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Sample records for periplasmic s1-like nuclease

  1. Periplasmic Screening for Artificial Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Jeschek, M; Panke, S; Ward, T R

    2016-01-01

    Artificial metalloenzymes represent an attractive means of combining state-of-the-art transition metal catalysis with the benefits of natural enzymes. Despite the tremendous recent progress in this field, current efforts toward the directed evolution of these hybrid biocatalysts mainly rely on the laborious, individual purification of protein variants rendering the throughput, and hence the outcome of these campaigns feeble. We have recently developed a screening platform for the directed evolution of artificial metalloenzymes based on the streptavidin-biotin technology in the periplasm of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. This periplasmic compartmentalization strategy comprises a number of compelling advantages, in particular with respect to artificial metalloenzymes, which lead to a drastic increase in the throughput of screening campaigns and additionally are of unique value for future in vivo applications. Therefore, we highlight here the benefits of this strategy and intend to propose a generalized guideline for the development of novel transition metal-based biocatalysts by directed evolution in order to extend the natural enzymatic repertoire. PMID:27586348

  2. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  3. Periplasmic glucans of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Talaga, P; Fournet, B; Bohin, J P

    1994-01-01

    We report the initial characterization of glucans present in the periplasmic space of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (strain R32). These compounds were found to be neutral, unsubstituted, and composed solely of glucose. Their size ranges from 6 to 13 glucose units/mol. Linkage studies and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses demonstrated that the glucans are linked by beta-1,2 and beta-1,6 glycosidic bonds. In contrast to the periplasmic glucans found in other plant pathogenic bacteria, the glucans of P. syringae pv. syringae are not cyclic but are highly branched structures. Acetolysis studies demonstrated that the backbone consists of beta-1,2-linked glucose units to which the branches are attached by beta-1,6 linkages. These periplasmic glucans were more abundant when the osmolarity of the growth medium was lower. Thus, P. syringae pv. syringae appears to synthesize periplasmic glucans in response to the osmolarity of the medium. The structural characteristics of these glucans are very similar to the membrane-derived oligosaccharides of Escherichia coli, apart from the neutral character, which contrasts with the highly anionic E. coli membrane-derived oligosaccharides. PMID:7961404

  4. Periplasmic Proteins of the Extremophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Chi, An; Valenzuela, Lissette; Beard, Simon; Mackey, Aaron J.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Jerez, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a chemolithoautotrophic acidophile capable of obtaining energy by oxidizing ferrous iron or sulfur compounds such as metal sulfides. Some of the proteins involved in these oxidations have been described as forming part of the periplasm of this extremophile. The detailed study of the periplasmic components constitutes an important area to understand the physiology and environmental interactions of microorganisms. Proteomics analysis of the periplasmic fraction of A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 was performed by using high resolution linear ion trap-FT MS. We identified a total of 131 proteins in the periplasm of the microorganism grown in thiosulfate. When possible, functional categories were assigned to the proteins: 13.8% were transport and binding proteins, 14.6% were several kinds of cell envelope proteins, 10.8% were involved in energy metabolism, 10% were related to protein fate and folding, 10% were proteins with unknown functions, and 26.1% were proteins without homologues in databases. These last proteins are most likely characteristic of A. ferrooxidans and may have important roles yet to be assigned. The majority of the periplasmic proteins from A. ferrooxidans were very basic compared with those of neutrophilic microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, suggesting a special adaptation of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium to its very acidic environment. The high throughput proteomics approach used here not only helps to understand the physiology of this extreme acidophile but also offers an important contribution to the functional annotation for the available genomes of biomining microorganisms such as A. ferrooxidans for which no efficient genetic systems are available to disrupt genes by procedures such as homologous recombination. PMID:17911085

  5. Off-target effects of engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in gene editing with engineered nucleases have transformed our ability to manipulate the genome from diverse organisms for applications ranging from biomedical research to disease treatment. A major complication with these engineered nucleases is the binding of the nuclease to unintended genomic sites that share sequence homology with the on-target site. Cleavage of these off-target sites followed by DNA repair using normal cellular DNA repair mechanisms can cause gene mutation or gross chromosome rearrangement. Identification of nuclease-generated off-target sites is a daunting task due to the size and complexity of the mammalian genome. Five unbiased, genome-wide strategies have been developed to detect the off-target cleavage. Some of these strategies reach the sensitivity near the detection limit of directed deep sequencing and have sufficient precision and resolution to objectively assessing the off-target effect of any engineered nuclease. Significant progress has also been made recently to boost the nuclease targeting specificity by protein engineering to modify the structure of the nuclease and alter the interaction with its genomic target. In several studied cases, the off-target effect generated by the modified nuclease is completely eliminated. These modified nucleases significantly improve the overall fidelity of gene editing. These developments will enable gene editing tools to be applied more broadly and safely in basic research and disease treatment.

  6. Protein quality control in the bacterial periplasm.

    PubMed

    Merdanovic, Melisa; Clausen, Tim; Kaiser, Markus; Huber, Robert; Ehrmann, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Protein quality control involves sensing and treatment of defective or incomplete protein structures. Misfolded or mislocalized proteins trigger dedicated signal transduction cascades that upregulate the production of protein quality-control factors. Corresponding proteases and chaperones either degrade or repair damaged proteins, thereby reducing the level of aggregation-prone molecules. Because the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria is particularly exposed to environmental changes and respective protein-folding stresses connected with the presence of detergents, low or high osmolarity of the medium, elevated temperatures, and the host's immune response, fine-tuned protein quality control systems are essential for survival under these unfavorable conditions. This review discusses recent advances in the identification and characterization of the key cellular factors and the emerging general principles of the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21639788

  7. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Voytas, Daniel F; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-04-02

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific genome engineering open the possibility to perform rapid targeted genome modification in virtually any laboratory species without the need to rely on embryonic stem (ES) cell technology. A genome editing experiment typically starts with identification of designer nuclease target sites within a gene of interest followed by construction of custom DNA-binding domains to direct nuclease activity to the investigator-defined genomic locus. Designer nuclease plasmids are in vitro transcribed to generate mRNA for microinjection of fertilized mouse oocytes. Here, we provide a protocol for achieving targeted genome modification by direct injection of TALEN mRNA into fertilized mouse oocytes.

  8. Mouse Genome Engineering Using Designer Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Voytas, Daniel F.; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific genome engineering open the possibility to perform rapid targeted genome modification in virtually any laboratory species without the need to rely on embryonic stem (ES) cell technology. A genome editing experiment typically starts with identification of designer nuclease target sites within a gene of interest followed by construction of custom DNA-binding domains to direct nuclease activity to the investigator-defined genomic locus. Designer nuclease plasmids are in vitro transcribed to generate mRNA for microinjection of fertilized mouse oocytes. Here, we provide a protocol for achieving targeted genome modification by direct injection of TALEN mRNA into fertilized mouse oocytes. PMID:24747757

  9. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Voytas, Daniel F; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific genome engineering open the possibility to perform rapid targeted genome modification in virtually any laboratory species without the need to rely on embryonic stem (ES) cell technology. A genome editing experiment typically starts with identification of designer nuclease target sites within a gene of interest followed by construction of custom DNA-binding domains to direct nuclease activity to the investigator-defined genomic locus. Designer nuclease plasmids are in vitro transcribed to generate mRNA for microinjection of fertilized mouse oocytes. Here, we provide a protocol for achieving targeted genome modification by direct injection of TALEN mRNA into fertilized mouse oocytes. PMID:24747757

  10. Periplasmic superoxide dismutase SodCI of Salmonella binds peptidoglycan to remain tethered within the periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoungkwan; Slauch, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Salmonellae survive and propagate in macrophages to cause serious systemic disease. Periplasmic superoxide dismutase plays a critical role in this survival by combating phagocytic superoxide. Salmonella Typhimurium strain 14028 produces two periplasmic superoxide dismutases, SodCI and SodCII. Although both proteins are produced during infection, only SodCI is functional in the macrophage phagosome. We have previously shown that SodCI, relative to SodCII, is both protease resistant and tethered within the periplasm, and that either of these properties is sufficient to allow a SodC to protect against phagocytic superoxide. Tethering is defined as remaining cell-associated after osmotic shock or treatment with cationic antimicrobial peptides. Here we show that SodCI non-covalently binds peptidoglycan. SodCI binds to Salmonella and Bacillus peptidoglycan, but not peptidoglycan from Staphylococcus. Moreover, binding can be inhibited by a diaminopimelic acid containing tripeptide, but not a lysine containing tripeptide, showing that the protein recognizes the peptide portion of the peptidoglycan. Replacing nine amino acids in SodCII with the corresponding residues from SodCI confers tethering, partially delineating an apparently novel peptidoglycan binding domain. These changes in sequence increase the affinity of SodCII for peptidoglycan fragments to match that of SodCI, and allow the now tethered SodCII to function during infection. PMID:25998832

  11. Structure and Metal Loading of a Soluble Periplasm Cuproprotein*

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Kevin J.; Firbank, Susan J.; Dainty, Samantha J.; Pérez-Rama, Mónica; Tottey, Steve; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2010-01-01

    A copper-trafficking pathway was found to enable Cu2+ occupancy of a soluble periplasm protein, CucA, even when competing Zn2+ is abundant in the periplasm. Here, we solved the structure of CucA (a new cupin) and found that binding of Cu2+, but not Zn2+, quenches the fluorescence of Trp165, which is adjacent to the metal site. Using this fluorescence probe, we established that CucA becomes partly occupied by Zn2+ following exposure to equimolar Zn2+ and Cu2+. Cu2+-CucA is more thermodynamically stable than Zn2+-CucA but k(Zn→Cu)exchange is slow, raising questions about how the periplasm contains solely the Cu2+ form. We discovered that a copper-trafficking pathway involving two copper transporters (CtaA and PacS) and a metallochaperone (Atx1) is obligatory for Cu2+-CucA to accumulate in the periplasm. There was negligible CucA protein in the periplasm of ΔctaA cells, but the abundance of cucA transcripts was unaltered. Crucially, ΔctaA cells overaccumulate low Mr copper complexes in the periplasm, and purified apoCucA can readily acquire Cu2+ from ΔctaA periplasm extracts, but in vivo apoCucA fails to come into contact with these periplasmic copper pools. Instead, copper traffics via a cytoplasmic pathway that is coupled to CucA translocation to the periplasm. PMID:20702411

  12. Structure and metal loading of a soluble periplasm cuproprotein.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Kevin J; Firbank, Susan J; Dainty, Samantha J; Pérez-Rama, Mónica; Tottey, Steve; Robinson, Nigel J

    2010-10-15

    A copper-trafficking pathway was found to enable Cu(2+) occupancy of a soluble periplasm protein, CucA, even when competing Zn(2+) is abundant in the periplasm. Here, we solved the structure of CucA (a new cupin) and found that binding of Cu(2+), but not Zn(2+), quenches the fluorescence of Trp(165), which is adjacent to the metal site. Using this fluorescence probe, we established that CucA becomes partly occupied by Zn(2+) following exposure to equimolar Zn(2+) and Cu(2+). Cu(2+)-CucA is more thermodynamically stable than Zn(2+)-CucA but k((Zn→Cu)exchange) is slow, raising questions about how the periplasm contains solely the Cu(2+) form. We discovered that a copper-trafficking pathway involving two copper transporters (CtaA and PacS) and a metallochaperone (Atx1) is obligatory for Cu(2+)-CucA to accumulate in the periplasm. There was negligible CucA protein in the periplasm of ΔctaA cells, but the abundance of cucA transcripts was unaltered. Crucially, ΔctaA cells overaccumulate low M(r) copper complexes in the periplasm, and purified apoCucA can readily acquire Cu(2+) from ΔctaA periplasm extracts, but in vivo apoCucA fails to come into contact with these periplasmic copper pools. Instead, copper traffics via a cytoplasmic pathway that is coupled to CucA translocation to the periplasm. PMID:20702411

  13. Generation of knockout mice using engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hoon; Jin, Young; Kim, Seokjoong; Lee, Han-Woong

    2014-08-15

    The use of engineered nucleases in one-cell stage mouse embryos is emerging as an efficient alternative to conventional gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These nucleases are designed or reprogrammed to specifically induce double strand breaks (DSBs) at a desired genomic locus, and efficiently introduce mutations by both error-prone and error-free DNA repair mechanisms. Since these mutations frequently result in the loss or alteration of gene function by inserting, deleting, or substituting nucleotide sequences, engineered nucleases are enabling us to efficiently generate gene knockout and knockin mice. Three kinds of engineered endonucleases have been developed and successfully applied to the generation of mutant mice: zinc-finger nuclease (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs). Based on recent advances, here we provide experimentally validated, detailed guidelines for generating non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)-mediated mutant mice by microinjecting TALENs and RGENs into the cytoplasm or the pronucleus of one-cell stage mouse embryos.

  14. Genome Editing in Rats Using TALE Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Ménoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thinard, Reynald; Savignard, Chloé; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important animal model to understand gene function and model human diseases. Since recent years, the development of gene-specific nucleases has become important for generating new rat models of human diseases, to analyze the role of genes and to generate human antibodies. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases efficiently create gene-specific knockout rats and lead to the possibility of gene targeting by homology-directed recombination (HDR) and generating knock-in rats. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout and knock-in rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  15. Nuclease digestion studies of chromatin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Micrococcal nuclease, which preferentially cleaves linker DNA in chromatin, was immobilized by covalent attachment to CNBr-activated agarose beads and used to study the accessibility of linker DNA in chromatin fibers prepared from chicken erythrocyte nuclei. This immobilized nuclease was able to cleave chromatin fibers into the typical pattern of fragments corresponding to multiples of mononucleosomes. Cleavage from only the ends of the fibers was ruled out by examining the products of cleavage of fibers end-labelled with /sup 35/P. Comparison of the rate of digestion by immobilized and soluble micrococcal nuclease indicated that the fiber structure does not significantly affect access to linker DNA. The absence of an effect of reducing temperatures on the rate of digestion of fibers, as compared to short oligonucleosomes, indicated that breathing motions to allow access to the fiber interior were not required for cleavage of linker DNA.

  16. Minimizing off-Target Mutagenesis Risks Caused by Programmable Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kentaro; Gee, Peter; Hotta, Akitsu

    2015-01-01

    Programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats associated protein-9 (CRISPR-Cas9), hold tremendous potential for applications in the clinical setting to treat genetic diseases or prevent infectious diseases. However, because the accuracy of DNA recognition by these nucleases is not always perfect, off-target mutagenesis may result in undesirable adverse events in treated patients such as cellular toxicity or tumorigenesis. Therefore, designing nucleases and analyzing their activity must be carefully evaluated to minimize off-target mutagenesis. Furthermore, rigorous genomic testing will be important to ensure the integrity of nuclease modified cells. In this review, we provide an overview of available nuclease designing platforms, nuclease engineering approaches to minimize off-target activity, and methods to evaluate both on- and off-target cleavage of CRISPR-Cas9. PMID:26501275

  17. Stress and strain in staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, A.; Kautz, R. A.; Jacobs, M. D.; Fox, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    Protein molecules generally adopt a tertiary structure in which all backbone and side chain conformations are arranged in local energy minima; however, in several well-refined protein structures examples of locally strained geometries, such as cis peptide bonds, have been observed. Staphylococcal nuclease A contains a single cis peptide bond between residues Lys 116 and Pro 117 within a type VIa beta-turn. Alternative native folded forms of nuclease A have been detected by NMR spectroscopy and attributed to a mixture of cis and trans isomers at the Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond. Analyses of nuclease variants K116G and K116A by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography are reported herein. The structure of K116A is indistinguishable from that of nuclease A, including a cis 116-117 peptide bond (92% populated in solution). The overall fold of K116G is also indistinguishable from nuclease A except in the region of the substitution (residues 112-117), which contains a predominantly trans Gly 116-Pro 117 peptide bond (80% populated in solution). Both Lys and Ala would be prohibited from adopting the backbone conformation of Gly 116 due to steric clashes between the beta-carbon and the surrounding residues. One explanation for these results is that the position of the ends of the residue 112-117 loop only allow trans conformations where the local backbone interactions associated with the phi and psi torsion angles are strained. When the 116-117 peptide bond is cis, less strained backbone conformations are available. Thus the relaxation of the backbone strain intrinsic to the trans conformation compensates for the energetically unfavorable cis X-Pro peptide bond. With the removal of the side chain from residue 116 (K116G), the backbone strain of the trans conformation is reduced to the point that the conformation associated with the cis peptide bond is no longer favorable. PMID:8495201

  18. Lanthanide accumulation in the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli B.

    PubMed

    Bayer, M E; Bayer, M H

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of growing Escherichia coli B with lanthanide ions [lanthanum(III), terbium(III), and europium(III)] and subsequent aldehyde-OsO4 fixation caused areas of high contrast to appear within the periplasm (the space between inner and outer membrane of the cell envelope). X-ray microanalysis of ultrathin sections of Epon-embedded or acrylic resin-embedded cells revealed the presence of the lanthanide and of phosphorus in the areas, whose contrast greatly exceeded that of other stained structures. Comparatively small amounts of the lanthanide were also present in the outer membrane and in the cytoplasm. The distribution of the periplasmic areas of high contrast was found to be random and not clustered at areas of current or future septum formation. Irregular cell shapes were observed after lanthanide treatment before onset of fixation. In contrast to glutaraldehyde-OsO4 fixation, glutaraldehyde used as the sole fixer caused a scattered distribution of the lanthanide. Cryofixation (slam-freezing) and freeze substitution revealed a lanthanum stain at both the periplasm and the outer part of the outer membrane. Deenergization of the cell membrane by either phage T4 or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone abolished the metal accumulation. Furthermore, addition of excess calcium, administered together with the lanthanide solution, diminished the quantity and size of areas of high contrast. Cells grown in media of high NaCl concentration revealed strongly stained areas of periplasmic precipitates, whereas cells grown under low-salt conditions showed very few high-contrast patches in the periplasm. Terbium treatment (during fixation) enhanced the visibility of the sites of inner-outer membrane contact (the membrane adhesion sites) in plasmolized cells, possibly as the result of an accumulation of the metal at the adhesion domains. The data suggest a rapid interaction of the lanthanides with components of the cell envelope, the periplasm, and the energized inner

  19. The Development of TALE Nucleases for Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ousterout, David G; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The development of a facile genome engineering technology based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has led to significant advances in diverse areas of science and medicine. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the development of TALENs and the use of this technology in basic science, biotechnology, and biomedical applications. This includes the discovery of DNA recognition by TALEs, engineering new TALE proteins to diverse targets, general advances in nuclease-based editing strategies, and challenges that are specific to various applications of the TALEN technology. We review examples of applying TALENs for studying gene function and regulation, generating disease models, and developing gene therapies. The current status of genome editing and future directions for other uses of these technologies are also discussed.

  20. The Development of TALE Nucleases for Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ousterout, David G; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The development of a facile genome engineering technology based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has led to significant advances in diverse areas of science and medicine. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the development of TALENs and the use of this technology in basic science, biotechnology, and biomedical applications. This includes the discovery of DNA recognition by TALEs, engineering new TALE proteins to diverse targets, general advances in nuclease-based editing strategies, and challenges that are specific to various applications of the TALEN technology. We review examples of applying TALENs for studying gene function and regulation, generating disease models, and developing gene therapies. The current status of genome editing and future directions for other uses of these technologies are also discussed. PMID:26443211

  1. Periplasmic quality control in biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Zhi Xin; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2015-04-01

    The β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are integral membrane proteins that reside in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and perform a diverse range of biological functions. Synthesized in the cytoplasm, OMPs must be transported across the inner membrane and through the periplasmic space before they are assembled in the outer membrane. In Escherichia coli, Skp, SurA and DegP are the most prominent factors identified to guide OMPs across the periplasm and to play the role of quality control. Although extensive genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed many basic functions of these periplasmic proteins, the mechanism of their collaboration in assisting the folding and insertion of OMPs is much less understood. Recently, biophysical approaches have shed light on the identification of the intricate network. In the present review, we summarize recent advances in the characterization of these key factors, with a special emphasis on the multifunctional protein DegP. In addition, we present our proposed model on the periplasmic quality control in biogenesis of OMPs.

  2. Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans synthesis gene family of Shigella flexneri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) of foodborne enteropathogen Shigella flexneri were characterized. OPGs were composed of 100 percent glucose with 2-linked glucose as the most abundant residue with terminal glucose, 2-linked and 2,6-linked glucose also present in high quantities. Most dominan...

  3. Origins of Programmable Nucleases for Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Carroll, Dana

    2016-02-27

    Genome engineering with programmable nucleases depends on cellular responses to a targeted double-strand break (DSB). The first truly targetable reagents were the zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) showing that arbitrary DNA sequences could be addressed for cleavage by protein engineering, ushering in the breakthrough in genome manipulation. ZFNs resulted from basic research on zinc finger proteins and the FokI restriction enzyme (which revealed a bipartite structure with a separable DNA-binding domain and a non-specific cleavage domain). Studies on the mechanism of cleavage by 3-finger ZFNs established that the preferred substrates were paired binding sites, which doubled the size of the target sequence recognition from 9 to 18bp, long enough to specify a unique genomic locus in plant and mammalian cells. Soon afterwards, a ZFN-induced DSB was shown to stimulate homologous recombination in cells. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that are based on bacterial TALEs fused to the FokI cleavage domain expanded this capability. The fact that ZFNs and TALENs have been used for genome modification of more than 40 different organisms and cell types attests to the success of protein engineering. The most recent technology platform for delivering a targeted DSB to cellular genomes is that of the RNA-guided nucleases, which are based on the naturally occurring Type II prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas9 system. Unlike ZFNs and TALENs that use protein motifs for DNA sequence recognition, CRISPR-Cas9 depends on RNA-DNA recognition. The advantages of the CRISPR-Cas9 system-the ease of RNA design for new targets and the dependence on a single, constant Cas9 protein-have led to its wide adoption by research laboratories around the world. These technology platforms have equipped scientists with an unprecedented ability to modify cells and organisms almost at will, with wide-ranging implications across biology and medicine. However, these nucleases have also been shown to cut

  4. Origins of Programmable Nucleases for Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Carroll, Dana

    2016-02-27

    Genome engineering with programmable nucleases depends on cellular responses to a targeted double-strand break (DSB). The first truly targetable reagents were the zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) showing that arbitrary DNA sequences could be addressed for cleavage by protein engineering, ushering in the breakthrough in genome manipulation. ZFNs resulted from basic research on zinc finger proteins and the FokI restriction enzyme (which revealed a bipartite structure with a separable DNA-binding domain and a non-specific cleavage domain). Studies on the mechanism of cleavage by 3-finger ZFNs established that the preferred substrates were paired binding sites, which doubled the size of the target sequence recognition from 9 to 18bp, long enough to specify a unique genomic locus in plant and mammalian cells. Soon afterwards, a ZFN-induced DSB was shown to stimulate homologous recombination in cells. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that are based on bacterial TALEs fused to the FokI cleavage domain expanded this capability. The fact that ZFNs and TALENs have been used for genome modification of more than 40 different organisms and cell types attests to the success of protein engineering. The most recent technology platform for delivering a targeted DSB to cellular genomes is that of the RNA-guided nucleases, which are based on the naturally occurring Type II prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas9 system. Unlike ZFNs and TALENs that use protein motifs for DNA sequence recognition, CRISPR-Cas9 depends on RNA-DNA recognition. The advantages of the CRISPR-Cas9 system-the ease of RNA design for new targets and the dependence on a single, constant Cas9 protein-have led to its wide adoption by research laboratories around the world. These technology platforms have equipped scientists with an unprecedented ability to modify cells and organisms almost at will, with wide-ranging implications across biology and medicine. However, these nucleases have also been shown to cut

  5. Periplasmal Physics: The Rotational Dynamics of Spirochetal Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg

    2012-02-01

    Spirochetes are distinguished by the location of their flagella, which reside within the periplasm: the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane. In Borrelia burgdorferi/ (the causative agent of Lyme Disease), rotation of the flagella leads to cellular undulations that drive swimming. Exactly how these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques acting between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. By applying low-Reynolds number hydrodynamic theory to the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasm, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. We obtain analytical solutions for the force and torque on the rotating flagellum through lubrication analysis, as well as through scaling analysis, and find results are in close agreement numerical simulations. (Joint work with J. Yang and C.W. Wolgemuth.)

  6. Venturing into the New Science of Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Tolarová, Markéta; McGrath, John A; Tolar, Jakub

    2016-04-01

    Gene editing with zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated proteins system, or meganucleases can, in principle, mediate any genome modification. Recent studies have shown that COL7A1 mutations in cells of patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can be corrected by homology-directed DNA repair. PMID:27012560

  7. Monomeric site-specific nucleases for genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Wolfs, Jason M.; Kolaczyk, Tomasz; Roberts, Alanna K.; Hu, Sherry X.; Edgell, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted manipulation of complex genomes often requires the introduction of a double-strand break at defined locations by site-specific DNA endonucleases. Here, we describe a monomeric nuclease domain derived from GIY-YIG homing endonucleases for genome-editing applications. Fusion of the GIY-YIG nuclease domain to three-member zinc-finger DNA binding domains generated chimeric GIY-zinc finger endonucleases (GIY-ZFEs). Significantly, the I-TevI-derived fusions (Tev-ZFEs) function in vitro as monomers to introduce a double-strand break, and discriminate in vitro and in bacterial and yeast assays against substrates lacking a preferred 5′-CNNNG-3′ cleavage motif. The Tev-ZFEs function to induce recombination in a yeast-based assay with activity on par with a homodimeric Zif268 zinc-finger nuclease. We also fused the I-TevI nuclease domain to a catalytically inactive LADGLIDADG homing endonuclease (LHE) scaffold. The monomeric Tev-LHEs are active in vivo and similarly discriminate against substrates lacking the 5′-CNNNG-3′ motif. The monomeric Tev-ZFEs and Tev-LHEs are distinct from the FokI-derived zinc-finger nuclease and TAL effector nuclease platforms as the GIY-YIG domain alleviates the requirement to design two nuclease fusions to target a given sequence, highlighting the diversity of nuclease domains with distinctive biochemical properties suitable for genome-editing applications. PMID:22566637

  8. Receptor-mediated delivery of engineered nucleases for genome modification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Jaafar, Lahcen; Agyekum, Davies G; Xiao, Haiyan; Wade, Marlene F; Kumaran, R Ileng; Spector, David L; Bao, Gang; Porteus, Matthew H; Dynan, William S; Meiler, Steffen E

    2013-10-01

    Engineered nucleases, which incise the genome at predetermined sites, have a number of laboratory and clinical applications. There is, however, a need for better methods for controlled intracellular delivery of nucleases. Here, we demonstrate a method for ligand-mediated delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) proteins using transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. Uptake is rapid and efficient in established mammalian cell lines and in primary cells, including mouse and human hematopoietic stem-progenitor cell populations. In contrast to cDNA expression, ZFN protein levels decline rapidly following internalization, affording better temporal control of nuclease activity. We show that transferrin-mediated ZFN uptake leads to site-specific in situ cleavage of the target locus. Additionally, despite the much shorter duration of ZFN activity, the efficiency of gene correction approaches that seen with cDNA-mediated expression. The approach is flexible and general, with the potential for extension to other targeting ligands and nuclease architectures.

