, Willem M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Parlevliet, Karien J; Krediet, Ray T; Boeschoten, Els W; Dekker, Friedo W; Verduijn, Marion

    2011-12-01

    Whether the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis is increased in dialysis patients as compared to the general population is unknown. In addition, it is unknown which subgroups are at highest risk. Furthermore, it is unknown whether having a history of venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis prior to dialysis treatment increases mortality risk. A total of 455 dialysis patients were followed for objectively verified symptomatic thrombotic events between January 1997 and June 2009. The incidence rates in dialysis patients as compared to the general population was 5.6-fold (95% CI 3.1-8.9) increased for venous thrombosis, 11.9-fold (95% CI 9.3-14.9) increased for myocardial infarction, and 8.4-fold (95% CI 5.7-11.5) increased for ischaemic stroke. The combination of haemodialysis, lowest tertile of albumin, history of venous thrombosis, and malignancy was associated with subsequent venous thrombosis. Increased age, renal vascular disease, diabetes, high cholesterol levels, history of venous thrombosis, and history of arterial thrombosis were associated with subsequent arterial thrombosis. The all-cause mortality risk was 1.9-fold (95% CI 1.1-3.3) increased for patients with a history of venous thrombosis and 1.9-fold (95% CI 1.4-2.6) increased for patients with a history of arterial thrombosis. A potential limitation of this study was that in some risk categories associations with venous thrombosis did not reach statistical significance due to small numbers. In conclusion, dialysis patients have clearly elevated risks of venous thrombosis and arterial thrombosis and occurrence of venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis prior to the start of dialysis is associated with an increased mortality risk.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF VENOUS THROMBOSIS IN ANIMAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    SP, Grover; CE, Evans; AS, Patel; B, Modarai; P, Saha; A, Smith

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and common complications, including pulmonary embolism and post thrombotic syndrome, represent a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Experimental models of venous thrombosis have provided considerable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate thrombus formation and subsequent resolution. Here we critically appraise the ex vivo and in vivo techniques used to assess venous thrombosis in these models. Particular attention is paid to imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, micro computed tomography and high frequency ultrasound that facilitate longitudinal assessment of thrombus size and composition. PMID:26681755

  10. Stent Placement on Fresh Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schuermann, Karl

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report on the efficacy of fixing fresh venous thrombus to the venous wall by stent placement. Methods: Seven patients underwent stenting to treat acute venous thrombosis. In two patients, the hemodialysis fistula was thrombosed with the thrombus extending into the brachial veins. In three patients, the hemodialysis fistula was patent but massive swelling of the ipsilateral arm was caused by proximal venous thrombosis. Two patients presented with iliac venous thrombosis within stented pelvic veins. Stent placement was preceded by other mechanical thrombectomy methods in all cases. Results: Attachment of thrombus to the venous wall was successful in all cases treated. Acute rethrombosis did not occur. Follow-up patency in dialysis patients was 7.2 {+-} 2.1 months. One patient had rethrombosis of the dialysis graft 3 months after primary treatment. Three patients developed restenosis within a mean period of 7.7 months. One shunt remained patent for 10 months with no event of reobstruction during follow-up. In both patients with iliac stent placement, the vein remained patent over a follow-up period of 8 and 12 months respectively. Conclusion: Stenting fresh venous thrombus can achieve immediate venous patency. It may be used as an alternative approach when all other percutaneous methods fail. Frequent restenosis within stented veins limits its use to very selected cases.

  11. [Superficial venous thrombosis. A state of art].

    PubMed

    Sándor, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    For a long time superficial thrombophlebitis has been thought to be a rather benign condition. Recently, when duplex ultrasound technique is used for the diagnosis more and more often, the disease is proved to be more dangerous than anticipated. Thrombosis propagates to the deep veins in 6-44% and pulmonary embolism was observed on the patients in 1,5-33%. We can calculate venous thromboembolic complications on every fourth patient. Diagnosis is clinical, but duplex ultrasound examination is mandatory, for estimation of the thrombus extent, for exclusion of the deep venous thrombosis and for follow up. Both legs should be checked with ultrasound, because simultaneous deep venous thrombosis can develop on the contralateral limb. Two different forms can be distinguished: superficial venous thrombosis with, or without varicose veins. In cases of spontaneous, non varicous form, especially when the process is migrating or recurrent, a careful clinical examination is necessery for exclusion of malignant diseases and thrombophilia. The treatment options are summarised on the basis of recent international consensus statements. The American and German guidelines are similar. Compression and mobilisation are cornerstones of the therapy. For a short segment thrombosis non steroidal antiinflammatory drugs are effective. For longer segments low molecular-weight heparins are preferred. Information on the effect of the novel oral anticoagulants for the therapy is lacking but they may appear to be effective in the future for this indication. When thrombus is close to the sapheno-femoral or sapheno-popliteal junction crossectomy (high ligation), or low molecular-weight heparin in therapeutic doses are indicated. The term superficial thrombophlebitis should be discouraged, because inflammation and infection is not the primary pathology. It should be called correctly superficial venous thrombosis in order to avoid the unnecessary administration of antibiotics and the misconception

  12. Nonclinical aspects of venous thrombosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Struble, Evi; Harrouk, Wafa; DeFelice, Albert; Tesfamariam, Belay

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy is a hypercoagulable state which carries an excess risk of maternal venous thrombosis. Endothelial injury, alterations in blood flow and activation of the coagulation pathway are proposed to contribute to the hypercoagulability. The risk for thrombosis may be accentuated by certain drugs and device implants that directly or indirectly affect the coagulation pathway. To help ensure that these interventions do not result in adverse maternal or fetal outcomes during pregnancy, gravid experimental animals can be exposed to such treatments at various stages of gestation and over a dosage range that would identify hazards and inform risk assessment. Circulating soluble biomarkers can also be evaluated for enhancing the assessment of any increased risk of venous thrombosis during pregnancy. In addition to traditional in vivo animal testing, efforts are under way to incorporate reliable non-animal methods in the assessment of embryofetal toxicity and thrombogenic effects. This review summarizes hemostatic balance during pregnancy in animal species, embryofetal development, biomarkers of venous thrombosis, and alterations caused by drug-induced venous thrombosis.

  13. Case of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Unusual Venous Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Susheel Kumar; Pasupaleti, Bhimeswarao; Juluri, Naganarasimharaju

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a relatively rare condition when compared with vascular accidents of arterial origin representing 0.5-1% of all strokes. Unlike arterial infarcts parenchymal changes are seldom present and when present most of the times are reversible. We present a case report of 28-year-old female with thrombosis of internal cerebral veins and straight sinus and hemorrhagic infarcts in bilateral basal ganglia and bilateral thalami .The findings of bilateral symmetrical hyper intensities in basal ganglia and thalami on MRI may be due to various causes of diverse etiology and cerebral venous thrombosis remains an important cause. Early recognition and prompt anticoagulation therapy helps to reduce the mortality to a great extent. The MRI imaging features of straight sinus thrombosis and other imaging differentials are discussed. PMID:26023623

  14. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Meppiel, Elodie; Crassard, Isabelle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; de Guibert, Sophie; Terriou, Louis; Chabriat, Hugues; Socié, Gérard; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired disorder of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by hemolytic anemia, marrow failure, and a high incidence of life-threatening venous thrombosis. Cerebral venous system is the second most frequent location of thrombosis after hepatic veins. However, data about PNH-related cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are very scarce because of the rarity of both the disorders. We report a French study about PNH patients with CVT. Patients were recruited retrospectively, from the Société Française d’Hématologie (SFH) registry of 465 patients with PNH; the Lariboisière registry of 399 patients with CVT; and a direct contact with 26 French Hematology Units. We review cases reported since 1938 in the English and French language literature. We then compared patients of our series with cases from the literature, with non-PNH-related CVT cases from Lariboisière registry, and with PNH patients without CVT from SFH registry. Fifteen patients were included between 1990 and 2012. Most patients were women (12/15) and half of them presented associated hormonal venous thrombosis risk factors. Three patients had concomitant hepatic vein thrombosis. CVT was the first manifestation of PNH in 4 patients. No major difference in CVT characteristics was found compared with non-PNH-related CVT cases, except for a younger age at diagnosis in PNH patients (P < 0.001). All patients were treated with anticoagulation therapy. One death occurred in acute stage. All surviving patients were independent 1 year after. Median survival time was 9 years. Recurrent thrombosis rate was 50% at 6 years, occurring in patients that did not have bone marrow transplantation or eculizumab therapy. Cases of death were mainly related to hepatic vein thrombosis. Prognosis of CVT was good in our series. However, these patients have a poor long-term prognosis due to PNH disease by itself. PNH treatment should be proposed as soon as possible to

  15. [Deep venous thrombosis related to cranioencephalic injury].

    PubMed

    Yáñez Baña, R M; Rossi López, R E; Romero López, J; Pareja Grande, J A; González-Elipe, J

    1989-09-01

    The clinical onset of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is very variable and the causes that may lead to its development are also quite numerous. Although characteristic CT diagnostic signs have been described, in most cases only nonspecific findings are present and angiography is required to confirm the diagnosis. The prognosis is variable. Classically, the mortality is high when the deep venous system is involved. We report a male with CVT involving Galen's vein and its major tributary vessels, who had a favorable outcome with heparin therapy and drugs for cerebral edema. We discuss the etiologic factors in this patient, the characteristic neuroradiologic findings, and their evolution during the course of therapy.

  16. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    Ben Sassi, Samia; Mizouni, Habiba; Nabli, Fatma; Kallel, Lamia; Kefi, Mounir; Hentati, Fayçal

    2010-01-01

    Venous infarction in the cerebellum has been reported only rarely, probably because of the abundant venous collateral drainage in this region. Bilateral occipital infarction is a rare cause of visual loss in cerebral venous thrombosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a history of ulcerative colitis who developed acute cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness. She had bilateral cerebellar and occipital lesions related to sigmoid venous thrombosis and achieved complete recovery with anticoagulation therapy. Cerebral venous thrombosis should be considered in cases of simultaneous cerebellar and occipital vascular lesions.

  17. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Amerasekera, S S H; Jones, C M; Patel, R; Cleasby, M J

    2009-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  18. Influence of World Thrombosis Day on digital information seeking on venous thrombosis: a Google Trends study.

    PubMed

    Scheres, L J J; Lijfering, W M; Middeldorp, S; Cannegieter, S C

    2016-12-01

    Essentials In 2014, World Thrombosis Day (WTD) was initiated to increase global awareness of thrombosis. Google Trends can be used freely to monitor digital information seeking behavior. We used Google Trends data to assess the impact of WTD on internet searches on venous thrombosis. The WTD period was associated with more searches on thrombosis compared to control periods.

  19. Deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Stephens, M B

    1997-02-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the upper extremity is a relatively uncommon but important cause of morbidity, especially in young active persons. The causes of upper extremity DVT may be categorized as catheter-related, spontaneous (effort-related) and miscellaneous (e.g., trauma, intravenous drug use). Diagnosis is based on clinical history and confirmed by either duplex ultrasonography or contrast venography. Significant controversy surrounds the optimal management of upper extremity DVT. Treatment options include conservative therapy, anticoagulation, catheter-directed thrombolysis and surgical intervention to remove intravascular clot or revise the anatomy of the costoclavicular space. Early aggressive treatment of active young patients may decrease long-term morbidity.

  20. Venous and arterial thrombosis during oral contraceptive use: risks and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tanis, Bea C; Rosendaal, Frits R

    2003-02-01

    Since the introduction of oral contraceptives, their use has been associated with an increased risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis. Pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke are serious disorders with a considerable risk of mortality. Because worldwide over 100 million women use oral contraceptives, issues of drug safety are of great importance. The risk of venous thrombosis during low-dose oral contraceptive use is three- to sixfold increased compared with that of nonusers. The association is not only attributed to the estrogen component of the pill: the risk is twice as high for desogestrel and gestodene (third generation) containing oral contraceptives as for levonorgestrel (second generation) containing oral contraceptives. The risk of venous thrombosis is highest in the first year of use and in women with genetic or acquired risk factors for thrombosis. Both venous or arterial thrombosis are unrelated to duration of use or past use of combined oral contraceptives. The risk of myocardial infarction and stroke during low-dose oral contraceptive use is two- to fivefold increased relative to that of nonusers. The risk of arterial thrombosis induced by oral contraceptive use is more pronounced in smokers and women with hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. All types of thrombosis have strongly age-dependent incidences, and therefore in absolute figures the risks and effects of risk factors increase with age. The lowering of the estrogen dose in combined oral contraceptives from 50 microg to 20-30 microg in the last decade did not clearly reduce the risk of venous thrombosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, or peripheral arterial disease. For stroke and peripheral arterial disease no difference in risk was found between second and third generation oral contraceptives. For myocardial infarction study results are conflicting, and a small benefit of third- over second-generation oral contraceptives cannot be ruled out. However, this is

  1. Occult pulmonary embolism: a common occurrence in deep venous thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, G.S.; Cronan, J.J.; Tupper, T.B.; Messersmith, R.N.; Denny, D.F.; Lee, C.H.

    1987-02-01

    Ventilation-perfusion scans were used in a prospective study to determine the prevalence of occult pulmonary embolus in proven deep venous thrombosis. Fifty-eight patients without symptoms of pulmonary embolism, but with venographically proven deep venous thrombosis, were subjected to chest radiographs, /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated-albumin perfusion scans, and /sup 133/Xe ventilation scans. Of the 49 patients with deep venous thrombosis proximal to the calf veins, 17 (35%) had high-probability scans. Of all 58 patients, only 12 (21%) had normal scans. When the study population was compared with a group of 430 patients described in reports of pulmonary perfusion in asymptomatic persons, a significantly higher percentage of high-probability scans was found in the study population with deep venous thrombosis. Baseline ventilation-perfusion lung scanning is valuable for patients with proven above-knee deep venous thrombosis.

  2. The risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with a history of superficial vein thrombosis and acquired venous thrombotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Roach, Rachel E J; Lijfering, Willem M; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2013-12-19

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) increases the risk of venous thrombosis fourfold to sixfold. As most individuals with SVT do not develop venous thrombosis, additional risk factors may explain the risk of developing a venous thrombosis. In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study, we assessed the risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with previous SVT and a mild thrombotic risk factor (smoking or overweight/obesity), a strong risk factor (surgery, hospitalization, plaster cast immobilization, or malignancy), or a reproductive factor in women (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, or pregnancy/puerperium). Individuals with previous SVT alone had a 5.5-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.4-6.8) increased risk of venous thrombosis. This was 9.3 (95% CI, 7.2-12.1) combined with a mild thrombotic risk factor, 31.4 (95% CI, 14.6-67.5) with a strong risk factor, and 34.9 (95% CI, 19.1-63.8) in women with a reproductive risk factor. The highest separate risk estimates were found for SVT with surgery (42.5; 95% CI, 10.2-177.6), hospitalization (49.8; 95% CI, 11.9-209.2), or oral contraception (43.0; 95% CI, 15.5-119.3 in women). In conclusion, the risk of venous thrombosis is markedly increased in individuals with previous SVT who have an acquired thrombotic risk factor.

  3. Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis Mainly Related to Iliofemoral Venous Obstruction by External Tumor Compression in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tzu-Yao; Hsu, Hui-Ching; Wen, Min-Sheng; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Hung, Yu-Hsin; Liaw, Chuang-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Background To study iliofemoral venous thrombosis related to iliofemoral venous obstruction in cancer patients. Methods In this case series study, 829 cancer patients were surveyed for iliofemoral obstruction/thrombosis within 10 years. The criteria for inclusion were: (1) presence of unilateral lower-extremity swelling; (2) computed tomography (CT) scans showing a tumor with external compression of the iliac or femoral vein, and (3) duplex ultrasound scans showing venous thrombosis or venous flow insufficiency over a femoral vein or saphenous vein. Results Sixty-three patients (8%) developed an iliofemoral venous obstruction. The presence of iliofemoral venous thrombosis was detected in 21 of these patients (33%). The rate of iliofemoral venous thrombosis was significantly higher in patients with an invasion of the inguinal region, D-dimer levels >3,000 ng/ml, gastrointestinal cancer, or invasion of the inguinal lymph nodes. However, none of our patients with iliofemoral venous thrombosis had a detection of iliofemoral venous obstruction. Improved lower-extremity swelling was reported in 84% of the patients following combination therapy involving low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and systemic therapy. Conclusion Patients with an iliofemoral venous thrombosis mainly had iliofemoral venous obstruction by external tumor compression. Combination therapy with LMWH and systemic therapy were mandatory for these patients. PMID:27990113

  4. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Silvis, Suzanne M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often than men. Although presenting symptoms are variable, headache is usually the first symptom, often in combination with focal neurologic deficits and epileptic seizures. The primary therapy for CVT consists of heparin followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 3 to 6 months. The mortality in the acute phase is 5 to 10% and a substantial proportion of survivors suffer from long-term disabilities. A large number of risk factors have been linked to CVT, although the scientific evidence for an association varies considerably between risk factors. Some risk factors, such as hereditary thrombophilia, correspond with risk factors for more common sites of VTE, whereas others, such as head trauma, are specific to CVT. In most patients, at least one risk factor can be identified. In this review, we provide an overview of the risk factors for CVT.

  5. [Deep venous thrombosis in an amputation stump].

    PubMed

    Baars, E C T; Ettema, H B; Fritschy, W M

    2007-09-15

    A 34-year-old patient underwent a knee exarticulation amputation and developed symptoms of pain, redness and swelling of the stump in combination with a feeling of tightness in the chest. These symptoms were first attributed to muscle pain and exertion but further examination revealed deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the stump and a pulmonary embolism for which he was treated with nadroparine and acenocoumarol. Shortly after treatment he could resume the use of the prosthesis. A DVT in the amputation stump is not frequently encountered, but is a serious complication that can, together with a pulmonary embolism, be life threatening. The literature mentions an incidence ranging from 0-12%. Physical examination is often not conclusive and further examination of the patient with duplex scanning is necessary, with a ventilation-perfusion scan if a pulmonary embolism is suspected. Patients with a lower extremity amputation have a higher risk of developing a DVT because of immobility and increased venous pooling in the residual limb. Symptoms of a red, swollen, warm and painful stump should trigger the physician to suspect a DVT.

  6. [Venous thrombosis of atypical location in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Campos Balea, Begoña; Sáenz de Miera Rodríguez, Andrea; Antolín Novoa, Silvia; Quindós Varela, María; Barón Duarte, Francisco; López López, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complication that frequently occurs in patients with neoplastic diseases. Several models have therefore been developed to identify patient subgroups diagnosed with cancer who are at increased risk of developing VTE. The most common forms of thromboembolic episodes are deep vein thrombosis in the lower limbs and pulmonary thromboembolism. However, venous thrombosis is also diagnosed in atypical locations. There are few revisions of unusual cases of venous thrombosis. In most cases, VTE occurs in the upper limbs and in the presence of central venous catheters, pacemakers and defibrillators. We present the case of a patient diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy who developed a thrombosis in the upper limbs (brachial and axillary).

  7. Spontaneous thrombosis of developmental venous anomaly (DVA) with venous infarct and acute cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Kalapos, Paul; Vijay, Kanupriya

    2014-08-01

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA), formally known as venous angioma, is a congenital anatomic variant of the venous drainage of the brain. Although they typically have a benign clinical course and a low symptomatic rate, thrombosis of a drainage vein may occur, leading to potentially debilitating complications. We report a unique case of spontaneous thrombosis of a posterior fossa developmental venous anomaly with cerebellar infarct in a 61-year-old man who presented with acute onset cerebellar ataxia. DVA thrombosis was well-depicted on CT and MR studies. Patient was put on anticoagulant therapy and complete recanalization was seen on follow-up imaging.

  8. [Extensive mesenteric venous thrombosis treatment by regional thrombolysis].

    PubMed

    Espeel, B; Gérard, C; Mansvelt, B; Bertrand, C; Vermonden, J

    2005-03-01

    Two cases of mesenteric venous thrombosis with portal extension are reported. The first patient was treated right away by local intra-arterial thrombolysis, the second one benefited from local venous thrombolysis immediately after intestinal resection. No significant complication was observed.

  9. Imaging Diagnosis of Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S.; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) is a broad term that includes Budd-Chiari syndrome and occlusion of veins that constitute the portal venous system. Due to the common risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of these clinically distinct disorders, concurrent involvement of two different regions is quite common. In acute and subacute SVT, the symptoms may overlap with a variety of other abdominal emergencies while in chronic SVT, the extent of portal hypertension and its attendant complications determine the clinical course. As a result, clinical diagnosis is often difficult and is frequently reliant on imaging. Tremendous improvements in vascular imaging in recent years have ensured that this once rare entity is being increasingly detected. Treatment of acute SVT requires immediate anticoagulation. Transcatheter thrombolysis or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is used in the event of clinical deterioration. In cases with peritonitis, immediate laparotomy and bowel resection may be required for irreversible bowel ischemia. In chronic SVT, the underlying cause should be identified and treated. The imaging manifestations of the clinical syndromes resulting from SVT are comprehensively discussed here along with a brief review of the relevant clinical features and therapeutic approach. PMID:26600801

  10. Volume Calculation of Venous Thrombosis Using 2D Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Dhibi, M; Puentes, J; Bressollette, L; Guias, B; Solaiman, B

    2005-01-01

    Venous thrombosis screening exams use 2D ultrasound images, from which medical experts obtain a rough idea of the thrombosis aspect and infer an approximate volume. Such estimation is essential to follow up the thrombosis evolution. This paper proposes a method to calculate venous thrombosis volume from non-parallel 2D ultrasound images, taking advantage of a priori knowledge about the thrombosis shape. An interactive ellipse fitting contour segmentation extracts the 2D thrombosis contours. Then, a Delaunay triangulation is applied to the set of 2D segmented contours positioned in 3D, and the area that each contour defines, to obtain a global thrombosis 3D surface reconstruction, with a dense triangulation inside the contours. Volume is calculated from the obtained surface and contours triangulation, using a maximum unit normal component approach. Preliminary results obtained on 3 plastic phantoms and 3 in vitro venous thromboses, as well as one in vivo case are presented and discussed. An error rate of volume estimation inferior to 4,5% for the plastic phantoms, and 3,5% for the in vitro venous thromboses was obtained.

  11. New insights into the mechanisms of venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mackman, Nigel

    2012-07-01

    Venous thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, especially in the elderly. Many risk factors have been identified for venous thrombosis that alter blood flow, activate the endothelium, and increase blood coagulation. However, the precise mechanisms that trigger clotting in large veins have not been fully elucidated. The most common site for initiation of the thrombus appears to be the valve pocket sinus, due to its tendency to become hypoxic. Activation of endothelial cells by hypoxia or possibly inflammatory stimuli would lead to surface expression of adhesion receptors that facilitate the binding of circulating leukocytes and microvesicles. Subsequent activation of the leukocytes induces expression of the potent procoagulant protein tissue factor that triggers thrombosis. Understanding the mechanisms of venous thrombosis may lead to the development of new treatments.

  12. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding

    PubMed Central

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic–clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully. PMID:23389726

  13. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  14. Air pollution and venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Qing-Yun; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Bei; Liu, Jing-Di; Hu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. However, the effect of air pollution on venous thrombotic disorders is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between air pollution and venous thrombosis. PubMed, Embase, EBM Reviews, Healthstar, Global Health, Nursing Database, and Web of Science were searched for citations on air pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matters) and venous thrombosis. Using a random-effects model, overall risk estimates were derived for each increment of 10 μg/m3 of pollutant concentration. Of the 485 in-depth reviewed studies, 8 citations, involving approximately 700,000 events, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the main air pollutants analyzed were not associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (OR = 1.005, 95% CI = 0.998–1.012 for PM2.5; OR = 0.995, 95% CI = 0.984–1.007 for PM10; OR = 1.006, 95% CI = 0.994–1.019 for NO2). Based on exposure period and thrombosis location, additional subgroup analyses provided results comparable with those of the overall analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias. Therefore, this meta analysis does not suggest the possible role of air pollution as risk factor for venous thrombosis in general population. PMID:27600652

  15. Fibrinogen, red blood cells, and factor XIII in venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Walton, B L; Byrnes, J R; Wolberg, A S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Among cardiovascular causes of death, venous thrombosis (VT) is ranked third most common in the world. Venous thrombi have high red blood cell and fibrin content; however, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to venous thrombus composition and stability are still poorly understood. This article reviews biological, biochemical, and biophysical contributions of fibrinogen, factor XIII, and red blood cells to VT, and new evidence suggesting interactions between these components mediate venous thrombus composition and size.

  16. [Venous thrombosis associated with central venous catheter use in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Iglesias Rey, Leticia; Fernández Pérez, Isaura; Barbagelata López, Cristina; Rivera Gallego, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters for various applications (administration of chemotherapy, blood products and others) in patients with cancer is increasingly frequent. The association between thrombosis and catheter use has been fully established but aspects such as its causes, diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment have not. We describe a case of thrombosis in a patient with cancer treated with chemotherapy who carried a central venous catheter. We also perform a review of the risk factors, the role of the prophylaxis and the treatment.

  17. Management of deep venous thrombosis in the pregnant female.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, J C; Estrada, F P; Orr, R M

    1990-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities is an uncommon but dreaded complication of pregnancy which can present diagnostic and therapeutic problems to the treating physician. From January 1, 1985, to December 31, 1988, 7867 deliveries were performed at St. Luke's Hospital. Five of these patients were pregnant women who were treated for deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities. The women were either in their second or third trimester of pregnancy. The clinical diagnosis in each case was confirmed with duplex ultrasonography. Each patient was treated with 7 to 10 days of intravenous heparin therapy and then discharged on subcutaneous heparin therapy. There were no bleeding complications related to the heparin therapy. No patient developed a pulmonary embolism. Each patient delivered a normal child. The only complication was a heparin induced rash in one patient which resolved when a different preparation of heparin was used. The management of deep venous thrombosis in pregnancy is discussed.

  18. [Disseminated arterial occlusions revealing bilateral venous thrombosis with paradoxical embolisms].

    PubMed

    Elsendoorn, A; Desport, E; Vialle, R; Frat, J-P; Bridoux, F; Touchard, G

    2009-06-01

    Paradoxical embolism is a diagnosis of exclusion. Clinical triad associates deep venous thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism, arterial embolism, and intracardiac communication with right-to-left shunt. The intracardiac communication is generally related to a patent foramen ovale (PFO). We report a 75-year-old patient, who presented with bilateral deep venous thrombosis of the legs, complicated by massive pulmonary embolism and paradoxical embolisms through a PFO. This resulted in cerebral, mesenteric, splenic and bilateral kidney infarctions. A promptly initiated anticoagulant treatment allowed a favourable outcome.

  19. [Cerebral venous thrombosis imagiologic features in a pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria Madalena; Rios, Ana Cristina; Fragata, Isabel; Baptista, José Tiago; Manaças, Rui; Reis, João

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare but serious condition potentially reversible upon accurate diagnosis and adequate therapy. The peri-partum state and pregnancy are predisposing factors and TVC accounts for about 6% of maternal deaths. Its clinical symptoms depend on the the thrombus site and extension, and also on the existing collateral vessels network. We present the case of a 33 year-old woman, 13 weeks pregnant, that complained of headaches and whose cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a subtotal oclusión of the superior sagittal sinus. We discuss the imaging features of dural venous thrombosis in the acute phase.

  20. Hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with multiple organ infiltration and deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Su-jun; Wei, Wei; Chen, Jiang-tao; Tan, Ye-hui; Yu, Cheng-bao; Litzow, Mark Robert; Liu, Qiu-ju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) can be fatal, particularly when eosinophils infiltrate vital organs and/or if extensive thrombosis develops. However there are no standard recommendations for the use of anticoagulant therapy of HES in the setting of thrombosis. Methods: We herein present a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with marked peripheral eosinophilia with symptoms of multi-organ infiltration and extensive deep venous thrombosis (DVT). In this case, evaluation was carried out before the diagnosis was established, and timely standard-dose corticosteroids combined with a new oral anticoagulant (NOAC) therapy were carried out. Results: These measures resulted in a rapid response and long-term disease control. Conclusion: Although there are no data to support which anticoagulant is preferred in this setting, this case indicates that the new oral anticoagulants may play an important role in the treatment of thrombosis in HES. PMID:27583887

  1. The Emerging Role of NETs in Venous Thrombosis and Immunothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Andrew S.; Obi, Andrea T.; Diaz, Jose A.; Henke, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT), a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has recently been linked to neutrophil activation and release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) via a process called NETosis. The use of various in vivo thrombosis models and genetically modified mice has more precisely defined the exact role of NETosis in the pathogenesis of VT. Translational large animal VT models and human studies have confirmed the presence of NETs in pathologic VT. Activation of neutrophils, with subsequent NETosis, has also been linked to acute infection. This innate immune response, while effective for bacterial clearance from the host by formation of an intravascular bactericidal “net,” also triggers thrombosis. Intravascular thrombosis related to such innate immune mechanisms has been coined immunothrombosis. Dysregulated immunothrombosis has been proposed as a mechanism of pathologic micro- and macrovascular thrombosis in sepsis and autoimmune disease. In this focused review, we will address the dual role of NETs in the pathogenesis of VT and immunothrombosis. PMID:27446071

  2. Does prophylactic anticoagulation prevent PICC-related upper extremity venous thrombosis? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James D; Alred, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    The evidence regarding the value of prophylactic anticoagulation to prevent peripherally inserted central catheter-related upper extremity venous thrombosis (PRUEVT) is inconsistent. The authors reviewed 3 years of data, identifying all cases of PRUEVT at a facility in Texas, and individually matched each for risk factors with 2 controls. Not being on any form of anticoagulant or antiplatelet agent was associated with a modestly increased risk of PRUEVT (odds ratio 1.93, P = .036, 95% confidence interval, 1.025-3.602). Each approach to thrombosis prevention showed a trend toward a protective effect, but none reached statistical significance individually.

  3. Clinical features of venous insufficiency and the risk of venous thrombosis in older people.

    PubMed

    Engbers, Marissa J; Karasu, Alev; Blom, Jeanet W; Cushman, Mary; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Venous thrombosis is common in older age, with an incidence of 0·5-1% per year in those aged >70 years. Stasis of blood flow is an important contributor to the development of thrombosis and may be due to venous insufficiency in the legs. The risk of thrombosis associated with clinical features of venous insufficiency, i.e., varicose veins, leg ulcers and leg oedema, obtained with a standardized interview was assessed in the Age and Thrombosis Acquired and Genetic risk factors in the Elderly (AT-AGE) study. The AT-AGE study is a case-control study in individuals aged 70 years and older (401 cases with a first-time venous thrombosis and 431 control subjects). We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age, sex and study centre. Varicose veins and leg ulcer were associated with a 1·6-fold (95% CI 1·2-2·3) and 3·3-fold increased risk of thrombosis (95% CI 1·6-6·7), respectively, while the risk was increased 3·0-fold (95% CI 2·1-4·5) in the presence of leg oedema. The risk of thrombosis was highest when all three risk factors occurred simultaneously (OR: 10·5; 95% CI 1·3-86·1). In conclusion, clinical features of venous insufficiency, i.e., varicose veins, leg ulcers and leg oedema, are risk factors for venous thrombosis in older people.

  4. [Blood groups as a risk factor in venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Hernández Cañete, C M; Alvarez Dieguez, R; González Sánchez M de la, C; Díaz Hernández, C; Sánchez Montiel, M E

    1993-01-01

    We report 173 patients with venous thrombosis (or post-thrombotic syndrome) demonstrated by phlebography. We show up the importance of blood groups as risk factor, being very significant the A group. Female sex is associated with a high incidence of this pathology. A frequent location is the left lower limb.

  5. Endovascular treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis: Contemporary multicenter experience

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Lopes, Demetrius K; Binning, Mandy J; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Liebman, Kenneth M; Arthur, Adam S; Doss, Vinodh T; Levy, Elad I

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy of cerebral venous thrombosis using modern approaches to intracranial recanalization, such as stent retrievers and aspiration thrombectomy, is not well described. We performed a retrospective review of data for consecutive patients with venous sinus thrombosis who underwent endovascular treatment between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013 at participating institutions. We identified a total of 13 patients with a diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. The most frequently utilized type of endovascular intervention was the Penumbra aspiration system (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA) (nine cases), followed by local infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (bolus and/or drip in six cases) and stent retrievers (Solitaire FR (Covidien, Irvine, California, USA) in three cases and Trevo (Stryker, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA) in one case). Overall, multimodality treatment (two or more different types of devices or approaches) was performed in 62% of cases. Follow-up data were available for 11 patients; of those, five had a favorable clinical outcome (defined as modified Rankin Scale score of 0–2) and three patients died. Various endovascular approaches are utilized in current clinical practice. A multimodal approach to endovascular therapy for the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis resulted in partial or complete restoration of flow in all cases, yet the mortality rate of 27% indicates the need for improvement in recanalization strategies for this disorder. PMID:26055685

  6. Cerebral venous thrombosis after immune thrombocytopenic purpura and anti-D immune globulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Kayyali, Husam R; Abdelmoity, Ahmed T; Morriss, M Craig; Graf, William D

    2008-03-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis has multiple etiologies and a wide variety of clinical manifestations. This article reports on a young girl who developed cerebral venous thrombosis after intravenous anti-D immune globulin therapy for immune thrombocytopenic purpura. In this case, venous infarction was manifested by an unusual pattern of restricted diffusion limited to the corpus callosum. The cause of cerebral venous thrombosis in this patient may be related to both immune thrombocytopenia and immunoglobulin therapy.

  7. Thrombosis of the portal venous system.

    PubMed

    Sacerdoti, D; Serianni, G; Gaiani, S; Bolognesi, M; Bombonato, G; Gatta, A

    2007-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare cause of portal hypertension. Its diagnosis has been facilitated by improvements in imaging techniques, in particular Doppler sonography. The prevalence is about 1% in the general population, but much higher rates are observed in patients with hepatic cirrhosis (7%, range 0.6-17%), particularly those who also have hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (35%). The most common causes of PVT are myeloproliferative disorders, deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins, prothrombotic gene mutations, cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and HCC. Its development often requires the presence of two or more risk factors (local and/or systemic), e.g., a genetically determined thrombophilic state plus an infectious episode or abdominal surgery. It is clinically useful to distinguish between cirrhotic and noncirrhotic forms. Portal vein thrombosis is also traditionally classified as acute or chronic, but this distinction is often difficult. Color Doppler ultrasound is the first-line imaging study for diagnosis of PVT; magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography are valid alternatives. The main complications are ischemic intestinal necrosis (in acute PVT) and esophageal varices (in chronic cases); the natural history of the latter differs depending on whether or not the thrombosis is associated with cirrhosis. The treatment of choice for PVT has never been adequately investigated. It is currently based on the use of anticoagulants associated, in some cases, with thrombolytics, but experience with the latter agents is too limited to draw any definite conclusions. In chronic thrombosis (even forms associated with cirrhosis), anticoagulant therapy is recommended and possibly, beta-blockers as well. Naturally, treatment of the underlying pathology is essential.

  8. Contribution of recurrent venous thrombosis and inherited thrombophilia to the pathogenesis of postthrombotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kreidy, Raghid

    2015-01-01

    Postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a common complication of deep vein thrombosis. This study aims to assess the role of recurrent venous thrombosis and inherited thrombophilia in the pathogenesis of PTS. A series of 206 patients diagnosed with lower extremity venous thrombosis were retrospectively reviewed. The PTS was observed in 30.58% of the patients. Recurrent venous thrombosis was identified in 3.4% of the patients without PTS and in 33.3% of patients with PTS (P < .001). Inherited thrombophilia alone or in association with recurrent venous thrombosis was more commonly detected when PTS was moderate to severe (P = .04 and <.001) or severe (P < .001). Recurrent venous thrombosis increases the incidence of PTS significantly. The severity of PTS raises when an underlying thrombophilia is present either alone or in association with recurrent venous thrombosis.

  9. Multiple venous thrombosis complicating central venous cannulation in a non cancer patient - a case report.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ce; Menkiti, Id; Desalu, I; Thomas, Mo

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is a common procedure for critically ill patients. Like all procedures, it has its complications, one of which is thrombosis. Reports of thrombosis are commoner among cancer patients. We present a 37 year old non cancer patient who developed thrombi in both right and left internal jugular veins, 10 and 13 days respectively after insertion of central venous catheter. This was detected by ultrasound scans of the neck while attempting re-cannulation for parenteral feeding. She also had left lower limb deep venous thrombosis, confirmed by doppler scan, which was managed with low molecular weight heparin and warfarin. The patient was subsequently treated with streptokinase. A repeat scan of the internal jugular veins 4 days after thrombolysis revealed a reduction in size of the thrombi. Symptoms of deep venous thrombosis improved and she was transferred to the wards where she made remarkable improvement. This case illustrates the potential usefulness of ultrasound guided-central line insertion in patients who have had central venous lines inserted previously in order to detect thrombi.

  10. Management of Cavoatrial Deep Venous Thrombosis: Incorporating New Strategies.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Mohamed A; De Silva, Gayan S; Ramaswamy, Raja S; Sanchez, Luis A

    2017-03-01

    Cavoatrial deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is diagnosed with increasing prevalence. It can be managed medically with anticoagulation or with directed interventions aimed to efficiently reduce the thrombus burden within the target venous segment. The type of management chosen depends greatly on the etiology and chronicity of the thrombosis, existing patient comorbidities, and the patient's tolerance to anticoagulants and thrombolytic agents. In addition to traditional percutaneous catheter-based pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, other catheter-based suction thrombectomy techniques have emerged in recent years. Each therapeutic modality requires operator expertise and a coordinated care paradigm to facilitate successful outcomes. Open surgical thrombectomy is alternatively reserved for specific patient conditions, including intolerance of anticoagulation, failed catheter-based interventions, or acute emergencies.

  11. Peripheral Venous Access Ports: Outcomes Analysis in 109 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bodner, Leonard J.; Nosher, John L.; Patel, Kaushik M.; Siegel, Randall L.; Biswal, Rajiv; Gribbin, Christopher E.; Tokarz, Robert

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective outcomes analysis of central venous catheters with peripheral venous access ports, with comparison to published data.Methods: One hundred and twelve central venous catheters with peripherally placed access ports were placed under sonographic guidance in 109 patients over a 4-year period. Ports were placed for the administration of chemotherapy, hyperalimentation, long-term antibiotic therapy, gamma-globulin therapy, and frequent blood sampling. A vein in the upper arm was accessed in each case and the catheter was passed to the superior vena cava or right atrium. Povidone iodine skin preparation was used in the first 65 port insertions. A combination of Iodophor solution and povidone iodine solution was used in the last 47 port insertions. Forty patients received low-dose (1 mg) warfarin sodium beginning the day after port insertion. Three patients received higher doses of warfarin sodium for preexistent venous thrombosis. Catheter performance and complications were assessed and compared with published data.Results: Access into the basilic or brachial veins was obtained in all cases. Ports remained functional for a total of 28,936 patient days. The port functioned in 50% of patients until completion of therapy, or the patient's expiration. Ports were removed prior to completion of therapy in 18% of patients. Eleven patients (9.9% of ports placed) suffered an infectious complication (0.38 per thousand catheter-days)-in nine, at the port implantation site, in two along the catheter. In all 11 instances the port was removed. Port pocket infection in the early postoperative period occurred in three patients (4.7%) receiving a Betadine prep vs two patients (4.2%) receiving a standard O.R. prep. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.9). Venous thrombosis occurred in three patients (6.8%) receiving warfarin sodium and in two patients (3%) not receiving warfarin sodium. This difference was not statistically significant

  12. Common genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Hua-Fang; Lu, Xuan; Jian, Xiao-Rong; Jin, Bi; Zheng, Hong; Li, Yi-Qing; Wang, Qing-Yun; Wu, Tang-Chun; Guo, Huan; Liu, Hui; Guo, Tao; Yu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Rui; Yang, Yan; Hu, Yu

    2013-02-07

    Venous thrombosis is a major medical disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Little is known about the genetic background of venous thrombosis in the Chinese population. A total of 1,304 individuals diagnosed with a first venous thrombosis and 1,334 age- and sex-matched healthy participants were enrolled in this study. Resequencing of THBD (encoding thrombomodulin) in 60 individuals with venous thrombosis and 60 controls and a functional assay showed that a common variant, c.-151G>T (rs16984852), in the 5' UTR significantly reduced the gene expression and could cause a predisposition to venous thrombosis. Therefore, this variant was genotyped in a case-control study, and results indicated that heterozygotes had a 2.80-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.88-4.29) increased risk of venous thrombosis. The THBD c.-151G>T variant was further investigated in a family analysis involving 176 first-degree relatives from 38 index families. First-degree relatives with this variant had a 3.42-fold increased risk of venous thrombosis, and their probability of remaining thrombosis-free was significantly lower than that of relatives without the variant. In addition, five rare mutations that might be deleterious were also identified in thrombophilic individuals by sequencing. This study is the largest genetic investigation of venous thrombosis in the Chinese population. Further study on genetics of thrombosis should focus on resequencing of THBD and other hemostasis genes in different populations.

  13. Local Intrasinus Thrombolysis for Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karanam, Lakshmi sudha Prasanna; Baddam, Sridhar Reddy; Pamidimukkala, Vijaya; Vemuri, Ramatharaknath; Byrapaneni, Sravanthi; Polavarapu, Raghavasarma

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous strokes due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) have varied presentation and clinical outcome. Despite aggressive medical treatment with optimal anticoagulation, some patients develop progressive neurologic deterioration causing significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present series is to analyze the safety and efficacy of in situ thrombolysis in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in severe clinical grade and refractory to conventional medical management. Materials and methods Twenty-nine patients with cerebral venous thrombosis who received in situ thrombolysis during a 3-year period (April 2013 to April 2016) were included in the study. Tissue plasminogen activator (tpa) was used in all the patients. The lytic agent was infused into the sinus via the micro catheter. Data regarding demographic, clinical, and radiologic features were analyzed in all the patients. Results Recanalization of the affected sinuses was achieved in all the cases. Twenty-four patients had good outcome (mRs 0 or1) and three patients had mild deficits (mRs 2). One patient had moderate disability (mRs 3). One patient succumbed due to increased hematoma causing midline shift and transtentorial herniation. At 3 months follow–up, 26 patients were asymptomatic and two patients had minor symptoms. Conclusion Local intrasinus thrombolysis (LIST) is safe and effective method in patients with poor clinical grade and the present study highlights the benefit of thrombolysis, particularly in patients unresponsive to anticoagulation. The improved efficacy of this therapy depends on early recognition of worsening symptoms and timely intervention. PMID:27829970

  14. Infections and inflammatory diseases as risk factors for venous thrombosis. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tichelaar, Y I G Vladimir; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke J C; Meijer, Karina

    2012-05-01

    Inflammation and venous thrombosis are intertwined. Only in the recent 15 years clinical epidemiological studies have focussed on inflammatory or infectious diseases as risk factors for venous thrombosis. Although a few reviews and many case reports or studies on these topic has been written, a review reporting relative or absolute risks for venous thrombosis has not been published yet. We performed a systematic review using Medline, Pubmed and Embase and found 31 eligible articles. Inflammatory bowel disease, ANCA-associated vasculitis, infections in general and more specifically, human immunodeficiency virus, pneumonia and urinary tract infections are associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis.

  15. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Revealing Primary Sjögren Syndrome: Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, A.; Altieri, M.; Saraceni, V. M.; Paolucci, T.; Lenzi, G. L.

    2013-01-01

    Sjögren syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease of the exocrine glands, characterized by focal lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of these glands. Neurologic complications are quite common, mainly involving the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The most common central nervous system (CNS) manifestations are myelopathy and microcirculation vasculitis. However, specific diagnostic criteria for CNS SS are still lacking. We report two cases of primary SS in which the revealing symptom was cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) in the absence of genetic or acquired thrombophilias. PMID:23424596

  16. Cortical blindness as a rare presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bonnie; Moon, Seong-Jin; Olivero, William C; Wang, Huan

    2013-05-09

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Manifesting in a remarkably wide spectrum of symptoms and signs, CVT often presents in a misleading fashion-if unrecognized or misdiagnosed, it carries potentially fatal consequences. Visual loss is quite rare as the initial presentation of CVT and is typically a finding more frequent in chronic cases with associated papilledema on funduscopy Ferro, Lopes, Rosas and Fontes (Delay in Hospital Admission of Patients with Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis. Cerebrovasc Dis 2005;19: :152-6). We report a rare case of acute cortical blindness as the initial presentation of CVT in an 18-year-old female patient and review the current literature.

  17. Extreme clinical presentations of venous stasis: coronary sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kachalia, Amit; Sideras, Panagiotis; Javaid, Mian; Muralidharan, Sethu; Stevens-Cohen, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    Sixty six year old male with history of heart failure was admitted for dysphagia, weight loss. CT scan chest revealed diffuse oesophageal wall thickening. Upper endoscopy, oesophagogram confirmed diagnosis of achalasia. TTE revealed severely reduced biventricular systolic function with LVEF 10%; PASP 75-80 mmHg. Parasternal long views showed dilated coronary sinus with a visible, mobile 2.0 cm thrombus. Pro-thrombotic workup was negative. Coronary sinus thrombosis has been identified as a rare complication to invasive cardiac procedures causing damage to coronary sinus endothelium and in hypercoagulable states.Typically acute thrombosis presents with chest pain, dynamic ECG changes, but chronic development does not present with ischaemic signs due to formation of efficient collateral circulation. We present a case report of stable primary coronary sinus thrombus incidentally diagnosed, secondary to chronic venous stasis in coronary circulation. Currently, there are no guidelines to assist physicians in long term management of such patients and thus warrants further investigations.

  18. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever-Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Vairamon, Pradhosh M; Gowtham, Thiruvengadam; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection can present as febrile illness with thrombocytopenia, dengue shock syndrome and dengue haemorrhagic fever. Neurological manifestation of dengue infection is more predominant in endemic region. Here, we report a case with unusual neurological presentation of dengue infection. A 16-year-old boy presented with fever for two week duration, headache and double vision involving left eye for two days. He had multiple erythematous rashes all over the body on 3rd day and treated conservatively. On examination he had bilateral papilloedema, left eye restricted abduction. His investigation revealed thrombocytopenia and positive dengue serology. His MRI brain with venogram showed bilateral transverse sinus thrombosis. Hence he was diagnosed as cerebral venous thrombosis due to dehydration with underlying dengue infection. He was hydrated and managed conservatively. On 3rd day his double vision started improving. His repeat MR Venogram was done after two week duration, which revealed recanalisation of bilateral transverse sinus. PMID:26266153

  19. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Pin; Ge, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) rarely induces cerebral hemorrhage, and CVST with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy is extremely rare. Upon literature review, we are able to find only one case of CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in early pregnancy. In this paper, we report another case of a 27-year-old patient who developed CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in her fifth week of pregnancy. Although the optimal treatment for this infrequent condition remains controversial, we adopted anticoagulation as the first choice of treatment and obtained favorable results. PMID:25630781

  20. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis in senile male patients: New risk factors and predictors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gao; Fu, Zhi-Qing; Zhu, Ping; Li, Shi-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC)-related venous thrombosis is a common but serious clinical complication, thus prevention and treatment on this problem should be extensively investigated. In this research, we aimed to investigate the incidence rate of CVC-related venous thrombosis in senile patients and give a further discussion on the related risk factors and predictors. A total of 324 hospitalized senile male patients subjected to CVC were selected. Retrospective investigation and analysis were conducted on age, underlying diseases, clinical medications, catheterization position and side, catheter retention time, and incidence of CVC-related venous thrombosis complications. Basic laboratory test results during catheterization and thrombogenesis were also collected and analyzed. Among the 324 patients, 20 cases (6.17%) of CVC-related venous thrombosis were diagnoseds. The incidence rate of CVC-related venous thrombosis in subclavian vein catheterization was significantly lower than that in femoral vein catheterization (P<0.01) and that in internal jugular vein catheterization (P<0.05). No statistically significant difference was found between femoral vein catheterization and internal jugular vein catheterization (P<0.05). Previous venous thrombosis history (P<0.01), high lactate dehydrogenase level (P<0.01), low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level (P<0.05), and low albumin level (P<0.05) were found as risk factors or predictors of CVC-related venous thrombosis in senile male patients. Subclavian vein catheterization was the most appropriate choice among senile patients to decrease the incidence of CVC-related venous thrombosis. Previous venous thrombosis history, high lactate dehydrogenase level, low HDL level, and low albumin level were important risk factors in predicting CVC-related venous thrombosis.

  1. Technetium-99m red blood cell venography in upper extremity deep venous thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, A.M.; Turbiner, E.H.

    1987-06-01

    The efficacy of Tc-99m RBC venography has been demonstrated with respect to the study of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. A case is presented where Tc-99m RBC venography was used to study the upper as well as lower extremities in a patient with upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) who was found to have pulmonary embolism.

  2. Lipid levels and risk of recurrent venous thrombosis: results from the MEGA follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Morelli, V M; Lijfering, W M; Rosendaal, F R; Cannegieter, S C

    2017-04-01

    Essentials The role of lipid levels in the risk of recurrent venous thrombosis is unclear. Lipids were assessed in patients with a first venous thrombosis (n = 2106) followed for 6.9 years. Lipids were not associated with recurrence, overall or in patients with unprovoked first events. Testing lipid levels is not useful to identify patients at an increased risk of recurrence.

  3. Systemic Venous Inflow to the Liver Allograft to Overcome Diffuse Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lupascu, Cristian; Darius, Tom; Goffette, Pierre; Lerut, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse splanchnic venous thrombosis (DSVT), formerly defined as contraindication for liver transplantation (LT), is a serious challenge to the liver transplant surgeon. Portal vein arterialisation, cavoportal hemitransposition and renoportal anastomosis, and finally combined liver and small bowel transplantation are all possible alternatives to deal with this condition. Five patients with preoperatively confirmed extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis were transplanted using cavoportal hemitransposition (4x) and renoportal anastomosis (1x). Median follow-up was 58 months (range: 0,5 to 130 months). Two patients with previous radiation-induced peritoneal injury died, respectively, 18 days and 2 months after transplantation. The three other patients had excellent long-term survival, despite the fact that two of them needed a surgical reintervention for severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis is no longer an absolute contraindication to liver transplantation. Although cavoportal hemitransposition and renoportal anastomosis undoubtedly are life-saving procedures allowing for ensuring adequate allograft portal flow, careful follow-up of these patients remains necessary as both methods are unable to completely eliminate the complications of (segmental) portal hypertension. PMID:26539214

  4. Acquired and Heritable Thrombophilia in Indian Patients With Pediatric Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT).

    PubMed

    Pai, Navin; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2014-09-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in children is more often associated with underlying pathological conditions than with hereditary thrombophilia. The present study is a retrospective analysis of thrombophilia in 285 pediatric patients with venous thrombosis at different sites. Four common thrombophilia markers, that is protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, and factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, were analyzed. Thrombosis in hepatic and portal veins was more common in pediatric patients (73%) when compared to other sites (27%). Overall, hereditary thrombophilia accounted for 15.5% of the patients with venous thrombosis. The FVL mutation, which was the major causative factor in Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis cases in the adult group, was not a major contributing factor in pediatric group, that is, 1.8% of the patients. In conclusion, the risk factors for venous thrombosis vary in different age groups.

  5. Clinical Aspects of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: Experiences in Two Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Hyun Taek; Jun, Hyo Sub; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Kim, Ji Hee; Oh, Jae Keun; Song, Joon Ho; Cho, Byung Moon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare condition for which few clinical reviews have been conducted in Korea. Our aim was to investigate, risk factors, clinical presentations/courses, and outcomes of 22 patients treated for CVT at two centers. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted, selecting 22 patients diagnosed with and treated for CVT at two patient care centers over a 10-year period (January 1, 2004 to August 31, 2015). Patient data, pathogenetic concerns (laboratory findings), risk factors, locations, symptoms, treatments, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Results Mean patient age at diagnosis was 54.41 ± 16.19. Patients most often presented with headache (40%), followed by seizure (27%) and altered mental status (18%). Focal motor deficits (5%), visual symptoms (5%), and dysarthria (5%) were less common. Important predisposing factors in CVT included prothrombotic conditions (35%), infections (14%), hyperthyroidism (18%), trauma (14%), and malignancy (4%). By location, 9 patients (40%) experienced thrombosis of superior sagittal sinus predominantly, with involvement of transverse sinus in 20 (90%), sigmoid sinus in 12 (40%), and the deep venous system in 5 (23%). Treatment generally consisted of anticoagulants (63%) or antiplatelet (23%) drugs, but surgical decompression was considered if warranted (14%). Medical therapy in CVT yields good functional outcomes. Conclusion Mean age of patients with CVT in our study exceeded that reported in Europe or in America and had difference in risk factors. Functional outcomes are good with use of antithrombotic medication, whether or not hemorrhagic infarction is evident. PMID:27847760

  6. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis during Everest Expedition: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, P.; Shrestha, A. M.; Bhattarai, S.; Sapkota, D.; Sharma, N.; Devkota, U. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare but serious disorder that is associated with a poor clinical outcome. We report a 35-year-old man who had a severe headache and diplopia while climbing Mount Everest. His MR venography showed right transverse and right sigmoid sinus thrombosis. He improved on anticoagulant and symptomatic measures. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis at high altitude is discussed. PMID:27872776

  7. Hereditary thrombophilia in cerebral venous thrombosis: a study from India.

    PubMed

    Pai, Navin; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2013-07-01

    A systematic study of thrombophilia markers in a large series of patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) from India is scarce. The present study was undertaken to know the prevalence of common hereditary thrombophilia in a large series of CVT patients from India. Six hundred and twelve (354 men, 219 women and 39 children) consecutive patients with CVT admitted to various hospitals in Mumbai between 2001 and 2010 were investigated for the common thrombophilia markers, that is, protein C (PC), protein S, antithrombin (AT), and factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation. The main presenting clinical manifestations included papilledema (62%), headache (62%), hemiparesis (48%), seizures (31%), and cranial nerve palsy (7%). All the patients were managed with heparin followed by warfarin during the succeeding 6 months. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis was the commonest site (74%) followed by cortical venous thrombosis (15%). Associated clinical pathologies were dehydration, sepsis, pregnancy and puerperium, malaria, and tuberculosis; but in the majority of patients, there was no obvious cause. Eighteen percent of the patients had any of the thrombophilia markers studied; PC deficiency was the commonest thrombophilia marker followed by deficiency of protein S, FVL mutation and AT deficiency. The men below 45 years with PC deficiency (P=0.03) and women with protein S deficiency were significantly higher (P=0.04). In conclusion, CVT is not an uncommon cause of neurological deficit as was presented in earlier reports. Pregnancy and puerperium-related CVT was much less common. Thrombophilia markers accounted for approximately one-fifth of the patients. Death due to CVT has shown remarkable reduction (13%) because of early diagnosis and appropriate anticoagulation.

  8. Antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a case series and a review.

    PubMed

    Shlebak, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral venous sinus system is a rare site for venous thrombosis except in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. We describe three patients presenting with cerebral venous thrombosis in association with other thrombotic sites in two patients and as an only site in one patient. Antiphospholipid syndrome has varied clinical manifestations but the defining feature is the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this report we will review the clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria and the management of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

  9. [Takayasu arteritis and cerebral venous thrombosis: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Mingo, E; Riofrío Cabeza, S; Villa Albuger, T; Velasco Blanco, M J

    2014-01-01

    Palpitations, paresthesias and anxiety are very common reasons of consultation in primary care. We report the case of a 40 year-old Caucasian woman who came to the clinic due to these symptoms, and was finally diagnosed with Takayasu arteritis. Later, she had an episode of headache, as the initial manifestation of cerebral venous thrombosis. Takayasu arteritis is a systemic vasculitis affecting medium and large arteries, mainly leacausing stenosis of the aorta and its branches. It most frequently affects Asian women, being much rarer in Europe. The primary care doctor plays a key role in the initial diagnosis and monitoring of patients with rare diseases, such as Takayasu arteritis, and must be a basic support for the patient and family, providing information and advice, and contributing with his work to reduce the vulnerability of this group.

  10. Cerebral venous thrombosis: a Moroccan retrospective study of 30 cases

    PubMed Central

    Souirti, Zouhayr; Messouak, Ouafae; Belahsen, Faouzi

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare origin of stroke, the clinical presentation and etiologies vary. The prognosis is shown to be better than arterial thrombosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and MR Venograpgy (MRV) are currently important tools for the diagnosis. We studied 30 cases of CVT diagnosed in the department of neurology at the University Hospital of Fez (Morocco). Patients diagnosed with CVT signs between January 2003 and October 2007 were included in the study. Cerebral CT-scan was performed in 27 cases (90%) while the MRI examination was done in 18 patients (67%); and most patients (90%) received anticoagulant therapy. The mean age of our patients was of 29 years (age range between 18 days and 65 years). A female predominance was observed (70%). The clinical presentation of patients was dominated by: headache in 24 cases (80%), motor and sensory disability in 15 cases (50%), seizures in 10 cases (33%), consciousness disorder in 10 cases (33%). CVT was associated to post-partum in 10 cases (33%), infectious origin in 8 cases (26%), Behçet disease in 2 cases (7%), pulmonary carcinoma in 1 case, thrombocytemia in 1 case and idiopathic in 7 cases (23%). The evolution was good in 20 cases (67%), minor squelaes were observed in 6 patients (20%), while major squelaes were observed in 2 cases. Two cases of death were registered. The CVT is a pathology of good prognosis once the diagnosis is promptly established and early heparin treatment initiated. PMID:25317229

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Spontaneous Lumbar Venous Retroperitoneal Hematoma in Setting of Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Case Report and Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Joseph; Chapman, Todd; Scott, Ryan; Kalinkin, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hematoma is rare and benefits from a systematic approach to prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of such bleeds is based upon patient stability, the cause (spontaneous or posttraumatic), and source (arterial or venous). Herein, the authors describe a diagnostic and management algorithm for retroperitoneal hemorrhage with an example of a rare lumbar venous bleed under the complicated clinical setting of deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27795865

  12. Fibrinogen and red blood cells in venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Maria M; Walton, Bethany L; Byrnes, James R; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2014-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively termed venous thromboembolism (VTE), affect over 1 million Americans each year. VTE is triggered by inflammation and blood stasis leading to the formation of thrombi rich in fibrin and red blood cells (RBCs). However, little is known about mechanisms regulating fibrin and RBC incorporation into venous thrombi, or how these components mediate thrombus size or resolution. Both elevated circulating fibrinogen (hyperfibrinogenemia) and abnormal fibrin(ogen) structure and function, including increased fibrin network density and resistance to fibrinolysis, have been observed in plasmas from patients with VTE. Abnormalities in RBC number and/or function have also been associated with VTE risk. RBC contributions to VTE are thought to stem from their effects on blood viscosity and margination of platelets to the vessel wall. More recent studies suggest RBCs also express phosphatidylserine, support thrombin generation, and decrease fibrinolysis. RBC interactions with fibrin(ogen) and cells, including platelets and endothelial cells, may also promote thrombus formation. The contributions of fibrin(ogen) and RBCs to the pathophysiology of VTE warrants further investigation.

  13. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Fatemeh; Faeghi, Fariborz; Ghorbani, Askar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE) sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences. Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging, T*2-weighted turbo SE (TSE), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T*2-weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). MR venography (MRV) images were obtained as the golden standard. Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. T*2-weighted GRE sequences were superior to T*2-weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis. Conclusion: T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27326365

  14. Contralateral Hypoplastic Venous Draining Sinuses Are Associated with Elevated Intracranial Pressure in Unilateral Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Farias-Moeller, R; Avery, R; Diab, Y; Carpenter, J; Murnick, J

    2016-12-01

    Variations in cerebral venous development can influence the ability to regulate drainage. In cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, these variations can be associated with elevated intracranial pressure. We present a series of pediatric patients with unilateral cerebral sinovenous thrombosis and investigate whether the contralateral venous sinus size increases the risk of developing elevated intracranial pressure. Patients diagnosed with a unilateral cerebral sinovenous thrombosis were identified by querying our institutional radiology data base. The difference in the occurrence of elevated intracranial pressure in patients with cerebral sinovenous thrombosis with and without hypoplastic venous sinuses was studied. Twelve cases of unilateral cerebral sinovenous thrombosis met the inclusion criteria and had sufficient images. Six patients had hypoplastic contralateral venous sinuses. The presence of hypoplastic contralateral venous sinus in the setting of thrombosis of a dominant sinus was associated with elevation of intracranial pressure (83% versus 0%, P = .015). Patients with cerebral sinovenous thrombosis and contralateral hypoplastic venous sinuses are at higher risk of developing elevated ICP and may benefit from screening with an ophthalmologic examination.

  15. High risk of deep vein thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central catheters in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao-Feng; Wang, Yu; Liu, Pan-Pan; Bi, Xi-Wen; Sun, Peng; Lin, Tong-Yu; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are widely used in cancer patients. Although PICC is a convenient tool, its use is associated with an obvious increase in the incidence of venous thrombosis. The risk factors for deep vein thrombosis associated with the use of PICCs in cancer patients are largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of PICC-associated thrombosis in lymphoma compared with its incidences in other types of cancer. A total of 8028 adult cancer patients inserted with PICC between June 2007 and June 2015 were included in this study. A total of 249 of the 8028 included patients (3.1%) inserted with PICC developed upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (PICC-UEDVT). Patients with lymphoma were more likely to have PICC-UEDVT than those with other types of malignancies (7.1% vs. 2.80%; P < 0.001). Logistic analysis revealed that a lymphoma diagnosis was a risk factor for UEDVT in cancer patients inserted with PICC (OR: 3.849, 95% CI: 2.334–6.347). Patients with lymphoma may be more predisposed to developing PICC-UEDVT than those with other types of malignancies. Identifying the mechanism underlying the relationship between PICC-UEDVT and lymphoma requires further study. PMID:27078849

  16. Venous sinus thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ronaldo Afonso; Torres, Bruna Ribeiro; de Castilho, Alessandra Soares Rocha; Honorato, Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is associated with a hypercoagulable state and an increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome, with few cases described in the literature, although the disease may be under-diagnosis. The true incidence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be underestimated because many events are asymptomatic or are not diagnosed in time. Here, we describe the case of a male child, 2 years and 10 months old, with nephrotic syndrome presenting with headache, epileptic seizures and sensory inhibition who was diagnosed with superior sagittal and transverse sinuses thrombosis. An international literature review was performed with a defined search strategy in the PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases using the terms 'nephrotic syndrome' and 'cerebral sinovenous thrombosis'. The diagnosis of venous thrombosis should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who presents with neurological signs and symptoms, as early clinical diagnosis promotes favorable outcomes.

  17. Cerebral venous thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Bhoobun, Shalinee; Jalloh, Alhaji Alusaine; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), a rare and life threatening complication of nephrotic syndrome, has a variable and non-specific presentation, posing diagnostic challenges. We describe a case of CVT in a Sierra Leonean child with nephrotic syndrome who was successfully treated for the condition despite the resource limitations of the hospital. This case highlights the importance of considering cerebral venous thrombosis as a complication of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome in children presenting with neurological symptoms.

  18. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis as an Extrahepatic Manifestation of Acute Anicteric Hepatitis A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zis, Panagiotis; Kontogeorgi, Elli; Karakalos, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Despoina; Sevastianos, Vassilios A.