  9. Protein engineering with artificial chemical nucleases.

    PubMed

    Larragy, Ruth; Fitzgerald, Jenny; Prisecaru, Andreea; McKee, Vickie; Leonard, Paul; Kellett, Andrew

    2015-08-21

    Herein we report the application of oxidative artificial chemical nucleases as novel agents for protein engineering. The complex ion [Cu(Phen)2(H2O)](2+) (CuPhen; Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) was applied under Fenton-type conditions against a recombinant antibody fragment specific for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and compared against traditional DNA shuffling using DNase I for the generation of recombinant mutagenesis libraries. We show that digestion and re-annealment of single chain variable fragment (scFv) coding DNA is possible using CuPhen. Results indicate recombinant library generation in this manner may generate novel clones—not accessible through the use of DNase I—with CuPhen producing highly PSA-specific binding antibodies identified by surface plasmon resonance.

  10. TALE nucleases and next generation GM crops.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific and adaptable DNA binding domains are essential modules to develop genome engineering technologies for crop improvement. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) proteins are used to provide a highly specific and adaptable DNA binding modules. TALE chimeric nucleases (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in vitro and in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mammalian and plant cells. The genomic DSBs can be generated at predefined and user-selected loci and repaired by either the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology dependent repair (HDR). Thus, TALENs can be used to achieve site-specific gene addition, stacking, deletion or inactivation. TALE-based genome engineering tools should be powerful to develop new agricultural biotechnology approaches for crop improvement. Here, we discuss the recent research and the potential applications of TALENs to accelerate the generation of genomic variants through targeted mutagenesis and to produce a non-transgenic GM crops with the desired phenotype.

  11. Genetic correction using engineered nucleases for gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Nakano, Takao; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in humans are associated with congenital disorders and phenotypic traits. Gene therapy holds the promise to cure such genetic disorders, although it has suffered from several technical limitations for decades. Recent progress in gene editing technology using tailor-made nucleases, such as meganucleases (MNs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) and, more recently, CRISPR/Cas9, has significantly broadened our ability to precisely modify target sites in the human genome. In this review, we summarize recent progress in gene correction approaches of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the clinical applications of gene therapy.

  12. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  13. Catalytic activity of nuclease P1: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Falcone, J.M.; Shibata, M.; Box, H.C.

    1994-10-01

    Nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum is a zinc dependent glyco-enzyme that recognizes single stranded DNA and RNA as substrates and hydrolyzes the phosphate ester bond. Nuclease Pl seems to recognize particular conformations of the phosphodiester backbone and shows significant variation in the rate of hydrolytic activity depending upon which nucleosides are coupled by the phosphodiester bond. The efficiency of nuclease Pl in hydrolyzing the phosphodiester bonds of a substrate can be altered by modifications to one of the substrate bases induced by ionizing radiation or oxidative stress. Measurements have been made of the effect of several radiation induced lesions on the catalytic rate of nuclease Pl. A model of the structure of the enzyme has been constructed in order to better understand the binding and activity of this enzyme on various ssDNA substrates.

  14. Multiple nuclear localization signals in XPG nuclease.

    PubMed

    Knauf, J A; Pendergrass, S H; Marrone, B L; Strniste, G F; MacInnes, M A; Park, M S

    1996-05-15

    We report here evidence for the mechanism of nuclear localization of XPG nuclease in human cells. Several candidate nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptides have been proposed for XPG protein. We have identified XPG peptides containing functional NLS and a potential nuclear retention signal (NRS) using in situ immunofluorescene localization of transiently expressed beta-galactosidase fusion proteins. Two XPG regions with putative NLS [amino acid (AA) coordinates: NLS-B (AA 1057-1074) and NLS-C (AA 1171-1185)] were each shown to independently localize the beta-gal extensively (> 80%) to the nucleus of HeLa cells. The C-terminus peptide containing NLS-C, an NLS conserved evolutionarily between yeasts and humans, also directed sub-localization of beta-galactosidase to intranuclear foci reminiscent of native XPG protein, as well as to peri-nucleolar regions. Peptides in the putative XPG 'NLS domain' (AA approximately 1051-1185) apparently function in concert for nuclear localization and also for retention of XPG in nuclear matrix-associated foci. Evidence presented elsewhere (Park et al., 1995) indicates that the peptide containing NLS-C (AA 1146-1185) also regulates the dynamic localization of XPG in the nucleus following UV-irradiation. PMID:8632779

  15. Protein diffusion in the periplasm of E. coli under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sochacki, Kem A; Shkel, Irina A; Record, M Thomas; Weisshaar, James C

    2011-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of the cell envelope of Escherichia coli are poorly understood. We use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to measure diffusion of periplasmic green fluorescent protein and probe the fluidity of the periplasm as a function of external osmotic conditions. For cells adapted to growth in complete medium at 0.14-1.02 Osm, the mean diffusion coefficient increases from 3.4 μm² s⁻¹ to 6.6 μm² s⁻¹ and the distribution of D(peri) broadens as growth osmolality increases. This is consistent with a net gain of water by the periplasm, decreasing its biopolymer volume fraction. This supports a model in which the turgor pressure drops primarily across the thin peptidoglycan layer while the cell actively maintains osmotic balance between periplasm and cytoplasm, thus avoiding a substantial pressure differential across the cytoplasmic membrane. After sudden hyperosmotic shock (plasmolysis), the cytoplasm loses water as the periplasm gains water. Accordingly, increases threefold. The fluorescence recovery after photobleaching is complete and homogeneous in all cases, but in minimal medium, the periplasm is evidently thicker at the cell tips. For the relevant geometries, Brownian dynamics simulations in model cytoplasmic and periplasmic volumes provide analytical formulae for extraction of accurate diffusion coefficients from readily measurable quantities. PMID:21190653

  16. In and out: an analysis of epibiotic vs periplasmic bacterial predators

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Z; Njagi, M; Shani, Y; Chanyi, R; Rotem, O; Lurie-Weinberger, M N; Koval, S; Pietrokovski, S; Gophna, U; Jurkevitch, E

    2014-01-01

    Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALO) are obligate predators of Gram-negative bacteria, belonging to the α- and δ-proteobacteria. BALO prey using either a periplasmic or an epibiotic predatory strategy, but the genetic background underlying these phenotypes is not known. Here we compare the epibiotic Bdellovibrio exovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus to the periplasmic B. bacteriovorus and Bacteriovorax marinus. Electron microscopy showed that M. aeruginosavorus, but not B. exovorus, can attach to prey cells in a non-polar manner through its longitudinal side. Both these predators were resistant to a surprisingly high number of antibiotic compounds, possibly via 26 and 19 antibiotic-resistance genes, respectively, most of them encoding efflux pumps. Comparative genomic analysis of all the BALOs revealed that epibiotic predators have a much smaller genome (ca. 2.5 Mbp) than the periplasmic predators (ca. 3.5 Mbp). Additionally, periplasmic predators have, on average, 888 more proteins, at least 60% more peptidases, and one more rRNA operon. Fifteen and 219 protein families were specific to the epibiotic and the periplasmic predators, respectively, the latter clearly forming the core of the periplasmic ‘predatome', which is upregulated during the growth phase. Metabolic deficiencies of epibiotic genomes include the synthesis of inosine, riboflavin, vitamin B6 and the siderophore aerobactin. The phylogeny of the epibiotic predators suggests that they evolved by convergent evolution, with M. aeruginosavorus originating from a non-predatory ancestor while B. exovorus evolved from periplasmic predators by gene loss. PMID:24088628

  17. A TALE nuclease architecture for efficient genome editing.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeffrey C; Tan, Siyuan; Qiao, Guijuan; Barlow, Kyle A; Wang, Jianbin; Xia, Danny F; Meng, Xiangdong; Paschon, David E; Leung, Elo; Hinkley, Sarah J; Dulay, Gladys P; Hua, Kevin L; Ankoudinova, Irina; Cost, Gregory J; Urnov, Fyodor D; Zhang, H Steve; Holmes, Michael C; Zhang, Lei; Gregory, Philip D; Rebar, Edward J

    2011-02-01

    Nucleases that cleave unique genomic sequences in living cells can be used for targeted gene editing and mutagenesis. Here we develop a strategy for generating such reagents based on transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins from Xanthomonas. We identify TALE truncation variants that efficiently cleave DNA when linked to the catalytic domain of FokI and use these nucleases to generate discrete edits or small deletions within endogenous human NTF3 and CCR5 genes at efficiencies of up to 25%. We further show that designed TALEs can regulate endogenous mammalian genes. These studies demonstrate the effective application of designed TALE transcription factors and nucleases for the targeted regulation and modification of endogenous genes.

  18. Hybrid nanosensor for colorimetric and ultrasensitive detection of nuclease contaminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecere, Paola; Valentini, Paola; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Nucleases are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade DNA or RNA, thus they can prejudice the good outcome of molecular biology experiments involving nucleic acids. We propose a colorimetric test for the naked-eye detection of nuclease contaminations. The system uses an hybrid nanosensor, based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with DNA probes. Our assay is rapid, instrument-free, simple and low-cost. Moreover, it reaches sensitivity equal or better than those of commercial kits, and presents a lot of advantageous aspects. Therefore, it is very competitive, with a real market potential. This test will be relevant in routine process monitoring in scientific laboratories, and in quality control in clinical laboratories and industrial processes, allowing the simultaneous detection of nucleases with different substrate specificities and large-scale screening.

  19. Engineering nucleases for gene targeting: safety and regulatory considerations.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Katia; Podevin, Nancy; Breyer, Didier; Carroll, Dana; Herman, Philippe

    2014-01-25

    Nuclease-based gene targeting (NBGT) represents a significant breakthrough in targeted genome editing since it is applicable from single-celled protozoa to human, including several species of economic importance. Along with the fast progress in NBGT and the increasing availability of customized nucleases, more data are available about off-target effects associated with the use of this approach. We discuss how NBGT may offer a new perspective for genetic modification, we address some aspects crucial for a safety improvement of the corresponding techniques and we also briefly relate the use of NBGT applications and products to the regulatory oversight.

  20. AMIN domains have a predicted role in localization of diverse periplasmic protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Robson Francisco; Anantharaman, Vivek; de Souza, Sandro José; Aravind, L.; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J.

    2008-01-01

    We describe AMIN (Amidase N-terminal domain), a novel protein domain found specifically in bacterial periplasmic proteins. AMIN domains are widely distributed among peptidoglycan hydrolases and transporter protein families. Based on experimental data, contextual information and phyletic profiles, we suggest that AMIN domains mediate the targeting of periplasmic or extracellular proteins to specific regions of the bacterial envelope. Contact: fgueiros@iq.usp.br Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18723522

  1. Metabolism of periplasmic membrane-derived oligosaccharides by the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, E.G.; McCabe, J.B.

    1988-02-01

    Membrane-derived oligosaccharides (MDO), a class of osmotically active carbohydrates, are the major organic solutes present in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and many other gram-negative bacteria when cells are grown in a medium of low osmolarity. Analyses of growing cells of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus, a gram-negative predator of other bacteria, have confirmed that they also synthesize a characteristic MDO-like class of oligosaccharides. The natural growth environment of bdellovibrios is the periplasm of other gram-negative bacteria. Because of this location, prey cell MDO constitute a potential source of organic nutrients for growing bdellovibrios. Using cells of E. coli whose MDO were /sup 3/H labeled, we examined the extent to which B. bacteriovorus 109J metabolizes these prey cell components. Interestingly, there was neither significant degradation nor incorporation of prey cell MDO by bdellovibrios during the course of their intracellular growth. In fact, bdellovibrios had little capability either to degrade extracellular MDO that was made available to them or to transport glucose, the major monomeric constituent of prey cell MDO. Instead, periplasmic MDO were irreversibly lost to the extracellular environment during the period of bdellovibrio attack and penetration. Thus, although prey cell periplasmic proteins are retained, other important periplasmic components are released early in the bdellovibrio growth cycle. The loss of these MDO may aid in the destabilization of the prey cell plasma membrane, increasing the availability of cytoplasmic constituents to the periplasmic bdellovibrio.

  2. Direct Metal Transfer Between Periplasmic Proteins Identifies a Bacterial Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Bagai, I.; Rensing, C.; Blackburn, N.; McEvoy, M.M.

    2009-05-11

    Transition metals require exquisite handling within cells to ensure that cells are not harmed by an excess of free metal species. In Gram-negative bacteria, copper is required in only small amounts in the periplasm, not in the cytoplasm, so a key aspect of protection under excess metal conditions is to export copper from the periplasm. Additional protection could be conferred by a periplasmic chaperone to limit the free metal species prior to export. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we have demonstrated that two periplasmic proteins, CusF and CusB, of the Escherichia coli Cu(I)/Ag(I) efflux system undergo a metal-dependent interaction. Through the development of a novel X-ray absorption spectroscopy approach using selenomethionine labeling to distinguish the metal sites of the two proteins, we have demonstrated transfer of Cu(I) occurs between CusF and CusB. The interaction between these proteins is highly specific, as a homologue of CusF with a 51% identical sequence and a similar affinity for metal, did not function in metal transfer. These experiments establish a metallochaperone activity for CusF in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria, serving to protect the periplasm from metal-mediated damage.

  3. c-Type Cytochrome Assembly Is a Key Target of Copper Toxicity within the Bacterial Periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Anne; Azzouzi, Asma; Bourbon, Marie-Line; Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Liotenberg, Sylviane; Maeshima, Akinori; Astier, Chantal; Argentini, Manuela; Saito, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the absence of a tight control of copper entrance into cells, bacteria have evolved different systems to control copper concentration within the cytoplasm and the periplasm. Central to these systems, the Cu+ ATPase CopA plays a major role in copper tolerance and translocates copper from the cytoplasm to the periplasm. The fate of copper in the periplasm varies among species. Copper can be sequestered, oxidized, or released outside the cells. Here we describe the identification of CopI, a periplasmic protein present in many proteobacteria, and show its requirement for copper tolerance in Rubrivivax gelatinosus. The ΔcopI mutant is more susceptible to copper than the Cu+ ATPase copA mutant. CopI is induced by copper, localized in the periplasm and could bind copper. Interestingly, copper affects cytochrome c membrane complexes (cbb3 oxidase and photosystem) in both ΔcopI and copA-null mutants, but the causes are different. In the copA mutant, heme and chlorophyll synthesis are affected, whereas in ΔcopI mutant, the decrease is a consequence of impaired cytochrome c assembly. This impact on c-type cytochromes would contribute also to the copper toxicity in the periplasm of the wild-type cells when they are exposed to high copper concentrations. PMID:26396241

  4. Purification, cloning, and characterization of the CEL I nuclease.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Wen, X; Kodali, N S; Oleykowski, C A; Miller, C G; Kulinski, J; Besack, D; Yeung, J A; Kowalski, D; Yeung, A T

    2000-04-01

    CEL I, isolated from celery, is the first eukaryotic nuclease known that cleaves DNA with high specificity at sites of base-substitution mismatch and DNA distortion. The enzyme requires Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) for activity, with a pH optimum at neutral pH. We have purified CEL I 33 000-fold to apparent homogeneity. A key improvement is the use of alpha-methyl-mannoside in the purification buffers to overcome the aggregation of glycoproteins with endogenous lectins. The SDS gel electrophoresis band for the homogeneous CEL I, with and without the removal of its carbohydrate moieties, was extracted, renatured, and shown to have mismatch cutting specificity. After determination of the amino acid sequence of 28% of the CEL I polypeptide, we cloned the CEL I cDNA. Potential orthologs are nucleases putatively encoded by the genes BFN1 of Arabidopsis, ZEN1 of Zinnia, and DSA6 of daylily. Homologies of CEL I with S1 and P1 nucleases are much lower. We propose that CEL I exemplifies a new family of neutral pH optimum, magnesium-stimulated, mismatch duplex-recognizing nucleases, within the S1 superfamily. PMID:10736152

  5. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  6. In Vivo Detection of the Cyclic Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucan of Ralstonia solanacearum by High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieruszeski, J.-M.; Bohin, A.; Bohin, J.-P.; Lippens, G.

    2001-07-01

    We investigate the mobility of the osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Ralstonia solanacearum in the bacterial periplasm through the use of high-resolution (HR) NMR spectroscopy under static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Because the nature of periplasm is far from an isotropic aqueous solution, the molecules could be freely diffusing or rather associated to a periplasmic protein, a membrane protein, a lipid, or the peptidoglycan. HR MAS NMR spectroscopy leads to more reproducible results and allows the in vivo detection and characterization of the complex molecule.

  7. Cloning and Expression of Recombinant Human Endostatin in Periplasm of Escherichia coli Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Abbas; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Pourhassan-Moghaddam, Mohammad; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Karimi, Pouran; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recombinant human endostatin (rhEs) is an angiogenesis inhibitor which is used as a specific drug in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer. In the current research, we developed an efficient method for expressing soluble form of the rhEs protein in the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli via fusing with pelB signal peptide. Methods: The human endostatin (hEs) gene was amplified using synthetic (hEs) gene as a template; then, cloned and expressed under T7 lac promoter. IPTG was used as an inducer for rhEs expression. Next, the osmotic shock was used to extraction of protein from the periplasmic space. The presence of rhEs in the periplasmic space was approved by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Results: The results show the applicability of pelB fusion protein system usage for secreting rhEs in the periplasm of E. coli in the laboratory scale. The rhEs represents approximately 35 % (0.83mg/l) of the total cell protein. Conclusion: The present study apparently is the first report of codon-optimized rhEs expression as a fusion with pelB signal peptide. The results presented the successful secretion of soluble rhEs to the periplasmic space. PMID:27478780

  8. Engineered Escherichia coli with Periplasmic Carbonic Anhydrase as a Biocatalyst for CO2 Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Kim, Im Gyu; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kang, Dong Gyun

    2013-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase is an enzyme that reversibly catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide (CO2). It has been suggested recently that this remarkably fast enzyme can be used for sequestration of CO2, a major greenhouse gas, making this a promising alternative for chemical CO2 mitigation. To promote the economical use of enzymes, we engineered the carbonic anhydrase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngCA) in the periplasm of Escherichia coli, thereby creating a bacterial whole-cell catalyst. We then investigated the application of this system to CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation, a process with the potential to store large quantities of CO2. ngCA was highly expressed in the periplasm of E. coli in a soluble form, and the recombinant bacterial cell displayed the distinct ability to hydrate CO2 compared with its cytoplasmic ngCA counterpart and previously reported whole-cell CA systems. The expression of ngCA in the periplasm of E. coli greatly accelerated the rate of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation and exerted a striking impact on the maximal amount of CaCO3 produced under conditions of relatively low pH. It was also shown that the thermal stability of the periplasmic enzyme was significantly improved. These results demonstrate that the engineered bacterial cell with periplasmic ngCA can successfully serve as an efficient biocatalyst for CO2 sequestration. PMID:23974145

  9. Microscopic studies on Thermosipho globiformans implicate a role of the large periplasm of Thermotogales.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Tomohiko; Igarashi, Kensuke

    2012-11-01

    Thermosipho globiformans is a member of Thermotogales, which contains rod-shaped, Gram-negative, anaerobic (hyper)thermophiles. These bacteria are characterized by an outer sheath-like envelope, the toga, which includes the outer membrane and an amorphous layer, and forms large periplasm at the poles of each rod. The cytoplasmic membrane and its contents are called "cell", and the toga and its contents "rod", to distinguish between them. Optical cells were constructed to observe binary fission of T. globiformans. High-temperature microscopy of rods adhering to optical cells' coverslips showed that the large periplasm forms between newly divided cells in a rod, followed by rod fission at the middle of the periplasm, which was accompanied by a sideward motion of the newly generated rod pole(s). Electron microscopic observations revealed that sessile rods grown on a glass plate have nanotubes adhered to the glass, and these may be involved in the sideward motion. Epifluorescence microscopy with a membrane-staining dye suggested that formation of the septal outer membrane is distinct from cytokinesis. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the amorphous layer forms in the periplasm between already-divided cells. These findings suggest that the large periplasm is the structure in which the septal toga forms, an event separate from cytokinesis. PMID:23076519

  10. Editing the Plasmodium vivax genome, using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Moraes Barros, Roberto R; Straimer, Judith; Sa, Juliana M; Salzman, Rebecca E; Melendez-Muniz, Viviana A; Mu, Jianbing; Fidock, David A; Wellems, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of malaria morbidity worldwide yet has remained genetically intractable. To stably modify this organism, we used zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which take advantage of homology-directed DNA repair mechanisms at the site of nuclease action. Using ZFNs specific to the gene encoding P. vivax dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr), we transfected blood specimens from Saimiri boliviensis monkeys infected with the pyrimethamine (Pyr)-susceptible Chesson strain with a ZFN plasmid carrying a Pyr-resistant mutant pvdhfr sequence. We obtained Pyr-resistant parasites in vivo that carried mutant pvdhfr and additional silent mutations designed to confirm editing. These results herald the era of stable P. vivax genetic modifications.

  11. [Prodigiosin as a possible inhibitor of Serratia marcescens nuclease].

    PubMed

    Insupova, D V; Kireeva, N A; Beliaeva, M I; Vinogradova, V S; Gareĭshina, A Z

    1977-01-01

    Preparations of prodigiosin inhibited the activity of nuclese of Serratia marcescens. The preparations were fractionated on an alumina column. The activity of nuclease was inhibited by both fractions containing pyrryldipyrrylmethene compounds and fractions in which these compounds were not found by spectrophotometry. The inhibitor was isolated also from the cells of a pigmentless strain. Therefore, the inhibition is exhibited by compounds that are extracted from the cells with acetone and petroleum ether, rather than by prodigiosin.

  12. Mechanism for nuclease regulation in RecBCD

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Martin; Chaban, Yuriy; Wigley, Dale B

    2016-01-01

    In bacterial cells, processing of double-stranded DNA breaks for repair by homologous recombination is catalysed by AddAB, AdnAB or RecBCD-type helicase-nucleases. These enzyme complexes are highly processive, duplex unwinding and degrading machines that require tight regulation. Here, we report the structure of E.coli RecBCD, determined by cryoEM at 3.8 Å resolution, with a DNA substrate that reveals how the nuclease activity of the complex is activated once unwinding progresses. Extension of the 5’-tail of the unwound duplex induces a large conformational change in the RecD subunit, that is transferred through the RecC subunit to activate the nuclease domain of the RecB subunit. The process involves a SH3 domain that binds to a region of the RecB subunit in a binding mode that is distinct from others observed previously in SH3 domains and, to our knowledge, this is the first example of peptide-binding of an SH3 domain in a bacterial system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18227.001 PMID:27644322

  13. Safety evaluation of nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum.

    PubMed

    Okado, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Kazushige; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Lynch, Barry S; Vo, Trung D; Roberts, Ashley S

    2016-02-01

    Nuclease P1 has been widely used in the food industry to enhance or create flavor. One commercial source of this enzyme is Penicillium citrinum, an anamorphic mesophilic fungus with a long history of safe use in Europe and Asia as a fermentation organism used in the production of ribonucleases. Given the intended use in food for human consumption, and noting its potential presence at trace levels in finished products, a series of safety studies including an in vitro Ames and chromosome aberration assay, an in vivo rat erythrocyte micronucleus assay and a 90-day oral toxicity study in rats were conducted. No mutagenic activity was observed in the Ames assay. Equivocal activity in the chromosome aberration assay was not replicated in the micronucleus assay at doses of up to 1007 mg total organic solids (TOS)/kg body weight (bw)/day. Following oral administration of nuclease P1 at dosages of 10.1, 101 or 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day to Sprague-Dawley rats, no adverse effects on any study parameter were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day. The results of the genotoxicity studies and subchronic rat study support the safe use in food production of nuclease P1 produced from P. citrinum.

  14. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNAfootprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L.; Yin, Yadong; Gerion, Daniele; Kunchakarra, Siri; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Jett, Stephen D.; Bear, David G.; Alivisatos, Paul; Lee, Luke P.

    2006-08-15

    We have constructed a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of DNA length changes and perform DNA footprinting. The ruler was created by tethering double-stranded DNA to single Au nanoparticles. The scattering spectra of Au-DNA nanoconjugates showed red-shifted peak plasmon resonance wavelength dependent on DNA length, which can be measured with sub-nanometer axial resolution, averaging {approx}1.24 nm peak wavelength shift per DNA base pair. The spectra of individual Au-DNA nanoconjugates in the presence of nuclease showed a time-resolved dependence on the reaction dynamics, allowing quantitative, kinetic and real-time measurement of nuclease activity. The ruler was further developed into a new DNA footprinting platform. We showed the specific binding of a protein to DNA and the accurate mapping of its footprint. This work promises a very fast and convenient platform for mapping DNA-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other DNA size-based methods.

  15. Initiation of DNA damage responses through XPG-related nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Karen; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Lesion-specific enzymes repair different forms of DNA damage, yet all lesions elicit the same checkpoint response. The common intermediate required to mount a checkpoint response is thought to be single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), coated by replication protein A (RPA) and containing a primer-template junction. To identify factors important for initiating the checkpoint response, we screened for genes that, when overexpressed, could amplify a checkpoint signal to a weak allele of chk1 in fission yeast. We identified Ast1, a novel member of the XPG-related family of endo/exonucleases. Ast1 promotes checkpoint activation caused by the absence of the other XPG-related nucleases, Exo1 and Rad2, the homologue of Fen1. Each nuclease is recruited to DSBs, and promotes the formation of ssDNA for checkpoint activation and recombinational repair. For Rad2 and Exo1, this is independent of their S-phase role in Okazaki fragment processing. This XPG-related pathway is distinct from MRN-dependent responses, and each enzyme is critical for damage resistance in MRN mutants. Thus, multiple nucleases collaborate to initiate DNA damage responses, highlighting the importance of these responses to cellular fitness. PMID:23211746

  16. Relationship of Treponema denticola periplasmic flagella to irregular cell morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, J D; Li, H; Kuramitsu, H; Norris, S J; Goldstein, S F; Buttle, K F; Charon, N W

    1997-01-01

    Treponema denticola is an anaerobic, motile, oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. We found that the periplasmic flagella (PFs), which are located between the outer membrane sheath and cell cylinder, influence its morphology in a unique manner. In addition, the protein composition of the PFs was found to be quite complex and similar to those of other spirochetes. Dark-field microscopy revealed that most wild-type cells had an irregular twisted morphology, with both planar and helical regions, and a minority of cells had a regular right-handed helical shape. High-voltage electron microscopy indicated that the PFs, especially in those regions of the cell which were planar, wrapped around the cell body axis in a right-handed sense. In those regions of the cell which were helical or irregular, the PFs tended to lie along the cell axis. The PFs caused the cell to form the irregular shape, as two nonmotile, PF-deficient mutants (JR1 and HL51) were no longer irregular but were right-handed helices. JR1 was isolated as a spontaneously occurring nonmotile mutant, and HL51 was isolated as a site-directed mutant in the flagellar hook gene flgE. Consistent with these results is the finding that wild-type cells with their outer membrane sheath removed were also right-handed helices similar in shape to JR1 and HL51. Purified PFs were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and several protein species were identified. Western blot analysis using antisera to Treponema pallidum PF proteins along with N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis indicated T. denticola PFs are composed of one class A sheath protein of 38 kDa (FlaA) and three class B proteins of 35 kDa (FlaB1 and FlaB2) and one of 34 kDa (FlaB3). The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the FlaA and FlaB proteins of T. denticola were most similar to those of T. pallidum and Treponema phagedenis. Because these proteins were present in markedly reduced amounts or were absent in HL51, PF synthesis is

  17. Export of cytochrome P450 105D1 to the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kaderbhai, M A; Ugochukwu, C C; Kelly, S L; Lamb, D C

    2001-05-01

    CYP105D1, a cytochrome P450 from Streptomyces griseus, was appended at its amino terminus to the secretory signal of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase and placed under the transcriptional control of the native phoA promoter. Heterologous expression in E. coli phosphate-limited medium resulted in abundant synthesis of recombinant CYP105D1 that was translocated across the bacterial inner membrane and processed to yield authentic, heme-incorporated P450 within the periplasmic space. Cell extract and whole-cell activity studies showed that the periplasmically located CYP105D1 competently catalyzed NADH-dependent oxidation of the xenobiotic compounds benzo[a]pyrene and erythromycin, further revealing the presence in the E. coli periplasm of endogenous functional redox partners. This system offers substantial advantages for the application of P450 enzymes to whole-cell biotransformation strategies, where the ability of cells to take up substrates or discard products may be limited.

  18. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging) of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Clark, Michelle W; Yie, Anna M; Eder, Elizabeth K; Dennis, Richard G; Basting, Preston J; Martinez, Keith A; Jones, Brian D; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2015-01-01

    Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH), no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5) the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2-7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress.

  19. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging) of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Michelle W.; Yie, Anna M.; Eder, Elizabeth K.; Dennis, Richard G.; Basting, Preston J.; Martinez, Keith A.; Jones, Brian D.; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2015-01-01

    Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH), no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5) the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2–7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress. PMID:26713733

  20. The nuclease FAN1 is involved in DNA crosslink repair in Arabidopsis thaliana independently of the nuclease MUS81

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Natalie J.; Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a severe genetic disorder. Mutations in one of several genes lead to defects in DNA crosslink (CL) repair in human cells. An essential step in CL repair is the activation of the pathway by the monoubiquitination of the heterodimer FANCD2/FANCI, which recruits the nuclease FAN1 to the CL site. Surprisingly, FAN1 function is not conserved between different eukaryotes. No FAN1 homolog is present in Drosophila and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The FAN1 homolog in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in CL repair; a homolog is present in Xenopus but is not involved in CL repair. Here we show that a FAN1 homolog is present in plants and it is involved in CL repair in Arabidopsis thaliana. Both the virus-type replication-repair nuclease and the ubiquitin-binding ubiquitin-binding zinc finger domains are essential for this function. FAN1 likely acts upstream of two sub-pathways of CL repair. These pathways are defined by the Bloom syndrome homolog RECQ4A and the ATPase RAD5A, which is involved in error-free post-replicative repair. Mutations in both FAN1 and the endonuclease MUS81 resulted in greater sensitivity against CLs than in the respective single mutants. These results indicate that the two nucleases define two independent pathways of CL repair in plants. PMID:25779053

  1. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations.

  2. Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucans (OPGs) of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium are needed for optimal growth under nutrient limiting- hypoosmotic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are major periplasmic constituents of gram negative bacteria. Synthesis of OPGs is regulated by the osmolarity of the growth medium. The role of OPGs has been postulated in plant-symbiotic as well as pathogenic microorganisms. On the other hand, opg mutant...

  3. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and rats. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these site-specific nuclease technologies for genetic analysis and manipulation in rats are discussed.

  4. Membrane topology and functional importance of the periplasmic region of ABC transporter LolCDE.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masaki; Iguchi-Yokoyama, Asako; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime; Narita, Shin-ichiro

    2009-10-01

    The LolCDE complex is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that mediates the release of newly synthesized lipoproteins from the cytoplasmic membrane of gram-negative bacteria, which results in the initiation of outer-membrane sorting of lipoproteins through the Lol pathway. LolCDE is composed of one copy each of membrane subunits LolC and LolE, and two copies of nucleotide-binding subunit LolD. In this study, we examined the membrane topology of LolC and LolE by PhoA fusion analysis. Both LolC and LolE were found to have four transmembrane segments with a large periplasmic loop exposed to the periplasm. Despite similarities in sequence and topology, the accessibility of a sulfhydryl reagent to Cys introduced into the periplasmic loop suggested that the structure of the periplasmic region differs between LolC and LolE. Inhibition of the release of lipoproteins by the sulfhydryl reagent supported a previous proposal that LolC and LolE have distinct functions. PMID:19809197

  5. Role of anionic charges of periplasmic glucans of Shigella flexneri in overcoming detergent stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are synthesized by the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae when grown under low osmotic growth conditions. Enteropathogens such as Shigella flexneri spend considerable time outside the host environment such as irrigation waters where low nutrient low os...

  6. A bacterial glutathione transporter (Escherichia coli CydDC) exports reductant to the periplasm.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Marc S; Robinson, Hilary C; Poole, Robert K

    2005-09-16

    Glutathione (GSH), a major biological antioxidant, maintains redox balance in prokaryotes and eukaryotic cells and forms exportable conjugates with compounds of pharmacological and agronomic importance. However, no GSH transporter has been characterized in a prokaryote. We show here that a heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette-type transporter, CydDC, mediates GSH transport across the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane. In everted membrane vesicles, GSH is imported via an ATP-driven, protonophore-insensitive, orthovanadate-sensitive mechanism, equating with export to the periplasm in intact cells. GSH transport and cytochrome bd quinol oxidase assembly are abolished in the cydD1 mutant. Glutathione disulfide (GSSG) was not transported in either Cyd(+) or Cyd(-) strains. Exogenous GSH restores defective swarming motility and benzylpenicillin sensitivity in a cydD mutant and also benzylpenicillin sensitivity in a gshA mutant defective in GSH synthesis. Overexpression of the cydDC operon in dsbD mutants defective in disulfide bond formation restores dithiothreitol tolerance and periplasmic cytochrome b assembly, revealing redundant pathways for reductant export to the periplasm. These results identify the first prokaryotic GSH transporter and indicate a key role for GSH in periplasmic redox homeostasis. PMID:16040611

  7. Interaction between bacterial outer membrane proteins and periplasmic quality control factors: a kinetic partitioning mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Si; Ge, Xi; Lv, Zhixin; Zhi, Zeyong; Chang, Zengyi; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2011-09-15

    The OMPs (outer membrane proteins) of Gram-negative bacteria have to be translocated through the periplasmic space before reaching their final destination. The aqueous environment of the periplasmic space and high permeability of the outer membrane engender such a translocation process inevitably challenging. In Escherichia coli, although SurA, Skp and DegP have been identified to function in translocating OMPs across the periplasm, their precise roles and their relationship remain to be elucidated. In the present paper, by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and single-molecule detection, we have studied the interaction between the OMP OmpC and these periplasmic quality control factors. The results of the present study reveal that the binding rate of OmpC to SurA or Skp is much faster than that to DegP, which may lead to sequential interaction between OMPs and different quality control factors. Such a kinetic partitioning mechanism for the chaperone-substrate interaction may be essential for the quality control of the biogenesis of OMPs.

  8. Periplasmic Export of Bile Salt Hydrolase in Escherichia coli by the Twin-Arginine Signal Peptides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zixing; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Li, Huazhong; Lee, Byonghoon

    2015-09-01

    Bile salt hydrolase (BSH, EC 3.5.1.24) is considered as an ideal way with lower cost and less side effects to release the risk of coronary heart disease caused by hypercholesterolemia. As bile salt hydrolase from Lactobacillus plantarum BBE7 could not be efficiently exported by PelB signal peptide of the general secretory (Sec) pathway, three twin-arginine signal peptides from twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway were synthesized, fused with bsh gene, inserted into expression vectors pET-20b(+) and pET-22b(+), and transformed into four different Escherichia coli hosts, respectively. Among the 24 recombinant bacteria obtained, E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS (pET-20b(+)-dmsA-bsh) showed the highest BSH activity in periplasmic fraction, which was further increased to 1.21 ± 0.03 U/mL by orthogonal experimental design. And, signal peptide dimethyl sulfoxide reductase subunit DmsA (DMSA) had the best activity of exported BSH. More importantly, the presence of BSH in the periplasm had proven to be caused by the export rather than cell leakage. For the first time, we report the periplasmic expression of BSH by signal peptides from the Tat pathway. This will lay a solid foundation for the purification and biochemical characterization of BSH from the supernatant, and strategies adopted here could be used for the periplasmic expression of other proteins in E. coli.

  9. Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are required for optimal virulence in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We purified osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and found them to be composed of 100% glucose with 2-linked glucose as the most abundant residue with terminal glucose, 2,3-linked and 2,6-linked glucose also present in high quantities. The two structu...

  10. Translocation of green fluorescent protein to cyanobacterial periplasm using ice nucleation protein.

    PubMed

    Chungjatupornchai, Wipa; Fa-aroonsawat, Sirirat

    2009-04-01

    The translocation of proteins to cyanobacterial cell envelope is made complex by the presence of a highly differentiated membrane system. To investigate the protein translocation in cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942 using the truncated ice nucleation protein (InpNC) from Pseudomonas syringae KCTC 1832, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused in frame to the carboxyl-terminus of InpNC. The fluorescence of GFP was found almost entirely as a halo in the outer regions of cells which appeared to correspond to the periplasm as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy, however, GFP was not displayed on the outermost cell surface. Western blotting analysis revealed that InpNC-GFP fusion protein was partially degraded. The N-terminal domain of InpNC may be susceptible to protease attack; the remaining C-terminal domain conjugated with GFP lost the ability to direct translocation across outer membrane and to act as a surface display motif. The fluorescence intensity of cells with periplasmic GFP was approximately 6-fold lower than that of cells with cytoplasmic GFP. The successful translocation of the active GFP to the periplasm may provide a potential means to study the property of cyanobacterial periplasmic substances in response to environmental changes in a non-invasive manner. PMID:19412603

  11. Structural Basis for c-di-GMP-Mediated Inside-Out Signaling Controlling Periplasmic Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Dean R.; O'Toole, George A.; Sondermann, Holger

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial second messenger bis-(3′–5′) cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) has emerged as a central regulator for biofilm formation. Increased cellular c-di-GMP levels lead to stable cell attachment, which in Pseudomonas fluorescens requires the transmembrane receptor LapD. LapD exhibits a conserved and widely used modular architecture containing a HAMP domain and degenerate diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase domains. c-di-GMP binding to the LapD degenerate phosphodiesterase domain is communicated via the HAMP relay to the periplasmic domain, triggering sequestration of the protease LapG, thus preventing cleavage of the surface adhesin LapA. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanism of autoinhibition and activation of LapD based on structure–function analyses and crystal structures of the entire periplasmic domain and the intracellular signaling unit in two different states. In the absence of c-di-GMP, the intracellular module assumes an inactive conformation. Binding of c-di-GMP to the phosphodiesterase domain disrupts the inactive state, permitting the formation of a trans-subunit dimer interface between adjacent phosphodiesterase domains via interactions conserved in c-di-GMP-degrading enzymes. Efficient mechanical coupling of the conformational changes across the membrane is realized through an extensively domain-swapped, unique periplasmic fold. Our structural and functional analyses identified a conserved system for the regulation of periplasmic proteases in a wide variety of bacteria, including many free-living and pathogenic species. PMID:21304926

  12. Swarm and swim motilities of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and role of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) under low osmolarity conditions (< 70 mos mol l-1). OPG synthesis is not observed when cells are grown in iso- or hyper-osmotic media (> 400 mos mol l-1). Mutation in OPG structural gene...

  13. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNA footprinting

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L; Lee, Luke P

    2013-10-29

    This invention provides a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of nucleic acid (e.g., DNA) length changes and perform nucleic acid footprinting. In various embodiments the ruler comprises a nucleic acid attached to a nanoparticle, such that changes in the nucleic acid length are detectable using surface plasmon resonance. The nanoplasmonic ruler provides a fast and convenient platform for mapping nucleic acid-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other footprinting related methods.

  14. Top-Down Characterization of the Post-Translationally Modified Intact Periplasmic Proteome from the Bacterium Novosphingobium aromaticivorans

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Si; Brown, Roslyn N.; Payne, Samuel H.; Meng, Da; Zhao, Rui; Tolić, Nikola; Cao, Li; Shukla, Anil; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; et al

    2013-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria is a dynamic and physiologically important subcellular compartment where the constant exposure to potential environmental insults amplifies the need for proper protein folding and modifications. Top-down proteomics analysis of the periplasmic fraction at the intact protein level provides unrestricted characterization and annotation of the periplasmic proteome, including the post-translational modifications (PTMs) on these proteins. Here, we used single-dimension ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with the Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) to investigate the intact periplasmic proteome of Novosphingobium aromaticivorans . Our top-down analysis provided the confident identification of 55 proteins in the periplasm andmore » characterized their PTMs including signal peptide removal, N-terminal methionine excision, acetylation, glutathionylation, pyroglutamate, and disulfide bond formation. This study provides the first experimental evidence for the expression and periplasmic localization of many hypothetical and uncharacterized proteins and the first unrestrictive, large-scale data on PTMs in the bacterial periplasm.« less

  15. Periplasmic Manganese in a Subsurface Bacterium During Anaerobic Growth on Birnessite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, S.; Glasauer, S.; Beveridge, T.

    2002-12-01

    In subsurface environments, where oxygen is not metabolically available for energy production, bacteria use alternate terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) to respire and grow. Anaerobic TEAs include, but are not limited to, Fe3+ and Mn4+. These metals can be present as mineral phases (e.g., ferrihydrite and hematite in the case of iron; birnessite and pyrolusite in the case of manganese). Bacteria bind strongly to minerals and reduce the metal by a process called dissimilatory metal reduction (DMR). Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of DMR. In previous reports, when this organism was grown on birnessite, we observed cytoplasmic granules of a Mn-rich mineral phase, and an unusual deposition of electron-dense material within the periplasm (that region of the cell located between the inner and outer membranes). In an attempt to characterize the periplasmic precipitates, CN32 was inoculated into an anaerobic defined medium (DM), supplemented with 20 mM Mn (birnessite) and incubated in an anaerobic chamber. Reduced and total Mn concentrations were monitored using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and cell numbers determined by viable counts on trypticase soy agar. TEM, combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), was used to localize and confirm the presence of any Mn-rich depositions. Soluble Mn concentration increased steadily after inoculation, indicating active metabolism and metal reduction by the cells. Viable counts indicated that the cells reached their maximum number on day 9. Stained thin sections from 4-day-old samples examined with TEM showed cells in close association with the mineral. Secondary mineral products derived from birnessite reduction were evident (e.g., manganese phosphate). TEM-EDS also revealed the presence of ~30 nm-thick deposits of electron-dense material in the periplasm of some cells. However, examination of similar sections which had not been previously stained with osmium tetroxide

  16. New Insights into the Biological Role of the Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucans in Pathogenic and Symbiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Lacroix, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Summary This review emphasizes the biological roles of the osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs). OPGs occur in almost all α, β and γ Proteobacteria. This polymer of glucose is required for full virulence. The roles of the OPGs are complex and vary depending on the species. Here, we outline the four major roles of the OPGs through four different pathogenic and one symbiotic bacterial models (Dickeya dadantii, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Brucella abortus and Sinorhizobium meliloti). When periplasmic, the OPGs are a part of the signal transduction pathway and indirectly regulate genes involved in virulence. The OPGs can also be secreted. When outside of the cell, they interact directly with antibiotics to protect the bacterial cell or interact with the host cell to facilitate the invasion process. When OPGs are not found, as in the ε Proteobacteria, OPG-like oligosaccharides are present. Their presence strengthens the evidence that OPGs play an important role in virulence. PMID:26265506

  17. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    May, Janine M; Sherman, David J; Simpson, Brent W; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Simpson, Brent W.; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM. PMID:26370939

  19. Periplasm Turgor Pressure Controls Wall Deposition and Assembly in Growing Chara corallina Cells

    PubMed Central

    PROSEUS, TIMOTHY E.; BOYER, JOHN S.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims New wall deposition usually accompanies plant growth. External osmotica inhibit both processes but wall precursors continue to be synthesized, and exocytosis follows. Consequently, the osmotica appear to act outside of the plasma membrane. Because this implies an action of turgor pressure (P) on the periplasm by unknown mechanisms, the following study was undertaken to determine whether P could act in a way that altered wall deposition and assembly in the periplasm while the cells grow. • Methods Cells of Chara corallina were exposed to P slightly below normal by using a pressure probe while supplying inorganic carbon in light. After labelling, the walls were isolated and the amount of new wall was determined. Similar measurements were made after treatment with osmotica. Chlortetracycline-stimulated exocytosis was determined microscopically. Polysaccharide properties were determined by confocal microscopy and vapour pressure osmometry in an ‘artificial periplasm’ in isolated Chara cell walls, using labelled dextran as an anologue of hemicellulose, and polygalacturonate as pectin. • Key Results Rapid growth and wall deposition occurred at normal P of 0.5 MPa but both processes decreased when P was lowered 0.1 MPa. Inorganic carbon uptake and exocytosis were unaffected. In the artificial periplasm, normal P caused high polysaccharide concentrations and rapid polysaccharide entry into the wall, and gel formation in the pectin. Lowering P decreased entry and gel formation. • Conclusions This is the first indication that normal P of 0.5 MPa can concentrate periplasmic polysaccharides sufficiently to cause cross-linking and gel formation in pectins while simultaneously fostering the entry of large polysaccharides into small interstices in the existing wall. This P-action would thicken the primary wall and form a smooth transition between the new and old structure, suggesting a molecular mechanism of wall deposition and assembly while the

  20. Influence of periplasmic oxidation of glucose on pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas putida S11.

    PubMed

    Ponraj, Paramasivan; Shankar, Manoharan; Ilakkiam, Devaraj; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2013-06-01

    Fluorescent pseudomonads catabolize glucose simultaneously by two different pathways, namely, the oxidative pathway in periplasm and the phosphorylative pathway in cytoplasm. This study provides evidence for the role of glucose metabolism in the regulation of pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas putida S11. We have characterized the influence of direct oxidation of glucose in periplasm on pyoverdine synthesis in P. putida S11. We identified a Tn5 transposon mutant of P. putida S11 showing increased pyoverdine production in minimal glucose medium (MGM). This mutant designated as IST1 had Tn5 insertion in glucose dehydrogenase (gcd) gene. To verify the role of periplasmic oxidation of glucose on pyoverdine synthesis, we constructed mutants S11 Gcd(-) and S11 PqqF(-) by antibiotic cassette mutagenesis. These mutants of P. putida S11 with loss of glucose dehydrogenase gene (gcd) or cofactor pyrroloquinoline quinone biosynthesis gene (pqqF) showed increased pyoverdine synthesis and impaired acid production in MGM. In minimal gluconate medium, the pyoverdine production of wild-type strain S11 and mutants S11 Gcd(-) and S11 PqqF(-) was higher than in MGM indicating that gluconate did not affect pyoverdine synthesis. In MGM containing PIPES-NaOH (pH 7.5) buffer which prevent pH changes due to gluconic acid production, strain S11 produced higher amount of pyoverdine similar to mutants S11 Gcd(-) and S11 PqqF(-). Therefore, it is proposed that periplasmic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid decreases the pH of MGM and thereby influences pyoverdine synthesis of strain S11. The increased pyoverdine synthesis enhanced biotic and abiotic surface colonization of the strain S11.

  1. Involvement of TatD nuclease during programmed cell death in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Debrabant, Alain

    2012-03-01

    In this report, we describe the involvement of TatD nuclease during programmed cell death (PCD) in the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. T. brucei TatD nuclease showed intrinsic DNase activity, was localized in the cytoplasm and translocated to the nucleus when cells were treated with inducers previously demonstrated to cause PCD in T. brucei. Overexpression of TatD nuclease resulted in elevated PCD and conversely, loss of TatD expression by RNAi conferred significant resistance to the induction of PCD in T. brucei. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TatD nuclease interacts with endonucleaseG suggesting that these two nucleases could form a DNA degradation complex in the nucleus. Together, biochemical activity, RNAi and subcellular localization results demonstrate the role of TatD nuclease activity in DNA degradation during PCD in these evolutionarily ancient eukaryotic organisms. Further, in conjunction with endonucleaseG, TatD may represent a critical nuclease in a caspase-independent PCD pathway in trypanosomatid parasites since caspases have not been identified in these organisms.

  2. Barley aleurone cell death is not apoptotic: characterization of nuclease activities and DNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Fath, A; Bethke, P C; Jones, R L

    1999-11-01

    Barley aleurone cells undergo programmed cell death (PCD) when exposed to gibberellic acid (GA), but incubation in abscisic acid (ABA) prevent PCD. We tested the hypothesis that PCD in aleurone cells occurs by apoptosis, and show that the hallmark of apoptosis, namely DNA cleavage into 180 bp fragments, plasma membrane blebbing, and the formation of apoptotic bodies do not occur when aleurone cells die. We show that endogenous barley aleurone nucleases and nucleases present in enzymes used for protoplast preparation degrade aleurone DNA and that DNA degradation by these nucleases is rapid and can result in the formation of 180 bp DNA ladders. Methods are described that prevent DNA degradation during isolation from aleurone layers or protoplasts. Barley aleurone cells contain three nucleases whose activities are regulated by GA and ABA. CA induction and ABA repression of nuclease activities correlate with PCD in aleurone cells. Cells incubated in ABA remain alive and do not degrade their DNA, but living aleurone cells treated with GA accumulate nucleases and hydrolyze their nuclear DNA. We propose that barley nucleases play a role in DNA cleavage during aleurone PCD.

  3. Barley aleurone cell death is not apoptotic: characterization of nuclease activities and DNA degradation

    PubMed

    Fath; Bethke; Jones

    1999-11-01

    Barley aleurone cells undergo programmed cell death (PCD) when exposed to gibberellic acid (GA), but incubation in abscisic acid (ABA) prevents PCD. We tested the hypothesis that PCD in aleurone cells occurs by apoptosis, and show that the hallmarks of apoptosis, namely DNA cleavage into 180 bp fragments, plasma membrane blebbing, and the formation of apoptotic bodies do not occur when aleurone cells die. We show that endogenous barley aleurone nucleases and nucleases present in enzymes used for protoplast preparation degrade aleurone DNA and that DNA degradation by these nucleases is rapid and can result in the formation of 180 bp DNA ladders. Methods are described that prevent DNA degradation during isolation from aleurone layers or protoplasts. Barley aleurone cells contain three nucleases whose activities are regulated by GA and ABA. GA induction and ABA repression of nuclease activities correlate with PCD in aleurone cells. Cells incubated in ABA remain alive and do not degrade their DNA, but living aleurone cells treated with GA accumulate nucleases and hydrolyze their nuclear DNA. We propose that barley nucleases play a role in DNA cleavage during aleurone PCD.