    2012-01-01

    Among the many infective causes of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), viral hepatitis has been regarded as a rare associated condition. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with CVT associated with hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, outlining probable pathogenic mechanisms. We suggest that hepatitis A serological markers should be routinely included in the investigation of cerebral venous thrombosis of unknown etiology, in nonvaccinated patients with risk factors of a recent HAV exposure. PMID:22934203

  19. Late deep venous thrombosis and delayed weightbearing after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Buehler, K O; D'Lima, D D; Petersilge, W J; Colwell, C W; Walker, R H

    1999-04-01

    One hundred ninety-nine patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty and used in hospital pneumatic compression stockings and aspirin as thromboembolic prophylaxis were screened for deep venous thrombosis using duplex ultrasonography on the fourth postoperative day. Of the initial 98 patients, 21 underwent noncemented arthroplasty, maintained touchdown weightbearing for 6 weeks after surgery, and then began progressive partial weightbearing. Of the subsequent 101 patients, 28 underwent noncemented arthroplasty and began progressive weightbearing immediately after surgery. All other patients underwent hybrid arthroplasty and began weightbearing to tolerance immediately after surgery. After duplex screening examination, patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis were given anticoagulation therapy, and patients with negative study results were observed clinically. The relative risk of proximal deep venous thrombosis after noncemented arthroplasty using delayed weightbearing was compared with that after noncemented arthroplasty using immediate progressive weightbearing. Of patients with noncemented arthroplasty, the prevalence of proximal deep venous thrombosis was significantly lower in those using progressive weightbearing immediately after surgery (none) than in those using delayed weightbearing rehabilitation (19%). This study showed that patients undergoing noncemented total hip arthroplasty with delayed weightbearing rehabilitation risk greater potential for deep venous thrombosis after hospital discharge. This study suggests consideration for continued thromboembolic prophylaxis or routine deep venous thrombosis surveillance, or both measures, after hospital discharge, unless more rapid progression of weightbearing is allowed.

  20. Venous Thrombosis and Cancer: from Mouse Models to Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Y.; Geddings, J. E.; Ay, C.; Mackman, N.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients have a ~4 fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with the general population and this is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review summarizes our current knowledge of VTE and cancer from mouse models to clinical studies. Notably, risk of VTE varies depending on the type and stage of cancer. For instance, pancreatic and brain cancer patients have a higher risk of VTE than breast and prostate cancer patients. Moreover, patients with metastatic disease have a higher risk than those with localized tumors. Tumor-derived procoagulant factors and growth factors may directly and indirectly enhance VTE. For example, increased levels of circulating tumor-derived, tissue factor-positive microvesicles may trigger VTE. In a mouse model of ovarian cancer, tumor-derived IL-6 and hepatic thrombopoietin has been linked to increased platelet production and thrombosis. In addition, mouse models of mammary and lung cancer showed that tumor-derived granulocyte colony-stimulating factor causes neutrophilia and activation of neutrophils. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that enhance thrombosis. Cell-free DNA in the blood derived from cancer cells, NETs and treatment with cytotoxic drugs can activate the clotting cascade. These studies suggest that there are multiple mechanisms for VTE in patients with different types of cancer. Preventing and treating VTE in cancer patients is challenging; the current recommendations are to use low molecular weight heparin. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may allow the development of new therapies to safely prevent VTE in cancer patients. PMID:25988873

  1. Chronic Stress Facilitates the Development of Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Yang, Fei; Sun, Pei-Wen; Zhu, Chen-Jie; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Guo-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The increasing pressure of modern social life intensifies the impact of stress on the development of cardiovascular diseases, which include deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Renal sympathetic denervation has been applied as one of the clinical approaches for the treatment of drug-resistant hypertension. In addition, the close relationship between oxidative stress and cardiovascular diseases has been well documented. The present study is designed to explore the mechanism by which the renal sympathetic nerve system and the oxidative stress affect the blood coagulation system in the development of DVT. Chronic foot shock model in rats was applied to mimic a state of physiological stress similar to humans. Our results showed that chronic foot shock procedure could promote DVT which may be through the activation of platelets aggregation. The aggravation of DVT and activation of platelets were alleviated by renal sympathetic denervation or antioxidant (Tempol) treatment. Concurrently, the denervation treatment could also reduce the levels of circulating oxidation factors in rats. These results demonstrate that both the renal sympathetic nerve system and the oxidative stress contribute to the development of DVT in response to chronic stress, which may provide novel strategy for treatment of clinic DVT patients.

  2. Risk of recurrent venous thrombosis related to past provoking risk situations: follow-up of a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel D; Lijfering, Willem M; Barreto, Sandhi M; Lopes, Fabiane Dias; Pires, Giselli de Souza; Rosendaal, Frits R; Rezende, Suely M

    2013-07-01

    Strategies targeting at classifying the risk for recurrent venous thrombosis are needed. We previously hypothesized, by studying a cohort of patients, that those who had 'survived' risk situations for venous thrombosis without developing it would, after a first venous thrombosis, have a low recurrence risk. Therefore, we re-evaluated the same cohort, now with a longer follow-up. Patients, after a first confirmed venous thrombosis event, were followed for an average of 43 months after suspension of anticoagulation. Patients with indication for indefinite anticoagulation were not included. The primary endpoint was objective recurrent venous thrombosis. Recurrent venous thrombosis was recorded in 9% of 378 eligible patients. Patients with a provoked first event and positive past risk situations for venous thrombosis had an incidence rate of recurrence of 1.26 (95% CI, 0.60-2.31) per 100 patient-years. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of this subgroup compared with patients with a provoked event without other past risk situations for venous thrombosis was 0.8 (95% CI 0.2-2.9). This IRR was 2.8 (95% CI, 1.2-6.5) in patients with an unprovoked event and positive past risk situations and 7.1 (95% CI, 3.0-17.1) in patients with an unprovoked event and no past risk situations. When only idiopathic first events were evaluated the IRR was 2.5 (95% CI, 1.1-5.9) for patients without past risk situation compared with those with these history. In this study, asking a patient about past exposure to risk factors for venous thrombosis long before the occurrence of a first venous thrombosis occurred, could be used to classify patients with a first unprovoked venous thrombosis at higher risk for recurrence of venous thrombosis.

  3. Venous thrombosis and prothrombotic factors in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Magro, Fernando; Soares, João-Bruno; Fernandes, Dália

    2014-05-07

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may have an increased risk of venous thrombosis (VTE). PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scopus were searched to identify studies investigating the risk of VTE and the prevalence of acquired and genetic VTE risk factors and prothrombotic abnormalities in IBD. Overall, IBD patients have a two- to fourfold increased risk of VTE compared with healthy controls, with an overall incidence rate of 1%-8%. The majority of studies did not show significant differences in the risk of VTE between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Several acquired factors are responsible for the increased risk of VTE in IBD: inflammatory activity, hospitalisation, surgery, pregnancy, disease phenotype (e.g., fistulising disease, colonic involvement and extensive involvement) and drug therapy (mainly steroids). There is also convincing evidence from basic science and from clinical and epidemiological studies that IBD is associated with several prothrombotic abnormalities, including initiation of the coagulation system, downregulation of natural anticoagulant mechanisms, impairment of fibrinolysis, increased platelet count and reactivity and dysfunction of the endothelium. Classical genetic alterations are not generally found more often in IBD patients than in non-IBD patients, suggesting that genetics does not explain the greater risk of VTE in these patients. IBD VTE may have clinical specificities, namely an earlier first episode of VTE in life, high recurrence rate, decreased efficacy of some drugs in preventing further episodes and poor prognosis. Clinicians should be aware of these risks, and adequate prophylactic actions should be taken in patients who have disease activity, are hospitalised, are submitted to surgery or are undergoing treatment.

  4. Venous thrombosis and prothrombotic factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Fernando; Soares, João-Bruno; Fernandes, Dália

    2014-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may have an increased risk of venous thrombosis (VTE). PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scopus were searched to identify studies investigating the risk of VTE and the prevalence of acquired and genetic VTE risk factors and prothrombotic abnormalities in IBD. Overall, IBD patients have a two- to fourfold increased risk of VTE compared with healthy controls, with an overall incidence rate of 1%-8%. The majority of studies did not show significant differences in the risk of VTE between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Several acquired factors are responsible for the increased risk of VTE in IBD: inflammatory activity, hospitalisation, surgery, pregnancy, disease phenotype (e.g., fistulising disease, colonic involvement and extensive involvement) and drug therapy (mainly steroids). There is also convincing evidence from basic science and from clinical and epidemiological studies that IBD is associated with several prothrombotic abnormalities, including initiation of the coagulation system, downregulation of natural anticoagulant mechanisms, impairment of fibrinolysis, increased platelet count and reactivity and dysfunction of the endothelium. Classical genetic alterations are not generally found more often in IBD patients than in non-IBD patients, suggesting that genetics does not explain the greater risk of VTE in these patients. IBD VTE may have clinical specificities, namely an earlier first episode of VTE in life, high recurrence rate, decreased efficacy of some drugs in preventing further episodes and poor prognosis. Clinicians should be aware of these risks, and adequate prophylactic actions should be taken in patients who have disease activity, are hospitalised, are submitted to surgery or are undergoing treatment. PMID:24803797

  5. [Endovascular thrombolysis for massive cerebral venous thrombosis in a teenager with nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, Paula; Biscoito, Luísa; Vieira, Marisa; Marçal, Mónica; Camilo, Cristina; Neto, Lia; Abecasis, Francisco; Almeida, Margarida; Correia, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially severe condition in children. We present the case of a teenager with corticodependent nephrotic syndrome diagnosed at five months of age and treated with cyclosporine A. In the context of recurrence of nephrotic syndrome he presented with headache, vomiting and severe intracranial hypertension. While the raised intracranial pressure and the status epilepticus were controlled, the brain imaging revealed venous thrombosis of all venous sinus, with absence of venous drainage. He was submitted to local thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, with recanalization of the venous sinuses. The outcome was favourable, without neurological deficits. In this case, the early radiologic intervention was crucial, enabling a full neurological recovery, in a teenager whose initial prognosis was very poor.

  6. [Umbilical and peripherally inserted venous central catheterization of the newborn].

    PubMed

    Bouissou, A; Rakza, T; Storme, L; Lafarghe, A; Fily, A; Diependaele, J-F; Dalmas, S

    2008-09-01

    Umbilical venous and peripherally inserted venous central catheters are widely used to perfuse low-weight preterm and term newborns in intensive care units. This catheter must be inserted carefully and monitored rigorously to prevent complications. This paper develops today's knowledge on the use and complications in the newborn population.

  7. Elevated plasma osteoprotegerin levels are associated with venous thrombosis and bleeding in patients with polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Kees, Mathias; Wiesbauer, Franz; Gisslinger, Bettina; Wagner, Renate; Shehata, Medhat; Gisslinger, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    Patients with polycythemia vera (PV) have an increased risk for the development of thrombohemorrhagic complications. The pathogenesis of these complications is still unclear. An important role in vascular disease has recently been attributed to osteoprotegerin (OPG). It has been shown that various tissues of the cardiovascular system produce OPG, and there is growing evidence of an association between elevated serum OPG levels and cardiovascular morbidity. We evaluated if OPG was associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis or bleeding complications in a cohort of 114 PV patients. The analysis consisted of a retrospective and a prospective part. In the retrospective univariate analysis, a one unit change in OPG caused the odds of venous thrombosis to increase by 40% (p=0.005) and the odds of bleeding to increase by 52% (p=0.001). Multivariate analysis only slightly attenuated the association to 33% (p=0.03) and 37% (p=0.013) for venous thrombosis and bleeding, respectively. OPG was also related to the development of the combined outcome of venous thrombosis and bleeding in the prospective analysis (log-rank-test: p=0.017). This is the first report that links the occurrence of venous thrombosis or bleeding to elevated OPG levels.

  8. An unusual cause of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: prothrombin G20210A gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Square, Jaime H; Storey, Raul; Rodriguez-Dunn, Simon; Mohamed-Aly, Mohamed S

    2007-09-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis represents less than 1% of all strokes, being an uncommon entity with a wide spectrum of clinical scenarios. We present a 45-year-old Hispanic female with a history of long-term oral contraceptive use who was diagnosed with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis due to a heterozygous carrier mutation in the prothrombin G20210A gene. The patient was successfully managed with intravenous heparin with favorable clinical results without adverse effects. The prevalence of inherited primary thrombophilia increases with additional risk factors such as the use of oral contraceptives that can trigger or prothrombotic events in any vascular bed. An increased prevalence in the prothrombin G20210 gene mutation has been demonstrated in the Mexican-Mestizo population. Controversy exists regarding therapy of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; according to experts, heparin remains the cornerstone of therapy with acceptable outcomes. More clinical trials are required to evaluate long-term outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  9. Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis after Laparoscopic Exploration for Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kunizaki, Shozo; Shimaguchi, Mayu; Yoshinaga, Yasuo; Kanda, Yukihiro; Lefor, Alan T.; Mizokami, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of intestinal ischemia which is potentially life-threatening because it can lead to intestinal infarction. Mesenteric venous thrombosis rarely develops after abdominal surgery and is usually associated with coagulation disorders. Associated symptoms are generally subtle or nonspecific, often resulting in delayed diagnosis. A 68-year-old woman underwent laparoscopic exploration for small bowel obstruction, secondary to adhesions. During the procedure, an intestinal perforation was identified and repaired. Postoperatively, the abdominal pain persisted and repeat exploration was undertaken. At repeat exploration, a perforation was identified in the small bowel with a surrounding abscess. After the second operation, the abdominal pain improved but anorexia persisted. Contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography was performed which revealed superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy with heparin was started immediately and the thrombus resolved over the next 6 days. Although rare, this complication must be considered in patients after abdominal surgery with unexplained abdominal symptoms. PMID:24455391

  10. Prevention and treatment of thrombosis associated with central venous catheters in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jasti, Nagamallika; Streiff, Michael B

    2014-10-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) play an essential role in the management of cancer patients. Venous thrombosis is a common complication of CVC. The incidence of CVC-associated venous thromboembolism (CVC-VTE) is 1.7 per 1000 catheter days. Risk factors for CVC-VTE include the patient's underlying cancer, a history of previous thrombotic events and the location and type of CVC. Anticoagulant prophylaxis is not effective for CVC-VTE. Anticoagulation alone is the preferred initial treatment for CVC-VTE. CVC removal may be considered in refractory cases or when anticoagulation is contraindicated. Thrombolytic therapy is reserved for patients with limb-threatening thrombosis or thrombosis unresponsive to conventional treatment. Anticoagulation should be continued for at least 3 months or as long as the CVC is present.

  11. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Pregnancy-A Poignant Allegory of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Shailesh, Gaikwad Harsha; Gupta, Sumedha; Sharma, Manjula; Mittal, Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT), also known as cortical venous, cerebral sinus, cerebral venous sinus, or dural sinus thrombosis, is an infrequent grave condition affecting pregnant females, resulting from clot formation in one of the many outflow tracts of the brain. Although pregnancy-associated stroke or CVT is uncommon, the risk of stroke is greatly increased above the low baseline rate in young patients during late pregnancy and, even more so, during the puerperium. Haemorrhagic infarction can occur in the acute stage of CVT. The article reports a case of CVT in puerperium in woman without any risk factors for thrombosis, highlighting the difficulties encountered in differentiating this rare cause from common diagnoses such as eclampsia. Also, clinical considerations and relevant literature review on prognostic factors affecting outcome have been addressed. CVT is an uncommon serious neurologic disorder in young gravidas requiring prudent assessment of the potential differential diagnoses and prompt management. PMID:28208950

  12. [Deep venous thrombosis in pregnancy: risk factors and possibilities for prevention].

    PubMed

    Heilmann, L; Hojnacki, B; Fischer, W M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-two cases of acute venous thrombosis in pregnancy (0.64%) were studied. Concomitant pulmonary embolism was documented in 0.23%. Prophylactic heparinization was performed in 32 gravidae. In the acute thrombosis group therapy was instituted in the 26th week, and in the prophylaxis group in the 20th week of pregnancy. Recurrent thromboses after cesarean section occurred in 4.5% of the patients with acute venous thrombosis and in 5.6% of those in the prophylaxis group. Reduced red blood cell deformability, low antithrombin III and high leukocyte count were identified as risk factors. Heparinization did not prevent increased red blood cell aggregation and plasma viscosity at birth. Rheologic factors played only a secondary role in the prophylaxis group. Prophylactic heparinization in pregnancy is currently the only means of reducing the thrombosis recurrence rate in patients with a history of thromboembolism.

  13. Use of light reflection rheography for diagnosis of axillary or subclavian venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, D; Andersen, C A; Sado, A S; Bertoglio, M C

    1991-06-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis of axillary and subclavian venous thrombosis or documentation of the post-thrombotic syndrome using modalities currently in use is not definitive. Light reflection rheography, which is a reflection of venous pressure changes in the extremity as recorded from the subdermal capillary plexus, was used to correctly diagnose axillary or subclavian venous thrombosis in 11 patients. A positive study was confirmed by phlebography in each instance. There were no instances of false-positive results. The methodology is simple, involving testing of the venous outflow from the upper extremity in response to exercise, application of venous congesting pressure, and measurement of the rate of venous outflow when the congesting pressure is released. Normal respiratory variations of an open venous system are also assessed by this noninvasive modality. The tracing obtained is easy to interpret and provides objective evidence of proximal venous occlusion. The test is not operator-dependent and the instrumentation is relatively inexpensive. We believe that light reflection rheography may be an exciting development in the noninvasive diagnosis of axillary or subclavian venous compromise and merits further trials.

  14. Peripheral Insertion of a Central Venous Access Device Under Fluoroscopic Guidance Using a Peripherally Accessed System (PAS) Port in the Forearm

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sojiro; Morita, Yoshitaka; Awatani, Toshihide; Takasaki, Motohiro; Horimi, Tadashi; Ozawa, Zen

    1998-05-15

    Purpose: We describe the technique, efficacy, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a peripherally accessed system (PAS) port via the forearm. Methods: Beginning in July 1994, 105 central venous access devices were implanted in 104 patients for the long-term infusion of antibiotics or antineoplasmic agents, blood products, or parenteral nutrition. The devices was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance with real-time venography from a peripheral route. Results: All ports were successfully implanted. There were no procedure-related complications. No thrombosis or local infection was observed; however, in six patients catheter-related phlebitis occurred. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a PAS port via the forearm is safe and efficacious, and injection of contrast medium through a peripheral IV catheter before introduction of the catheter helps to avoid catheter-related phlebitis.

  15. Dangerous Headache: A Case of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Protein S Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, D Angeline; Singh, Deepak Ningombam; Virupakshappa, Banu; Rahul, R

    2017-01-01

    Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) is a sporadic cause of headache. DVST is a recherché complication of maxillary sinus infection. Maxillary sinusitis infection may spread directly to orbit via lamina papyracea and it is expedited by the presence veins of breschet. The authors present a clinical case of dural sinus thrombosis with protein S deficiency and also describe an effective management approach for DVST. PMID:28274079

  16. Poor Prognostic Outcome in Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Dyskinesia and Elevated Platelet Volume.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shousen; Xu, Bingyang; Zhao, Qingshuang; Li, Jun; Hong, Jingfang; Wei, Liangfeng; Zhao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Although about 80% of patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have a good prognosis, some patients develop severe complications and a small proportion do not survive. The study included patients who had been diagnosed with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in our hospital from May 2008 to February 2014. Based on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at 3 months for outcome, the patients were divided into two groups: good prognosis (mRS score ≤ 2) and poor prognosis (mRS score > 2). Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to identify significant prognostic factors for poor outcome. A total of 86 patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, 54 males and 32 females, average age 41.3 years (range, 3-83 years), were enrolled. Of these 86 patients, 64 (74.4%) had a good prognosis and 22 (25.6%) a poor prognosis. Univariate analysis revealed that dyskinesia was a significant risk factor (factor with odds ratio >1) for poor prognosis. In multivariate analysis, the risk of poor prognosis in patients with dyskinesia was 23 times higher than for those without dyskinesia (p < 0.001). Thrombosis of the sinus transervus was found to reduce the risk of poor prognosis in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Most patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have a good prognosis but patients with dyskinesia have a poorer prognosis.

  17. Simple, hybrid deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ward, W G; Olin, M D

    1999-01-01

    A 7.1% deep venous thrombosis rate followed total hip arthroplasty in 56 patients using a hybrid prophylactic regimen against deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolus. There were no bleeding complications, no symptomatic pulmonary emboli, and no unexplained deaths. The regimen consisted of an initial loading dose of warfarin, usually 10 mg, the night of surgery followed by 2.5 mg/day for 3 weeks, with dosage adjustments only in cases of over-anticoagulation. This regimen was combined with elevated sling suspension of the operative leg, bilateral pedal intermittent pneumatic compression devices, and early mobilization. This prophylactic regimen is simple, inexpensive, efficacious, and compatible with an early hospital discharge.

  18. A Rare Case of Transverse Sinus Venous Thrombosis Simulating Postdural Puncture Headache After Cervical Epidural Injection.

    PubMed

    Guirguis, Maged; Jusino, Eduardo; Tolba, Reda; Samuel, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a feared complication related to epidural steroid injections. We report a unique case in which all subjective and objective findings indicated the diagnosis of PDPH. However, the patient failed appropriate conservative and interventional management. Therapeutic failure prompted further investigation to establish the correct diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare, difficult to diagnose, but potentially lethal disorder with nonspecific and variable clinical presentations, including headache and focal neurological deficits. Performing magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venogram should be considered early, especially in patients who fail to respond to standard interventions for PDPH.

  19. Venous sinus thrombosis after Proteus vulgaris meningitis and concomitant Clostridium abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Bodur, Hürrem; Colpan, Aylin; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Akinci, Esragul; Cevik, Mustafa Aydin; Balaban, Neriman

    2002-01-01

    A 19-y-old woman presented with Proteus vulgaris meningitis as a complication of chronic otitis media. Despite treatment with ceftazidime and amikacin no clinical improvement was observed. Cranial MRI revealed right-sided mastoiditis/otitis media and venous sinus thrombosis. After mastoidectomy, repeat cranial MRI demonstrated abscess formation in the venous sinuses. The abscess was drained. Clostridium spp. was isolated from the abscess culture.

  20. Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access for therapeutic apheresis procedures reduces need for central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Eric; Garcia, Salvador; Miguel, Robin; Segura, Francisco J; Ipe, Tina S; Leveque, Christopher

    2016-08-10

    Therapeutic and donor apheresis requires adequate vascular access to achieve inlet flow rates of ∼50-100 mL/min. While central dialysis-type venous catheters can usually provide such access, their use includes several associated risks. Some of these risks can be avoided or diminished if adequate peripheral venous access can be established. Some patients have adequate peripheral veins for apheresis that cannot be readily identified visually or by palpation. We hypothesized that ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access would benefit such patients and would lead to placement of fewer central venous catheters. The technique of ultrasound-guided peripheral access for apheresis has been in use at Houston Methodist Hospital since 2012. We performed a prospective review of patients undergoing inpatient and outpatient apheresis at Houston Methodist Hospital from July 1, 2015 to September 30, 2015, to assess its benefit. During this time, we performed 831 procedures on 186 patients, including 787 therapeutic plasma exchanges, three red blood cell exchanges, 41 peripheral stem cell collections. Ultrasound-guided vascular access was used for 68 procedures (8% of all procedures), including 62 therapeutic plasma exchanges, 4 peripheral stem cell collections, and 2 red blood cell changes. Use of ultrasound-guided peripheral access prevented the placement of central venous catheters in 37 (20%) patients, demonstrating its utility in a busy transfusion service.

  1. A Possible Association of Diindolylmethane with Pulmonary Embolism and Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Moualla, Maan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. 3,3′-Diindolylmethane is available as a supplement in the United States for “cancer prevention” and “augmentation of physical fitness.” A derivative of indole-3-carbinol found in plants, diindolylmethane, binds to receptors associated with the sex steroid pathways and has unclear effects on estrogen and androgen physiology. We present a patient who had been taking diindolylmethane and developed right lower extremity deep venous thrombosis and bilateral pulmonary embolism. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old man presented with swelling, erythema, and warmth of his right lower extremity for three to four weeks. He had been taking diindolylmethane one tablet daily for three to four months. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism included tobacco use, personal history of possible pulmonary embolism, body mass index, and age. Imaging studies found extensive deep venous thrombosis in his right lower extremity and bilateral pulmonary embolism with probable right middle lobe infarction. Follow-up imaging showed chronic deep venous thrombosis in his right lower extremity. Discussion. As suggested in this single case, patients who take diindolylmethane may be at greater risk for venous thromboembolism. Further reports and studies are necessary in order to elucidate this possible association. Clinicians should question patients about supplements in the setting of venous thromboembolism. PMID:28050169

  2. Factors That Influence Perforator Thrombosis and Predict Healing Perforator Sclerotherapy for Venous Ulceration Without Axial Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Kiguchi, Misaki M.; Hager, Eric S.; Winger, Daniel G.; Hirsch, Stanley A.; Chaer, Rabih A.; Dillavou, Ellen D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Refluxing perforators contribute to venous ulceration. We sought to describe patient characteristics and procedural factors that (1) impact rates of incompetent perforator vein (IPV) thrombosis with ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy (UGS) and (2) impact the healing of venous ulcers (CEAP 6) without axial reflux. METHODS Retrospective review of UGS of IPV injections from 1/2010–11/2012 identified 73 treated venous ulcers in 62 patients. Patients had no other superficial/axial reflux and were treated with standard wound care and compression. Ultrasound was used to screen for refluxing perforators near ulcer(s), and these were injected with sodium tetradecyl sulfate or polidocanol foam and assessed for thrombosis at 2 weeks. Demographic data, comorbidities, treatment details and outcomes were analyzed. Univariate and multivariable modeling was performed to determine covariates predicting IPV thrombosis and ulcer healing. RESULTS 62 patients with active ulcers for an average of 28 months with compression therapy prior to perforator treatment had an average age of 57.1 years, were 55% male, 36% had a history of DVT and 30% had deep venous reflux. 32 patients (52%) healed ulcers, while 30 patients (48%) had non-healed ulcer(s) in mean follow-up of 30.2 months. Ulcers were treated with 189 injections, with average thrombosis rate of 54%. Of 73 ulcers, 43 ulcers healed (59%), and 30 ulcers did not heal (41%). Patients that healed ulcers had an IPV thrombosis rate of 69 % vs. 38% in patients who did not heal (P<.001). Multivariate models demonstrated male gender and warfarin use negatively predicted thrombosis of IPVs (P=.03, P=.01). Multivariate model for ulcer healing found complete IPV thrombosis was a positive predictor (P=.02), while large initial ulcer area was a negative predictor (P=.08). Increased age was associated with fewer ulcer recurrences (P=.05). Hypertension and increased follow-up time predicted increased ulcer recurrences (P=.04, P=.02). Calf

  3. Pancreas Transplant Venous Thrombosis: Role of Endovascular Interventions for Graft Salvage

    SciTech Connect

    Stockland, Andrew H.; Willingham, Darrin L.; Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo; Grewal, Hani P.; McKinney, J. Mark; Hughes, Christopher B.; Walser, Eric M.

    2009-03-15

    Venous thrombosis of pancreas transplant allografts often leads to graft loss. We evaluated the efficacy of emergent endovascular techniques to salvage thrombosed pancreatic allografts in a series of six patients. Of the 76 pancreas transplants performed between 2002 and 2006, six patients were diagnosed with venous thrombosis on MRI between 2 and 28 days posttransplant (mean, 9 days). Five patients were systemic-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient iliac vein) and one patient was portal-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient superior mesenteric vein). Conventional venography confirmed the diagnosis of venous thrombosis in all patients. One patient was treated with catheter-directed venous thrombolysis and balloon thrombectomy. Another patient was treated with rheolytic thrombectomy alone. The remaining four patients were treated with a combination of these mechanical and thrombolytic techniques. Completion venography revealed >50% clot reduction and resumption of venous drainage in all patients. One patient required additional intervention 16 days later for recurrent thrombosis. Two patients required metal stent placement for anastomotic stenoses or kinks. One patient required pancreatectomy 36 h after attempted salvage secondary to a major hemorrhage and graft necrosis. Two patients recovered pancreatic function initially but lost graft function at 8 and 14 months, respectively, from severe chronic rejection. Patient survival was 100%, long-term graft survival was 50%, rethrombosis rate was 16.6%, and graft loss from rejection was 33%. In conclusion, early recognition and treatment of venous thrombosis after pancreas transplantation has acceptable morbidity and no mortality using short-term endovascular pharmacomechanical therapy.

  4. Cerebral venous thrombosis and secondary polycythemia in a case of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Bairy, Manohar; Attur, Ravindra Prabhu; Sambhaji, Charudutt Jayant

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and polycythemia are considered as rare and life threatening complications of nephrotic syndrome. We report an unusual combination of both these complications in a case of nephrotic syndrome due to minimal change disease that was treated successfully. There was prompt and complete remission of nephrotic syndrome with steroid therapy, concurrent with complete resolution of polycythemia and CVT.

  5. Cerebral arterial occlusion and intracranial venous thrombosis in a woman taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Montón, F.; Rebollo, M.; Quintana, F.; Berciano, J.

    1984-01-01

    Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus are reported in a 30-year-old woman taking oral contraceptives (OC). The coexistence of arterial and venous cerebral pathology as a complication of OC use has only been previously reported in one case. The pathogenesis of this rare association is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6462985

  6. Role of Color Flow Ultrasound in Detection of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Shelan Hakeem; AL-Najjar, Salwa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of lower limbs is one of the most causes for the majority of death caused by pulmonary embolism. Many medical and surgical disorders are complicated by DVT. Most venous thrombi are clinically silent. B-mode and color Doppler imaging is needed for early diagnosis of DVT to prevent complications and squeal of…

  7. [Risk of deep venous thrombosis during an air flight: prevention and counselling at the counter].

    PubMed

    Zawieja, P; Orecchioni, A-M; Métais, P; Touze, J-É

    2011-09-01

    Worldwide air traffic reaches about 2.3 billion passengers per year. The increasing number of persons at thrombo-embolic risk, together with potentially severe or fatal complications of deep venous thrombosis, suggests community pharmacists can give basic preventive advice to persons identified as at risk.

  8. [Thrombosis of the right atrium after umbilical venous catheterization. Favourable outcome after early thrombectomy].

    PubMed

    Paupe, A; Lenclen, R; Blanc, P; Chassevent, J; Hoenn, E; Molho, M; Zannier, D; Olivier-Martin, M

    1992-02-01

    A case of right atrial thrombosis after venous umbilical catheterization in a 21 day-old premature newborn is reported. The initiating factors of such an accident and its clinical signs are evocated. The authors emphasize the value of a systematic ultrasonographic supervision of newborns with central catheters for a long period of time and the value of surgical thrombectomy.

  9. The complete recanalization of PICC-related venous thrombosis in cancer patients: A series of case reports.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zuo-Ping; Liu, Xing-Jing; Zou, Bin-Xin; Wang, Li-Gen; Zhou, Tao

    2013-08-01

    In this study, cancer patients with venous thrombosis associated with the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) underwent complete recanalization by the administration of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS), which vary from heparin or urokinase in that they do not have the same risks associated with thrombolysis, including bleeding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study concerning the treatment of cancers with PNS to be reported in the literature. Three cancer patients aged 30-50 years old, two females and one male, were subjected to chemotherapy. On the first day of chemotherapy, a PICC was inserted into the right basilic vein with its tip in the superior vena cava. On the third day of chemotherapy, pain, swelling and skin flushing started. In the following days, particularly days 10-13, a Doppler ultrasound examination confirmed a long thrombus along the PICC line in the axillary vein and brachial veins in each patient. The patients rejected the insertion of an inferior vena cava filter, and neither heparin nor urokinase were administered due to contra-indications. An injection of PNS (200 mg) was administered every day. On days 20-28 of chemotherapy, the thrombus in the axillary and brachial veins disappeared in the three patients. It was concluded that PNS promote blood circulation, which prevents blood stasis and reduces the toxicity of cisplatin. The results suggest that PNS are a feasible and effective treatment option for many types of cancer, but have a broader clinical impact on cancer patients with PICC-related venous thrombosis. Therefore, this study is an original case report of particular interest to cancer patients with PICC-related venous thrombosis.

  10. Endovascular Thrombolysis Using Monteplase for Non-chronic Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Yoshimatsu, Rika Tanaka, Osamu Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of endovascular thrombolysis using monteplase for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Between December 2005 and October 2009, at our institution nine endovascular thrombolysis treatments with monteplase were performed for symptomatic DVT in eight patients (6 women, 2 men; mean age, 56 (range, 15-80) years). In all, systemic anticoagulation administered by the peripheral intravenous route with heparin and/or thrombolysis with urokinase followed by anticoagulation with orally administered warfarin had been performed, and subsequently six endovascular treatments without monteplase were administered. However, DVT persisted, and endovascular treatments with monteplase were tried. In six (67%) of the nine procedures, DVT completely or almost completely disappeared after endovascular thrombolysis with monteplase. Mean dose of monteplase used was 2,170,000 IU. There was only one procedure-related complication. In one patient, just after thrombolysis with monteplase, bleeding at the puncture site and gingival bleeding occurred. Bleeding was stopped by manual astriction only. Endovascular thrombolysis with monteplase may be an effective treatment for DVT, even in cases resistant to traditional systemic anticoagulation and thrombolysis and endovascular procedures without monteplase.

  11. Peripheral venous catheter fracture with embolism into the pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Chady; Campisi, Alessio; D’Andrea, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral vein catheterization is generally considered a harmless procedure. Venous catheter rupture associated with pulmonary embolism is an unlikely but potentially serious complication. We report a case of a peripheral venous catheter (PVC) fracture with pulmonary artery embolization in the left lower lobe treated successfully by a surgical approach. The positioning of a PVC is not always a harmless procedure. Every time there are difficulties in positioning or in removal of a catheter device, it should be carefully inspected to verify integrity. The advisability of removal of these small foreign bodies is debated; percutaneous retrieval is preferred, while surgery should be discussed case by case. PMID:28149586

  12. From presentation to follow-up: diagnosis and treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Nicole; Figueroa, Ramón E; Vender, John R

    2009-11-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is an uncommon cause of stroke but remains a challenge for physicians faced with this diagnosis largely due to the variability in presentation. Anticoagulation, typically with intravenous heparin, remains the mainstay of treatment for stable patients and is sufficient in the majority of cases. However, a significant mortality rate exists for cerebral venous thrombosis due to patients who deteriorate or do not adequately respond to initial treatments. It is in these patients that more aggressive interventions must be undertaken. The neurosurgeon is often called on, either acutely for initial evaluation of the stroke or venous hemorrhage or after the failure of initial therapy for clot evacuation, hemicraniectomy, or thrombectomy. A proper workup must include a search for an underlying, correctable cause as well as thorough follow-up with correction of identified risk factors to decrease the risk of recurrent disease.

  13. Association study of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation with cerebral venous thrombosis in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Ghaznavi, Habib; Soheili, Zahra; Samiei, Shahram; Soltanpour, Mohammad S

    2015-12-01

    There are limited data on the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism and hyperhomocysteinemia as risk factors for cerebral venous thrombosis in Iranian population. We examined a possible association between fasting plasma homocysteine levels, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism, and cerebral venous thrombosis in 50 patients with a diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis (20-63 years old) and 75 healthy controls (18-65 years old). Genotyping of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene polymorphism was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and homocysteine levels were measured by enzyme immunoassay. Fasting plasma homocysteine levels were significantly higher in cerebral venous thrombosis patients than in controls (P = 0.015). Moreover, plasma homocysteine levels were significantly higher in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677TT genotype compared to 677CT and 677CC genotypes in both cerebral venous thrombosis patients (P = 0.01) and controls (P = 0.03). Neither 677CT heterozygote genotype [odds ratio (OR) 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-2.84, P = 0.556] nor 677TT homozygote genotype (OR 1.73, 95% CI 0.32-9.21, P = 0.833) was significantly associated with cerebral venous thrombosis. Additionally, no significant differences in the frequency of 677T allele between cerebral venous thrombosis patients and controls were identified (OR 1.31, 95% CI 0.69-2.50, P = 0.512). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that elevated plasma homocysteine levels are significant risk factors for cerebral venous thrombosis. Also, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677TT genotype is not linked with cerebral venous thrombosis, but is a determinant of elevated plasma homocysteine levels.

  14. Different characteristics and prognostic impact of deep-vein thrombosis / pulmonary embolism and intraabdominal venous thrombosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyoun; Lee, Keun-Wook; Bang, Soo-Mee; Kim, Sujung; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Doyeun; Lee, Jong Seok

    2011-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the incidence, risk factors, and prognostic implications of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Asian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Differences in clinical characteristics and prognostic impact between extremity venous thrombosis (or deep-vein thrombosis; DVT)/pulmonary embolism (PE) and intra-abdominal venous thrombosis (IVT) were also evaluated. For this study, consecutive CRC patients (N = 2,006) were enrolled and analyses were conducted retrospectively. VTEs were classified into two categories (DVT/PE and IVT). Significant predictors of developing VTEs were advanced stage and an increased number of co-morbidities. The two-year cumulative incidence of DVT/PE was 0.3%, 0.9% and 1.4% in stages 0~1, 2 and 3, respectively; this incidence range of DVT/PE in Asian patients with loco-regional CRC was lower than in Western patients. However, the two-year incidence (6.4%) of DVT/PE in Asian patients with distant metastases was not lower than in Western patients. Although 65.2% of patients with DVT/PE were symptomatic, only 15.7% of patients with IVT were symptomatic. During chemotherapy, DVT/PE developed more frequently than IVT. Only DVT/PE had a negative effect on survival; IVT had no prognostic significance. In conclusion, despite the low incidence of DVT/PE in Asian patients with loco-regional CRC, the protective effect of Asian ethnicity on VTE development disappears as tumour stage increases in patients with distant metastases. Considering different clinical characteristics and prognostic influences between DVT/PE and IVT, the treatment approach should be also different.

  15. Multimodality Imaging of the Peripheral Venous System

    PubMed Central

    Gaitini, Diana

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the spectrum of image-based diagnostic tools used in the investigation of suspected deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Summary of the experience gained by the author as well as relevant publications, regarding vein imaging modalities taken from a computerized database, was reviewed. The imaging modalities reviewed include phlebography, color Doppler duplex ultrasonography (CDDUS), computerized tomography angiography (CTA) and venography (CTV), magnetic resonance venography (MRV), and radionuclide venography (RNV). CDDUS is recommended as the modality of choice for the diagnosis of DVT. A strategy combining clinical score and D-dimer test refines the selection of patients. Phlebography is reserved for discrepant noninvasive studies. PMID:18521181

  16. Venous sinus thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Afonso; Torres, Bruna Ribeiro; de Castilho, Alessandra Soares Rocha; Honorato, Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is associated with a hypercoagulable state and an increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome, with few cases described in the literature, although the disease may be under-diagnosis. The true incidence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be underestimated because many events are asymptomatic or are not diagnosed in time. Here, we describe the case of a male child, 2 years and 10 months old, with nephrotic syndrome presenting with headache, epileptic seizures and sensory inhibition who was diagnosed with superior sagittal and transverse sinuses thrombosis. An international literature review was performed with a defined search strategy in the PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases using the terms ‘nephrotic syndrome’ and ‘cerebral sinovenous thrombosis’. The diagnosis of venous thrombosis should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who presents with neurological signs and symptoms, as early clinical diagnosis promotes favorable outcomes. PMID:25607275

  17. Hematologic variables and venous thrombosis: red cell distribution width and blood monocyte count are associated with an increased risk.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Suely Meireles; Lijfering, Willem M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that leukocytes and erythrocytes play a role in coagulation. However, whether leukocytes, erythrocytes and other hematologic variables are associated with risk of venous thrombosis is not well known. To study this, we used data from 2473 patients with venous thrombosis and 2935 controls. The variables assessed were: total leukocytes, granulocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes, hematocrit, hemoglobin, erythrocytes and red cell indices (mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and red cell distribution width). We found a strong dose-response relation for higher red cell distribution width and monocyte count with risk of venous thrombosis, with odds ratios of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 2.0-4.8) and 2.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.8), respectively, after adjustment for age, sex, C-reactive protein level, malignancy and co-morbidities. Monocyte count and red cell distribution width were associated with venous thrombosis even within reference ranges. A low monocyte count (<0.12 × 10(9)/L) was associated with a lower risk of venous thrombosis after full adjustment (odds ratios 0.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-0.8). In summary, high red cell distribution width and blood monocyte count, two parameters that are inexpensive and easily obtainable, were clearly associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Future studies should evaluate the underlying mechanism and the use of these variables in prediction models for first and recurrent thrombosis.

  18. Outcome of venous stenting following catheter directed thrombolysis for acute proximal lower limb venous thrombosis: a prospective study with venous Doppler follow-up at 1-year.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Reddy, Babu; Nagesh, C M; Agarwal, Naveen; Manjunath, C N

    2015-10-01

    Functional outcome of venous stent placement for the management of acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) following catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), remain undefined. The purpose of this study was to assess immediate and intermediate term outcomes among patients treated with venous stenting following CDT in patients with proximal lower limb DVT. Thirty consecutive patients aged between 20-70 years with proximal lower limb DVT formed the study group. The mean duration of CDT done with streptokinase was 4.5 ± 1.3 days. Patients with residual venous obstruction and/or large clot burden were treated further with venous angioplasty and/or stenting. Primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety, efficacy and patency of venous stenting in the management of incomplete result following CDT. After 12 months, post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) was assessed clinically using Villalta scale and deep venous patency was assessed through duplex ultrasound. We studied 8 (5 female and 3 male) patients with 9 (3 left and 6 right) limb involvement and 13 stent (4 balloon expandable and 9 self expandable) placement. All patients improved clinically immediately following venous stenting. Technical success was achieved in all patients. One patient developed pulmonary embolism during course of hospital stay. One patient had stent thrombosis and PTS and another patient died due to carcinoma breast during follow-up. Deep venous stenting is an effective mode of treatment in proximal acute lower limb DVT with high late patency rate up to 1-year.

  19. Diagnosis of thrombosis by catheter phlebography after prolonged central venous catheterization.

    PubMed Central

    Brismar, B; Hårdstedt, C; Jacobson, S

    1981-01-01

    Sixty central venous catheterizations in 53 patients were prospectively studied with respect to phlebographic findings after prolonged parenteral nutrition. Phlebography was performed by a special technique on completion of the intravenous therapy. Under fluoroscopic control, the central venous catheter was slowly removed, while simultaneously contrast medium was continuously injected through it. Two types of thrombosis were demonstrated--sleeve thrombosis, on 25 occasions (42%), and mural veno-occlusive thrombosis, on five occasions (8%). On removal of the catheter the sleeve thrombosis peeled off the catheter and in several cases it was noticed that parts of the sleeve thrombus or the entire sleeve became detached and were carried away with the blood flow. Although the sleeve thrombus seldom gave rise to any symptoms, this type of thrombosis is of great importance in view of the risk of pulmonary embolism, especially in connection with removal of the catheter. With use of the described phlebographic technique thrombi of this type can be visualized. Images Fig. 1A. Fig. 1B. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:7305496

  20. Endovascular Treatment Options in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-15

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  1. Portal vein thrombosis relevance on liver cirrhosis: Italian Venous Thrombotic Events Registry.

    PubMed

    Violi, Francesco; Corazza, Roberto Gino; Caldwell, Stephen Hugh; Perticone, Francesco; Gatta, Angelo; Angelico, Mario; Farcomeni, Alessio; Masotti, Michela; Napoleone, Laura; Vestri, Annarita; Raparelli, Valeria; Basili, Stefania

    2016-12-01

    Portal vein thrombosis may occur in cirrhosis; nevertheless, its prevalence, and predictors are still elusive. To investigate this issue, the Italian Society of Internal Medicine undertook the "Portal vein thrombosis Relevance On Liver cirrhosis: Italian Venous thrombotic Events Registry" (PRO-LIVER). This prospective multicenter study includes consecutive cirrhotic patients undergoing Doppler ultrasound examination of the portal area to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of portal vein thrombosis over a 2-year scheduled follow-up. Seven hundred and fifty-three (68 % men; 64 ± 12 years) patients were included in the present analysis. Fifty percent of the cases were cirrhotic outpatients. Viral (44 %) etiology was predominant. Around half of the patients had a mild-severity disease according to the Child-Pugh score; hepatocellular carcinoma was present in 20 %. The prevalence of ultrasound-detected portal vein thrombosis was 17 % (n = 126); it was asymptomatic in 43 % of the cases. Notably, more than half of the portal vein thrombosis patients (n = 81) were not treated with anticoagulant therapy. Logistic step-forward multivariate analysis demonstrated that previous portal vein thrombosis (p < 0.001), Child-Pugh Class B + C (p < 0.001), hepatocellular carcinoma (p = 0.01), previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding (p = 0.030) and older age (p = 0.012) were independently associated with portal vein thrombosis. Portal vein thrombosis is a frequent complication of cirrhosis, particularly in patients with moderate-severe liver failure. The apparent undertreatment of patients with portal vein thrombosis is a matter of concern and debate, which should be addressed by planning interventional trials especially with newer oral anticoagulants. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01470547.

  2. Venous thrombosis in subclavian, axillary, brachial veins with extension to internal jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Beigi, Arash; Rismankarzadeh, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of Venous Thrombosis in Subclavian, Axillary, Brachial Veins with extension to Internal Jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous Pulmonary embolism during the treatment with low molecular weight heparin. PMID:23901341

  3. Deep venous thrombosis: The valve cusp hypoxia thesis and its incompatibility with modern orthodoxy.

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    The valve cusp hypoxia thesis (VCHT) of the aetiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was adumbrated in this journal in 1977 and fully articulated in 2008, the original hypothesis having been strongly corroborated by experiments published in 1981 and 1984. It presents a unitary account of the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis and embolism that is rooted in the pathophysiological tradition of Hunter, Virchow, Lister, Welch and Aschoff, a tradition traceable back to Harvey. In this paper we summarise the thesis in its mature form, consider its compatibility with recent advances in the DVT field, and ask why it has not yet been assimilated into the mainstream literature, which during the past half century has been dominated by a haematology-orientated 'consensus model'. We identify and discuss seven ways in which the VCHT is incompatible with these mainstream beliefs about the aetiology of venous thrombosis, drawing attention to: (1) the spurious nature of 'Virchow's triad'; (2) the crucial differences between 'venous thrombus' and 'clot'; the facts that (3) venous thrombi form in the valve pockets (VVPs), (4) DVT is not a primarily haematological condition, (5) the so-called 'thrombophilias' are not thrombogenic per se; (6) the conflict between the single unitary aetiology of DVT and the tacit assumption that the condition is 'multicausal'; (7) the inability of anticoagulants to prevent the initiation of venous thrombogenesis, though they do prevent the growth of thrombi to clinically significant size. In discussing point (7), we show that the VCHT indicates new approaches to mechanical prophylaxis against DVT. These approaches are then formulated as experimentally testable hypotheses, and we suggest methods for testing them preclinically using animal trials.

  4. Massive multicystic dilatation of the uterine wall with myometrial venous thrombosis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Uotila, J; Dastidar, P; Martikainen, P; Kirkinen, P

    2004-09-01

    We present a pregnancy complicated by multicystic dilatation of the uterine wall during the second trimester, leading to massive uterine distension, anemia and preterm Cesarean section. The cystic changes detected by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging involved the whole uterine wall surrounding the entire amniotic cavity. Histopathological examination revealed the benign nature of the cystic changes, which represented dilated and thrombosed venous lacunae. Disturbed venous drainage, combined with local thrombosis, was likely to have led to the collection of a large volume of blood in the uterine wall and the subsequent multicystic change of the myometrium.

  5. Popliteal cysts and deep venous thrombosis: Tc-99m red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohn, G.O.; Brand, C.A.; Ada, A.; Wong, C.

    1985-04-01

    Thirty-four patients who clinically were suspected of having deep venous thrombosis (DVT) underwent Tc-99m red blood cell (RBC) venography followed by contrast venography. The sensitivity (88%) and specificity (94%) of Tc-99m RBC venography of DVT confirmed findings of previous studies. Twenty-four patients who had proved popliteal cysts and swollen calves also were examined using Tc-99m RBC venography. Large cysts showed lack of DVT features, photon deficient cold areas in the popliteal fossa, and diversion of venous flow around the photon deficient area. These features were seen in 25% of the study population (six patients), and assisted in the distinction between the two conditions.

  6. Portal venous thrombosis developing after torsion of a wandering spleen.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ö; Kiziltan, R; Almali, N; Aras, A

    2017-03-01

    Torsion of a wandering spleen is a rare disease. The symptoms and signs of this condition are only present when the splenic pedicle torts. The etiological factors are the congenital absence of the ligaments that hold the spleen in its normal anatomic position, or the relaxation of these ligaments resulting from conditions like trauma and abdominal surgery. We aimed to present a rare case with torsion of wandering spleen that consequently developed thrombosis of portal vein and its branches, taking into consideration the relevant literature.

  7. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related thrombosis in children: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Agarwal, Arnav; Tassone, Maria Cristina; Shahjahan, Nadia; Walton, Mark; Chan, Anthony; Mondal, Tapas

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) placement is associated with increased risk of thrombosis in the paediatric population, particularly in relation to the type of catheter and the manner of its insertion. Here, we investigate risk factors associated with CVC-related thrombosis in children, with particular emphasis on positioning of the catheter tip. Patients aged 0-18 who underwent at least one CVC placement from 2008 to 2013 at a single centre with a subsequent follow-up echocardiogram were included for a total of 104 patients and 147 lines. Data on clinical and catheter-related risk factors were collected from patient charts. Statistical analysis using Pearson's χ tests, independent samples t-test, and odds ratios were used to assess potential risk factors for thrombosis. Neither insertion site (subclavian vein or otherwise), left- vs. right-sided insertion, nor catheter type were significant risk factors for thrombosis. There were no thrombotic events reported at the superior vena cava (SVC)-right atrium junction and no significant differences in thrombotic risk with initial tip placement in the SVC-right atrium junction vs. the SVC, right atrium, or inferior vena cava. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was a major clinical risk factor for thrombosis. Tip movement was common and may have been an important factor in the development of CVC-related thrombi. Prospective studies can yield insight into the role of follow-up imaging in the prevention of catheter-related thrombosis in children.

  8. Differential risks in men and women for first and recurrent venous thrombosis: the role of genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Roach, R E J; Cannegieter, S C; Lijfering, W M

    2014-10-01

    Men have a higher risk of first and recurrent venous thrombosis than do women. However, the pathophysiology underlying this phenomenon is as yet unknown. In this review article, we assessed the prevalence and strength of genetic and acquired risk factors for venous thrombosis for men and women separately, because it is likely that either a difference in effect or distribution of a risk factor explains the risk difference between the sexes. We also summarized the sex-specific results of previous studies on the risk of first and recurrent venous thrombosis. Few explanations for the sex difference were found. The major factor, explaining about 20% difference in population-attributable fraction, was body height. No difference in prevalence or strength for other venous thrombosis risk factors was observed, such as plaster cast immobilization, hospitalization, surgery, trauma, malignancy, hyperhomocysteinemia, factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, or blood group non-O. Alternative explanations for the sex difference are hypothesized in this review, including X- or Y-linked mutations or a mutation on a gene with a sex-specific effect. Future studies should focus on the sex-specific risk of venous thrombosis to unravel the pathophysiology and thereby improve sex-specific treatment and prevention strategies. Even so, male sex can be used as a tool through which individuals at increased risk of first or recurrent venous thrombosis may be identified.

  9. Reversible changes in diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Wong, Andrew K; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Mokin, Maxim; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-02-01

    Diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging studies are regularly used in patients with ischemic stroke. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare cause of stroke and is primarily treated by systemic anticoagulation. Endovascular intervention can be considered in cases of failed medical therapy, yet the prognostic value of diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging for CVST has not been clearly established. We present a patient with CVST whose abnormal findings on MRI and CT perfusion images were largely reversed after endovascular treatment.

  10. Presumed Pulmonary Embolism Following Power-Pulse Spray Thrombectomy of Upper Extremity Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jason; Georgiades, Christos S.; Hong, Kelvin; Kim, Hyun S.

    2006-08-15

    To achieve more effective thrombolysis in a shorter treatment time, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy has been increasingly used in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The power-pulse spray is a new technique to combine chemical and rheolytic effects on clots. We present a case of presumed pulmonary embolism following power-pulse spray treatment for upper extremity DVT which necessitated resuscitation and intubation. The power-pulse spray technique should be used with caution when treating DVT.

  11. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients with Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Delomez, Maxence; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Willoteaux, Serge; Bauchart, Jean-Jacques; D'Othee, Bertrand Janne; Asseman, Philippe; Perez, Nessim; Thery, Claude

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To report our experience with mechanical thrombectomy in proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT).Methods: Eighteen patients with a mean ({+-} SD) age of 37.6 {+-} 16.1 years who presented with DVT in the iliac and femoral vein (n = 3), inferior vena cava (n = 5), or inferior vena cava and iliac vein (n = 10), were treated with the Amplatz Thrombectomy Device after insertion of a temporary caval filter.Results: Successful recanalization was achieved in 15 of 18 patients (83%). Overall, the percentage of thrombus removed was 66 {+-} 29%: 73 {+-} 30% at caval level and 55 {+-} 36% at iliofemoral level. Complementary interventions (seven patients) were balloon angioplasty (n = 2), angioplasty and stenting (n = 2), thrombo-aspiration alone (n = 1), thrombo-aspiration, balloon angioplasty, and permanent filter (n = 1), and permanent filter alone (n = 1). There was one in-hospital death. Follow-up was obtained at a mean of 29.6 months; three patients had died (two cancers, one myocardial infarction); 10 had no or minimal sequelae; one had post-phlebitic limb.Conclusion: Mechanical thrombectomy is a potential therapeutic option in patients presenting with proximal DVT.

  12. Superficial Dorsal Vein Injury/Thrombosis Presenting as False Penile Fracture Requiring Dorsal Venous Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Arash; Hakky, Tariq S; Martinez, Daniel; Parker, Justin; Carrion, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Conditions mimicking penile fracture are extremely rare and have been seldom described. Aim To describe a patient with false penile fracture who presented with superficial dorsal vein injury/thrombosis managed with ligation. Methods A 33-year-old male presented with penile swelling and ecchymosis after intercourse. A penile ultrasound demonstrated a thrombosed superficial dorsal vein but also questionable fracture of the tunica albuginea. As the thrombus was expanding, he was emergently taken to the operating room for exploration and required only dorsal venous ligation. Results Postoperatively, patient's Sexual Health Inventory for Men score was 23, and he had no issues with erections or sexual intercourse. Conclusion Early exploration of patients with suspected penile fracture provides excellent results with maintenance of erectile function. Also, in the setting of dorsal vein thrombosis, ligation preserves the integrity of the penile tissues and avoids unnecessary complications from conservative management. Rafiei A, Hakky TS, Martinez D, Parker J, and Carrion R. Superficial dorsal vein injury/thrombosis presenting as false penile fracture requiring dorsal venous ligation. PMID:25548650

  13. Lack of association between potential prothrombotic genetic risk factors and arterial and venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, F C G; Rios, D R A; Ribeiro, D D; Carvalho, M G; Dusse, L M S; Fernandes, A P; Sabino, A P

    2015-08-14

    Recent studies have shown an association between thrombosis and factor VII (FVII), tissue factor (TF), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). This suggests that individuals with FVII-402 G/A, FVII-401 G/T, TF+5466 A/G, and ACE-287 insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphisms present an increased risk of venous thrombosis, heart disease, and ischemic stroke compared with controls. In this study, we investigated the frequencies of these polymorphisms and their association with arterial and venous thrombosis. For the FVII-402 G/A polymorphism, there were 57.3% heterozygote (HT) genotypes and 8.3% homozygote (HM) genotypes in the patients, and 45.2% HT genotypes and 15.4% HM genotypes in the controls. For the FVII-401 G/T polymorphism, there were 37.5% HT genotypes and 3.1% HM genotypes in the patients, and 32.7% HT genotypes and 4.8% HM genotypes in the controls. The polymorphism TF+5466 A/G was not found in any of the samples analyzed. For the ACE-287 I/D polymorphism, there were 43 (40.6%) HT genotypes and 63 (59.4%) HM genotypes in the controls and 28 (45.2%) HT genotypes and 34 (54.8%) HM genotypes in the patients. No significant difference was observed by comparing patients and controls. In this study, no association was found between the presence of the evaluated polymorphisms and the occurrence of thrombotic events.

  14. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis concomitant with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, in a patient with epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Oda, Naohiro; Sakugawa, Makoto; Bessho, Akihiro; Horiuchi, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Toyota, Yosuke; Fukamatsu, Nobuaki; Nishii, Kazuya; Watanabe, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with dizziness, after two weeks of experiencing symptoms. Chest computed tomography revealed a peripheral nodule in her left upper lobe, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the presence of multiple brain masses. The patient underwent whole-brain radiotherapy based on a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer with multiple brain metastases. The diagnosis was confirmed by endobronchial biopsy as T4N3M1b, stage IV lung adenocarcinoma with an epidermal growth factor receptor mutation. On the 31st day of hospitalization, the patient developed severe headache. Subsequent magnetic resonance venography revealed defects in the superior sagittal, right sigmoid, and right transverse venous sinuses and the right internal jugular vein. Anticoagulation therapy with unfractionated heparin and warfarin was immediately administered following diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Brain MRI demonstrated leptomeningeal gadolinium enhancement in front of the pons and medulla. Positive cerebrospinal fluid tumor cytology confirmed the diagnosis of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Following four weeks of antithrombotic therapy, complete thrombolysis was confirmed by magnetic resonance venography. Effective treatment with gefitinib was administered, and the patient survived for 10 months after the diagnosis of CVST and leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Adequate early diagnosis and treatment of CVST enabled an excellent survival rate for the patient, despite leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Following the development of headaches in patients with lung cancer, CVST, although rare, should be considered. Furthermore, following a diagnosis of CVST, leptomeningeal carcinomatosis should be investigated as an underlying cause.

  15. A Rare Occurrence of Simultaneous Venous and Arterial Thromboembolic Events – Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Thromboembolism as Initial Presentation in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kutiyal, Aditya S.; Dharmshaktu, Pramila; Kataria, Babita; Garg, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute myeloid leukemia has been attributed to various factors, including hereditary, radiation, drugs, and certain occupational exposures. The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolism events is well established. Here, we present a case of a 70-year-old Indian man who had presented with arterial and venous thrombosis, and the patient was later diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our case, the patient presented with right lower limb deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism four months prior to the diagnosis of APL. Although thromboembolic event subsequent to the diagnosis of malignancy, and especially during the chemotherapy has been widely reported, this prior presentation with simultaneous occurrence of both venous and arterial thromboembolism has rarely been reported. We take this opportunity to state the significance of a complete medical evaluation in cases of recurrent or unusual thrombotic events. PMID:26949347

  16. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27672574

  17. Deep vein thrombosis after spine operation in prone position with subclavian venous catheterization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Kyung; Han, Jin Hee; Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Keon Sik

    2014-07-01

    We experienced a case of deep vein thrombosis after spine surgery in the prone position with a central venous catheter (CVC). Posterior lumbar interbody fusion was performed on a 73-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with spinal stenosis. Accordingly, in the operation room under general anesthesia, two-lumen CVC were inserted into the left subclavian vein. The surgery was performed in the prone position with a Wilson frame. On the next day, there was a sudden occurrence of severe edema in the patient's left arm. By ultrasonography and computed tomography scanning, extensive deep vein thrombosis was observed in the left subclavian vein. The existence of a factor affecting blood flow such as the prone position may increase the risk of thrombus formation. Therefore, careful perioperative evaluation should be implemented.

  18. Disulfide HMGB1 derived from platelets coordinates venous thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Philippi, Vanessa; Stockhausen, Sven; Busse, Johanna; Antonelli, Antonella; Miller, Meike; Schubert, Irene; Hoseinpour, Parandis; Chandraratne, Sue; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Gaertner, Florian; Lorenz, Michael; Agresti, Alessandra; Coletti, Raffaele; Antoine, Daniel J.; Heermann, Ralf; Jung, Kirsten; Reese, Sven; Laitinen, Iina; Schwaiger, Markus; Walch, Axel; Sperandio, Markus; Nawroth, Peter P.; Reinhardt, Christoph; Jäckel, Sven; Bianchi, Marco E.; Massberg, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is one of the most common cardiovascular diseases, but its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Although sterile inflammation has recently been shown to boost coagulation during DVT, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully resolved, which could potentially identify new anti-inflammatory approaches to prophylaxis and therapy of DVT. Using a mouse model of venous thrombosis induced by flow reduction in the vena cava inferior, we identified blood-derived high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a prototypical mediator of sterile inflammation, to be a master regulator of the prothrombotic cascade involving platelets and myeloid leukocytes fostering occlusive DVT formation. Transfer of platelets into Hmgb1−/− chimeras showed that this cell type is the major source of HMGB1, exposing reduced HMGB1 on their surface upon activation thereby enhancing the recruitment of monocytes. Activated leukocytes in turn support oxidation of HMGB1 unleashing its prothrombotic activity and promoting platelet aggregation. This potentiates the amount of HMGB1 and further nurtures the accumulation and activation of monocytes through receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and Toll-like receptor 2, leading to local delivery of monocyte-derived tissue factor and cytokines. Moreover, disulfide HMGB1 facilitates formation of prothrombotic neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) mediated by RAGE, exposing additional HMGB1 on their extracellular DNA strands. Eventually, a vicious circle of coagulation and inflammation is set in motion leading to obstructive DVT formation. Therefore, platelet-derived disulfide HMGB1 is a central mediator of the sterile inflammatory process in venous thrombosis and could be an attractive target for an anti-inflammatory approach for DVT prophylaxis. PMID:27574188

  19. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-ran

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  20. Disulfide HMGB1 derived from platelets coordinates venous thrombosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Stark, Konstantin; Philippi, Vanessa; Stockhausen, Sven; Busse, Johanna; Antonelli, Antonella; Miller, Meike; Schubert, Irene; Hoseinpour, Parandis; Chandraratne, Sue; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Gaertner, Florian; Lorenz, Michael; Agresti, Alessandra; Coletti, Raffaele; Antoine, Daniel J; Heermann, Ralf; Jung, Kirsten; Reese, Sven; Laitinen, Iina; Schwaiger, Markus; Walch, Axel; Sperandio, Markus; Nawroth, Peter P; Reinhardt, Christoph; Jäckel, Sven; Bianchi, Marco E; Massberg, Steffen

    2016-11-17

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is one of the most common cardiovascular diseases, but its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Although sterile inflammation has recently been shown to boost coagulation during DVT, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully resolved, which could potentially identify new anti-inflammatory approaches to prophylaxis and therapy of DVT. Using a mouse model of venous thrombosis induced by flow reduction in the vena cava inferior, we identified blood-derived high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a prototypical mediator of sterile inflammation, to be a master regulator of the prothrombotic cascade involving platelets and myeloid leukocytes fostering occlusive DVT formation. Transfer of platelets into Hmgb1(-/-) chimeras showed that this cell type is the major source of HMGB1, exposing reduced HMGB1 on their surface upon activation thereby enhancing the recruitment of monocytes. Activated leukocytes in turn support oxidation of HMGB1 unleashing its prothrombotic activity and promoting platelet aggregation. This potentiates the amount of HMGB1 and further nurtures the accumulation and activation of monocytes through receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and Toll-like receptor 2, leading to local delivery of monocyte-derived tissue factor and cytokines. Moreover, disulfide HMGB1 facilitates formation of prothrombotic neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) mediated by RAGE, exposing additional HMGB1 on their extracellular DNA strands. Eventually, a vicious circle of coagulation and inflammation is set in motion leading to obstructive DVT formation. Therefore, platelet-derived disulfide HMGB1 is a central mediator of the sterile inflammatory process in venous thrombosis and could be an attractive target for an anti-inflammatory approach for DVT prophylaxis.