  4. Surface-Bound Nuclease of Staphylococcus aureus: Localization of the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Okabayashi, Kinji; Mizuno, Den'ichi

    1974-01-01

    The cellular localization of staphylococcus nuclease, previously known as an exoenzyme, was investigated, and the following results were obtained. (i) When Staphylococcus aureus cells were converted to protoplasts by cell wall lytic enzyme L-11 (a bacteriolytic enzyme purified from Flavobacterium sp. which specifically hydrolyzes amide and peptide linkages of murein layers), over 80% of the cell-bound nuclease was released into the surrounding sucrose medium. (ii) The cell-bound nuclease was associated with the cell-wall membrane fraction of mechanically disrupted cells. (iii) The nuclease activity of cell-wall membrane fractions from cells during early and late stages of protoplast formation were compared. Less activity was found in the late stage. These results suggest that nuclease may be located at or near the surface of the cells. The distribution of cell-bound nuclease in the cell-wall membrane fraction varied with the growth conditions of S. aureus. The activity of alkaline phosphatase, another surface enzyme, was also investigated. Less of this enzyme than nuclease was released when the cells were converted to protoplasts. PMID:4587603

  5. Split invertase polypeptides form functional complexes in the yeast periplasm in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schonberger, O; Knox, C; Bibi, E; Pines, O

    1996-09-01

    The assembly of functional proteins from fragments in vivo has been recently described for several proteins, including the secreted maltose binding protein in Escherichia coli. Here we demonstrate for the first time that split gene products can function within the eukaryotic secretory system. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains able to use sucrose produce the enzyme invertase, which is targeted by a signal peptide to the central secretory pathway and the periplasmic space. Using this enzyme as a model we find the following: (i) Polypeptide fragments of invertase, each containing a signal peptide, are independently translocated into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are modified by glycosylation, and travel the entire secretory pathway reaching the yeast periplasm. (ii) Simultaneous expression of independently translated and translocated overlapping fragments of invertase leads to the formation of an enzymatically active complex, whereas individually expressed fragments exhibit no activity. (iii) An active invertase complex is assembled in the ER, is targeted to the yeast periplasm, and is biologically functional, as judged by its ability to facilitate growth on sucrose as a single carbon source. These observation are discussed in relation to protein folding and assembly in the ER and to the trafficking of proteins through the secretory pathway.

  6. Purification and characterization of the periplasmic nitrate reductase from Thiosphaera pantotropha.

    PubMed

    Berks, B C; Richardson, D J; Robinson, C; Reilly, A; Aplin, R T; Ferguson, S J

    1994-02-15

    The periplasmic nitrate reductase of Thiosphaera pantotropha has been purified from a mutant strain (M-6) that overproduces the enzyme activity under anaerobic growth conditions. The enzyme is a complex of a 93-kDa polypeptide and a 16-kDa nitrate-oxidizable cytochrome c552. The complex contains molybdenum; a fluorescent compound with spectral features of a pterin derivative can be extracted. In contrast to the dissimilatory membrane-bound nitrate reductases, the periplasmic nitrate reductase shows high specificity for nitrate as a substrate and is insensitive to inhibition by azide. The 93-kDa subunit exhibits immunological cross-reactivity with the catalytic subunit of Rhodobacter capsulatus N22DNAR+ periplasmic nitrate reductase. Mass spectrometric comparisons of holo-cytochrome c552 and apo-cytochrome c552 demonstrated that the polypeptide bound two haem groups. Mediated redox potentiometry of the cytochrome indicated that the haem groups have reduction potentials (pH = 7.0) of approximately -15 mV and + 80 mV. The functional significance of these potentials is discussed in relation to the proposed physiological role of the enzyme as a redox valve. PMID:8119278

  7. Site-selective dual modification of periplasmic binding proteins for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Crochet, Amanda P; Kabir, Mohiuddin M; Francis, Matthew B; Paavola, Chad D

    2010-09-15

    We have developed three sensitive and specific amino acid sensors based on bacterial periplasmic solute binding proteins. A site-specific amino-terminal transamination reaction provides a useful complement to cysteine chemistry for the covalent modification of biomolecules in this application. We demonstrate this combination to attach two different chromophores to a single biomolecule in two locations. The periplasmic glutamine binding protein from E. coli was modified with a pair of dyes suitable for fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and this conjugate exhibited an l-glutamine dependent optical response. Two periplasmic binding proteins from the thermophilic organism Thermotoga maritima, for arginine and aliphatic amino acids, were modified and evaluated similarly. All three conjugates manifested signal changes mediated by resonant energy transfer upon binding their respective ligands, with nanomolar dissociation constants and stereochemical specificity. This represents a readily generalizable method for construction of reagentless biosensors. The double-labeling strategy was also exploited for the surface attachment of a dye-labeled glutamine binding protein via a biotin-streptavidin interaction.

  8. Macromolecular crowding in the Escherichia coli periplasm maintains alpha-synuclein disorder.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Brian C; Young, Gregory B; Pielak, Gary J

    2006-02-01

    The natively disordered protein alpha-synuclein is the primary component of Lewy bodies, the cellular hallmark of Parkinson's disease. Most studies of this protein are performed in dilute solution, but its biologically relevant role is performed in the crowded environment inside cells. We addressed the effects of macromolecular crowding on alpha-synuclein by combining NMR data acquired in living Escherichia coli with in vitro NMR data. The crowded environment in the E.coli periplasm prevents a conformational change that is detected at 35 degrees C in dilute solution. This change is associated with an increase in hydrodynamic radius and the formation of secondary structure in the N-terminal 100 amino acid residues. By preventing this temperature-induced conformational change, crowding in the E.coli periplasm stabilizes the disordered monomer. We obtain the same stabilization in vitro upon crowding alpha-synuclein with 300 g/l of bovine serum albumin, indicating that crowding alone is sufficient to stabilize the disordered, monomeric protein. Two disease-associated variants (A30P and A53T) behave in the same way in both dilute solution and in the E.coli periplasm. These data reveal the importance of approaching the effects of macromolecular crowding on a case-by-case basis. Additionally, our work shows that discrete structured protein conformations may not be achieved by alpha-synuclein inside cells, implicating the commonly overlooked aspect of macromolecular crowding as a possible factor in the etiology of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Periplasmic production via the pET expression system of soluble, bioactive human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Szoka, Francis C

    2013-02-01

    A pET based expression system for the production of recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) directed to the Escherichia coli periplasmic space was developed. The pET22b plasmid was used as a template for creating vectors that encode hGH fused to either a pelB or ompA secretion signal under control of the strong bacteriophage T7 promoter. The pelB- and ompA-hGH constructs expressed in BL21 (λDE3)-RIPL E. coli are secreted into the periplasm which facilitates isolation of soluble hGH by selective disruption of the outer membrane. A carboxy-terminal poly-histidine tag enabled purification by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography with an average yield of 1.4 mg/L culture of purified hGH, independent of secretion signal. Purified pelB- and ompA-hGH are monomeric based on size exclusion chromatography with an intact mass corresponding to mature hGH indicating proper cleavage of the signal peptide and folding in the periplasm. Both pelB- and ompA-hGH bind the hGH receptor with high affinity and potently stimulate Nb2 cell growth. These results demonstrate that the pET expression system is suitable for the rapid and simple isolation of bioactive, soluble hGH from E. coli.

  10. Mechanical unfolding of ribose binding protein and its comparison with other periplasmic binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Narayan, Satya; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2014-10-01

    Folding and unfolding studies on large, multidomain proteins are still rare despite their high abundance in genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we investigate the unfolding properties of a 271 residue, two-domain ribose binding protein (RBP) from the bacterial periplasm using single-molecule force spectroscopy. We observe that RBP predominately unfolds via a two-state pathway with an unfolding force of ∼80 pN and an unfolding contour length of ∼95 nm. Only a small population (∼15%) of RBP follows three-state pathways. The ligand binding neither increases the mechanical stability nor influences the unfolding flux of RBP through different pathways. The kinetic partitioning between two-state and three-state pathways, which has been reported earlier for other periplasmic proteins, is also observed in RBP, albeit to a lesser extent. These results provide important insights into the mechanical stability and unfolding processes of large two-domain proteins and highlight the contrasting features upon ligand binding. Protein structural topology diagrams are used to explain the differences in the mechanical unfolding behavior of RBP with other periplasmic binding proteins.

  11. Relationship between thermal stability, degradation rate and expression yield of barnase variants in the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kwon, W S; Da Silva, N A; Kellis, J T

    1996-12-01

    An advantage of exporting a recombinant protein to the periplasm of Escherichia coli is decreased proteolysis in the periplasm compared with that in the cytoplasm. However, protein degradation in the periplasm also occurs. It has been widely accepted that the thermodynamic stability of a protein is an important factor for protein degradation in the cytoplasm of E.coli. To investigate the effect of the thermodynamic stability of an exported protein on the extent of proteolysis in the periplasm, barnase (an extracellular ribonuclease from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens) fused to alkaline phosphatase leader peptide was used as a model protein. A set of singly or doubly mutated barnase variants were constructed for export to the E.coli periplasm. It was found that the half-life of the barnase variants in vivo increased with their thermodynamic stability in vitro. A dominant factor for the final yield of exported barnase was not exportability but the turnover rate of the barnase variant. The yield of a stabilized mutant was up to 50% higher than that of the wild type. This suggests that exporting a protein to the periplasm and using protein engineering to enhance the stability can be combined as a strategy to optimize the production of recombinant proteins. PMID:9010933

  12. Plant plasma membrane-bound staphylococcal-like DNases as a novel class of eukaryotic nucleases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The activity of degradative nucleases responsible for genomic DNA digestion has been observed in all kingdoms of life. It is believed that the main function of DNA degradation occurring during plant programmed cell death is redistribution of nucleic acid derived products such as nitrogen, phosphorus and nucleotide bases. Plant degradative nucleases that have been studied so far belong mainly to the S1-type family and were identified in cellular compartments containing nucleic acids or in the organelles where they are stored before final application. However, the explanation of how degraded DNA components are exported from the dying cells for further reutilization remains open. Results Bioinformatic and experimental data presented in this paper indicate that two Arabidopsis staphylococcal-like nucleases, named CAN1 and CAN2, are anchored to the cell membrane via N-terminal myristoylation and palmitoylation modifications. Both proteins possess a unique hybrid structure in their catalytic domain consisting of staphylococcal nuclease-like and tRNA synthetase anticodon binding-like motifs. They are neutral, Ca2+-dependent nucleaces showing a different specificity toward the ssDNA, dsDNA and RNA substrates. A study of microarray experiments and endogenous nuclease activity revealed that expression of CAN1 gene correlates with different forms of programmed cell death, while the CAN2 gene is constitutively expressed. Conclusions In this paper we present evidence showing that two plant staphylococcal-like nucleases belong to a new, as yet unidentified class of eukaryotic nucleases, characterized by unique plasma membrane localization. The identification of this class of nucleases indicates that plant cells possess additional, so far uncharacterized, mechanisms responsible for DNA and RNA degradation. The potential functions of these nucleases in relation to their unique intracellular location are discussed. PMID:23102437

  13. Enhancing zinc-finger-nuclease activity with improved obligate heterodimeric architectures.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Yannick; Vo, Thuy D; Mendel, Matthew C; Greenberg, Shon G; Wang, Jianbin; Xia, Danny F; Miller, Jeffrey C; Urnov, Fyodor D; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) drive efficient genome editing by introducing a double-strand break into the targeted gene. Cleavage is induced when two custom-designed ZFNs heterodimerize upon binding DNA to form a catalytically active nuclease complex. The importance of this dimerization event for subsequent cleavage activity has stimulated efforts to engineer the nuclease interface to prevent undesired homodimerization. Here we report the development and application of a yeast-based selection system designed to functionally interrogate the ZFN dimer interface. We identified critical residues involved in dimerization through the isolation of cold-sensitive nuclease domains. We used these residues to engineer ZFNs that have superior cleavage activity while suppressing homodimerization. The improvements were portable to orthogonal domains, allowing the concomitant and independent cleavage of two loci using two different ZFN pairs. These ZFN architectures provide a general means for obtaining highly efficient and specific genome modification.

  14. Theoretical studies on binding modes of copper-based nucleases with DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunmei; Zhu, Yanyan; Tang, Mingsheng

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, molecular simulations were performed for the purpose of predicting the binding modes of four types of copper nucleases (a total 33 compounds) with DNA. Our docking results accurately predicted the groove binding and electrostatic interaction for some copper nucleases with B-DNA. The intercalation modes were also reproduced by "gap DNA". The obtained results demonstrated that the ligand size, length, functional groups and chelate ring size bound to the copper center could influence the binding affinities of copper nucleases. The binding affinities obtained from the docking calculations herein also replicated results found using MM-PBSA approach. The predicted DNA binding modes of copper nucleases with DNA will ultimately help us to better understand the interaction of copper compounds with DNA.

  15. Structure-Specific nuclease activities of Artemis and the Artemis: DNA-PKcs complex

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Howard H.Y.; Lieber, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Artemis is a vertebrate nuclease with both endo- and exonuclease activities that acts on a wide range of nucleic acid substrates. It is the main nuclease in the non-homologous DNA end-joining pathway (NHEJ). Not only is Artemis important for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in NHEJ, it is essential in opening the DNA hairpin intermediates that are formed during V(D)J recombination. Thus, humans with Artemis deficiencies do not have T- or B-lymphocytes and are diagnosed with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). While Artemis is the only vertebrate nuclease capable of opening DNA hairpins, it has also been found to act on other DNA substrates that share common structural features. Here, we discuss the key structural features that all Artemis DNA substrates have in common, thus providing a basis for understanding how this structure-specific nuclease recognizes its DNA targets. PMID:27198222

  16. Comparison of the large-scale periplasmic proteomes of the Escherichia coli K-12 and B strains.

    PubMed

    Han, Mee-Jung; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Jung A

    2014-04-01

    Escherichia coli typically secretes many proteins into the periplasmic space, and the periplasmic proteins have been used for the secretory production of various proteins by the biotechnology industry. However, the identity of all of the E. coli periplasmic proteins remains unknown. Here, high-resolution periplasmic proteome reference maps of the E. coli K-12 and B strains were constructed and compared. Of the 145 proteins identified by tandem mass spectrometry, 61 proteins were conserved in the two strains, whereas 11 and 12 strain-specific proteins were identified for the E. coli K-12 and B strains, respectively. In addition, 27 proteins exhibited differences in intensities greater than 2-fold between the K-12 and B strains. The periplasmic proteins MalE and OppA were the most abundant proteins in the two E. coli strains. Distinctive differences between the two strains included several proteins that were caused by genetic variations, such as CybC, FliC, FliY, KpsD, MglB, ModA, and Ybl119, hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phosphatases, glycosylases, and proteases, and many uncharacterized proteins. Compared to previous studies, the localization of many proteins, including 30 proteins for the K-12 strain and 53 proteins for the B strain, was newly identified as periplasmic. This study identifies the largest number of proteins in the E. coli periplasm as well as the dynamics of these proteins. Additionally, these findings are summarized as reference proteome maps that will be useful for studying protein secretion and may provide new strategies for the enhanced secretory production of recombinant proteins.

  17. Regulation by interdomain communication of a headful packaging nuclease from bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh-Kumar, Manjira; Alam, Tanfis I.; Draper, Bonnie; Stack, John D.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2011-01-01

    In genome packaging by tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses, a concatemeric DNA is cut and inserted into an empty procapsid. A series of cuts follow the encapsidation of each unit-length ‘headful’ genome, but the mechanisms by which cutting is coupled to packaging are not understood. Here we report the first biochemical characterization of a headful nuclease from bacteriophage T4. Our results show that the T4 nuclease, which resides in the C-terminal domain of large ‘terminase’ gp17, is a weak endonuclease and regulated by a variety of factors; Mg, NaCl, ATP, small terminase gp16 and N-terminal ATPase domain. The small terminase, which stimulates gp17-ATPase, also stimulates nuclease in the presence of ATP but inhibits in the absence of ATP suggesting interdomain crosstalk. Comparison of the ‘relaxed’ and ‘tensed’ states of the motor show that a number of basic residues lining the nuclease groove are positioned to interact with DNA in the tensed state but change their positions in the relaxed state. These results suggest that conformational changes in the ATPase center remodel the nuclease center via an interdomain ‘communication track’. This might be a common regulatory mechanism for coupling DNA cutting to DNA packaging among the headful packaging nucleases from dsDNA viruses. PMID:21109524

  18. Polyplex-induced cytosolic nuclease activation leads to differential transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Rahul; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Wu, Gordon S-H; Shakya, Anisha; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2013-08-01

    Cytosolic nucleases have been proposed to play an important role in limiting the effectiveness of polyplex-based gene delivery agents. In order to explore the effect of cell membrane disruption on nuclease activation, nuclease activity upon polyplex uptake and localization, and nuclease activity upon gene expression, we employed an oligonucleotide molecular beacon (MB). The MB was incorporated as an integral part of the polymer/DNA polyplex, and two-color flow cytometry experiments were performed to explore the relationship of MB cleavage with propidium iodide (PI) uptake, protein expression, and polyplex uptake. In addition, confocal fluorescence microcopy was performed to examine both polyplex and cleaved MB localization. The impact of cell membrane disruption was also probed using whole-cell patch clamp measurement of the plasma membrane's electrical conductance. Differential activation of cytosolic nuclease was observed with substantial activity for B-PEI and G5 PAMAM dendrimer (G5), less cleavage for jetPEI, and little activity for L-PEI. jetPEI and L-PEI exhibited substantially greater transgene expression, consistent with the lower amounts of MB oligonucleotide cleavage observed. Cytosolic nuclease activity, although dependent on the choice of polymer employed, was not related to the degree of cell plasma membrane disruption that occurred as measured by PI uptake or whole-cell patch clamp.

  19. A baculovirus alkaline nuclease knockout construct produces fragmented DNA and aberrant capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Kazuhiro; Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Rohrmann, George F. . E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-03-01

    DNA replication of bacmid-derived constructs of the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was analyzed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) in combination with digestion at a unique Eco81I restriction enzyme site. Three constructs were characterized: a parental bacmid, a bacmid deleted for the alkaline nuclease gene, and a bacmid from which the gp64 gene had been deleted. The latter was employed as a control for comparison with the alkaline nuclease knockout because neither yields infectious virus and their replication is limited to the initially transfected cells. The major difference between DNA replicated by the different constructs was the presence in the alkaline nuclease knockout of high concentrations of relatively small, subgenome length DNA in preparations not treated with Eco81I. Furthermore, upon Eco81I digestion, the alkaline nuclease knockout bacmid also yielded substantially more subgenome size DNA than the other constructs. Electron microscopic examination of cells transfected with the alkaline nuclease knockout indicated that, in addition to a limited number of normal-appearing electron-dense nucleocapsids, numerous aberrant capsid-like structures were observed indicating a defect in nucleocapsid maturation or in a DNA processing step that is necessary for encapsidation. Because of the documented role of the baculovirus alkaline nuclease and its homologs from other viruses in homologous recombination, these data suggest that DNA recombination may play a major role in the production of baculovirus genomes.

  20. Enhanced gene disruption by programmable nucleases delivered by a minicircle vector.

    PubMed

    Dad, A-B K; Ramakrishna, S; Song, M; Kim, H

    2014-11-01

    Targeted genetic modification using programmable nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is of great value in biomedical research, medicine and biotechnology. Minicircle vectors, which lack extraneous bacterial sequences, have several advantages over conventional plasmids for transgene delivery. Here, for the first time, we delivered programmable nucleases into human cells using transient transfection of a minicircle vector and compared the results with those obtained using a conventional plasmid. Surrogate reporter assays and T7 endonuclease analyses revealed that cells in the minicircle vector group displayed significantly higher mutation frequencies at the target sites than those in the conventional plasmid group. Quantitative PCR and reverse transcription-PCR showed higher vector copy number and programmable nuclease transcript levels, respectively, in 293T cells after minicircle versus conventional plasmid vector transfection. In addition, tryphan blue staining and flow cytometry after annexin V and propidium iodide staining showed that cell viability was also significantly higher in the minicircle group than in the conventional plasmid group. Taken together, our results show that gene disruption using minicircle vector-mediated delivery of ZFNs and TALENs is a more efficient, safer and less toxic method than using a conventional plasmid, and indicate that the minicircle vector could serve as an advanced delivery method for programmable nucleases.

  1. Nuclease-Assisted Suppression of Human DNA Background in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yajing; Giske, Christian G.; Gille-Johnson, Patrik; Emanuelsson, Olof; Lundeberg, Joakim; Gyarmati, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe medical condition characterized by a systemic inflammatory response of the body caused by pathogenic microorganisms in the bloodstream. Blood or plasma is typically used for diagnosis, both containing large amount of human DNA, greatly exceeding the DNA of microbial origin. In order to enrich bacterial DNA, we applied the C0t effect to reduce human DNA background: a model system was set up with human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) DNA to mimic the conditions of bloodstream infections; and this system was adapted to plasma and blood samples from septic patients. As a consequence of the C0t effect, abundant DNA hybridizes faster than rare DNA. Following denaturation and re-hybridization, the amount of abundant DNA can be decreased with the application of double strand specific nucleases, leaving the non-hybridized rare DNA intact. Our experiments show that human DNA concentration can be reduced approximately 100,000-fold without affecting the E. coli DNA concentration in a model system with similarly sized amplicons. With clinical samples, the human DNA background was decreased 100-fold, as bacterial genomes are approximately 1,000-fold smaller compared to the human genome. According to our results, background suppression can be a valuable tool to enrich rare DNA in clinical samples where a high amount of background DNA can be found. PMID:25076135

  2. Effect of codon-optimized E. coli signal peptides on recombinant Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase periplasmic localization, yield and activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Shalaka; Gupta, Gunja; Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Haq, Saiful F; Nair, Ayyappan; Sambasivam, Ganesh; Sukumaran, Sunilkumar

    2014-09-01

    Recombinant proteins can be targeted to the Escherichia coli periplasm by fusing them to signal peptides. The popular pET vectors facilitate fusion of target proteins to the PelB signal. A systematic comparison of the PelB signal with native E. coli signal peptides for recombinant protein expression and periplasmic localization is not reported. We chose the Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase (MA), an industrial enzyme widely used in the baking and brewing industry, as a model protein and analyzed the competence of seven, codon-optimized, E. coli signal sequences to translocate MA to the E. coli periplasm compared to PelB. MA fusions to three of the signals facilitated enhanced periplasmic localization of MA compared to the PelB fusion. Interestingly, these three fusions showed greatly improved MA yields and between 18- and 50-fold improved amylase activities compared to the PelB fusion. Previously, non-optimal codon usage in native E. coli signal peptide sequences has been reported to be important for protein stability and activity. Our results suggest that E. coli signal peptides with optimal codon usage could also be beneficial for heterologous protein secretion to the periplasm. Moreover, such fusions could even enhance activity rather than diminish it. This effect, to our knowledge has not been previously documented. In addition, the seven vector platform reported here could also be used as a screen to identify the best signal peptide partner for other recombinant targets of interest. PMID:25038884

  3. Electron transfer between periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and cytochromes c in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sofia Marques; Pacheco, Isabel; Pereira, Inês A Cardoso

    2012-06-01

    Desulfovibrio spp. are sulfate-reducing organisms characterized by having multiple periplasmic hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases (FDHs). In contrast to enzymes in most bacteria, these enzymes do not reduce directly the quinone pool, but transfer electrons to soluble cytochromes c. Several studies have investigated electron transfer with hydrogenases, but comparatively less is known about FDHs. In this work we conducted experiments to assess potential electron transfer pathways resulting from formate oxidation in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774. This organism can grow on sulfate and on nitrate, and contains a single soluble periplasmic FDH that includes a cytochrome c (3) like subunit (FdhABC(3)). It has also a unique cytochrome c composition, including two cytochromes c not yet isolated from other species, the split-Soret and nine-heme cytochromes, besides a tetraheme type I cytochrome c (3) (TpIc (3)). The FDH activity and cytochrome composition of cells grown with lactate or formate and nitrate or sulfate were determined, and the electron transfer between FDH and these cytochromes was investigated. We studied also the reduction of the Dsr complex and of the monoheme cytochrome c-553, previously proposed to be the physiological partner of FDH. FdhABC(3) was able to reduce the c-553, TpIc (3), and split-Soret cytochromes with a high rate. For comparison, the same experiments were performed with the [NiFe] hydrogenase from the same organism. This study shows that FdhABC(3) can directly reduce the periplasmic cytochrome c network, feeding electrons into several alternative metabolic pathways, which explains the advantage of not having an associated membrane subunit.

  4. Properties of the periplasmic ModA molybdate-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rech, S; Wolin, C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-02-01

    The modABCD operon, located at 17 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, encodes the protein components of a high affinity molybdate uptake system. Sequence analysis of the modA gene (GenBank L34009) predicts that it encodes a periplasmic binding protein based on the presence of a leader-like sequence at its N terminus. To examine the properties of the ModA protein, the modA structural gene was overexpressed, and its product was purified. The ModA protein was localized to the periplasmic space of the cell, and it was released following a gentle osmotic shock. The N-terminal sequence of ModA confirmed that a leader region of 24 amino acids was removed upon export from the cell. The apparent size of ModA is 31.6 kDa as determined by gel sieve chromatography, whereas it is 22.5 kDa when examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A ligand-dependent protein mobility shift assay was devised using a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protocol to examine binding of molybdate and other anions to the ModA periplasmic protein. Whereas molybdate and tungstate were bound with high affinity (approximately 5 microM), sulfate, chromate, selenate, phosphate, and chlorate did not bind even when tested at 2 mM. A UV spectral assay revealed apparent Kd values of binding for molybdate and tungstate of 3 and 7 microM, respectively. Strains defective in the modA gene were unable to transport molybdate unless high levels of the anion were supplied in the medium. Therefore the modA gene product is essential for high affinity molybdate uptake by the cell. Tungstate interference of molybdate acquisition by the cell is apparently due in part to the high affinity of the ModA protein for this anion.