  1. [Thrombosis of the intracranial venous sinuses after ingestion of estroprogestative agents. 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, P; Bernard, M H; Scherpereel, B; Morel, M; Guyot, J F

    1977-06-04

    The authors report 4 cases of thrombosis of the superior longitudinal sinus (SLS) in women taking oestroprogestational agents. This complication is very rare, only 25 cases existing in the literature. The clinical picture consists of premonitory headaches associated with neurological signs suggesting lesions affecting both hemispheres in alternation. In the absence of treatment, sudden deterioration on about the tenth day is to be feared. This picture is similar to that of puerperal thrombosis of the SLS. The diagnosis should be confirmed by carotid arteriography, which demonstrates the presence of collateral varices and the thrombosed sinus giving a "negative" image on the AP view. Cerebral scintigraphy shows one or more areas of uptake in the form of adjacent rounded shapes, corresponding to cerebral infarctions of venous origin. As far as the responsibility of oestro-progenstational agents is concerned, the role is suggested by the analogy with puerperal thromboses and also by the absence of cases in men (with the exception of head injury, infections of the face and haematological malignancies). The prognosis is grave (19 deaths out of 29 cases), but surviving patients are completely cured. This prognosis would seem to be essentially dependent upon the possibilities of venous callateral circulation, which are variable in each individual patient. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic risk, in effective doses, to transform the venous thrombosis into a cerebral haemorrhage. Treatment consists rather of methods to reduce cerebral volume, aimed at maximal use of collateral varices and assisting the patient to overcome to acute phase of the first 2 weeks. Headache would seem to be the principal presenting symptom. In our opinion, no biological test gives a reliable indication as to those women most at risk and contraindictions are in fact of a clinical character.

  2. Different combined oral contraceptives and the risk of venous thrombosis: systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stegeman, Bernardine H; de Bastos, Marcos; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Hylckama Vlieg, A; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Stijnen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide a comprehensive overview of the risk of venous thrombosis in women using different combined oral contraceptives. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data sources PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Academic Search Premier, and ScienceDirect up to 22 April 2013. Review methods Observational studies that assessed the effect of combined oral contraceptives on venous thrombosis in healthy women. The primary outcome of interest was a fatal or non-fatal first event of venous thrombosis with the main focus on deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Publications with at least 10 events in total were eligible. The network meta-analysis was performed using an extension of frequentist random effects models for mixed multiple treatment comparisons. Unadjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were reported. The requirement for crude numbers did not allow adjustment for potential confounding variables. Results 3110 publications were retrieved through a search strategy; 25 publications reporting on 26 studies were included. Incidence of venous thrombosis in non-users from two included cohorts was 1.9 and 3.7 per 10 000 woman years, in line with previously reported incidences of 1-6 per 10 000 woman years. Use of combined oral contraceptives increased the risk of venous thrombosis compared with non-use (relative risk 3.5, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 4.3). The relative risk of venous thrombosis for combined oral contraceptives with 30-35 µg ethinylestradiol and gestodene, desogestrel, cyproterone acetate, or drospirenone were similar and about 50-80% higher than for combined oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. A dose related effect of ethinylestradiol was observed for gestodene, desogestrel, and levonorgestrel, with higher doses being associated with higher thrombosis risk. Conclusion All combined oral contraceptives investigated in this analysis were

  3. A Case of Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis Resulting in Mortality in Severe Preeclamptic Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Soydinc, Hatice Ender; Ozler, Ali; Evsen, Mehmet Sıddık; Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Basaranoglu, Serdar; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Cetincakmak, Mehmet Guli

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rarely encountered condition during pregnancy. A 21-year-old pregnant woman with labour pains was hospitalized in our clinic. Diagnosis of severe preeclampsia was made based on her clinical and laboratory findings. She suffered from convulsive episodes during postpartum period which lead to initiation of treatment for eclampsia. However neurological and radiological examinations were performed after emergence of additional neurological symptoms disclosed the diagnosis of CVST. In this paper, we aimed to present a case with CVST which diagnosis was confused with eclampsia and resulting in maternal mortality. PMID:23509646

  4. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria associated with venous thrombosis and papillary endothelial hyperplasia presenting as ulcerated duodenal mass.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, C H; Sotelo-Avila, C; Luisiri, A; Chu, J Y

    1994-08-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is an acquired clonal expansion of bone marrow stem cells that are deficient in the decay-accelerating factor, which is a complement regulatory glycoprotein (CD55), as well as in the membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (CD59) and the C8-binding protein. These proteins are deficient on the membranes of red blood cells, granulocytes, monocytes, and platelets. The disorder is associated with intermittent hemolytic anemia, hemoglobinuria, infection, a tendency toward bone marrow aplasia, and venous thromboses. The thromboses, on resolution, may give rise to endothelial proliferation that may cause ischemia and ulceration, or, alternatively, the thromboses may cause ulceration leading to a granulation tissue response with exaggerated endothelial proliferation. We report a second case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria that presented roentgenographically as an ulcerated circumferential duodenal mass secondary to venous thrombosis accompanied by florid papillary endothelial hyperplasia. We also review the literature concerning this phenomenon.

  5. Splenectomy Causes 10-Fold Increased Risk of Portal Venous System Thrombosis in Liver Cirrhosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xingshun; Han, Guohong; Ye, Chun; Zhang, Yongguo; Dai, Junna; Peng, Ying; Deng, Han; Li, Jing; Hou, Feifei; Ning, Zheng; Zhao, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xintong; Wang, Ran; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-07-19

    BACKGROUND Portal venous system thrombosis (PVST) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis. We conducted a retrospective study to comprehensively analyze the prevalence and risk factors of PVST in liver cirrhosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS All cirrhotic patients without malignancy admitted between June 2012 and December 2013 were eligible if they underwent contrast-enhanced CT or MRI scans. Independent predictors of PVST in liver cirrhosis were calculated in multivariate analyses. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the severity of PVST (any PVST, main portal vein [MPV] thrombosis >50%, and clinically significant PVST) and splenectomy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. RESULTS Overall, 113 cirrhotic patients were enrolled. The prevalence of PVST was 16.8% (19/113). Splenectomy (any PVST: OR=11.494, 95%CI=2.152-61.395; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=29.987, 95%CI=3.247-276.949; clinically significant PVST: OR=40.415, 95%CI=3.895-419.295) and higher hemoglobin (any PVST: OR=0.974, 95%CI=0.953-0.996; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=0.936, 95%CI=0.895-0.980; clinically significant PVST: OR=0.935, 95%CI=0.891-0.982) were the independent predictors of PVST. The prevalence of PVST was 13.3% (14/105) after excluding splenectomy. Higher hemoglobin was the only independent predictor of MPV thrombosis >50% (OR=0.952, 95%CI=0.909-0.997). No independent predictors of any PVST or clinically significant PVST were identified in multivariate analyses. Additionally, PVST patients who underwent splenectomy had a significantly higher proportion of clinically significant PVST but lower MELD score than those who did not undergo splenectomy. In all analyses, the in-hospital mortality was not significantly different between cirrhotic patient with and without PVST. CONCLUSIONS Splenectomy may increase by at least 10-fold the risk of PVST in liver cirrhosis independent of severity of liver dysfunction.

  6. Risk factors for arterial and venous thrombosis in WHO-defined essential thrombocythemia: an international study of 891 patients.

    PubMed

    Carobbio, Alessandra; Thiele, Juergen; Passamonti, Francesco; Rumi, Elisa; Ruggeri, Marco; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Randi, Maria Luigia; Bertozzi, Irene; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Antonioli, Elisabetta; Gisslinger, Heinz; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Finazzi, Guido; Gangat, Naseema; Tefferi, Ayalew; Barbui, Tiziano

    2011-06-02

    In an international collaborative study, a central histologic review identified 891 patients with essential thrombocythemia, strictly defined by World Health Organization criteria. After a median follow-up of 6.2 years, 109 (12%) patients experienced arterial (n = 79) or venous (n = 37) thrombosis. In multivariable analysis, predictors of arterial thrombosis included age more than 60 years (P = .03; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.7), thrombosis history (P = .003; HR = 2.1), cardiovascular risk factors including tobacco use, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus (P = .007; HR = 1.9), leukocytosis (> 11 × 10(9)/L; P = .04; HR = 1.7), and presence of JAK2V617F (P = .009; HR = 2.6). In contrast, only male gender predicted venous thrombosis. Platelet count more than 1000 × 10(9)/L was associated with a lower risk of arterial thrombosis (P = .007; HR = 0.4). These associations, except the one with leukocytosis, remained significant (or near significant) when analysis was restricted to JAK2V617F-positive cases. The current study clarifies the contribution of specific disease and host characteristics to the risk of arterial versus venous thrombosis in essential thrombocythemia.

  7. Lower extremity deep venous thrombosis with fatal pulmonary thromboembolism caused by benign pelvic space-occupying lesions--an overview.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Hannah; Byard, Roger W

    2012-05-01

    Venous stasis predisposes to thrombosis. One hundred and sixty cases of fatal pulmonary thromboembolism were reviewed to determine how many cases had deep venous thromboses associated with venous blood flow reduction caused by external pressure from benign pelvic masses. Three cases were identified, representing 2% of cases overall (3/160): a 44-year-old woman with a large uterine leiomyoma (1048 g); a 74-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 1 L of urine); and a 70-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 3 L of urine). Although a rare cause of fatal deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, space-occupying pelvic lesions can lead to extrinsic pressure on adjacent veins reducing blood flow and causing stasis and thrombosis. Individuals with large pelvic masses may, therefore, be at increased risk of pulmonary thromboembolism from deep venous thrombosis, particularly in the presence of concurrent risk factors such as immobility, thrombophilias, malignancy, and significant cardiopulmonary disease.

  8. Venous thromboembolism and port-related thrombosis in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: a monocenter experience.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Elisabetta; Di Cicilia, Roberto; Di Battista, Monica; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Paragona, Marco; Corbelli, Jody; Macchini, Marina; Prandoni, Paolo; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) may occur during the natural history of neoplastic disease and is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer patients. Major risk factors for VTE in cancer patients include surgery, immobilization, hospitalization, and the administration of granulopoietic and/or erythropoietic (stimulatory) agents. Chemotherapy is a supplementary independent risk factor for VTE and the use of central venous catheters (CVC) in clinical practice has increased the risk of thromboembolic events. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate CVC-related thrombosis and the VTE rate in 145 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We observed only 2 cases of symptomatic CVC- related thrombotic events (1.38%) and 10 cases of thromboembolic events (6.9%) in our series. Only surgery for metastases was found to be significantly related to the development of VTE, with an incidence of 16.1% vs. 4.4 in patients who did not undergo surgery (p = 0.037). In addition, a history of VTE seems to be a supplementary risk factor for CVC-related thrombosis (p = 0.055).

  9. Coagulation factor VII R353Q polymorphism and the risk of puerperal cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kruthika-Vinod, T P; Nagaraja, Dindagur; Christopher, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Puerperal cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively common form of stroke in young women in India. The blood coagulation factor VII (FVII) R353Q polymorphism increases the risk for venous thrombosis. Our aim was to investigate the association of FVII R353Q polymorphism with the risk of puerperal CVT. A total of 100 women with puerperal CVT and 102 age-matched women without postpartum complications were investigated. FVII R353Q genotypes were identified using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Our results showed that the homozygous FVII 353QQ genotype was present in 9% and 8% of patients and controls, respectively; and 42% of patients and 31.4% of controls had the heterozygous 353RQ genotype (odds ratio = 1.55, 95% confidence interval = 0.89-2.70; p = 0.243). Our findings suggest that the FVII R353Q polymorphism is not associated with increased risk for CVT occurring during the puerperal period in Indian women.

  10. Progressive Ischemic Stroke due to Thyroid Storm-Associated Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Natsumi; Hiraoka, Eiji; Hoshino, Masataka; Deshpande, Gautam A.; Sawada, Kana; Norisue, Yasuhiro; Tsukuda, Jumpei; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 49 Final Diagnosis: Cerebral venous thrombosis Symptoms: Altered mental state • weakness in limbs Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare but fatal complication of hyperthyroidism that is induced by the hypercoagulable state of thyrotoxicosis. Although it is frequently difficult to diagnose CVT promptly, it is important to consider it in the differential diagnosis when a hyperthyroid patient presents with atypical neurologic symptoms. Care Report: A 49-year-old Japanese female with unremarkable medical history came in with thyroid storm and multiple progressive ischemic stroke identified at another hospital. Treatment for thyroid storm with beta-blocker, glucocorticoid, and potassium iodide-iodine was started and MR venography was performed on hospital day 3 for further evaluation of her progressive ischemic stroke. The MRI showed CVT, and anticoagulation therapy, in addition to the anti-thyroid agents, was initiated. The patient’s thyroid function was successfully stabilized by hospital day 10 and further progression of CVT was prevented. Conclusions: Physicians should consider CVT when a patient presents with atypical course of stroke or with atypical MRI findings such as high intensity area in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping. Not only is an early diagnosis and initiation of anticoagulation important, but identifying and treating the underlying disease is essential to avoid the progression of CVT. PMID:28228636

  11. Sonographic and Clinical Features of Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis in Critical Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blaivas, Michael; Stefanidis, Konstantinos; Nanas, Serafim; Poularas, John; Wachtel, Mitchell; Cohen, Rubin; Karakitsos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Background-Aim. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is an increasingly recognized problem in the critically ill. We sought to identify the prevalence of and risk factors for UEDVT, and to characterize sonographically detected thrombi in the critical care setting. Patients and Methods. Three hundred and twenty patients receiving a subclavian or internal jugular central venous catheter (CVC) were included. When an UEDVT was detected, therapeutic anticoagulation was started. Additionally, a standardized ultrasound scan was performed to detect the extent of the thrombus. Images were interpreted offline by two independent readers. Results. Thirty-six (11.25%) patients had UEDVT and a complete scan was performed. One (2.7%) of these patients died, and 2 had pulmonary embolism (5.5%). Risk factors associated with UEDVT were presence of CVC [(odds ratio (OR) 2.716, P = 0.007)], malignancy (OR 1.483, P = 0.036), total parenteral nutrition (OR 1.399, P = 0.035), hypercoagulable state (OR 1.284, P = 0.045), and obesity (OR 1.191, P = 0.049). Eight thrombi were chronic, and 28 were acute. We describe a new sonographic sign which characterized acute thrombosis: a double hyperechoic line at the interface between the thrombus and the venous wall; but its clinical significance remains to be defined. Conclusion. Presence of CVC was a strong predictor for the development of UEDVT in a cohort of critical care patients; however, the rate of subsequent PE and related mortality was low. PMID:22655181

  12. Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jose Amo-Setién, Francisco; Herrero-Montes, Manuel; Olavarría-Beivíde, Encarnación; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mercedes; Torres-Manrique, Blanca; Rodríguez-de la Vega, Carlos; Caso-Álvarez, Vanesa; González-Parralo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim The use of venous catheters is a widespread practice, especially in oncological and oncohematological units. The objective of this study was to evaluate the complications associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in a cohort of patients. Materials and Methods In this retrospective cohort study, we included all patient carrying PICCs (n = 603) inserted at our institute between October 2010 and December 2013. The main variables collected were medical diagnosis, catheter care, location, duration of catheterization, reasons for catheter removal, complications, and nursing care. Complications were classified as infection, thrombosis, phlebitis, migration, edema, and/or ecchymosis. Results All patients were treated according to the same “nursing care” protocol. The incidence rate of complications was two cases per 1000 days of catheter duration. The most relevant complications were infection and thrombosis, both with an incidence of 0.17 cases per 1000 days of the total catheterization period. The total average duration of catheterization was 170 days [SD 6.06]. Additionally to “end of treatment” (48.42%) and “exitus”, (22.53%) the most frequent cause of removal was migration (displacement towards the exterior) of the catheter (5.80%). Conclusions PICCs are safe devices that allow the administration of long-term treatment and preserve the integrity of the venous system of the patient. Proper care of the catheter is very important to improve the quality life of patients with oncologic and hematologic conditions. Therefore, correct training of professionals and patients as well as following the latest scientific recommendations are particularly relevant. PMID:27588946

  13. Role of platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII in spontaneous venous thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Heestermans, Marco; Salloum-Asfar, Salam; Salvatori, Daniela; Laghmani, El Houari; Luken, Brenda M.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Korporaal, Suzanne J.; Wagenaar, Gerry T. M.; Reitsma, Pieter H.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII (FXII) have been implicated as important players in the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis. Their role became evident in mouse models in which surgical handling was used to provoke thrombosis. Inhibiting anticoagulation in mice by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Serpinc1 and Proc also results in a thrombotic phenotype, which is spontaneous (no additional triggers) and reproducibly results in clots in the large veins of the head and fibrin deposition in the liver. This thrombotic phenotype is fatal but can be fully rescued by thrombin inhibition. The mouse model was used in this study to investigate the role of platelets, neutrophils, and FXII. After administration of siRNAs targeting Serpinc1 and Proc, antibody-mediated depletion of platelets fully abrogated the clinical features as well as microscopic aspects in the head. This was corroborated by strongly reduced fibrin deposition in the liver. Whereas neutrophils were abundant in siRNA-triggered thrombotic lesions, antibody-mediated depletion of circulating Ly6G-positive neutrophils did not affect onset, severity, or thrombus morphology. In addition, absence of circulating neutrophils did not affect quantitative liver fibrin deposition. Remarkably, siRNA-mediated depletion of plasma FXII accelerated the onset of the clinical phenotype; mice were affected with more severe thrombotic lesions. To summarize, in this study, onset and severity of the thrombotic phenotype are dependent on the presence of platelets but not circulating neutrophils. Unexpectedly, FXII has a protective effect. This study challenges the proposed roles of neutrophils and FXII in venous thrombosis pathophysiology. PMID:26932804

  14. Venous thrombosis risk associated with plasma hypofibrinolysis is explained by elevated plasma levels of TAFI and PAI-1.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Mirjam E; Lisman, Ton; de Groot, Philip G; Meijers, Joost C M; le Cessie, Saskia; Doggen, Carine J M; Rosendaal, Frits R

    2010-07-08

    Elevated plasma clot lysis time (CLT) increases risk of venous and arterial thrombosis. It is unclear which fibrinolytic factors contribute to thrombosis risk. In 743 healthy control subjects we investigated determinants of CLT. By comparison with 770 thrombosis patients, we assessed plasma levels of fibrinolytic proteins as risk factors for a first thrombosis. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels were the main determinants of CLT, followed by plasminogen, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), prothrombin, and alpha2-antiplasmin. Fibrinogen, factor VII, X, and XI contributed minimally. These proteins explained 77% of variation in CLT. Levels of the fibrinolytic factors were associated with thrombosis risk (odds ratios, highest quartile vs lowest, adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index: 1.6 for plasminogen, 1.2 for alpha2-antiplasmin, 1.6 for TAFI, 1.6 for PAI-1, and 1.8 for tissue plasminogen activator [t-PA]). Adjusting for acute-phase proteins attenuated the risk associated with elevated plasminogen levels. The risk associated with increased t-PA nearly disappeared after adjusting for acute-phase proteins and endothelial activation. TAFI and PAI-1 remained associated with thrombosis after extensive adjustment. In conclusion, CLT reflects levels of all fibrinolytic factors except t-PA. Plasminogen, TAFI, PAI-1, and t-PA are associated with venous thrombosis. However, plasminogen and t-PA levels may reflect underlying risk factors.

  15. Placement of a Retrievable Guenther Tulip Filter in the Superior Vena Cava for Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nadkarni, Sanjay; Macdonald, Sumaira; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-12-15

    A retrievable Guenther Tulip caval filter(William Cook, Europe) was successfully placed and retrieved in the superior vena cava for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman. Bilateral subclavian and internal jugular venous thromboses thought secondary to placement of multiple central venous catheters were present. There have been reports of the use of permanent Greenfield filters and a single case report of a temporary filter in the superior vena cava. As far as we are aware this is the first reported placement and successful retrieval of a filter in these circumstances.

  16. Use of a Trellis Device for Endovascular Treatment of Venous Thrombosis Involving a Duplicated Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Saettele, Megan R.; Morelli, John N.; Chesis, Paul; Wible, Brandt C.

    2013-12-15

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are increasingly recognized with CT and venography techniques. Although many patients with IVC anomalies are asymptomatic, recent studies have suggested an association with venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with extensive venous clot involving the infrarenal segment of a duplicated left IVC who underwent pharmacomechanical thrombectomy and tissue plasminogen activator catheter-directed thrombolysis with complete deep venous thrombosis resolution. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the English literature of the use of a Trellis thrombectomy catheter in the setting of duplicated IVC.

  17. Peripherally Placed Totally Implantable Venous-access Port Systems of the Forearm: Clinical Experience in 763 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goltz, Jan P. Scholl, Anne; Ritter, Christian O.; Wittenberg, Guenther; Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneously placed totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) of the forearm. Between January 2006 and October 2008, peripheral TIVAPs were implanted in 763 consecutive patients by ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. All catheters were implanted under local anesthesia and were tunneled subcutaneously. Indication, technical success, and complications were retrospectively analyzed according to Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) criteria. Presence of antibiotic prophylaxis, periprocedurally administered drugs (e.g., sedation), and laboratory results at the time of implantation were analyzed. Maintenance during the service interval was evaluated. In total, 327,499 catheter-days were analyzed. Technical success rate was 99.3%. Reasons for initial failure of implantation were either unexpected thrombosis of the subclavian vein, expanding tumor mass of the mediastinum, or failure of peripheral venous access due to fragile vessels. Mean follow-up was 430 days. There were 115 complications observed (15.1%, 0.03 per 100 catheter-days), of which 33 (4.3%) were classified as early (within 30 days from implantation) and 82 (10.7%) as late. Catheter-related venous thrombosis was found in 65 (8.5%) of 763 (0.02 per 100 catheter-days) TIVAPs. Infections were observed in 41 (5.4%) of 763 (0.01 per 100 catheter-days) devices. Other complications observed included dislocation of the catheter tip (0.8%), occlusion (0.1%), or rupture (0.1%) of the port catheter. Dislocated catheters were corrected during a second interventional procedure. In conclusion, implantation of percutaneously placed peripheral TIVAPs shows a high technical success rate and low risk of early complications when ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance are used. Late complications are observed three times as often as early complications.

  18. A nonsense polymorphism in the protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor increases the risk for venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Javier; González-Conejero, Rocio; Soria, Jose Manuel; González-Porras, Jose Ramón; Pérez-Ceballos, Elena; Lecumberri, Ramón; Roldán, Vanessa; Souto, Juan Carlos; Miñano, Antonia; Hernández-Espinosa, David; Alberca, Ignacio; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Vicente, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    The protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) is a hemostatic serpin with anticoagulant activity. As for antithrombin, deficiency of ZPI could have relevant thrombotic consequences. We have studied 6 genetic modifications affecting the ZPI gene, identifying 5 haplotypes. Haplotype H5 is featured by a stop codon at position 67. The relevance of these genetic modifications and haplotypes in venous thrombosis was evaluated in a case-control study including 1018 patients and 1018 age- and sex-matched controls. Surprisingly, the H5 haplotype was found in 0.9% of controls, supporting that the Arg67Stop change is a low frequency nonsense polymorphism. The prevalence of this haplotype increased significantly in patients (3.0%), one of whom was in a homozygous state. Multivariate analysis confirms that carriers have a 3.3-fold risk of developing venous thrombosis (P = .002; 95% CI: 1.5-7.1). Moreover, we observed a significant association of this polymorphism with familial history of thrombosis (P < .001). Our study supports that the ZPI Arg67Stop nonsense polymorphism might be an independent genetic risk factor for venous thrombosis. This polymorphism has slightly lower prevalence but similar thrombotic risk than the FV Leiden or prothrombin 20210A. Although further studies are required, all available data support that the ZPI is a candidate to play a significant role in thrombosis and should be evaluated in thrombophilic studies. (Blood. 2006;108:177-183) PMID:16527896

  19. Iliocaval Stenosis and Iliac Venous Thrombosis in Retroperitoneal Fibrosis: Percutaneous Treatment by Use of Hydrodynamic Thrombectomy and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wendt, Georg; Neuerburg, Joerg; Schuermann, Karl

    1996-11-15

    A case of bilateral iliac stenosis and caval stenosis due to retroperitoneal fibrosis was treated by caval stenting and iliac balloon angioplasty, but was complicated by subsequent iliac thrombosis. Venous thrombectomy was successfully achieved by hydrodynamic thrombectomy, and iliac patency was stabilized by bilateral stent insertion.

  20. [Neonatology nurses' knowledge about Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter].

    PubMed

    Belo, Marcela Patricia Macêdo; Silva, Roberta Albuquerque Mello de Castro; Nogueira, Isis Larissa Maia; Mizoguti, Daniele Pereira; Ventura, Claudiane Maria Urbano

    2012-01-01

    The Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) has been used as a safe venous access for infants at risk. The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge and practice of nurses from the five public Neonatal Intensive Care Units, of Recife-PE, Brazil, about the use of the PICC. The sample was comprised by 52 nurses; data were collected from January to February/2010. It was found that 64,8% of nurses did not have license for insertion of the PICC. Only two units routinely used the PICC. About the indication of the access, the accuracy was above 70%. In unit B only 8,3% of nurses reported adequate initial location of the catheter tip. It was concluded that is necessary greater incentives to train nurses to use the PICC.

  1. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results.

  2. Hemodynamic Characterization of Peripheral Arterio-venous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Frey, Sabrina; Haine, A; Kammer, R; von Tengg-Kobligk, H; Obrist, D; Baumgartner, I

    2017-03-21

    Peripheral arterio-venous malformations (pAVMs) are congenital vascular anomalies that require treatment, due to their severe clinical consequences. The complexity of lesions often leads to misdiagnosis and ill-planned treatments. To improve disease management, we developed a computational model to quantify the hemodynamic effects of key angioarchitectural features of pAVMs. Hemodynamic results were used to predict the transport of contrast agent (CA), which allowed us to compare our findings to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) recordings of patients. The model is based on typical pAVM morphologies and a generic vessel network that represents realistic vascular feeding and draining components related to lesions. A lumped-parameter description of the vessel network was employed to compute blood pressure and flow rates. CA-transport was determined by coupling the model to a 1D advection-diffusion equation. Results show that the extent of hemodynamic effects of pAVMs, such as arterial steal and venous hypertension, strongly depends on the lesion type and its vascular architecture. Dimensions of shunting vessels strongly influence hemodynamic parameters. Our results underline the importance of the dynamics of CA-transport in diagnostic DSA images. In this context, we identified a set of temporal CA-transport parameters, which are indicative of the presence and specific morphology of pAVMs.

  3. A survey of pediatric hematology/oncology specialists regarding management of central line associated venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Witmer, Char M; Sauck, Emily; Raffini, Leslie J

    2016-12-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) account for the largest proportion of thrombotic events in pediatric patients. Questions remain regarding adequate treatment and prevention methods. We surveyed pediatric hematology/oncology specialists, using hypothetical cases to assess management strategies for acute CVC thrombosis and secondary prevention. Survey respondents varied in the use of the thrombophilia evaluation (33.3%, 41/123) and duration of treatment (6 weeks: 54.1%, 66/122). Secondary CVC prophylaxis was utilized by 36.6% (45/123) of respondents and by 24.4% (30/123) but only if there was a documented thrombophilia. This heterogeneity highlights the need for clinical studies to address these important clinical questions.

  4. The Role of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Deep Venous Thrombosis: Advanced Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Gerard J.

    2011-06-15

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is often managed with a health care pathway that funnels patients to anticoagulation therapy alone. This 'usual treatment' is designed to stop propagation and embolisation of venous thrombus but not remove it. Surgical thrombectomy was once the only option in severe cases in which limbs were threatened, but thrombus removal is no longer restricted to emergency cases. Interventional radiologists are now using advanced endovascular techniques to achieve thrombus removal in a minimally invasive manner in a very short treatment time, thereby quickly restoring patency, relieving acute symptoms, and potentially limiting the subsequent development of postthrombotic syndrome when followed with anticoagulation and compression regimens. This article provides an overview of the interventions available for treating DVT. One of the newer 'single-session' techniques is isolated pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, which is described here in detail with supporting cases.

  5. Quantitative ultrasound venous valve movement: early diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhd Suberi, Anis Azwani; Wan Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani; Tomari, Razali; Ibrahim, Nabilah

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an in-depth analysis of computer aided system for the early diagnosis of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). Normally, patients are diagnosed with DVT through ultrasound examination after they have a serious complication. Thus, this study proposes a new approach to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT by tracking the venous valve movement behaviour. Inspired by image processing technology, several image processing methods namely, image enhancement, segmentation and morphological have been implemented to improve the image quality for further tracking procedure. In segmentation, Otsu thresholding provides a significant result in segmenting valve structure. Subsequently, morphological dilation method is able to enhance the region shape of the valve distinctly and precisely. Lastly, image subtraction method is presented and evaluated to track the valve movement. Based on the experimental results the normal range of valve velocity lies within the range of blood flow velocity (Vb) and occasionally may result in higher values.

  6. An unusual presentation of cortical venous thrombosis and its association with typical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Andole, Sreeman Narayan

    2011-10-04

    A 41-year-old patient with schizophrenia was admitted to hospital following episodes of unexplained collapse attacks and on and off episodes of frontal headaches for 3 months. After three such episodes of loss of consciousness in 2 weeks duration and subsequent spontaneous recovery, his evaluation which included MRI scan of head revealed extensive cortical venous thrombosis. He was on zuclopenthixol (thioxanthene group) for several months for schizophrenia and was under regular psychiatric evaluation. He was treated for simple lower respiratory infection a week prior to admission. Other causes for any clotting disorders including vasculitic and thrombophilic screen were negative. There was no evidence of focal neurology on examination. Systemic examination was otherwise unremarkable. He was treated initially with unfractionated heparin and subsequently changed to warfarin with target international normalised ratio between two and three for at least 6 months and psychiatrist was advised to stop zuclopenthixol.

  7. Management of occlusion and thrombosis associated with long-term indwelling central venous catheters

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Reiss, Ulrike; Wilimas, Judith A.; Metzger, Monika L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Howard, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term central venous catheters (CVC) facilitate care for patients with chronic illnesses, but catheter occlusions and catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) are common complications. This review summarizes management of CVC and CRT. Mechanical CVC occlusions require cause-specific therapy; whereas, thrombotic occlusions usually resolve with thrombolytic therapy, such as alteplase. Prophylaxis with thrombolytic flushes may decrease CVC infections and CRT, but confirmatory studies and cost-effectiveness analysis are needed. Risk factors for CRT include previous catheter infections, malposition of the catheter tip, and prothrombotic states. CRT can lead to catheter infection, pulmonary embolism, and post-thrombotic syndrome. CRT is diagnosed primarily using Doppler ultrasound or venography and treated with anticoagulation for 6 weeks to a year, depending on the extent of the thrombus, response to initial therapy, and whether thrombophilic factors persist. Prevention of CRT includes proper positioning of the CVC and prevention of infections; anticoagulation prophylaxis is not recommended at present. PMID:19595350

  8. Early pregnancy cerebral venous thrombosis and status epilepticus treated with levetiracetam and lacosamide throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ylikotila, Pauli; Ketola, Raimo A; Timonen, Susanna; Malm, Heli; Ruuskanen, Jori O

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke, accounting to less than 1% of all strokes. We describe a pregnant woman with a massive CVT in early pregnancy, complicated by status epilepticus. The mother was treated with levetiracetam, lacosamide, and enoxaparin throughout pregnancy. A male infant was born on pregnancy week 36, weighing 2.2kg. Both levetiracetam and and lacosamide were present in cord blood in levels similar to those in maternal blood. The infant was partially breast-fed and experienced poor feeding and sleepiness, starting to resolve after two first weeks. Milk samples were drawn 5 days after the delivery and a blood sample from the infant 3 days later. Lacosamide level in milk was low, resulting in an estimated relative infant dose of 1.8% of the maternal weight-adjusted daily dose in a fully breast-fed infant. This is the first case describing lacosamide use during pregnancy and lactation.

  9. Emergency Department Management of Suspected Calf-Vein Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Diagnostic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Levi; Lawrence, Matthew; Speicher, Matthew; Frumkin, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Unilateral leg swelling with suspicion of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common emergency department (ED) presentation. Proximal DVT (thrombus in the popliteal or femoral veins) can usually be diagnosed and treated at the initial ED encounter. When proximal DVT has been ruled out, isolated calf-vein deep venous thrombosis (IC-DVT) often remains a consideration. The current standard for the diagnosis of IC-DVT is whole-leg vascular duplex ultrasonography (WLUS), a test that is unavailable in many hospitals outside normal business hours. When WLUS is not available from the ED, recommendations for managing suspected IC-DVT vary. The objectives of the study is to use current evidence and recommendations to (1) propose a diagnostic algorithm for IC-DVT when definitive testing (WLUS) is unavailable; and (2) summarize the controversy surrounding IC-DVT treatment. Discussion The Figure combines D-dimer testing with serial CUS or a single deferred FLUS for the diagnosis of IC-DVT. Such an algorithm has the potential to safely direct the management of suspected IC-DVT when definitive testing is unavailable. Whether or not to treat diagnosed IC-DVT remains widely debated and awaiting further evidence. Conclusion When IC-DVT is not ruled out in the ED, the suggested algorithm, although not prospectively validated by a controlled study, offers an approach to diagnosis that is consistent with current data and recommendations. When IC-DVT is diagnosed, current references suggest that a decision between anticoagulation and continued follow-up outpatient testing can be based on shared decision-making. The risks of proximal progression and life-threatening embolization should be balanced against the generally more benign natural history of such thrombi, and an individual patient’s risk factors for both thrombus propagation and complications of anticoagulation. PMID:27429688

  10. Acute venous thrombosis as complication and clue to diagnose a SAPHO syndrome case. A case report.

    PubMed

    Rosero, A; Ruano, R; Martin, M; Hidalgo, C; Garcia-Talavera, J

    2013-01-01

    This report concerns a male adult admitted for sternal and left arm pain, who was diagnosed and treated for acute deep venous thrombosis in the left subclavian and axillary veins. X-ray and a hybrid single photon emission tomography and computed tomography (SPECT-CT) scintigraphy scan revealed high intensity uptake in both sternoclavicular joints, which corresponded to hyperostosis, thereby suggesting a SAPHO syndrome. Upon reviewing the patient's medical history, we found dermatological pustulosis disease and an intermittent sternal chest pain untreated since 10 years ago. In the biochemical study we found erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation, hyperglobulinemia, and mild anaemia. Initial treatment included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with low response, which then changed to methotrexate, sulfasalazine, and prednisone. The patient's pain was controlled almost completely in 10 months. A control bone scan revealed a marked decrease in intensity of bone deposits according to clinical response. To our knowledge, there are only a few cases of SAPHO and thrombosis and none are followed up with a bone SPECT-CT scan.

  11. Management of Venous Thromboembolisms: Part I. The Consensus for Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang-Ling; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Lee, Cheng-Han; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lin, Pao-Yen; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Huang, Chien-Lung; Lee, Chung-Yi; Lin, Yen-Hung; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Yeh, Hung-I; Chiang, Chern-En; Lin, Shing-Jong; Yeh, San-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a potentially catastrophic condition because thrombosis, left untreated, can result in detrimental pulmonary embolism. Yet in the absence of thrombosis, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding. In the existing literature, knowledge about the epidemiology of DVT is primarily based on investigations among Caucasian populations. There has been little information available about the epidemiology of DVT in Taiwan, and it is generally believed that DVT is less common in Asian patients than in Caucasian patients. However, DVT is a multifactorial disease that represents the interaction between genetic and environmental factors, and the majority of patients with incident DVT have either inherited thrombophilia or acquired risk factors. Furthermore, DVT is often overlooked. Although symptomatic DVT commonly presents with lower extremity pain, swelling and tenderness, diagnosing DVT is a clinical challenge for physicians. Such a diagnosis of DVT requires a timely systematic assessment, including the use of the Wells score and a D-dimer test to exclude low-risk patients, and imaging modalities to confirm DVT. Compression ultrasound with high sensitivity and specificity is the front-line imaging modality in the diagnostic process for patients with suspected DVT in addition to conventional invasive contrast venography. Most patients require anticoagulation therapy, which typically consists of parenteral heparin bridged to a vitamin K antagonist, with variable duration. The development of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants has revolutionized the landscape of venous thromboembolism treatment, with 4 agents available,including rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban, and edoxaban. Presently, all 4 drugs have finished their large phase III clinical trial programs and come to the clinical uses in North America and Europe. It is encouraging to note that the published data to date regarding Asian patients indicates that such new therapies are safe and

  12. Malposition of a Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter in the Graft Hepatic Vein.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Zeynep; Araz, Coşkun; Taşkın, Duygu; Moray, Gökhan; Torgay, Adnan

    2015-11-01

    Central venous catheters are used for delivering medications and parenteral nutrition, measuring hemodynamic variations, and providing long-term intravenous access. In our clinic, during liver transection using a living-liver donor, peripherally inserted central venous catheters are generally preferred because they involve a less invasive technique with a lower risk of complications. In this report, we present the case of a 36-year-old male liver donor into whom we peripherally inserted a central venous catheter from his left basilic vein. After transecting the hepatic vein, the surgeon found foreign material inside the venous lumen, which turned out to be the distal segment of the catheter.

  13. Cerebral venous thrombosis and thrombophilia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lauw, Mandy N; Barco, Stefano; Coutinho, Jonathan M; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2013-11-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare manifestation of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke. The aim of our systematic review was to provide an updated summary of the strength of association between CVT and thrombophilia and to explore the relevance of thrombophilia for recurrence of CVT or other VTE, or other outcome variables. MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE (via Ovid), and CENTRAL were systematically searched, including references of retrieved articles. Cohort studies of ≥ 40 patients and case-control studies comparing the prevalence of thrombophilia in patients with CVT and unrelated controls were eligible. Two reviewers independently selected studies, assessed quality, and extracted data. A meta-analysis was performed for high quality case-control studies with unselected cases and healthy controls. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated and pooled. We included 23 cohort studies and 33 case-control studies. A significant association was demonstrated between CVT and all inherited thrombophilic factors, as well as increased levels of homocysteine. Inconclusive results were found on the relevance of thrombophilia for recurrent CVT or other VTE. Although there is a strong association between CVT and thrombophilia, the clinical relevance of thrombophilia testing in patients with CVT seems limited, similarly to other forms of VTE.

  14. Prolonged clot lysis time increases the risk of a first but not recurrent venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Karasu, Alev; Baglin, Trevor P; Luddington, Roger; Baglin, Caroline A; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid

    2016-03-01

    The role of the fibrinolytic system in the development of venous thrombosis (VT) is unclear. We studied the risk of first and recurrent VT associated with reduced fibrinolysis, as measured by clot lysis time (CLT). We also studied the relationship between CLT and thrombin generation to determine if any relationship between CLT and VT was affected by thrombin generation. Analyses were performed in the Thrombophilia Hypercoagulability Environmental risk for Venous Thromboembolism Study, a two-centre population-based case-control study, including 579 patients and 338 controls, with patients followed from the event to determine incidence of recurrent VT. Hypofibrinolysis was associated with a 1·8-fold increased risk of a first VT [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·2-2·7]. Adjustment for sex, age, study location and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) did not change the result. The risk of VT was 2·9-fold increased when the 90th percentiles of prolonged CLT and high ETP were combined, with the highest risk for unprovoked first events (Odds Ratio = 4·2, 95% CI 1·3-13·5). In the follow-up study the Hazard Ratio for a recurrent VT associated with hypofibrinolysis was 1·5 (95% CI 0·9-2·6). A weak dose response effect was observed in relation to prolongation of CLT and recurrent VT. Although hypofibrinolysis constitutes a risk factor for a first VT, an association with recurrence is, at best, weak.

  15. Non-contrast computed tomography in the diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Oblak, Janja Pretnar; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) in the diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Methods. Screening our neurological department database, we identified 53 patients who were admitted to neurological emergency department with clinical signs of CVST. Two independent observers assessed the NCCT scans for the presence of CVST. CT venography and/or MR venography were used as a reference standard. Interobserver agreement between the two readers was assessed using Kappa statistic. Attenuation inside the cerebral venous sinuses was measured and compared between the patient and the control group. Results CVST was confirmed in 13 patients. Sensitivity and specificity of NCCT for overall presence of CVST were 100% and 83%, respectively, with Kappa value of 0.72 (a good agreement between observers). The attenuation values between CVST patients and control group were significantly different (73.4 ± 14.12 HU vs. 58.1 ± 7.58 HU; p = 0.000). The ROC analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.916 (95% CI, 0.827 – 1.00) and an optimal cutoff value of 64 HU, leading to a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 87%. Conclusions NCCT as a first-line investigation has a high value for diagnosis of CVST in the emergency setting. The additional measurement of the sinus attenuation may improve the diagnostic value of the examination. PMID:27679541

  16. Effects of walking in deep venous thrombosis: a new integrated solid and fluid mechanics model.

    PubMed

    López, Josep M; Fortuny, Gerard; Puigjaner, Dolors; Herrero, Joan; Marimon, Francesc; Garcia-Bennett, Josep

    2016-08-09

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common disease. Large thrombi in venous vessels cause bad blood circulation and pain; and when a blood clot detaches from a vein wall, it causes an embolism whose consequences range from mild to fatal. Walking is recommended to DVT patients as a therapeutical complement. In this study the mechanical effects of walking on a specific patient of DVT were simulated by means of an unprecedented integration of 3 elements: a real geometry, a biomechanical model of body tissues, and a computational fluid dynamics study. A set of computed tomography images of a patient's leg with a thrombus in the popliteal vein was employed to reconstruct a geometry model. Then a biomechanical model was used to compute the new deformed geometry of the vein as a function of the fiber stretch level of the semimembranosus muscle. Finally, a computational fluid dynamics study was performed to compute the blood flow and the wall shear stress (WSS) at the vein and thrombus walls. Calculations showed that either a lengthening or shortening of the semimembranosus muscle led to a decrease of WSS levels up to 10%. Notwithstanding, changes in blood viscosity properties or blood flow rate may easily have a greater impact in WSS.

  17. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  18. The use of micro-/milli-fluidics to better understand the mechanisms behind deep venous thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Zoe; Alexiadis, Alessio; Brill, Alexander; Nash, Gerard; Vigolo, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a dangerous and painful condition in which blood clots form in deep veins (e.g., femoral vein). If these clots become unstable and detach from the thrombus they can be delivered to the lungs resulting in a life threatening complication called pulmonary embolism (PE). Mechanisms of clot development in veins remain unclear but researchers suspect that the specific flow patterns in veins, especially around the valve flaps, play a fundamental role. Here we show how it is now possible to mimic the current murine model by developing micro-/milli-fluidic experiments. We exploited a novel detection technique, ghost particle velocimetry (GPV), to analyse the velocity profiles for various geometries. These vary from regular microfluidics with a rectangular cross section with a range of geometries (mimicking the presence of side and back branches in veins, closed side branch and flexible valves) to a more accurate venous representation with a 3D cylindrical geometry obtained by 3D printing. In addition to the GPV experiments, we analysed the flow field developing in these geometries by using computational fluid dynamic simulations to develop a better understanding of the mechanisms behind DVT. ZS gratefully acknowledges financial support from the EPSRC through a studentship from the Sci-Phy-4-Health Centre for Doctoral Training (EP/L016346/1).

  19. Case report: central venous catheterization via internal jugular vein with associated formation of perioperative venous thrombosis during surgery in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Minami, Kimito; Mimami, Kimito; Iida, Miki; Iida, Hiroki

    2012-06-01

    An unusual case of central venous catheter (CVC)-related thrombosis during supine surgery in the prone position is presented. A 76-year-old woman was scheduled for elective surgery to repair a broken lumbar instrument. A single-lumen CVC was inserted via the right internal jugular vein. Surgery was performed in the prone position, with the patient's face directed downward in the standard median position (i.e., no rotation), but with slight forward flexion at the neck. After the surgery, the external jugular vein was dilated, and a postoperative X-ray revealed an infiltrative shadow in the right thoracic cavity. Because cervical echography showed dilated cervical veins with a "moyamoya-type" echo, possibly indicating a thrombus, contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed, revealing a venous thrombus in the right internal jugular vein. An internal jugular venous-velocity measurement suggested that her slightly flexed neck position and her prone position during surgery may have kinked the internal jugular vein, causing engorgement with venous blood. The presence of the internal jugular venous catheter may have created thrombogenic conditions. A patient's position during surgery can reduce deep venous-flow velocity, and venous blood may stagnate, contributing greatly to thrombogenicity. We should consider a patient's position during surgery as a risk factor for thrombus formation, and a careful preoperative evaluation should be made as to which route should be chosen for CVC.

  20. Complications of Peripheral Venous Access Devices: Prevention, Detection, and Recovery Strategies.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Elizabeth A

    2017-04-01

    Most hospitalized patients have placement of a peripheral venous access device, either a short peripheral catheter or a peripherally inserted central catheter. Compared with central venous catheters that are not peripherally inserted, the other 2 types are generally perceived by health care providers as safer and less complicated to manage, and less emphasis is placed on the prevention and management of complications. Expertise of nurses in inserting, managing, and removing these devices may reduce the likelihood of complications, and increased recognition of complications associated with use of the devices is important to ensure continued improvements in the safety, quality, and efficiency of health care. Complications associated with short peripheral catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters include tourniquet retention, tubing and catheter misconnections, phlebitis, air embolism, device fragment embolization, and inadvertent discharge with a retained peripheral venous access device. Integration of prevention, detection, and recovery strategies into personal nursing practice promotes the quality and safety of health care delivery.

  1. Active Ankle Movements Prevent Formation of Lower-Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis After Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Guan, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Rui; Li, Bin; Ning, Bo; Su, Wei; Sun, Tao; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the preventive value of active ankle movements in the formation of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), attempting to develop a new method for rehabilitation nursing after orthopedic surgery. Material/Methods We randomly assigned 193 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the lower limbs into a case group (n=96) and a control group (n=97). The control group received routine nursing while the case group performed active ankle movements in addition to receiving routine nursing. Maximum venous outflow (MVO), maximum venous capacity (MVC), and blood rheology were measured and the incidence of DVT was recorded. Results On the 11th and 14th days of the experiment, the case group had significantly higher MVO and MVC than the control group (all P<0.05). The whole-blood viscosity at high shear rate and the plasma viscosity were significantly lower in the case group than in the control group on the 14th day (both P<0.05). During the experiment, a significantly higher overall DVT incidence was recorded in the control group (8 with asymptomatic DVT) compared with the case group (1 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.034). During follow-up, the case group presented a significantly lower DVT incidence (1 with symptomatic DVT and 4 with asymptomatic DVT) than in the control group (5 with symptomatic DVT and 10 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.031). Conclusions Through increasing MVO and MVC and reducing blood rheology, active ankle movements may prevent the formation of lower-extremity DVT after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27600467

  2. The Kallikrein Inhibitor from Bauhinia bauhinioides (BbKI) shows antithrombotic properties in venous and arterial thrombosis models.

    PubMed

    Brito, Marlon V; de Oliveira, Cleide; Salu, Bruno R; Andrade, Sonia A; Malloy, Paula M D; Sato, Ana C; Vicente, Cristina P; Sampaio, Misako U; Maffei, Francisco H A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2014-05-01

    The Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein Inhibitor (BbKI) is a Kunitz-type serine peptidase inhibitor of plant origin that has been shown to impair the viability of some tumor cells and to feature a potent inhibitory activity against human and rat plasma kallikrein (Kiapp 2.4 nmol/L and 5.2 nmol/L, respectively). This inhibitory activity is possibly responsible for an effect on hemostasis by prolonging activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Because the association between cancer and thrombosis is well established, we evaluated the possible antithrombotic activity of this protein in venous and arterial thrombosis models. Vein thrombosis was studied in the vena cava ligature model in Wistar rats, and arterial thrombosis in the photochemical induced endothelium lesion model in the carotid artery of C57 black 6 mice. BbKI at a concentration of 2.0 mg/kg reduced the venous thrombus weight by 65% in treated rats in comparison to rats in the control group. The inhibitor prolonged the time for total artery occlusion in the carotid artery model mice indicating that this potent plasma kallikrein inhibitor prevented thrombosis.

  3. Renal transplantation with venous drainage through the superior mesenteric vein in cases of thrombosis of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Aguirrezabalaga, Javier; Novas, Serafín; Veiga, Francisco; Chantada, Venancio; Rey, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Marcelino; Gomez, Manuel

    2002-08-15

    Renal transplantation usually is performed by placing the graft in the iliac fossa, anastomosing the renal vein to the iliac vein or, when this is not possible, to the vena cava. When vascular complications occur, particularly on the venous side, the position of the graft may have to be changed. This report describes orthotopic renal grafts and positioning of the organ with anastomosis to the splenic vessels. Venous drainage was established directly into the mesenteric-portal territory, with two cases to the portal vein and one to the inferior mesenteric vein. A new technique for the venous drainage of the renal graft is shown. We have used this model in two cases of infrarenal inferior vena cava thrombosis. The kidney was located in a retroperitoneal position, with venous drainage to the superior mesenteric vein through an orifice in the posterior peritoneum.

  4. Peripherally inserted central venous catheter safety in burn care: a single-center retrospective cohort review.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ryan E; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Bolourani, Siavash; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line for central venous access in thermally injured patients has increased in recent years despite a lack of evidence regarding safety in this patient population. A recent survey of invasive catheter practices among 44 burn centers in the United States found that 37% of burn units use PICC lines as part of their treatment protocol. The goal of this study was to compare PICC-associated complication rates with the existing literature in both the critical care and burn settings. The methodology involved is a single institution retrospective cohort review of patients who received a PICC line during admission to a regional burn unit between 2008 and 2013. Fifty-three patients were identified with a total of seventy-three PICC lines. The primary outcome measurement for this study was indication for PICC line discontinuation. The most common reason for PICC line discontinuation was that the line was no longer indicated (45.2%). Four cases of symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (5.5%) and three cases of central line-associated bloodstream infection (4.3%, 2.72 infections per 1000 line days) were identified. PICC lines were in situ an average of 15 days (range 1 to 49 days). We suggest that PICC line-associated complication rates are similar to those published in the critical care literature. Though these rates are higher than those published in the burn literature, they are similar to central venous catheter-associated complication rates. While PICC lines can be a useful resource in the treatment of the thermally injured patient, they are associated with significant and potentially fatal risks.

  5. Venous function in the leg after postoperative thrombosis diagnosed with /sup 125/I-fibrinogen uptake test

    SciTech Connect

    Lindhagen, A.; Bergqvist, D.; Hallboeoek, T.; Efsing, H.O.

    1983-02-01

    The /sup 125/I-fibrinogen uptake test (FUT) has been widely used in the past decade to detect postoperative thrombosis. FUT has been shown to correlate well with phlebography, and positive FUT is associated with a high frequency of pulmonary embolism. The long-term venous function of the leg after FUT-detected postoperative thrombosis, however, is inadequately documented. In 179 patients who had been studied after operation with FUT, a follow-up evaluation of FUT as an indicator of risk for development of deep venous insufficiency was made four to five years later. The patients replied to a questionnaire, were clinically examined, and underwent venous strain-gauge plethysmography, venous pressure measurement, and, in some cases, phlebography. No statistically significant differences were found in any of the parameters between legs that had been FUT-positive and those that were FUT-negative at the time of the operation. The frequency of deep venous insufficiency thus was equal in FUT-positive and FUT-negative legs. It was also independent of the site of FUT-detected thrombus in the leg.

  6. Incidence and risk factors for central venous catheter-related thrombosis in hematological patients.

    PubMed

    Joks, Monika; Czyż, Anna; Popławski, Dariusz; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) is a serious complication in hematological patients, but the risk factors for its occurrence are not well established. The study objectives were to estimate the incidence of CRT and to identify the risk factors for developing CRT in hematological patients. In a prospective setting, 104 consecutive patients with 200 insertions of central venous catheters were enrolled into the study. The patients were screened for CRT by compression Doppler ultrasound every 10-14 days. Additionally, ultrasonography was performed in the case of clinical symptoms suggesting CRT. Over the course of 6,098 catheter days of follow-up, the incidence of CRT was 13.5 %. In 18/27 cases (66.6 %), radiological evidence of CRT was preceded by clinical symptoms. However, in 9/27 (33.3 %), CRT was clinically asymptomatic. The median times to symptomatic and asymptomatic CRT were 17 (range 1-49) and 8 (range 1-16) catheter days, respectively. In univariate analysis, the risk factors for CRT were exit-site infection (ESI) (P < 0.001), two or more prior chemotherapy lines (P = 0.015), catheter-related blood stream infection (P < 0.001), and Coagulase-negative staphylococci infection (P = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, ESI (OR 5.0; 95 % CI 1.6-6.3; P = 0.006) and two or more prior chemotherapy lines (OR 3.57; 95 % CI 1.27-10.11; P = 0.015) remained significantly associated with the risk of CRT. The results of our study provide information regarding the characteristic features of the patients who are at high risk of thrombosis, for whom Doppler ultrasound screening should be considered.

  7. Effects of Analgesic Use on Inflammation and Hematology in a Murine Model of Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hish, Gerald A; Diaz, Jose A; Hawley, Angela E; Myers, Daniel D; Lester, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Surgical animal models are crucial in studies investigating the pathogenesis of this disease and evaluating VT therapies. Because inflammation is critical to both the development and resolution of VT, analgesic medications have the potential to adversely affect multiple parameters of interest in VT research. The objective of this study was to determine how several common analgesics affect key variables in a murine ligation model of deep vein thrombosis. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to receive either local (bupivacaine) or systemic parenteral analgesia (buprenorphine, tramadol, or carprofen) or 0.9% NaCl (control). All mice underwent laparotomy and ligation of the inferior vena cava, and treatment was continued until euthanasia at 6 or 48 h after surgery. Analysis of harvested tissues and blood included: hematology, thrombus weight, serum and vein-wall cytokines (IL1β, IL6, IL10, TNFα), soluble P-selectin, and vein-wall leukocyte infiltration. Compared with 0.9% NaCl, all of the analgesics affected multiple parameters important to VT research. Carprofen and tramadol affected the most parameters and should not be used in murine models of VT. Although they affected fewer parameters, a single dose of bupivacaine increased thrombus weight at 6 h, and buprenorphine was associated with reduced vein wall macrophages at 48 h. Although we cannot recommend the use of any of the evaluated analgesic dosages in this mouse model of VT, buprenorphine merits additional investigation to ensure the highest level of laboratory animal care and welfare. PMID:25255071

  8. Arterial and venous thrombosis in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: incidence and risk factors in a cohort of 1491 patients.

    PubMed

    Za, Tommaso; De Stefano, Valerio; Rossi, Elena; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Andriani, Alessandro; Annino, Luciana; Cimino, Giuseppe; Caravita, Tommaso; Pisani, Francesco; Ciminello, Angela; Torelli, Fabio; Villivà, Nicoletta; Bongarzoni, Velia; Rago, Angela; Betti, Silvia; Levi, Anna; Felici, Stefano; Gentilini, Fabiana; Calabrese, Elisabetta; Leone, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) has been associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We carried out a retrospective multicentre cohort study on 1491 patients with MGUS. In 49 patients (3.3%) MGUS was diagnosed after a thrombotic event. Follow-up details for a period of at least 12 months after diagnosis of MGUS were obtained in 1238 patients who had no recent history of thrombosis (<2 years) prior to diagnosis, for a total of 7334 years. During the follow-up, 33 of 1238 patients (2.7%) experienced thrombosis, with an incidence of 2.5 arterial events and 1.9 venous events per 1000 patient-years. Multivariate analysis showed increased risks of arterial thrombosis in patients with cardiovascular risk factors [hazard ratio (HR) 4.92, 95%confidence interval (CI) 1.42-17.04], and of venous thrombosis in patients with a serum monoclonal (M)-protein level >16 g/l at diagnosis (HR 3.08, 95%CI 1.01-9.36). No thrombosis was recorded in patients who developed multiple myeloma (n = 50) or other neoplastic diseases (n = 21). The incidence of arterial or venous thrombosis in patients with MGUS did not increase relative to that reported in the general population for similarly aged members. Finally, the risk of venous thrombosis did increase when the M-protein concentration exceeded >16 g/l.

  9. A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent deep venous thrombosis after elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Steve; Waddell, James P.; Cardella, Piera; Morton, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a short course of low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin) in the prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after elective total hip replacement. Design A prospective cohort study. Follow-up was a minimum of 3 months. Setting An acute-care hospital with a large-volume practice of elective total joint replacement. Patients A prospective group of 150 patients who required primary total hip arthroplasty and a historic control group of 150 patients. All patients were treated with compression stockings, indomethacin and early mobilization. The treatment group received low-molecular-weight heparin, 30 mg every 12 hours for 5 days postoperatively; the control group received no specific anticoagulant therapy. Interventions Total hip replacement. Doppler venography on postoperative day 5 and 2 to 5 days later if required. Main outcome measures Presence or absence of deep venous thrombosis. Wound hemorrhage, transfusion rate, number of units of blood transfused and changes in the hemoglobin level. Results The incidence of proximal deep venous thrombosis (popliteal vein to common iliac vein) was 0% in the treatment group versus 4% in the control group. There was no difference in bleeding or number of transfusions required. There was, however, a significant (p = 0.005) drop in hemoglobin level in the treatment group. Conclusions A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin provides effective protection against proximal deep venous thrombosis without significantly increasing the risk to the patient. The treatment is compatible with early patient discharge and the pharmacologic prevention of heterotopic ossification after total joint replacement. PMID:9126125

  10. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in the Superior Sagittal Sinus as a Rare Cause of a Paroxysmal Kinetic Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Murao, Kei; Arakawa, Shuji; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Shijo, Masahiro; Ago, Tetsuro; Kitazono, Takanari

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has a broad spectrum of clinical presentation compared to arterial etiology. Seizure is one of the common symptoms and is more frequent than in other stroke types. Hence, transient neurological symptoms in CVT patients are usually due to epileptic seizures, while transient repetitive movement disorder is extremely rare except as a complication of epilepsy. We report a case of CVT in the superior sagittal sinus with a 1-year history of paroxysmal kinetic tremor without evident epilepsy. PMID:28203183

  11. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of cerebral venous thrombosis in Chinese women during pregnancy and puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhu-Wei; Gao, Wan-Li; Feng, Li-Min

    2017-01-01

    Due to the specific physiology associated with pregnancy and puerperium, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) may manifest different characteristics. This study aimed to identify the clinical manifestations and prognosis of pregnancy-associated CVT. A total of 43 pregnancy-associated CVT patients were enrolled. We analysed the clinical presentations of the disease and performed a multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine which variables were associated with prognosis. Our descriptive results showed the following: 1) the incidence was 202 per 100,000 deliveries, and the mortality rate was 11.63%; 2) the most frequent symptom was headache; 3) the most frequent abnormal laboratory findings were increased levels of fibrinogen and several serum lipoproteins (including triglyceride, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, apolipoprotein A1, and apolipoprotein B); and 4) the superior sagittal sinus and transverse sinus were the most frequently affected locations. Moreover, an increased modified Rankin Scale score was positively associated with infection, seizure, intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP). Comparably, the occurrence of death was positively and significantly associated with infection, seizure and ICH. Consequently, timely diagnosis and treatment of pregnancy-associated CVT patients with infection, seizure, ICH or HDP are needed. Patients with infection, seizure or ICH have a greater risk of death. PMID:28262755

  12. Risk factors for deep venous thrombosis of lower limbs in postoperative neurosurgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Zongxue; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Jinjun; Jiang, Guixi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To detect the risk factors for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients after neurosurgery. Methods: Three hundred and seventy-six patients treated in the department of neurosurgery of our hospital from February 2013 to November 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. The clinical data including age, gender, hospital stay, operation time, occupation type, hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes, smoking status, drinking status, postoperative exercises, malignant tumor, and postoperative hormone or dehydrating agent were collected. Results: In this study, 52 patients were included in the DVT group and 295 patients in the Non-DVT group. There was significant difference in age, hypertension, occupation type, malignant tumors, operation time, smoking status, and postoperative exercises between the two groups (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in gender, drinking status, coronary heart disease, diabetes, hospital stay, and postoperative hormone or dehydrating agent (p>0.05). In multivariate analysis, age, malignant tumor, hypertension were independent risk factors, while physical labour and postoperative exercises were protective factor for DVT. Conclusion: The postoperative patients with older age, malignant tumor or hypertension should be paid high attention to prevent DVT, and postoperative exercises should be selected as precautionary measures. PMID:27882003

  13. Hormonal Contraceptives and Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amoozegar, Farnaz; Ronksley, Paul E.; Sauve, Reg; Menon, Bijoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Use of oral contraceptive pills (OCP) increases the risk of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Whether this risk varies by type, duration, and other forms of hormonal contraceptives is largely unknown. This systematic review and meta-analysis update the current state of knowledge. Methods: We performed a search to identify all published studies on the association between hormonal contraceptive use and risk of CVST in women aged 15–50 years. Results: Of 861 studies reviewed, 11 were included. The pooled odds of developing CVST in women aged 15–50 years taking OCPs was 7.59 times higher compared to women not taking OCPs (OR = 7.59, 95% CI 3.82–15.09). Data are insufficient to make conclusions about duration of use and other forms of hormonal contraceptives. Conclusion: Oral contraceptive pills use increases the risk of developing CVST in women of reproductive age. Future studies are required to determine if duration and type of hormonal contraceptives modify this risk. PMID:25699010

  14. Comparison of duplex ultrasonography and venography in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D C; Grasty, M S; Stebbings, W S; Nockler, I B; Lewars, M D; Levison, R A; Wood, R F

    1991-05-01

    Sixty-five patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in 68 limbs were entered consecutively into a study to compare venography with duplex ultrasonography scanning. Both tests were performed on 64 limbs, venography being contraindicated in four. Overall, duplex scanning correctly identified 86 per cent of DVTs diagnosed on venography and correctly excluded 80 per cent with negative venograms. Nearly all errors arose in the diagnosis of calf DVT. In the femoral vein duplex scanning had a specificity of 100 per cent and a sensitivity of 95 per cent. In addition, duplex scanning provided data on the limb not undergoing venography. Of 55 limbs that underwent bilateral duplex scanning, five had thrombus in the femoropopliteal segment and a negative contralateral venogram. In addition, three Baker's cysts were diagnosed. Duplex scanning can be used in patients in whom venography is contraindicated and may also provide information about the contralateral limb. We regard femoropopliteal duplex scanning as sufficiently accurate that treatment can be initiated on the basis of the scan. Duplex scanning should replace venography as the standard method of diagnosing femoropopliteal DVT; radiographic studies should now be required only when the scan result is in doubt.