  5. Promoter engineering to optimize recombinant periplasmic Fab' fragment production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Desmond M; Templar, Alex; Newton, Joseph; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-07-01

    Fab' fragments have become an established class of biotherapeutic over the last two decades. Likewise, developments in synthetic biology are providing ever more powerful techniques for designing bacterial genes, gene networks and entire genomes that can be used to improve industrial performance of cells used for production of biotherapeutics. We have previously observed significant leakage of an exogenous therapeutic Fab' fragment into the growth medium during high cell density cultivation of an Escherichia coli production strain. In this study we sought to apply a promoter engineering strategy to address the issue of Fab' fragment leakage and its consequent bioprocess challenges. We used site directed mutagenesis to convert the Ptac promoter, present in the plasmid, pTTOD-A33 Fab', to a Ptic promoter which has been shown by others to direct expression at a 35% reduced rate compared to Ptac . We characterized the resultant production trains in which either Ptic or Ptac promoters direct Fab' fragment expression. The Ptic promoter strain showed a 25-30% reduction in Fab' expression relative to the original Ptac strain. Reduced Fab' leakage and increased viability over the course of a fed-batch fermentation were also observed for the Ptic promoter strain. We conclude that cell design steps such as the Ptac to Ptic promoter conversion reported here, can yield significant process benefit and understanding with respect to periplasmic Fab' fragment production. It remains an open question as to whether the influence of transgene expression on periplasmic retention is mediated by global metabolic burden effects or periplasm overcapacity. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:840-847, 2016.

  6. The role of ExbD in periplasmic pH homeostasis in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Sachs, George; Scott, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori, a neutralophile, colonizes the acidic environment of the human stomach by employing acid acclimation mechanisms that regulate periplasmic and cytoplasmic pH. The regulation of urease activity is central to acid acclimation. Inactive urease apoenzyme, UreA/B, requires nickel for activation. Accessory proteins UreE, F, G and H are required for nickel insertion into apoenzyme. The ExbB/ExbD/TonB complex transfers energy from the inner to outer membrane, providing the driving force for nickel uptake. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the contribution of ExbD to pH homeostasis. Materials and Methods A nonpolar exbD knockout was constructed and survival, growth, urease activity, and membrane potential were determined in comparison to wildtype. Results Survival of the ΔexbD strain was significantly reduced at pH 3.0. Urease activity as a function of pH and UreI activation were similar to the wildtype strain, showing normal function of the proton-gated urea channel, UreI. The increase in total urease activity over time in acid seen in the wildtype strain was abolished in the ΔexbD strain, but recovered in the presence of supra-physiologic nickel concentrations, demonstrating that the effect of the ΔexbD mutant is due to loss of a necessary constant supply of nickel. In acid, ΔexbD also decreased its ability to maintain membrane potential and periplasmic buffering in the presence of urea. Conclusions ExbD is essential for maintenance of periplasmic buffering and membrane potential by transferring energy required for nickel uptake, making it a potential non-antibiotic target for H. pylori eradication. PMID:23600974

  7. The Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Expression Levels and Folding of Organophosphorus Hydrolase Enzyme in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Khajeh, Khosro; Farnoosh, Gholamreza; Hassanpour, Kazem; Khodi, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) is a type of organophosphate-degrading enzyme which is widely used in the bioremediation process. Objectives: In this study, the periplasmic and cytoplasmic productions and the activity of recombinant OPH in Escherichia coli were investigated and compared using two pET systems (pET21a and pET26b). Materials and Methods: The sequence encoding the opd gene was synthesized and expressed in the form of inclusion body using pET21a-opd and in the periplasmic space in pET26b-opd. Results: Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed a band of about 37 kDa with a maximum expression level at 30°C from pET21a-opd.However, the obtained results of the periplasmic space extraction of OPH (pET26b-opd) showed a very weak band, while the cytoplasmic expression of OPH (pET21a-opd) produced a strong protein band. Conclusions: The activities studied by the production of PNP were determined by following the increase at 410 nm. The maximum PNP was produced at 30°C with an optical density of 10.62 in the presence of cytoplasmic expression of OPH (pET21a-opd). Consequently, our results suggest cytoplasmic expression system as an appropriate candidate with a high amount of OPH in spite of inclusion body formation, which needs an additional refolding step. PMID:26870308

  8. Holo- and apo-bound structures of bacterial periplasmic heme-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ho, Winny W; Li, Huiying; Eakanunkul, Suntara; Tong, Yong; Wilks, Angela; Guo, Maolin; Poulos, Thomas L

    2007-12-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an "in" position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an "out" orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg(228) in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg(228), and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B(12)-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B(12), compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  9. Crystal Structure of a Histidine Kinase Sensor Domain with Similarity to Periplasmic Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J.; Le-Khac, M; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Histidine kinase receptors are elements of the two-component signal transduction systems commonly found in bacteria and lower eukaryotes, where they are crucial for environmental adaption through the coupling of extracellular changes to intracellular responses. The typical two-component system consists of a membrane-spanning histidine kinase sensor and a cytoplasmic response regulator. In the calssic system, extracellular signals such as small molecule ligands and ions are detected by the periplasmic sensor domain of the histidine kinase receptor, which modulates the catalytic activity of the cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain and promotes ATP-dependent autophosphorylation of a conserved histidine residue. G. sulfurreducens genomic DNA was used.

  10. Identification of periplasmic nitrate reductase Mo(V) EPR signals in intact cells of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Sears, H J; Bennett, B; Spiro, S; Thomson, A J; Richardson, D J

    1995-08-15

    EPR spectroscopy has been successfully used to detect signals due to molybdenum (V) and ferric iron in intact cells of aerobically grown Paracoccus denitrificans. The signals are ascribed to the catalytic molybdenum centre and to the haem iron of the periplasmic nitrate reductase. These signals are absent from a mutant strain deficient in this enzyme. The Mo(V) signal is due to the High-g Split species which has been well characterized in the purified enzyme. This confirms that the High-g Split is the physiologically relevant signal of a number observed in the previous work on the purified enzyme. PMID:7646461

  11. Self-quenched covalent fluorescent dye-nucleic acid conjugates as polymeric substrates for enzymatic nuclease assays.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hagstrom, James E; Budker, Vladimir G

    2002-01-01

    A fluorescent method is described for assessing nuclease activity. The technique is based on the preparation of quenched fluorophore-nucleic acid covalent conjugates and their subsequent dequenching due to degradation by nucleases. The resulting fluorescence increase can be measured by a spectrofluorometer and exhibits subpicogram per milliliter sensitivity level for RNase A and low picogram per milliliter level for DNase I. The method is adaptable for quantitative nuclease inhibitor testing.

  12. Cloning and characterization of a novel nuclease from shrimp hepatopancreas, and prediction of its active site.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Y; Liaw, S H; Liao, T H

    2000-03-15

    Approximately 95% of the amino acid sequence of a shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) nuclease was derived from protease-digested peptides. A 1461-base cDNA for the nuclease was amplified and sequenced with degenerate primers based on the amino acid sequence and then specific primers by 3' and 5' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). It contains an open reading frame encoding a putative 21-residue signal peptide and a 381-residue mature protein. The N-terminus of the enzyme is pyroglutamate, deduced from composition and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS analyses, and confirmed by a glutamine residue in the cDNA sequence. The enzyme has 11 Cys residues, forming five intramolecular disulphides. The eleventh Cys residue was linked to a thiol compound with an estimated molecular mass of between 500 and 700 Da. A sequence similarity search revealed no homologous proteins but residues 205-255 shared a conserved active-site motif within a distinct group of nucleases. His(211) in this conserved motif was shown to be very important in catalysis by site-specific modification with (14)C-labelled iodoacetate. The shrimp nuclease, previously designated DNase I, does indeed possess a low level of hydrolytic activity towards RNA in the presence of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+). The conservation of functionally important residues during distant evolution might imply that the catalytic mechanisms are similar in these nucleases, which should be classified in one subfamily. Finally, an active-site structure for shrimp nuclease was proposed on the basis of published structural data and the results of mutational and biochemical analyses of Serratia nuclease.

  13. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Prew, Michelle S.; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Topkar, Ved; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P.W.; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2015-01-01

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing1, 2, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM)3–6. As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-Seq analysis7. In addition, we identified and characterized another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also found that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities. PMID:26098369

  14. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities.

    PubMed

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Topkar, Ved V; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P W; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2015-07-23

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome-editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-seq analysis. In addition, we identify and characterize another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also find that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities.

  15. Thermodynamic characterization of an equilibrium folding intermediate of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, D.; Fox, R.; Freire, E.

    1994-01-01

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and CD spectroscopy have been used to probe the structural stability and measure the folding/unfolding thermodynamics of a Pro117-->Gly variant of staphylococcal nuclease. It is shown that at neutral pH the thermal denaturation of this protein is well accounted for by a 2-state mechanism and that the thermally denatured state is a fully hydrated unfolded polypeptide. At pH 3.5, thermal denaturation results in a compact denatured state in which most, if not all, of the helical structure is missing and the beta subdomain apparently remains largely intact. At pH 3.0, no thermal transition is observed and the molecule exists in the compact denatured state within the 0-100 degrees C temperature interval. At high salt concentration and pH 3.5, the thermal unfolding transition exhibits 2 cooperative peaks in the heat capacity function, the first one corresponding to the transition from the native to the intermediate state and the second one to the transition from the intermediate to the unfolded state. As is the case with other proteins, the enthalpy of the intermediate is higher than that of the unfolded state at low temperatures, indicating that, under those conditions, its stabilization must be of an entropic origin. The folding intermediate has been modeled by structural thermodynamic calculations. Structure-based thermodynamic calculations also predict that the most probable intermediate is one in which the beta subdomain is essentially intact and the rest of the molecule unfolded, in agreement with the experimental data. The structural features of the equilibrium intermediate are similar to those of a kinetic intermediate previously characterized by hydrogen exchange and NMR spectroscopy. PMID:7756977

  16. DNA Oxidation Profiles of Copper Phenanthrene Chemical Nucleases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molphy, Zara; Slator, Creina; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Kellett, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The deleterious effects of metal-catalyzed reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems can be seen in a wide variety of pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, ageing, and neurodegenerative disorder. On the other hand however, targeted ROS production in the vicinity of nucleic acids - as demonstrated by metal-activated bleomycin - has paved the way for ROS-active chemotherapeutic drug development. Herein we report mechanistic investigations into the oxidative nuclease activity and redox properties of copper(II) developmental therapeutics [Cu(DPQ)(phen)]2+ (Cu-DPQ-Phen), [Cu(DPPZ)(phen)]2+ (Cu-DPPZ-Phen), and [{Cu(phen)2}2(μ-terph)](terph) (Cu-Terph), with results being compared directly to Sigman’s reagent [Cu(phen)2]2+ throughout (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DPQ = dipyridoquinoxaline; DPPZ = dipyridophenazine). Oxidative DNA damage was identified at the minor groove through use of surface bound recognition elements of methyl green, netropsin, and [Co(NH3)6]Cl3 that functioned to control complex accessibility at selected regions. ROS-specific scavengers and stabilisers were employed to identify the cleavage process, the results of which infer hydrogen peroxide produced metal-hydroxo or free hydroxyl radicals (•OH) as the predominant species. The extent of DNA damage owing to these radicals was then quantified through 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) lesion detection under ELISA protocol with the overall trend following Cu-DPQ-Phen > Cu-Terph > Cu-Phen > Cu-DPPZ. Finally, the effects of oxidative damage on DNA replication processes were investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) where amplification of 120 base pair DNA sequences of varying base content were inhibited - particularly along A-T rich chains - through oxidative damage of the template strands.

  17. DNA oxidation profiles of copper phenanthrene chemical nucleases.

    PubMed

    Molphy, Zara; Slator, Creina; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Kellett, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The deleterious effects of metal-catalyzed reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems can be seen in a wide variety of pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, aging, and neurodegenerative disorder. On the other hand however, targeted ROS production in the vicinity of nucleic acids-as demonstrated by metal-activated bleomycin-has paved the way for ROS-active chemotherapeutic drug development. Herein we report mechanistic investigations into the oxidative nuclease activity and redox properties of copper(II) developmental therapeutics [Cu(DPQ)(phen)](2+) (Cu-DPQ-Phen), [Cu(DPPZ)(phen)](2+) (Cu-DPPZ-Phen), and [{Cu(phen)2}2(μ-terph)](terph) (Cu-Terph), with results being compared directly to Sigman's reagent [Cu(phen)2](2+) throughout (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DPQ = dipyridoquinoxaline; DPPZ = dipyridophenazine; Terph = terephthalate). Oxidative DNA damage was identified at the minor groove through use of surface bound recognition elements of methyl green, netropsin, and [Co(NH3)6]Cl3 that functioned to control complex accessibility at selected regions. ROS-specific scavengers and stabilizers were employed to identify the cleavage process, the results of which infer hydrogen peroxide produced metal-hydroxo or free hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) as the predominant species. The extent of DNA damage owing to these radicals was then quantified through 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) lesion detection under ELISA protocol with the overall trend following Cu-DPQ-Phen > Cu-Terph > Cu-Phen > Cu-DPPZ. Finally, the effects of oxidative damage on DNA replication processes were investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) where amplification of 120 base pair DNA sequences of varying base content were inhibited-particularly along A-T rich chains-through oxidative damage of template strands. PMID:25954741

  18. Transition to the open state of the TolC periplasmic tunnel entrance.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Christian; Koronakis, Eva; Bokma, Evert; Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Humphreys, Daniel; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2002-08-20

    The TolC channel-tunnel spans the bacterial outer membrane and periplasm, providing a large exit duct for protein export and multidrug efflux when recruited by substrate-engaged inner membrane complexes. The sole constriction in the single pore of the homotrimeric TolC is the periplasmic tunnel entrance, which in its resting configuration is closed by dense packing of the 12 tunnel-forming alpha-helices. Recruitment of TolC must trigger opening for substrate transit to occur, but the mechanism underlying transition from the closed to the open state is not known. The high resolution structure of TolC indicates that the tunnel helices are constrained at the entrance by a circular network of intra- and intermonomer hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. To assess how opening is achieved, we disrupted these connections and monitored changes in the aperture size by measuring the single channel conductance of TolC derivatives in black lipid bilayers. Elimination of individual connections caused incremental weakening of the circular network, accompanied by gradual relaxation from the closed state and increased flexibility of the entrance. Simultaneous abolition of the key links caused a substantial increase in conductance, generating an aperture that corresponds to the modeled open state, with the capacity to allow access and passage of diverse substrates. The results support a model in which transition to the open state of TolC is achieved by an iris-like realignment of the tunnel entrance helices.

  19. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  20. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    PubMed Central

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states. PMID:25004958

  1. Periscope: quantitative prediction of soluble protein expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catherine Ching Han; Li, Chen; Webb, Geoffrey I; Tey, BengTi; Song, Jiangning; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2016-01-01

    Periplasmic expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli not only offers a much-simplified downstream purification process, but also enhances the probability of obtaining correctly folded and biologically active proteins. Different combinations of signal peptides and target proteins lead to different soluble protein expression levels, ranging from negligible to several grams per litre. Accurate algorithms for rational selection of promising candidates can serve as a powerful tool to complement with current trial-and-error approaches. Accordingly, proteomics studies can be conducted with greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Here, we developed a predictor with a two-stage architecture, to predict the real-valued expression level of target protein in the periplasm. The output of the first-stage support vector machine (SVM) classifier determines which second-stage support vector regression (SVR) classifier to be used. When tested on an independent test dataset, the predictor achieved an overall prediction accuracy of 78% and a Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.77. We further illustrate the relative importance of various features with respect to different models. The results indicate that the occurrence of dipeptide glutamine and aspartic acid is the most important feature for the classification model. Finally, we provide access to the implemented predictor through the Periscope webserver, freely accessible at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/periscope/. PMID:26931649

  2. Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression in Escherichia coli using Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Cumulative Power.

    PubMed

    Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hemayatkar, Mahdi; Davami, Fatemeh; Barkhordary, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Soleimani, Mohammad; Davoudi, Noushin; Khalaj, Vahid

    2010-07-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease, which is composed of five distinct structural domains with 17 disulfide bonds, representing a model of high-disulfide proteins in human body. One of the most important limitations for high yield heterologous protein production in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the expression of complex proteins with multiple disulfide bridges. In this study the combination of two distinct strategies, manipulated cytoplasm and native periplasm, was applied to produce the functional full length tPA enzyme in E. coli. Using a PelB signal peptide sequence at 5' site of tPA gene, the expression cassette was prepared and subsequently was transformed into a strain with manipulated oxidizing cytoplasm. Then the induction was made to express the protein of interest. The SDS-PAGE analysis and gelatin hydrolysis confirmed the successful expression of functional tPA. The results of this study showed that complex proteins can be produced in E. coli using the cumulative power of both cytoplasm and periplasm.

  3. Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression in Escherichia coli using Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Cumulative Power

    PubMed Central

    Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hemayatkar, Mahdi; Davami, Fatemeh; Barkhordary, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Soleimani, Mohammad; Davoudi, Noushin; Khalaj, Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease, which is composed of five distinct structural domains with 17 disulfide bonds, representing a model of high-disulfide proteins in human body. One of the most important limitations for high yield heterologous protein production in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the expression of complex proteins with multiple disulfide bridges. In this study the combination of two distinct strategies, manipulated cytoplasm and native periplasm, was applied to produce the functional full length tPA enzyme in E. coli. Using a PelB signal peptide sequence at 5′ site of tPA gene, the expression cassette was prepared and subsequently was transformed into a strain with manipulated oxidizing cytoplasm. Then the induction was made to express the protein of interest. The SDS-PAGE analysis and gelatin hydrolysis confirmed the successful expression of functional tPA. The results of this study showed that complex proteins can be produced in E. coli using the cumulative power of both cytoplasm and periplasm. PMID:23408156

  4. Periscope: quantitative prediction of soluble protein expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Catherine Ching Han; Li, Chen; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Tey, BengTi; Song, Jiangning; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2016-01-01

    Periplasmic expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli not only offers a much-simplified downstream purification process, but also enhances the probability of obtaining correctly folded and biologically active proteins. Different combinations of signal peptides and target proteins lead to different soluble protein expression levels, ranging from negligible to several grams per litre. Accurate algorithms for rational selection of promising candidates can serve as a powerful tool to complement with current trial-and-error approaches. Accordingly, proteomics studies can be conducted with greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Here, we developed a predictor with a two-stage architecture, to predict the real-valued expression level of target protein in the periplasm. The output of the first-stage support vector machine (SVM) classifier determines which second-stage support vector regression (SVR) classifier to be used. When tested on an independent test dataset, the predictor achieved an overall prediction accuracy of 78% and a Pearson’s correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.77. We further illustrate the relative importance of various features with respect to different models. The results indicate that the occurrence of dipeptide glutamine and aspartic acid is the most important feature for the classification model. Finally, we provide access to the implemented predictor through the Periscope webserver, freely accessible at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/periscope/. PMID:26931649

  5. Trapping Open and Closed Forms of FitE-A Group III Periplasmic Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, R.; Proteau, A; Wagner, J; Cui, Q; Purisima, E; Matte, A; Cygler, M

    2009-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are essential components of bacterial transport systems, necessary for bacterial growth and survival. The two-domain structures of PBPs are topologically classified into three groups based on the number of crossovers or hinges between the globular domains: group I PBPs have three connections, group II have two, and group III have only one. Although a large number of structures for group I or II PBPs are known, fewer group III PBPs have been structurally characterized. Group I and II PBPs exhibit significant domain motions during transition from the unbound to ligand-bound form, however, no large conformational changes have been observed to date in group III PBPs. We have solved the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein FitE, part of an iron transport system, fit, recently identified in a clinical E. coli isolate. The structure, determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, shows that FitE is a group III PBP containing a single {alpha}-helix bridging the two domains. Among the individual FitE molecules present in two crystal forms we observed three different conformations (open, closed, intermediate). Our crystallographic and molecular dynamics results strongly support the notion that group III PBPs also adopt the same Venus flytrap mechanism as do groups I and II PBPs. Unlike other group III PBPs, FitE forms dimers both in solution and in the crystals. The putative siderophore binding pocket is lined with arginine residues, suggesting an anionic nature of the iron-containing siderophore.

  6. Structural analysis of DegS, a stress sensor of the bacterial periplasm.

    PubMed

    Zeth, Kornelius

    2004-07-01

    Regulated proteolysis is a key event in transmembrane signalling between intracellular compartments. In Escherichia coli the membrane-bound protease DegS has been identified as the periplasmic stress sensor for unfolded outer membrane proteins (OMPs). DegS inititates a proteolytic cascade resulting in the release of sigmaE the transcription factor of periplasmic genes. The crystal structure of DegS protease reported at 2.2 A resolution reveals a trimeric complex with the monomeric protease domain in an inhibited state followed by the inhibitory PDZ domain. Noteably, domain architecture and communication of DegS are remarkably to homologous proteins known to date. Here the domain interface is mechanically locked by three intradomain salt bridges. Co-crystallisation trials in the presence of a 10-residue activating peptide did not result in significant structural intradomain shifts nor distortions in the crystal packing. These observations imply a mode of activation indicative of peptide-induced structural shifts imposed to the protease domain rather than disturbing the PDZ-protease interface. PMID:15225661

  7. High-Throughput Detection of Thiamine Using Periplasmic Binding Protein-Based Biorecognition.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Katie A; Seog, Woo Jin; Han, Lu; Feder, Seth; Kraft, Clifford E; Baeumner, Antje J

    2016-08-16

    Although antibodies and aptamers are commonly used bioaffinity recognition elements, they are not available for many important analytes. As an alternative, we demonstrate use of a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) to provide high affinity recognition for thiamine (vitamin B1), an analyte of great importance to human and environmental health for which, like so many other small molecules, no suitable biorecognition element is available. We demonstrate that with an appropriate competitive strategy, a highly sensitive (limit of detection of 0.5 nM) and specific bioassay for thiamine and its phosphorylated derivatives can be designed. The high-throughput method relies upon the thiamine periplasmic binding protein (TBP) from Escherichia coli for thiamine biorecognition and dye-encapsulating liposomes for signal-enhancement. A thiamine monosuccinate-PEG-biotin derivative was synthesized to serve as an immobilized competitor that overcame constraints imposed by the deep binding cleft and structural recognition requirements of PBPs. The assay was applied to ambient environmental samples with high reproducibility. These findings demonstrate that PBPs can serve as highly specific and sensitive affinity recognition elements in bioanalytical assay formats, thereby opening up the field of affinity sensors to a new range of analytes. PMID:27460839

  8. Chemical Biology Approaches to Genome Editing: Understanding, Controlling, and Delivering Programmable Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hu, Johnny H; Davis, Kevin M; Liu, David R

    2016-01-21

    Programmable DNA nucleases have provided scientists with the unprecedented ability to probe, regulate, and manipulate the human genome. Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 system (CRISPR-Cas9) represent a powerful array of tools that can bind to and cleave a specified DNA sequence. In their canonical forms, these nucleases induce double-strand breaks at a DNA locus of interest that can trigger cellular DNA repair processes that disrupt or replace genes. The fusion of these programmable nucleases with a variety of other protein domains has led to a rapidly growing suite of tools for activating, repressing, visualizing, and modifying loci of interest. Maximizing the usefulness and therapeutic relevance of these tools, however, requires precisely controlling their activity and specificity to minimize potentially toxic side effects arising from off-target activities. This need has motivated the application of chemical biology principles and methods to genome-editing proteins, including the engineering of variants of these proteins with improved or altered specificities, and the development of genetic, chemical, optical, and protein delivery methods that control the activity of these agents in cells. Advancing the capabilities, safety, effectiveness, and therapeutic relevance of genome-engineering proteins will continue to rely on chemical biology strategies that manipulate their activity, specificity, and localization.

  9. Nuclease-mediated genome editing: At the front-line of functional genomics technology.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Woltjen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered endonucleases is rapidly becoming a staple method in developmental biology studies. Engineered nucleases permit random or designed genomic modification at precise loci through the stimulation of endogenous double-strand break repair. Homology-directed repair following targeted DNA damage is mediated by co-introduction of a custom repair template, allowing the derivation of knock-out and knock-in alleles in animal models previously refractory to classic gene targeting procedures. Currently there are three main types of customizable site-specific nucleases delineated by the source mechanism of DNA binding that guides nuclease activity to a genomic target: zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). Among these genome engineering tools, characteristics such as the ease of design and construction, mechanism of inducing DNA damage, and DNA sequence specificity all differ, making their application complementary. By understanding the advantages and disadvantages of each method, one may make the best choice for their particular purpose.

  10. Nuclease activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dna2 inhibits its potent DNA helicase activity

    PubMed Central

    Levikova, Maryna; Klaue, Daniel; Seidel, Ralf; Cejka, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Dna2 is a nuclease-helicase involved in several key pathways of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. The potent nuclease activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dna2 was reported to be required for all its in vivo functions tested to date. In contrast, its helicase activity was shown to be weak, and its inactivation affected only a subset of Dna2 functions. We describe here a complex interplay of the two enzymatic activities. We show that the nuclease of Dna2 inhibits its helicase by cleaving 5′ flaps that are required by the helicase domain for loading onto its substrate. Mutational inactivation of Dna2 nuclease unleashes unexpectedly vigorous DNA unwinding activity, comparable with that of the most potent eukaryotic helicases. Thus, the ssDNA-specific nuclease activity of Dna2 limits and controls the enzyme's capacity to unwind dsDNA. We postulate that regulation of this interplay could modulate the biochemical properties of Dna2 and thus license it to carry out its distinct cellular functions. PMID:23671118

  11. Quantification of designer nuclease induced mutation rates: a direct comparison of different methods

    PubMed Central

    Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Bergmann, Thorsten; Schiwon, Maren; Doerner, Johannes; Saydaminova, Kamola; Lieber, Andre; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Designer nucleases are broadly applied to induce site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in genomic DNA. These are repaired by nonhomologous end joining leading to insertions or deletions (in/dels) at the respective DNA-locus. To detect in/del mutations, the heteroduplex based T7-endonuclease I -assay is widely used. However, it only provides semi-quantitative evidence regarding the number of mutated alleles. Here we compared T7-endonuclease I- and heteroduplex mobility assays, with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction mutation detection method. A zinc finger nuclease pair specific for the human adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1), a transcription activator-like effector nuclease pair specific for the human DMD gene, and a zinc finger nuclease- and a transcription activator-like effector nuclease pair specific for the human CCR5 gene were explored. We found that the heteroduplex mobility assays and T7-endonuclease I - assays detected mutations but the relative number of mutated cells/alleles can only be estimated. In contrast, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction based method provided quantitative results which allow calculating mutation and homologous recombination rates in different eukaryotic cell types including human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In conclusion, our quantitative polymerase chain reaction based mutation detection method expands the array of methods for in/del mutation detection and facilitates quantification of introduced in/del mutations for a genomic locus containing a mixture of mutated and unmutated DNA. PMID:27419195

  12. Improving Lambda Red Genome Engineering in Escherichia coli via Rational Removal of Endogenous Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Harris H.; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Lambda Red recombineering is a powerful technique for making targeted genetic changes in bacteria. However, many applications are limited by the frequency of recombination. Previous studies have suggested that endogenous nucleases may hinder recombination by degrading the exogenous DNA used for recombineering. In this work, we identify ExoVII as a nuclease which degrades the ends of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) cassettes. Removing this nuclease improves both recombination frequency and the inheritance of mutations at the 3′ ends of ssDNA and dsDNA. Extending this approach, we show that removing a set of five exonucleases (RecJ, ExoI, ExoVII, ExoX, and Lambda Exo) substantially improves the performance of co-selection multiplex automatable genome engineering (CoS-MAGE). In a given round of CoS-MAGE with ten ssDNA oligonucleotides, the five nuclease knockout strain has on average 46% more alleles converted per clone, 200% more clones with five or more allele conversions, and 35% fewer clones without any allele conversions. Finally, we use these nuclease knockout strains to investigate and clarify the effects of oligonucleotide phosphorothioation on recombination frequency. The results described in this work provide further mechanistic insight into recombineering, and substantially improve recombineering performance. PMID:22957093

  13. Purification and identification of a nuclease activity in embryo axes from French bean.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Rocío; Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Cabello-Díaz, Juan Miguel; Piedras, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Plant nucleases are involved in nucleic acid degradation associated to programmed cell death processes as well as in DNA restriction, repair and recombination processes. However, the knowledge about the function of plant nucleases is limited. A major nuclease activity was detected by in-gel assay with whole embryonic axes of common bean by using ssDNA or RNA as substrate, whereas this activity was minimal in cotyledons. The enzyme has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from embryonic axes. The main biochemical properties of the purified enzyme indicate that it belongs to the S1/P1 family of nucleases. This was corroborated when this protein, after SDS-electrophoresis, was excised from the gel and further analysis by MALDI TOF/TOF allowed identification of the gene (PVN1) that codes this protein. The gene that codes the purified protein was identified. The expression of PVN1 gene was induced at the specific moment of radicle protrusion. The inclusion of inorganic phosphate to the imbibition media reduced the level of expression of this gene and the nuclease activity suggesting a relationship with the phosphorous status in French bean seedlings. PMID:24908514

  14. Generating and identifying axolotls with targeted mutations using Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease.

    PubMed

    Flowers, G Parker; Crews, Craig M

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease now enables a reverse genetics approach to investigate the function of genes of interest during regeneration in the axolotl. The process of generating the constructs necessary for targeting a gene of interest is considerably less labor intensive than for other methods of targeted mutagenesis such as Zinc finger nucleases or Transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Here, we describe the identification of targetable sequences in the gene of interest, the construction of unique guide RNAs, the microinjection of these RNAs with Cas9-encoding mRNA, the selection of well-injected animals, and an inexpensive, PCR-based method for identifying highly mutagenized animals. PMID:25740494

  15. Reassessment of the coagulase and thermostable nuclease tests as means of identifying Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rayman, M K; Park, C E; Philpott, J; Todd, E C

    1975-04-01

    A total of 91 enterotoxigenic strains of Staphylococcus auerus isolated from foods and tested for production of coagulase and thermostable nuclease and the ability to ferment glucose and mannitol showed, with the exception of four strains, a complete correlation among these properties. A similar correlation was observed with 103 cultures of S. aureus isolated from clinical material. In all instances, the coagulase reactions were sufficiently strong to be scored at either the 3+ or 4+ levels. Presumptive staphylococcal cultures isolated during routine examination of foods and yielding 2+ coagulase reactions or lower were invariably negative for thermostable nuclease production. It is suggested that the thermostable nuclease test be performed on cultures with doubtful coagulase reactions before classifying them as S. aureus.

  16. Cellular Architecture of Treponema pallidum: Novel Flagellum, Periplasmic Cone, and Cell Envelope as Revealed by Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Bradley, Sherille D.; Zheng, Yesha; Zhou, Z. Hong; Norris, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) was utilized to visualize Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, at the molecular level. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions from 304 infectious organisms revealed unprecedented cellular structures of this unusual member in the spirochetal family. High resolution cryo-ET reconstructions provided the detailed structures of the cell envelope, which is significantly different from that of gram-negative bacteria. The 4 nm lipid bilayer of both outer and cytoplasmic membranes resolved in 3-D reconstructions, providing an important marker for interpreting membrane-associated structures. Abundant lipoproteins cover the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane, in contrast to the rare outer membrane proteins visible by scanning probe microscopy. High resolution cryo-ET images also provided the first observation of T. pallidum chemoreceptor arrays, as well as structural details of the periplasmically located, cone-shaped structure at both ends of bacterium. Furthermore, 3-D subvolume averages of the periplasmic flagellar motors and filaments from living organisms revealed the novel flagellar architectures that may facilitate their rotation within the confining periplasmic space. Together, our findings provide the most detailed structural understanding of the periplasmic flagella and the surrounding cell envelope, which enable this enigmatic bacterium to efficiently penetrate tissue and escape host immune responses. PMID:20850455

  17. Cellular architecture of Treponema pallidum: novel flagellum, periplasmic cone, and cell envelope as revealed by cryo electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Bradley, Sherille D; Zheng, Yesha; Zhou, Z Hong; Norris, Steven J

    2010-11-01

    High-resolution cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) was utilized to visualize Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, at the molecular level. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from 304 infectious organisms revealed unprecedented cellular structures of this unusual member of the spirochetal family. High-resolution cryo-ET reconstructions provided detailed structures of the cell envelope, which is significantly different from that of Gram-negative bacteria. The 4-nm lipid bilayer of both outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane resolved in 3D reconstructions, providing an important marker for interpreting membrane-associated structures. Abundant lipoproteins cover the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane, in contrast to the rare outer membrane proteins visible by scanning probe microscopy. High-resolution cryo-ET images also provided the first observation of T. pallidum chemoreceptor arrays, as well as structural details of the periplasmically located cone-shaped structure at both ends of the bacterium. Furthermore, 3D subvolume averages of periplasmic flagellar motors and flagellar filaments from living organisms revealed the novel flagellar architectures that may facilitate their rotation within the confining periplasmic space. Our findings provide the most detailed structural understanding of periplasmic flagella and the surrounding cell envelope, which enable this enigmatic bacterium to efficiently penetrate tissue and to escape host immune responses.

  18. Sequence selective double strand DNA cleavage by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeting using nuclease S1.

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, V; Frank-Kamenetskii, M D; Egholm, M; Buchardt, O; Nielsen, P E

    1993-01-01

    A novel method for sequence specific double strand DNA cleavage using PNA (peptide nucleic acid) targeting is described. Nuclease S1 digestion of double stranded DNA gives rise to double strand cleavage at an occupied PNA strand displacement binding site, and under optimized conditions complete cleavage can be obtained. The efficiency of this cleavage is more than 10 fold enhanced when a tandem PNA site is targeted, and additionally enhanced if this site is in trans rather than in cis orientation. Thus in effect, the PNA targeting makes the single strand specific nuclease S1 behave like a pseudo restriction endonuclease. Images PMID:8502550

  19. Mutagenicity of the nuclease activity of 1,10-phenanthroline-copper ion

    SciTech Connect

    Feig, A.L.; Thederahn, T.; Sigman, D.S.

    1988-08-30

    The nuclease activity of 1,10-phenanthroline-copper functions intracellularly. This was shown by its mutagenicity in the Ames Test using the tester strain TA 102 and the in vivo nicking of plasmids derived from this strain. In vivo DNA strand scission requires all the components essential for the in vitro activity: 1,10-phenanthroline, cupric ion, thiol and hydrogen peroxide. Although /sup 60/Co gamma radiation potentiates the nuclease activity of 1,10-phenanthroline-copper ion in vitro via a superoxide dependent pathway, it does not promote significant mutagenesis in vivo at exposure levels below cytotoxicity.

  20. Defining and improving the genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Joung, J Keith

    2016-05-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases are a transformative technology for biology, genetics and medicine owing to the simplicity with which they can be programmed to cleave specific DNA target sites in living cells and organisms. However, to translate these powerful molecular tools into safe, effective clinical applications, it is of crucial importance to carefully define and improve their genome-wide specificities. Here, we outline our state-of-the-art understanding of target DNA recognition and cleavage by CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases, methods to determine and improve their specificities, and key considerations for how to evaluate and reduce off-target effects for research and therapeutic applications.

  1. Periplasmic maltose-binding protein confers specificity on the outer membrane maltose pore of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Heuzenroeder, M W; Reeves, P

    1980-01-01

    ompB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 are markedly deficient in porin in their outer membrane. This results in a decreased rate of uptake for many substrates: the maltose pore (lambda receptor) can in some circumstances, in the absence of the periplasmic maltose-binding protein, compensate for the consequent defects in permeability to lactose, mannitol, glycylglycyl-L-valine, and tri-L-ornithine. It is postulated that the maltose-binding protein associates with the maltose pore and confers on it the specificity for maltose, and that the absence of the maltose-binding protein leaves the pore open and results in enhanced transmembrane diffusion of molecules other than maltose. This paper presents evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:6444941

  2. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils.

  3. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the periplasmic flagellar flaA1 gene of Serpulina species.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, L N; Mathiesen, M R; Duhamel, G E

    1997-01-01

    Forty-one reference and field isolates of intestinal spirochetes representing Serpulina hyodysenteriae, Serpulina innocens, Serpulina pilosicoli, Brachyspira aalborgi, and nonclassified weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes were compared by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the periplasmic flagellar (PF) flaA1 gene. Six genetically distinct groups (I through VI), each with a unique RFLP fingerprint pattern, were identified by Southern blotting analysis of EcoRV chromosomal DNA digests with a PCR-amplified digoxigenin-labeled 1-kb fragment of the S. hyodysenteriae isolate B78 PF flaA1 gene. The RFLP fingerprint patterns corresponded to known DNA homology differences between Serpulina species and to provisionally designated species described previously by using phenotypic and genotypic classification schemes. RFLP fingerprinting of the PF flaA1 gene provides a relatively simple genotypic method for identification of intestinal spirochetes without the use of radioisotopes. PMID:9384289

  4. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mónica N; Neto, Sónia E; Alves, Alexandra S; Fonseca, Bruno M; Carrêlo, Afonso; Pacheco, Isabel; Paquete, Catarina M; Soares, Cláudio M; Louro, Ricardo O

    2015-01-01

    The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1) relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR), but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR). In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA), the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB-OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC.

  5. Modeling structural transitions from the periplasmic-open state of lactose permease and interpretations of spin label experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaohong; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2016-07-01

    Lactose permease of E. coli (LacY) is a secondary active transporter (SAT) that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Experimental structures of the cytoplasmic-open and more recently occluded-like structure have been determined, however, the crystal structure of LacY in the periplasmic-open state is still not available. The periplasmic-open LacY structure is important for understanding complete proton/sugar transport process of LacY as well as other similar SAT proteins. Previously, a structural model of periplasmic-open LacY has been obtained through a two-step hybrid implicit-explicit (IM-EX) simulation method (JMB404: 506). Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to further test the IM-EX model for the periplasmic-open LacY with ββ-(Galp)2 in a lipid membrane. The comparison of the calculated pore radii to the data of the crystal structure indicates that the IM-EX model of LacY remains periplasmic-open in E269-protonated states. The neighbor residue distance change based on Cα are very similar in simulation results, but they are significantly different in double electron-electron resonance (DEER) experimental data, which motivates us to perform the molecular dynamics dummy spin-label (MDDS) simulations to test the effect of spin labels (size and internal flexibility) on DEER spin label distance measurements. The MDDS simulation results show that the orientation and movement of the spin labels significantly affect the residue pair distance measurement. DEER data alone may not provide an accurate guide for predicting protein structures. MDDS simulations can be applied to analyze the distance distribution due to spin labels and also aid in proper interpretation of DEER experimental data. PMID:27107553

  6. Acinetobacter baumannii Extracellular OXA-58 Is Primarily and Selectively Released via Outer Membrane Vesicles after Sec-Dependent Periplasmic Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chiang, Ming-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Sung, Wang-Chou; Chen, You-Hsuan; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) shelter cohabiting carbapenem-susceptible bacteria from carbapenem killing via extracellular release of carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases, including OXA-58. However, the mechanism of the extracellular release of OXA-58 has not been elucidated. In silico analysis predicted OXA-58 to be translocated to the periplasm via the Sec system. Using cell fractionation and Western blotting, OXA-58 with the signal peptide and C terminus deleted was not detected in the periplasmic and extracellular fractions. Overexpression of enhanced green fluorescent protein fused to the OXA-58 signal peptide led to its periplasmic translocation but not extracellular release, suggesting that OXA-58 is selectively released. The majority of the extracellular OXA-58 was associated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The OMV-associated OXA-58 was detected only in a strain overexpressing OXA-58. The presence of OXA-58 in OMVs was confirmed by a carbapenem inactivation bioassay, proteomic analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Imipenem treatment increased OMV formation and caused cell lysis, resulting in an increase in the OMV-associated and OMV-independent release of extracellular OXA-58. OMV-independent OXA-58 hydrolyzed nitrocefin more rapidly than OMV-associated OXA-58 but was more susceptible to proteinase K degradation. Rose bengal, an SecA inhibitor, inhibited the periplasmic translocation and OMV-associated release of OXA-58 and abolished the sheltering effect of CRAb. This study demonstrated that the majority of the extracellular OXA-58 is selectively released via OMVs after Sec-dependent periplasmic translocation. Addition of imipenem increased both OMV-associated and OMV-independent OXA-58, which may have different biological roles. SecA inhibitor could abolish the carbapenem-sheltering effect of CRAb. PMID:26369971

  7. Trapping open and closed forms of FitE: a group III periplasmic binding protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong; Proteau, Ariane; Wagner, John; Cui, Qizhi; Purisima, Enrico O; Matte, Allan; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2009-05-15

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are essential components of bacterial transport systems, necessary for bacterial growth and survival. The two-domain structures of PBPs are topologically classified into three groups based on the number of crossovers or hinges between the globular domains: group I PBPs have three connections, group II have two, and group III have only one. Although a large number of structures for group I or II PBPs are known, fewer group III PBPs have been structurally characterized. Group I and II PBPs exhibit significant domain motions during transition from the unbound to ligand-bound form, however, no large conformational changes have been observed to date in group III PBPs. We have solved the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein FitE, part of an iron transport system, fit, recently identified in a clinical E. coli isolate. The structure, determined at 1.8 A resolution, shows that FitE is a group III PBP containing a single alpha-helix bridging the two domains. Among the individual FitE molecules present in two crystal forms we observed three different conformations (open, closed, intermediate). Our crystallographic and molecular dynamics results strongly support the notion that group III PBPs also adopt the same Venus flytrap mechanism as do groups I and II PBPs. Unlike other group III PBPs, FitE forms dimers both in solution and in the crystals. The putative siderophore binding pocket is lined with arginine residues, suggesting an anionic nature of the iron-containing siderophore. PMID:19004000

  8. Structure and Metal Binding Properties of ZnuA, a Periplasmic Zinc Transporter from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsunyk,L.; Easton, J.; Kim, L.; Sugarbaker, S.; Bennett, B.; Breece, R.; Vorontsov, I.; Tierney, D.; Crowder, M.; Rosenzweig, A.

    2008-01-01

    ZnuA is the periplasmic Zn(2+)-binding protein associated with the high-affinity ATP-binding cassette ZnuABC transporter from Escherichia coli. Although several structures of ZnuA and its homologs have been determined, details regarding metal ion stoichiometry, affinity, and specificity as well as the mechanism of metal uptake and transfer remain unclear. The crystal structures of E. coli ZnuA (Eco-ZnuA) in the apo, Zn(2+)-bound, and Co(2+)-bound forms have been determined. ZnZnuA binds at least two metal ions. The first, observed previously in other structures, is coordinated tetrahedrally by Glu59, His60, His143, and His207. Replacement of Zn(2+) with Co(2+) results in almost identical coordination geometry at this site. The second metal binding site involves His224 and several yet to be identified residues from the His-rich loop that is unique to Zn(2+) periplasmic metal binding receptors. Electron paramagnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopic data on CoZnuA provide additional insight into possible residues involved in this second site. The second site is also detected by metal analysis and circular dichroism (CD) titrations. Eco-ZnuA binds Zn(2+) (estimated K (d) < 20 nM), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Cu(+), and Cd(2+), but not Mn(2+). Finally, conformational changes upon metal binding observed in the crystal structures together with fluorescence and CD data indicate that only Zn(2+) substantially stabilizes ZnuA and might facilitate recognition of ZnuB and subsequent metal transfer.

  9. Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase (NapABC Enzyme) Supports Anaerobic Respiration by Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Valley; Lu, Yiran; Darwin, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapABC enzyme) has been characterized from a variety of proteobacteria, especially Paracoccus pantotrophus. Whole-genome sequencing of Escherichia coli revealed the structural genes napFDAGHBC, which encode NapABC enzyme and associated electron transfer components. E. coli also expresses two membrane-bound proton-translocating nitrate reductases, encoded by the narGHJI and narZYWV operons. We measured reduced viologen-dependent nitrate reductase activity in a series of strains with combinations of nar and nap null alleles. The napF operon-encoded nitrate reductase activity was not sensitive to azide, as shown previously for the P. pantotrophus NapA enzyme. A strain carrying null alleles of narG and narZ grew exponentially on glycerol with nitrate as the respiratory oxidant (anaerobic respiration), whereas a strain also carrying a null allele of napA did not. By contrast, the presence of napA+ had no influence on the more rapid growth of narG+ strains. These results indicate that periplasmic nitrate reductase, like fumarate reductase, can function in anaerobic respiration but does not constitute a site for generating proton motive force. The time course of Φ(napF-lacZ) expression during growth in batch culture displayed a complex pattern in response to the dynamic nitrate/nitrite ratio. Our results are consistent with the observation that Φ(napF-lacZ) is expressed preferentially at relatively low nitrate concentrations in continuous cultures (H. Wang, C.-P. Tseng, and R. P. Gunsalus, J. Bacteriol. 181:5303-5308, 1999). This finding and other considerations support the hypothesis that NapABC enzyme may function in E. coli when low nitrate concentrations limit the bioenergetic efficiency of nitrate respiration via NarGHI enzyme. PMID:11844760

  10. Thiocyanate binding to the molybdenum centre of the periplasmic nitrate reductase from Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    PubMed

    Butler, C S; Charnock, J M; Garner, C D; Thomson, A J; Ferguson, S J; Berks, B C; Richardson, D J

    2000-12-15

    The periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) from Paracoccus pantotrophus is a soluble two-subunit enzyme (NapAB) that binds two haem groups, a [4Fe-4S] cluster and a bis(molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide) (MGD) cofactor that catalyses the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. In the present study the effect of KSCN (potassium thiocyanate) as an inhibitor and Mo ligand has been investigated. Results are presented that show NAP is sensitive to SCN(-) (thiocyanate) inhibition, with SCN(-) acting as a competitive inhibitor of nitrate (K(i) approximately 4.0 mM). The formation of a novel EPR Mo(V) species with an elevated g(av) value (g(av) approximately 1.994) compared to the Mo(V) High-g (resting) species was observed upon redox cycling in the presence of SCN(-). Mo K-edge EXAFS analysis of the dithionite-reduced NAP was best fitted as a mono-oxo Mo(IV) species with three Mo-S ligands at 2.35 A (1 A=0.1 nm) and a Mo-O ligand at 2.14 A. The addition of SCN(-) to the reduced Mo(IV) NAP generated a sample that was best fitted as a mono-oxo (1.70 A) Mo(IV) species with four Mo-S ligands at 2.34 A. Taken together, the competitive nature of SCN(-) inhibition of periplasmic nitrate reductase activity, the elevated Mo(V) EPR g(av) value following redox cycling in the presence of SCN(-) and the increase in sulphur co-ordination of Mo(IV) upon SCN(-) binding, provide strong evidence for the direct binding of SCN(-) via a sulphur atom to Mo. PMID:11104696

  11. myo-inositol and D-ribose ligand discrimination in an ABC periplasmic binding protein.

    PubMed

    Herrou, Julien; Crosson, Sean

    2013-05-01

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) IbpA mediates the uptake of myo-inositol by the IatP-IatA ATP-binding cassette transmembrane transporter. We report a crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus IbpA bound to myo-inositol at 1.45 Å resolution. This constitutes the first structure of a PBP bound to inositol. IbpA adopts a type I PBP fold consisting of two α-β lobes that surround a central hinge. A pocket positioned between the lobes contains the myo-inositol ligand, which binds with submicromolar affinity (0.76 ± 0.08 μM). IbpA is homologous to ribose-binding proteins and binds D-ribose with low affinity (50.8 ± 3.4 μM). On the basis of IbpA and ribose-binding protein structures, we have designed variants of IbpA with inverted binding specificity for myo-inositol and D-ribose. Five mutations in the ligand-binding pocket are sufficient to increase the affinity of IbpA for D-ribose by 10-fold while completely abolishing binding to myo-inositol. Replacement of ibpA with these mutant alleles unable to bind myo-inositol abolishes C. crescentus growth in medium containing myo-inositol as the sole carbon source. Neither deletion of ibpA nor replacement of ibpA with the high-affinity ribose binding allele affected C. crescentus growth on D-ribose as a carbon source, providing evidence that the IatP-IatA transporter is specific for myo-inositol. This study outlines the evolutionary relationship between ribose- and inositol-binding proteins and provides insight into the molecular basis upon which these two related, but functionally distinct, classes of periplasmic proteins specifically bind carbohydrate ligands.

  12. The periplasmic serine protease inhibitor ecotin protects bacteria against neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Christopher T; Murray, Iain A; Delmar, Valerie A; Day, Anthony G; Craik, Charles S

    2004-01-01

    Ecotin is a dimeric periplasmic protein from Escherichia coli that has been shown to inhibit potently many trypsin-fold serine proteases of widely varying substrate specificity. To help elucidate the physiological function of ecotin, we examined the family of ecotin orthologues, which are present in a subset of Gram-negative bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that ecotin has an exogenous target, possibly neutrophil elastase. Recombinant protein was expressed and purified from E. coli, Yersinia pestis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all species that encounter the mammalian immune system, and also from the plant pathogen Pantoea citrea. Notably, the Pa. citrea variant inhibits neutrophil elastase 1000-fold less potently than the other orthologues. All four orthologues are dimeric proteins that potently inhibit (<10 pM) the pancreatic digestive proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin, while showing more variable inhibition (5 pM to 24 microM) of the blood proteases Factor Xa, thrombin and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. To test whether ecotin does, in fact, protect bacteria from neutrophil elastase, an ecotin-deficient strain was generated in E. coli. This strain is significantly more sensitive in cell-killing assays to human neutrophil elastase, which causes increased permeability of the outer membrane that persists even during renewed bacterial growth. Ecotin affects primarily the ability of E. coli to recover and grow following treatment with neutrophil elastase, rather than the actual rate of killing. This suggests that an important part of the antimicrobial mechanism of neutrophil elastase may be a periplasmic bacteriostatic effect of protease that has translocated across the damaged outer membrane. PMID:14705961

  13. Membrane protein thermodynamic stability may serve as the energy sink for sorting in the periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Moon, C. Preston; Zaccai, Nathan R.; Fleming, Patrick J.; Gessmann, Dennis; Fleming, Karen G.