  15. Protein S Heerlen mutation heterozygosity is associated with venous thrombosis risk

    PubMed Central

    Suchon, P.; Germain, M.; Delluc, A.; Smadja, D.; Jouven, X.; Gyorgy, B.; Saut, N.; Ibrahim, M.; Deleuze, J. F.; Alessi, M. C.; Morange, P. E.; Trégouët, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Protein S (PS) deficiency is a rare coagulation disorder associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (VT). The PS Heerlen (PSH) mutation is a rare S501P mutation that was initially considered to be a neutral polymorphism. However, it has been later shown that PSH has a reduced half-life in vivo which may explain the association of PSH heterozygosity with mildly reduced levels of plasma free PS (FPS). Whether the risk of VT is increased in PSH carriers remains unknown. We analyzed the association of PSH (rs121918472 A/G) with VT in 4,173 VT patients and 5,970 healthy individuals from four independent case-control studies. Quantitative determination of FPS levels was performed in a subsample of 1257 VT patients. In the investigated populations, the AG genotype was associated with an increased VT risk of 6.57 [4.06–10.64] (p = 1.73 10−14). In VT patients in whom PS deficiency was excluded, plasma FPS levels were significantly lower in individuals with PSH when compared to those without [72 + 13 vs 91 + 21 UI/dL; p = 1.86 10−6, mean + SD for PSH carriers (n = 21) or controls (n = 1236) respectively]. We provide strong evidence that the rare PSH variant is associated with VT in unselected individuals. PMID:28374852

  16. Incidence of cannula associated deep vein thrombosis after veno-venous ECMO.

    PubMed

    Menaker, Jay; Tabatabai, Ali; Rector, Raymond; Dolly, Katelyn; Kufera, Joseph; Lee, Eugenia; Kon, Zachary; Sanchez, Pablo; Pham, Si; Herr, Daniel L; Mazzeffi, Michael; Rabinowitz, Ronald P; OʼConnor, James V; Stein, Deborah M; Scalea, Thomas M

    2017-02-13

    Limited literature regarding the incidence of cannula associated deep vein thrombosis (CaDVT) following veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) exists. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of post decannulation CaDVT and identify any associated risk factors. Forty eight patients were admitted between August 2014 and January 2016 to the Lung Rescue Unit were included in the study. Protocolized anticoagulation levels (partial thromboplastin time 45-55 second) and routine post decannulation DVT screening were in place during the study period. Forty-one (85.4%) patients had CaDVT. Of those with CaDVT, 31 (76%) patients were treated with full anti-coagulation therapy. 34 (76%) patients with right internal jugular cannulation had CaDVT at cannula site. Twenty-five (61%) patients had CaDVT in the lower extremity. (18 associated right femoral vein cannulation; 7 left femoral vein cannulation) 18 (44%) patients had both upper and lower extremity CaDVT. Overall, patients with CaDVT tended to be older, have a higher body mass index (BMI) and on ECMO longer (p=NS). Mean PTT during time on ECMO between patients that did and did not have CaDVT did not differ. No clinical evidence of pulmonary embolism was seen.

  17. Monocytes, neutrophils, and platelets cooperate to initiate and propagate venous thrombosis in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Stark, Konstantin; Steinhart, Alexander; Chandraratne, Sue; Konrad, Ildiko; Lorenz, Michael; Khandoga, Alexander; Tirniceriu, Anca; Coletti, Raffaele; Köllnberger, Maria; Byrne, Robert A; Laitinen, Iina; Walch, Axel; Brill, Alexander; Pfeiler, Susanne; Manukyan, Davit; Braun, Siegmund; Lange, Philipp; Riegger, Julia; Ware, Jerry; Eckart, Annekathrin; Haidari, Selgai; Rudelius, Martina; Schulz, Christian; Echtler, Katrin; Brinkmann, Volker; Schwaiger, Markus; Preissner, Klaus T; Wagner, Denisa D; Mackman, Nigel; Engelmann, Bernd; Massberg, Steffen

    2012-04-09

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major cause of cardiovascular death. The sequence of events that promote DVT remains obscure, largely as a result of the lack of an appropriate rodent model. We describe a novel mouse model of DVT which reproduces a frequent trigger and resembles the time course, histological features, and clinical presentation of DVT in humans. We demonstrate by intravital two-photon and epifluorescence microscopy that blood monocytes and neutrophils crawling along and adhering to the venous endothelium provide the initiating stimulus for DVT development. Using conditional mutants and bone marrow chimeras, we show that intravascular activation of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation via tissue factor (TF) derived from myeloid leukocytes causes the extensive intraluminal fibrin formation characteristic of DVT. We demonstrate that thrombus-resident neutrophils are indispensable for subsequent DVT propagation by binding factor XII (FXII) and by supporting its activation through the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Correspondingly, neutropenia, genetic ablation of FXII, or disintegration of NETs each confers protection against DVT amplification. Platelets associate with innate immune cells via glycoprotein Ibα and contribute to DVT progression by promoting leukocyte recruitment and stimulating neutrophil-dependent coagulation. Hence, we identified a cross talk between monocytes, neutrophils, and platelets responsible for the initiation and amplification of DVT and for inducing its unique clinical features.

  18. Desmoid Fibromatosis Presenting as Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Case Report and Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Lisa M.; Neuhaus, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 40 Final Diagnosis: Desmoid fibromatosis Symptoms: Discomfort Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgery and radiotherapy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE), comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a common, serious cardiovascular event. Predisposing factors include genetic disorders, immobility, and underlying malignancy. Soft tissue tumors are by contrast rare, but should be included in the differential etiology of DVT, especially when the patient is young and has few thrombotic risk factors. Case Report: We present a 40-year-old patient whose initial diagnosis was spontaneous DVT of the lower leg, treated conventionally. Subsequently, he developed progressive calf swelling, which was diagnosed as multifocal desmoid fibromatosis, a rare and complex soft tissue tumor. Conclusions: DVT is common but soft tissue tumors are rare. The disparity in incidence of these very distinct pathologies may contribute to late diagnosis of occult soft tissue pathology. We discuss the incidence, etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and best management of both desmoid fibromatosis and DVT, which may co-exist in a causative way. PMID:27994217

  19. Activation of circulated immune cells and inflammatory immune adherence are involved in the whole process of acute venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le-Min; Duan, Qiang-Lin; Yang, Fan; Yi, Xiang-Hua; Zeng, Yu; Tian, Hong-Yan; Lv, Wei; Jin, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate localization and distribution of integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 and morphological changes of ligand-recepter binding in thrombi of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) patients and explore activation of circulated immune cells, inflammatory immune adherence and coagulation response in acute venous thrombosis. Methods: Thrombi were collected from patients with acute PE. Immunohistochemistry was done to detect the expression and distribution of integrin β1, β2 and β3 in cells within thrombi, and ligands of integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 were also determined by immunohistochemistry within the thrombi. Results: 1) Acute venous thrombi were red thrombi composed of skeletons and filamentous mesh containing large amounts of red blood cells and white blood cells; 2) Integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 were expressed on lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets; 3) No expression of integrin β1 ligands: Laminin, Fibronectin, Collagen I or Collagen-II on lymphocytes; integrin β2 ligands including ICAM, factor X and iC3b are distributed on neutrophils, and ligand fibrinogen bound to neutrophils; integrin β3 was expressed on platelets which form the skeleton of thrombi and bound to fibrinogen to construct mesh structure; 4) Factor Xa was expressed on the filamentous mesh; 5) Filamentous mesh was fully filled with red blood cell dominant blood cells. Conclusion: Acute venous thrombosis is an activation process of circulated lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets mainly, and a whole process including integrin subunit β2 and β3 binding with their ligands. Activation of immune cells, inflammatory immune adherence and coagulation response are involved in the acute venous thrombosis. PMID:24753749

  20. Persistent neutrophilia is a marker for an increased risk of venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Margarita; Cohen, Hillel W; Billett, Henny H

    2016-11-01

    In patients with cancer and myeloproliferative disorders, leukocytosis has been associated with an increased venous thromboembolic (VTE) risk. Our goal was to determine whether persistent neutrophilia (PN), not associated with known causes such as malignancies, infections or steroids, is independently associated with VTE. All adult patients with >3 outpatient complete blood counts (CBCs) within 3 years were included. PN was defined as having an absolute neutrophil count >95 % (>2SD) of the population (≥7.8 × 10(9)/L) on at least three CBCs, at least 2 months apart. Separate analyses for neutrophil counts ≥9 × 10(9)/L and ≥10 × 10(9)/L were also performed. Blood counts from inpatients were excluded. Primary outcome was diagnosis of VTE, as determined by ICD-9 codes. Odds ratios were adjusted for diabetes, smoking, obesity, gender, and age. Charlson score was utilized as a morbidity measure. Data on 43,538 outpatients were collected. Although there was no association of VTE with neutrophil counts ≥7.8 × 10(9)/L, patients with ≥9.0 × 10(9)/L neutrophils were twice as likely to be diagnosed with VTE compared to those with normal neutrophil counts (OR 2.0, 95 % CI 1.3, 3.1; p = 0.003). Patients with neutrophil counts ≥10.0 × 10(9)/L were at an even higher risk (OR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.2, 4.8; p = 0.019). Charlson scores significantly modified this risk when incorporated into analysis. Elevated neutrophil counts are associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis even when they are not due to cancer, infection or steroids. In patients with significant comorbidities, neutrophilia may be a marker of VTE risk.

  1. Transdermal hormone therapy and the risk of stroke and venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Speroff, L

    2010-10-01

    Recent case-control and cohort studies have indicated that the transdermal administration of postmenopausal estrogen therapy is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, specifically stroke and venous thrombosis. These studies have prompted the clinical promotion of transdermal treatment as 'safer'. There are reasons, however, to be cautious regarding postmenopausal transdermal hormone therapy, especially in regard to stroke. Previous reports linking postmenopausal estrogen therapy and the risk of stroke have not yielded consistent results, finding it difficult to adjust for all confounding factors, including compliance with treatment. Age of the population studies may be a critical issue. Notably, the risk of stroke with oral estrogen was not increased in the Women's Health Initiative when women with prior cardiovascular disease or those older than 60 years were excluded. There does appear to be a dose-response relationship with stroke, similar to that observed with estrogen-progestin contraceptives, and this may be a problem when studying standard doses of transdermal treatment, in that many women receiving transdermal estrogen display lower estrogen blood levels when compared with oral treatment. Clinicians should administer low doses of estrogen to women with risk factors for stroke, and the transdermal route of administration is indicated for women at high risk for venous thrombosis and for older postmenopausal women, especially for women with stroke risk factors. In a recent study, Renoux and colleagues from McGill University in Montreal performed a nested case-control study deriving the data from a cohort of women in the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Current use of oral and transdermal hormone therapy, based on recorded prescriptions, was compared to no use in 15 710 cases and 59 958 controls. The adjusted rate ratio (RR) for stroke for current use of transdermal estrogens, with or without a progestin, was not

  2. Long-term prognostic analysis of early interventional therapy for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Zongxue; Wang, Jinjun; Chen, Xiao; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the long-term prognostic value of early interventional therapy for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (LDVT). In total, 85 patients diagnosed with LDVT for the first time were consecutively selected (identified course of disease was <3 months), and were divided into the control group with 43 cases and the observation group with 42 cases according to different therapeutic methods. The control group received anticoagulation therapy and thrombolysis, or integrated surgical thrombectomy, a conventional open operation, while the observation group received comprehensive treatment, combining endovascular catheter-directed thrombolysis and thrombectomy. The therapeutic effects were compared. After treatment, the differences in circumference of the thigh and shank between the affected and unaffected extremities, and vein dysfunction score of the two groups were decreased compared with before treatment. In addition, the above indexes of the observation group were significantly lower than in the control group (P<0.05). The clinical effective rate and effective extent of the observation group were higher than those of the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The occurrence rate of post-thrombotic syndrome in the observation group was lower than that of the control group, and there was no difference in comparison of grading. The recurrence rate and restenosis rate of the observation group were lower than in the control group, while the patency rate of the observation group was higher than that of the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, early catheter-directed invention of thrombolysis with thrombectomy for LDVT has good clinical effect in the short-term and long-term. PMID:28105087

  3. Clinical features, risk factors, and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yadegari, Samira; Ghorbani, Askar; Miri, S. Roohollah; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rostami, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite increasing the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has remained an under-diagnosed condition. In this study, characteristics and frequency of various risk factors of CVST patients in a tertiary referral hospital were closely assessed. Methods: Patients with an unequivocal diagnosis of CVST confirmed by MRI and magnetic resonance venography during 6 years of the study were included. All data from the onset of symptoms regarding clinical signs and symptoms, hospital admission, seasonal distribution, medical and drug history, thrombophilic profile, D-dimer, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid findings, mortality, and outcome were collected and closely analyzed. Result: A total of 53 patients with female to male ratio of 3.07 and mean age of 33.7 years were included in the study. Headache and papilledema were the most frequent clinical features (44 and 36 patients, respectively). An underlying disease (diagnosed previously or after admission) was the most common identified risk factor for CVST in both females and males (21 patients). A total of 15 women used the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) where 12 of them had simultaneously other predisposing factors. Overall, 19 patients (36%) had more than one contributing factor. D-dimer had a sensitivity of 71.4% in CVST patients. The mortality of patients in this study was 3.7% (n = 2). Focal neurologic deficit and multicranial nerve palsy were associated with poor outcome which defined as death, recurrence, and massive intracranial hemorrhage due to anticoagulation (P = 0.050 and 0.004, respectively). Conclusion: Unlike most of the CVST studies in which OCP was the main factor; in this study, an underlying disease was the most identified cause. Considering the high probability of multiple risk factors in CVST that was shown by this study, appropriate work up should be noted to uncover them. PMID:27695236

  4. Radiolabeled tirofiban – a potential radiopharmaceutical for detection of deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Darkovska-Serafimovska, Marija; Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Djorgoski, Icko; Arsova-Sarafinovska, Zorica; Zdravkovska, Milka; Balkanov, Trajan; Ugresic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using 99mtechnetium (99mTc)-labeled tirofiban (a reversible antagonist of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) for detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in rats without causing an antiplatelet effect. Methods The ability of in vitro tirofiban to inhibit adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was evaluated using optical aggregometer. Binding of 99mTc-tirofiban to platelets was evaluated. Serum levels of unlabeled (a validated high performance liquid chromatography method) and 99mTc-tirofiban after single intravenous injection were evaluated in male Wistar rats with or without induced DVT (femoral vein ligation model), and the rats were also subjected to whole body scintigraphy. Results Tirofiban in vitro inhibits ADP-induced aggregation of human platelets in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner (10 nM to 2 μM), but only if it is added before ADP and not after ADP. 99mTc labeling did not affect the ability of tirofiban to bind to either human or rat platelets, nor did it affect tirofiban pharmacokinetics in intact rats or in animals with induced DVT. When 99mTc-tirofiban was injected to rats after induction of DVT, at a molar dose lower than the one showing only a weak antiaggregatory effect in vitro, whole body scintigraphy indicated localization of 99mTc-tirofiban around the place of the induced DVT. Conclusion 99mTc labeling of tirofiban does not affect its ability to bind to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa or its in vivo pharmacokinetics in rats, either intact or with DVT. A low, nonantiaggregatory dose of 99mTc-tirofiban may be used to visualize DVT at an early stage. PMID:27713618

  5. Portomesenteric venous thrombosis: A rare but probably under-reported complication of laparoscopic surgery: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yan Mei; Tokala, Ajay; Hany, Tarek; Pursnani, Kishore G.; Date, Ravindra S.

    2017-01-01

    Portomesenteric venous thrombosis (PMVT) is a rare but well-reported complication following laparoscopic surgery. We present three cases of PMVT following laparoscopic surgery. Our first case is a 71-year-old morbidly obese woman admitted for elective laparoscopic giant hiatus hernia (LGHH) repair. Post-operatively, she developed multi-organ dysfunction and computed tomography scan revealed portal venous gas and extensive small bowel infarct. The second patient is a 51-year-old man with known previous deep venous thrombosis who also had elective LGHH repair. He presented 8 weeks post-operatively with severe abdominal pain and required major bowel resection. Our third case is an 86-year-old woman who developed worsening abdominal tenderness 3 days after laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for adenocarcinoma and was diagnosed with an incidental finding of thrombus in the portal vein. She did not require further surgical intervention. The current guidelines for thromboprophylaxis follow-up in this patient group may not be adequate for the patients at risk. Hence, we propose prolonged period of thromboprophylaxis in the patients undergoing major laparoscopic surgery. PMID:28281480

  6. Regional lymph node metastases are a strong risk factor for venous thromboembolism: results from the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study

    PubMed Central

    Dickmann, Boris; Ahlbrecht, Jonas; Ay, Cihan; Dunkler, Daniela; Thaler, Johannes; Scheithauer, Werner; Quehenberger, Peter; Zielinski, Christoph; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Advanced cancer is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. However, lymph node metastases are usually not considered an established risk factor. In the framework of the prospective, observational Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study we investigated the association between local (N0), regional (N1–3), and distant (M1) cancer stages and the occurrence of venous thromboembolism. Furthermore, we were specifically interested in the relationship between stage and biomarkers that have been reported to be associated with venous thromboembolism. We followed 832 patients with solid tumors for a median of 527 days. The study end-point was symptomatic venous thromboembolism. At study inclusion, 241 patients had local, 138 regional, and 453 distant stage cancer. The cumulative probability of venous thromboembolism after 6 months in patients with local, regional and distant stage cancer was 2.1%, 6.5% and 6.0%, respectively (P=0.002). Compared to patients with local stage disease, patients with regional and distant stage disease had a significantly higher risk of venous thromboembolism in multivariable Cox-regression analysis including age, newly diagnosed cancer (versus progression of disease), surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy (regional: HR=3.7, 95% CI: 1.5–9.6; distant: HR=5.4, 95% CI: 2.3–12.9). Furthermore, patients with regional or distant stage disease had significantly higher levels of D-dimer, factor VIII, and platelets, and lower hemoglobin levels than those with local stage disease. These results demonstrate an increased risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with regional disease. Elevated levels of predictive biomarkers in patients with regional disease underpin the results and are in line with the activation of the hemostatic system in the early phase of metastatic dissemination. PMID:23585523

  7. A Flare of Ulcerative Colitis Accompanied With Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis And Bilateral Thalamic Infarctus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Begenik, Huseyin; Demirtas, Levent; Esen, Ramazan; Emre, Habib

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory and recurrent disorder that is characterized by bowel inflammation. Some patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have acute, severe, and sometimes devastating intracranial complications that require immediate medical intervention. Cerebral sinus vein thrombosis is a rare but serious extraintestinal complication associated with ulcerative colitis. Herein we report a 30-year-old man with UC who presented with a flare of gastrointestinal symptoms with mental obtundation and apathy. Total colonoscopy revealed active colitis and cranial MRI showed extensive cerebral sinus venous thrombosis with thalamic infarcts. Because the patient was clinically unstable metilprednisolon with low molecular weight heparin were administered. Two days after treatment the patient was died despite all medical efforts. PMID:27785183

  8. Haemodynamic response to peripheral venous congestion in patients with unexplained recurrent syncope.

    PubMed

    Bellard, Elisabeth; Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Dupuis, Jean-Marc; Victor, Jacques; Lefthériotis, Georges

    2003-09-01

    In patients with recurrent unexplained syncope, exaggerated peripheral venous pooling and impaired circulatory adjustment is thought to contribute to the outcome of a head-up tilt (HUT) test. The present study investigated the role of leg volume changes during venous congestion in the haemodynamic response of patients with recurrent unexplained syncope and the ability to predict the outcome of a HUT test. Changes in calf volume (strain gauge plethysmography), heart rate and arterial blood pressure were recorded in 60 patients with history of unexplained syncope (without postural tachycardia symptom) during venous congestion provoked by pneumatic thigh cuffs while supine at rest and during the initial 10 min of a 45 min 70 degrees HUT test. Twenty-seven patients [age (mean+/-S.D.), 39+/-16 years] exhibited symptoms [HUT(+)] and 33 patients (45+/-14 years) were asymptomatic [HUT(-)]. During venous congestion, mean+/-S.E.M. calf volume increased in both groups [HUT(-), 4.5+/-0.2; HUT(+), 4.8+/-0.4 ml x 100 ml(-1), not significant), but significantly less during head-upright tilt [HUT(-), 3.3+/-0.2, P <0.01; HUT(+), 2.6+/-0.3 ml x 100 ml(-1), P <0.001] without differences between the groups. During venous congestion, arterial pressure increased significantly in asymptomatic HUT(-) patients, but not in the HUT(+) patients. Calf volume changes did not correlate with a symptomatic outcome to a 70 degrees HUT. The lack of exaggerated venous pooling during venous congestion and the inability of calf volume changes to predict a positive HUT suggest that excessive venous pooling does not contribute to the outcome of HUT. Attenuated changes in arterial pressure during venous congestion while supine suggest impaired adjustment of peripheral resistance to leg venous occlusion.

  9. Deep venous thrombosis and inferior vena cava agenesis causing double crush sciatic neuropathy in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kara, Murat; Ozçakar, Levent; Eken, Güneş; Ozen, Gülsen; Kiraz, Sedat

    2008-12-01

    We report here the case of a 18-year-old young man with Behçet's disease who had suffered deep venous thrombosis of the right femoral and popliteal veins. Consequently, right sciatic nerve injury, drop foot and tightness of the achilles tendon also ensued. The clinical scenario was further challenged by demonstration of the agenetic inferior vena cava and epidural vein dilatations compressing the lumbar nerve roots. To the best notice of the authors, this is the first patient encompassing all these complications in the literature concerning Behçet's disease.

  10. Peripheral venous scintillation angiocardiography in determination of left ventricular volume in man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. W.; Bergeron, D. A.; Vetter, W. R.; Hyatt, K. H.; Haughton, V.; Vogel, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic volume was determined by cardiac visualization after peripheral venous injection of a gamma-emitting isotope in 10 patients with organic heart disease. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume measured by the isotope method consistently averaged 9% less than that determined by the X-ray method. The mean difference in left ventricular end-diastolic volume was 21 ml. Excellent correlation between the two methods was observed. It is pointed out that peripheral venous scintillation angiocardiography compares well with left ventriculography in the determination of left ventricular end-diastolic volume in man.

  11. Venous Congestive Myelopathy due to Chronic Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis Treated with Endovascular Stenting: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Diego Z.; Hughes, Joshua D.; Liebo, Greta B.; Bendel, Emily C.; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Klaas, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impaired inferior vena cava (IVC) outflow can lead to collateralization of blood to the valveless epidural venous plexus, causing epidural venous engorgement and venous congestion. Herein we describe a case of chronic IVC thrombosis presenting as venous congestive myelopathy treated with angioplasty and endovascular stenting. The pathophysiological mechanisms of cord injury are hypothesized, and IVC stenting application is evaluated. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results IVC outflow obstruction has only rarely been associated with neurologic dysfunction, with reports of lumbosacral nerve root compression in the cases of IVC agenesis, compression, or occlusion. Although endovascular angioplasty with stenting is emerging as a leading treatment option for chronic IVC thrombosis, its use to treat neurologic complications is limited to one case report for intractable sciatica. Our case is the first description of IVC thrombosis presenting with venous congestive myelopathy, and treated successfully with IVC stenting. Conclusion Venous congestive myelopathy should be seen as a broader clinical condition, including not only typical dural arteriovenous fistulas, but also disorders of venous outflow. Therefore, identifying a rare, but potentially treatable, etiology is important to avoid permanent neurologic deficits. IVC stenting is proposed as a novel and effective treatment approach. PMID:25825633

  12. Acylcarnitines are anticoagulants that inhibit factor Xa and are reduced in venous thrombosis, based on metabolomics data

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, Hiroshi; Banerjee, Yajnavalka; Trauger, Sunia; Siuzdak, Gary; Kalisiak, Ewa; Fernández, José A.; Hoang, Linh; Tran, Minerva; Yegneswaran, Subramanian; Elias, Darlene J.

    2015-01-01

    In many patients with deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (venous thromboembolism, VTE), biomarkers or genetic risk factors have not been identified. To discover novel plasma metabolites associated with VTE risk, we employed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics, which do not target any specific metabolites. Using the Scripps Venous Thrombosis Registry population for a case-control study, we discovered that 10:1 and 16:1 acylcarnitines were low in plasmas of the VTE patient group compared with matched controls, respectively. Data from targeted metabolomics studies showed that several long-chain acylcarnitines (10:1, 12:0, 12:2, 18:1, and 18:2) were lower in the VTE group. Clotting assays were used to evaluate a causal relationship for low acylcarnitines in patients with VTE. Various acylcarnitines inhibited factor Xa-initiated clotting. Inhibition of factor Xa by acylcarnitines was greater for longer acyl chains. Mechanistic studies showed that 16:0 acylcarnitine had anticoagulant activity in the absence of factor Va or phospholipids. Surface plasmon resonance investigations revealed that 16:0 acylcarnitine was bound to factor Xa and that binding did not require the γ-carboxy glutamic acid domain. In summary, our study identified low plasma levels of acylcarnitines in patients with VTE and showed that acylcarnitines have anticoagulant activity related to an ability to bind and inhibit factor Xa. PMID:26175037

  13. P-selectin/ PSGL-1 Inhibitors versus enoxaparin in the resolution of venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramacciotti, Eduardo; Myers, Daniel D.; Wrobleski, Shirley K.; Deatrick, K. Barry; Londy, Frank J; Rectenwald, John E.; Henke, Peter K.; Schaub, Robert G.; Wakefield, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Background P-selectin antagonism has been shown to decrease thrombogenesis and inflammation in animal models of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Objective To determine the effectiveness of P-selectin inhibitors versus saline and enoxaparin in venous resolution in nonhuman primate models of venous thrombosis. Methods Studies reporting vein re-opening, inflammation expressed as Gadolinium enhancement and coagulation parameters were searched in the literature and pooled into a meta-analysis using an inverse variance with random effects. Results Five studies were identified comparing P-selectin/ PSGL-1 inhibitors versus saline or enoxaparin regarding venous thrombosis resolution. Vein re-opening was significantly higher on P-selectin/ PSGL-1 compounds, when compared to saline (Inverse Variance [IV] 95% CI; 44.37 [17.77–70.96], p=0.001, I2 =97%) and similar to enoxaparin (IV 95% CI; 5.03 [−8.88–18.95], p=0.48, I2 =41%). Inflammation, reflected as Gadolinium enhancement at magnetic resonance venography (MRV), was significantly decreased in the P-selectin treated group when compared to saline (IV 95% CI; −17.84 [−14.98 – −8.30], p<0.00001, I2 =80%). No significant differences on vein wall inflammation were observed between P-selectin/ PSGL-1 inhibitors and enoxaparin treated animals (IV95% CI; −3.59 [−10.67–3.48], p=0.32, I2 =66%). In addition, there was no differences in the coagulation parameters (aPTT, TCT, BT, D-Dimer, fibrinogen, platelets) between P-selectin/ PSGL-1 inhibitors and enoxaparin (IV 95% CI; −1.12[−2.36–0.11], p=0.07, I2 =92%), although there was a trend showing less prolongation in TCT with P-selectin /PSGL-1 inhibitors over enoxaparin (p<0.0001). Conclusion P-selectin antagonism successfully paralleled the low-molecular-weight-heparin enoxaparin, for the treatment of DVT in nonhuman primate models, by decreasing both thrombus burden and inflammation without causing any bleeding complications and increasing coagulation times. PMID

  14. Chronic venous ulceration of leg associated with peripheral arterial disease: an underappreciated entity in developing country.

    PubMed

    Nag, Falguni; De, Abhishek; Hazra, Avijit; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Surana, Trupti V

    2014-10-01

    Chronic venous ulcer can often be associated with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which usually remains undiagnosed adding significantly to the morbidity of these patients. The Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) is suggested for PAD evaluation. Many PAD studies were conducted in western countries, but there is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of PAD in clinical venous ulcer patient in developing countries. We conducted a study in a tertiary care hospital of eastern part of India to find out the prevalence of PAD in venous ulcer patients, and also to find the sensitivity of ABPI as a diagnostic tool in these patients. We evaluated clinically diagnosed patients with venous ulcer using ABPI and Colour Doppler study for the presence of PAD. Possible associations such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, hypertension and atherosclerosis were studied. All results were analysed using the software Statistica version 6. PAD was present in 23 (27·71%) patients. Older age, longer duration, smoking, high BMI and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with PAD. A very strong level of agreement was found between venous Doppler and ABPI. Assessment for the presence of PAD is important in all clinically diagnosed venous ulcer patients. ABPI being a simple, non-invasive outpatient department (OPD)-based procedure, can be routinely used in cases of venous ulcer to find out the hidden cases of PAD even in developing countries.

  15. Ten years of cerebral venous thrombosis: male gender and myeloproliferative neoplasm is associated with thrombotic recurrence in unprovoked events.

    PubMed

    Lim, H Y; Ng, C; Donnan, G; Nandurkar, H; Ho, Prahlad

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare venous thrombotic event. We review our local experience in the management of CVT in comparison to other venous thromboembolism (VTE) with specific focus on risk factors for thrombotic recurrence. Retrospective evaluation of consecutive CVT presentations from January 2005 to June 2015, at two major tertiary hospitals in Northeast Melbourne, Australia. This population was compared to a separate audit of 1003 consecutive patients with DVT and PE. Fifty-two patients (30 female, 22 male) with a median age of 40 (18-83) years, presented with 53 episodes of CVT. Twenty-nine episodes (55 %) were associated with an underlying risk factor, with hormonal risk factors in females being most common. The median duration of anticoagulation was 6 months with 11 receiving life-long anticoagulation. Eighty-one percent had residual thrombosis on repeat imaging, which was not associated with recurrence at the same or distant site. Nine (17 %) had CVT-related haemorrhagic transformation with two resultant CVT-related deaths (RR 22.5; p = 0.04). All three VTE recurrences occured in males with unprovoked events (RR 18.2; p = 0.05) who were subsequently diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Compared to the non-cancer VTE population, non-cancer CVT patients were younger, had similar rate of provoked events and VTE recurrence, although with significantly higher rate of MPN diagnosis (RR 9.30 (2.29-37.76); p = 0.002) CVT is a rare thrombotic disorder. All recurrences in this audit occurred in male patients with unprovoked events and subsequent diagnosis of MPN, suggesting further evaluation for MPN may be warranted in patients with unprovoked CVT.

  16. [Synthesis: certainties/uncertainties in the prevention of venous thrombosis in medical patients].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, J F; Kevorkian, J P; Chassany, O

    1998-01-01

    In medical patients there are numerous and variable risk factors for deep vein thrombosis. Placebo-controlled clinical trials are rare. The efficacy of standard heparin or low molecular weight heparin for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis is clearly demonstrated for patients with recent myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke with hemiplegia or severe pulmonary sepsis with lung failure. Pharmacological prophylaxis is probably also efficient in patients with a severe acute disease and a certain history of deep vein thrombosis. For all other medical and especially for bedridden elderly patients, use of low molecular weight heparin might decrease the incidence of deep vein thrombosis but might not modify the overall mortality. In these situations, placebo-controlled clinical trials are needed for best evaluation of the benefit-risk ratio.

  17. Wound healing and catheter thrombosis after implantable venous access device placement in 266 breast cancers treated with bevacizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Irène; Cottu, Paul H; Fourchotte, Virginie; Sanchez, Sebastian; Fromantin, Isabelle; Kirov, Krassen; Guillaume, Alain; Pelloquin, Anne; Esteve, Marc; Salmon, Remy J

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, in a population with metastatic breast cancer treated with bevacizumab therapy, the incidence of wound dehiscence after placement of an implantable venous access device (VAD) and to study the risk of catheter thrombosis. This study enrolled all VADs placed by 14 anesthetists between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2009: 273 VADs in patients treated with bevacizumab therapy and 4196 VADs in patients not treated with bevacizumab therapy. In the bevacizumab therapy group, 13 cases of wound dehiscence occurred in 12 patients requiring removal of the VAD (4.76%). All cases of dehiscence occurred when bevacizumab therapy was initiated less than 7 days after VAD placement. Bevacizumab therapy was initiated less than 7 days after VAD placement in 150 cases (13 of 150: 8.6%). The risk of dehiscence was the same from 0 to 7 days. In parallel, the VAD wound dehiscence rate in patients not receiving bevacizumab therapy was eight of 4197 cases (0.19%) (Fisher's test significant, P<0.001). No risk factors of dehiscence were identified: anesthetists, learning curves, and irradiated patients. VAD thrombosis occurred in four patients (1.5%). In parallel, VAD thrombosis occurred in 51 of 4197 patients (1.2%) not receiving bevacizumab therapy (Fisher's test not significant; P=0.43). Bevacizumab therapy was permanently discontinued in five patients related to wound dehiscence and in one patient due to extensive skin necrosis. These data suggest the need to observe an interval of at least 7 days between VAD placement and initiation of bevacizumab therapy to avoid the risk of a wound dehiscence requiring chest wall port explant. The risk of VAD thrombosis does not require any particular primary prevention.

  18. Angioarchitectural Changes in Subacute Cerebral Venous Thrombosis. A Synchrotron-based Micro- and Nano-CT Study

    SciTech Connect

    E Stolz; M Yeniguen; M Kreisel; M Kampschulte; S Doenges; D Sedding; E Ritman; T Gerriets; A Langheinrich

    2011-12-31

    It is well known that recanalization of thrombosed cerebral sinuses occurs early but without marked influence on the long-term outcome and on final venous infarct volume on magnetic resonance imaging. To better understand the possible microvascular mechanisms behind these clinical observations, we evaluated the sequels of subacute superior sagittal sinus (SSS) thrombosis in rats using micro- and nano-CT imaging of the same specimen to provide large volume and high resolution CT image data respectively. SSS thrombosis was induced in 11 animals which were euthanized after 6 h (n = 4) or 6 weeks (n = 7). Eight sham-operated rats served as controls. After infusion of contrast into the vasculature of the brains, these were isolated and scanned using micro-, nano-, and synchrotron-based micro-CT ((8 {mu}m{sup 3}), (900 nm){sup 3}, and (1.9 {mu}m{sup 3}) voxel sizes). The cross-sectional area of the superior sagittal sinus, microvessels and cortical veins were quantified. Tissue sections were stained against VEGF antigen. Immunohistochemistry was confirmed using quantitative rtPCR. SSS thrombosis led to a congestion of the bridging veins after 6 h. After 6 weeks, a network of small vessels surrounding the occluded SSS was present with concurrent return towards the diameter of the draining bridging veins of controls. This microvascular network connected to cortical veins as demonstrated by nano- and synchrotron-based micro-CT. Also the volume fraction and number of cortical veins increased significantly. Immunohistochemistry in the region of the microsvascular network demonstrated a strong immunoreactivity against VEGF, confirmed by rtPCR. The sequel of subacute SSS thrombosis induced a network of microvessels ('venogenesis') draining the bridging veins. Also the volume fraction of cortical veins increased significantly.

  19. Recipient and donor thrombophilia and the risk of portal venous thrombosis and hepatic artery thrombosis in liver recipients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vascular complications, such as HAT, are an important cause of graft loss and recipient mortality. We aimed to characterize post-transplant thrombotic events in a cohort of liver transplant recipients, and identify independent risk factors for these complications. Methods We conducted a thrombophilic study of 293 orthotopic liver transplants performed in the Digestive Surgery Department of the 12 de Octubre Hospital (Madrid, Spain) between January 2001 and December 2006. Results The most frequent post-transplant thrombotic events were HAT (9%) and PVT (1.7%). The one variable associated with post-transplant thrombotic event was a high fibrinogen level in the global cohort of liver transplantation. But toxicity as event post-OLT has been associated with post-transplant thrombotic event in the retrospective group and high fibrinogen level and low protein C levels were associated post-transplant thrombotic event in the prospective group. Liver disease relapse (HR 6.609, p < 0.001), high levels of FVIII (HR 1.008, p = 0.019)) and low levels of antithrombin (HR 0.946, p < 0.001) were associated with poor overall survival (OS). In conclusion, high fibrinogen and decreased protein C levels were associated with allograft thrombosis. Further studies are required in order to assess the clinical relevance of these parameters in prospective studies and to study the effect of anticoagulation prophylaxis in this group of risk. PMID:22123067

  20. Venous Thromboembolism—Incidence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Tertiary Care Experience in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem Sultan; Nawaz, Ahmad; Junaid, Montasir; Kazi, Maliha; Akhtar, Shabbir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although venous thromboembolism (VTE) is seen with morbidity and mortality in various surgical specialties, scarce data are available in the head and neck surgery domain. Objective We aim to determine the incidence of VTE in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer. Methods Four hundred thirteen patients who underwent head and neck surgery procedures between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients with head and neck surgery had received thromboprophylaxis (i.e., compression stockings and subcutaneous heparin). Patient demographics, operating time, and length of hospital stay were analyzed. The incidence of symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) during the initial postoperative hospitalization was assessed. Results Twelve patients were identified who developed VTE. Three patients developed DVT, and nine developed PE. The incidence of DVT and PE was 0.72 and 2.17%, respectively. Interestingly, all of these patients had undergone excision of extensive head and neck cancers accompanied by a reconstructive procedure. Patients who developed PE had a longer hospital stay compared with those who only had DVT. There were overall three mortalities in the nine patients who developed PE. Conclusion Although VTE has a low incidence, it is a known complication of extensive head and neck surgeries with life-threatening outcomes. We recommend early mobilization and physiotherapy with the possible aid from appropriate mechanical and pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. PMID:26157492

  1. Predictors for the development of post-thrombotic syndrome in patients with primary lower limb deep venous thrombosis: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Nadeem A; Sophie, Ziad; Zafar, Farhan; Soares, Delvene; Naz, Iram

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Post-thrombotic syndrome is a common and debilitating sequelae of lower limb deep venous thrombosis. Very little awareness is present about the risk factors and about the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of this condition. Objective The objective of this study is to identify the predictors of post-thrombotic syndrome after lower limb deep venous thrombosis. Materials and methods A case-control study was conducted on all adult patients who were admitted with lower limb deep venous thrombosis at our institution from January 2005 to June 2012. These patients were scheduled for a research clinic visit, which included informed consent, data collection, and physical examination. Patients found to have post-thrombotic syndrome served as cases and those without post-thrombotic syndrome served as controls. Villalta scoring system was used to diagnose the post-thrombotic syndrome and then to assess the severity of the condition in both the groups. Cox regression risk factor analysis was performed to identify the predictors of post-thrombotic syndrome. Results Out of the 125 patients examined, 49 were found to have post-thrombotic syndrome. Risk factors found to be significant were body mass index of more than 35 kg/m(2) ( n = 13, p = 0.003), history of immobilization ( n = 19, p = 0.003), one or more hypercoagable disorders ( n = 32, p = 0.02), iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis ( n = 18, p = 0.001), complete obstruction on ultrasound ( n = 26, p = 0.016), unstable range of international normalized ratio ( n = 23, p = 0.041) and non-compliance for the use of compressions stockings ( n = 14, p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, one or more hypercoagable disorder, iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis, and non-compliance to the use of compression stockings were found to be independent risk factors for the development of post-thrombotic syndrome. Conclusion One or more hypercoagable disorders, iliofemoral

  2. Recurrent cerebral venous thrombosis associated with heterozygote methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation and sickle cell trait without homocysteinemia: an autopsy case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Troncoso, J C; Fowler, D R

    2014-09-01

    Elevated blood homocysteine concentration and certain genetic mutations have been associated with increased risk for developing arterial and venous thrombosis. A common mutation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, MTHFR C677T, has been associated with elevated homocysteine concentration and increased risk for developing thrombosis in homozygote carriers. Heterozygote carriers for this gene mutation, if associated with other major or minor risk factors for thrombophilia, appear to be prone to develop thrombosis. A postmortem genetic testing for common mutations resulting in thrombophilia should be performed in all individuals who die as a result of thrombosis, regardless of predisposing risk factors, to determine the true prevalence of mutations in these individuals, and to assess the true role of a certain mutation, such as heterozygote MTHFR C677T, in the pathogenesis of thrombosis. Postmortem genetic testing for common mutations associated with thrombophilia in selected cases has potentially life-saving importance to surviving family members. We report a case of recurrent cerebral venous thrombosis in a 19 year old male with history of sickle cell trait, obesity, and high normal blood homocysteine, who was heterozygote for MTHFR C677T mutation.

  3. Prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in deep venous thrombosis patients and its clinical significance as a thrombophilic risk factor: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Sharma, Amit; Sazawal, Sudha; Ahuja, Ankur; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism is known to be a complex interaction of genetic and acquired factors leading to thrombosis. JAK2V617F mutation is believed to contribute to a thrombophilic phenotype, possibly through enhanced leukocyte-platelet interactions in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Several studies have focused on the importance of screening for JAK2V617F mutation in patients with splanchnic venous thrombosis (VT) for the detection of nonovert MPNs. The role of JAK2V617F mutation in VT outside the splanchnic region is still widely unsettled. The primary aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), its clinical significance as a prothrombotic risk factor, and its possible interactions with other genetic thrombophilic risk factors. A total of 148 patients with idiopathic, symptomatic DVT were evaluated. Median age of presentation was 32 years (range 15-71 years) with a sex ratio of 1.3:1. Overall, the most common genetic prothrombotic factor was factor V Leiden mutation, found in 10.8% (16 of 148) of patients who also showed strong association with increased risk of thrombosis (odds ratio 5.94, confidence interval 1.33-26.4, P = .019). Deficiencies in protein C, protein S, and antithrombin were seen in 8 (5.4%), 10 (6.7%), and 8 (5.4%) patients, respectively. It was observed that the frequency of JAK2V617F mutation was lower in Indian patients, and it also showed weaker association with risk of thrombosis, at least in cases of venous thrombosis outside the splanchnic region.

  4. [A mathematical analysis of strain-gauge curves in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Vega Gómez, M E; Ley Pozo, J; Aldama Figueroa, A; Alvarez Sánchez, J A; Charles-Edouard Otrante, D; Fernández Boloña, A; Gutierrez Jiménez, O

    1991-01-01

    The plethysmographic strain gauge venous outflow curves were studied by means of an exponential function. The parameters analyzed made possible the establishment of differences between patients with and without DVT.

  5. Recurrent Hemorrhagic Venous Infarctions Caused by Thrombosis of a Pontine Developmental Venous Anomaly and Protein S Mutation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuri; Takase, Kei-Ichiro; Matsushita, Takuya; Yoshimura, Satoshi; Yamasaki, Ryo; Murai, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-11-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with an acute onset of upbeat nystagmus, slurred speech, and limb and truncal ataxias. The patient had a history of limb ataxia and gait disturbance previously treated as brainstem encephalitis with corticosteroids 3 years previously. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed pontine developmental venous anomaly (DVA) and hemorrhagic infarction within the drainage territory of the DVA. Three months later, the patient exhibited recurrent limb ataxia, double vision, and numbness of the left side of the body. The brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed recurrent hemorrhagic venous infarction within the same territory of the pontine DVA. Laboratory tests disclosed a hypercoagulable state owing to a decrease of protein S activity despite the normal antigen level. Genetic testing indicated that the patient was a homozygous carrier of protein S Tokushima. The patient's severe disability remained unchanged in spite of treatment with anticoagulation therapy using warfarin. We propose that further research on hereditary coagulopathy be carried out in patients with recurrent episodes of DVA-related infarction.

  6. Deep venous thrombosis of the neck and pulmonary embolism in patients with a central venous catheter admitted to cardiac rehabilitation after cardiac surgery: a prospective study of 815 patients.

    PubMed

    Frizzelli, Rino; Tortelli, Ornella; Di Comite, Vincenzo; Ghirardi, Redenta; Pinzi, Claudio; Scarduelli, Cleante

    2008-12-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are widely used for therapeutic purposes and to measure hemodynamic variables that cannot be recorded from a peripheral vein. However, the method can involve complications. In cardiac surgery, CVCs are electively placed in the right internal jugular vein but there is little information on deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in catheterized veins (CVC-related DVT) or on secondary pulmonary embolism (PE). The impact of CVC-related DVT and PE in cardiac surgery and measures to prevent PE were assessed. We used ultrasonography (US) to check the point of insertion of CVC in 815 patients in the intensive cardiac rehabilitation unit after heart surgery. In this series, 386 patients (48%) had CVC-related DVT; those already receiving anticoagulant, and considered at low risk, continued that therapy, while those taking an antiplatelet agent (aspirin 100 mg daily) but deemed at high risk of PE from the US findings were given an anticoagulant instead. Only patients with CVC-related DVT at low risk of PE continued taking aspirin. At 3 months, there were no cases of PE among patients receiving an anticoagulant, but six on antiplatelet had non-fatal PE. The prevalence of PE in the whole series of 815 patients was 0.7%. CVC-related DVT is a frequent complication of heart surgery. Anticoagulant therapy started early does not prevent thrombus formation but probably prevents PE, whereas antiplatelet gives no such protection. Sonographic screening of the CVC removal in intensive care unit may be useful for avoiding PE after CVC-related DVT.

  7. Power-Pulse Thrombolysis and Stent Recanalization for Acute Post-Liver Transplant Iliocaval Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baccin, Carlos E.; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2008-07-15

    Postoperative inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis is a potentially lethal complication in a liver transplant recipient. We report the case of a 57-year-old liver transplant recipient, who developed acute, postoperative, markedly symptomatic complete IVC, ilial-femoral-caval, and left renal vein thrombosis. After treatment with power-pulse tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis, thrombectomy, and stent placement, the IVC and iliac veins were successfully recanalized. At 2.5-year imaging and laboratory follow-up, the IVC, iliac, and renal veins remained patent and graft function was preserved.

  8. Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava associated with deep venous thrombosis and a partial Protein C deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tribe, Howard; Borgstein, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava is rare but it is being increasingly diagnosed by cross-sectional imaging techniques. Patients are usually asymptomatic with abnormalities detected incidentally. An 11 year old boy presented with a 10 day history of fever, vomiting and abdominal pain, which progressed to his back and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging, computerised tomography and Doppler ultrasonography showed the absence of a suprarenal inferior vena cava with bilateral superficial femoral vein thrombi extending cranially to the end of the aberrant inferior vena cava. Haematological testing revealed a partial Protein C deficiency. The presenting clinical picture in this case is unique within the English literature and highlights that deep venous thrombosis associated with inferior vena cava dysgenesis may not present with typical symptoms in children. Early use of advanced imaging modalities would expedite diagnosis and subsequent treatment. PMID:24421930

  9. Statins Improve the Resolution of Established Murine Venous Thrombosis: Reductions in Thrombus Burden and Vein Wall Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Kessinger, Chase W.; Kim, Jin Won; Henke, Peter K.; Thompson, Brian; McCarthy, Jason R.; Hara, Tetsuya; Sillesen, Martin; Margey, Ronan J. P.; Libby, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Lin, Charles P.; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite anticoagulation therapy, up to one-half of patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) will develop the post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Improving the long-term outcome of DVT patients at risk for PTS will therefore require new approaches. Here we investigate the effects of statins—lipid-lowering agents with anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties—in decreasing thrombus burden and decreasing vein wall injury, mediators of PTS, in established murine stasis and non-stasis chemical-induced venous thrombosis (N = 282 mice). Treatment of mice with daily atorvastatin or rosuvastatin significantly reduced stasis venous thrombus burden by 25% without affecting lipid levels, blood coagulation parameters, or blood cell counts. Statin-driven reductions in VT burden (thrombus mass for stasis thrombi, intravital microscopy thrombus area for non-stasis thrombi) compared similarly to the therapeutic anticoagulant effects of low molecular weight heparin. Blood from statin-treated mice showed significant reductions in platelet aggregation and clot stability. Statins additionally reduced thrombus plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), tissue factor, neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and macrophages, and these effects were most notable in the earlier timepoints after DVT formation. In addition, statins reduced DVT-induced vein wall scarring by 50% durably up to day 21 in stasis VT, as shown by polarized light microscopy of picrosirius red-stained vein wall collagen. The overall results demonstrate that statins improve VT resolution via profibrinolytic, anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and anti-vein wall scarring effects. Statins may therefore offer a new pharmacotherapeutic approach to improve DVT resolution and to reduce the post-thrombotic syndrome, particularly in subjects who are ineligible for anticoagulation therapy. PMID:25680183

  10. Artificial neural networks predict the incidence of portosplenomesenteric venous thrombosis in patients with acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Fei, Y; Hu, J; Li, W-Q; Wang, W; Zong, G-Q

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Predicting the occurrence of portosplenomesenteric vein thrombosis (PSMVT) is difficult. We studied 72 patients with acute pancreatitis. Artificial neural networks modeling was more accurate than logistic regression in predicting PSMVT. Additional predictive factors may be incorporated into artificial neural networks.

  11. Testosterone therapy, thrombophilia, and hospitalization for deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolus, an exploratory, hypothesis-generating study.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Friedman, Joel; Hafeez, Ahsan; Hassan, Atif; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Our hypothesis was that testosterone therapy (TT) interacts with previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis, leading to hospitalization for deep venous thrombosis (DVT)-pulmonary emboli (PE). We determined the prevalence of DVT-PE associated with TT 147 men hospitalized in the last 12 months for DVT-PE. Of the 147 men, 2 (1.4%) had TT before and at the time of their DVT-PE. Neither had risk factors for thrombosis. Neither smoked. Case #1 (intramuscular T 50mg/week) had 2 PE, 6 and 24 months after starting TT. DVT-PE in case #2 (T gel 100mg/day) occurred 24 months after starting T. Both men were found to have previously undiagnosed familial thrombophilia (protein S deficiency, homocysteinemia, high Factor VIII). In case #2, on 100mg T gel/day, serum estradiol was high, 51 pg/ml (upper normal limit 42.6 pg/ml). At least 1.4% of men hospitalized for DVT-PE were on TT and had previously undiagnosed thrombophilia, suggesting a thrombotic interaction between exogenous T and thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Given the increasing use of TT, our preliminary findings should facilitate design of a much-needed, multi-center, prospective study of pro-thrombotic interactions between T therapy and thrombophilia for subsequent thrombotic events including DVT-PE.

  12. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in cancer: novel findings from the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study (CATS).

    PubMed

    Königsbrügge, Oliver; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2014-05-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs frequently in patients with cancer and contributes to elevated morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for the occurrence of VTE events in patients with cancer have been investigated in numerous clinical studies. For now more than 10 years, the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study (CATS) has focused on the identification of parameters predictive of future VTE occurrence. CATS has contributed to new findings, which may help identify patients at high risk of developing VTE, by means of biomarkers (such as D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1+2, soluble P-selectin, platelet count, coagulation factor VIII activity, thrombin generation potential, etc.). The association of tissue factor bearing microparticles and the mean platelet volume with the risk of VTE was also elaborately investigated in the framework of CATS. More recently CATS has researched clinical and clinicopathologic parameters which contribute to identification of patients at risk of VTE. The type of cancer is one of the most important risk factor for VTE occurrence. Also the stage of cancer and the histological grade of a tumor have been found to be associated with the occurrence of cancer-related VTE. In further investigations, venous diseases including a history of previous VTE, a history of superficial thrombophlebitis and the presence of varicose veins, have been associated with the risk of VTE in CATS.

  13. Gunther Tulip Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement During Treatment for Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Kato, Takeharu; Iida, Shigeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gunther tulip retrievable vena cava filter (GTF) implantation to prevent pulmonary embolism during intravenously administered thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy and interventional radiological therapy for occlusive or nonocclusive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity. Methods. We evaluated placement of 55 GTFs in 42 patients with lower extremity DVT who had undergone various treatments including those utilizing techniques of interventional radiology. Results. Worsening of pulmonary embolism in patients with existing pulmonary embolism or in those without pulmonary embolism at the time of GTF insertion was avoided in all patients. All attempts at implantation of the GTF were safely accomplished. Perforation and migration experienced by one patient was the only complication. Mean period of treatment for DVT under protection from pulmonary embolism by the GTF was 12.7 {+-} 8.3 days (mean {+-} SD, range 4-37 days). We attempted retrieval of GTFs in 18 patients in whom the venous thrombus had disappeared after therapy, and retrieval in one of these 18 cases failed. GTFs were left in the vena cava in 24 patients for permanent use when the DVT was refractory to treatment. Conclusion. The ability of the GTF to protect against pulmonary embolism during treatment of DVT was demonstrated. Safety in both placement and retrieval was clarified. Because replacement with a permanent filter was not required, use of the GTF was convenient when further protection from complicated pulmonary embolism was necessary.

  14. Low molecular weight heparin for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis: a suitable monitoring in elderly patients?

    PubMed

    Mahé, Isabelle; Drouet, Ludovic; Chassany, Oliver; Grenard, Anne-Sophie; Caulin, Charles; Bergmann, Jean-François

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring of anti-Xa activity (aXa) levels is not routinely required in patients receiving enoxaparine at prophylactic dosages, since aXa is supposed to stay below the manufacturer's recommended range in patients treated for venous thrombosis (0.5-1 IU/ml). In order to aXa in elderly subjects receiving prophylactic enoxaparin, 68 consecutive patients (mean age 82.5 +/- 10.7 years) hospitalized in a medical department receiving 4000 IU enoxaparin daily subcutaneously for the prevention of venous thromboembolic disease were studied. After the first injection of enoxaparin, the aXa of 57.4% patients was superior to 0.5 IU/ml while 69.4% had an aXa higher than 0.5 after 8.4 +/- 1.2 days. A negative relationship between aXa and body weight and a trend towards a positive correlation between aXa and age but not with creatinine clearance were noted. Our findings question the opportunity to monitor aXa in elderly patients receiving 4000 IU enoxaparin as antithrombotic prophylaxis.

  15. Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Kinsky, Michael; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Khan, Muzna N.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock may be fatal unless promptly recognized and treated. The most commonly used indicators of shock (hypotension and tachycardia) lack sensitivity and specificity. In the initial stages of shock, the body compensates by reducing blood flow to the peripheral (skin, muscle, etc.) circulation in order to preserve vital organ (brain, heart, liver) perfusion. Characteristically, this can be observed by a greater reduction in peripheral venous oxygenation (for instance, the axillary vein) compared to central venous oxygenation (the internal jugular vein). While invasive measurements of oxygenation are accurate, they lack practicality and are not without complications. We have developed a novel optoacoustic system that noninvasively determines oxygenation in specific veins. In order to test this application, we used lower body negative pressure (LBNP) system, which simulates hemorrhage by exerting a variable amount of suction on the lower body, thereby reducing the volume of blood available for central circulation. Restoration of normal blood flow occurs promptly upon cessation of LBNP. Using two optoacoustic probes, guided by ultrasound imaging, we simultaneously monitored oxygenation in the axillary and internal jugular veins (IJV). LBNP began at -20 mmHg, thereafter was reduced in a step-wise fashion (up to 30 min). The optoacoustically measured axillary oxygenation decreased with LBNP, whereas IJV oxygenation remained relatively constant. These results indicate that our optoacoustic system may provide safe and rapid measurement of peripheral and central venous oxygenation and diagnosis of shock with high specificity and sensitivity.

  16. Assessing nursing students' knowledge and skills in performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, C; Klang-Söderkvist, B; Johansson, E; Björkholm, M; Löfmark, A

    2017-01-27

    Venepuncture and the insertion of peripheral venous catheters are common tasks in health care, and training in these procedures is included in nursing programmes. Evidence of nursing students' knowledge and skills in these procedures is limited. The main aim of this study was to assess nursing students' knowledge and skills when performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters. Potential associations between level of knowledge and skills, self-training, self-efficacy, and demographic characteristics were also investigated. The assessment was performed by lecturers at a university college in Sweden using the two previously tested instruments "Assess Venepuncture" and "Assess Peripheral Venous Catheter Insertion". Between 81% and 100% of steps were carried out correctly by the students. The step with the highest rating was "Uses gloves", and lowest rating was 'Informs the patients about the possibility of obtaining local anaesthesia'. Significant correlations between degree of self-training and correct performance were found in the group of students who registered their self-training. No associations between demographic characteristics and correct performances were found. Assessing that students have achieved adequate levels of knowledge and skills in these procedures at different levels of the nursing education is of importance to prevent complications and support patient safety.

  17. Immunoscintigraphic detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities by means of human antifibrin monoclonal antibodies labeled with sup 111 In

    SciTech Connect

    Lusiani, L.; Zanco, P.; Visona, A.; Breggion, G.; Pagnan, A.; Ferlin, G. )

    1989-07-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for the beta-chain of human fibrin (C22A) and labeled with 111In has been obtained and successfully used in rabbits and dogs for the in vivo detection of venous thrombosis. Studies in humans are currently ongoing. In order to assess the diagnostic value of 111In-antifibrin for the detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, the authors investigated 25 consecutive patients. Ten patients had clinical and instrumental (contrast phlebography and duplex scanning) evidence of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 3 had a long-standing DVT with relapsing episodes of swelling and pain, 5 had superficial venous thrombosis, and the remaining 7 had no signs of thrombosis at all. Twenty patients were being treated with heparin. All patients received 111In-antifibrin at the dose of 74 MBq IV and were scanned with a large field of view gamma camera coupled with a high-energy, parallel-hole collimator at 30 minutes and three, six, and twenty-four hours postinjection. Only the persistence of an abnormal uptake at twenty-four hours confirmed by two observers at visual inspection was considered as positive. A positive result was obtained in 9 of 10 DVT patients (90% sensitivity) and in all SVT patients. The single DVT patient with a negative 111In-antifibrin test had the longest interval between scintigraphy and onset of symptoms (fifty-five days). Thus, the age of thrombi represented a substantial limitation for the test. A false-positive result was obtained in a single SVT patient, in whom also a deep involvement, unconfirmed by phlebography, was suspected (91.6% specificity).

  18. A case-series study of cerebral venous thrombosis in women using short course oral contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Khomand, Payam; Hassanzadeh, Kambiz

    2016-01-01

    Background: We report a case series of cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT) in women who used oral contraceptive pill (OCP) in the Muslims Ramadan and fasting month. Methods: This study was a retrospective case series of 9 patients with diagnosis of CVT, who admitted in the neurology ward of Tohid Hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, in July-August 2014-2015. Results: Patients had no history of thrombosis before. They were treated with oral contraceptive more than 1 month to be able to fast during Ramadan. They did not have other possible risk factors for CVT. A headache was the most common in 9/9 patients (100%) followed by vomiting and vertigo. Conclusion: We found that high rate of CVT in female population during Ramadan indicates that it needs be considered as a specific risk factor and should be considered by healthcare system. PMID:27326364

  19. Cerebral venous thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma during induction chemotherapy with l-asparaginase: The GRAALL experience.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Marie-Anne; Huguet, Françoise; Chevallier, Patrice; Suarez, Felipe; Thomas, Xavier; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Cacheux, Victoria; Pignon, Jean-Michel; Bonmati, Caroline; Sanhes, Laurence; Bories, Pierre; Daguindau, Etienne; Dorvaux, Véronique; Reman, Oumedaly; Frayfer, Jamile; Orvain, Corentin; Lhéritier, Véronique; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé; Hunault-Berger, Mathilde; Tanguy-Schmidt, Aline

    2015-11-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) thrombotic events are a well-known complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) induction therapy, especially with treatments including l-asparaginase (l-ASP). Data on risk factors and clinical evolution is still lacking in adult patients. We report on the clinical evolution of 22 CNS venous thrombosis cases occurring in 708 adults treated for ALL or lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) with the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-induction protocol, which included eight L-ASP (6,000 IU/m(2) ) infusions. The prevalence of CNS thrombosis was 3.1%. CNS thrombosis occurred after a median of 18 days (range: 11-31) when patients had received a median of three l-ASP injections (range: 2-7). Patients with CNS thrombosis exhibited a median antithrombin (AT) nadir of 47.5% (range: 36-67%) at Day 17 (range: D3-D28), and 95% of them exhibited AT levels lower than 60%. There were no evident increase in hereditary thrombotic risk factors prevalence, and thrombosis occurred despite heparin prophylaxis which was performed in 90% of patients. Acquired AT deficiency was frequently detected in patients with l-ASP-based therapy, and patients with CNS thrombosis received AT prophylaxis (45%) less frequently than patients without CNS thrombosis (83%), P = 0.0002). CNS thrombosis was lethal in 5% of patients, while 20% had persistent sequelae. One patient received all planned l-ASP infusions without recurrence of CNS thrombotic whereas l-ASP injections were discontinued in 20 patients during the management of thrombosis without a significant impact on overall survival (P = 0.4).

  20. Clinical application of sonoelastography in thyroid, prostate, kidney, pancreas, and deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Arash; Barr, Richard G; Dhyani, Manish; Samir, Anthony E

    2015-04-01

    This article reviews the clinical applications of current ultrasound elastography methods in non-hepatic conditions including thyroid nodules, prostate cancer, chronic kidney disease, solid renal lesions, pancreatic lesions, and deep vein thrombosis. Pathophysiology alters tissue mechanical properties via ultrastructural changes including fibrosis, increased cellularity, bleeding, and necrosis, creating a target biomarker, which can be imaged qualitatively or quantitatively with US elastography. US elastography methods can add information to conventional US methods and improve the diagnostic performance of conventional US in a range of disease processes.

  1. Diagnostic methods for deep vein thrombosis: venous Doppler examination, phleborheography, iodine-125 fibrinogen uptake, and phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Comerota, A.J.; White, J.V.; Katz, M.L.

    1985-10-08

    Since clinical diagnosis of DVT is often inaccurate, it has become accepted that an objective means of diagnosing clot in the deep venous system becomes critically important in the management of these patients. The venous Doppler examination monitors the velocity of blood flowing through a particular vein. Doppler probes in the 5 to 10 mHz range are routinely used. Respiratory variation is a normal finding due to a diminished flow signal during inspiration, followed by a progressive increase in flow signal during expiration. Characteristics of the spontaneous flow signals are the most important part of interpreting the venous Doppler examination. In addition, the response to distal or proximal compression (augmentation) adds important information to the interpretation; however, the response during any augmentation maneuver depends on the rapidity of compression, the force of compression, the quantity of blood in the veins at the time of compression, and the distance between the Doppler probe and the compression point. Phleborheography is a six-channel volumetric plethysmographic technique that monitors volume changes in the lower extremities associated with respiration and foot and calf compression.

  2. A Prospective Study of the Clinical Profile, Outcome and Evaluation of D-dimer in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Dharanipragada, Subrahmanyam; Basu, Debdatta; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Surendiran, Deepanjali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT) is a well known disease with diverse clinical presentation and causes. With advances in neuroimaging and changing lifestyles, the clinical profile and causes of CVT are changing. D-dimer has been studied in early diagnosis of CVT with variable results. This prospective study was carried out to assess the clinical profile of CVT and role of D-dimer in diagnosis of CVT. Aim To study various aspects of CVT and role of D-dimer. Materials and Methods The study period was September 2012 to July 2014 and included 80 imaging proven patients of CVT. We also included 39 controls for assessing D-dimer. Data was collected according to a preformed format. D-dimer was assessed by a rapid semi-quantitative latex agglutination assay. Discharged patients were followed up to six months. Results Of the total 44 were women and 36 were men (F: M=1.2:1). The mean age of the patients was 29.5±9.68 years. Most common clinical features were headache 77 (96.25%), papilloedema (67.5%) and seizures 51 (63.75%). Pregnancy was the most common cause of CVT. Superior sagittal and transverse sinuses were the most common sinuses to be affected. The sensitivity and specificity of D-dimer for diagnosing CVT was 84.62% and 80% respectively. The risk factors for poor prognosis were altered sensorium, presence of sepsis, increased sinus involvement and deep sinus thrombosis. Conclusion CVT affects both sexes equally. Puerperium still contributes to majority of the cases. Iron deficiency anaemia needs to be evaluated as a contributing factor for incidence of CVT. D-dimer is not useful in puerperal female with CVT. Positive D-dimer will strengthen the suspicion of CVT in patients with acute headache followed by a neurological deficit. PMID:27504325

  3. Platelet adhesiveness and fibrinolysis after recent cerebro-vascular accidents and their relationship with subsequent deep venous thrombosis of the legs.