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic stabilities are pivotal for understanding structure–function relationships of proteins, and yet such determinations are rare for membrane proteins. Moreover, the few measurements that are available have been conducted under very different experimental conditions, which compromises a straightforward extraction of physical principles underlying stability differences. Here, we have overcome this obstacle and provided structure–stability comparisons for multiple membrane proteins. This was enabled by measurements of the free energies of folding and the m values for the transmembrane proteins PhoP/PhoQ-activated gene product (PagP) and outer membrane protein W (OmpW) from Escherichia coli. Our data were collected in the same lipid bilayer and buffer system we previously used to determine those parameters for E. coli outer membrane phospholipase A (OmpLA). Biophysically, our results suggest that the stabilities of these proteins are strongly correlated to the water-to-bilayer transfer free energy of the lipid-facing residues in their transmembrane regions. We further discovered that the sensitivities of these membrane proteins to chemical denaturation, as judged by their m values, was consistent with that previously observed for water-soluble proteins having comparable differences in solvent exposure between their folded and unfolded states. From a biological perspective, our findings suggest that the folding free energies for these membrane proteins may be the thermodynamic sink that establishes an energy gradient across the periplasm, thus driving their sorting by chaperones to the outer membranes in living bacteria. Binding free energies of these outer membrane proteins with periplasmic chaperones support this energy sink hypothesis. PMID:23440211

  14. Membrane protein thermodynamic stability may serve as the energy sink for sorting in the periplasm.

    PubMed

    Moon, C Preston; Zaccai, Nathan R; Fleming, Patrick J; Gessmann, Dennis; Fleming, Karen G

    2013-03-12

    Thermodynamic stabilities are pivotal for understanding structure-function relationships of proteins, and yet such determinations are rare for membrane proteins. Moreover, the few measurements that are available have been conducted under very different experimental conditions, which compromises a straightforward extraction of physical principles underlying stability differences. Here, we have overcome this obstacle and provided structure-stability comparisons for multiple membrane proteins. This was enabled by measurements of the free energies of folding and the m values for the transmembrane proteins PhoP/PhoQ-activated gene product (PagP) and outer membrane protein W (OmpW) from Escherichia coli. Our data were collected in the same lipid bilayer and buffer system we previously used to determine those parameters for E. coli outer membrane phospholipase A (OmpLA). Biophysically, our results suggest that the stabilities of these proteins are strongly correlated to the water-to-bilayer transfer free energy of the lipid-facing residues in their transmembrane regions. We further discovered that the sensitivities of these membrane proteins to chemical denaturation, as judged by their m values, was consistent with that previously observed for water-soluble proteins having comparable differences in solvent exposure between their folded and unfolded states. From a biological perspective, our findings suggest that the folding free energies for these membrane proteins may be the thermodynamic sink that establishes an energy gradient across the periplasm, thus driving their sorting by chaperones to the outer membranes in living bacteria. Binding free energies of these outer membrane proteins with periplasmic chaperones support this energy sink hypothesis.

  15. The Escherichia coli amidase AmiC is a periplasmic septal ring component exported via the twin-arginine transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Thomas G; de Boer, Piet A J

    2003-06-01

    The N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases of Escherichia coli (AmiA, B and C) are periplasmic enzymes that remove murein cross-links by cleaving the peptide moiety from N-acetylmuramic acid. Ami- cells form chains, indicating that the amidases help to split the septal murein. Interestingly, cells defective in the twin-arginine protein transport (Tat) pathway show a similar division defect. We find that both AmiA and AmiC are routed to the periplasm via Tat, providing an explanation for the Tat- division phenotype. Taking advantage of the ability of Tat to export prefolded (fluorescent) green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the periplasm, we sublocalized AmiA and AmiC in live cells using functional fusions to GFP. Interestingly, the periplasmic localization of the fusions differed markedly. AmiA-GFP appeared to be dispersed throughout the periplasm in all cells. AmiC-GFP similarly appeared throughout the periplasm in small cells, but was concentrated almost exclusively at the septal ring in constricting cells. Recruitment of AmiC to the ring was mediated by an N-terminal non-amidase targeting domain and required the septal ring component FtsN. AmiC therefore replaces FtsN as the latest known recruit to the septal ring and is the first entirely periplasmic component to be localized.

  16. The FEN-1 family of structure-specific nucleases in eukaryotic DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    PubMed

    Lieber, M R

    1997-03-01

    Unlike the most well-characterized prokaryotic polymerase, E. coli DNA pol l, none of the eukaryotic polymerases have their own 5' to 3' exonuclease domain for nick translation and Okazaki fragment processing. In eukaryotes, FEN-1 is an endo- and exonuclease that carries out this function independently of the polymerase molecules. Only seven nucleases have been cloned from multicellular eukaryotic cells. Among these, FEN-1 is intriguing because it has complex structural preferences; specifically, it cleaves at branched DNA structures. The cloning of FEN-1 permitted establishment of the first eukaryotic nuclease family, predicting that S. cerevisiae RAD2 (S. pombe Rad13) and its mammalian homolog, XPG, would have similar structural specificity. The FEN-1 nuclease family includes several similar enzymes encoded by bacteriophages. The crystal structures of two enzymes in the FEN-1 nuclease family have been solved and they provide a structural basis for the interesting steric requirements of FEN-1 substrates. Because of their unique structural specificities, FEN-1 and its family members have important roles in DNA replication, repair and, potentially, recombination. Recently, FEN-1 was found to specifically associate with PCNA, explaining some aspects of FEN-1 function during DNA replication and potentially in DNA repair.

  17. Nuclease stability of boron-modified nucleic acids: application to label-free mismatch detection.

    PubMed

    Reverte, Maëva; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Smietana, Michael

    2015-11-21

    5'-End boronic acid-modified oligonucleotides were evaluated against various nucleases at single and double stranded levels. The results show that these modifications induce a high resistance to degradation by calf-spleen and snake venom phosphodiesterases. More importantly, this eventually led to the development of a new label-free enzyme-assisted fluorescence-based method for single mismatch detection.

  18. Mycoplasma bovis MBOV_RS02825 Encodes a Secretory Nuclease Associated with Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Gang; Guo, Yusi; Menghwar, Harish; Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Huanchun; Guo, Aizhen

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the activity of one Mycoplasma bovis nuclease encoded by MBOV_RS02825 and its association with cytotoxicity. The bioinformatics analysis predicted that it encodes a Ca(2+)-dependent nuclease based on existence of enzymatic sites in a TNASE_3 domain derived from a Staphylococcus aureus thermonuclease (SNc). We cloned and purified the recombinant MbovNase (rMbovNase), and demonstrated its nuclease activity by digesting bovine macrophage linear DNA and RNA, and closed circular plasmid DNA in the presence of 10 mM Ca(2+) at 22-65 °C. In addition, this MbovNase was localized in membrane and rMbovNase able to degrade DNA matrix of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). When incubated with macrophages, rMbovNase bound to and invaded the cells localizing to both the cytoplasm and nuclei. These cells experienced apoptosis and the viability was significantly reduced. The apoptosis was confirmed by activated expression of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 and Bax, and inhibition of Iκβα and Bcl-2. In contrast, rMbovNase(Δ181-342) without TNASE_3 domain exhibited deficiency in all the biological functions. Furthermore, rMbovNase was also demonstrated to be secreted. In conclusion, it is a first report that MbovNase is an active nuclease, both secretory and membrane protein with ability to degrade NETs and induce apoptosis. PMID:27136546

  19. Programmable Site-Specific Nucleases for Targeted Genome Engineering in Higher Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Ganesan; Ramalingam, Sivaprakash

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances in the targeted genome engineering enable molecular biologists to generate sequence specific modifications with greater efficiency and higher specificity in complex eukaryotic genomes. Programmable site-specific DNA cleavage reagents and cellular DNA repair mechanisms have made this possible. These reagents have become powerful tools for delivering a site-specific genomic double-strand break (DSB) at the desired chromosomal locus, which produces sequence alterations through error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) resulting in gene inactivations/knockouts. Alternatively, the DSB can be repaired through homology-directed repair (HDR) using a donor DNA template, which leads to the introduction of desired sequence modifications at the predetermined site. Here, we summarize the role of three classes of nucleases; zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) system in achieving targeted genome modifications. Further, we discuss the progress towards the applications of programmable site-specific nucleases (SSNs) in treating human diseases and other biological applications in economically important higher eukaryotic organisms such as plants and livestock. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2380-2392, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945523

  20. Genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas Cpf1 nucleases in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Prew, Michelle S; Nguyen, Nhu T; Welch, Moira M; Lopez, Jose M; McCaw, Zachary R; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2016-08-01

    The activities and genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas Cpf1 nucleases are not well defined. We show that two Cpf1 nucleases from Acidaminococcus sp. BV3L6 and Lachnospiraceae bacterium ND2006 (AsCpf1 and LbCpf1, respectively) have on-target efficiencies in human cells comparable with those of the widely used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9). We also report that four to six bases at the 3' end of the short CRISPR RNA (crRNA) used to program Cpf1 nucleases are insensitive to single base mismatches, but that many of the other bases in this region of the crRNA are highly sensitive to single or double substitutions. Using GUIDE-seq and targeted deep sequencing analyses performed with both Cpf1 nucleases, we were unable to detect off-target cleavage for more than half of 20 different crRNAs. Our results suggest that AsCpf1 and LbCpf1 are highly specific in human cells.

  1. [Expression, purification and characterization of non-specific Serratia nuclease in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Yang, Haiyan; Li, Huijing; Yang, Longyu; Li, Xuejun

    2011-08-01

    To efficiently produce non-specific nuclease (NU) of Serratia marcescens through recombinant overexpression approach and to characterize the purified NU. The nuclease gene was amplified from the genomic DNA of Serratia marcescens by PCR and fused into vector pMAL-c4X with maltose binding protein (MBP) tag. The recombinant vector verified by DNA sequencing was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. The expressed MBP-NU was purified through the amylose resin and its catalytic characters were analyzed. The results showed the NU gene had 97% identities with the reported S. marcescens nuclease gene and intracellularly expressed in E. coli BL21. The optimal expression conditions were 37 degrees C, 0.75 mmol/L IPTG with 1.5 h induction. The purified MBP-NU exhibited non-specific nuclease activity, able to degrade various nucleic acids, including RNA, single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA that was circular or linear. Its optimal temperature was 37 degrees C and optimal pH 8.0. From 1 L culture broth 10.8 mg NU could be purified with a specific activity of 1.11x10(6) U/mg. The catalytic activity of NU was not inhibited by reagents such as EDTA (0.5 mmol/L), PMSF (1 mmol/L) and KCl (150 mmol/L) commonly used in protein purification.

  2. Mycoplasma bovis MBOV_RS02825 Encodes a Secretory Nuclease Associated with Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Gang; Guo, Yusi; Menghwar, Harish; Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Huanchun; Guo, Aizhen

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the activity of one Mycoplasma bovis nuclease encoded by MBOV_RS02825 and its association with cytotoxicity. The bioinformatics analysis predicted that it encodes a Ca2+-dependent nuclease based on existence of enzymatic sites in a TNASE_3 domain derived from a Staphylococcus aureus thermonuclease (SNc). We cloned and purified the recombinant MbovNase (rMbovNase), and demonstrated its nuclease activity by digesting bovine macrophage linear DNA and RNA, and closed circular plasmid DNA in the presence of 10 mM Ca2+ at 22–65 °C. In addition, this MbovNase was localized in membrane and rMbovNase able to degrade DNA matrix of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). When incubated with macrophages, rMbovNase bound to and invaded the cells localizing to both the cytoplasm and nuclei. These cells experienced apoptosis and the viability was significantly reduced. The apoptosis was confirmed by activated expression of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 and Bax, and inhibition of Iκβα and Bcl-2. In contrast, rMbovNaseΔ181–342 without TNASE_3 domain exhibited deficiency in all the biological functions. Furthermore, rMbovNase was also demonstrated to be secreted. In conclusion, it is a first report that MbovNase is an active nuclease, both secretory and membrane protein with ability to degrade NETs and induce apoptosis. PMID:27136546

  3. A novel nuclease activity that is activated by Ca(2+) chelated to EGTA.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Kenneth; Ward, W Steven

    2009-12-01

    Most nucleases require a divalent cation as a cofactor, usually Mg(2+) or Ca(2+), and are inhibited by the chelators EDTA and EGTA. We report the existence of a novel nuclease activity, initially identified in the luminal fluids of the mouse male reproductive tract but subsequently found in other tissues,that requires EGTA chelated to calcium to digest DNA. We refer to this unique enzyme as CEAN (Chelated EGTA Activated Nuclease). Using a fraction of vas deferens luminal fluid, plasmid DNA was degraded in the presence of excess Ca(2+) (Ca(2+) :EGTA = 16) or excess EGTA (Ca(2+) :EGTA = 0.25), but required the presence of both. Higher levels of EGTA (Ca(2+) :EGTA = 0.10) prevented activity, suggesting that unchelated EGTA may be a competitive inhibitor. The EGTA-Ca(2+) activation of CEAN is reversible as removing EGTA-Ca(2+) stops ongoing DNA degradation, but adding EGTA-Ca(2+) again reactivates the enzyme. This suggests the possibility that CEAN binds directly to EGTA-Ca(2+). CEAN has a greater specificity for the chelator than for the divalent cation. Two other chelators, BAPTA and sodium citrate, do not activate CEAN in the presence of cation, but chelated EDTA does. EGTA chelated to other divalent cations such as Mn(2+), Zn(2+) , and Cu(2+) activate CEAN, but not Mg(2+) . The activity is lost upon boiling suggesting that it is a protein. These data suggest that EGTA and EDTA may not always protect DNA from nuclease damage.

  4. An inducible 3'-nucleotidase/nuclease from the trypanosomatid Crithidia luciliae. Purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Neubert, T A; Gottlieb, M

    1990-05-01

    Several species of protozoan parasites of the family Trypanosomatidae have a surface membrane-associated enzyme which is capable of hydrolyzing extracellular 3'-nucleotides and nucleic acids, thereby aiding in the acquisition of nutritionally required purines and Pi from their hosts. In Crithidia luciliae, this 3'-nucleotidase/nuclease previously has been shown to be highly regulated as purine and/or Pi starvation of this trypanosomatid leads to as much as a 1000-fold increase in enzyme activity. We have purified the enzyme to apparent homogeneity from detergent extracts of purine-starved C. luciliae by heparin-agarose chromatography followed by Mono Q and Mono S fast protein liquid chromatography. The enzyme had an apparent molecular weight of 43,000 and a pI of approximately 5.8. The enzyme displayed broad pH optima, with peaks at 8.0, for both nucleotidase and nuclease activities. The pH optima shifted to lower values when the activity was assayed in the presence of sulfhydryl reagents. The enzyme was most active with 3'-AMP and poly(A) in nucleotidase and nuclease assays, respectively. As a nuclease the enzyme hydrolyzed RNA at a faster rate than single-stranded DNA with no detectable hydrolysis of double-stranded DNA. The loss of enzyme activity which occurred upon storage at acid pH was prevented by the inclusion of Zn2+ in storage buffers. The physicochemical and kinetic properties of this trypanosomatid enzyme suggest that it is similar to the class I nucleases found in fungi and in germinating seedlings of higher plants.

  5. The extracellular nuclease Dns and its role in natural transformation of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Blokesch, Melanie; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2008-11-01

    Free extracellular DNA is abundant in many aquatic environments. While much of this DNA will be degraded by nucleases secreted by the surrounding microbial community, some is available as transforming material that can be taken up by naturally competent bacteria. One such species is Vibrio cholerae, an autochthonous member of estuarine, riverine, and marine habitats and the causative agent of cholera, whose competence program is induced after colonization of chitin surfaces. In this study, we investigate how Vibrio cholerae's two extracellular nucleases, Xds and Dns, influence its natural transformability. We show that in the absence of Dns, transformation frequencies are significantly higher than in its presence. During growth on a chitin surface, an increase in transformation efficiency was found to correspond in time with increasing cell density and the repression of dns expression by the quorum-sensing regulator HapR. In contrast, at low cell density, the absence of HapR relieves dns repression, leading to the degradation of free DNA and to the abrogation of the transformation phenotype. Thus, as cell density increases, Vibrio cholerae undergoes a switch from nuclease-mediated degradation of extracellular DNA to the uptake of DNA by bacteria induced to a state of competence by chitin. Taken together, these results suggest the following model: nuclease production by low-density populations of V. cholerae might foster rapid growth by providing a source of nucleotides for the repletion of nucleotide pools. In contrast, the termination of nuclease production by static, high-density populations allows the uptake of intact DNA and coincides with a phase of potential genome diversification.

  6. Secretion of bacterial lipoproteins: through the cytoplasmic membrane, the periplasm and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zückert, Wolfram R

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-positive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporter-like LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the "+2 rule". Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  7. Periplasmic nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase: similar molecular architectures with very different enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Gonzalez, Pablo J; Fernandes, Pedro A; Moura, José J G; Ramos, Maria João

    2015-11-17

    It is remarkable how nature has been able to construct enzymes that, despite sharing many similarities, have simple but key differences that tune them for completely different functions in living cells. Periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) from the DMSOr family are representative examples of this. Both enzymes share almost identical three-dimensional protein foldings and active sites, in terms of coordination number, geometry and nature of the ligands. The substrates of both enzymes (nitrate and formate) are polyatomic anions that also share similar charge and stereochemistry. In terms of the catalytic mechanism, both enzymes have a common activation mechanism (the sulfur-shift mechanism) that ensures a constant coordination number around the metal ion during the catalytic cycle. In spite of these similarities, they catalyze very different reactions: Nap abstracts an oxygen atom from nitrate releasing nitrite, whereas FdH catalyzes a hydrogen atom transfer from formate and releases carbon dioxide. In this Account, a critical analysis of structure, function, and catalytic mechanism of the molybdenum enzymes periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) is presented. We conclude that the main structural driving force that dictates the type of reaction, catalyzed by each enzyme, is a key difference on one active site residue that is located in the top region of the active sites of both enzymes. In both enzymes, the active site is centered on the metal ion of the cofactor (Mo in Nap and Mo or W in Fdh) that is coordinated by four sulfur atoms from two pyranopterin guanosine dinucleotide (PGD) molecules and by a sulfido. However, while in Nap there is a Cys directly coordinated to the Mo ion, in FdH there is a SeCys instead. In Fdh there is also an important His that interacts very closely with the SeCys, whereas in Nap the same position is occupied by a Met. The role of Cys in Nap and SeCys in FdH is similar in both

  8. Cold adaptation of the mononuclear molybdoenzyme periplasmic nitrate reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Philippa J L; Codd, Rachel

    2011-11-01

    The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalysed in bacteria by periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) which describes a system of variable protein subunits encoded by the nap operon. Nitrate reduction occurs in the NapA subunit, which contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (Mo-MGD) cofactor and one [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster. The activity of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) isolated as native protein from the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina (Nap(Sgel)) and middle-temperature adapted (mesophilic) Shewanella putrefaciens (Nap(Sput)) was examined at varied temperature. Irreversible deactivation of Nap(Sgel) and Nap(Sput) occurred at 54.5 and 65°C, respectively. When Nap(Sgel) was preincubated at 21-70°C for 30 min, the room-temperature nitrate reductase activity was maximal and invariant between 21 and 54°C, which suggested that Nap(Sgel) was poised for optimal catalysis at modest temperatures and, unlike Nap(Sput), did not benefit from thermally-induced refolding. At 20°C, Nap(Sgel) reduced selenate at 16% of the rate of nitrate reduction. Nap(Sput) did not reduce selenate. Sequence alignment showed 46 amino acid residue substitutions in Nap(Sgel) that were conserved in NapA from mesophilic Shewanella, Rhodobacter and Escherichia species and could be associated with the Nap(Sgel) cold-adapted phenotype. Protein homology modeling of Nap(Sgel) using a mesophilic template with 66% amino acid identity showed the majority of substitutions occurred at the protein surface distal to the Mo-MGD cofactor. Two mesophilic↔psychrophilic substitutions (Asn↔His, Val↔Trp) occurred in a region close to the surface of the NapA substrate funnel resulting in potential interdomain π-π and/or cation-π interactions. Three mesophilic↔psychrophilic substitutions occurred within 4.5Å of the Mo-MGD cofactor (Phe↔Met, Ala↔Ser, Ser↔Thr) resulting in local regions that varied in hydrophobicity and hydrogen bonding

  9. Effect of periplasmic expression of recombinant mouse interleukin-4 on hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh Aghdam, Elnaz; Mahmoudi Azar, Lena; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Karimi, Farrokh; Mesbahfar, Majid; Samadi, Naser; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2012-12-15

    Oxidative stress occurs as a result of imbalance between generation and detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This kind of stress was rarely discussed in connection with foreign protein production in Escherichia coli. Relation between cytoplasmic recombinant protein expression with H(2)O(2) concentration and catalase activity variation was already reported. The periplasmic space of E. coli has different oxidative environment in relative to cytoplasm and there are some benefits in periplasmic expression of recombinant proteins. In this study, hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalase activity following periplasmic expression of mouse IL-4 were measured in E. coli. After construction of pET2mIL4 plasmid, the expression of recombinant mouse interleukin-4 (mIL-4) was confirmed. Then, the H(2)O(2) concentration and catalase activity variation in the cells were studied in exponential and stationary phases at various ODs and were compared to those of wild type cells and empty vector transformed cells. It was revealed that empty vector introduction and periplasmic recombinant protein expression increased significantly the H(2)O(2) concentration of the cells. However, the H(2)O(2) concentration in mIL-4 expressing cells was significantly higher than its concentration in empty vector transformed cells, demonstrating more effects of recombinant mIL-4 expression on H(2)O(2) elevation. Likewise, although catalase activity was reduced in foreign DNA introduced cells, it was more lowered following expression of recombinant proteins. Correlation between H(2)O(2) concentration elevation and catalase activity reduction with cell growth depletion is also demonstrated. It was also found that recombinant protein expression results in cell size increase.

  10. Novel Mechanism for Scavenging of Hypochlorite Involving a Periplasmic Methionine-Rich Peptide and Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and a putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. PMID:25968643

  11. Analyzing the Role of Periplasmic Folding Factors in the Biogenesis of OMPs and Members of the Type V Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Marín, Elvira; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is highly packed with OM proteins (OMPs) and the trafficking and assembly of OMPs in gram-negative bacteria is a subject of intense research. Structurally, OMPs vary in the number of β-strands and in the size and complexity of extra-membrane domains, with extreme examples being the members of the type V protein secretion system (T5SS), such as the autotransporter (AT) and intimin/invasin families of secreted proteins, in which a large extracellular "passenger" domain is linked to a β-barrel that inserts in the OM. Despite their structural and functional diversity, OMPs interact in the periplasm with a relatively small set of protein chaperones that facilitate their transport from the inner membrane (IM) to the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM complex), preventing aggregation and assisting their folding in various aspects including disulfide bond formation. This chapter is focused on the periplasmic folding factors involved in the biogenesis of integral OMPs and members of T5SS in E. coli, which are used as a model system in this field. Background information on these periplasmic folding factors is provided along with genetic methods to generate conditional mutants that deplete these factors from E. coli and biochemical methods to analyze the folding, surface display, disulfide formation and oligomerization state of OMPs/T5SS in these mutants.

  12. Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Proteomic Signatures of Exponentially Growing Cells of the Psychrophilic Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Boris; Kock, Holger; Glagla, Susanne; Albrecht, Dirk; Voigt, Birgit; Markert, Stephanie; Gardebrecht, Antje; Bode, Rüdiger; Danchin, Antoine; Feller, Georges; Hecker, Michael; Schweder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The psychrophilic model bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis is characterized by remarkably fast growth rates under low-temperature conditions in a range from 5°C to 20°C. In this study the proteome of cellular compartments, the cytoplasm and periplasm, of P. haloplanktis strain TAC125 was analyzed under exponential growth conditions at a permissive temperature of 16°C. By means of two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, a first inventory of the most abundant cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins expressed in a peptone-supplemented minimal medium was established. By this approach major enzymes of the amino acid catabolism of this marine bacterium could be functionally deduced. The cytoplasmic proteome showed a predominance of amino acid degradation pathways and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes but also the protein synthesis machinery. Furthermore, high levels of cold acclimation and oxidative stress proteins could be detected at this moderate growth temperature. The periplasmic proteome was characterized by a significant abundance of transporters, especially of highly expressed putative TonB-dependent receptors. This high capacity for protein synthesis, efficient amino acid utilization, and substrate transport may contribute to the fast growth rates of the copiotrophic bacterium P. haloplanktis in its natural environments. PMID:21183643

  13. Overexpression, purification, and characterization of the periplasmic space thiamin-binding protein of the thiamin traffic ATPase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Andrew D; Dickson, Kimberly A; Washabaugh, Michael W

    2002-08-01

    Thiamin (Vitamin B(1)) transport in Escherichia coli occurs by the superfamily of traffic ATPases in which the initial receptor is the periplasmic binding protein. We have cloned the periplasmic thiamin-binding protein (TBP) of the E. coli periplasmic thiamin transport system and purified the overexpressed protein to apparent homogeneity. A subsequent biochemical characterization demonstrates that TBP is a 34.205kDa monomer. TBP also contains one tightly bound thiamin species [thiamin, thiamin monophosphate (TMP), or thiamin diphosphate (TDP)] per monomer (K(D)=0.8 microM) when isolated under conditions that would remove any loosely bound ligands. We also demonstrate that thiamin is readily exchangeable in the presence of exogenous thiamin with a k(off)=0.12s(-1). The biochemical characteristics of the overexpressed, plasmid-derived TBP are indistinguishable from those determined for endogenous TBP purified from E. coli. The overexpression and purification of TBP that we present here allows the rapid isolation of large amounts of pure protein that are required for further mechanistic and structural studies and demonstrates a vast improvement over previously reported purifications.

  14. Substrate-Linked Conformational Change in the Periplasmic Component of a Cu(I)/Ag(I) Efflux System

    SciTech Connect

    Bagai, I.; Liu, W.; Rensing, C.; Blackburn, N.J.; McEvoy, M.M.

    2009-06-02

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize dual membrane resistance nodulation division-type efflux systems to export a variety of substrates. These systems contain an essential periplasmic component that is important for assembly of the protein complex. We show here that the periplasmic protein CusB from the Cus copper/silver efflux system has a critical role in Cu(I) and Ag(I) binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrate that one Ag(I) ion is bound per CusB molecule with high affinity. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data indicate that the metal environment is an all-sulfur 3-coordinate environment. Candidates for the metal-coordinating residues were identified from sequence analysis, which showed four conserved methionine residues. Mutations of three of these methionine residues to isoleucine resulted in significant effects on CusB metal binding in vitro. Cells containing these CusB variants also show a decrease in their ability to grow on copper-containing plates, indicating an important functional role for metal binding by CusB. Gel filtration chromatography demonstrates that upon binding metal, CusB undergoes a conformational change to a more compact structure. Based on these structural and functional effects of metal binding, we propose that the periplasmic component of resistance nodulation division-type efflux systems plays an active role in export through substrate-linked conformational changes.