    PubMed

    Warlow, C P; Rennie, J A; Ogston, D; Douglas, A S

    1976-08-31

    In fifteen patients with a cerebro-vascular accident resulting in an acute hemiplegia there was a subsequent rise in the platelet count and plasma fibrinogen level. There were no significant alterations in platelet adhesiveness, plasminogen activator, plasminogen, FR-antigen and haematocrit. Patients diagnosed as developing deep venous thrombosis with the 125I-fibrinogen technique had a significantly lower platelet adhesiveness and plasminogen level than those who were not.

  4. mTORC1 promotes aging-related venous thrombosis in mice via elevation of platelet volume and activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Zhou, Xuan; Fan, Xiaorong; Xiao, Min; Yang, Dinghua; Liang, Bo; Dai, Meng; Shan, Lanlan; Lu, Jingbo; Lin, Zhiqi; Liu, Rong; Liu, Jun; Wang, Liping; Zhong, Mei; Jiang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE), resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Platelet hyperactivation is linked to aging-related VTE. However, the mechanisms through which aging enhances platelet activation and susceptibility to VTE are poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is essential for aging-related platelet hyperactivation and VTE. mTORC1 was hyperactivated in platelets and megakaryocytes (MKs) from aged mice, accompanied by elevated mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet activation. Inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin led to a significant reduction in susceptibility to experimental deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in aged mice (P < .01). To ascertain the specific role of platelet mTORC1 activation in DVT, we generated mice with conditional ablation of the mTORC1-specific component gene Raptor in MKs and platelets (Raptor knockout). These mice developed markedly smaller and lighter thrombi, compared with wild-type littermates (P < .01) in experimental DVT. Mechanistically, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production with aging induced activation of mTORC1 in MKs and platelets, which, in turn, enhanced bone marrow MK size, MPV, and platelet activation to promote aging-related VTE. ROS scavenger administration induced a significant decrease (P < .05) in MK size, MPV, and platelet activation in aged mice. Our findings collectively demonstrate that mTORC1 contributes to enhanced venous thrombotic susceptibility in aged mice via elevation of platelet size and activation. PMID:27288518

  5. A systematic review of the utility of residual vein obstruction studies in primary and secondary venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Murali; Sullivan, Matthew; Shcherba, Marina; Guo, Shuang; Billett, Henny H

    2013-01-01

    Background. Residual vein obstruction (RVO), the persistence of venous thrombosis with time and often after anticoagulation, may indicate a systemic prothrombotic condition. Prior studies have shown varying efficacy in using RVO as a risk factor for future venous thromboembolic (VTE) recurrence. Methods. To assess whether positive RVO imaging predicts recurrent VTE events, we performed a meta-analysis on studies in which patients with documented VTEs, anticoagulated for a minimum of 4 weeks, had repeat sonography to assess RVO and were subsequently followed for recurrent events. Results. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria: 3531 patient VTE events with 3474 evaluable results were analyzed. The presence of RVO was associated with recurrence in all VTE (OR 1.93; 95% CI: 1.29, 2.89) and secondary VTE (OR 2.78; 95% CI: 1.41, 5.5) but not for primary VTE (OR 1.35; 95% CI: 0.87, 2.08). When cancer patients were eliminated from the secondary VTE group, there was no longer a significant association of RVO with VTE recurrence (OR 1.73; 95% CI: 0.81, 3.67) while in the subset of cancer patients, presence of RVO was associated with an increase in VTE recurrence risk (OR 5.14; 95% CI: 1.59, 16.65, P < 0.006). Conclusions. We conclude that the presence of RVO is associated with recurrence in secondary VTE but not in primary VTE and that association may be driven by the subset with cancer.

  6. Early thrombosis of the superior vena cava in a patient with a central venous catheter and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Robert; Shah, Malay; Suydam, Erin; Gucwa, Angela; Bowden, Talmadge; Holsten, Steven B

    2008-12-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome results from obstruction of flow through the vessel either by external compression or thrombosis. External compression by intrathoracic neoplasms is the most common etiology. Thrombosis of the vessel most often occurs in the setting of indwelling catheters or pacemakers. The diagnosis is suggested by the clinical manifestations of facial and upper extremity swelling, dyspnea, and cough. It is confirmed by CT scan showing the development of collateral flow around the lesion. In this report, we present a patient who developed superior vena cava thrombosis after undergoing a short period of central venous catheterization and a Whipple procedure for adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. The endothelial damage caused by the catheter, the low-flow state induced by the large fluid shifts during the operation, and the hypercoagulable state induced by malignancy fulfill Virchow's triad for venous thrombosis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of superior vena cava syndrome after the Whipple procedure with symptoms appearing after a shorter period of catheterization than previously reported in the adult literature.

  7. Increased soluble P-selectin levels following deep venous thrombosis: cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Blann, A D; Noteboom, W M; Rosendaal, F R

    2000-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is associated with coagulation abnormalities, but evidence of excess platelet activity is scant. Soluble P-selectin is a marker of platelet activity, with high levels being found in patients with thrombotic disease. We measured soluble P-selectin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in plasma from 89 patients with objectively confirmed DVT and in 126 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects, and found higher levels in the patients (P = 0.011). Taking the risk of DVT with a level of soluble P-selectin < 238 ng/ml to be 1, the relative risk of DVT with a soluble P-selectin level >238 ng/ml was 2.1 (95% CI 1. 2-3.6). These high levels may be a reflection of a generalized hypercoagulable state that, with factors such as the presence of persistent thrombin generation, could be responsible for excess platelet activation.

  8. Increased Levels of NF-kB-Dependent Markers in Cancer-Associated Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Malaponte, Grazia; Signorelli, Salvatore S; Bevelacqua, Valentina; Polesel, Jerry; Taborelli, Martina; Guarneri, Claudio; Fenga, Concettina; Umezawa, Kazou; Libra, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies highlight the role of inflammatory markers in thrombosis as well as in cancer. However, their combined role in cancer-associated deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and the molecular mechanisms, involved in its pathophysiology, needs further investigations. In the present study, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteases-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue factor (TF), fibrinogen and soluble P-selectin, were analyzed in plasma and in monocyte samples from 385 cancer patients, of whom 64 were concomitantly affected by DVT (+). All these markers were higher in cancer patients DVT+ than in those DVT-. Accordingly, significantly higher NF-kB activity was observed in cancer patients DVT+ than DVT-. Significant correlation between data obtained in plasma and monocyte samples was observed. NF-kB inhibition was associated with decreased levels of all molecules in both cancer DVT+ and DVT-. To further demonstrate the involvement of NF-kB activation by the above mentioned molecules, we treated monocyte derived from healthy donors with a pool of sera from cancer patients with and without DVT. These set of experiments further suggest the significant role played by some molecules, regulated by NF-kB, and detected in cancer patients with DVT. Our data support the notion that NF-kB may be considered as a therapeutic target for cancer patients, especially those complicated by DVT. Treatment with NF-kB inhibitors may represent a possible strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of DVT in cancer patients.

  9. Bilateral Vertebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Causing Cervical Spinal Cord Compression in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Rhue, Kathryn E.; Taylor, Amanda R.; Cole, Robert C.; Winter, Randolph L.

    2017-01-01

    A 10-year-old male neutered mixed breed dog was evaluated for cervical hyperesthesia and tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cervical spinal cord identified an extradural compressive lesion over the body of C2 caused by marked dilation of the vertebral venous sinuses. Following intravenous contrast administration both vertebral sinuses had heterogeneous contrast enhancement consistent with incomplete thrombi formation. An abdominal ultrasound also showed a distal aortic thrombus. A definitive cause for the thrombi formation was not identified, but the patient had several predisposing factors which may have contributed. The patient was treated with a combination of warfarin, clopidogrel, and enoxaparin as well as analgesics. Within 48 h of initiation of warfarin therapy, the tetraparesis and hyperesthesia were markedly improved. Repeat abdominal ultrasound 3 weeks after discharge showed reduction in size of aortic thrombus. Neurologic function remained normal for 6 weeks following initiation of treatment. Seventy-four days following initial diagnosis the patient rapidly declined and passed away at home. Necropsy was declined. This is the first report of vertebral venous sinus enlargement leading to spinal cord compression and tetraparesis in a dog. Additionally, warfarin in combination with clopidogrel and enoxaparin appeared to be a safe and effective treatment for the suspected thrombi reported in this case. Vertebral sinus enlargement secondary to thrombi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with tetraparesis and cervical hyperesthesia. PMID:28229071

  10. Association of vWA and TPOX Polymorphisms with Venous Thrombosis in Mexican Mestizos

    PubMed Central

    Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Santana, Carla; Noris, Gino; Camacho-Mejorado, Rafael; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C.; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S.; Hernández-Juárez, Jesús; Magaña, Jonathan J.; Gómez, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multifactorial disorder and, worldwide, the most important cause of morbidity and mortality. Genetic factors play a critical role in its aetiology. Microsatellites are the most important source of human genetic variation having more phenotypic effect than many single nucleotide polymorphisms. Hence, we evaluate a possible relationship between VTE and the genetic variants in von Willebrand factor, human alpha fibrinogen, and human thyroid peroxidase microsatellites to identify possible diagnostic markers. Methods. Genotypes were obtained from 177 patients with VTE and 531 nonrelated individuals using validated genotyping methods. The allelic frequencies were compared; Bayesian methods were used to correct population stratification to avoid spurious associations. Results. The vWA-18, TPOX-9, and TPOX-12 alleles were significantly associated with VTE. Moreover, subjects bearing the combination vWA-18/TPOX-12 loci exhibited doubled risk for VTE (95% CI = 1.02–3.64), whereas the combination vWA-18/TPOX-9 showed an OR = 10 (95% CI = 4.93–21.49). Conclusions. The vWA and TPOX microsatellites are good candidate biomarkers in venous thromboembolism diseases and could help to elucidate their origins. Additionally, these polymorphisms could become useful markers for genetic studies of VTE in the Mexican population; however, further studies should be done owing that this data only show preliminary evidence. PMID:25250329

  11. Incidence of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Venous Thromboembolism following TKA in Rheumatoid Arthritis versus Osteoarthritis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis was designed to compare the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). All studies directly comparing the post-TKA incidence of DVT and/or VTE in patients with RA and OA were included. For all comparisons, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for binary outcomes. Six studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled data showed that the combined rates of asymptomatic and symptomatic DVT did not differ significantly in the RA and OA groups (1065/222,714 [0.5%] vs. 35,983/6,959,157 [0.5%]; OR 0.77, 95% CI: 0.57 to 1.02; P = 0.07). The combined rates of asymptomatic and symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE) after TKA were significantly lower in the RA than in the OA group (1831/225,406 [0.8%] vs. 63,953/7,018,721 [0.9%]; OR 0.76, 95% CI: 0.62 to 0.93; P = 0.008). Conclusiviely, the DVT rates after primary TKA were similar in RA and OA patients. In contrast, the incidence of VTE (DVT plus PE) after primary TKA was lower in RA than in OA patients, despite patients with RA being at theoretically higher risk of thrombi due to chronic inflammation. PMID:27911916

  12. Association between B-group vitamins and venous thrombosis: systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kuangguo; Zhao, Ruizhi; Geng, Zhe; Jiang, Lijun; Cao, Yang; Xu, Danmei; Liu, Yin; Huang, Liang; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2012-11-01

    A homocysteine-independent role for B-group vitamins on venous thrombosis (VT) development has been reported. However, related research findings remain inconsistent. PUBMED, EMBASE, and COCHRANE databases were searched to collect information on all eligible studies to make a meta-analysis about the relationship between B-group vitamins and VT. Literature search results did not suggest a correlation between thiamin, pantothenic acid, niacin, or riboflavin with VT. Based on their correlations in the literature, folic acid, vitamin B12, B6 were considered in the meta-analysis and systematic review. Significant standardized mean differences were obtained for plasma folic acid (-0.55; 95% CI, -0.75 to -0.36) and vitamin B12 (-0.34; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.13). Reduced levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 may be independent risk factors of VT. Moreover, a qualitative systematic review indicated that low level of vitamin B6 was an independent risk factor of VT. Randomized clinical studies of B-group vitamins supplementation showed varying results on VT prevention. Multivitamin supplementation for VT prevention, regardless of homocysteine level, would be of interest. Further prospective clinical studies are needed to provide additional evidence on the clinical benefits of B-group vitamin supplementation for VT.

  13. Improving Patient Safety with a Mobile Application for Patients with Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters (PICC).

    PubMed

    Nüssli, Stephan; Schnyder, Florian; Zenhäusern, Raphael; Bosshart, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are of growing interest because they allow intravenous therapies up to several months. The appropriate management of the PICCs is crucial to minimize complications and largely depends on the right information for everyone who cares for the patient. To reach this goal we develop the mobile application "PICC App" to provide the necessary information for all involved persons in the outpatient setting. We expect to be able to report about the PICC App and the results of the usability evaluation with pilot users.

  14. Use of sodium hypochlorite for skin antisepsis before inserting a peripheral venous catheter: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Forni, Cristiana; Sabattini, Tania; D'Alessandro, Fabio; Fiorani, Ambra; Gamberini, Simonetta; Maso, Alessandra; Curci, Rosa; Zanotti, Enrichetta; Chiari, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Although it can be prevented, catheter-related bacteremia is common and dangerous. The antiseptics most widely used during insertion of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) include povidone iodine, alcohol, and chlorhexidine. Another widely used antiseptic is a solution of 0.057 g sodium hypochlorite. This pilot study explored the contamination rate of the PVC tip inserted after skin decontamination with sodium hypochlorite. Culture analysis of the tips of the PVCs inserted into the 42 participants showed 7 (16.7%) colonized catheters. The results of this pilot study suggest taking into serious consideration the assessment of this antiseptic in randomized experimental studies.

  15. [Oxidative carbonylation of vascular wall proteins in dynamics of experimental venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Fomina, N V; Fomina, M A; Kalinin, R E; Suchkov, I A

    2015-01-01

    The objects of the study were a total of 24 conventional sexually mature Wistar rats weighing 200-400 g. Thrombosis was modelled by means of ligation of the common iliac vein. Animals were withdrawn from the study on days 1, 3 and 5 after intervention. The materials for the study in each animal were homogenates of the vein portion below the site of ligation (thrombosed vein) and the portion of the symmetrical vessel (intact vein). Taken as controls were portions of the common iliac vein of intact animals matched by age, body weight, and keeping conditions. The level of spontaneous and induced in the Fenton reaction oxidative carbonylation of proteins was determined by means of carbonyl derivatives according to the R.L. Levine technique modified by E.E. Dubinina with optical registration of the formed dinitrophenylhydrazines at 356, 370, 430 and 530 nm. The reserve-and-adaptation potential was assessed by means of counting the ratio of the amount of carbonyl derivatives of proteins in spontaneous and induced oxidation. The obtained findings showed that experimental thrombosis is accompanied and followed by an increase in the content of carbonyl derivatives of proteins in the wall of thrombosed veins and, to a lesser degree, in that of intact veins. The maximal elevation of the parameters was registered during the first 24 hours of the development of pathology, demonstrating not only early but late markers of oxidative modification of proteins. Thrombosed veins on day 3 were found to have a decrease in the content of carbonylated proteins to the level of the control values, which was associated with a maximal value of the reserve-adaptation potential. However, day five was marked by a secondary increase in carbonylation accompanied by certain exhaustion of the reserve-adaptive potential. In intact veins, a decrease of the spontaneous oxidative modification level on day 3 was accompanied by a splash of induced carbonylation followed by stabilization of the parameters

  16. Young's modulus reconstruction for elasticity imaging of deep venous thrombosis: animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Xie, Hua; Kim, Kang; Rubin, Jonathan M.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wakefield, T. W.; Myers, D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2004-04-01

    Recently, it was suggested that ultrasound elasticity imaging can be used to age deep vein thrombosis (DVT) since blood clot hardness changes with fibrin content. The main components of ultrasound elasticity imaging are deformation of the object, speckle or internal boundary tracking and evaluation of tissue motion, measurement of strain tensor components, and reconstruction of the spatial distribution of elastic modulus using strain images. In this paper, we investigate a technique for Young's modulus reconstruction to quantify ultrasound elasticity imaging of DVT. In-vivo strain imaging experiments were performed using Sprague-Dawley rats with surgically induced clots in the inferior vena cavas (IVC). In this model, the clot matures from acute to chronic in less than 10 days. Therefore, nearly every 24 hours the strain imaging experiments were performed to reveal temporal transformation of the clot. The measured displacement and strain images were then converted into maps of elasticity using model-based elasticity reconstruction where the blood clot within an occluded vein was approximated as a layered elastic cylinder surrounded by incompressible tissue. Results of this study demonstrate that Young's modulus gradually increases with clot maturity and can be used to differentiate clots providing a desperately needed clinical tool of DVT staging.

  17. Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal venous tumor thrombosis: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kichang; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is dismal (approximately 2-4 mo), and PVTT is reportedly found in 10%-40% of HCC patients at diagnosis. According to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) Staging System (which is the most widely adopted HCC management guideline), sorafenib is the standard of care for advanced HCC (i.e., BCLC stage C) and the presence of PVTT is included in this category. However, sorafenib treatment only marginally prolongs patient survival and, notably, its therapeutic efficacy is reduced in patients with PVTT. In this context, there have been diverse efforts to develop alternatives to current standard systemic chemotherapies or combination treatment options. To date, many studies on transarterial chemoembolization, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, hepatic arterial chemotherapy, and transarterial radioembolization report better overall survival than sorafenib therapy alone, but their outcomes need to be verified in future prospective, randomized controlled studies in order to be incorporated into current treatment guidelines. Additionally, combination strategies have been applied to treat HCC patients with PVTT, with the hope that the possible synergistic actions among different treatment modalities would provide promising results. This narrative review describes the current status of the management options for HCC with PVTT, with a focus on overall survival. PMID:26755886

  18. A Missing Guide Wire After Placement of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Kashif, Muhammad; Hashmi, Hafiz; Jadhav, Preeti; Khaja, Misbahuddin

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 50 Final Diagnosis: Retained guidewire removal by interventional radiology Symptoms: Swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Fluoroscopic retrieval of the guidewire Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: Central venous catheterization is a common tool used in critically ill patients to monitor central venous pressure and administer fluids and medications such as vasopressors. Here we present a case of a missing guide wire after placement of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), which was incidentally picked up by bedside ultrasound in the intensive care unit. Case Report: A 50-year-old Hispanic male was admitted to the intensive care unit for alcohol intoxication. He was managed for septic shock and required placement of a peripherally inserted central line in his left upper extremity for antibiotics and vasopressor administration. A bedside ultrasound performed by the intensivist to evaluate upper extremity swelling revealed a foreign body in the left arm. Percutaneous procedure by Interventional radiologist was required for retrieval of the guidewire. Conclusions: Guide wire related complications are rarely reported, but are significantly associated with mortality and morbidity. The use of ultrasound guidance placement of PICC lines decreases the risk of complications, provides better optimal vein selection, and enhances success. PMID:27920421

  19. Knowledge Level on Administration of Chemotherapy through Peripheral and Central Venous Catheter among Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Kapucu, Sevgisun; Özkaraman, Ayşe Özaydın; Uysal, Neşe; Bagcivan, Gulcan; Şeref, Ferhan Çetin; Elöz, Aygül

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the knowledge levels of oncology nurses about peripheral and central venous catheter during their chemotherapy administration. Methods: Data collection of this descriptive study was started on April 15, 2015–July 15, 2015. The data presented in this summary belong to 165 nurses. Data were collected with data collection form including questions related to sociodemographic qualifications and knowledge levels of nurses. Data collection forms were E-mailed to the members of Turkish Oncology Nursing Society. Data presented with numbers, percentages, and mean ± standard deviation. Results: The mean age of nurses was 33.60 ± 7.34 years and mean duration for oncology nursing experience was 2.65 ± 0.91 years. Nurses had correct information about the importance of selecting peripheral venous catheter and choosing the placement area for chemotherapy administration (63.6%), control of catheter before the administration (93.9%), influence of chemotherapeutic agent on length of catheter (40.6%), and management of extravasation (75.7%). Nurses also had correct information about the first use of port catheter (67.3%) and checking the catheter whether it is working properly or not (75.8%). Conclusions: In General, nurses’ level of knowledge related to catheter is 50% and higher. It is recommended to increase the knowledge of nurses about evidence-based information for catheter care as a step to safe chemotherapy practice. PMID:28217732

  20. Bleeding complications in venous thrombosis patients on well-managed warfarin.

    PubMed

    Sandén, Per; Renlund, Henrik; Svensson, Peter J; Själander, Anders

    2016-02-01

    Anticoagulation treatment is effective in preventing both death and recurrence in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE), but at the same time confers a substantial risk of bleeding complications. The aim of this study was to examine the rate of and predictors for bleeding complications in VTE patients on warfarin with high treatment quality. In total 13,859 patients on warfarin for VTE between January 1st 2006 and December 31th 2011 were retrieved from the national quality register Auricula. The cohort was matched with the Swedish National Patient Register for complications and background characteristics, the Cause of Death Register for date and cause of death and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register for retrieved medication. The rate of major bleeding was 2.36 per 100 treatment years, increasing with age from 1.25 to 4.33 for those under 60 or over 80 years of age, respectively. Factors found to independently increase the risk of bleeding complications were increasing age HR 1.02, cardiac failure HR 1.39, Chronic pulmonary disease HR 1.41, alcohol abuse HR 3.33, anaemia HR 1.75, hypertension HR 1.29 and a history of major bleeding HR 1.69. Warfarin as treatment for VTE is safe with a low rate of bleeding complications at least for the younger patient. In an era of NOAK, warfarin has a comparable safety profile among VTE patients and is still a valid treatment option.

  1. Possible association of etanercept, venous thrombosis, and induction of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Virupannavar, Shanti; Brandau, Anthony; Guggenheim, Carla; Laird-Fick, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF α ) inhibitors are commonly used for treatment of aggressive rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases. Etanercept is one of the medications approved for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Though many studies have documented the safety and efficacy of these medications, evidence for adverse effects is emerging including cancer, infections, and cardiovascular disease. There have been studies showing that these medications induce autoantibody production, including antinuclear antibodies and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Limited data exists, however, regarding induction of antiphospholipid antibodies (APLs) by TNF α inhibitors, including anticardiolipin antibodies (ACLs), lupus anticoagulant (LAC), and anti- β 2-glycoprotein I (anti- β 2 GPI), or an association between antibody development and clinical manifestations. In this case series, we describe five patients who developed venous thromboembolism (VTE) and APLs while receiving etanercept therapy. All five of our patients met the criteria for diagnosis of APS after receiving etanercept. Our case series supports the association between etanercept, APLs, and VTE. We believe that testing for APLs prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy is reasonable, given this relationship and the risks associated with VTE.

  2. Collaborative overview of randomised trials of antiplatelet therapy--III: Reduction in venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism by antiplatelet prophylaxis among surgical and medical patients. Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy as prophylaxis against deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in surgical and high risk medical patients. DESIGN--Overviews of all randomised trials of antiplatelet therapy that could have been available by March 1990 and in which deep venous thrombosis was assessed systematically. SETTING--53 trials (total 8400 patients) of an average of two weeks of antiplatelet therapy versus control in general or orthopaedic surgery; nine trials (600 patients) of antiplatelet therapy versus control in other types of immobility; 18 trials (1000 patients) of one antiplatelet regimen versus another. RESULTS--Overall, a few weeks of antiplatelet therapy produced a highly significant (2P < 0.00001) reduction in deep venous thrombosis. 25% of patients allocated antiplatelet therapy versus 34% of appropriately adjusted controls had deep venous thrombosis detected by systematic fibrinogen scanning or venography, representing prevention in about 90 patients per 1000 allocated antiplatelet therapy. There was an even greater proportional reduction in pulmonary embolism: such emboli were detected among 47 (1.0%) antiplatelet allocated patients versus an adjusted control total of 129 (2.7%), representing prevention among about 17 patients per 1000 treated (2P < 0.00001). In analyses confined to surgical trials, the proportional reductions were similar and separately significant for nonfatal pulmonary embolism (0.7% antiplatelet therapy v 1.8% control; 2P < 0.00001) and for deaths attributed to pulmonary embolism (0.2% v 0.9%; 2P = 0.0001). There was a slight but non-significant excess of deaths from other causes (1.0% v 0.7%), which made the difference in total mortality nonsignificant, though still favourable (1.2% v 1.5%). Information on adding antiplatelet therapy to heparin was limited but, at least for pulmonary embolism, suggested more protection from the combination than from heparin alone. The proportional reduction

  3. Use of Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy vs. Anticoagulation Therapy to Treat Acute Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis: 1-year Follow-up Results of a Randomised, Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Volkan; Gulcu, Aytac; Akay, Emrah; Capar, Ahmet E.; Gencpinar, Tugra; Kucuk, Banu; Karabay, Ozalp; Goktay, A. Yigit

    2014-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) followed by standard anticoagulant therapy, with anticoagulation therapy alone, for the treatment of acute proximal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis.MethodsIn this randomised, prospective study, 42 patients with acute proximal iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis documented via Doppler ultrasound examination, were separated into an interventional treatment group (16 males, 5 females, average age 51 years) and a medical treatment group (13 males, 8 females, average age 59 years). In the interventional group, PAT with large-lumen 9-F diameter catheterisation was applied, after initiation of standard anticoagulant therapy. Balloon angioplasty (n 19) and stent implementation (n: 14) were used to treat patients with residual stenosis (>50 %) after PAT. Prophylactic IVC filters were placed in two patients. The thrombus clearance status of the venous system was evaluated by venography. In both the medical and interventional groups, venous patency rates and clinical symptom scores were evaluated at months 1, 3, and 12 after treatment.ResultsDeep venous systems became totally cleared of thrombi in 12 patients treated with PAT. The venous patency rates in month 12 were 57.1 and 4.76 % in the interventional and medical treatment groups, respectively. A statistically significant improvement was observed in clinical symptom scores of the interventional group (PAT) with or without stenting (4.23 ± 0.51 before treatment; 0.81 ± 0.92 at month 12) compared with the medical treatment group (4.00 ± 0.63 before treatment; 2.43 ± 0.67 at month 12). During follow-up, four patients in the medical treatment and one in the interventional group developed pulmonary embolisms.ConclusionsFor treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis, PAT with or without stenting is superior to anticoagulant therapy alone in terms of both ensuring venous patency and improving clinical

  4. Prevention of recurrent deep venous thrombosis with sulodexide: the SanVal registry.

    PubMed

    Errichi, B M; Cesarone, M R; Belcaro, G; Marinucci, R; Ricci, A; Ippolito, A; Brandolini, R; Vinciguerra, G; Dugall, M; Felicita, A; Pellegrini, L; Gizzi, G; Ruffini, M; Acerbi, G; Bavera, P; Renzo, A Di; Corsi, M; Scoccianti, M; Hosoi, M; Lania, M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevention of recurrent deep vein thrombosis (R-DVT) with an oral antithrombotic agent (sulodexide) in moderate to high-risk subjects. A group of 405 patients was included into the multicenter registry. Both compression and an exercise program were used as well as a risk-factors control plan. After diagnosis of DVT, patients were treated with oral anticoagulants for 6 months. At the end of this period a coagulation study was made and patients started treatment with oral sulodexide capsules for a period of 24 months. The femoral, popliteal, tibial, and superficial veins were scanned with high-resolution ultrasound at inclusion;scans were repeated at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Of the 405 subjects included into the registry 178 in the control group (mean age 52.2; SD 11; M:F=90:88) and 189 in the treatment group (mean age 53.2; SD 10.3; M:F=93:96) completed the analysis period of 24 months. At 6 and 12 months the incidence of R-DVT was lower (p<0.05) in the treatment group. At 24 months the global incidence of R-DVT was 17.9% in the control group and 7.4% in the sulodexide group (p<0.05), 2.42 times lower than in controls. The 2 groups were comparable for age and sex distribution and for the localization of the thrombi at inclusion. Also the 2 groups of dropouts were comparable. In the control group there were 32 recurrent DVTs and 24 subjects lost to follow-up (total of 56) of 202 included subjects (27.7%) in comparison with 28 failures (14 recurrent DVTs and 14 lost subjects) of 203 subjects (13.8%) in the treatment group. This difference was statistically significant. In this analysis the incidence of DVT in controls was 2.07 times higher than in the treatment group subjects. In conclusion sulodexide was effective in reducing recurrent thrombotic events in high-risk subjects.

  5. Peripheral venous congestion causes time- and dose-dependent release of endothelin-1 in humans.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jeffrey; Chudasama, Neelesh; Hayashi, Yacki; Hawk, Christopher; Ramnauth, Sahadeo D; Wong, Ka Yuk; Harxhi, Ante; Onat, Duygu; Wakabayashi, Michiyori; Uriel, Nir; Jorde, Ulrich P; LeJemtel, Thierry H; Sabbah, Hani N; Demmer, Ryan T; Colombo, Paolo C

    2017-03-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a pivotal mediator of vasoconstriction and inflammation in congestive states such as heart failure (HF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Whether peripheral venous congestion (VC) increases plasma ET-1 at pressures commonly seen in HF and CKD patients is unknown. We seek to characterize whether peripheral VC promotes time- and dose-dependent increases in plasma ET-1 and whether these changes are sustained after decongestion. We used a randomized, cross-over design in 20 healthy subjects (age 30 ± 7 years). To experimentally model VC, venous pressure was increased to either 15 or 30 mmHg (randomized at first visit) above baseline by inflating a cuff around the subject's dominant arm; the nondominant arm served as a noncongested control. We measured plasma ET-1 at baseline, after 20, 60 and 120 min of VC, and finally at 180 min (60 min after cuff release and decongestion). Plasma ET-1 progressively and significantly increased over 120 min in the congested arm relative to the control arm and to baseline values. This effect was dose-dependent: ET-1 increased by 45% and 100% at VC doses of 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.05), and declined after 60 min of decongestion though remaining significantly elevated compared to baseline. In summary, peripheral VC causes time- and dose-dependent increases in plasma ET-1. Of note, the lower dose of 15 mmHg (more clinically relevant to HF and CKD patients) was sufficient to raise ET-1. These findings support the potentially contributory, not merely consequential, role of VC in the pathophysiology of HF and CKD.

  6. A genome-wide search for common SNP x SNP interactions on the risk of venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Venous Thrombosis (VT) is a common multifactorial disease with an estimated heritability between 35% and 60%. Known genetic polymorphisms identified so far only explain ~5% of the genetic variance of the disease. This study was aimed to investigate whether pair-wise interactions between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could exist and modulate the risk of VT. Methods A genome-wide SNP x SNP interaction analysis on VT risk was conducted in a French case–control study and the most significant findings were tested for replication in a second independent French case–control sample. The results obtained in the two studies totaling 1,953 cases and 2,338 healthy subjects were combined into a meta-analysis. Results The smallest observed p-value for interaction was p = 6.00 10-11 but it did not pass the Bonferroni significance threshold of 1.69 10-12 correcting for the number of investigated interactions that was 2.96 1010. Among the 37 suggestive pair-wise interactions with p-value less than 10-8, one was further shown to involve two SNPs, rs9804128 (IGFS21 locus) and rs4784379 (IRX3 locus) that demonstrated significant interactive effects (p = 4.83 10-5) on the variability of plasma Factor VIII levels, a quantitative biomarker of VT risk, in a sample of 1,091 VT patients. Conclusion This study, the first genome-wide SNP interaction analysis conducted so far on VT risk, suggests that common SNPs are unlikely exerting strong interactive effects on the risk of disease. PMID:23509962

  7. Plasma Vitamin D Status and Its Correlation with Risk Factors of Thrombosis, P-selectin and hs-CRP Level in Patients with Venous Thromboembolism; the First Study of Iranian Population.

    PubMed

    Entezari-Maleki, Taher; Hajhossein Talasaz, Azita; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Javadi, Mohammad Reza; Bozorgi, Ali; Jenab, Yaser; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Gholami, Kheirollah

    2014-01-01

    Low plasma level of vitamin D is linked to the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and peripheral vascular diseases. Vitamin D deficiency is a worldwide problem that involves Iranian population. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first investigation on venous thromboembolism (VTE) subjects that assessed the correlation of vitamin D level with plasma P-selectin, hs-CRP, and risk factors of thrombosis. In this prospective pilot study, patients with diagnosis of acute deep vein thrombosis and/ or pulmonary embolism were enrolled. All patients' clinical data, demographics and risk factors of thrombosis were evaluated. Plasma level of P-selectin and hs-CRP were measured by ELISA method. Radio immune assay method was used to determine plasma level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH) D). In this study, 60 subjects were included. The mean ± SD plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D level (25(OH) D) of participants was 21.4 ± 14.6 ng/mL. The vitamin D deficiency was detected in 60% of patients. No significant relation was found between the plasma 25(OH)D level and P-selectin and hs-CRP. In multiple regression analysis, there was a significant relationship between the level of 25(OH)D and the patients' age (beta = 0.452; p = 0.001), diabetes (beta = 0.280; p = 0.036) and positive family history of cardiovascular diseases (beta = 0.373; p = 0.003). Vitamin D deficiency is a frequent problem in Iranian VTE patients. Moreover, Plasma level of vitamin D is not associated with P-selectin and hs-CRP in VTE patients.

  8. Controlateral cavernous syndrome, brainstem congestion and posterior fossa venous thrombosis with cerebellar hematoma related to a ruptured intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Sorin; Guedin, Pierre; Roccatagliata, Luca; Boulin, Anne; Auliac, Stéphanie; Dupuy, Michel; Cerf, Charles; Gaillard, Stéphan; Rodesch, Georges

    2011-06-01

    Intracavernous carotid artery aneurysms (ICCAs) are rarely associated with life-threatening complications. We describe a 55-year-old woman who, after the rupture of an intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm, presented with a contralateral cavernous sinus syndrome and severe posterior fossa and spinal cord symptoms. Following parent artery occlusion, thrombosis of the posterior fossa and spinal cord veins caused a progressive worsening of the neurological status to a "locked-in" state. The patient fully recovered with anticoagulation therapy. Comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanism associated with the rupture of ICCA and early diagnosis of the related symptoms are essential in order to plan a correct treatment that includes the management of the aneurysm rupture and of possible complications related to venous thrombosis.

  9. Inferior vena cava filter insertion through the popliteal vein: enabling the percutaneous endovenous intervention of deep vein thrombosis with a single venous access approach in a single session

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kang, Yang Jun; Jung, Hye Doo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the efficiency of placing an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter through the same popliteal vein access site used for percutaneous endovenous intervention in patients with extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. METHODS This retrospective study included 21 patients who underwent IVC filter insertion through the popliteal vein over a three-year period. Patient medical records were reviewed for the location of the deep vein thrombosis, result of filter removal, and total number of endovascular procedures needed for filter insertion and recanalization of the lower extremity venous system. Follow-up lower extremity computed tomography (CT) venography was also reviewed in each patient to assess the degree of filter tilt in the IVC. RESULTS All patients had extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis involving the iliac vein and/or femoral vein. Seventeen patients showed deep vein thrombosis of the calf veins. In all patients, IVC filter insertion and the recanalization procedure were performed during a single procedure through the single popliteal vein access site. In the 17 patients undergoing follow-up CT, the mean tilt angle of the filter was 7.14°±4.48° in the coronal plane and 8.77°±5.49° in the sagittal plane. Filter retrieval was successful in 16 of 17 patients (94.1%) in whom filter retrieval was attempted. CONCLUSION Transpopliteal IVC filter insertion is an efficient technique that results in low rates of significant filter tilt and enables a single session procedure using a single venous access site for filter insertion and percutaneous endovenous intervention. PMID:27559713

  10. [Sequence of venous blood flow alterations in patients after recently endured acute thrombosis of lower-limb deep veins based on the findings of ultrasonographic duplex scanning].

    PubMed

    Tarkovskiĭ, A A; Zudin, A M; Aleksandrova, E S

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the sequence of alterations in the venous blood flow to have occurred within the time frame of one year after sustained acute thrombosis of the lower-limb deep veins, which was carried out using the standard technique of ultrasonographic duplex scanning. A total of thirty-two 24-to-62-year-old patients presenting with newly onset acute phlebothrombosis were followed up. All the patients were sequentially examined at 2 days, 3 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months after the manifestation of the initial clinical signs of the disease. Amongst the parameters to determine were the patency of the deep veins and the condition of the valvular apparatus of the deep, superficial and communicant veins. According to the obtained findings, it was as early as at the first stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations after the endured thrombosis, i. e., during the acute period of the disease, that seven (21.9%) patients were found to have developed valvular insufficiency of the communicant veins of the cms, manifesting itself in the formation of a horizontal veno-venous reflux, and 6 months later, these events were observed to have occurred in all the patients examined (100%). Afterwards, the second stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations was, simultaneously with the process of recanalization of the thrombotic masses in the deep veins, specifically characterized by the formation of valvular insufficiency of the latter, manifesting itself in the form of the development of a deep vertical veno-venous reflux, which was revealed at month six after the onset of the disease in 56.3% of the examined subjects, to be then observed after 12 months in 93.8% of the patients involved. Recanalization of thrombotic masses was noted to commence 3 months after the onset of thrombosis in twelve (37.5%) patients, and after 12 months it was seen to ensue in all the patients (100%), eventually ending in complete restoration of the patency of the affected

  11. Validating the HERDOO2 rule to guide treatment duration for women with unprovoked venous thrombosis: multinational prospective cohort management study.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Marc A; Le Gal, Gregoire; Anderson, David R; Schmidt, Jeannot; Pernod, Gilles; Kahn, Susan R; Righini, Marc; Mismetti, Patrick; Kearon, Clive; Meyer, Guy; Elias, Antoine; Ramsay, Tim; Ortel, Thomas L; Huisman, Menno V; Kovacs, Michael J

    2017-03-17

    Objective To prospectively validate the HERDOO2 rule (Hyperpigmentation, Edema, or Redness in either leg; D-dimer level ≥250 μg/L; Obesity with body mass index ≥30; or Older age, ≥65 years), which states that women with none or one of the criteria can safely discontinue anticoagulants after short term treatment.Design Prospective cohort management study.Setting 44 secondary or tertiary care centres in seven countries.Participants Of 3155 consecutive eligible participants with a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE, proximal leg deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism) who completed 5-12 months of short term anticoagulant treatment, 370 declined to participate, leaving 2785 enrolled participants. 2.3% were lost to follow-up.Interventions Women with none or one of the HERDOO2 criteria were classified as at low risk of recurrent VTE and discontinued anticoagulants (intervention arm), whereas anticoagulant management for high risk women (≥2 HERDOO2 criteria) and men was left to the discretion of the clinicians and patients (observation arm).Main outcome measure Recurrent symptomatic VTE (independently and blindly adjudicated) over one year of follow-up.Results Of 1213 women, 631 (51.3%) were classified as low risk and 591 discontinued oral anticoagulant treatment. In the primary analysis, 17 low risk women who discontinued anticoagulants developed recurrent VTE during 564 patient years of follow-up (3.0% per patient year, 95% confidence interval 1.8% to 4.8%). In 323 high risk women and men who discontinued anticoagulants, 25 had VTE during 309 patient years of follow-up (8.1%, 5.2% to 11.9%), whereas in 1802 high risk women and men who continued anticoagulants 28 had recurrent VTE during 1758 patient years of follow-up (1.6%, 1.1% to 2.3%).Conclusions Women with a first unprovoked VTE event and none or one of the HERDOO2 criteria have a low risk of recurrent VTE and can safely discontinue anticoagulants after completing short term treatment

  12. The use of indium-111 labeled platelet scanning for the detection of asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis in a high risk population

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.S.; Rae, J.L.; Ryan, N.L.; Edwards, C.; Fortune, W.P.; Lewis, R.J.; Reba, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Five hundred indium-111 labeled platelet imaging studies (387 donor and 113 autologous) were performed postoperatively in 473 patients who had undergone total hip replacement, total knee replacement, or internal fixation of a hip fracture to detect occult deep venous thrombosis. All patients had been anticoagulated prophylactically with aspirin, warfarin sodium (Coumadin), or dextran. Thirty-four possible cases of proximal deep venous thrombosis were identified in 28 asymptomatic patients. To verify the scan results, 31 venograms were performed in 25 patients (three refused). In 21 of 31 cases, totally occlusive thrombi were detected; in 5 cases, partially occlusive thrombi were detected; in 5 cases, no thrombus was seen. No patient who had a negative scan nor any patient who had a verified positive scan (and received appropriate heparin therapy) subsequently developed symptoms or signs of pulmonary embolism. One hundred forty-one indium study patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography/impedance plethysmography (Doppler/IPG) as a comparative non-invasive technique. In 137 cases, the results of the indium study and Doppler/IPG studies were congruent. The indium study had no false negative results that were detected by Doppler/IPG. No patient had any clinically evident toxicity. These results suggest that indium-111 labeled platelet scanning is a safe, noninvasive means for identifying DVT in high risk patients.

  13. Thigh-length versus below-knee compression elastic stockings for prevention of the postthrombotic syndrome in patients with proximal-venous thrombosis: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Prandoni, Paolo; Noventa, Franco; Quintavalla, Roberto; Bova, Carlo; Cosmi, Benilde; Siragusa, Sergio; Bucherini, Eugenio; Astorri, Francesco; Cuppini, Stefano; Dalla Valle, Fabio; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin H; Villalta, Sabina

    2012-02-09

    Although below-knee compression elastic stockings (CES) are effective for the prevention of the postthrombotic syndrome (PTS), a substantial number of patients with deep venous thrombosis still develop PTS. In the present open-label, randomized clinical trial, we compared thigh-length with below-knee CES for the prevention of PTS. A total of 267 patients with the first episode of proximal deep venous thrombosis were randomized to wear either thigh-length or below-knee CES for 2 years. After 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months, they were assessed for PTS manifestations according to the Villalta scale. PTS developed in 44 (32.6%) of the 135 patients randomized to thigh-length CES and in 47 (35.6%) of the 132 allocated to below-knee CES, for an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.62-1.41). Severe PTS developed in 3 patients in each group. CES-related side effects developed in 55 (40.7%) of the 135 patients allocated to thigh-length CES and in 36 (27.3%) of those randomized to the below-knee group (P = .017), and led to premature discontinuation of their use in 29 (21.5%) and 18 (13.6%) patients, respectively. We conclude that thigh-length CES do not offer a better protection against PTS than below-knee CES and are less well tolerated.

  14. Use of a peripherally inserted central catheter as a conduit for central venous access across thrombosed great veins.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Prasad Guntur; Chakraverty, Sam; Zealley, Ian

    2010-02-01

    This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.

  15. Use of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter as a Conduit for Central Venous Access Across Thrombosed Great Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Guntur Ramkumar, Prasad Chakraverty, Sam Zealley, Ian

    2010-02-15

    This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.

  16. Venous thrombosis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , editorial process and privacy policy . A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  17. Pharmacological prophylaxis of venous thrombo-embolism.

    PubMed

    Flute, P T

    1976-02-07

    The pathogenesis of venous thrombosis is briefly discussed as a basis for the understanding of preventive measures used in this condition. Prophylaxis in venous thrombosis is then reviewed with emphasis on pharmacological treatment, and more particularly on heparin.

  18. Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia and the MTHFR C677T polymorphism in patients with arterial and venous thrombosis from North Western Russia.

    PubMed

    Shmeleva, Veronika M; Kapustin, Sergey I; Papayan, Ludmila P; Sobczyńska-Malefora, Agata; Harrington, Dominic J; Savidge, Geoffrey F

    2003-01-01

    Conflicting data from Western European and USA population studies led us to investigate hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphisms and thrombotic disease in North Western Russia. Plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) levels, MTHFR C677T genotype, selected life style determinants and haemostatic factor activity were determined in patients with arterial (n = 33), venous (n = 40), arterial + venous (n = 11) thrombosis and healthy controls (n = 30). We found raised median tHcy levels in all patient groups vs. controls (p < 0.05), with odds ratios (95% CI) for vascular disease among patients with HHcy (defined as > 15 micromol/l) of 3.9 (0.6 - 14.3), 4.8 (1.2 - 18.8) and 15.8 (2.8 - 87.3) respectively. tHcy levels were a function of MTHFR C677T genotype, and all patients with tHcy levels > 30 micromol/l had the MTHFR C677T homozygous substitution. Elevated tHcy levels (p < 0.05) were identified in smokers and coffee drinkers, with the degree of elevation dependent on MTHFR C677T genotype. Of the studied haemostatic parameters increased factor VIII activity and vWF antigen and activity was observed in HHcy subjects. We conclude that HHcy and MTHFR C677T genotype are positively associated with arterial and venous thrombotic disease in the population of North Western Russia.

  19. Risk Factors for Deep Venous Thrombosis Following Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery: An Analysis of 56,000 patients

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Paul S.; White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A.; Greenberg, Sarah E.; VanHouten, Jacob P.; Avilucea, Frank R.; Obremskey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are recognized as major causes of morbidity and mortality in orthopaedic trauma patients. Despite the high incidence of these complications following orthopaedic trauma, there is a paucity of literature investigating the clinical risk factors for DVT in this specific population. As our healthcare system increasingly emphasizes quality measures, it is critical for orthopaedic surgeons to understand the clinical factors that increase the risk of DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Objectives: Utilizing the ACS-NSQIP database, we sought to determine the incidence and identify independent risk factors for DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Patients and Methods: Using current procedural terminology (CPT) codes for orthopaedic trauma procedures, we identified a prospective cohort of patients from the 2006 to 2013 ACS-NSQIP database. Using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests where appropriate, patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative factors were compared between patients who developed a DVT within 30 days of surgery and those who did not. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and identify independent risk factors for DVT. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: 56,299 orthopaedic trauma patients were included in the analysis, of which 473 (0.84%) developed a DVT within 30 days. In univariate analysis, twenty-five variables were significantly associated with the development of a DVT, including age (P < 0.0001), BMI (P = 0.037), diabetes (P = 0.01), ASA score (P < 0.0001) and anatomic region injured (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified several independent risk factors for development of a DVT including use of a ventilator (OR = 43.67, P = 0.039), ascites (OR = 41.61, P = 0.0038), steroid use (OR = 4.00, P < 0.001), and alcohol use (OR = 2.98, P = 0.0370). Compared to patients with upper extremity trauma, those with lower

  20. Position-Dependent Ventricular Tachycardia Related to Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Paulino; Schurmann, Paul; Smith, Melanie; Valderrábano, Miguel; Lin, C. Huie

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old male who developed frequent nonsustained episodes of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia after being diagnosed with bioprosthetic aortic valve endocarditis and treated with intravenous antibiotics. A peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) had been placed without complication less than 24 hours prior to the episodes. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) occurred during the night, while sleeping, when he assumed a right lateral decubitus position with abduction of the right arm and placement of the forearm under his head. VT occurred repeatedly when such position was assumed again upon request, and it would terminate immediately when sitting upright. The PICC was repositioned in the superior vena cava without further VT. He was discharged home the same day and underwent successful aortic valve replacement 2 months later. Position-dependent VT related to PICC requires careful history taking and PICC repositioning to make the diagnosis. X-ray in different patient positions during PICC placement can be considered to evaluate for ventricular migration. PMID:27826374

  1. Travelers' thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Raymond V; Hudson, Martin F

    2014-02-01

    The suggestion that venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with air travel has for several decades been the subject of both "media hype" and extensive debate in the medical literature. As emotion and anecdote is often a feature in this debate, it is therefore necessary to separate evidence from anecdote. "Travelers' thrombosis" is a more appropriate term because the evidence suggests that any form of travel involving immobility lasting more than 4 h can predispose to thrombosis. There is no unique factor in the air travel cabin environment that has been shown to have any effect on the coagulation cascade. Prevention of thrombosis in any form of travel, including air travel, requires being aware of the issue and making an adequate risk assessment together with appropriate prophylactic measures.

  2. Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma as a complication of anticoagulation in acute cerebral venous thrombosis: to stop or not to stop (the anticoagulation)?

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Carina; Pereira, Pedro; Rodrigues, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma is an infrequent complication of anticoagulation, potentially causing neurological dysfunction through compression of the femoral nerve or lumbar plexus. The authors report the case of a puerperal woman admitted for an extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started, with clinical improvement. The patient later reported low back pain irradiating to the right thigh and developed neurological impairment consistent with lumbar plexus dysfunction. A pelvic CT scan revealed a right iliopsoas muscle haematoma. Considering the risk of anticoagulation suspension, a conservative approach was chosen, with maintenance of anticoagulation. Clinical and functional improvement occurred, with mild right hip and knee flexion paresis as sequelae. Anticoagulation complications are challenging, especially when interruption of anticoagulation may threaten vital and functional outcomes. Therefore, a careful evaluation is essential, since no clinical guidelines are available. In this case, continuing anticoagulation provided a good functional outcome. PMID:25750219

  3. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  4. D-dimer is not elevated in asymptomatic high altitude climbers after descent to 5340 m: the Mount Everest Deep Venous Thrombosis Study (Ev-DVT).

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Feldman, Joanne; Becker, Robert J; Williams, Sarah R; Weiss, Eric A; Deloughery, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We performed this study to determine the prevalence of elevated D-dimer, a marker for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), in asymptomatic high altitude climbers. On-site personnel enrolled a convenience sample of climbers at Mt. Everest Base Camp (Nepal), elevation 5340 m (17,500 ft), during a single spring climbing season. Subjects were enrolled after descent to base camp from higher elevation. The subjects completed a questionnaire to evaluate their risk factors for DVT. We then performed a D-dimer test in asymptomatic individuals. If the D-dimer test was negative, DVT was considered ruled out. Ultrasound was available to perform lower-extremity compression ultrasounds to evaluate for DVT in case the D-dimer was positive. We enrolled 76 high altitude climbers. None had a positive D-dimer test. The absence of positive D-dimer tests suggests a low prevalence of DVT in asymptomatic high altitude climbers.

  5. Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma as a complication of anticoagulation in acute cerebral venous thrombosis: to stop or not to stop (the anticoagulation)?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carina; Pereira, Pedro; Rodrigues, Miguel

    2015-03-06

    Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma is an infrequent complication of anticoagulation, potentially causing neurological dysfunction through compression of the femoral nerve or lumbar plexus. The authors report the case of a puerperal woman admitted for an extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started, with clinical improvement. The patient later reported low back pain irradiating to the right thigh and developed neurological impairment consistent with lumbar plexus dysfunction. A pelvic CT scan revealed a right iliopsoas muscle haematoma. Considering the risk of anticoagulation suspension, a conservative approach was chosen, with maintenance of anticoagulation. Clinical and functional improvement occurred, with mild right hip and knee flexion paresis as sequelae. Anticoagulation complications are challenging, especially when interruption of anticoagulation may threaten vital and functional outcomes. Therefore, a careful evaluation is essential, since no clinical guidelines are available. In this case, continuing anticoagulation provided a good functional outcome.

  6. A 17-year-old male with pseudotumor cerebri secondary to performance-enhancing steroids triggering venous thrombosis in the brain.

    PubMed

    DeSena, Allen D; Weimer, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    This article is a case report of a 17-year-old male who presented with a headache and blurry vision. He subsequently was noted to have papilledema on a fundoscopic examination and an initial normal magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of his head; his condition was, therefore, diagnosed as pseudotumor cerebri. A subsequent magnetic resonance venography of his head revealed venous thrombosis, and other investigations revealed an elevated factor VIII level as well as a mutation at the MTHFR locus, consistent with an elevated risk for hypercoagulability. In addition, he admitted to steroid usage for purposes of performance enhancement in baseball. The patient's condition eventually improved with acetazolamide and serial lumbar punctures. Steroids have been linked to predisposition to hypercoagulable states, but there are no reports identified by these authors that link performance-enhancing steroids with pseudotumor cerebri as a result of a coagulation dyscrasia.

  7. Prognostic significance of residual venous obstruction in patients with treated unprovoked deep vein thrombosis: a patient-level meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Donadini, Marco P; Ageno, Walter; Antonucci, Emilia; Cosmi, Benilde; Kovacs, Michael J; Le Gal, Grégoire; Ockelford, Paul; Poli, Daniela; Prandoni, Paolo; Rodger, Marc; Saccullo, Giorgia; Siragusa, Sergio; Young, Laura; Bonzini, Matteo; Caprioli, Monica; Dentali, Francesco; Iorio, Alfonso; Douketis, James D

    2014-01-01

    Residual venous obstruction (RVO) could improve the stratification of the risk of recurrence after unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (DVT), but results from clinical studies and study-level meta-analyses are conflicting. It was the objective of this analysis to determine if RVO is a valid predictor of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with a first unprovoked DVT who had received at least three months of anticoagulant therapy. Individual patient data were obtained from the datasets of original studies, after a systematic search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library), supplemented by manual reviewing of the reference lists and contacting content experts. A multivariate, shared-frailty Cox model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for recurrent VTE, including, as covariates: RVO; age; sex; anticoagulation duration before RVO assessment; and anticoagulation continuation after RVO assessment. A total of 2,527 patients from 10 prospective studies were included. RVO was found in 1,380 patients (55.1%) after a median of six months from a first unprovoked DVT. Recurrent VTE occurred in 399 patients (15.8%) during a median follow-up of 23.3 months. After multivariate Cox analysis, RVO was independently associated with recurrent VTE (HR = 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.65). The association was stronger if RVO was detected early, i.e. at three months after DVT (HR = 2.17; 95% CI: 1.11-4.25), but non-significant if detected later, i.e. >6 months (HR = 1.19; 95% CI: 0.87-1.61). In conclusion, after a first unprovoked DVT, RVO is a weak overall predictor of recurrent VTE. The association is stronger if RVO is detected at an earlier time (3 months) after thrombosis.

  8. The Retrograde Transvenous Push-Through Method: A Novel Treatment of Peripheral Arteriovenous Malformations with Dominant Venous Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, Walter A. Müller-Wille, René Teusch, Veronika I.; Dudeck, Oliver; Cahill, Anne M.; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Uller, Wibke

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel retrograde transvenous embolization technique of peripheral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) using Onyx.Materials and MethodsWe conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent transvenous retrograde Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow over a 29-month period. The embolization is aimed at retrograde filling of the nidus after building a solid plug in the dominant venous outflow (push-through). Classification, clinical signs, technical aspects, clinical and technical success rates, and complications were recorded. Short-term outcome was assessed.Results11 Symptomatic patients (8 female; mean age 31.4 years) were treated at our Vascular Anomalies Center with this method between January 2012 and May 2014. The AVMs were located on the upper extremity (n = 3), pelvis (n = 2), buttock (n = 2), and lower extremity (n = 4). Retrograde embolization was successfully carried out after preparatory transarterial-flow reduction in eight cases (73 %) and venous-flow reduction with Amplatzer Vascular Plugs in four cases (36 %). Complete devascularization (n = 10; 91 %) or 95 % devascularization (n = 1; 9 %) led to complete resolution (n = 8; 73 %) or improvement of clinical symptoms (n = 3; 27 %). One minor complication occurred (pain and swelling). During a mean follow-up time of 8 months, one clinically asymptomatic recurrence of AVM was detected.ConclusionInitial results suggest that retrograde transvenous Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow is a safe and effective novel technique with a low complication rate.

  9. Experience of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter in Patients with Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yoshinori; Fukuta, Takanori; Maruyama, Junko; Omura, Hiromi; Tanaka, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    Objective Although use of the peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) has become increasingly common, there are few reports of PICCs used for patients with hematologic diseases. In this study, we analyzed the safety of PICC placement in patients with hematologic diseases where PICCs had been placed to perform blood collection, blood transfusion, drug administration, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods This study included 142 PICCs placed in 95 patients managed at our department from November 2013 to December 2015. The PICCs used were the GroshongⓇ Catheter (NXT single-lumen; BARD Inc.). Results A total of 95 patients underwent the placement of 142 PICCs. The mean patient age was 65.5 years. The total duration of catheterization was 8,089 days, with a mean duration of 57.0 days. Chemotherapy was administered through 107 catheters. Stem cells were injected through 12 catheters. Although a fever was observed in association with 103 catheters, it was generally controlled by antimicrobial therapy. There were 18 catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) cases, an incidence equivalent to 2.1 cases per 1,000 catheter-days. Conclusion The present study demonstrated a low CRBSI incidence rate and found no evidence of serious complications with PICC placement. PICCs can be used for blood collection, blood transfusion, drug administration, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without problems. Thus, PICC placement appears to be a safe procedure for patients with hematologic diseases. Safe catheters are therefore urgently needed for these patients. We expect that PICCs will be widely adopted in Japan in the near future. PMID:28202859

  10. Antithrombotic activity of a monoclonal antibody inducing the substrate form of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in rat models of venous and arterial thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, C N; Lunven, C; Lechaire, I; Girardot, C; O'Connor, S E

    1998-01-01

    Elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a risk factor for thrombosis, and inhibitors of the interaction between PAI-1 and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) have antithrombotic and pro-thrombolytic activity in animals. We describe the antithrombotic effects in the rat of a monoclonal antibody (MA33H1) which converts PAI-1 to a non-inhibitory substrate. The activity of MA33H1 against rat PAI-1 was confirmed using two-chain t-PA and a chromogenic substrate. MA33H1 was evaluated in rat venous (thromboplastin+stasis in the abdominal vena cava) and arterial (electric current applied to a carotid artery) thrombosis models. The effects on tail-transection bleeding time were studied. MA33H1 at 100 ng ml−1 inhibited both human (44.1%) and rat PAI-1 (49.7%). This effect was concentration-dependent. Its effect on human PAI-1 was not significantly inhibited by 1 μg ml−1 fibrin or a ≈amp;7 fold molar excess of vitronectin (1 nM). Inhibition of rat PAI-1 was unchanged by fibrin, but vitronectin reduced inhibition from 0.5 nM. In the venous thrombosis model, MA33H1 significantly reduced thrombus weights by 38 and 58.6% at 50 and 100 μg kg−1 min−1 i.v. respectively. This effect was inhibited by tranexamic acid. In the arterial model, MA33H1 significantly increased the delay to occlusive thrombus formation by 58 and 142% at 50 and 100 μg kg−1 min−1 i.v., and did not affect bleeding time at 300 μg kg−1 min−1 i.v. Thus, a monoclonal antibody which transforms PAI-1 to a t-PA substrate prevents thrombus formation in the rat with no effect on bleeding time at a higher dose. PMID:9776340

  11. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, W W

    1977-01-01

    This review of the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism includes estimates of incidence and prevalence of venous thrombosis and its sequelae, a discussion geographical, annual and seasonal variations and data concerning possible risk factors. Selection of patients at increased risk for development of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism for specific diagnostic screening or for prophylactic therapy with low-dose heparin may be a more effective approach to lowering morbidity and mortality from this disease. PMID:329779

  12. Free Flap Salvage after Recurrent Venous Thrombosis by Means of Large-Scale Treatment with Medical Leeches

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, Masahide; Arikawa, Masaki; Kagaya, Yu; Miyamoto, Shimpei

    2016-01-01

    Summary: An anterolateral thigh flap was salvaged using 110 medical leeches in the absence of an available vein for reanastomosis. After surgical construction of the flap for full-thickness thoracic wall reconstruction, the patient developed complete venous occlusion. Specifically, the anastomotic vein developed complete occlusion, and the internal jugular vein had a thrombus. In addition, because the lung was posterior to the flap, the angiogenic area of the flap was very small. When the medical leeches were first applied, the flap showed prominent venous congestion. However, the congestion began to resolve by day 6 of leech use, leading to complete survival of the flap. PMID:28293509

  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in the Treatment of Venous Symptomatic Chronic Portal Thrombosis in Non-cirrhotic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose I. Elorz, Mariana; Vivas, Isabel; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Bastarrika, Gorka; Benito, Alberto

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To present a series of cases of non-cirrhotic patients with symptomatic massive portal thrombosis treated by percutaneous techniques. All patients underwent a TIPS procedure in order to maintain the patency of the portal vein by facilitating the outflow. Methods: A total of six patients were treated for thrombosis of the main portal vein (6/6); the main right and left branches (3/6) and the splenic vein (5/6) and superior mesenteric vein (6/6). Two patients had a pancreatic malignancy; one patient with an orthotopic liver transplant had been surgically treated for a pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients had idiopathic thrombocytosis, and in the remaining patient no cause for the portal thrombosis was identified. During the initial procedure in each patient one or more approaches were tried: transhepatic (5/6), transileocolic (1/6), trans-splenic (1/6) or transjugular (1/6). In all cases the procedure was completed with a TIPS with either ultrasound guidance (3/6), 'gun-shot' technique (2/6) or fluoroscopic guidance (1/6).Results: No complications were observed during the procedures. One patient had a repeat episode of variceal bleeding at 30 months, one patient remained asymptomatic and was lost to follow-up at 24 months, two patients were successfully treated surgically (cephalic duodenopancreatectomy) and are alive at 4 and 36 months. One patient remains asymptomatic (without new episodes of abdominal pain) at 16 months of follow-up. One patient died because of tumor progression at 10 months. Conclusion: Percutaneous techniques for portal recanalization are an interesting alternative even in non-acute thrombosis. Once flow has been restored in the portal vein TIPS may be necessary to obtain an adequate outflow, hence facilitating and maintaining the portal flow.

  14. Sulodexide in the treatment of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Giuseppe Maria

    2012-04-01

    Chronic venous disease encompasses a range of venous disorders, including those involving the lower limbs resulting from venous hypertension. The spectrum of chronic venous disease signs and symptoms shows variable severity, ranging from mild (aching, pain, and varicose veins) to severe (venous ulcers). The pathophysiology of chronic venous disease is characterized by venous hypertension, which triggers endothelial dysfunction and inflammation leading to microcirculatory and tissue damage, and eventually to varicose veins and venous ulcers. Sulodexide is an orally active mixture of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) polysaccharides with established antithrombotic and profibrinolytic activity. The agent is used in the treatment of a number of vascular disorders with increased risk of thrombosis, including intermittent claudication, peripheral arterial occlusive disease and post-myocardial infarction. Sulodexide differs from heparin because it is orally bioavailable and has a longer half-life and a smaller effect on systemic clotting and bleeding. An increasing body of preclinical evidence shows that sulodexide also exerts anti-inflammatory, endothelial-protective, and pleiotropic effects, supporting its potential efficacy in the treatment of chronic venous disease. Clinical studies of sulodexide have shown that the agent is associated with significant improvements in the clinical signs and symptoms of venous ulcers, and is therefore a recommended therapy in combination with local wound care and bandages for patients with persistent venous leg ulcers. Preliminary evidence supports the use of sulodexide in the prevention of recurrent deep venous thrombosis. Sulodexide was generally safe and well tolerated in clinical trials, without hemorrhagic complications. Sulodexide therefore appears to be a favorable option for the treatment of all stages of chronic venous disease and for the prevention of disease progression.

  15. Role of IVC Filters in Endovenous Therapy for Deep Venous Thrombosis: The FILTER-PEVI (Filter Implantation to Lower Thromboembolic Risk in Percutaneous Endovenous Intervention) Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Bay, Curt; Skrocki, Laura; Lawson, David; Mazdeh, Shahnaz

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the necessity of and recommend indications for inferior vena cava (IVC) filter implantation during percutaneous endovenous intervention (PEVI) for deep venous thrombosis (DVT).BackgroundPEVI has emerged as a powerful tool in the management of acute proximal DVT. Instrumentation of extensive fresh thrombus is potentially associated with iatrogenic pulmonary embolism (PE). The true frequency of this complication has not been studied in a randomized fashion. We evaluated IVC filter implantation during PEVI for DVT. Methods: A total of 141 patients with symptomatic proximal DVT undergoing PEVI for symptomatic DVT were randomized to receive an IVC filter (70 patients) or no filter (71 patients; control group). The anticoagulation and PEVI regimen were similar between the two groups. Patients with development of symptoms suggestive of PE underwent objective testing for PE. Results: PE developed in 1 of the 14 symptomatic patients in the filter group and 8 of the 22 patients in the control group (P = 0.048). There was no mortality in any group. Three patients (4.2%) in the control group had transient hemodynamic instability necessitating resuscitory efforts. Predictors of iatrogenic PE were found to be PE at admission; involvement of two or more adjacent venous segments with acute thrombus; inflammatory form of DVT (severe erythema, edema, pain, and induration); and vein diameter of {>=}7 mm with preserved architecture. Conclusions: IVC filter implantation during PEVI reduces the risk of iatrogenic PE by eightfold without a mortality benefit. A selective approach may be exercised in filter implantation during PEVI.

  16. New Developments in the Pathophysiology, Workup, and Diagnosis of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) and a Systematic Review of Endovascular Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Schirmer, Clemens M.; Li, Fengwu; Geng, Xiaogun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis (DVST) is a rare cause of stroke, which typically affects young women. The importance of identifying pre-disposing factors that lead to venous stasis lies in the foundation of understanding the etiology, pathophysiology and clinical presentation. The precise therapeutic role of interventional therapies is not fully understood though the current data do suggest potential applications. The aim of the study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the utility of and short-term 30-day survival after endovascular therapy for patients with DVST. Standard PRISMA guidelines were followed. Data sources included PubMed keywords and phrases, which were also incorporated into a MeSH search to yield articles indexed in Medline over a 5-year period. All RCTs, observational cohort studies, and administrative registries comparing or reporting DVST were included. Sixty-six studies met inclusion criteria. 35 articles investigating treatment in a summation of 10,285 patients were eligible for data extraction and included in the review of treatment modalities. A total of 312 patients were included for statistical analysis. All patients included received endovascular intervention with direct thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy or both. 133 (42.6%) patients were documented to have a neurologic decline, which prompted endovascular intervention. All patients who had endovascular interventions were those who were started on and failed systemic anticoagulation. 44 patients were reported to have intracranial hemorrhages after intervention. Regardless of systemic anticoagulation, patients were still reported to have complications of VTE and PE. Primary outcome at 3-6 month follow up revealed mRS<1 in 224 patients. DVST presents with many diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The utility of invasive interventions such as local thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy is not fully understood. It is exceedingly difficult to conduct large

  17. CT venography for deep venous thrombosis: can it predict catheter-directed thrombolysis prognosis in patients with iliac vein compression syndrome?

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Woo; Jae, Hwan Jun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Min, Sang-Il; Min, Seung-Kee; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT venography for catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) in iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS) patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. Among the 201 consecutive patients treated in our interventional suite for DVT from January 2001 to June 2013, 48 IVCS patients (12 men, 36 women) who underwent pre-procedural CT venography, CDT with stenting, and follow-up imaging were analyzed. To identify possible determinants of 6-month patency, CT venography was evaluated with Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analyses. Based on the analyses, image-based criteria were established and compared to the current symptom duration-based approach by receiver-operating-characteristic curve analyses and the McNemar test. Recoiling of external iliac vein (EIV) diameter (<120 %) [hazard ratio (HR) 28.652, p = .007] and severe rim enhancement (HR 20.545, p = .016) were significant risk factors for venous occlusion within 6 months of CDT. The dual-parameter image-based criteria were significantly superior to the current symptom duration-based approach in terms of area under the curve value (p = .010) and predictive accuracy (p = .031). With a 2-point cut-off, the proposed criteria demonstrated a 66.7 % sensitivity, 100.0 % specificity, and 92.9 % predictive accuracy for identifying non-responders of CDT. CT venography may be useful in assessing CDT prognoses in IVCS patients, particularly to identify non-responders who demonstrate recoiling of EIV diameter and rim enhancement on CT venography.

  18. Long-term Outcome of Peripherally Implanted Venous Access Ports in the Forearm in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klösges, Laura Meyer, Carsten Boschewitz, Jack Andersson, Magnus; Rudlowski, Christian; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the long-term outcome of peripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm at our institution in a female patient collective.MethodsBetween June 2002 and May 2011, a total of 293 female patients with an underlying malignancy had 299 forearm ports implanted in our interventional radiology suite. The mean age of the cohort was 55 ± 12 years (range 26–81 years). The majority of women suffered from breast (59.5 %) or ovarian cancer (28.1 %). Complications were classified as infectious complications, thrombotic and nonthrombotic catheter dysfunction (dislocation of the catheter or port chamber, fracture with/without embolization or kinking of the catheter, port occlusion), and others.ResultsWe analyzed a total of 90,276 catheter days in 248 port systems (47 patients were lost to follow-up). The mean device service interval was 364 days per catheter (range 8–2,132, median 223 days, CI 311–415, SD 404). Sixty-seven early (≤30 days from implantation) or late complications (>30 days) occurred during the observation period (0.74/1,000 catheter days). Common complications were port infection (0.18/1,000 days), thrombotic dysfunction (0.12/1,000 days), and skin dehiscence (0.12/1,000 days). Nonthrombotic dysfunction occurred in a total of 21 cases (0.23/1,000 days) and seemed to cumulate on the venous catheter entry site on the distal upper arm.ConclusionPeripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm are a safe alternative to chest or upper-arm ports in female oncology patients. Special attention should be paid to signs of skin dehiscence and nonthrombotic dysfunction, especially when used for long-term treatment.

  19. Catheter-directed thrombolysis in management of postpartum lower limb deep venous thrombosis – A case series

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, B.C.; Patra, Soumya; Nagesh, C.M.; Reddy, Babu; Manjunath, C.N.

    2015-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major health problem in pregnancy and postpartum period. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is safe and effective in the management of symptomatic DVT. Value of CDT in postpartum DVT is not fully evaluated. We describe five patients presenting with acute iliofemoral DVT in their early postpartum period who were treated with mechanical thromboaspiration and CDT. The CDT was done using streptokinase infusion and unfractionated heparin. Percutaneous angioplasty was done in patients with symptomatic residual lesion following thrombolysis. Patients were discharged with oral anticoagulant and compression stockings. This approach was successful in all five cases. Percutaneous endovascular therapy using CDT, mechanical thromboaspiration, and balloon angioplasty is safe and effective in iliofemoral DVT in postpartum period. PMID:26995437

  20. Alternative techniques for gaining venous access. What to do when peripheral intravenous catheterization is not possible.

    PubMed

    Vyskocil, J J; Kruse, J A; Wilson, R F

    1993-03-01

    There are a number of therapeutic options for fluid administration in patients who lack usual venous access. Ways to establish this access include limb elevation and wrapping, the application of nitroglycerin ointment to dilate veins, and blood pressure cuff inflation. Ultrasonography can also be used to delineate vascular structures. Cutdown procedures are the oldest, most direct method to reach uncommon venous sites, such as the inferior epigastric, intercostal, iliac, and lateral thoracic veins. Today, cutdown procedures are regarded as the method of last resort, and they should be performed in operating suites or similar settings. Possible complications include inadvertent arterial puncture and hemorrhage.

  1. Ultrasound-Assisted Peripheral Venous Access in Young Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Pilot Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Bair, Aaron E.; Rose, John S.; Vance, Cheryl W.; Andrada-Brown, Emily; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Intravenous (IV) access in children treated in the emergency department (ED) is frequently required and often difficult to obtain. While it has been shown that ultrasound can be useful in adults for both central and peripheral venous access, research regarding children has been limited. We sought to determine if the use of a static ultrasound technique could, a) allow clinicians to visualize peripheral veins and b) improve success rates of peripheral venous cannulation in young children in the ED. Methods We performed a randomized clinical trial of children < 7 years in an academic pediatric ED who required IV access and who had failed the first IV attempt. We randomized patients to either continued standard IV attempts or ultrasound-assisted attempts. Clinicians involved in the study received one hour of training in ultrasound localization of peripheral veins. In the ultrasound group, vein localization was performed by an ED physician who marked the skin overlying the target vessel. Intravenous cannulation attempts were then immediately performed by a pediatric ED nurse who relied on the skin mark for vessel location. We allowed for technique cross-over after two failed IV attempts. We recorded success rate and location of access attempts. We compared group success rates using differences in 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results We enrolled 44 children over a one-year period. The median age of enrollees was 9.5 months. We visualized peripheral veins in all patients in the ultrasound group (n=23) and in those who crossed over to ultrasound after failed standard technique attempts (n= 8). Venipuncture was successful on the first attempt in the ultrasound group in 13/23 (57%, CI, 35% to 77%), versus 12/21 (57%, CI, 34% to 78%) in the standard group, difference between groups 0.6% (95% CI −30% to 29%). First attempt cannulation success in the ultrasound group was 8/23 (35%, CI, 16% to 57%), versus 6/21 (29%, CI, 11% to 52%) in the standard group

  2. Simultaneous appearance of cerebral venous thrombosis and subdural hematomas as rare cause of headache in puerperium following epidural analgesia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Župan, Željko; Sotošek Tokmadžić, Vlatka; Matanić-Manestar, Marinka; Šustić, Alan; Antončić, Igor; Dunatov, Siniša; Pavlović, Ivan; Antulov, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report the first case of simultaneous appearance of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and bilateral subdural hematomas (SDHs) following epidural analgesia for labor and delivery and to point out the difficulty of establishing such a diagnosis in the presence of postpartum headache. A 26-year old primigravida with a history of epilepsy received epidural analgesia for delivery. Three days after the uneventful spontaneous vaginal delivery she complained about the headache. Patient responded very well to the pain medication and oral hydration, and the headache was relieved. Ten days after the delivery, the headache reoccurred, and an epidural blood patch was performed that successfully relieved her symptom. Stronger progressive headache with nausea reappeared two days later and the parturient was readmitted to hospital. Urgent neuroimaging examinations detected CVT of right the transverse sinus, ipsilateral cortical veins, and partially occluded superior sagittal sinus, as well as bilateral subacute/chronic SDHs. The treatment of the patient with low molecular weight heparin and antiaggregation therapy was effective. In this case, the diagnosis was delayed because of atypical clinical presentation and potentially confounding events (epidural analgesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. Otherwise, unrecognized intracranial complications and delay of appropriate therapy could be life-threatening. PMID:22911532

  3. Consultations on patients with venous or arterial diseases.

    PubMed

    Alving, Barbara M; Francis, Charles W; Hiatt, William R; Jackson, Mark R

    2003-01-01

    Advances in vascular biology and drug development, as well as improved interventional techniques, are yielding multiple new treatments for patients with venous and/or arterial thrombosis. Hematologists who are providing consultations for these patients often participate in a multidisciplinary approach to provide optimal care. New anticoagulants, simplified and validated tests for detecting vascular disease, and improved interventional procedures can all reduce the morbidity and mortality that result from venous and arterial thrombosis. In this chapter, different aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders are addressed by a hematologist, an expert in vascular medicine, and a vascular surgeon. The key to the prevention and treatment of venous and arterial thrombosis is anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy. In Section I, Dr. Charles Francis, a hematologist with expertise in thrombosis and hemostasis, describes the clinical trials that have resulted in the approval of newer anticoagulants such as fondaparinux and the thrombin- specific inhibitors. He also reviews the clinical trials that have shown the efficacy of the new oral anticoagulant ximelagatran. Although currently under study primarily for the prevention and treatment of venous thrombosis, these anticoagulants are likely to undergo evaluation for use in arterial thrombosis. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which affects as many as 12% of individuals over the age of 65 years, provides a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to physicians across multiple subspecialties. Dr. William Hiatt, a specialist in vascular medicine, discusses in Section II the epidemiology and manifestations of PAD, the best ways in which to diagnose this disorder and determine its severity, and the most appropriate pharmacologic treatment. In Section III, Dr. Mark Jackson, a vascular surgeon, describes interventional procedures that have been developed or are under development to treat arterial thrombosis. He also

  4. Peripheral venous blood gas analysis: An alternative to arterial blood gas analysis for initial assessment and resuscitation in emergency and intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Shilpi; Rani, Raka; Malviya, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is the gold standard method for assessment of oxygenation and acid base analysis, yielding valuable information about a variety of disease process. This study is aimed to determine the extent of correlation between arterial and peripheral venous samples for blood gases and acid base status in critically ill and emergency department patients and to evaluate if venous sample may be a better alternative for initial assessment and resuscitation. The prospective study was conducted on 45 patients of either sex in the age group of 15-80 years of intensive care unit and emergency ward. Relevant history, presenting complaints, vital signs, and indication for testing were recorded. Arterial and peripheral venous samples were drawn simultaneously in a pre-heparinized syringe and analyzed immediately for blood gases and acid base status. Mean difference and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient was used to compare the result. After statistical evaluation, the present study shows minimal mean difference and good correlation (r > 0.9) between arterial and peripheral venous sample for blood gases and acid base status. Correlation in PO2 measurement was poor (r < 0.3). Thus, venous blood may be a useful alternative to arterial blood during blood gas analysis obviating the need for arterial puncture in difficult clinical situation especially trauma patients, for initial emergency department assessment and early stages of resuscitation.

  5. Prevention of venous thrombosis in long-haul flights with Flite Tabs: the LONFLIT-FLITE randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Belcaro, G; Nicolaides, A N; Ricci, A; Geroulakos, G; Ippolito, E; Brandolini, R; Vinciguerra, G; Dugall, M; Griffin, M; Ruffini, I; Acerbi, G; Corsi, M; Riordan, N H; Stuard, S; Bavera, P; Di Renzo, A; Kenyon, J; Errichi, B M

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the development of edema, and superficial and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis with an oral profibrinolytic agent (Flite Tabs, 150 mg pinokinase, Aidan, Tempe, AZ, USA) in long-haul flights (7-8 hours), in high-risk subjects. A group of 300 subjects was included; 76 were excluded for several problems including concomitant treatments; 204 were randomized into 2 groups (active treatment or placebo) to evaluate the effects of prophylaxis with Flite Tabs. An exercise program was used in both groups. The femoral, popliteal, tibial, and superficial veins were scanned with ultrasound before and within 90 minutes after flights. Of the included subjects, 92 of 103 controls and 94 of 101 treated subjects completed the study. Dropouts were due to connection problems. Age, gender, and risk distribution were comparable in the groups. In the treatment group, no DVT was observed. In the control group, 5 subjects (5.4%) had a DVT and there were 2 superficial thromboses (7 events in 92 subjects; 7.6%). At inclusion, edema was comparable in the 2 groups. After flights there was an increase in score in controls (+12%) in comparison with a decrease (-15%) in the Flite Tabs group (the difference in variation was statistically significant). Intention-to-treat analysis for thrombotic events shows 18 failures in controls (11 lost to follow-up + 7 thrombotic events) of 92 subjects (19.6%) in comparison with 7 failures (of 94 subjects, equivalent to 7.4%) in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Events were asymptomatic. In conclusion, Flite Tabs were effective in reducing thrombotic events and in controlling edema in high-risk subjects in long flights.

  6. The Effect of Simulation Teaching on Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Self-confidence Related to Peripheral Venous Catheterization in Children: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Amini, Abolghasem; Fathi-Azar, Eskandar; Ghiasvandian, Shahrzad; Akbarzadeh, Bahareh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent decades, nursing instructors have tended to use simulation rather than traditional methods due to benefits such as increased self-confidence. However, little academic literature is available to verify this claim. The procedure of establishing peripheral venous catheterization in pediatric patients is of great importance. Therefore, the researchers attempted to review the effect of the simulation teaching method on nursing students' self-confidence related to peripheral venous catheterization in pediatric patients. Methods: In this trial, 45 students in the 5th and 6th semester of nursing school in the first half of school year 2012 from the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, were randomly assigned to three groups (a control group, and two intervention groups). They were trained in establishing peripheral venous catheterization in pediatric patients through simulation teaching method and practical training. The students' self-confidence was assessed by C-Scale before and after the intervention. Results: The students' self-confidence score showed a significant increase in the simulation group after the intervention in comparison to other groups (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Results revealed a significant increase in self-confidence of nursing students related to peripheral venous catheterization in pediatric patients by simulation. This substantiates the assertion that simulation can improve self-confidence. Due to the low sample size, further studies with larger population are suggested. PMID:25276722

  7. Are Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models Reporting the Right C(max)? Central Venous Versus Peripheral Sampling Site.

    PubMed

    Musther, Helen; Gill, Katherine L; Chetty, Manoranjenni; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Rowland, Malcolm; Jamei, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can over-predict maximum plasma concentrations (C(max)) following intravenous administration. A proposed explanation is that invariably PBPK models report the concentration in the central venous compartment, rather than the site where the samples are drawn. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate potential corrective models based on anatomy and physiology governing the blood supply at the site of sampling and incorporate them into a PBPK platform. Four models were developed and scrutinised for their corrective potential. All assumed the peripheral sampling site concentration could be described by contributions from surrounding tissues and utilised tissue-specific concentration-time profiles reported from the full-PBPK model within the Simcyp Simulator. Predicted concentrations for the peripheral site were compared to the observed C(max). The models results were compared to clinical data for 15 studies over seven compounds (alprazolam, imipramine, metoprolol, midazolam, omeprazole, rosiglitazone and theophylline). The final model utilised tissue concentrations from adipose, skin, muscle and a contribution from artery. Predicted C(max) values considering the central venous compartment can over-predict the observed values up to 10-fold whereas the new sampling site predictions were within 2-fold of observed values. The model was particularly relevant for studies where traditional PBPK models over-predict early time point concentrations. A successful corrective model for C(max) prediction has been developed, subject to further validation. These models can be enrolled as built-up modules into PBPK platforms and potentially account for factors that may affect the initial mixing of the blood at the site of sampling.

  8. Endothelial cell protein C receptor gene 6936A/G and 4678G/C polymorphisms as risk factors for deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zoheir, Naguib; Eldanasouri, Nabiel; Abdel-Aal, Asmaa A; Hosny, Karim Adel; Abdel-Ghany, Wafaa M

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) enhances the generation of activated protein C by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. A soluble form of EPCR (sEPCR) is present in plasma. Two polymorphisms in the EPCR gene (6936A/G and 4678G/C) have been reported to influence the risk of venous thromboembolism. We aimed to investigate the relation between EPCR gene polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678C/G) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and their relations to sEPCR level. This study involved 90 patients with DVT and 90 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Plasma levels of sEPCR were measured in 45 cases of the primary DVT by ELISA. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used for detection of EPCR polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678G/C). Regarding 6936A/G, our results demonstrated that mutant genotypes (AG, GG) were associated with an increased risk for DVT [P < 0.001, odds ratio (OR) 4.125, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.198-7.740] as well as its mutant allele G (P < 0.001, OR 2.549, 95% CI 1.601-4.061). The mutant genotypes were associated with increased levels of sEPCR. Although in 4678G/C, our results demonstrated that the mutant genotype (CC) was considered as a protective factor against DVT (P = 0.014, OR 0.289, 95% CI 0.108-0.776) as well as its mutant allele C (P = 0.02, OR 0.600, 95% CI 0.388-0.927), but it had no effect on sEPCR level. Our data suggest that 6936A/G polymorphism is a risk factor for DVT and is associated with elevated plasma levels of sEPCR, while 4678G/C polymorphism plays a role in protection against DVT.

  9. Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-1 Is a Valuable Marker for the Prediction of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Tumor Metastasis in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wufeng

    2017-01-01

    Activation of blood coagulation contributes to cancer progression. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1) is the main inhibitor of extrinsic coagulation pathway. The aim of this study is to assess the predicting significance of TFPI-1 for thrombotic complication and metastasis in lung cancer patients. Total of 188 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were included in this study. Plasma TFPI-1, D-dimer (D-D), antithrombin (AT), Fibrinogen (Fbg), and coagulating factor VIII activity (FVIII:C) were measured. In NSCLC patients, significantly decreased TFPI-1 and AT and increased D-D, Fbg, and FVIII:C levels were observed, and there was a significant correlation between TFPI-1 and other hemostatic parameters (P < 0.001, resp.). NSCLC patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or metastasis had significantly lower TFPI-1 levels than those without DVT or metastasis (P < 0.01, resp.). Multivariate regression revealed that TFPI-1 acted as a predictor for DVT or tumor metastasis in NSCLC patients [OR: 4.15 or 3.28, P < 0.05, resp.]. The area under ROC curve of TFPI-1 was 0.905 (95% CI, 0.842~0.967) or 0.828 (95% CI, 0.742~0.915) for predicting DVT or metastasis (P < 0.001, resp.). The optimal point of TFPI-1 was 57.7 or 54.3 ng/mL for predicting DVT or metastasis, respectively. Combination of TFPI-1 and D-D measurements can improve the predicting power for DVT or metastasis in NSCLC patients. Our findings suggested that TFPI-1 was a valuable predictor of DVT and tumor metastasis in NSCLC patients. PMID:28246607

  10. Rivaroxaban: a review of its use in the treatment of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism and the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Burness, Celeste B; Perry, Caroline M

    2014-02-01

    Rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)), an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, is approved for the initial treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), as well as the prevention of recurrent DVT and PE. It is administered at a fixed oral dose and does not require routine coagulation monitoring. In the EINSTEIN-DVT and EINSTEIN-PE trials, in over 8,000 patients with DVT and/or PE, a single-drug approach with rivaroxaban was shown to be noninferior to standard therapy consisting of subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium overlapping with and followed by an oral dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonist (enoxaparin-VKA) with regard to the incidence of symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) after 3, 6 or 12 months of treatment. Rivaroxaban was generally well tolerated in patients with DVT or PE, with no significant between-group differences in clinically relevant bleeding between the rivaroxaban and enoxaparin-VKA groups. Notably, rivaroxaban was associated with a significantly lower rate of major bleeding compared with enoxaparin-VKA when EINSTEIN-DVT and EINSTEIN-PE data were pooled. Pharmacoeconomic analyses indicated that rivaroxaban may be a cost-effective alternative to enoxaparin-VKA for the treatment of DVT or PE and prevention of recurrent VTE. Extended prophylaxis with rivaroxaban reduced the incidence of symptomatic recurrent VTE to a greater extent than placebo in the EINSTEIN-Extension trial, but was associated with a non-significant increase in the risk of clinically relevant bleeding compared with placebo. In conclusion, rivaroxaban is a reasonable alternative to standard therapy for the treatment of DVT and PE, and as extended thromboprophylaxis.

  11. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  12. Risk factors and presentation of deep venous thrombosis among Asian patients: a hospital-based case-control study in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ker-Kan; Koh, Woon-Puay; Chao, Alexandre K H

    2007-07-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is perceived to occur less frequently among Asians than Caucasians, although the reason for this has not been fully understood. Hence, there may be differences in risk factors and presentations among Asian patients compared to their Caucasian counterparts. This study examined the association of classical risk factors and presentations among Asian patients with DVT. We retrospectively reviewed 862 symptomatic patients referred to the vascular diagnostic laboratory in a hospital for suspected DVT over a 30-month period. Two hundred and seventy-seven patients (32.1%) tested positive for DVT on duplex ultrasound. After adjusting for age and gender, ethnicity was not a statistically significant demographic factor associated with DVT. Two hundred and seventy-one patients diagnosed as having DVT on ultrasound were matched for age, gender, and ethnicity to negative controls to study the significance of risk factors and presenting symptoms or signs. In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for DVT included immobility (odds ratio [OR] = 2.61, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.63-4.15], malignancy (OR = 1.77, 95% CI 1.01-3.10), and a history of thrombophilia (OR = 9.95, 95% CI 1.26-78.87). The significant forms of DVT presentation were limb swelling (OR = 2.53, 95% CI 1.41-4.54) and pulmonary embolism (OR = 11.45, 95% CI 3.23-40.59). Fever of more than 37.5 degrees C was a negative predictive factor (OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.23-0.76). This study shows that the common risk factors of DVT such as surgery and fractures do not affect Asians as much as Caucasians. Instead, thrombophilia and underlying malignancy are prominent risk factors among Asians. Diagnosis of DVT in Asians based on clinical grounds can also be problematic as few presentations are specific.

  13. Blood Samples of Peripheral Venous Catheter or The Usual Way: Do Infusion Fluid Alters the Biochemical Test Results?

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeganzadeh, Mahboobeh; Yazdankhahfard, Mohammadreza; Farzaneh, Mohammadreza; Mirzaei, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most blood tests require venous blood samples. Puncturing the vein also causes pain, infection, or damage to the blood, and lymph flow, or long-term healing. This study aimed to determine and compare the biochemical laboratory value of the blood samples that were provided through: peripheral vein infusion (PVI) receiving continuous intravenous fluid; and the usual method of blood sampling. Methods: This is an interventional, quasi-experimental, and controlled study. The selected study sample included 60 patients, who were hospitalized during 2014, in the Internal Medicine, part of Martyrs of Persian Gulf, teaching hospital at Bushehr. Three blood samples were taken from each patient that were provided through PVI line (5 ml blood collected at beginning of IVC and then another 5 cc), and another case was prepared by common blood sampling (control). All the samples were analyzed in terms of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine using SPSS Ver.19 software, by paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the amount of sodium and potassium in the first blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. However, no significant differences were found among the biochemical amount in the second blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. Conclusions: We can use blood samples taken from peripheral intravenous infusion lines after 5cc discarding from the first part of the sample for measuring the value of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine. PMID:26925892

  14. Feasibility of continuous, catheter-directed thrombolysis using low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular-weight heparin for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients at risk of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoping; Shi, Wangyin; He, Xu; Lou, Wensheng; Chen, Liang; Gu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the feasibility of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. This retrospective analysis included patients with symptomatic acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis who received CDT using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with LMWH within the past four years. Urokinase was administered at 1×104 U/h and 2×104 U/h in patients at high-risk and low-risk of bleeding, respectively. Measurements included urokinase dosage, duration, clinical outcomes and CDT-related complications. A total of 46 patients were included (high-risk, n=17; low-risk, n=29). In the high-risk patients, 64.7% experienced dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 8 days (range, 6–10 days) and median total urokinase dose of 1.92×106 units (range, 1.44–2.4×106 units). In the low-risk patients, 82.8% achieved dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 7 days (range, 4–10 days) and a median total urokinase dose of 3.36×106 units (range, 1.92–4.80×106 units). Remission of clinical symptoms after CDT was achieved in 15 (88.2%) and 28 (96.6%) cases in high-risk and low-risk patients, respectively. No treatment-associated pulmonary embolism or major bleeding was observed. Three (6.5%) subjects (high-risk, n=1; low-risk, n=2) experienced minor bleeding. In conclusion, continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase via CDT in combination with LMWH is effective and safe for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients with one or more risk factor for bleeding. PMID:28352362

  15. CORRIGENDUM to Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Owing to errors made by the authors, Charles J. Glueck, Kevin Lee, Marloe Prince, Vybhav Jetty, Parth Shah, and Ping Wang, the following article contains errors. Glueck CJ, Lee K, Prince M, et al. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant. J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep. 2016;4(3):1-6. doi: 10.1177/2324709616661833 PMID:28321420

  16. The power peripherally inserted central catheter is superior to a central venous catheter in management of patients with esophageal variceal bleeding undergoing devascularization.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wen; Rong, He; Li, Jiang; Xia, Zhang Hai; Yu, Zhang Hong; Ke, Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Peripherally-inserted central catheters (PICC) have a greater retention time and less complications compared to central venous catheters (CVC). The study was conducted from From January of 2014 to December 2015 at Beijing DiTan Hospital, Beijing, China, and comprised 70 patients undergoing devascularisation. Of the total, 36(51.4%) patients underwent placement of PICC (Group A), while 34(48.6%) underwent had CVC (Group B). Venous catheterisation was successful in all patients. The median duration of venous catheterization in Group A was greater than that in Group B (p=0.002). Catheter-associated complications did not differ between the groups (p=0.46). The level of blood platelet (PLT) count, Prothrombin activity (PTA) and white blood cell (WBC) count before venous catheterisation were independent risk factors for bleeding at the puncture site and catheter-related infections. A Power PICC may be a better choice than a CVC in patients undergoing devascularisation requiring catheterisation. For patients with a lower PLT count, a decreased PTA, or a decreased WBC, venous catheterisation should be performed with caution.

  17. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Glueck, Charles J.; Lee, Kevin; Prince, Marloe; Jetty, Vybhav; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: When exogenous testosterone or treatments to elevate testosterone (human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG] or Clomid) are prescribed for men who have antecedent thrombophilia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism often occur and may recur despite adequate anticoagulation if testosterone therapy is continued. Case Presentation: A 55-year-old white male was referred to us because of 4 thrombotic events, 3 despite adequate anticoagulation over a 5-year period. We assessed interactions between thrombophilia, exogenous testosterone therapy, and recurrent thrombosis. In 2009, despite low-normal serum testosterone 334 ng/dL (lower normal limit [LNL] 300 ng/dL), he was given testosterone (TT) cypionate (50 mg/week) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG; 500 units/week) for presumed hypogonadism. Ten months later, with supranormal serum T (1385 ng/dL, upper normal limit [UNL] 827 ng/dL) and estradiol (E2) 45 pg/mL (UNL 41 pg/mL), he had a pulmonary embolus (PE) and was then anticoagulated for 2 years (enoxaparin, then warfarin). Four years later, on TT-HCG, he had his first deep venous thrombosis (DVT). TT was stopped and HCG continued; he was anticoagulated (enoxaparin, then warfarin, then apixaban, then fondaparinux). One year after his first DVT, on HCG, still on fondaparinux, he had a second DVT (5/315), was anticoagulated (enoxaparin + warfarin), with a Greenfield filter placed, but 8 days later had a second PE. Thrombophilia testing revealed the lupus anticoagulant. After stopping HCG, and maintained on warfarin, he has been free of further DVT-PE for 9 months. Conclusion: When DVT-PE occur on TT or HCG, in the presence of thrombophilia, TT-HCG should be stopped, lest DVT-PE reoccur despite concurrent anticoagulation. PMID:27536705

  18. Heparin for clearance of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in newborns: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Balaminut, Talita; Venturini, Danielle; da Silva, Valéria Costa Evangelista; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini; Zani, Adriana Valongo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of two concentrations of heparin to clear the lumen of in vitro clotted neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Methods: This is an in vitro, experimental quantitative study of 76 neonatal 2.0-Fr PICCs coagulated in vitro. The catheters were divided into two groups of 38 PICCs each. In both groups an infusion of low molecular weight heparin was administered with a dose of 25IU/mL for Group 1 and 50IU/mL for Group 2. The negative pressure technique was applied to the catheters of both groups at 5, 15 and 30min and at 4h to test their permeability. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to verify the outcome of the groups according to time intervals. Results: The comparison between both groups in the first 5min showed that more catheters from Group 2 were cleared compared to Group 1 (57.9 vs. 21.1%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that less time was needed to clear catheters treated with 50IU/mL of heparin (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of low molecular weight heparin at a concentration of 50IU/mL was more effective in restoring the permeability of neonatal PICCs occluded in vitro by a clot, and the use of this concentration is within the safety margin indicated by scientific literature. PMID:26116325

  19. [Travel thrombosis, 2008].

    PubMed

    Sándor, Tamás

    2009-01-18

    In Hungary, the first studies on travel thrombosis were published at the beginning of the 2000s. In this paper recent investigational results of this special type of venous thrombosis have been reviewed. Travel thrombosis is a subgroup of sitting thromboses. It is a consequence of prolonged sitting which is common of ground transportation and air travel. More and more computer-linked sitting thromboses have been observed as well. Long-haul air travel related venous thrombosis is a multifactorial disease. Possible contributory risk factors are in connection with the milieu of the cabin. Various investigations evaluated the effect of immobilization and hypobaric hypoxia on thrombin generation and fibrinolysis. The studies differed much in participants' characteristics, duration and type of exposure and statistical analysis, so the results are contradictory. Personal, traveller-related risk factors may be regarded as triggers. The presently available evidences do not permit to assess the exact actual risk. For healthy young passengers there seem to be low risk. However, passengers suffering from predisposing factors for venous thromboembolism can be exposed to serious hazards, if they fly more than 5000 km or travel more than 8 hours. Proper safety measures are summarized on the basis of recent international recommendations.

  20. Peripheral Venous Catheter-Related Adverse Events: Evaluation from a Multicentre Epidemiological Study in France (the CATHEVAL Project)

    PubMed Central

    Miliani, Katiuska; Taravella, Raphaël; Thillard, Denis; Chauvin, Valérie; Martin, Emmanuelle; Edouard, Stéphanie; Astagneau, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral venous catheters (PVC) are medical devices most frequently used during hospital care. Although the frequency of specific PVC-related adverse events (PVCAEs) has been reported, the global risk related to the insertion of this device is poorly estimated. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of PVCAEs during the indwell time, after catheter removal, and to identify practice-mirroring risk factors. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted as a part of a research project, called CATHEVAL, in one surgery ward and four medicine wards from three public general tertiary care hospitals in Northern France that were invited to participate between June-2013 and June-2014. Each participating ward included during a two-month study period all patients older than 15 years carrying a PVC. All inserted PVCs were monitored from insertion of PVC to up to 48 hours after removal. Monitored data included several practice-mirroring items, as well as the occurrence of at least one PVCAE. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, based on a marginal risk approach, was used to identify factors associated with the occurrence of at least one PVCAE. Results Data were analysed for 815 PVCs (1964 PVC-days) in 573 patients. The incidence of PVCAE was 52.3/100 PVCs (21.9/100 PVC-days). PVCAEs were mainly clinical: phlebitis (20.1/100 PVCs), haematoma (17.7/100 PVCs) and liquid/blood escape (13.1/100 PVCs). Infections accounted for only 0.4/100 PVCs. The most frequent mechanical PVCAEs, was obstruction/occlusion of PVC (12.4/100 PVCs). The incidence of post-removal PVCAEs was 21.7/100 PVCs. Unstable PVC and unclean dressing were the two main risk factors. Conclusion Limitation of breaches in healthcare quality including post-removal monitoring should be reinforced to prevent PVC-related adverse events in hospital settings. PMID:28045921

  1. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and—in women—pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing. PMID:26076949

  2. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  3. Venous complications of pancreatitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Yashant; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-31

    Pancreatitis is notorious to cause vascular complications. While arterial complications include pseudoaneurysm formation with a propensity to bleed, venous complications can be quite myriad. Venous involvement in pancreatitis often presents with thrombosis. From time to time case reports and series of unusual venous complications associated with pancreatitis have, however, been described. In this article, we review multitudinous venous complications in the setting of pancreatitis and propose a system to classify pancreatitis associated venous complications.

  4. The impact of high-frequency magnetic stimulation of peripheral nerves: muscle hardness, venous blood flow, and motor function of upper extremity in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Okudera, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Sato, Mineyoshi; Chida, Satoaki; Hatakeyama, Kazutoshi; Watanabe, Motoyuki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of high-frequency peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation on the upper limb function. Twenty-five healthy adults (16 men and 9 women) participated in this study. The radial nerve of the non-dominant hand was stimulated by high-frequency magnetic stimulation device. A total of 600 impulses were applied at a frequency of 20 Hz and intensity of 1.2 resting motor threshold (rMT). At three time points (before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation), muscle hardness of the extensor digitorum muscle on the stimulated side was measured using a mechanical tissue hardness meter and a shear wave imaging device, cephalic venous blood flow on the stimulated side was measured using an ultrasound system, and the Box and Block test (BBT) was performed. Mechanical tissue hardness results did not show any significant differences between before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation. Measurements via shear wave imaging showed that muscle hardness significantly decreased both immediately and 15 min after stimulation compared to before stimulation (P < 0.05). Peripheral venous blood flow and BBT score significantly increased both immediately and 15 min after stimulation compared to before stimulation (P < 0.01). High-frequency peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation can achieve effects similar to electrical stimulation in a less invasive manner, and may therefore become an important element in next-generation rehabilitation.

  5. Heparin Saline Versus Normal Saline for Flushing and Locking Peripheral Venous Catheters in Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Ming-Guang; Luo, Ou; He, Liu; Li, Jia-Xin; Tang, Yun-Jing; Luo, Yan-Li; Zhou, Min; Tang, Li; Zhang, Zong-Xia; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A prospective randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of heparin saline (HS) to those of normal saline (NS) as flushing and locking solutions for peripheral venous catheter (PVC) in decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC) patients. Patients with DLC at our institution between April 2012 and March 2013 were enrolled after obtaining informed consent. The patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups: the NS group received preservative-free 0.9% sodium chloride as the flushing and locking solution, while the HS group received HS (50 U/mL). PVC-related events and the duration of PVC maintenance were compared between the 2 groups. Moreover, the preinfusion and postinfusion levels of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and platelet (PLT) were also compared. A total of 32 and 36 DLC patients in the NS (125 PVCs) and HS (65 PVCs) groups, respectively, were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, including gender, age, Child–Pugh grade, PVC type and administration of anticoagulant, and irritant agents, were comparable between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). The maintenance times of the HS and NS groups were 80.27 ± 26.47 and 84.19 ± 29.32 hours, respectively (P = 0.397). Removal of PVC for abnormal reasons occurred in 30.7% and 22.4% of patients in the HS and NS groups (P = 0.208). The PVC occlusion rates were 6.2% and 5.6% in the HS and NS groups, respectively (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.31–3.92). The PT, APTT, and PLT levels were comparable between the 2 groups both before and after infusion (P > 0.05). Incremental analyses showed that Child–Pugh grade C might be a risk factor for the suppression of PLT in the HS group. We consider NS to be as effective as and safer than conventional HS for flushing and locking PVC in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients. PMID:26252305

  6. Travel-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2012-09-01

    Travel-related thrombosis is a serious public health concern considering the large and increasing number of travellers. Due to a lack of evidence, counselling air travellers on their venous thrombosis risk is not immediately straightforward, and advice will have to be based mostly on theoretical grounds. In this review a basis for these considerations is given. First of all it needs to be recognized that venous thrombosis is a multicausal disease, i.e. several risk factors have to be present before an event occurs. This is reflected in the literature where clearly increased risks have been described for certain groups, such as subjects with factor V Leiden, those who use oral contraceptives or are obese. Also, an increased risk for tall and short people has been reported. So, for subjects with a known risk factor who plan to travel, benefits and risks of thrombosis prophylaxis, (pharmacological or other), need to be weighed. This review provides some theoretical examples. For all other travellers, the advice to move and exercise as much as possible is likely to be sufficient.

  7. Effect of Ultrasound-Guided Placement of Difficult-to-Place Peripheral Venous Catheters: A Prospective Study of a Training Program for Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Partovi-Deilami, Kohyar; Nielsen, Jesper K; Moller, Ann M; Nesheim, Sara-Sophie S; Jorgensen, Vibeke L

    2016-04-01

    Patients with difficult intravenous access (DIVA) often experience discomfort because of failed attempts to place peripheral venous catheters (PVCs); however, ultrasound guidance may improve this problem with catheter placement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of ultrasound when operated by nurse anesthetists for these patients. This prospective observational study with a pre/post design focused on inpatients with DIVA referred for PVC placement, a service provided by nurse anesthetists in most Scandinavian hospitals. The rate of success, procedure time, number of skin punctures, discomfort, catheter size, location, and incidence of central venous catheter placement are reported before and after implementation of a training program and a mobile service using ultrasound to place difficult-to-place PVCs. The success rate increased from 0% (0 of 33 patients) to 83% (58 of 70 patients) with ultrasound. Procedure time was reduced from 20 to 10 minutes, discomfort was unchanged, and the median number of skin punctures decreased from 3 to 2. The incidence of central venous catheter placement dropped from 34% to 7%. Implementation of a training program and a mobile service in which nurse anesthetists performed ultrasound-guided PVC placement improved the success rate and quality of care in patients with DIVA.

  8. Impact of Indoxyl Sulfate on Progenitor Cell-Related Neovascularization of Peripheral Arterial Disease and Post-Angioplasty Thrombosis of Dialysis Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hung, Szu-Chun; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of vascular disease, which is associated with considerable health care costs. Vascular disease in CKD differs clinically and pathobiologically from that in patients with normal renal function. Besides the traditional risk factors, retention of uremic toxins contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in patients with CKD. Indoxyl sulfate is a protein-bound uremic toxin and is inefficiently removed by conventional dialysis. Accumulating evidence suggests that indoxyl sulfate is a vascular toxin involved in atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, vascular calcification and vascular repair. Clinically, indoxyl sulfate is associated with total and cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. Recent studies have indicated that in addition to coronary and cerebral arteries, indoxyl sulfate plays a role in peripheral artery disease (PAD) and dialysis graft thrombosis. Emerging evidence suggests that indoxyl sulfate is implicated via novel mechanisms, including progenitor cell-related neovascularization and tissue factor-related hypercoagulability. These findings raise the possibility that strategies targeting serum indoxyl sulfate may have the potential to improve the outcomes of PAD and dialysis vascular access in patients with CKD. PMID:28067862

  9. Management of superficial vein thrombosis and thrombophlebitis: status and expert opinion document.

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Belcaro, G; Agus, G; Georgiev, M; Errichi, B M; Marinucci, R; Errichi, S; Filippini, A; Pellegrini, L; Ledda, A; Vinciguerra, G; Ricci, A; Cipollone, G; Lania, M; Gizzi, G; Ippolito, E; Bavera, P; Fano, F; Dugall, M; Adovasio, R; Gallione, L; Del Boccio, G; Cornelli, U; Steigerwalt, R; Acerbi, G; Cacchio, M; Di Renzo, A; Hosoi, M; Stuard, S; Corsi, M; Di Ciano, L; Simeone, E; Collevecchio, G; Grossi, M G; Di Giambattista, F; Carestia, F; Zukowski, A

    2007-01-01

    Superficial vein thrombosis is characterized by clotting of superficial veins (ie, following direct trauma) with minimal inflammatory components. Superficial thrombophlebitis is a minimally thrombotic process of superficial veins associated with inflammatory changes and/or infection. Treatments generally include analgesics, elastic compression, anti-inflammatory agents, exercise and ambulation, and, in some cases, local or systemic anticoagulants. It is better to avoid bed rest and reduced mobility. Topical analgesia with nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory creams applied locally to the superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis area controls symptoms. Hirudoid cream (heparinoid) shortens the duration of signs/symptoms. Locally acting anticoagulants/antithrombotics (Viatromb, Lipohep, spray Na-heparin) have positive effects on pain and on the reduction in thrombus size. Intravenous catheters should be changed every 24 to 48 hours (depending on venous flow and clinical parameters) to prevent superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis and removed in case of events. Low molecular weight heparin prophylaxis and nitroglycerin patches distal to peripheral lines may reduce the incidence of superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis in patients with vein catheters. In case of superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis, vein lines should be removed. In neoplastic diseases and hematological disorders, anticoagulants may be necessary. Exercise reduces pain and the possibility of deep vein thrombosis. Only in cases in which pain is very severe is bed rest necessary. Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis should be established in patients with reduced mobility. Antibiotics usually do not have a place in superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis unless there are documented infections. Prevention of superficial vein thrombosis should be considered on the basis of patient's history and clinical evaluation.

  10. Behçet's Disease Complicated with Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiuhua; Li, Guohua; Huang, Xinxiang; Wang, Li; Liu, Wanli; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the clinical features of Behçet's disease (BD) complicated with thrombosis. Medical records of patients with BD at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from 1993 to 2013 were reviewed to identify thrombosis. Of the 766 patients with BD, 93 patients (16 female and 77 male) developed thrombosis. The most common thrombosis was extremity vein thrombosis (86.0%), including deep vein thrombosis (n = 78) and superficial thrombophlebitis (n = 4). The other thrombosis types associated with BD in descending frequency of order were: vena cava thrombosis (30.1%), pulmonary thromboembolism (15.1%), cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) (12.9%), intracardiac thrombosis (8.6%), Budd–Chiari syndrome (7.5%), and renal vein thrombosis (4.3%), etc. Venous thrombosis is more frequent than arterial thrombosis, and most of patients (94.6%) experienced multiple thrombosis. A male predominance of extremity vein thrombosis and positive pathergy test, and a female predominance of CVT and genital ulcers were noted. All of these patients exhibited active disease during the emergence of thrombotic events. After treating with glucocorticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and/or anticoagulants, the thrombosis resolved in 89 patients. Three patients died from aneurysm rupture, myocardial infarction and Budd–Chiari syndrome, respectively. One patient with septic shock discontinued therapy during follow-up. Thrombosis in BD patients is male predominance, mainly multiple and venous thrombosis is more common. Active disease patients are prone to thrombosis, which suggest the key role of immunosuppressive therapy for the complication. PMID:25526452

  11. Simultaneous acute deep vein thrombosis and acute brucellosis. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Andaç, Şeyda; Kalender, Mehmet; Yıldırım, Onur; İmre, Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease common in developing countries. Vascular complications, including arterial and venous, associated with Brucella infection have rarely been reported. A case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) developing after a diagnosis of acute brucellosis in a young milkman is presented. A 26-year-old man presented with pain in the right leg. The patient's medical history included a diagnosis of brucellosis in our hospital where he had presented with complaints of weakness and fever. Peripheral venous Doppler ultrasound showed DVT, and the patient was treated with anticoagulants. The patient was discharged with warfarin therapy and anti-brucellosis treatment. Although rare, some infectious agents may cause vascular pathologies. Patients presenting with symptoms of DVT or similar vascular pathologies should be assessed for infectious agents, particularly in those coming from Brucella-endemic areas. PMID:27516795

  12. Dual thrombosis of the pulmonary arterial and venous anastomotic sites after single lung transplantation: role of transesophageal echocardiography in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Bahaa M; Abdulbaki, Khaled; Nambiar, Vijayaraghavan; Al Amri, Mohammad; Shahid, Maie; Khouqeer, Farid; Canver, Charles

    2007-04-01

    We present the case of a patient who developed severe respiratory and hemodynamic compromise shortly after single right lung transplantation. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a large intraluminal thrombus at the right pulmonary artery anastomosis resulting in severe obstruction to flow together with thrombosis of the right pulmonary veins extending into the left atrium. After thrombectomy and surgical revision of the vascular anastomoses, the patient made an uneventful recovery. This case illustrates the usefulness of transesophageal echocardiography in the diagnosis and treatment of patients who are hemodynamically unstable after lung transplantation.

  13. Travel, venous thromboembolism, and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Alexander S

    2005-02-01

    Current evidence indicates that prolonged air travel predisposes to venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. An effect is seen once travel duration exceeds 6 to 9 hours and becomes obvious in long-haul passengers traveling for 12 or more hours. A recent records linkage study found that increase in thrombosis rate among arriving passengers peaked during the first week and was no longer apparent after 2 weeks. Medium- to long-distance travelers have a 2- to 4-fold increase in relative thrombosis risk compared with nontravelers, but the averaged absolute risk is small (approximately one symptomatic event per 2 million arrivals, with a case-fatality rate of approximately 2%) and there is no evidence that thrombosis is more likely in economy class than in business- or first-class passengers. It remains uncertain whether and to what extent thrombosis risk is increased by short-distance air travel or prolonged travel by motorcar, train, or other means. Most travelers who develop venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism also have one or more other predisposing risk factors that may include older age, obesity, recent injury or surgery, previous thrombosis, venous insufficiency, malignancy, hormonal therapies, or pregnancy. Limited (though theoretically plausible) evidence suggests that factor V Leiden and the prothrombin gene mutation predispose to thrombosis in otherwise healthy travelers. Given that very many passengers with such predispositions do not develop thrombosis, and a lack of prospective studies to link predisposition with disease, it is not now possible to allocate absolute thrombosis risk among intending passengers or to estimate benefit-to-risk ratios or benefit-to-cost ratios for prophylaxis. Randomized comparisons using ultrasound imaging indicate a measurable incidence of subclinical leg vein thrombosis after prolonged air travel, which appears to increase with travel duration and is reduced by graded pressure elastic support stockings. Whether this

  14. Gene-expression patterns predict phenotypes of immune-mediated thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Potti, Anil; Bild, Andrea; Dressman, Holly K.; Lewis, Deborah A.; Nevins, Joseph R.; Ortel, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a complex autoimmune thrombotic disorder with defined clinical phenotypes. Although not all patients with elevated antiphospholipid antibody (aPLA) levels develop complications, the severity of these potential events mandates aggressive and extended lifelong anti-thrombotic therapy. One hundred twenty-nine patients (57 patients with APS and venous thromboembolism [VTE], 32 patients with VTE without aPLA, 32 patients with aPLA only, and 8 healthy patients) were enrolled. RNA from peripheral-blood collection was used for DNA microarray analysis. Patterns of gene expression that characterize APS as well as thrombosis in the presence of aPLA were identified by hierarchical clustering and binary regression methods. Gene-expression profiles identify and predict individuals with APS from patients with VTE without aPLA. Importantly, similar methods identified expression profiles that accurately predicted those patients with aPLA at high risk for thrombotic events. All profiles were validated in independent cohorts of patients. The ability to predict APS, but more importantly, those patients at risk for venous thrombosis, represents a paradigm for a genomic approach that can be applied to other populations of patients with venous thrombosis, providing for more effective clinical management of disease, while also reflecting the possible underlying biologic processes. PMID:16263789

  15. C4BPB/C4BPA is a new susceptibility locus for venous thrombosis with unknown protein S–independent mechanism: results from genome-wide association and gene expression analyses followed by case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Buil, Alfonso; Souto, Juan Carlos; Saut, Noémie; Germain, Marine; Rotival, Maxime; Tiret, Laurence; Cambien, Françcois; Lathrop, Mark; Zeller, Tanja; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Münzel, Thomas; Wild, Philipp; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Gagnon, France; Emmerich, Joseph; Almasy, Laura; Blankenberg, Stefan; Soria, José-Manuel; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Through its binding with protein S (PS), a key element of the coagulation/fibrinolysis cascade, the C4b-binding protein (C4BP) has been hypothesized to be involved in the susceptibility to venous thrombosis (VT). To identify genetic factors that may influence the plasma levels of the 3 C4BP existing isoforms, α7β1, α6β1, and α7β0, we conducted a genome-wide association study by analyzing 283 437 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia (GAIT) study composed of 352 persons. Three SNPs at the C4BPB/C4BPA locus were found genome-wide significantly associated with α7β0 levels. One of these SNPs was further found to explain approximately 11% of the variability of mRNA C4BPA expression in the Gutenberg Heart Study composed of 1490 persons, with no effect on C4BPB mRNA expression. The allele associated with increased α7β0 plasma levels and increased C4BPA expression was further found associated with increased risk of VT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.24 [1.03-1.53]) in 2 independent case-control studies (MARseille THrombosis Association study [MARTHA] and FActeurs de RIsque et de récidives de la maladie thromboembolique VEineuse [FARIVE]) gathering 1706 cases and 1379 controls. This SNP was not associated with free PS or total PS. In conclusion, we observed strong evidence that the C4BPB/C4BPA locus is a new susceptibility locus for VT through a PS-independent mechanism that remains to be elucidated. PMID:20212171

  16. Renal Vein and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis: A Rare Extrasplanchnic Complication of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Dhaval; Chaubal, Alisha; Pipaliya, Nirav; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder often associated with various complications. Approximately one fourth of patients with acute pancreatitis develop vascular complications, of which venous thrombosis forms a major group. Extrasplanchnic venous thrombosis is less common, and simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis is reported only twice. We report a case of alcohol-related acute pancreatitis complicated by simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis. PMID:28008405

  17. Testosterone, thrombophilia, thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Friedman, Joel; Hafeez, Ahsan; Hassan, Atif; Wang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    We assessed previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis in 11 testosterone (T)-taking men, five of whom developed deep venous thrombosis (DVT), four pulmonary embolism, one spinal cord infarction, and one osteonecrosis 3.5 months (median) after starting T gel (50-160 mg/day) or T intramuscular (50-250 mg/week). In the order of referral because of thrombosis after starting T, thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis was studied in 11 men, and, separately, in two control groups without thrombosis - 44 healthy normal male controls and 39 healthy men taking T. Nine men had DVT or DVT-pulmonary embolism after 3.5 months (median) on T, one spinal cord infarction after 5 days on T, and one had osteonecrosis (knee and then hip osteonecrosis after 6 and 18 months on T). Four of the 11 men (36%) had high factor VIII (≥150%) vs. one of 42 (2%) controls (P = 0.005), and vs. one of 25 (4%) T-controls, (P = 0.023). Of the 11 men, two (18%) had factor V Leiden heterozygosity vs. none of 44 controls, (P = 0.04) and vs. none of 39 T-controls(P = 0.045). Of the 11 men, three had 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 homozygosity, one prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity, one low protein S, and one high factor XI. When T was continued, second DVT-pulmonary embolism recurred in three of 11 men despite adequate anticoagulation. T interacts with thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis leading to thrombosis. Men sustaining DVT-pulmonary embolism-osteonecrosis on T should be studied for thrombophilia. Continuation of T in thrombophilic men appears to be contraindicated because of recurrent thrombosis despite adequate anticoagulation. Before starting T, to prevent T-associated thrombosis, we recommend measures of factor V Leiden, factor VIII, and the prothrombin gene.

  18. Markers of endothelial and haemostatic function in the treatment of relapsed myeloma with the immunomodulatory agent Actimid (CC-4047) and their relationship with venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Streetly, Matthew; Hunt, Beverley J; Parmar, Kiran; Jones, Richard; Zeldis, Jerome; Schey, Steve

    2005-04-01

    We evaluated the serum/plasma levels of cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta2] and markers of coagulation, fibrinolysis, endothelial and platelet activation during the first 4 wk of treatment with the thalidomide analogue Actimid (CC-4047) in 15 patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. There was evidence of activation of endothelium (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule, sVCAM), coagulation (prothrombin fragment 1 + 2, PF1 + 2) and fibrinolysis (D-dimers) but no evidence of platelet activation or endothelial cell damage in myeloma patients. These parameters were not affected by the use of CC-4047. Three of four patients with baseline D-dimers levels >500 microg/L subsequently developed deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The hypothesis that D-dimer level >500 microg/L may predict for those patients most at risk of thromboembolism with multiple myeloma undergoing treatment is worthy of further study.

  19. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Is a Safe and Alternative Therapeutic Approach in the Management of Postpartum Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Nagesh, C M; Reddy, Babu; Manjunath, C N

    2015-12-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major health problem in pregnancy and postpartum period. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is safe and effective in management of symptomatic DVT. Value of CDT in postpartum DVT is not fully evaluated. We describe five patients presenting with acute iliofemoral DVT in their early postpartum period who were treated with mechanical thromboaspiration and CDT. The CDT was done using streptokinase infusion and unfractionated heparin. Percutaneous angioplasty was done in patients with symptomatic residual lesion following thrombolysis. Patients were discharged with oral anticoagulant and compression stockings. This approach was successful in all four cases. Percutaneous endovascular therapy using CDT, mechanical thromboaspiration, and balloon angioplasty is safe and effective in iliofemoral DVT in postpartum period.

  20. The diagnostic dilemma: dual presentations of clinical mucosal bleeding and venous thrombosis associated with the presence of thrombophilia markers and mild reduction in von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Bonar, Roslyn; Survela, Lesley; McDonald, David; Koutts, Jerry; Sioufi, John; Marsden, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    A prothrombotic and hemorrhagic state can separately manifest in one patient and can potentially cause several diagnostic problems. We report an intriguing case as an example of a potential hemostasis-based diagnostic dilemma. A 29-year-old female patient presented with a personal history of menorrhagia and other mucosal bleeding and renal ovarian thrombosis. Previous investigations had uncovered several diagnostic anomalies, including von Willebrand disease (VWD), factor V Leiden (FVL), antiphospholipid syndrome, and thrombocytopaenia. Previous therapy in this patient included heparin and warfarin for the thrombosis and desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) and antifibrinolytic therapy for surgical management. Subsequent laboratory testing with fresh samples consistently confirmed an equivocal (borderline normal/abnormal) level of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and FVL with activated protein C resistance (APCR). A patient sample, differentially labeled according to the tests being performed, was later distributed for blind testing to participants within several modules of the RCPA Quality Assurance Program (QAP). Most participants reported a low level of VWF consistent with possible mild Type 1 VWD, and most (but not all) reported a positive finding for APCR. All participants correctly reported the sample as heterozygous for the FVL mutation, negative for the Prothrombin gene mutation G20210A, and heterozygous for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation C677T. Interestingly, a significant number of laboratories performing Protein S testing using clot-based procedures also identified a false Protein S deficiency. In conclusion, this exercise showed how, either depending on the clinical review and specific laboratory investigation and tests performed, a pro-bleeding diagnosis (of either VWD or thrombocytopenia) or pro-thrombophilia risk (Antiphospholipid Syndrome or FVL/APCR or false Protein S deficiency) could potentially and differentially arise in the one

  1. Testosterone, thrombophilia, and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Richardson-Royer, Caitlin; Schultz, Reiker; Burger, Tim; Labitue, Fanta; Riaz, Muhammad K; Padda, Jagjit; Bowe, Dedrick; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    We describe thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis (DVT) pulmonary embolism (PE; n = 9) and hip-knee osteonecrosis (n = 5) that developed after testosterone therapy (median 11 months) in 14 previously healthy patients (13 men and 1 woman; 13 Caucasian and 1 African American), with no antecedent thrombosis and previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Of the 14 patients, 3 were found to be factor V Leiden heterozygotes, 3 had high factor VIII, 3 had plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 4G4G homozygosity, 2 had high factor XI, 2 had high homocysteine, 1 had low antithrombin III, 1 had the lupus anticoagulant, 1 had high anticardiolipin antibody Immunoglobulin G, and 1 had no clotting abnormalities. In 4 men with thrombophilia, DVT-PE recurred when testosterone was continued despite therapeutic international normalized ratio on warfarin. In 60 men on testosterone, 20 (33%) had high estradiol (E2 >42.6 pg/mL). When exogenous testosterone is aromatized to E2, and E2-induced thrombophilia is superimposed on thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis, thrombosis occurs. The DVT-PE and osteonecrosis after starting testosterone are associated with previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Thrombophilia should be ruled out before administration of exogenous testosterone.

  2. Multi-Parametric Assessment of Vascular Function in Peripheral Artery Disease: Dynamic Measurement of Skeletal Muscle Perfusion, BOLD Signal, and Venous Oxygen Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Erin K.; Langham, Michael C.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Fanning, Molly; Wehrli, Felix W.; Mohler, Emile R.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction present in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) may be better understood by measuring the temporal dynamics of blood flow and oxygen saturation during reactive hyperemia than by conventional static measurements. Methods and Results Perfusion, Intravascular Venous Oxygen saturation, and T2* (PIVOT), a recently developed MRI technique, was used to measure the response to an ischemia-reperfusion paradigm in ninety-six patients with PAD of varying severity, and ten healthy controls. Perfusion, venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), and T2* were each quantified in the calf at two second temporal resolution, yielding a dynamic time course for each variable. Compared to healthy controls, patients had a blunted and delayed hyperemic response. Moreover, patients with lower ankle-brachial index had: 1) a more delayed reactive hyperemia response time, manifesting as an increase in time to peak perfusion in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and peroneus muscles, and in the anterior compartment; 2) an increase in the time to peak T2* measured in the soleus muscle; and 3) a prolongation of the posterior tibial vein SvO2 washout time. Intra- and inter-session repeatability was also assessed. Results indicated that time to peak perfusion and time to peak T2* were the most reliable extracted time course metrics. Conclusions Perfusion, dynamic SvO2, and T2* response times following induced ischemia are highly correlated with PAD disease severity. Combined imaging of peripheral microvascular blood flow and dynamics of oxygen saturation with PIVOT may be a useful tool to investigate the pathophysiology of PAD. PMID:25873722

  3. Venous ulcer: epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbade, Luciana P Fernandes; Lastória, Sidnei

    2005-06-01

    This review discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and current therapeutic options for venous ulcer. Venous ulcer is a severe clinical manifestation of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). It is responsible for about 70% of chronic ulcers of the lower limbs. The high prevalence of venous ulcer has a significant socioeconomic impact in terms of medical care, days off work and reduced quality of life. Long-term therapeutics are needed to heal venous ulcers and recurrence is quite common, ranging from 54 to 78%. Thrombophlebitis and trauma with long-term immobilization predisposing to deep venous thrombosis are important risk factors for CVI and venous ulcer. The most recent theories about pathogenesis of venous ulcer have associated it with microcirculatory abnormalities and generation of an inflammatory response. Management of venous leg ulcers is based on understanding the pathogenesis. In recent years novel therapeutic approaches for venous ulcers have offered valuable tools for the management of patients with this disorder.

  4. Venous thromboembolic disease after hybrid hip arthroplasty with negative duplex screening.

    PubMed

    Beuhler, K O; D'Lima, D D; Colwell, C W; Otis, S M; Walker, R H

    1999-04-01

    Postoperative duplex ultrasonography screening after total hip arthroplasty has been shown to identify patients who may require treatment or additional monitoring for venous thromboembolic disease. The potential for manifestation of venous thromboembolic disease subsequent to screening remains a concern. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of symptomatic venous thromboembolic disease after total hip arthroplasty and after inhospital prophylaxis, inhospital screening with negative results for proximal deep venous thrombosis, and no posthospitalization venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis. One hundred fifty patients undergoing primary hybrid total hip arthroplasty and using pneumatic compression stockings and aspirin as prophylaxis against venous thromboembolic disease were screened for deep venous thrombosis with duplex ultrasonography on the fourth day after surgery. Duplex ultrasonography screening revealed 17 (11.3%) patients with asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis. In response to duplex ultrasonography screening, these patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis received therapeutic anticoagulation. Of 133 patients with a duplex screen with negative results for proximal deep venous thrombosis, 131 (98.5%) continued to have no symptoms of venous thromboembolic disease and two (1.5%) began to have symptoms for venous thromboembolic disease (one with proximal deep venous thrombosis, one with nonfatal pulmonary embolism) during 12 months of clinical followup after total hip arthroplasty. The overall prevalence of venous thromboembolic disease requiring anticoagulation was 19 of 150 (12.6%) patients. The remaining 131 (87.4%) were not exposed to the risks of postoperative anticoagulation and did not have subsequent symptomatic venous thromboembolic disease.

  5. [Homocysteine and venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Monnerat, C; Hayoz, D

    1997-09-06

    Congenital homocysteinuria is a rare inherited metabolic disorder with early onset atherosclerosis and arterial and venous trombosis. Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is more frequently encountered and is recognized as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Several case-control studies demonstrate an association between venous thromboembolism and moderate hyperhomocysteinemia. A patient with moderate hyperhomocysteinemia has a 2-3 relative risk of developing an episode of venous thromboembolism. The occurrence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia in heterozygotes for the mutation of Leiden factor V involves a 10-fold increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism. The biochemical mechanism by which homocysteine may promote thrombosis is not fully recognized. Homocysteine inhibits the expression of thrombomodulin, the thrombin cofactor responsible for protein C activation, and inhibits antithrombin-III binding. Treatment with folic acid reduces the plasma level of homocysteinemia, but no study has demonstrated its efficacy in reducing the incidence of venous thromboembolism or atherosclerosis. Hyperhomocysteinemia should be included in the screening of abnormalities of hemostasis and thrombosis in patients with idiopathic thromboembolism, and mild hyperhomocysteinemia may justify a trial of folic acid.

  6. A study on the safety, efficacy, and efficiency of sulodexide compared with acenocoumarol in secondary prophylaxis in patients with deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cirujeda, J Lasierra; Granado, P Coronel

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out to study the safety and efficacy of a fixed dosage of sulodexide compared to adjusted dosages (INR) of acenocoumarol as secondary prophylaxis in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in lower limbs. An economic evaluation based on the criteria of use in normal clinical practice was also performed. One hundred and fifty patients of both sexes were included, all over 18 years of age and diagnosed with proximal DVT of the lower limbs by color echo-Doppler, and with clinical evolution of less than 1 month. The patients were initially treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and urokinase in accordance with the established protocol. They were then randomized to continue treatment with acenocoumarol and INR adjustments every 30 days, or with sulodexide. Treatment was extended for 3 months with monthly follow-up visits and a final visit at 3 months posttreatment. No differences between the groups were detected concerning demographic or basal characteristics in clinical evolution or adverse reactions. In the group treated with sulodexide, no major/minor hemorrhagic complications were detected. On the other hand, in the acenocoumarol group, 1 major hemorrhage and 9 minor hemorrhages were produced (13.3%), reaching statistical difference in relation to the sulodexide group (p = 0.014; CI from 95% of 4.7% to 19.4%). Regarding the economic impact, treatment costs with sulodexide are much less than those with acenocoumarol, the data confirmed by the sensitivity analyses performed. The results prove the efficacy, safety, and efficiency of sulodexide as a secondary prophylaxis in thromboembolic disease, avoiding hemorrhagic risks and the monitoring of patients, and providing significant savings to the health system.

  7. Severe hyperhomocysteinemia due to cystathionine β-synthase deficiency, and Factor V Leiden mutation in a patient with recurrent venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Awan, Zuhier; Aljenedil, Sumayah; Rosenblatt, David S; Cusson, Jean; Gilfix, Brian M; Genest, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine is an amino acid that is toxic to vascular endothelial cells, and plasma elevations have been associated with venous thromboembolism. Severe hyperhomocysteinemia (>100 μmol/L) may result from mutations in the genes coding for enzymes in the trans-sulfuration or the folate/vitamin B12-dependent re-methylation pathways. Here, we report the case of a young woman with severe, recurrent thrombo-embolic events associated with severe hyperhomocysteinemia (111 μmol/L). We identified a homozygous mutation in the cystathionine β -synthase gene (p.I278T) and the presence of the Factor V Leiden mutation. Family study shows segregation of elevated homocysteine in heterozygous relatives for the mutation in the cystathionine β -synthase gene. Management consisted of anticoagulation with warfarin and supplementation with folate, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) and vitamin B12. After twelve years of follow-up, plasma homocysteine levels remain in the moderate range (~20 μmol/L, reference range 8-12 μmol/L) and no further thromboembolic events were identified.

  8. Use of Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition Solutions as a Risk Factor for Bacillus cereus Peripheral Venous Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infection at a Japanese Tertiary Care Hospital: a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Sakihama, Tomoko; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2016-11-22

    The risk factors are unclear for peripheral venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (PVCBSIs) caused by Bacillus cereus. We aimed to examine for these risk factors in patients with B. cereus PVCBSI by conducting a 2-year case-control study in a large teaching hospital. We analyzed all adult cases of B. cereus PVCBSI (37 patients) and 180 controls who were randomly selected from among patients who had a PVC in place for at least 2 days. Multivariate analysis using a conditional logistic regression model indicated that independent risk factors were use of a peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) solution with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 88.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.4-451.9), and steroid therapy (adjusted OR, 5.7 [95% CI, 1.3-24.4]). In conclusion, use of PPN solutions or steroids was an independent risk factor for B. cereus PVCBSI. Appropriate use of PPN solutions may help prevent B. cereus PVCBSI. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results.

  9. Thrombosis in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Bacciedoni, Viviana; Attie, Myriam; Donato, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of thrombosis is higher among newborn infants than in any other stage of pediatric development. This fact is the consequence of labile characteristics of the neonatal hemostatic system, in addition to exposure to multiple risk factors and the wide use of vascular catheters. Venous thromboses, which mainly affect the limbs, the right atrium and renal veins, are more frequently seen than arterial thromboses. A stroke may be caused by the occlusion of the arterial flow entering the brain or by occlusion of its venous drainage system. Purpura fulminans is a very severe condition that should be treated as a medical emergency, and is secondary to severe protein C deficiency or, less frequently, protein S or antithrombin deficiency. Most thrombotic events should be managed with antithrombotic therapy, which is done with unfractionated and/or low molecular weight heparins. Purpura fulminans requires protein C replacement and/or fresh frozen plasma infusion. Thrombolytic therapy is done using tissue plasminogen activator and should only be used for life-, or limb-, or organ-threatening thrombosis.

  10. Catheter directed interventions for inferior vena cava thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Warhit, Michael; Matsunaga, Felipe; Cynamon, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis, although similar in many aspects to deep venous thrombosis (DVT), has distinct clinical implications, treatments and roles for endovascular management. Etiologies of IVC thrombosis vary from congenital malformations of the IVC to acquired, where indwelling IVC filters have been implicated as a leading cause. With an increasing incidence of IVC thrombosis throughout the United States, clinicians need to be educated on the clinical signs and diagnostic tools available to aid in the diagnosis as well as available treatment options. Untreated IVC thrombus can result in serious morbidity and mortality, both in the acute phase with symptoms related to venous outflow occlusion and embolism, and in the long-term, sequelae of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) related to chronic venous occlusion. This manuscript will discuss the clinical presentation of IVC thrombosis, diagnostic and treatment options, as well as the role of endovascular management. PMID:28123981

  11. Prophylaxis and management of venous thromboembolism in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms: consensus statement of the Haemostasis Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO), the Austrian Society of Hematology and Oncology (ÖGHO) and Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research (GTH e.V.).

    PubMed

    Kreher, Stephan; Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Trappe, Ralf U; Pabinger, Ingrid; Bergmann, Frauke; Petrides, Petro E; Koschmieder, Steffen; Matzdorff, Axel; Tiede, Andreas; Griesshammer, Martin; Riess, Hanno

    2014-12-01

    Patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) like polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are at increased risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. Strategies of prevention may consist of platelet aggregation inhibitors and/or cytoreductive agents depending on the underlying disease and the individual risk. Clinical evidence for management of acute venous thromboembolic events in MPN patients is limited. Modality and duration of therapeutic anticoagulation after venous thrombosis has to be evaluated critically with special regard to the increased risk for spontaneous bleeding events associated with the underlying diseases. Both for therapy of the acute event and for secondary prophylaxis, low-molecular-weight heparins should preferentially be used. A prolongation of the therapeutic anticoagulation beyond the usual 3 to 6 months can only be recommended in high-risk settings and after careful evaluation of potential risks and benefits for the individual patient. New direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC) should not preferentially be used due to lack of clinical experience in patients with MPN and potential drug interactions (e.g. with JAK inhibitors). Consequent treatment of the underlying myeloproliferative disease and periodical evaluation of the response to therapy is crucial for optimal secondary prophylaxis of thromboembolic events in those patients.

  12. Doping and thrombosis in sports.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    Historically, humans have long sought to enhance their "athletic" performance to increase body weight, aggressiveness, mental concentration and physical strength, contextually reducing fatigue, pain, and improving recovery. Although regular training is the mainstay for achieving these targets, the ancillary use of ergogenic aids has become commonplace in all sports. The demarcation between ergogenic aids and doping substances or practices is continuously challenging and mostly based on perceptions regarding the corruption of the fairness of competition and the potential side effects or adverse events arising from the use of otherwise unnecessary ergogenic substances. A kaleidoscope of side effects has been associated with the use of doping agents, including behavioral, skeletal, endocrinologic, metabolic, hemodynamic, and cardiovascular imbalances. Among the various doping substances, the most striking association with thrombotic complications has been reported for androgenic anabolic steroids (i.e., cardiomyopathy, fatal and nonfatal arrhythmias, myocardial infarction [MI], intracardiac thrombosis, stroke, venous thromboembolism [VTE], limb arterial thrombosis, branch retinal vein occlusion, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis) and blood boosting (i.e., VTE and MI, especially for epoetin and analogs). The potential thrombotic complication arising from misuse of other doping agents such as the administration of cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, cocaine, and platelet-derived preparations is instead speculative or anecdotal at best. The present article provides an overview on the epidemiological association as well as the underlying biochemical and biological mechanisms linking the practice of doping in sports with the development of thrombosis.

  13. Recommendations for the use of long-term central venous catheter (CVC) in children with hemato-oncological disorders: management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis. On behalf of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Giordano, Paola; Saracco, Paola; Grassi, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Banov, Laura; Carraro, Francesca; Crocoli, Alessandro; Cesaro, Simone; Zanazzo, Giulio Andrea; Molinari, Angelo Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC), used for the management of children with hemato-oncological disorders, are burdened by a significant incidence of mechanical, infective, or thrombotic complications. These complications favor an increasing risk in prolongation of hospitalization, extra costs of care, and sometimes severe life-threatening events. No guidelines for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis are available for children. To this aim, members of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP) reviewed the pediatric and adult literature to propose the first recommendations for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis in children with hemato-oncological disorders.

  14. Inferior Vena Cava Filters for Recurrent Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Salil H.; Patel, Rima

    2007-01-01

    Inferior vena cava filters are often used as alternatives to anticoagulant therapy for the prevention of pulmonary embolism. Many of the clinical data that support the use of these devices stem from relatively limited retrospective studies. The dual purpose of this review is to examine the incidence of thrombotic complications associated with inferior vena cava filters and to discuss the role of anticoagulant therapy concurrent with filter placement. Device-associated morbidity and overall efficacy can be considered only in the context of rates of vena cava thrombosis, insertion-site thrombosis, recurrent deep venous thrombosis, and recurrent pulmonary embolism. PMID:17622366

  15. The effectiveness of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated central venous catheters in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Maaskant, J M; De Boer, J P; Dalesio, O; Holtkamp, M J; Lucas, C

    2009-09-01

    Immuno-compromised patients are at high risk for all kind of infections. Unfortunately, they need central venous catheters (CVCs), which are associated with infectious complications. In this study we examined the effectiveness of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated CVCs to prevent catheter-related infections in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral stem cell transplantation. This historical cohort study evaluated 139 patients of whom 70 patients were provided with non-impregnated CVCs and 69 patients with impregnated CVCs. Patients were treated for different diagnoses. The median number of days a CVC stayed in situ was 18 in the non-impregnated group and 16 in the impregnated group. The median duration of neutropenia of patients with non-impregnated CVCs was 9 days compared with 7 days of patients with impregnated CVCs. We found less catheter colonization (CC) in patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine CVCs (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.41-0.96; P = 0.03). Catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI) were also diminished, but this result was not statistically significant (RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.02-1.15; P = 0.06). The reduction in CC and CR-BSI did not diminish the incidence of fever. We conclude that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated CVCs provide an important improvement in the attempt to reduce CC and CR-BSI.

  16. Cancer associated thrombosis: risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism are frequent diseases and cancer is one of their most important risk factors. Patients with cancer also have a higher prevalence of venous thrombosis located in other parts than in the legs and/or in unusual sites including upper extremity, splanchnic or cerebral veins. Cancer also affects the risk of arterial thrombotic events particularly in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms and in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor recipients. Several risk factors need to interact to trigger thrombosis. In addition to common risk factors such as surgery, hospitalisation, infection and genetic coagulation disorders, the thrombotic risk is also driven and modified by cancer-specific factors including type, histology, and stage of the malignancy, cancer treatment and certain biomarkers. A venous thrombotic event in a cancer patient has serious consequences as the risk of recurrent thrombosis, the risk of bleeding during anticoagulation and hospitalisation rates are all increased. Survival of cancer patients with thrombosis is worse compared to that of cancer patients without thrombosis, and thrombosis is a leading direct cause of death in cancer patients.

  17. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile. PMID:24436666

  18. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile.

  19. Thrombus in Transit: A Potentially Life-threatening Complication of Cerebral Sinus Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Petracca, Martina; Calandrelli, Rosalinda; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Caliandro, Pietro; Della Marca, Giacomo; Frisullo, Giovanni; Morosetti, Roberta; Profice, Paolo; Lamendola, Priscilla; Pennestrì, Faustino; Pilato, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old, 7-weeks-pregnant patient, presenting with headache and generalized seizure due to cerebral venous thrombosis complicated by jugular thrombosis and thrombus dislocation into right cardiac cavities. The patient was treated with intravenous heparin, and underwent embolectomy in extracorporeal circulation. This case illustrates the variability of cerebral venous thrombosis progression and a potentially life-threatening condition even during anticoagulant therapy.

  20. Imaging of venous compression syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ganguli, Suvranu; Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Gupta, Rajiv; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous compression syndromes are a unique group of disorders characterized by anatomical extrinsic venous compression, typically in young and otherwise healthy individuals. While uncommon, they may cause serious complications including pain, swelling, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism, and post-thrombotic syndrome. The major disease entities are May-Thurner syndrome (MTS), variant iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS), venous thoracic outlet syndrome (VTOS)/Paget-Schroetter syndrome, nutcracker syndrome (NCS), and popliteal venous compression (PVC). In this article, we review the key clinical features, multimodality imaging findings, and treatment options of these disorders. Emphasis is placed on the growing role of noninvasive imaging options such as magnetic resonance venography (MRV) in facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and tailored intervention. PMID:28123973

  1. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  2. Update of thrombosis in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Leebeek, Frank W G

    2016-04-01

    With the introduction of thalidomide and multi-agent chemotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma around 15years ago a strongly increased risk of venous thrombosis was observed. The occurrence of venous thrombosis in multiple myeloma is not only determined by the kind of treatment, but also by several other factors, including disease specific factors, patient-specific factors, changes in pro-and anticoagulant factors and fibrinolysis. Studies showed a prevalence of up to 25% in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Therefore these patients nowadays receive prophylaxis with aspirin, low molecular weight heparin or warfarin in order to reduce the risk of venous thrombosis. It is however still debatable which patients should receive prophylaxis and what the best kind of prophylaxis is, considering both the risk of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. In recent years several new anti-myeloma agents have been developed and investigated in large clinical studies. The risk of thrombosis using these new drugs seems less than with thalidomide and lenalidomide-based regimens. In this article an update on prevention and management of thrombotic events in patients with multiple myeloma is given.

  3. A Patient with Recurrent Arteriovenous Graft Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are prone to frequent thrombosis that is superimposed on underlying hemodynamically significant stenosis, most commonly at the graft-vein anastomosis. There has been great interest in detecting AVG stenosis in a timely fashion and performing preemptive angioplasty, in the belief that this will prevent AVG thrombosis. Three surveillance methods (static dialysis venous pressure, flow monitoring, and duplex ultrasound) can detect AVG stenosis. Whereas observational studies have reported that surveillance with preemptive angioplasty substantially reduces AVG thrombosis, randomized clinical trials have failed to confirm such a benefit. There is a high frequency of early AVG restenosis after angioplasty caused by aggressive neointimal hyperplasia resulting from vascular injury. Stent grafts prevent AVG restenosis better than balloon angioplasty, but they do not prevent AVG thrombosis. Several pharmacologic interventions to prevent AVG failure have been evaluated in randomized clinical trials. Anticoagulation or aspirin plus clopidogrel do not prevent AVG thrombosis, but increase hemorrhagic events. Treatment of hyperhomocysteinemia does not prevent AVG thrombosis. Dipyridamole plus aspirin modestly decreases AVG stenosis or thrombosis. Fish oil substantially decreases the frequency of AVG stenosis and thrombosis. In patients who have exhausted all options for vascular access in the upper extremities, thigh AVGs are a superior option to tunneled internal jugular vein central vein catheters (CVCs). An immediate-use AVG is a reasonable option in patients with recurrent CVC dysfunction or infection. Tunneled femoral CVCs have much worse survival than internal jugular CVCs. PMID:25883073

  4. Core curriculum illustration: dural venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Sibi; Pereira, Alex; Eckerd, Morgan; Pawley, Barbara

    2016-11-28

    This is the 25th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as a part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for study online at http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.htm .

  5. Thrombosis in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barbano, Biagio; Gigante, Antonietta; Amoroso, Antonio; Cianci, Rosario

    2013-07-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is characterized by heavy proteinuria, edema, hypoalbuminemia, and hyperlipidemia and the most frequent causes are glomerular diseases. An uncommon presentation is iatrogenic NS, an adverse effect of some drugs administration. In the clinical course of NS, a typical feature is dysregulated coagulation state, promoted by the breakdown of permselectivity barrier of the glomerular capillary wall, resulting in the leakage of high-molecular-mass proteins, at least the size of albumin. This hypercoagulable condition is supported by several factors, such as abnormalities in platelet activation and an imbalance between anticoagulation/antithrombosis and procoagulant/prothrombotic mechanisms. Thus, NS and the risk of developing thromboses are strictly related. Thrombotic events affect the venous system rather than arterial vessels with different features and frequencies. Deep venous system of the lower extremities and renal veins are the most frequent source of pulmonary embolism, the most dangerous NS complication. Prophylactic anticoagulation and thrombosis treatment are not clearly established because large randomized trials and guidelines are lacking. The management of NS and the decision of when and how to anticoagulate the patient represent a teamwork challenge for physicians.

  6. Transluminally Placed Endovascular Grafts for Venous Lesions in Patients on Hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, S.F. Kim, J.; Sheley, R.C.

    2003-08-15

    This report summarizes a feasibility study of transluminally placed endovascular grafts (TPEG) using pre-expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to treat venous abnormalities inpatients on hemodialysis. Seventeen patients with peripheral(n = 11) or central (n = 6) venous lesions were treated with TPEG devices. Covered Gianturco stents were used for the peripheral lesions and covered Palmaz stents were used for central lesions. Venous abnormalities included vascular rupture after balloon angioplasty or surgical thrombectomy (n = 4),stenosis associated with an aneurysm (n = 2) and occlusive disease and central stenoses not responsive to balloon angioplasty (n = 11). The mean primary patency period was 37 days. The mean secondary patency period was 215 days. At 60,180, and 360 days the primary and secondary patency rates were 40%,32%, and 32%, and 70%, 55%, and 39%, respectively. Follow-up studies have shown various outcomes of the implanted TPEG devices,which have included stenoses within the TPEG (n = 2),stenoses central to the TPEG (n = 1), stenoses peripheral to the TPEG (n = 3), acute thrombosis extending to the TPEG without a stenosis (n = 1), graft abandoned with patent TPEG (n = 6), and TPEG patent within primary patency period at last follow-up (n =4). The TPEG devices, made with pre-expanded PTFE, appear safe in the short term, do not prevent progressive dialysis access site failure, and need to be compared to PTA and endovascular stenting in a randomized prospective trial.

  7. Testosterone, thrombophilia, thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joel; Glueck, Charles J; Prince, Marloe; Riaz, Rashid; Wang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    We screened previously undiagnosed thrombophilia (V Leiden-prothrombin mutations, Factors VIII and XI, homocysteine, and antiphospholipid antibody [APL] syndrome) in 15 men and 2 women with venous thromboembolism (VTE) or osteonecrosis 7 months (median) after starting testosterone therapy (TT), gel (30-50 mg/d), intramuscular (100-400 mg/wk), or human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (6000 IU/wk). Thrombophilia was studied in 2 healthy control groups without thrombosis (97 normal controls, 31 subjects on TT) and in a third control group (n = 22) with VTE, not on TT. Of the 17 cases, 76% had ≥1 thrombophilia vs 19% of 97 normal controls (P < 0.0001), vs 29% of 31 TT controls (P = 0.002). Cases differed from normal controls by Factor V Leiden (12% vs 0%, P = 0.021), by high Factor VIII (>150%) (24% vs 7%, P = 0.058), by high homocysteine (29% vs 5%, P = 0.007), and from both normal and TT controls for APL syndrome (18% vs 2%, P = 0.023, vs 0%, P = 0.04). Despite adequate anticoagulation with TT continued after the first deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolus (DVT-PE), 1 man sustained 3 DVT-PEs 5, 8, and 11 months later and a second man had 2 DVT-PEs 1 and 2 months later. Of the 10 cases with serum T measured on TT, 6 (60%) had supranormal T (>800 ng/dL) and of 9 with estradiol measured on TT, 7 (78%) had supranormal levels (>42.6 pg/mL). TT interacts with thrombophilia leading to thrombosis. TT continuation in thrombophilic men is contraindicated because of recurrent thrombi despite anticoagulation. Screening for thrombophilia before starting TT should identify subjects at high risk for VTE with an adverse the risk to benefit ratio for TT.

  8. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Home For Patients Search FAQs Preventing ... Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF Format Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Women's Health What is deep vein ...

  13. Prothrombin G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphisms in peripheral capillary nonperfusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wathek, Chaima; Mrad, Meriem; Abdessalem, Nadia Ben; Maalej, Afef; Gritli, Nasreddine; Gabsi, Salem; Rannen, Riadh; Fekih-Mrissa, Najiba

    2015-09-01

    The G20210A mutation in the prothrombin gene is an established risk factor for venous thrombosis. However, there is some controversy as to the role played by this mutation in arterial thrombotic disease. The association of peripheral capillary nonperfusion with prothrombin G20210A mutation has never been reported before. We present the case of 34-year-old man who presented with peripheral capillary nonperfusion. The fundus examination of his right eye revealed an epiretinal membrane, peripheral (mainly temporally) retinal haemorrhages, exudates and microaneurismal alterations of the vascular bed. Fluorescein angiography of his right eye demonstrated an extended area of capillary nonperfusion distal to the microaneurismal lesions. Evaluation revealed mutations of the G20210A prothrombin and MTHFR genes. Screening for hereditary thrombophilia should be considered, regardless of patient age, in patients with peripheral retinal ischemia. The prothrombin G20210A mutation, a genetic risk factor, may be associated with peripheral capillary nonperfusion.

  14. Subclavian vein thrombosis: A continuing challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, S.L.; Berry, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Subclavian vein thrombosis is a relatively uncommon but potentially morbid disease entity. To determine the frequency, cause, and best mode of treatment of this problem, we performed a chart review of all patients with a diagnosis of subclavian vein thrombosis at two major metropolitan hospitals during a 6-year period. A total of 40 patients were identified with subclavian vein thrombosis, which represented 3.5% of all venous thromboses detected during the 6-year period. No side or sex predilection was noted and the majority of patients were outpatients. The cause was fairly evenly divided among intravenous catheters (32%), anatomic abnormalities (45%), and carcinoma with postoperative radiation (22.5%). Despite the increasing use of the subclavian veins for pacemaker leads, hyperalimentation, and permanent intravenous access for chemotherapy, there has not been an increase in diagnosed subclavian vein thrombosis. Anatomic abnormalities with compression of the vein respond well to either heparinization or lytic therapy but require surgery if the venous abnormality persists. Treatment consisted of lytic therapy in 20%, heparinization in 55%, and elevation with removal of the central line in 25% of patients. All patients responded well to treatment, with a decrease in swelling and symptoms; no patient progressed to venous gangrene and only one (2.5%) had a documented pulmonary embolus. Medical treatment provides excellent long-term benefit in most cases unless complicated by an anatomic abnormality.

  15. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  16. Idiopathic Thrombosis of the Inferior Vena Cava and Bilateral Femoral Veins in an Otherwise Healthy Male Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Sarah; Kerns, Tamie; Londeree, William; Ching, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis of the inferior vena cava is less common than deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, particularly in the absence of an obvious congenital caval abnormality or hypercoagulable state. We present a case of IVC thrombosis in an otherwise healthy and active 28-year-old male soldier secondary to dehydration and venous webbing. IVC thrombosis is an uncommon and underrecognized condition; in this case, the patient's caval thrombosis was initially mistaken for acute back strain. Prompt recognition is necessary to minimize long-term sequelae. PMID:24187556

  17. [Venous thromboembolic disease: presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in its clinical spectrum includes both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, which is usually a complication of deep vein thrombosis. It is a relatively common disease with significant morbidity and requires an accurate diagnosis. They are numerous risk factors for venous thromboembolism, and there is evidence that the risk of thromboembolic disease increases proportionally to the number of predisposing risk factors present. The primary care physician should know the risk factors and suspect the presence of venous thromboembolic disease when there is a compatible clnical picture. The treatment for this pathology is anticoagulation. We report a patient with cardiovascular risk factors who was seen with pain in the right leg and shortness of breath and referred to the hospital with suspected venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation and pleural effusion.

  18. Common acquired causes of thrombosis in children.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Jaszianne; Carpenter, Shannon L

    2013-08-01

    Compared to adults, venous thromboembolism in the pediatric population is a rare event. Cancer, cardiac disease, antiphospholipid antibodies, and indwelling catheters are established risk factors for thromboembolism in children. We examined the literature related to thrombophilia in children, childhood cancer and thrombosis, cardiac disease and thrombosis, and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in children. Citations in identified articles yielded additional articles for review. We found that studies of acquired thrombophilia in children are limited. Current treatment for thromboembolism in children is based on adult data therefore optimal treatment in this population remains unclear.

  19. Venous thromboembolism in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increasing in the pediatric population. Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have an increased risk of thrombosis due to central venous catheters (CVCs), as well as acquired thrombophilia secondary to inflammation, or deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins due to vitamin K deficiency and/or liver dysfunction. CVC-associated thrombosis commonly results in line occlusion, but may develop into serious life-threatening conditions such as deep venous thrombosis (DVT), superior vena cava syndrome or pulmonary embolism (PE). Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) may be a long complication. Local occlusion of the catheter tip may be managed with instillation of thrombolytics (such as tPA) within the lumen of the catheter; however, CVC-associated thrombosis involving the proximal veins is most often is treated with systemic anticoagulation. Initial treatment with heparin is a standard approach, but thrombolytic therapy, which may carry higher bleeding risks, should be considered for life and limb threatening episodes of VTE. Recommended duration of anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin ranges from 3 to 6 months for major removable thrombotic risks; longer anticoagulation is considered for recurrent thrombosis, major persistent thrombophilia, or the continued presence of a major risk factor such as a CVC. While CVCs are the most common risk for development of VTE in children, studies have not demonstrated a clear benefit with routine use of systemic thromboprophylaxis. The incidence and risk factors of VTE in CF patients will be reviewed and principles of diagnosis and management will be summarized.

  20. Advanced imaging in acute and chronic deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karande, Gita Yashwantrao; Sanchez, Yadiel; Baliyan, Vinit; Mishra, Vishala; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) affecting the extremities is a common clinical problem. Prompt imaging aids in rapid diagnosis and adequate treatment. While ultrasound (US) remains the workhorse of detection of extremity venous thrombosis, CT and MRI are commonly used as the problem-solving tools either to visualize the thrombosis in central veins like superior or inferior vena cava (IVC) or to test for the presence of complications like pulmonary embolism (PE). The cross-sectional modalities also offer improved visualization of venous collaterals. The purpose of this article is to review the established modalities used for characterization and diagnosis of DVT, and further explore promising innovations and recent advances in this field. PMID:28123971

  1. Prevention of postvenographic thrombosis by heparin flush: fibrinogen uptake measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Minar, E.; Ehringer, H.; Sommer, G.; Marosi, L.; Czembirek, H.

    1984-09-01

    The incidence of postphlebographic venous thrombosis was investigated by /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen uptake tests in 60 patients whose veins were flushed with saline solution containing 10,000 IU of heparin after leg phlebography. Ionic methylglucamine iodamide was used as the contrast medium. In six patients superficial thrombophlebitis extending from the contrast-medium injection site was observed after phlebography. The incidence of deep venous thrombosis was 3.3%, significantly less than that reported for studies using triiodinated ionic contrast media without flushing the veins with a heparin solution. It is comparable to the incidence of venous thrombosis reported after using nonionic contrast media. The authors conclude that flushing the veins with heparinized saline solution can improve the safety of phlebography considerably.

  2. Prevention of postvenographic thrombosis by heparin flush: fibrinogen uptake measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Minar, E.; Ehringer, H.; Sommer, G.; Marosi, L.; Czembirek, H.

    1984-09-01

    The incidence of postphlebographic venous thrombosis was investigated by 125I-labeled fibrinogen uptake tests in 60 patients whose veins were flushed with saline solution containing 10,000 IU of heparin after leg phlebography. Ionic methylglucamine iodamide was used as the contrast medium. In six patients superficial thrombophlebitis extending from the contrast-medium injection site was observed after phlebography. The incidence of deep venous thrombosis was 3.3%, significantly less than that reported for studies using triiodinated ionic contrast media without flushing the veins with a heparin solution. It is comparable to the incidence of venous thrombosis reported after using nonionic contrast media. The authors conclude that flushing the veins with heparinized saline solution can improve the safety of phlebography considerably.

  3. [Chronic venous insufficiency in postthrombotic syndrome and varicose veins].

    PubMed

    Hafner, Jürg; Mayer, D; Amann, B; French, L E; Läuchli, S; Hofer, T; Ramelet, A-A; Jeanneret, Ch

    2010-10-06

    Venous disorders have a high prevalence and require approximately 1% of health budgets of industrialized countries. The postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is defined by subjective symptoms and morphologic trophical skin changes following deep venous thrombosis. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in risk situations, easy availability of diagnostic tools (D-dimers, colour-coded duplex sonography) and early detection of deep venous thrombosis, as well as immediate therapeutic anticoagulation along with leg compression during the acute phase and over a two year period of time significantly reduce the incidence of PTS. Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) includes trophical skin and soft tissue pathologies of the lower leg due to venous hypertension in the distal venous system of the lower extremity. Roughly, two main causes can be distinguished. (A) Deep venous insufficiency (A1 in postthrombotic syndrome; A2 in primary deep venous insufficiency) and (B) superficial venous reflux, usually varicose veins. Compression therapy, surgical ablation of superficial venous reflux, and tangential ablation with split skin graft (shave treatment) of refractory venous ulcers are the mainstays in the treatment of CVI.

  4. Extra-abdominal venous thromboses at unusual sites.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ida; De Stefano, Valerio

    2012-09-01

    Venous thrombosis typically involves the lower extremities. Rarely, it can occur in cerebral, splanchnic, or renal veins, with a frightening clinical impact. Other rare manifestations are upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis, that can complicate with pulmonary embolism and post-thrombotic syndrome, and retinal vein occlusion, significantly affecting the quality of life. This review is focused on venous thromboses at unusual extra-abdominal sites. Local infections or cancer are frequent in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis. Upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis is mostly due to catheters or effort-related factors. Common risk factors are inherited thrombophilia and oral contraceptive use. Acute treatment is based on heparin; in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis, local or systemic fibrinolysis should be considered in case of clinical deterioration. Vitamin-K antagonists are recommended for 3-6 months; indefinite anticoagulation is suggested for recurrent thrombosis or unprovoked thrombosis and permanent risk factors. However, such recommendations mainly derive from observational studies; there are no data about long-term treatment of retinal vein occlusion.

  5. Hypereosinophilic syndrome, Churg-Strauss syndrome and parasitic diseases: possible links between eosinophilia and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Maino, Alberto; Rossio, Raffaella; Cugno, Massimo; Marzano, Angelo V; Tedeschi, Alberto

    2012-09-01

    Throughout the past decade, a possible role of eosinophils in blood coagulation and thrombosis has been suggested. We conducted a Pubmed (MEDLINE) search of case and series referring to any kind of thrombotic events described in three conditions characterised by persistent blood eosinophilia, i.e. the hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), the Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS), and parasitic infestations from 1966 to date. One hundred and ninety-two articles were found regarding thrombotic events in HES and CSS, and 209 cases of thrombosis were extracted. One hundred and seventy- seven articles dealing with parasitic diseases and thrombosis were found, but only 15 manuscripts reporting thrombosis of unknown origin in 22 patients were selected. In HES, arterial thromboses were more frequent than in CSS (p=0.006), representing almost half of the cases (45%), while venous and mixed artero-venous thrombosis were respectively 28% and 27%. In contrast, in CSS there was a predominance of venous thrombosis (56%, p=0.006), with arterial thrombosis representing 38% of total thrombotic events, and mixed thrombosis being the least frequent (4%). The higher incidence of arterial thrombosis in HES patients can be explained by the common cardiac involvement (64% of patients). In the 22 patients with parasitoses and thrombosis, 15 had arterial thrombosis (68%) and 7 had venous thrombosis (32 %). Literature analysis shows that there are numerous reports of thrombotic events in patients with eosinophil-related disorders supporting a role for eosinophils in thrombosis. This observation raises the problem of prevention and treatment of thromboembolism particularly in HES and CSS patients.

  6. Infective Endocarditis in a Patient with Celiac Disease after Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Suryanarayan; Arobelidze, Salome; Gundelly, Parveen; Changarath Vijayan, Anil Kumar

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of infective endocarditis secondary to central venous catheters, which is termed as 'healthcare-associated infective endocarditis'. There is an increased risk of getting infective endocarditis in conditions with malnutrition and also if the tip of the central venous catheter is deep in the right atrium close to the tricuspid valve. We present a case of 31-year-old female who had all these risk factors. She was admitted to the hospital for the work up of the weight loss and was diagnosed with celiac disease. Central venous access was obtained because of poor peripheral intravenous access via the peripherally inserted central catheter which was complicated by thrombosis and removed after three days of insertion, and she was started on anticoagulation. Two weeks after being discharged, she presented to the emergency department with fever, shortness of breath, and had signs of congestive heart failure. A computed tomography of the chest for pulmonary embolism was taken and showed small clot burden pulmonary embolism and two cavitary lesions in the right lung. A transthoracic echocardiogram was taken and showed vegetation on the tricuspid valve and blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. Hence, a diagnosis of infective endocarditis was made, and she was treated with intravenous antibiotics for a total of six weeks after a long and complicated hospital stay. PMID:28348945

  7. Omental vein catheter thrombolysis for acute porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Annabelle L; Cleary, Muriel A; Cholewczynski, Walter; Sumpio, Bauer E; Atweh, Nabil A

    2013-05-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) is an uncommon clinical condition with potential high morbidity. We report here a patient who presented with acute-onset MVT and bowel infarction, which was successfully ameliorated with intramesenteric vein thrombolytic therapy.

  8. Rock climbing-related subclavian vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Christoph; Monasterio, Erik; Schöffl, Volker

    2015-10-01

    Paget-Schroetter syndrome, also known as upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT), is a rare condition, characterised by a (sub-) total occlusion of the axillary-subclavian venous system due to thrombosis. UEDVT is the most common vascular condition among athletes so far; although the general incidence is low, this problem will become more frequent as a result of increased participation in climbing sports. The purpose of this report is to illustrate two cases in rock climbers where UEDVT developed during rock climbing or bouldering. Fortunately, both patients were diagnosed relatively early after the symptoms began, despite the ambiguity of UEDVT symptoms. This relatively unfamiliar condition may become more highly recognised as a potentially serious differential diagnosis of unspecific pain of the shoulder. Rock climbers are disposed to develop UEDVT due to frequent stress on the upper extremities during training or competition.

  9. Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Community-Based Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Frederick A.; Emery, Cathy; Lessard, Darleen; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the magnitude, risk factors, management strategies, and outcomes in a population-based investigation of patients with upper, as compared to lower, extremity deep vein thrombosis diagnosed in 1999. Methods The medical records of all residents from Worcester, Massachusetts (2000 census=478,000) diagnosed with ICD-9 codes consistent with possible deep vein thrombosis at all Worcester hospitals during 1999 were reviewed and validated. Results The age-adjusted attack rate (per 100,000 population) of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis was 16 (95% CI 13, 20) compared to 91 (83,100) for lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Patients with upper extremity deep vein thrombosis were significantly more likely to have undergone recent central line placement, a cardiac procedure, or an intensive care unit admission than patients with lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Although short and 1-year recurrence rates of venous thromboembolism and all-cause mortality were not significantly different between patients with upper, versus lower, extremity deep vein thrombosis, patients with upper extremity deep vein thrombosis were less likely to have pulmonary embolism at presentation or in follow-up. Conclusions Patients with upper extremity deep vein thrombosis represent a clinically important patient population in the community setting. Risk factors, occurrence of pulmonary embolism, and timing and location of venous thromboembolism recurrence differ between patients with upper as compared to lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. These data suggest that strategies for prophylaxis and treatment of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis need further study and refinement. PMID:17679126

  10. Air travel and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Shanthi; Yach, Derek; Alwan, Ala

    2002-01-01

    There has recently been increased publicity on the risk of venous thrombosis after long-haul flights. This paper reviews the evidence base related to the association between air travel and venous thromboembolism. The evidence consists only of case reports, clinical case-control studies and observational studies involving the use of intermediate end-points, or expert opinion. Some studies have suggested that there is no clear association, whereas others have indicated a strong relationship. On the whole it appears that there is probably a link between air travel and venous thrombosis. However, the link is likely to be weak, mainly affecting passengers with additional risk factors for venous thromboembolism. The available evidence is not adequate to allow quantification of the risk. There are insufficient scientific data on which to base specific recommendations for prevention, other than that leg exercise should be taken during travel. Further studies are urgently needed in order to identify prospectively the incidence of the condition and those at risk. PMID:12077617

  11. Travel thrombosis: Pathomechanisms and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Tamás

    2008-12-01

    The possibility of life threatening venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with long-haul air travel has received increasing attention in recent years. VTE can develop after long travel by car, bus or train, as well. In this paper recent investigational results on the pathomechanism of this special type of venous thrombosis have been reviewed. Travel thrombosis is a subgroup of sitting thromboses. It is a consequence of prolonged sitting, which is common of ground transportation and air travel. Air travel-related venous thromboembolism (ATVT) is a multifactorial disease. Possible contributory risk factors are in connection with the milieu of the cabin, such as narrow sitting in cramp position, hypobaric hypoxia and lower humidity. Personal, traveler-related risk factors may be regarded as a trigger. The risk of thrombosis is depending on the duration and distance of the travel. Recent studies have clarified effects of long-haul travel on the coagulation system. Various investigations evaluated the effect of immobilization and hypobaric hypoxia on thrombin generation and fibrinolysis. The studies differed much in participant characteristics, duration and type of exposure and statistical analysis, so the results are contradictory. Healthy passengers seem to have low risk. However, travelers suffering from predisposing risk factors for VTE can be exposed to serious hazards.

  12. Thrombophilia, thrombosis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Eldor, A

    2001-07-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy is 0.05-1.8%, six times greater than in the non-pregnant state, and pulmonary embolism remains the most common cause of maternal death. Maternal age, previous history of VTE, Caesarean section and the presence of thrombophilia, significantly increase the risk of VTE. Acquired or hereditary thrombophilia occur in almost two-thirds of women presenting with recurrent miscarriages, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, abruptio placentae, or stillbirth, which are associated with microvascular thrombosis in placental blood vessels. Women with VTE during pregnancy and especially those with thrombophilia require individualized management, based on the type of defect, the family history and the presence of additional risk factors. These factors are important in determining the dose and duration of antithrombotic therapy during pregnancy and the puerperium, and the thromboprophylactic strategy for future pregnancies. Oral anticoagulants are now seldom used during pregnancy because of their significant side effects. Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) are increasingly replacing unfractionated heparin in the prevention and treatment of VTE during pregnancy. LMWHs have also been shown to be effective in improving the outcome of pregnancy in women with previous obstetric complications.

  13. Evaluating safety of tunneled small bore central venous catheters in chronic kidney disease population: A quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Gauri; El Ters, Mireille; Kremers, Walter K; Klunder, Joe L; Taler, Sandra J; Williams, Amy W; Stockland, Andrew H; Hogan, Marie C

    2016-09-20

    Introduction Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) may adversely impact future successful arteriovenous fistulae (AVF). As part of a quality improvement project, the performance of tunneled small bore tunneled central venous catheters (TSB-CVCs), as alternatives to PICCs, was evaluated. Methods A retrospective observational study, involving individuals ≥18 years of age who underwent TSB-CVC placement by Interventional Radiology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN between 1/1/2010 and 8/30/2013. Findings The study cohort included 92 patients with a median age of 55 (46-67) years, who underwent 108 TSB-CVC placements. Baseline renal disease was present in 71% (77/108). Most TSB-CVCs were placed in hospitalized patients (94%; 102/108); five French in diameter (61%; 66/108) and located in an internal jugular vein (84%; 91/108). Median catheter indwelling time was 20 (11-43) days (n = 84). TSB-CVC-related bloodstream infection, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and superficial venous thrombosis (SpVT) rates per line were 0.009 (1/108), 0.018 (2/108), and 0.009 (1/108), respectively. Venous outcomes in a subgroup of 54 patients, who had documented PICC placements (n = 161) in addition to TSB-CVC (n = 58) were compared. TSB-CVC-DVT rate was lower than the PICC-DVT rate (0.017 [1/58] vs. 0.106 per line [17/161]; P = 0.04). The TSB-CVC-SpVT rate was not different from the PICC-SpVT rate (0 [0/58] vs. 0.037 [6/161] per line; P = 0.14). Discussion TSB-CVCs demonstrated an excellent safety profile in our study. These catheters should be preferentially utilized for arm vein preservation in advanced kidney disease. Their impact on future AVF success needs further evaluation.

  14. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000027.htm Deep vein thrombosis - discharge To use the sharing features ... page, please enable JavaScript. You were treated for deep vein thrombosis ( DVT ). This is a condition in ...

  15. The management of filter-related caval thrombosis complicated by heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wanyin; Lou, Wensheng; He, Xu; Liu, Changjian; Gu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    This report evaluates the efficiency and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and argatroban for the treatment of IVC filter thrombosis complicated by heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). From October 2012 to December 2014, 19 patients with unilateral lower extremity deep venous thrombosis were treated with standard anticoagulation, filter placement and urokinase-based CDT, all of whom developed IVC filter thrombosis and HIT. A revised protocol (tPA-based CDT and argatroban-based anticoagulation) was performed to treat IVC thrombosis. The extent of lysis was graded from I to III. Technical and clinical outcomes and complications were monitored. A total of 22 filters were implanted, 20 of which were retrieved later. The technical success rate of revised CDT for IVC thrombosis was 100%. On evaluating IVC thrombus, thirteen cases (68.4%, 13/19) were identified as grade III (complete resolution of thrombus) and six (31.6%, 6/19) as grade II (50-99% resolution of thrombus). No major bleeding related to CDT occurred. HIT in all patients was successfully treated with argatroban. Two patients with malignant tumor died during the follow-up. For patients with IVC filter thrombosis complicated by HIT, it seems tPA-based CDT and argatroban is an alternative regimen. PMID:26550230

  16. Venous Sampling

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of the body, including: Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) , in which blood samples are taken from the ... for a few days before the procedure. For AVS, you will be asked to stop taking certain ...

  17. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  18. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in a military patient.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Charlotte; Johnston, A McD

    2016-08-01

    We describe the case of a 23-year-old serviceman on overseas deployment who presented with a painful, swollen arm. Investigations showed an upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) of the right arm with an associated asymptomatic pulmonary embolism, which was treated with warfarin anticoagulation. Further investigation identified positional obstruction at the thoracic outlet, and the patient was diagnosed with Paget-Schroetter syndrome. He underwent elective resection of the first rib, and has now returned to normal duties. After review of the literature on UEDVT, it is suggested that in this military patient, the occurrence of an anatomical variant put him at risk of upper limb venous thrombosis, which was probably potentiated by the occupational factor of carrying a rifle. The external compression of the subclavian vein from the rifle butt and hypertrophied muscles, in addition to the anatomical variation, caused repetitive microtrauma of the vessel intima, which precipitated venous thrombosis.

  19. [Neonatal cerebral thrombosis and deficit of factor V leiden].

    PubMed

    Moliner Calderón, E; López Bernal, E; Ginovart Galiana, G; Nadal Amat, J; Cubells Riero, J

    2000-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous thrombosis is an inusual disease in neonatal age. Increasing reports of this disorder had described since magnetic resonance angiography is used. Case report Newborn of apropriate seze for gestational age was delivered at 35 weeks of gestation. Refered a severe hipoxic-isquemic disease with multisistemic afectation. The second day of life presented disseminated intravascular coagulation with pulmonary bleeding. The third day, the infant developed seizures that required treatment with diazepam in continuous perfussion. MR angiography visualized superior sagital and transvers sinus thrombosis. Coagulation study detected factor V Leiden. Comments Frecuently venous cerebral thrombosis is presenting with lethargy and seizures. The most common vessels involved are sagital and transvers sinus. It is described in association with exogenous risk factors that increasing blood hyperviscosity and additional inhered coagulation dissorders such as defects on antihrombina III, protein C and S and activate protein C resistance. The last defect has a hight prevalence in subjects with trombosis events.

  20. A novel mutation in exon 2 of FGB caused by c.221G>T (†) substitution, predicting the replacement of the native Arginine at position 74 with a Leucine (p.Arg74Leu (†) ) in a proband from a Kurdish family with dysfibrinogenaemia and familial venous and arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Shlebak, Abdul A; Katsarou, Alexia D; Adams, George; Fernando, Fiona

    2017-02-01

    Dysfibrinogenaemias may present in either congenital or acquired form and are disorders of fibrinogen structure which may or may not be associated with abnormal function. More than 100 point mutations with single amino acid substitutions have been identified in over 400 families. These lead to defective DNA in the translated fibrinogen molecule. Such cases have improved our understanding of the fibrinogen-fibrin structure. Six members of a consanguineous family including a female proband, a female sibling, three male siblings and a daughter, with ages between 29 years and 53 years presented with early onset venous and premature arterial thromboembolic disease were investigated for a pro-thrombotic tendency associated with dysfibrinogenaemia. The family was investigated using standard coagulation assays and DNA sequencing of the genes encoding the FGA, FGB and FGG. All cases have dysfibrinogenaemia with a fibrinogen level 1.4 to 1.5 (1.9-4.3 g/L). Thrombophilia testing (including AT, PS & PC, F5 G1691A (FV Leiden)/F2 (prothombin G20210A) genotypes, homocysteine, antiphosphlipid antibody, paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria by flow cytometry and Janus Kinase-2 (exon 14)) were normal. PCR amplification and sequencing of exon 2 of FBG revealed a heterozygous mutation for a c.221G> T (†) substitution, predicting the replacement of the native Arginine at position 74 with a Leucine (p.Arg74Leu (†) ). In silico analysis of p.Arg74Leu strongly support pathogenicity. A novel mutation was identified in exon 2 of FGB caused by c.221G> T (†) substitution, predicting the replacement of Arginine at position 74 with a Leucine (p.Arg74Leu (†) ) in a proband from a Kurdish family with dysfibrinogenaemia and familial venous and arterial thrombosis.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren; Seraj, Samina

    2010-04-15

    Venous ulcer, also known as stasis ulcer, is the most common etiology of lower extremity ulceration, affecting approximately 1 percent of the U.S. population. Possible causes of venous ulcers include inflammatory processes resulting in leukocyte activation, endothelial damage, platelet aggregation, and intracellular edema. The primary risk factors for venous ulcer development are older age, obesity, previous leg injuries, deep venous thrombosis, and phlebitis. On physical examination, venous ulcers are generally irregular, shallow, and located over bony prominences. Granulation tissue and fibrin are typically present in the ulcer base. Associated findings include lower extremity varicosities, edema, venous dermatitis, and lipodermatosclerosis. Venous ulcers are usually recurrent, and an open ulcer can persist for weeks to many years. Severe complications include cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and malignant change. Poor prognostic factors include large ulcer size and prolonged duration. Evidence-based treatment options for venous ulcers include leg elevation, compression therapy, dressings, pentoxifylline, and aspirin therapy. Surgical management may be considered for ulcers that are large in size, of prolonged duration, or refractory to conservative measures.

  2. Testosterone therapy, thrombosis, thrombophilia, cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Wang, Ping

    2014-08-01

    There are similar time intervals between starting testosterone therapy (TT) and development of thrombotic (~4.5 months) or cardiovascular (CVD) events (~3 months) which may, speculatively, reflect a shared pathophysiology. We have described thrombotic events 5 months (median) after starting TT in 38 men and 4 women, including 27 with deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolism, 12 with osteonecrosis, 1 with central retinal vein thrombosis, 1 with amaurosis fugax, and 1 with spinal cord infarction. In 8 men whose TT was continued, second thrombotic events occurred despite adequate anticoagulation with Coumadin in 8 men, 3 of whom had a third thrombotic event. Of these 42 cases, 40 had measures of thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis, and 39 were found to have previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Before beginning TT, especially in men with previous history of thrombotic events, we suggest that, at a minimum, measurements be made for the Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin mutations, Factors VIII and XI, and homocysteine, to identify men who should not receive TT. We need prospective data focused on whether there should be pre-TT screening based on history of previous venous thromboembolism or for all subjects for major gene thrombophilias. To better resolve questions about TT and all cause and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and thrombosis, a long term, prospective, randomized, blinded study following the example of the Women's Health Initiative is needed. While we wait for prospective placebo-controlled TT outcome data, TT should be restricted to men with well-defined androgen deficiency syndromes.

  3. Cancer-Associated Thrombosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Elyamany, Ghaleb; Alzahrani, Ali Mattar; Bukhary, Eman

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in patients with malignant disease. Emerging data have enhanced our understanding of cancer-associated thrombosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. In addition to VTE, arterial occlusion with stroke and anginal symptoms is relatively common among cancer patients, and is possibly related to genetic predisposition. Several risk factors for developing venous thrombosis usually coexist in cancer patients including surgery, hospital admissions and immobilization, the presence of an indwelling central catheter, chemotherapy, use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and new molecular-targeted therapies such as antiangiogenic agents. Effective prophylaxis and treatment of VTE reduced morbidity and mortality, and improved quality of life. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is preferred as an effective and safe means for prophylaxis and treatment of VTE. It has largely replaced unfractionated heparin (UFH) and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Recently, the development of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that directly inhibit factor Xa or thrombin is a milestone achievement in the prevention and treatment of VTE. This review will focus on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of cancer-associated thrombosis, risk factors, and new predictive biomarkers for VTE as well as discuss novel prevention and management regimens of VTE in cancer according to published guidelines. PMID:25520567

  4. Safety and effectiveness of central venous catheterization in patients with cancer: prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Yun, Jina; Kim, Han Jo; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Bae, Sang Byung; Kim, Chan Kyu; Lee, Nam Su; Lee, Kyu Taek; Park, Seong Kyu; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Hee Sook; Hong, Dae Sik

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the safety and effectiveness of each type of central venous catheters (CVC) in patients with cancer. We prospectively enrolled patients with cancer who underwent catheterization involving a subclavian venous catheter (SVC), peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC), or chemo-port (CP) in our department. From March 2007 to March 2009, 116 patients underwent 179 episodes of catheterization. A SVC was inserted most frequently (46.4%). Fifty-four complications occurred (30.1%): infection in 23 cases, malpositioning or migration of the tip in 18 cases, thrombosis in eight cases, and bleeding in five cases. Malpositioning or migration of the tip occurred more frequently with a PICC (P<0.001); infection occurred more often with a tunneled catheter (P=0.028) and was observed more often in young patients (P=0.023). The catheter life span was longer for patients with solid cancer (P=0.002) than for those with hematologic cancer, with a CP (P<0.001) than a PICC or SVC, and for an indwelling catheter with image guidance (P=0.014) than a blind procedure. In conclusion, CP is an effective tool for long term use and the fixation of tip is important for the management of PICC.

  5. Conceptual design of a combined device for normothermia and venous compression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Z C; Yost, W F

    2000-04-01

    Hypothermia and venous thrombosis can cause complications during perioperative and postoperative periods which can even be fatal to patients' conditions. Separative devices have currently been used to prevent those two problems. The device proposed here is to combine in a simple unobtrusive fashion the desirable effects of both temperature control and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in perioperative patients. A design chart of the new device is provided and design issues are addressed.

  6. Papilloedema and Increased Intracranial Pressure as a Result of Unilateral Jugular Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Thandra, Abhishek; Jun, Bokkwan; Chuquilin, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial hypertension and papilloedema are known to develop secondary to cerebral sinus or bilateral jugular vein thrombosis. However, in rare cases, unilateral jugular vein thrombosis may lead to increased intracranial pressure and papilloedema with resultant headache and vision changes. We describe a 45-year-old patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx that developed right jugular vein thrombosis after chemoradiation therapy with cetuximab. This was later complicated by intracranial hypertension and papilloedema. The normal cerebral venous drainage, the potential role of chemoradiation therapy on the aetiology of jugular vein thrombosis, and the mechanism of increased intracranial pressure secondary to unilateral jugular vein occlusion are discussed. PMID:27928352

  7. Computerized Decision Support for the Cardiovascular Clinician: Applications for Venous Thromboembolism Prevention and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2010-01-01

    Case Presentation A 76-year-old woman with coronary artery disease, left ventricular systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction = 30%), obesity, and a history of deep vein thrombosis presents with dyspnea and hypoxemia. The combination of physical examination findings of an S3, rales in the lower half of both lung fields, and peripheral edema, chest x-ray evidence of cardiomegaly and pulmonary edema, and a pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide level of 2,150 pg/mL (normal <350 pg/mL) confirms the diagnosis of decompensated heart failure. She is admitted to the Cardiology Service for diuretic therapy and optimization of her heart failure regimen. Although she is written for bedrest, her admission orders do not include venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis. While entering orders, the Medical House Officer caring for the patient receives an electronic alert identifying the patient as high-risk for VTE and recommending that she be prescribed prophylaxis. PMID:19770412

  8. Prevention and treatment of venous ulceration.

    PubMed Central

    Negus, D.

    1985-01-01

    Venous ulcers are related to incompetence of the direct calf and ankle perforating veins, the majority of which follow deep vein thrombosis. Prevention of the latter by intravenous micro-dose heparin (1 unit/kg/hour) is effective, safe and inexpensive. Its efficacy has been proved in two controlled clinical trials. Venous ulcers have been treated by perforating vein ligation, with saphenous ligation and stripping where necessary, and with the addition of permanent knee-length elastic compression stockings in patients with femoro-popliteal incompetence. This regimen has achieved a 92% long-term success rate in patients without rheumatoid arthritis. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3890671

  9. Duplex evaluation of venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Leon, Luis R

    2005-03-01

    Duplex ultrasound is the most useful examination for the evaluation of venous valvular incompetence. Multi-frequency 4 to 7-MHz linear array transducers are typically used for this assessment of superficial and deep reflux. The examination is done with the patient standing and manual compression maneuvers are used to initiate reflux. Automatic rapid inflation and deflation cuffs may be used when a standard stimulus is needed. Cutoff values for reflux have been defined. Perforating veins must be identified and flow direction during compression recorded. When ulcers are present, duplex ultrasound is used to investigate veins of the ulcerated legs. Venous outflow obstruction is also studied by duplex ultrasound and chronic changes in deep and superficial veins following deep venous thrombosis noted. The main drawback in evaluation of chronic obstruction is inability to quantify hemodynamic significance. Anatomic variations in superficial and deep veins are common and their identification is necessary. Reporting results of duplex ultrasound studies must take into consideration the proper classification of venous disease as well as the new anatomic terms that have been accepted.

  10. Pycnogenol® in chronic venous insufficiency and related venous disorders.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Om P

    2014-03-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological profile of Pycnogenol in the light of its use in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and related venous disorders such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), post-thrombotic syndrome, long haul air-travel-related leg oedema, venous ulcers and acute haemorrhoids. Pycnogenol is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator activities, antithrombotic effects and collagen stabilizing properties make it uniquely able to target the multi facet pathophysiology of CVI and related venous disorders. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce oedema of the legs in CVI, reduce the incidence of deep venous thrombosis during long haul flights and enhance the healing of venous ulcers and haemorrhoidal episodes by topical application and/or oral administration. This review highlights clinical research findings on the safety, compliance and efficacy of Pycnogenol, including its use in combination products.

  11. Deep venous thrombophlebitis following aortoiliac reconstructive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.K.; McCabe, C.J.; Abbott, W.M.; Brewster, D.C.; Moncure, A.C.; Reidy, N.C.; Darling, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    One hundred patients undergoing elective aortic surgery were scanned prospectively for development of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The incidence of DVT in this population was 13%. Eleven patients showed only calf vein thrombosis on venography, whereas two had occlusive iliofemoral thrombus. The correlation between venous Doppler ultrasound and venography was 80%. More importantly, Doppler examination correctly identified both patients with occlusive thrombus. Fibrinogen scanning was associated with a false-positive rate of 31%. Only one patient suffered a nonfatal pulmonary embolus. Fibrinogen scanning has an unacceptably high false-positive rate; however, Doppler ultrasound will identify significant occlusive thrombus without a high false-positive rate. The low incidence of pulmonary emboli does not warrant such definitive measures as prophylactic vena caval interruption.

  12. Factors related to venous ulceration: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Vlajinac, Hristina; Marinkovic, Jelena; Maksimovic, Milos; Radak, Djordje

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the factors related to venous ulceration. Patients with venous ulceration (278 patients) were compared with 1401 patients in other categories of clinical classification of venous disease (clinical, etiologic, anatomic, and pathophysiological [CEAP]). Demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data were collected. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. According to multivariate analyses, risk factors for venous ulceration were age, male sex, personal history of superficial and deep venous thrombosis, diabetes, high blood pressure, skeletal or joint disease in the legs and emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, higher body mass index and physical inactivity, parental history of ankle ulcer as well as reflux in deep and perforator veins, deep obstruction, and combination of reflux and obstruction. It seems reasonable to pay special attention to patients in whom the postulated risk factors for venous ulceration are present.

  13. [Myelopathies in impairment of extravertebral venous blood circulation].

    PubMed

    Tsuladze, I I; Dreval', O N; Kornienko, V N

    2009-01-01

    Development of myelopathies of venous genesis is based on venous hypertension inside vertebral canal which was initially described by J. Aboulker. According to anatomical and functional features of epidural venous system, two factors contribute in development of venous congestion: decreased outflow and increased inflow. Clinical manifestation is presented by spastic movement disorders. Morphological study performed in 18 cadavers allowed to discover so called 'narrow areas' which cause impaired circulation through large feeders of caval veins, which can be discovered by selective phlebography. Main phlebographic features include stenosis, compression, atresia, thrombosis and retrograde flow towards epidural venous plexus. We examined 58 patients with spastic para- and tetraparesis of unknown nature. Phlebographic signs of venous dyscirculation were revealed in 34 cases. 28 surgical operations were performed: 24 on feeders of vena cava superior and 4 on feeders of vena cava inferior. In 18 cases we obtained satisfactory results. This investigation should be continued.

  14. Microparticles: new light shed on the understanding of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; Qi, Xiao-long; Xu, Ming-xin; Mao, Yu; Liu, Ming-lin; Song, Hao-ming

    2014-01-01

    Microparticles are small membrane fragments shed primarily from blood and endothelial cells during either activation or apoptosis. There is mounting evidence suggesting that microparticles perform a large array of biological functions and contribute to various diseases. Of these disease processes, a significant link has been established between microparticles and venous thromboembolism. Advances in research on the role of microparticles in thrombosis have yielded crucial insights into possible mechanisms, diagnoses and therapeutic targets of venous thromboembolism. In this review, we discuss the definition and properties of microparticles and venous thromboembolism, provide a synopsis of the evidence detailing the contributions of microparticles to venous thromboembolism, and propose potential mechanisms, by which venous thromboembolism occurs. Moreover, we illustrate a possible role of microparticles in cancer-related venous thromboembolism. PMID:25152025

  15. Large-volume leukapheresis using femoral venous access for harvesting peripheral blood stem cells with the Fenwal CS 3000 Plus from normal healthy donors: predictors of CD34+ cell yield and collection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Kim, Jong Gwang; Chae, Yeo Soo; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Nan Young; Suh, Jang Soo; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2003-01-01

    The current paper reports on the predicting factors associated with satisfactory peripheral blood stem cell collection and the efficacy of large-volume leukapheresis (LVL) using femoral vein catheterization to harvest PBSCs with Fenwal CS 3000 Plus from normal healthy donors for allogeneic transplantation. A total of 113 apheresis procedures in 57 patients were performed. The median number of MNCs, CD3+ cells, and CD34+ cells harvested per apheresis was 5.3 x 10(8)/kg (range, 0.3-11.0 x 10(8)/kg), 3.0 x 10(8)/kg (range, 0.2-6.6 x 10(8)/kg), and 7.9 x 10(6)/kg (range, 0.1-188.9 x 10(6)/kg), respectively. The median collection efficiency of MNCs and CD34+ cells was 49.8% and 49.7%, respectively. A highly significant correlation was found between the collected CD34+ cell counts and the pre-apheresis WBC counts in the donors (P = 0.013), and between the collected CD34+ cell counts and the pre-apheresis peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cell counts (P<0.001). Harvesting at least >4 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells from the 1st LVL was achieved in 44 (77.2%) out of 57 donors and in 19 (90.5%) out of 21 donors with a PB-CD34+ cell count of >40/microl. There was no significant difference in the harvested MNC and CD34+ cell counts between the 1st and 2nd apheresis. The catheter-related complications included catheter obstruction (n = 2) and hematoma at the insertion site (n = 3). Accordingly, LVL using femoral venous access for allogeneic PBSC collection from normal healthy donors would appear to be safe and effective.

  16. [Impact of clinical practice guidelines on the incidence of bloodstream infections related to peripherally inserted central venous catheter in preterm infants].

    PubMed

    Boutaric, E; Gilardi, M; Cécile, W; Fléchelles, O

    2013-02-01

    In our neonatal intensive care unit, the incidence density of infections related to central catheters, assessed retrospectively over 2 years, exceeded that described in the literature. To reduce this incidence density, clinical practice guidelines were implemented for the insertion and maintenance of central lines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the protocol on the incidence density and the incidence rate of nosocomial bloodborne infections. This was a prospective study in a neonatal intensive care unit of the Fort-de-France University Hospital over 17 months, which included all premature infants with a central line. We studied the adherence to the protocol, possible complications related to the protocol, the characteristics of the population, the incidence rate, and the density of specific central catheter-related infections. There were 111 children, 122 catheters, and 2575 catheter days during period 1 and 101 children, 125 catheters, and 1631 catheter days during period 2. Gestational age and birth weight were significantly lower in period 2 (29.6±2.3 GW vs 27.3±1.9, P=0.001; 1239±379g vs 915±175g, P<0.001) and the catheterization duration differed between the 2 periods (20±11 days vs 13±6 days, P<0.0001). A trend for a lower incidence density of infection was observed in the second period (16 per 1000 catheter days vs 10 per 1000 catheter days, P=0.06). Although the 2 groups' baseline characteristics were different, this study suggests a positive impact of clinical practice guidelines for the insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters on the incidence of nosocomial infections related to central catheters.

  17. Neutrophil histone modification by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 is critical for deep vein thrombosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Martinod, Kimberly; Demers, Melanie; Fuchs, Tobias A; Wong, Siu Ling; Brill, Alexander; Gallant, Maureen; Hu, Jing; Wang, Yanming; Wagner, Denisa D

    2013-05-21

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are major health problems associated with high mortality. Recently, DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) resulting from the release of decondensed chromatin, were found to be part of the thrombus scaffold and to promote coagulation. However, the significance of nuclear decondensation and NET generation in thrombosis is largely unknown. To address this, we adopted a stenosis model of deep vein thrombosis and analyzed venous thrombi in peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4)-deficient mice that cannot citrullinate histones, a process required for chromatin decondensation and NET formation. Intriguingly, less than 10% of PAD4(-/-) mice produced a thrombus 48 h after inferior vena cava stenosis whereas 90% of wild-type mice did. Neutrophils were abundantly present in thrombi formed in both groups, whereas extracellular citrullinated histones were seen only in thrombi from wild-type mice. Bone marrow chimera experiments indicated that PAD4 in hematopoietic cells was the source of the prothrombotic effect in deep vein thrombosis. Thrombosis could be rescued by infusion of wild-type neutrophils, suggesting that neutrophil PAD4 was important and sufficient. Endothelial activation and platelet aggregation were normal in PAD4(-/-) mice, as was hemostatic potential determined by bleeding time and platelet plug formation after venous injury. Our results show that PAD4-mediated chromatin decondensation in the neutrophil is crucial for pathological venous thrombosis and present neutrophil activation and PAD4 as potential drug targets for deep vein thrombosis.

  18. Deep Vein Thrombosis as Initial Manifestation of Whipple Disease

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Mônica Souza de Miranda; da Paz, Alexandre Rolim; Gaertner, Ana Beatriz Person; Melo, Cibelle Ingrid Stephen; Filgueiras, Priscyanne Lins; Jerome, Rafaella Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wipple disease (WD) is a rare chronic disease caused by the bacillus Tropheryma whipplei. Constitutive, rheumatologic, gastrointestinal, cardiac, cerebral, lymphatic, cutaneous, and ophthalmological signs are possible systemic symptoms. However, thrombotic manifestations are rarely described as “stroke-like syndrome” or arterial thrombosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations and pathological examination. Laboratory findings may include anemia, leukocytosis, and thrombocytosis. Objective We report a case of venous thrombosis as initial manifestation of WD. Case Report We describe the case of a 53-year-old male with iliofemoral vein thrombosis followed by intermittent diarrhea, loss of appetite, abdominal distension, and bloating. A mild malnutrition state with a weight loss of 13 kg, pallor (+/4 +), presence of lower-limb edema (+/4 +), and hypertympanic distended abdomen occurred. Laboratory tests on admission revealed anemia, positive inflammatory activity tests, and normal coagulation. Endoscopic examination showed villous edema with white dotted infiltrates in the second duodenal portion and intestinal lymphangiectasia in the terminal ileum. Pathological examination revealed numerous macrophages with positive periodic acid-Schiff inclusions. Venous Doppler ultrasound showed extensive deep thrombosis on the left lower limb and recanalization of the femoral vein in the right lower limb. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone and enoxaparin sodium, which led to an improvement of gastrointestinal and thrombosis symptoms. Comments Hypercoagulability, endothelial damage, vasculitis, and blood stasis are present in T. whipplei infection, which are associated with the activation of inflammatory mechanisms as well as procoagulant and thromboembolic events. WD should be part of the differential diagnosis of diseases that cause venous thrombosis of unknown origin. PMID:27920655

  19. Internal Jugular and Subclavian Vein Thrombosis in a Case of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayama, Nana; Morozumi, Shouko; Nakano, Mika; Nakayama, Akari; Takahata, Yoshiomi; Sakaguchi, Yuusuke; Inoue, Natsuki; Kubota, Toshiki; Takenoya, Akiko; Ishii, Yoshiko; Okubo, Haruka; Yamaguchi, Souta; Ono, Tsuyoshi; Oharaseki, Toshiaki; Yoshikawa, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    Central venous catheter insertion and cancer represent some of the important predisposing factors for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). DVT usually develops in the lower extremities, and venous thrombosis of the upper extremities is uncommon. Early diagnosis and treatment of deep venous thrombosis are of importance, because it is a precursor of complications such as pulmonary embolism and postthrombotic syndrome. A 47-year-old woman visited our department with painful swelling on the left side of her neck. Initial examination revealed swelling of the region extending from the left neck to the shoulder without any redness of the overlying skin. Laboratory tests showed a white blood cell count of 5,800/mm3 and an elevated serum C-reactive protein of 4.51 mg/dL. Computed tomography (CT) of the neck revealed a vascular filling defect in the left internal jugular vein to left subclavian vein region, with the venous lumina completely occluded with dense soft tissue. On the basis of the findings, we made the diagnosis of thrombosis of the left internal jugular and left subclavian veins. The patient was begun on treatment with oral rivaroxaban, but the left shoulder pain worsened. She was then admitted to the hospital and treated by balloon thrombectomy and thrombolytic therapy, which led to improvement of the left subclavian venous occlusion. Histopathologic examination of the removed thrombus revealed adenocarcinoma cells, indicating hematogenous dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:28194291

  20. Lower extremity venous reflux

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Tajmir, Shahein; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous incompetence in the lower extremity is a common clinical problem. Basic understanding of venous anatomy, pathophysiologic mechanisms of venous reflux is essential for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. The complex interplay of venous pressure, abdominal pressure, venous valvular function and gravitational force determine the venous incompetence. This review is intended to provide a succinct review of the pathophysiology of venous incompetence and the current role of imaging in its management. PMID:28123974

  1. Patterns of venous reflux and obstruction in patients with skin damage due to chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Patel, Parag J; Tiongson, Jay E; Pryor, Landon; Leon, Luis R; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos K

    2007-01-01

    Identified were characteristics of individuals with skin damage related to chronic venous disease. Patients with chronic venous disease (n = 164) were evaluated with duplex ultrasound imaging and were placed in classes 4, 5, and 6 according to the CEAP classification. Their findings were compared with 100 class 2 controls. The prevalence of deep venous thrombosis was higher in the study group (23.7%) versus controls (5.1%; P < .0001), as was the prevalence of deep, perforator, and combined patterns of disease (P < .0001, P < .0007, and P < .0001). The mean duration of disease in controls 2 was shorter compared with the study group (P = .0019). The prevalence of reflux and obstruction within the study group was higher than in controls (P = .0021). Skin changes accurately reflect severity of chronic venous disease. Superficial and perforator vein reflux is the major cause of disease.

  2. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency: a possible risk factor for thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Venkateswaran, Lakshmi; Scaglia, Fernando; McLin, Valerie; Hertel, Paula; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Karpen, Saul; Mahoney, Donald; Yee, Donald L

    2009-07-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common urea cycle defect. Thromboembolic complications have not heretofore been linked with this diagnosis. We describe four patients with neonatal-onset OTC deficiency who developed vascular thromboses. One patient had arterial thrombosis; the rest developed venous thromboses. Multiple pro-thrombotic risk factors were identified. Low plasma arginine levels were observed in all patients at the time of thrombosis. Arginine deficiency and the resultant nitric oxide insufficiency may contribute to thrombotic risk. Careful normalization of plasma arginine and citrulline levels and increased surveillance for thrombotic complications should be considered in patients with OTC deficiency.

  3. Deep vein thrombosis of the lower limb secondary to lumbar discal hernia compression: a rarity? Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Di Cello, P; Izzo, S; Pugliese, F; Di Poce, I; Orsini, A; Izzo, L; Mazzone, G; Biancucci, F; Sinaimeri, G; Valabrega, S; Almansour, M; Izzo, P

    2016-01-01

    This case report is about a 70-years-old female patient, suffering from discal hernia, with compression of the iliac vein, that led to the formation of deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs. The angio-CT scan revealed the starting point of the L4- L5 compression where a voluminous discal hernia caused deep vein thrombosis, with the involvement the femoro-popliteal venous axis. Blood samples and PET-CT scans excluded other possible etiologic factors. This case demonstrates how a voluminous discal hernia can cause venous thrombosis.

  4. Deep vein thrombosis of the lower limb secondary to lumbar discal hernia compression: a rarity? Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    DI CELLO, P.; IZZO, S.; PUGLIESE, F.; DI POCE, I.; ORSINI, A.; IZZO, L.; MAZZONE, G.; BIANCUCCI, F.; SINAIMERI, G.; VALABREGA, S.; ALMANSOUR, M.; IZZO, P.

    2016-01-01

    This case report is about a 70-years-old female patient, suffering from discal hernia, with compression of the iliac vein, that led to the formation of deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs. The angio-CT scan revealed the starting point of the L4–L5 compression where a voluminous discal hernia caused deep vein thrombosis, with the involvement the femoro-popliteal venous axis. Blood samples and PET-CT scans excluded other possible etiologic factors. This case demonstrates how a voluminous discal hernia can cause venous thrombosis. PMID:27734797

  5. Ultrasound Guidance as a Rescue Technique for Peripheral Intravenous Cannulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-14

    painful, time consuming, and may result in arterial puncture, nerve damage, and paresthes ias.5 Other routes such as central venous or venous cut down...peripherally inserted central lines-PICCS), femoral catheterizations during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and peripheral IV catheters in difficult...techniques for gaining venous access. What to do when peripheral intravenous catheterization is not possible. J Crit 11/n. 1993;8:435-442. 2. Nee PA

  6. A peripherally inserted central catheter line, inserted the day before surgery, decreases the time from induction to incision for spinal deformity surgery and safely provides central venous access during surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stuedemann, Anne E; Schwend, Richard M; Thomas, Valorie K; Leamon, Julia M; Lightner, Tammy S

    2017-02-24

    Pediatric patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity may benefit from central venous access to provide intraoperative monitoring and fluid resuscitation. For pediatric surgical patients requiring central access, we hypothesized that placing a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line preoperatively should decrease time from induction of anesthesia to incision and result in improved patient safety and decreased operating room charges. This was a retrospective, nonrandomized, and case comparison study. Clinical records of all children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis or neuromuscular scoliosis treated surgically by the senior author between December 2007 and April 2012 were reviewed. Control group patients had a central venous catheter (CVC) placed by the anesthesiologist after induction of anesthesia. The trial group had a PICC placed under local anesthesia the day before surgery by an experienced vascular access team. The time from induction of anesthesia to the time for the surgical incision was determined for each study group. The CVC line placement charges were determined by the operating room time charges at $214/min. Charges saved were the mean time difference multiplied by the operating room time charge, less the charge for PICC line insertion ($1282). There were 29 neuromuscular patients, the mean age was 13 years (SD: 4 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 91 min [95% confidence interval (CI): 67-115 min] and for the CVC group 113 min (95% CI: 99-127 min, P=0.083). For this mean time difference of 22 min, the estimated cost savings would be $3426 per patient. There were 59 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the mean age was 14 years (SD: 2 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 78 min (95% CI: 74-82 min) and for the CVC group 106 min (95% CI: 96-116  min, P≤0.001). For this mean time difference of 28 min, the estimated cost savings would

  7. Ovarian and Renal Vein Thrombosis: A Rare Cause of Fever Outer the Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Togan, Turhan; Turan, Hale; Cifci, Egemen; Çiftci, Ceylan

    2015-01-01

    Although there is no other underlying disease, women can sometimes experience rare and serious diseases such as ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) and renal vein thrombosis (RVT) after giving birth. The widespread development of thrombosis is treated for the first time in this study. Stasis, coagulation factor abnormalities, and intimal damage to the venous thrombosis risk can increase during pregnancy. It was mentioned that it diagnoses an abnormality in the hypercoagulability half of women with OVT. Despite the hypercoagulant abnormality observed in pregnant women, it was very unusual that the renal vein thrombosis led to this complication. It can lead to severe complication of OVT which can even cause death. It was the first time that the renal vein and ovarian vein thrombosis were observed in the postpartum period, and there was no coagulation abnormality. It is known that the thrombus in the postpartum period can be observed with the fever of unknown origin. The problematic, but rarely observed, postpartum disease such as ovarian venous thrombosis (OVT) is generally observed in the right ovarian vein. In this disease, avoiding the resulting laparotomy heparin and intravenous antibiotics is best solution for the patient. If it is to be noted a fever for unknown reasons, that it be thrombosis. PMID:26185694

  8. Venous Thromboembolism Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, R.W.; Hsieh, T.J.; Aubut, JA. L.; Eng, J.J.; Krassioukov, A.; Tu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the published literature on the treatment of deep venous thromboembolism post-spinal cord injury (SCI). Data Sources MEDLINE/Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles addressing the treatment of deep venous thromboembolism post-SCI. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale, while non-RCTs were assessed using the Downs and Black evaluation tool. Study Selection Studies included RCTs, non-RCTS, cohort, case-control, case series, pre-post, and postinterventional studies. Case studies were included only when no other studies were available. Data Extraction Data extracted included demographics, the nature of the study intervention, and study results. Data Synthesis Levels of evidence were assigned to the interventions using a modified Sackett scale. Conclusions Twenty-three studies met inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies examined various pharmacologic interventions for the treatment or prevention of deep venous thrombosis in SCI patients. There was strong evidence to support the use of low molecular weight heparin in reducing venous thrombosis events, and a higher adjusted dose of unfractionated heparin was found to be more effective than 5000 units administered every 12 hours, although bleeding complication was more common. Nonpharmacologic treatments were also reviewed, but again limited evidence was found to support these treatments. PMID:19236977

  9. [Venous thromboembolic risk during repatriation for medical reasons].

    PubMed

    Stansal, A; Perrier, E; Coste, S; Bisconte, S; Manen, O; Lazareth, I; Conard, J; Priollet, P

    2015-12-01

    In France, approximately 3000 people are repatriated every year, either in a civil situation by insurers. Repatriation also concerns French army soldiers. The literature is scarce on the topic of venous thromboembolic risk and its prevention during repatriation for medical reasons, a common situation. Most studies have focused on the association between venous thrombosis and travel, a relationship recognized more than 60 years ago but still subject to debate. Examining the degree of venous thromboembolic risk during repatriation for medical reasons must take into account several parameters, related to the patient, to comorbid conditions and to repatriation modalities. Appropriate prevention must be determined on an individual basis.

  10. Venous pressure in man during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, K. A.; Roecker, L.; Gauer, O. H.; Krause, R.; Wicke, H. J.; Leach, C.; Landry, R.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether the body fluid shift from the lower limbs toward the head that occurs during spaceflight leads to lasting increases of venous pressure in the upper body, venous pressure and hematocrit measurements were made on four astronauts before flight and 1 and 12 hours after recovery and compared with measurements in space. During the mission the hematocrit was elevated and the venous pressure lowered by 1 to 8 centimeters of water as compared with the preflight data. One hour after landing the hematocrit decreased, indicating a hemodilution, venous pressures were unexpectedly high, and a body weight loss of 4 to 5 percent was observed. Twelve hours later the venous pressures were the lowest recorded during the study. The fluid shift apparently takes place during the first several hours of spaceflight. Thereafter, the pressure in the peripheral veins and the central circulation is lower than that measured before flight.

  11. Venous thromboembolic disease in colorectal patients.

    PubMed

    McNally, Michael P; Burns, Christopher J

    2009-02-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease, which includes deep vein thromboses as well as pulmonary emboli, can be a significant complication in the postoperative patient. In particular, colorectal patients often carry a higher risk for venous thromboembolism when compared with patients undergoing other operative procedures. Features unique to colorectal patients are the high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease or malignancy. Typically, these patients will undergo lengthy pelvic procedures, which also contribute to a cumulative risk of venous thrombosis. It is critical that all patients and the proposed operative procedure are appropriately risk stratified. Risk stratification allows for easier implementation of an appropriate prophylactic strategy. There are a wide range of safe and effective mechanical and pharmacologic measures available. The authors provide very specific recommendations, but note that clinical judgment plays a significant role.

  12. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research.

  13. A case of renal cell carcinoma with an extensive inferior vena cava thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alfreijat, Majd

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most prevalent primary renal malignant neoplasm in adults. Most of the cases are usually found incidentally. It is commonly associated with venous thrombosis. We demonstrate a case of a RCC which was associated with an extensive thrombus that reached the upper part of the inferior vena cava (IVC). We also perform a brief literature review about the association between RCC and IVC thrombosis. PMID:27802848

  14. Portal vein thrombosis with protein C-S deficiency in a non-cirrhotic patient

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Gustavo A; Morán, Segundo; Corona-Cedillo, Roberto; Brom-Valladares, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    There are several conditions that can lead to portal vein thrombosis (PVT), including including infection, malignancies, and coagulation disorders. Anew condition of interest is protein C and S deficiencies, associated with hypercoagulation and recurrent venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a non-cirrhotic 63-year-old male diagnosed with acute superior mesenteric vein thrombosis and PVT and combined deficiencies in proteins C and S, recanalized by short-term low molecular heparin plus oral warfarin therapy. PMID:25068006

  15. Management of complications related to central venous catheters in cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit

    2014-04-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are important for the treatment of patients with cancer, especially in the perioperative and palliative care settings. These devices not only allow for the administration of chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and other intravenous therapies, but they may also improve the patients' quality of life by reducing the need for repeated peripheral venipunctures. Thrombotic and infectious complications are common, especially in the long-term use of CVCs. There are different types of thrombotic complications associated with CVCs, that is, a thrombotic occlusion of the catheter, a mural thrombus at the catheter tip and classical deep vein thrombosis, which occurs most frequently in the upper extremity where the majority of long-term catheters are inserted. Infections are common complications associated with CVCs. Patients with cancer who receive intensive chemotherapy and those patients who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have a markedly increased risk for insertion site and bloodstream infections. In this review, the epidemiology and risk factors that predispose patients to CVC-related thrombosis and infection are discussed. The diagnostic and therapeutic options according to the published data and the current guidelines are summarized and data for establishing primary and secondary preventative strategies are provided.

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem in the lung, called a pulmonary embolism. Sitting still for a long time can make ...

  17. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Review Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  18. [Thrombosis and assisted reproductive techniques (ART)].

    PubMed

    Conard, J; Plu-Bureau, G; Horellou, M-H; Samama, M-M; Gompel, A

    2011-06-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) concern procedures designed to increase fertility of couples: artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization (IVF), either classical or after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), transfer of frozen embryos, or gamete intrafallopian transfer. Their use has greatly increased these last years. They may be associated with severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and one possible major complication is venous or arterial thrombosis. Thromboses are rare but potentially serious with important sequellae. They are mostly observed in unusual sites such as head and neck vessels and the mechanism is still unknown although hypotheses have been proposed. This review is an update of our knowledge and an attempt to consider guidelines for the prevention and treatment of ART-associated thromboses, which frequently occur when the woman is pregnant. Prevention of severe ovarian hyperstimulation by appropriate stimulation procedures, detection of women at risk of hyperstimulation and of women at high risk of thrombosis should allow reduction of the risk of thrombosis, possibly by administration of a thromboprophylaxis at a timing and dose which can be only determined by extrapolation.

  19. [Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Chagoya, Gloria Alejandra; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background: despite the proven effectiveness of preventive therapy for deep vein thrombosis, a significant proportion of patients at risk for thromboembolism do not receive prophylaxis during hospitalization. Our objective was to determine the adherence to thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines in a general hospital as a quality control strategy. Methods: a random audit of clinical charts was conducted at the Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico, to determine the degree of adherence to deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines. The instrument used was the Caprini's checklist for thrombosis risk assessment in adult patients. Results: the sample included 300 patient charts; 182 (60.7 %) were surgical patients and 118 were medical patients. Forty six patients (15.3 %) received deep vein thrombosis pharmacologic prophylaxis; 27.1 % of medical patients received deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis versus 8.3 % of surgical patients (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: our results show that adherence to DVT prophylaxis at our hospital is extremely low. Only 15.3 % of our patients at risk received treatment, and even patients with very high risk received treatment in less than 25 % of the cases. We have implemented strategies to increase compliance with clinical guidelines.

  20. Endovascular treatment of iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis in pregnancy using US-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gedikoglu, Murat; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to describe ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy in pregnant women with iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis. METHODS This study included nine pregnant women with acute and subacute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis, who were severe symptomatic cases with massive swelling and pain of the leg. Patients were excluded from the study if they had only femoropopliteal deep vein thrombosis or mild symptoms of deep vein thrombosis. US-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy was applied to achieve thrombus removal and uninterrupted venous flow. The treatment was considered successful if there was adequate venous patency and symptomatic relief. RESULTS Complete or significant thrombus removal and uninterrupted venous flow from the puncture site up to the iliac veins were achieved in all patients at first intervention. Complete relief of leg pain was achieved immediately in seven patients (77.8%). Two patients (22.2%) had a recurrence of thrombosis in the first week postintervention. One of them underwent a second intervention, where percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy was performed again with successful removal of thrombus and establishment of in line flow. Two patients were lost to follow-up after birth. None of the remaining seven patients had rethrombosis throughout the postpartum period. Symptomatic relief was detected clinically in these patients. CONCLUSION Endovascular treatment with US-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy can be considered as a safe and effective way to remove thrombus from the deep veins in pregnant women with acute and subacute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis. PMID:27801353

  1. Postsurgical segmental mesenteric ischemic thrombosis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cuervo, María; Gracia, Luis A; Vieitez, Verónica; Jiménez, Joquin; Durán, Esther; Ezquerra, Luis J

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old, Lusitanian stallion was admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a 12-hour history of signs of abdominal pain. Exploratory celiotomy was performed due to an inguinal hernia, and a second celiotomy was performed in response to the abdominal pain. The horse was euthanized and mesenteric venous thrombosis was diagnosed and considered likely due to peritonitis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).

  2. Postsurgical segmental mesenteric ischemic thrombosis in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cuervo, María; Gracia, Luis A.; Vieitez, Verónica; Jiménez, Joquin; Durán, Esther; Ezquerra, Luis J.

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old, Lusitanian stallion was admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a 12-hour history of signs of abdominal pain. Exploratory celiotomy was performed due to an inguinal hernia, and a second celiotomy was performed in response to the abdominal pain. The horse was euthanized and mesenteric venous thrombosis was diagnosed and considered likely due to peritonitis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). PMID:23814308

  3. [Deep vein thrombosis revealing myeloproliferative syndrome in two adolescents].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, A; Heissat, S; Caron, N; Viremouneix, L; Pracros, J-P; Javouhey, E; Lachaux, A; Mialou, V

    2014-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis occurs in 30% of patients with essential thrombocythemia, but rarely at initial diagnosis. We report two pediatric patients with essential thrombocythemia revealed by atypical deep vein thrombosis. First, a 16-year-old girl presented Budd-Chiari syndrome revealed by a hemorrhagic shock. Clinical exam revealed isolated splenomegaly. A search for thrombophilia found a factor V Leiden homozygous mutation and a Jak2 mutation. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of a myeloproliferative disorder. The second case, a 17-year-old girl, had a routine examination by her physician that revealed splenomegaly. Ultrasonography displayed thrombus in the splenic and portal vein. An isolated Jak2 mutation was found and a myeloproliferative disorder was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. The diagnosis of myeloproliferative disorder was made in both patients presenting atypical venous thrombosis with a Jak2 mutation and confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. These initial presentations of myeloproliferative disorders are rare in childhood and possibly underdiagnosed.

  4. [Diagnosing venous and venous/arterial ulcers].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    A venous ulcer can be diagnosed on the basis of elements arising from the questioning and the clinical examination of the patient. A venous Doppler ultrasound can specify the type of reverse flow (superficial and/or deep). Measuring the ankle brachial pressure index helps to eliminate or confirm any arterial involvement. Depending on the systolic pressure index, the ulcer will be considered as purely venous, mixed (arterial-venous) or predominantly arterial.

  5. Thyroid vein thrombosis in a young woman with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation receiving cyproterone acetate/ethinylestradiol treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nazli, Yunus; Colak, Necmettin; Aksoy, Omer N; Cakir, Omer

    2011-06-01

    Thyroid vein thrombosis is a rare variety of venous thrombosis. The use of oral contraceptives and heterozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutation could have synergistic effects on the onset of venous thromboembolism. We report a 28-year-old woman with thyroid vein thrombosis. The thrombosis was possibly provoked by a combination of heterozygous MTHFR gene mutation and the use of a combined oral contraceptive (COC) containing cyproterone acetate/ethinylestradiol (CPA/EE) for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The patient was treated successfully with low molecular weight heparin and oral anticoagulation. The thyroid vein thrombosis resolved and the patient was advised to maintain lifelong use of anticoagulation therapy. Our report emphasizes that the combination of heterozygous MTHFR gene mutation, PCOS, and the use of a COC-containing CPA/EE could increase risk of thyroid vein thrombosis in young adults.

  6. Postdural Puncture Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis in a Juvenile Case of Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Miriam; Haberlandt, Edda; Baumann, Matthias; Entenmann, Andreas; Wagner, Michaela; Rostasy, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background. The causes of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are manifold as is its clinical presentation. Case. We report the case of a CVT following lumbar puncture and intravenous glucocorticosteroid therapy in a female adolescent with a clinically isolated syndrome and risk factors for thrombosis. Conclusion. In adolescent patients with acute inflammatory disease undergoing lumbar puncture followed by intravenous high-dose glucocorticosteroid therapy, one should be aware of the elevated risk for thrombosis. A persistent headache with change in the headache pattern and loss of a postural component might be a sign for CVT, requiring emergency imaging of the brain. PMID:26558127

  7. Postdural Puncture Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis in a Juvenile Case of Clinically Isolated Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michel, Miriam; Haberlandt, Edda; Baumann, Matthias; Entenmann, Andreas; Wagner, Michaela; Rostasy, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background. The causes of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are manifold as is its clinical presentation. Case. We report the case of a CVT following lumbar puncture and intravenous glucocorticosteroid therapy in a female adolescent with a clinically isolated syndrome and risk factors for thrombosis. Conclusion. In adolescent patients with acute inflammatory disease undergoing lumbar puncture followed by intravenous high-dose glucocorticosteroid therapy, one should be aware of the elevated risk for thrombosis. A persistent headache with change in the headache pattern and loss of a postural component might be a sign for CVT, requiring emergency imaging of the brain.

  8. Iatrogenic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm and Secondary Ipsilateral Deep Vein Thrombosis: An Indication for Early Surgical Exploration.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Marios; Zirngibl, Hubert; Floros, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm formation often complicates transfemoral interventional procedures. Nonsurgical treatment consists of femoral compression and thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance. We report a 74-year-old man who was diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm, following coronary angiography. Duplex ultrasound revealed deep vein thrombosis of the ipsilateral common femoral vein. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was unsuccessfully performed, and the patient subsequently underwent surgical exploration for repair of the pseudoaneurysm and release of the venous compression. The increased local inflammation, because of the thrombosis, added in surgical difficulties. We conclude that early surgical intervention should be considered as a primary strategy in patients with femoral pseudoaneurysms and deep vein thrombosis secondary to femoral compression.

  9. Clinical Trials in Peripheral Vascular Disease: Pipeline and Trial Designs: An Evaluation of the ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    PubMed Central

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R.; Chiswell, Karen; Tidemann-Miller, Beth A.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Conte, Michael S.; White, Christopher J.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Laird, John R.; Hiatt, William R.; Tasneem, Asba; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tremendous advances have occurred in therapies for peripheral vascular disease (PVD); however, until recently it has not been possible to examine the entire clinical trial portfolio of studies for treatment of PVD (both arterial and venous disease). Methods and Results We examined interventional trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov from October 2007 through September 2010 (n=40,970) and identified 676 (1.7%) PVD trials (n=493 arterial only, n=170 venous only, n=13 both arterial and venous). Most arterial studies investigated lower extremity peripheral artery disease and acute stroke (35% and 24%, respectively), while most venous studies examined deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prevention (42%) or venous ulceration (25%). A placebo-controlled trial design was used in 27% of the PVD trials, and 4% of the PVD trials excluded patients aged >65 years. Enrollment in at least 1 US site decreased from 51% in 2007 to 41% of trials in 2010. Compared with non-cardiology disciplines, PVD trials were more likely to be double-blinded, investigate use of devices and procedures, and have industry sponsorship and assumed funding source, and less likely to investigate drug and behavioral therapies. Geographic access to PVD clinical trials within the United States is limited to primarily large metropolitan areas. Conclusions PVD studies represent a small group of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, despite the high prevalence of vascular disease in the general population. This low number, compounded by the decreasing number of PVD trials in the United States, is concerning and may limit the ability to inform current clinical practice of patients with PVD. PMID:25239436

  10. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  11. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg – a condition often referred to as deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation ... leg. This condition is often referred to as deep vein thrombosis or DVT. These clots may break ...

  12. [Anticoagulant treatment of venous thromboembolic disease: optimal duration of antivitamin K therapy. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pinède, L; Ninet, J; Boissel, J P; Pasquier, J

    1994-12-10

    Every clinician managing a patient with venous thromboembolism of the lower limbs is faced with two opposing problems: first the risk of antivitamin K induced haemorrhage requires adequate but not excessive hypocoaguability of limited duration (international normalized ratio between 2 and 3); second the threat of recurrence requiring an adequate level of hypocoaguability of sufficient duration. Recently reported clinical data have greatly changed management attitudes. Current recommendations favour a 6 week regimen of antivitamin K for distal venous thrombosis in patients with thromboembolism of lower limb veins without any other aggravating factor and a 12 week regimen for proximal vein thrombosis or pulmonary emboli, although the therapeutic efficacity and risk remain to be demonstrated with precision. In France, we are conducting a multicentric controlled study with sufficient power (1800 patients) comparing parallel groups of patients: those with distal deep venous thrombosis treated 6 versus 12 week regimens, those with proximal deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary emboli treated 12 versus 24 week regimens. The "DOTAVK" study (Durée Optimale du Traitement Antivitamine K) involves patients with first time venous thrombosis or pulmonary emboli and no underlying neoplasia or coagulation disease. The two criteria of outcome are haemorrhage complications and thromboembolic recurrence during treatment and the first year after treatment withdrawal.

  13. Venous thromboembolism is associated with graft-versus-host disease and increased non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kekre, Natasha; Kim, Haesook T; Ho, Vincent T; Cutler, Corey; Armand, Philippe; Nikiforow, Sarah; Alyea, Edwin P; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Connors, Jean M; Koreth, John

    2017-03-24

    Although venous thromboembolism rates and risk factors are well described in patients with cancer, there are limited data on the incidence, risk factors and outcomes of thrombosis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, a curative therapy for patients with hematologic malignancies. We aimed to determine the incidence and risks associated with venous thrombosis in allogeneic stem cell transplant. We studied 2276 recipients of first transplant between 2002-2013 at our institution with a median follow-up of 50 months (range 4-146). Using pharmacy records and subsequent chart review, 190 patients who received systemic anticoagulation for venous thrombosis were identified. The 1 and 2-year cumulative incidence of all venous thrombotic events were 5.5% (95% CI 4.6-6.5%) and 7.1% (95% CI 6.1-8.2%) respectively. There was no difference in age, gender, body mass index, diagnosis, disease risk index, conditioning intensity, donor type or graft source between transplant recipients with and without subsequent thrombosis. In multivariable models, both acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were independently associated with thrombosis occurrence (HR=2.05, 95% CI 1.52-2.76; HR=1.71, 95% CI 1.19-2.46 respectively). Upper extremity thrombosis differed from all other thrombosis in timing, risk factors and clinical impact, and was not associated with non-relapse mortality (HR=1.15; 95% CI 0.69-1.90), unlike all other thrombosis which did increase non-relapse mortality (HR=1.71; 95% CI 1.17-2.49). In subgroup analysis evaluating conventional thrombosis predictors by comparing patients with and without thrombosis, history of prior venous thrombosis was the only significant predictor. Venous thromboembolism has a high incidence after allogeneic stem cell transplant and is associated with graft-versus-host disease and non-relapse mortality.

  14. Characterizing the Risk Factors Associated With Venous Thromboembolism in Pediatric Patients After Central Venous Line Placement

    PubMed Central

    Eades, Shannan; Turiy, Yuliya

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: With the apparent increase in venous thromboembolism noted in the pediatric population, it is important to define which children are at risk for clots and to determine optimal preventative therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for venous thromboembolism in pediatric patients with central venous line placement. METHODS: This was an observational, retrospective, case-control study. Control subjects were patients aged 0 to 18 years who had a central venous line placed. Case subjects had a central line and a radiographically confirmed diagnosis of venous thromboembolism. RESULTS: A total of 150 patients were included in the study. Presence of multiple comorbidities, particularly the presence of a congenital heart defect (34.7% case vs. 14.7% control; p < 0.005), was found to put pediatric patients at increased risk for thrombosis. Additionally, the administration of parenteral nutrition through the central line (34.7% case vs. 18.7% control; p = 0.03) and location of the line increased the risk for clot formation. CONCLUSIONS: With increased awareness of central venous line–related thromboembolism, measures should be taken to reduce the number and duration of central line placements, and further studies addressing the need for thromboprophylaxis should be conducted. PMID:26472949

  15. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Thierry; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community. PMID:25802795

  16. Implementing Thrombosis Guidelines in Cancer Patients: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Bounameaux, Henri; Brenner, Benjamin; Büller, Harry R.; Kakkar, Ajay; Pabinger, Ingrid; Streiff, Michael; Debourdeau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a frequent and serious complication in patients with cancer. It is an independent prognostic factor of death in cancer patients and the second leading cause of death, but physicians often underestimate its importance, as well as the need for adequate prevention and treatment. Management of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer requires the coordinated efforts of a wide range of clinicians, highlighting the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. However, a lack of consensus among various national and international clinical practice guidelines has contributed to knowledge and practice gaps among practitioners, and inconsistent approaches to venous thromboembolism. The 2013 international guidelines for thrombosis in cancer have sought to address these gaps by critically re-evaluating the evidence coming from clinical trials and synthesizing a number of guidelines documents. An individualized approach to prophylaxis is recommended for all patients. PMID:25386357

  17. Predicting post-traumatic stress and health anxiety following a venous thrombotic embolism.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Paul; Patterson, Katie; Noble, Simon

    2016-05-01

    This research identified psychosocial factors associated with post-traumatic stress and health anxiety following a venous thrombotic embolism. In all, 158 participants, largely registered with a venous thrombotic embolism information website (Lifeblood: The Thrombosis Charity), completed an online survey. Post-traumatic symptom scores were linked to health threat, and not moderated by perceived control over risk for further venous thrombotic embolism. Health anxiety was associated with continuing symptoms and a negative emotional response to the venous thrombotic embolism. There is a need to intervene to reduce both short- and long-term distress in this population, ideally using a stepped-care model.

  18. Congenital Thrombophilia and Intracardiac Thrombosis: Probably an Underdiagnosed Event

    PubMed Central

    Girolami, Antonio; de Marinis, Giulia Berti; Treleani, Martina; Tasinato, Valentina; Girolami, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the number of patients with congenital thrombophilia who presented an intracardiac thrombosis. Methods Personal files were reevaluated together with a time-unlimited search of the literature. Results Twenty-five patients with intracardiac thrombosis and congenital thrombophilia have been gathered from the literature including the two personal cases. The distribution observed in thrombophilia patients is similar for left side or right side heart (9 vs 11 cases). The left ventricle and the right ventricle were involved in six or five instances, respectively. In one case, both ventricles were involved. On the contrary, the left atrium was involved in three cases whereas the right atrium was affected in six cases. In the remaining cases, more than one heart chamber was involved. Conclusions In “normal” subjects, left side thromboses are predominant once catheter-associated thrombi are excluded. The reason of this discrepancy lies in the greater prothrombotic effect exercised by congenital thrombophilia on venous thrombosis compared to arterial thrombosis. The relative high prevalence of cardiac thrombosis seen in patients with antithrombin and protein C deficiencies indicated that a cardiac evaluation should be carried out in all patients with these two defects.

  19. Risk factors, management and primary prevention of thrombotic complications related to the use of central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2012-09-01

    An adequate vascular access is of importance for the treatment of patients with cancer and complex illnesses in the intensive, perioperative or palliative care setting. Deep vein thrombosis and thrombotic occlusion are the most common complications attributed to central venous catheters in short-term and, especially, in long-term use. In this review we will focus on the risk factors, management and prevention strategies of catheter-related thrombosis and occlusion. Due to the lack of randomised controlled trials, there is still controversy about the optimal treatment of catheter-related thrombotic complications, and therapy has been widely adopted using the evidence concerning lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Given the increasing use of central venous catheters in patients that require long-term intravenous therapy, the problem of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis can be expected to increase in the future. We provide data for establishing a more uniform strategy for preventing, diagnosing and treating catheter-related thrombotic complications.

  20. A Case Study of Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Right Internal Jugular Vein in a Healthy 21-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Geri

    2016-01-01

    We are reporting a case of a healthy 21-year-old male, with no significant past medical history, who was found to have an incidental nonocclusive deep vein thrombosis in the right internal jugular vein detected on a head MRI previously ordered for work-up of headaches. A follow-up upper extremity venous Doppler ultrasound confirmed the presence of a partially occlusive deep vein thrombosis in the right jugular vein. The case presented is unique for the reason that the patient is young and has no prior risk factor, personal or familial, for venous thrombosis except for associated polycythemia on clinical presentation. PMID:27725891

  1. Fatal bilateral lower-limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following single digit replantation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Anderson S M; Fok, Margaret W M; Fung, Boris K K

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism in hand surgery is rare. There is no report in the literature on postoperative mortality from venous thromboembolism following microsurgery in upper limbs. We report the case of a 56-year-old Chinese man who died from pulmonary embolism as a result of bilateral lower-limb deep vein thrombosis following prolonged surgery under general anaesthesia after replantation of a finger. This case raises awareness of the need for precautions against venous thromboembolism following prolonged microsurgery and identification of high-risk patients.

  2. Management of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Finks, Shannon W.; Trujillo, Toby C.; Dobesh, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review clinical data on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) used in the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) as well as practical considerations when using these products. Data Sources: Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar for VTE, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and relevant drug international nonproprietary names were conducted. Additional online searches were conducted for prescribing information. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Relevant articles on dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban for the management of VTE compared with oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; published between 1966 and December 2015) were reviewed and summarized, together with information on dosing, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interactions. Data Synthesis: The DOACs have the potential to circumvent many of the disadvantages of VKAs. At a minimum, they greatly increase the available therapeutic options, thus providing a greater opportunity for clinicians to select a management option that best fits the needs of individual patients. Despite the significant advance that DOACs represent, they are not without risk and require careful consideration of a number of clinical issues to optimize safety and efficacy. Conclusions: The emergence of DOACs for the management of thromboembolic disorders represents a paradigm shift from oral VKAs. The DOACs provide similar efficacy and improved safety in selected patients as compared with VKAs. Clinicians treating VTE need to be familiar with the intricacies involved in using these agents, including the appropriate dose selection for the relevant indication, avoidance of drug-drug and drug-disease interactions, and consideration of dose adjustments in specific clinical situations, such as organ dysfunction. PMID:26917821

  3. Traumatic Distal Ulnar Artery Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Karakaşlı, Ahmet; Mayda, Aslan; Karcı, Tolga; Aycan, Hakan; Kobak, Şenol

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about a posttraumatic distal ulnar artery thrombosis case that has occurred after a single blunt trauma. The ulnar artery thrombosis because of chronic trauma is a frequent condition (hypothenar hammer syndrome) but an ulnar artery thrombosis because of a single direct blunt trauma is rare. Our patient who has been affected by a single blunt trauma to his hand and developed ulnar artery thrombosis has been treated by resection of the thrombosed ulnar artery segment. This report shows that a single blunt trauma can cause distal ulnar artery thrombosis in the hand and it can be treated merely by thrombosed segment resection in suitable cases. PMID:25276455

  4. Umbilical venous catheterization gone wrong: Hepatic complications

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Poonam; Vire, Adweta; Anand, Rama; Jajoo, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic complications of malposition of umbilical venous catheter (UVC) are uncommon and occur due to extravasation of hypertonic fluids and the blood products in the liver tissue. Various hepatic complications include thrombosis of hepatic vessels, hepatic necrosis, hepatic fluid collections, and hematoma, with the intraparenchymal liver lesions seen along the course of ductus venosus. Radiologists must be aware of these complications and their imaging findings, as the timely recognition and immediate management can prevent the fatal outcome. Here, we present a rare case of intraparenchymal liver lesions associated with malposition of UVC in a preterm baby. PMID:27081222

  5. Do neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to the heightened risk of thrombosis in inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ashish N; Kazzaz, Nayef M; Knight, Jason S

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic events, both arterial and venous, are a major health concern worldwide. Further, autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome, predispose to thrombosis, and thereby push the risk for these morbid events even higher. In recent years, neutrophils have been identified as important players in both arterial and venous thrombosis. Specifically, chromatin-based structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play a key role in activating the coagulation cascade, recruiting platelets, and serving as scaffolding upon which the thrombus can be assembled. At the same time, neutrophils and NETs are emerging as important mediators of pathogenic inflammation in the aforementioned autoimmune diseases. Here, we first review the general role of NETs in thrombosis. We then posit that exaggerated NET release contributes to the prothrombotic diatheses of systemic lupus erythematosus, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:26730289

  6. Multi-channel photon migration study in visible Chinese human muscle for optical detection of deep vein thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunlong; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) always induced venous thrombosis. Most cases of venous thrombosis were induced by deep vein thrombosis (DVT), with high incidence rate of >60% in >60 years old people. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were reported recently to be an intriguing and potential technique in detecting DVT in clinics. However, the photon transport is still unclear, which is crucial for the image reconstruction of the updated development called as NIRS-based DVT imager. Here we employed the Monte Carlo simulation software for 3D voxelized media (MCVM) and the Visible Chinese Human (VCH) model, which segmentation is finest in the world, to simulate multi-channel photon migration in calf muscle. And the image reconstruction of DVT hemodynamic distribution was achieved. This study, for the first time, provides the most realistic 3-D multichannel photon migration for NIRS study on DVT, and explored the image reconstruction for furtherly developing a NIRS-based DVT imager.

  7. [Venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Lecumberri, Ramón; Feliu, Jesús; Rocha, Eduardo

    2006-06-03

    The association between neoplastic diseases and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is known since long time ago. The nature of this association is bidirectional. On one hand, cancer increases the incidence of venous thrombosis and, on the other hand, the hemostatic system does play a key role in the tumorigenesis process. However, despite recent advances in the field, prophylaxis and treatment of VTE in cancer patients is still a challenge, due to the complexity of this type of patients. This review is focused on some important points regarding management of VTE in cancer patients such as physiopathology, epidemiology, search for hidden malignancy, prognostic impact, prophylaxis in the medical and surgical setting, or initial and long-term treatment.

  8. [Prevention of venous thromboembolism in musculoskeletal surgery].

    PubMed

    Pabinger-Fasching, Ingrid; Eichinger-Hasenauer, Sabine; Grohs, Josef; Hochreiter, Josef; Kastner, Norbert; Korninger, Hans Christian; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle; Marlovits, Stefan; Niessner, Herwig; Rachbauer, Franz; Ritschl, Peter; Wurnig, Christian; Windhager, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Musculoskeletal surgery is associated with a high risk of venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOAK) has broadened the possibilities for prevention of venous thromboembolism in the course of orthopedic and trauma surgery. Addressing this recent development, the Austrian Societies of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery (ÖGO), Trauma Surgery (ÖGU), Hematology and Oncology (OeGHO) and of Anaesthesiology, Reanimation und Intensive Care Medicine (ÖGARI) have taken the initiative to create Austrian guidelines for the prevention of thromboembolism after total hip and knee replacement, hip fracture surgery, interventions at the spine and cases of minor orthopedic and traumatic surgery. Furthermore, the pharmacology of the DOAK and the pivotal trial data for each of the three currently available substances - apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban - are briefly presented. Separate chapters are dedicated to "anticoagulation and neuroaxial anesthesia" and "bridging".

  9. [Prevalence of stenosis and thrombosis of central veins in hemodialysis after a tunneled jugular catheter].

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Vanel, T; Chazot, C; Charra, B; Terrat, J C; Hurot, J M

    2001-01-01

    Central venous stenosis (ST) and thrombosis (TB) related to catheter (KT) had been reported mostly for the subclavian vein. We performed a systematic cavographic study to evaluate the prevalence of these complications in 51 hemodialysis patients with present or previous history of tunneled internal jugular catheter. Each of them had used one or several KT (1.8 +/- 1.4 KT) for a mean 28 +/- 26 month cumulative time (i.e. 43,584 days total exposure time). Fifty percent of the KT were PermCath Quinton and 50% were Twincath (uncuffed) or CS 100 (cuffed) Medcomp. Twenty-seven had no ST (53%, group I), 24 had one or several significant ST (47%, group II) of superior Vena Cava (SVC, n = 4), inferior Vena Cava (IVC, n = 1), Brachio-cephalic Vein (BCV, n = 5) and subclavian vein (SC, n = 10), or a TB of SVC (n = 1), IVC (n = 3), BCV (n = 3), SC (n = 2). This accounts for an incidence of 0.55 ST or TB/1000 patient-days. Five of the twelve subclavian ST and TB had no history of previous subclavian catheter. Comparison between the two groups showed no differences according to age, time on dialysis, diabetes, hematocrit, CRP, cumulative time with catheter, catheter-related infections, type of catheter and anticoagulant treatment. IVC catheter tip's position is an important risk factor for TB and ST (4/6). Twelve group II patients had ST or TB-related symptoms, with a functional AV fistula in 9 cases. Eleven patients underwent repeated percutaneous angioplasty with 4 additional Wallstents and in 2 cases an AV fistula need to be closed. Central venous ST and TB after a jugular KT is extremely frequent, mostly without any symptoms. Consequences on peripheral or central vascular access, cost and poor long-term patency rate of angioplasty are of major importance. These results incite us to further reduce the catheter use in dialysis patients.

  10. [Medial venous catheter or midline (MVC)].

    PubMed

    Carrero Caballero, Ma Carmen; Montealegre Sanz, María; Cubero Pérez, Ma Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Current clinical practice is characterised for importance of the patient's quality of life and the need to reduce the costs of their treatment. We search intravenous therapy alternatives that meet the needs of the patient, reducing the complications associated with the use of venous catheters. Scientific evidence shows that there are midline venous catheters that offer patients and professionals the possibility of extending the duration of infusion therapy, using more venous compatibility materials, and with less risk of infection. The Midlines are becoming in a safe an efficient device for intravenous therapy, continuous and intermittent infusion, provided the necessary care by expert nurses. Midline catheters are peripheral venous access devices between 3 to 10 inches in length (8 to 25 cm). Midlines are usually placed in an upper arm vein, such as the brachial or cephalic, and the distal extreme ends below the level of the axillary line. Midlines catheters implanted in the cephalic or deep basilica veins get more blood flow. This large blood volume justifies the lower risk of mechanical or chemical phlebitis. Midlines are routinely used for two to six weeks. Due that the extrem of these catheters does not extend beyond the axillary line, there are limitations for its use: type of infused drugs, velocity of infusion, etc. In general, solutions that have pH 5 to 9, or an osmolarity less than 500 mOsm are appropriate for infusion through a Midline. Its use is recommended in case of treatments over 7 days with low irritant capacity fluids. According to the Infusion Nurses Society's standards of practice, Midline catheters are appropriate for all intravenous fluids that would normally be administered through a short peripheral IV Importantly, due that the catheter does not pass through the central veins, Midlines can be placed without a chest X-ray to confirm placement. For certain situations, Midlines are suitable for acute units and even for care home settings

  11. [The genetics of thrombosis in cancer].

    PubMed

    Soria, José Manuel; López, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multifactorial and complex disease in which the interaction of genetic factors (estimated at 60%) and environmental factors (e.g., the use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, immobility and cancer) determine the risk of thrombosis for each individual. In particular, the association between thrombosis and cancer is well established. Approximately 20% of patients with cancer develop a thromboembolic event over the course of the natural history of the tumor process, with thrombosis being the second leading cause of death for these patients. One of the greatest challenges currently facing the field of oncology is the identification of patients at high risk of VTE who can benefit from thromboprophylaxis. Currently, there is a VTE risk prediction model for patients with cancer (the Khorana risk score); however, its ability to identify patients at high risk is very low. It is important to note that this score, which is based on five clinical parameters, ignores the genetic variability associated with VTE risk. In this article, we present the preliminary results of the Oncothromb study, whose objective is to develop an individual VTE risk prediction model for patients with cancer who are treated with outpatient chemotherapy. Our model includes the clinical and genetic data on each patient (Thrombo inCode(®) genetic profile). Only by integrating multiple layers of biological information (clinical, plasmatic and genetic) we could obtain models that provide accurate information as to which patients are at high risk of developing a thromboembolic event associated with cancer so as to take appropriate prophylactic measures.

  12. D-dimer testing and acute venous thromboembolism. A shortcut to accurate diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Becker, D M; Philbrick, J T; Bachhuber, T L; Humphries, J E

    1996-05-13

    D-dimer fragments can be measured easily in plasma and whole blood, and the presence or absence of D-dimer could be useful in the diagnostic evaluation of venous thromboembolism. We systematically reviewed the English literature for articles that compared D-dimer results with those of other tests for deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Twenty-nine studies were selected for detailed review, and we noted wide variability in assay performance, heterogeneity among subjects, and failure to define absence or presence of venous thromboembolism by a comprehensive criterion standard for diagnosis. These methodologic problems limit the generalizability of the published estimates of D-dimer accuracy for deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, and the clinical utility of this potentially important test remains unproved.

  13. Pilot study of homocysteine and cysteine in patients with thrombosis in different vascular sites. Epidemiology and response to folate.

    PubMed

    Casais, Patricia; Alberto, Maria F; Salviú, Maria J; Meschengieser, Susana S; Aixalá, Monica; Lazzari, Maria A

    2009-02-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for arterial and venous thrombosis. However, lowering homocysteine (Hcy) with vitamins not only failed to improve outcomes but also may lead to recurrent events. Our objectives were to evaluate Hcy and cysteine (Cys) levels in patients with thrombosis in different vascular sites, and their response to folate. One hundred and sixty four consecutive patients with thrombosis (42.1% arterial (AT), 36% venous (VT), 4.9% both venous and arterial thrombosis (AVT) and 17% unusual site (UST)) were included. Hcy and Cys were highest in patients with AVT and UST (p=0.0006). Ninety-three patients were treated, 70% were followed-up. Hcy levels normalized after therapy in all patients. Cys levels tended to vary after therapy according to the site of thrombosis. We observed a significant correlation between folate and Hcy (r: 0.48; p=0.005) among homozygous for MTHFR. A significant inverse relation was observed between Hcy and folate among homozygous and heterozygous (r: 0.462, p=0.007 and r: 0.267; p=0.04, respectively). No correlation was observed between folate and Cys. In conclusion, our observations suggest that Hcy and Cys might be implicated in thrombosis in different vascular sites, and respond differently to folate.

  14. Central venous Access device SeCurement And Dressing Effectiveness (CASCADE) in paediatrics: protocol for pilot randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Victoria; Long, Debbie A; Williams, Tara; Hallahan, Andrew; Mihala, Gabor; Cooke, Marie; Rickard, Claire M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric central venous access devices (CVADs) are associated with a 25% incidence of failure. Securement and dressing are strategies used to reduce failure and complication; however, innovative technologies have not been evaluated for their effectiveness across device types. The primary aim of this research is to evaluate the feasibility of launching a full-scale randomised controlled efficacy trial across three CVAD types regarding CVAD securement and dressing, using predefined feasibility criteria. Methods and analysis Three feasibility randomised, controlled trials are to be undertaken at the Royal Children's Hospital and the Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. CVAD securement and dressing interventions under examination compare current practice with sutureless securement devices, integrated securement dressings and tissue adhesive. In total, 328 paediatric patients requiring a peripherally inserted central catheter (n=100); non-tunnelled CVAD (n=180) and tunnelled CVAD (n=48) to be inserted will be recruited and randomly allocated to CVAD securement and dressing products. Primary outcomes will be study feasibility measured by eligibility, recruitment, retention, attrition, missing data, parent/staff satisfaction and effect size. CVAD failure and complication (catheter-associated bloodstream infection, local infection, venous thrombosis, occlusion, dislodgement and breakage) will be compared between groups. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval to conduct the research has been obtained. All dissemination will be undertaken using the CONSORT Statement recommendations. Additionally, the results will be sent to the relevant organisations which lead CVAD focused clinical practice guidelines development. Trial registration numbers ACTRN12614001327673; ACTRN12615000977572; ACTRN12614000280606. PMID:27259529

  15. Effect of echo contrast media on the visualization of transverse sinus thrombosis with transcranial 3-D duplex sonography.

    PubMed

    Delcker, A; Häussermann, P; Weimar, C

    1999-09-01

    Transcranial duplex sonography has the capacity of detecting venous flow as in the transverse sinus. During a 6-month period, 28 consecutive patients (mean age 55 y) with a clinically suspected diagnosis of cerebral sinus thrombosis were included in the study. All patients were examined using 3-D ultrasound equipment within 24 h of having undergone either venous computerized tomography (CT), venous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or cerebral angiography. A total of 22 healthy patients had a normal venous CT, venous MRI or cerebral angiography of both transverse sinuses. Before echo contrast enhancement, the transverse sinus could be visualized in only 2 of these 44 sinuses (22 patients). A total of 6 patients with an unilaterally missed transverse sinus in 3-D ultrasound suffered from sinus thrombosis (n = 3), hypoplasia (n = 2) or aplasia (n = 1) of the unilateral transverse sinus in neuroradiological tests. In none of the patients with an thrombosis of the transverse sinus did ultrasound contrast media application improve the visualization of the affected sinus. Our study confirms that the normal transverse sinus, insonated through the contralateral temporal bone, often cannot be visualized without the use of contrast agents. With transcranial 3-D duplex sonography, a differentiation between thrombosis, hypoplasia and aplasia of the sinus was not possible.

  16. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Yogesh K; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion.

  17. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  18. Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Toker, Serdar; Hak, David J.; Morgan, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE). Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of 5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs), pneumatic compression devices (PCDs), and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. PMID:22084663

  19. Vascular access for hemodialysis: thrills and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Victoria; Nichols, W Kirt

    2010-06-01

    Hemodialysis is a life saving treatment for Americans with end stage renal disease. In the last decade, liberal selection of patients treated by hemodialysis has resulted in patients who are substantially older, diabetics, who have higher co-morbidities including extensive atherosclerotic vascular disease. Many of these patients start hemodialysis treatments with a synthetic graft access rather than with their own native vessels. Grafts are appropriate for patients with inadequate vessels for construction of an arterio-venous (A-V) fistulas. The National Kidney Foundation published the Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative (DOQI) guidelines in 1997, a set of evidenced based guidelines regarding the optimal management of vascular access. One important guideline had been to increase the number of patient dialyzing with Arterio-Venous (A-V) fistulas rather than A-V grafts which are prone to frequent stenosis, thrombosis, and thus are more costly and labor intensive. The prevalence of patient dialyzing with fistulas depends on several factors; timing of the referral, anatomy and adequacy of the patients vessels, type of fistula placed, fistula maturation, minimal accepted dialysis blood flow and patency of the fistula. The management of a vascular access for hemodialysis is a challenging area of practice for those who care for the hemodialysis patient population. The multidisciplinary approach to management of patients with hemodialysis access includes support, education, collaboration and ongoing communication with the multidisciplinary team, patients, and their family members.

  20. Statins and prevention of venous thromboembolism: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Sébastien; Cordeanu, Eléna-Mihaela; Nouri, Salah; Mirea, Corina; Stephan, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    The pleiotropic effects of statins, beyond their cholesterol-lowering properties, are much debated. In primary prevention, several observational cohort and case-control studies appear to show that statins reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism by about 30%. In a single randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial (JUPITER), which included 17,000 patients, rosuvastatin 20mg/day reduced the risk of venous thromboembolism by 43%. However, these patients were at low risk of venous thromboembolism, and the frequency of the event was, in principle, low. In secondary prevention, several observational studies and post-hoc analyses of randomized clinical trials have suggested that statins may prevent recurrence of venous thromboembolism. However, none of these studies had enough scientific weight to form the basis of a recommendation to use statins for secondary prevention. The putative preventive effect of statins appears to be independent of plasma cholesterol concentration and could be a pharmacological property of the statin class, although a dose-effect relationship has not been demonstrated. The mechanism through which statins might prevent venous thrombosis is thought to involve their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects or perhaps a more specific action, by blocking the degradation of antithrombotic proteins. A mechanism involving the action of statins on interactions between risk factors for atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism is supported by some studies, but not all. In the absence of firm evidence, statins cannot currently be recommended for primary or secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism.

  1. Eosinophilia and thrombosis in parasitic diseases: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ames, Paul R J; Aloj, Giuseppina; Gentile, Fabrizio

    2011-02-01

    It is known that peripheral blood eosinophilia (PBE) is a normal hematopoietic response to several parasitic diseases, but it is less known that PBE promotes a hypercoagulable state that may favor thrombosis. Scope of this article is to explore which parasitic infestations are most likely to be complicated by thrombosis and to highlight the pathogenetic contribution of PBE to vascular occlusions in this setting. A review of the world literature revealed 18 cases in which PBE was associated with vascular occlusion though no specific surveys were dedicated to this topic. The eosinophil exerts its thrombogenic potential by inhibition of the natural anticoagulant pathways and release of tissue factor with enhanced coagulation activation leading to vascular occlusion. It is hoped that this review contributes to the awareness of the link between PBE and thrombosis in parasitic disorders to foster research in this area.

  2. Embryologicalic collateral venous channel on radionuclide liver/spleen study

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, R.H. Jr.; Johnson, D.G.

    1983-07-01

    Obstruction of normal venous portal blood flow generally results in collateral circulation. The obstruction may be intrinsic t the vasculature (e.g., hepatic vein thrombosis, vascular anomalies) or it may be extravascular (e.g., cirrhosis, hepatic masses) and may effect blood flow by deforming and compressing the intrahepatic or splenoportal axis vessels. A technetium-99m sulfur colloid liver/spleen study demonstrates what is thought to be a functional paraumbilical or umbilical vein in a cirrhotic patient with portal hypertension.

  3. Prevention of Hospital-Acquired Venous Thromboembolism in Children: A Review of Published Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, E. Vincent S.; Raffini, Leslie J.

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism, which includes deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a potentially preventable condition in children. In adults, pharmacologic prophylaxis has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism in distinct patient cohorts. However, pediatric randomized controlled trials have failed to demonstrate the efficacy of pharmacologic prophylaxis against thrombosis associated with central venous catheters, the most important risk factor for venous thromboembolism in children. Despite the lack of supporting evidence, hospital-based initiatives are being undertaken to try to prevent venous thromboembolism in children. In this study, we sought to review the published guidelines on the prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized children. We identified five guidelines, all of which were mainly targeted at adolescents and used various risk-stratification approaches. In low-risk children, ambulation was the recommended prevention strategy, while mechanical prophylaxis was recommended for children at moderate risk and pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis were recommended for the high-risk group. The effectiveness of these strategies has not been proven. In order to determine whether venous thromboembolism can be prevented in children, innovative clinical trial designs are needed. In the absence of these trials, guidelines can be a source of valuable information to inform our practice. PMID:28184368

  4. Thrombosis in the critically ill neonate: incidence, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Veldman, Alex; Nold, Marcel F; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2008-01-01

    Among children, newborn infants are most vulnerable to development of thrombosis and serious thromboembolic complications. Amongst newborns, those neonates who are critically ill, both term and preterm, are at greatest risk for developing symptomatic thromboembolic disease. The most important risk factors are inflammation, DIC, impaired liver function, fluctuations in cardiac output, and congenital heart disease, as well as exogenous risk factors such as central venous or arterial catheters. In most clinically symptomatic infants, diagnosis is made by ultrasound, venography, or CT or MRI angiograms. However, clinically asymptomatic vessel thrombosis is sometimes picked up by screening investigations or during routine imaging for other indications. Acute management of thrombosis and thromboembolism comprises a variety of approaches, including simple observation, treatment with unfractionated or low molecular weight heparin, as well as more aggressive interventions such as thrombolytic therapy or catheter-directed revascularization. Long-term follow-up is dependent on the underlying diagnosis. In the majority of infants, stabilization of the patients’ general condition and hemodynamics, which allows removal of indwelling catheters, renders long-term anticoagulation superfluous. Nevertheless, in certain types of congenital heart disease or inherited thrombophilia, long-term prophylaxis may be warranted. This review article focuses on pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute and long-term management of thrombosis in critically ill term and preterm neonates. PMID:19337547

  5. Abducens nerve palsy due to inferior petrosal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Siddiqui, Junaid; Katirji, Bashar

    2017-02-24

    Isolated unilateral abducens nerve palsy is usually due to ischemia, trauma or neoplasm. Dorello's canal is the space between the petrous apex and superolateral portion of the clivus, bound superiorly by Gruber's ligament. The abducens nerve travels with inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) though the Dorello's canal before entering the cavernous sinus. A 31-year-old man presented with neck pain, and binocular horizontal diplopia, worse looking towards left and at distance. He had a history of intravenous drug abuse but no history of hypertension or diabetes. On examination, he had complete left 6th nerve palsy with normal fundi, pupils, and other cranial nerves. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was detected with naïve tricuspid valve endocarditis and multiple septic emboli to lungs with infarcts. His cerebrospinal fluid was normal. MRI of the brain was normal. MRV of head and neck showed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein, left sigmoid sinus and left inferior petrosal sinus with normal cavernous sinus and no evidence of mastoiditis. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. He was not anticoagulated for fear of pulmonary hemorrhage from pulmonary infarcts. Although cerebral venous sinus thrombosis commonly presents with elevated intracranial pressure, isolated ipsilateral 6th nerve palsy from its compression in Dorello's canal due to thrombosis of the ipsilateral inferior petrosal sinus is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only two patients have been reported with isolated abducens palsy due to IPS thrombosis; one caused by septic emboli and the other developed it during IPS cortisol level sampling.

  6. [Thrombosis of the right atrium disclosed by severe pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    el Mouknia, M; Harti, A; Barrou, L; Mjahed, K; Fedouach, S; Benaguida, M

    1994-01-01

    The case of a thrombosis of the right auricle, revealed by severe pulmonary embolism in a 56-year-old patient without significant medical history is reported. He was admitted to the ICU with a haemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident. The course was characterized by the occurrence of a venous thrombosis of the right lower limb confirmed by phlebography. The treatment with a platelet antiaggregating agent was effective and the patient left hospital two weeks later. He was re-admitted after 2 months with a clinical picture of massive embolism including polypnea, tachycardia and haemoptysis. The diagnosis was confirmed by pulmonary angiography (Miller index > 65%) and echocardiography showed a floating thrombus in the right auricle with dilated right cavities. The phlebocavography displayed an extensive thrombosis in the left lower limb up to femoral, iliac and cava inferior veins. The patient was treated with heparin (500 IU.kg-1.d-1) and later with antivitamine K. The course was favourable. This is a rare case of extensive thrombosis, completely regressive with a treatment including only heparin.

  7. [Superior Cava Venous syndrome as presentation of neoplasic disease].

    PubMed

    Pérez Maure, M; Subils, G; Peresin Paz, R; Cazaux, A; Cambursano, V H; Cortés, J R

    2013-01-01

    Superior Cava Venous Syndrome (SVCS) encompasses a constellation of signs and symptoms resulting from partial or complete obstruction of blood flow through the superior vena cava (SVC) to the right atrium. Thrombosis can be caused by intrinsic (primary) or extrinsic compression (with or without secondary thrombosis). The causes of SVCS can be grouped according to their etiology in non-neoplastic and neoplastic. The causes malignant correspond to 65-90% of them, thrombosis and nonmalignant conditions are another causes. The presentation may be acute, clinically characterized by dyspnea and a characteristic triad (facial, neck and arms edema, cyanosis and collateral circulation). Early detection improves prognosis and is based on clinical data and imaging studies. We describe 8 cases where the SVCS was the first manifestation of neoplastic diseases. Patients were predominantly of middle-aged, male, without association with consumption of tobacco and lymphoma was most frequent diagnosis.

  8. [Cerebral sinov