  15. Exploring the size limit of protein diffusion through the periplasm in cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 using the 13 kDa iLOV fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Chen; Risoul, Véronique; Latifi, Amel; Christie, John M; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2013-09-01

    In the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, vegetative cells and heterocysts are interdependent on each other and engaged in exchanges of metabolites for survival when grown under diazotrophic conditions. In this organism, the periplasm appears to be continuous along each filament, with a shared outer membrane; however, barriers exist preventing free diffusion of the fluorescent protein GFP (27 kDa) targeted into the periplasmic space. Here we expressed a smaller fluorescent protein iLOV (≈ 13 kDa) fused to the All3333 (a putative homologue of NrtA) signal sequence corresponding to those recognized by the TAT protein translocation system, which exports iLOV to the periplasm of either heterocysts or vegetative cells. Fluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis indicated that the iLOV protein is translocated into the periplasm of the producing cell and properly processed, but does not diffuse to neighboring cells via the periplasm. Thus, periplasmic barriers appear to block diffusion of molecules with a size of 13 kDa, the minimum size tested thus far. Assuming that the physical barrier is the peptidoglycan sacculus, its pores might allow diffusion of molecules within the size range between the PatS pentapeptide and iLOV, thus between 0.53 kDa and 13 kDa.

  16. Exploring the size limit of protein diffusion through the periplasm in cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 using the 13 kDa iLOV fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Chen; Risoul, Véronique; Latifi, Amel; Christie, John M; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2013-09-01

    In the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, vegetative cells and heterocysts are interdependent on each other and engaged in exchanges of metabolites for survival when grown under diazotrophic conditions. In this organism, the periplasm appears to be continuous along each filament, with a shared outer membrane; however, barriers exist preventing free diffusion of the fluorescent protein GFP (27 kDa) targeted into the periplasmic space. Here we expressed a smaller fluorescent protein iLOV (≈ 13 kDa) fused to the All3333 (a putative homologue of NrtA) signal sequence corresponding to those recognized by the TAT protein translocation system, which exports iLOV to the periplasm of either heterocysts or vegetative cells. Fluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis indicated that the iLOV protein is translocated into the periplasm of the producing cell and properly processed, but does not diffuse to neighboring cells via the periplasm. Thus, periplasmic barriers appear to block diffusion of molecules with a size of 13 kDa, the minimum size tested thus far. Assuming that the physical barrier is the peptidoglycan sacculus, its pores might allow diffusion of molecules within the size range between the PatS pentapeptide and iLOV, thus between 0.53 kDa and 13 kDa. PMID:23748014

  17. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils. PMID:24435070

  18. Treponema phagedenis has at least two proteins residing together on its periplasmic flagella.

    PubMed Central

    Limberger, R J; Charon, N W

    1986-01-01

    Treponema phagedenis is an anaerobic, motile spirochete with several periplasmic flagella (PFs) at each cell end. This study provides the first genetic evidence that multiple protein species are associated with the PFs. In addition, these proteins were found to reside together on a given PF. Nonmotile mutants which lacked the PFs were isolated, and spontaneous revertants to motility regained the PFs. These results suggest that the PFs are involved in the motility of T. phagedenis. Isolated PFs had two major protein bands with molecular weights of 33,000 and 39,800, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Western blots with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies indicated that both proteins were absent in the PF mutants but present in the revertants. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the 39,800-molecular-weight protein was distributed along the entire PF. Immunoprecipitation analysis suggested that the 39,800- and 33,000-molecular-weight proteins were closely associated in situ. Images PMID:3957864

  19. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  20. SilE is an intrinsically disordered periplasmic "molecular sponge" involved in bacterial silver resistance.

    PubMed

    Asiani, Karishma R; Williams, Huw; Bird, Louise; Jenner, Matthew; Searle, Mark S; Hobman, Jon L; Scott, David J; Soultanas, Panos

    2016-09-01

    Ag(+) resistance was initially found on the Salmonella enetrica serovar Typhimurium multi-resistance plasmid pMG101 from burns patients in 1975. The putative model of Ag(+) resistance, encoded by the sil operon from pMG101, involves export of Ag(+) via an ATPase (SilP), an effluxer complex (SilCFBA) and a periplasmic chaperon of Ag(+) (SilE). SilE is predicted to be intrinsically disordered. We tested this hypothesis using structural and biophysical studies and show that SilE is an intrinsically disordered protein in its free apo-form but folds to a compact structure upon optimal binding to six Ag(+) ions in its holo-form. Sequence analyses and site-directed mutagenesis established the importance of histidine and methionine containing motifs for Ag(+) -binding, and identified a nucleation core that initiates Ag(+) -mediated folding of SilE. We conclude that SilE is a molecular sponge for absorbing metal ions. PMID:27085056

  1. Crystal structure of a putative oligopeptide-binding periplasmic protein from a hyperthermophile.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hee Jung; Mikami, Bunzo; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Oligopeptide-binding proteins (Opps) are part of the ATP-binding cassette system, playing a crucial role in nutrient uptake and sensing the external environment in bacteria, including hyperthermophiles. Opps serve as a binding platform for diverse peptides; however, how these peptides are recognized by Opps is still largely unknown and few crystal structures of Opps from hyperthermophiles have been determined. To facilitate such an understanding, the crystal structure of a putative Opp, OppA from Thermotoga maritima (TmOppA), was solved at 2.6-Å resolution in the open conformation. TmOppA is composed of three domains. The N-terminal domain consists of twelve strands, nine helices, and four 310 helices, and the C-terminal domain consists of five strands, ten helices, and one 310 helix. These two domains are connected by the linker domain, which consists of two strands, three helices, and three 310 helices. Based on structural comparisons of TmOppA with other OppAs and binding studies, we suggest that TmOppA might be a periplasmic Opp. The most distinct feature of TmOppA is the insertion of two helices, which are lacking in other OppAs. A cavity volume between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains is suggested to be responsible for binding peptides of various lengths. PMID:27377296

  2. Identification of a blue copper protein from Hyphomicrobium denitrificans and its functions in the periplasm.

    PubMed

    Hira, Daisuke; Nojiri, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Suzuki, Shinnichiro

    2007-09-01

    It has been known that the methylotrophic denitrifying bacteria have the specific electron transfer chains, involving in 'methanol oxidation' and 'denitrification', in the periplasm. Recently, a unique blue copper protein (HdBCP) has been isolated from the methanol-grown methylotrophic denitrifying bacterium, Hyphomicrobium denitrificans. HdBCP is a 14.5 kDa protein and contains one copper atom in the molecule. The electronic absorption spectrum of HdBCP exhibits two absorption maxima near 450 and 750 nm comparable with the intense 600 nm band (epsilon(450)/epsilon(600) = ca. 0.9). The rhombic electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum shows clearly that the copper centre is a 'perturbed' type 1 copper geometry. Stopped-flow kinetics indicates that HdBCP accepts efficiently an electron from cytochrome c(L) (k(2) = 4.0 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) at 25.0 degrees C), which is a physiological electron acceptor for methanol dehydrogenase. According to cloning and DNA sequencing of the structural gene, the deduced amino acid sequence shows significant similarities with pseudoazurins, which are a physiological electron donor for Cu-containing nitrite reductase from the denitrifying bacteria. Based on these results, we discuss the role of HdBCP in the electron-flow system, which link 'methanol oxidation' and 'denitrification' together. PMID:17646178

  3. Architecture and roles of periplasmic adaptor proteins in tripartite efflux assemblies.

    PubMed

    Symmons, Martyn F; Marshall, Robert L; Bavro, Vassiliy N

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen major advances in the structural understanding of the different components of tripartite efflux assemblies, which encompass the multidrug efflux (MDR) pumps and type I secretion systems. The majority of these investigations have focused on the role played by the inner membrane transporters and the outer membrane factor (OMF), leaving the third component of the system - the Periplasmic Adaptor Proteins (PAPs) - relatively understudied. Here we review the current state of knowledge of these versatile proteins which, far from being passive linkers between the OMF and the transporter, emerge as active architects of tripartite assemblies, and play diverse roles in the transport process. Recognition between the PAPs and OMFs is essential for pump assembly and function, and targeting this interaction may provide a novel avenue for combating multidrug resistance. With the recent advances elucidating the drug efflux and energetics of the tripartite assemblies, the understanding of the interaction between the OMFs and PAPs is the last piece remaining in the complete structure of the tripartite pump assembly puzzle.

  4. Translocation of capsular polysaccharides in pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli requires a 60-kilodalton periplasmic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, R P; Aaronson, W; Vann, W F

    1987-01-01

    An 11.6-kilobase (kb) region of a 34-kb fragment of Escherichia coli DNA that encodes the K1 capsular polysaccharide genes is necessary for translocation of the K1 polysaccharide to the bacterial cell surface. This 11.6-kb region contains a gene, kpsD, encoding a 60-kilodalton protein. The kpsD gene was localized to a 2.4-kb PstI-BamHI fragment. Cells harboring a Tn1000 insertion in kpsD did not synthesize the 60-kilodalton protein and did not express polysaccharide on the cell surface. Immunodiffusion and rocket immunoelectrophoresis of cell extracts, however, demonstrated that K1 polysaccharide was synthesized by these cells. We present evidence that the kpsD gene product is synthesized as a precursor and that the processed form is located in the periplasmic space. Analysis of alkaline phosphatase activity of a kpsD-phoA fusion demonstrated that kpsD expression was under positive regulation. A 260-base-pair AluI fragment located within the kpsD coding sequence was used as a probe and was found to hybridize to chromosomal DNA from E. coli that synthesizes the K2, K5, K7, K12, and K13 capsular polysaccharides but not K3 and K100. These results suggest that the kpsD gene product may be required for export not only of K1 but for other K antigens as well. Images PMID:3119565

  5. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Bertuccini, Lucia; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery.

  6. Architecture and roles of periplasmic adaptor proteins in tripartite efflux assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Symmons, Martyn F.; Marshall, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen major advances in the structural understanding of the different components of tripartite efflux assemblies, which encompass the multidrug efflux (MDR) pumps and type I secretion systems. The majority of these investigations have focused on the role played by the inner membrane transporters and the outer membrane factor (OMF), leaving the third component of the system – the Periplasmic Adaptor Proteins (PAPs) – relatively understudied. Here we review the current state of knowledge of these versatile proteins which, far from being passive linkers between the OMF and the transporter, emerge as active architects of tripartite assemblies, and play diverse roles in the transport process. Recognition between the PAPs and OMFs is essential for pump assembly and function, and targeting this interaction may provide a novel avenue for combating multidrug resistance. With the recent advances elucidating the drug efflux and energetics of the tripartite assemblies, the understanding of the interaction between the OMFs and PAPs is the last piece remaining in the complete structure of the tripartite pump assembly puzzle. PMID:26074901

  7. A genetic screen reveals a periplasmic copper chaperone required for nitrite reductase activity in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Jen, Freda E-C; Djoko, Karrera Y; Bent, Stephen J; Day, Christopher J; McEwan, Alastair G; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    Under conditions of low oxygen availability, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are able to respire via a partial denitrification pathway in which nitrite is converted to nitrous oxide. In this process, nitrite reductase (AniA), a copper (Cu)-containing protein converts nitrite to NO, and this product is converted to nitrous oxide by nitric oxide reductase (NorB). NorB also confers protection against toxic NO, and so we devised a conditional lethal screen, using a norB mutant, to identify mutants that were resistant to nitrite-dependent killing. After random-deletion mutagenesis of N. meningitidis, this genetic screen identified a gene encoding a Cu chaperone that is essential for AniA function, AccA. Purified AccA binds one Cu (I) ion and also possesses a second binding site for Cu (II). This novel periplasmic Cu chaperone (AccA) appears to be essential for provision of Cu ions to AniA of pathogenic Neisseria to generate an active nitrite reductase. Apart from the Neisseria genus, AccA is distributed across a wide range of environmental Proteobacteria species.

  8. Physiological roles for two periplasmic nitrate reductases in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 (ATCC 17025).

    PubMed

    Hartsock, Angela; Shapleigh, James P

    2011-12-01

    The metabolically versatile purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 is a denitrifier whose genome contains two periplasmic nitrate reductase-encoding gene clusters. This work demonstrates nonredundant physiological roles for these two enzymes. One cluster is expressed aerobically and repressed under low oxygen while the second is maximally expressed under low oxygen. Insertional inactivation of the aerobically expressed nitrate reductase eliminated aerobic nitrate reduction, but cells of this strain could still respire nitrate anaerobically. In contrast, when the anaerobic nitrate reductase was absent, aerobic nitrate reduction was detectable, but anaerobic nitrate reduction was impaired. The aerobic nitrate reductase was expressed but not utilized in liquid culture but was utilized during growth on solid medium. Growth on a variety of carbon sources, with the exception of malate, the most oxidized substrate used, resulted in nitrite production on solid medium. This is consistent with a role for the aerobic nitrate reductase in redox homeostasis. These results show that one of the nitrate reductases is specific for respiration and denitrification while the other likely plays a role in redox homeostasis during aerobic growth. PMID:21949073

  9. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  10. Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis and DNA damage-induced polyploidy in Fan1 nuclease-defective knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Lachaud, Christophe; Slean, Meghan; Marchesi, Francesco; Lock, Claire; Odell, Edward; Castor, Dennis; Toth, Rachel; Rouse, John

    2016-03-15

    The Fan1 endonuclease is required for repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Mutations in human Fan1 cause karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN), but it is unclear whether defective ICL repair is responsible or whether Fan1 nuclease activity is relevant. We show that Fan1 nuclease-defective (Fan1(nd/nd)) mice develop a mild form of KIN. The karyomegalic nuclei from Fan1(nd/nd) kidneys are polyploid, and fibroblasts from Fan1(nd/nd) mice become polyploid upon ICL induction, suggesting that defective ICL repair causes karyomegaly. Thus, Fan1 nuclease activity promotes ICL repair in a manner that controls ploidy, a role that we show is not shared by the Fanconi anemia pathway or the Slx4-Slx1 nuclease also involved in ICL repair.

  11. Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis and DNA damage-induced polyploidy in Fan1 nuclease-defective knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lachaud, Christophe; Slean, Meghan; Marchesi, Francesco; Lock, Claire; Odell, Edward; Castor, Dennis; Toth, Rachel; Rouse, John

    2016-01-01

    The Fan1 endonuclease is required for repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Mutations in human Fan1 cause karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN), but it is unclear whether defective ICL repair is responsible or whether Fan1 nuclease activity is relevant. We show that Fan1 nuclease-defective (Fan1nd/nd) mice develop a mild form of KIN. The karyomegalic nuclei from Fan1nd/nd kidneys are polyploid, and fibroblasts from Fan1nd/nd mice become polyploid upon ICL induction, suggesting that defective ICL repair causes karyomegaly. Thus, Fan1 nuclease activity promotes ICL repair in a manner that controls ploidy, a role that we show is not shared by the Fanconi anemia pathway or the Slx4–Slx1 nuclease also involved in ICL repair. PMID:26980188

  12. Increased neutrophil extracellular trap-mediated Staphylococcus aureus clearance through inhibition of nuclease activity by clindamycin and immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Schilcher, Katrin; Andreoni, Federica; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Ogawa, Taiji; Schuepbach, Reto A; Zinkernagel, Annelies S

    2014-08-01

    The Gram-positive human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of human diseases such as skin infections, pneumonia, and endocarditis. The micrococcal nuclease Nuc1 is one of the major S. aureus virulence factors and allows the bacterium to avoid neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-mediated killing. We found that addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin to S. aureus LAC cultures decreased nuc1 transcription and subsequently blunted nuclease activity in a molecular beacon-based fluorescence assay. We also observed reduced NET degradation through Nuc1 inhibition translating into increased NET-mediated clearance. Similarly, pooled human immunoglobulin specifically inhibited nuclease activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of nuclease activity by clindamycin and immunoglobulin enhanced S. aureus clearance and should be considered in the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  13. Electron transport to periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) of Wolinella succinogenes is independent of a NapC protein.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Sänger, Monica; Schuster, Stephan C; Gross, Roland

    2003-07-01

    The rumen bacterium Wolinella succinogenes grows by respiratory nitrate ammonification with formate as electron donor. Whereas the enzymology and coupling mechanism of nitrite respiration is well known, nitrate reduction to nitrite has not yet been examined. We report here that intact cells and cell fractions catalyse nitrate and chlorate reduction by reduced viologen dyes with high specific activities. A gene cluster encoding components of a putative periplasmic nitrate reductase system (napA, G, H, B, F, L, D) was sequenced. The napA gene was inactivated by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette. The resulting mutant did not grow by nitrate respiration and did not reduce nitrate during growth by fumarate respiration, in contrast to the wild type. An antigen was detected in wild-type cells using an antiserum raised against the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) from Paracoccus pantotrophus. This antigen was absent in the W. succinogenes napA mutant. It is concluded that the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA is the only respiratory nitrate reductase in W. succinogenes, although a second nitrate-reducing enzyme is apparently induced in the napA mutant. The nap cluster of W. succinogenes lacks a napC gene whose product is thought to function in quinol oxidation and electron transfer to NapA in other bacteria. The W. succinogenes genome encodes two members of the NapC/NirT family, NrfH and FccC. Characterization of corresponding deletion mutants indicates that neither of these two proteins is required for nitrate respiration. A mutant lacking the genes encoding respiratory nitrite reductase (nrfHA) had wild-type properties with respect to nitrate respiration. A model of the electron transport chain of nitrate respiration is proposed in which one or more of the napF, G, H and L gene products mediate electron transport from menaquinol to the periplasmic NapAB complex. Inspection of the W. succinogenes genome sequence suggests that ammonia formation from

  14. A simple molecular beacon with duplex-specific nuclease amplification for detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingcun; Zhang, Jiangyan; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhao, Likun; Cheng, Yongqiang; Li, Zhengping

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene activity, promoting or inhibiting cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with many diseases. Therefore, it is essential to establish a simple, rapid and sensitive miRNA detection method. In this paper, based on a simple molecular beacon (MB) and duplex-specific nuclease (DSN), we developed a target recycling amplification method for miRNA detection. By controlling the number of stem bases to 5, the MB probe used in this method can be prevented from hydrolysis by DSN without special modification. This assay is direct and simple to quantitatively detect miRNA with high sensitivity and specificity. The MB probe design provides a new strategy for nuclease-based amplification reaction.

  15. Structures of human exonuclease I DNA complexes suggest a unified mechanism for nuclease family

    PubMed Central

    Orans, Jillian; McSweeney, Elizabeth A.; Iyer, Ravi R.; Hast, Michael A.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Modrich, Paul; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Human exonuclease 1 (hExo1) plays important roles in DNA repair and recombination processes that maintain genomic integrity. It is a member of the 5′ structure-specific nuclease family of exonucleases and endonucleases that includes FEN-1, XPG, and GEN1. We present structures of hExo1 in complex with a DNA substrate, followed by mutagenesis studies, and propose a common mechanism by which this nuclease family recognizes and processes diverse DNA structures. hExo1 induces a sharp bend in the DNA at nicks or gaps. Frayed 5′ ends of nicked duplexes resemble flap junctions, unifying the mechanisms of endo- and exo-nucleolytic processing. Conformational control of a mobile region in the catalytic site suggests a mechanism for allosteric regulation by binding to protein partners. The relative arrangement of substrate binding sites in these enzymes provides an elegant solution to a complex geometrical puzzle of substrate recognition and processing. PMID:21496642

  16. Studies of interaction between a new synthesized minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen; Zhao, Yu-Fen

    2007-04-01

    Nuclease plays an important role in molecular biology, such as DNA sequencing. Synthetic polyamide conjugates can be considered as new tool in the selective inhibition of gene expression and as potential drugs in anticancer or antiviral chemotherapy. In this paper, a new synthesized minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease, oligopyrrol-containing peptide, was reported. It was found that this new compound can bind DNA in AT-riched minor groove with high affinity and site specificity. DNA binding behavior was determined by UV-vis and circular dichroism (CD) methods. It was indicated that compound 6 can enhance the Tm of oligomer DNA from 51.8 to 63.5 °C and possesses large binding constant ( Kb = 8.83 × 10 4 L/mol).

  17. Human KIAA1018/FAN1 nuclease is a new mitotic substrate of APC/CCdh1

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Fenju; Hu, Kaishun; Wu, Yuanzhong; Tang, Jianjun; Sang, Yi; Cao, Jingying; Kang, Tiebang

    2012-01-01

    A recently identified protein, FAN1 (FANCD2-associated nuclease 1, previously known as KIAA1018), is a novel nuclease associated with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 that is required for cellular resistance against DNA interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agents. The mechanisms of FAN1 regulation have not yet been explored. Here, we provide evidence that FAN1 is degraded during mitotic exit, suggesting that FAN1 may be a mitotic substrate of the anaphase-promoting cyclosome complex (APC/C). Indeed, Cdh1, but not Cdc20, was capable of regulating the protein level of FAN1 through the KEN box and the D-box. Moreover, the up- and down-regulation of FAN1 affected the progression to mitotic exit. Collectively, these data suggest that FAN1 may be a new mitotic substrate of APC/CCdh1 that plays a key role during mitotic exit. PMID:22854063

  18. Efficient gene targeting by homology-directed repair in rat zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Remy, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Menoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; De Cian, Anne; Thepenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Baron, Daniel; Charpentier, Marine; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Buelow, Roland; Cost, Gregory J; Giovannangeli, Carine; Fraichard, Alexandre; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    The generation of genetically modified animals is important for both research and commercial purposes. The rat is an important model organism that until recently lacked efficient genetic engineering tools. Sequence-specific nucleases, such as ZFNs, TALE nucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 have allowed the creation of rat knockout models. Genetic engineering by homology-directed repair (HDR) is utilized to create animals expressing transgenes in a controlled way and to introduce precise genetic modifications. We applied TALE nucleases and donor DNA microinjection into zygotes to generate HDR-modified rats with large new sequences introduced into three different loci with high efficiency (0.62%-5.13% of microinjected zygotes). Two of these loci (Rosa26 and Hprt1) are known to allow robust and reproducible transgene expression and were targeted for integration of a GFP expression cassette driven by the CAG promoter. GFP-expressing embryos and four Rosa26 GFP rat lines analyzed showed strong and widespread GFP expression in most cells of all analyzed tissues. The third targeted locus was Ighm, where we performed successful exon exchange of rat exon 2 for the human one. At all three loci we observed HDR only when using linear and not circular donor DNA. Mild hypothermic (30°C) culture of zygotes after microinjection increased HDR efficiency for some loci. Our study demonstrates that TALE nuclease and donor DNA microinjection into rat zygotes results in efficient and reproducible targeted donor integration by HDR. This allowed creation of genetically modified rats in a work-, cost-, and time-effective manner.

  19. Residual charge interactions in unfolded staphylococcal nuclease can be explained by the Gaussian-chain model.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2002-01-01

    The discrepancy of the pH dependence of the unfolding free energy for staphylococcal nuclease from what is expected from an idealized model for the unfolded state is accounted for by the recently developed Gaussian-chain model. Residual electrostatic effects in the unfolded state are attributed to nonspecific interactions dominated by charges close along the sequence. The dominance of nonspecific local interactions appears to be supported by some experimental evidence. PMID:12496071

  20. Transient cold shock enhances zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene disruption.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Yannick; Choi, Vivian M; Xia, Danny F; Vo, Thuy D; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C

    2010-06-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are powerful tools for editing the genomes of cell lines and model organisms. Given the breadth of their potential application, simple methods that increase ZFN activity, thus ensuring genome modification, are highly attractive. Here we show that transient hypothermia generally and robustly increased the level of stable, ZFN-induced gene disruption, thereby providing a simple technique to enhance the experimental efficacy of ZFNs.

  1. Compact thermally-denatured state of a staphylococcal nuclease mutant from resonance energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Wu, P G; James, E; Brand, L

    1993-12-01

    Thermal denaturation of a staphylococcal nuclease mutant K78C, where lysine 78 is replaced by cysteine, was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and resonance energy transfer. CD spectra suggest that residual structures remain in the denatured state. Steady-state energy transfer from intrinsic tyrosines to a single and intrinsic tryptophan was measured at different temperatures. In the thermally-denatured state of K78C, there is still a substantial degree of energy transfer from tyrosine(s) to tryptophan, indicating residual structures in the denatured state. The cysteine residue in mutant K78C was labeled with a cysteine specific probe IAEDANS. Fluorescence decays of the tryptophan were measured to estimate distance distributions between Trp 140 and IAEDANS at position 78. Measurements were done as a function of temperature from 4 degrees C (native) to 65 degrees C (denatured) both with and without Ca2+ and inhibitor pdTp. Below 30 degrees C, the apparent distance distribution of both the ligand-free nuclease and the enzyme with bound pdTp can be adequately described by a Gaussian model. Above 40 degrees C, where the ligand-free nuclease but not the ternary complex begins to denature, two different populations are required to fit the data both with and without pdTp. One population has a compact structure and the other has an expanded structure. As temperature rises, the population of the expanded structure increases. At the highest temperature, the non-native compact structure is still the major form (60 to 70%). The overall thermally-denatured states of staphylococcal nuclease mutant K78C in the absence and presence of ligands are thus compact and heterogeneous.

  2. The structural biochemistry of Zucchini implicates it as a nuclease in piRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J; Haase, Astrid D; Knott, Simon R; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Hannon, Gregory J

    2012-11-01

    PIWI-family proteins and their associated small RNAs (piRNAs) act in an evolutionarily conserved innate immune mechanism to provide essential protection for germ-cell genomes against the activity of mobile genetic elements. piRNA populations comprise a molecular definition of transposons, which permits them to distinguish transposons from host genes and selectively silence them. piRNAs can be generated in two distinct ways, forming either primary or secondary piRNAs. Primary piRNAs come from discrete genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters, and seem to be derived from long, single-stranded precursors. The biogenesis of primary piRNAs involves at least two nucleolytic steps. An unknown enzyme cleaves piRNA cluster transcripts to generate monophosphorylated piRNA 5' ends. piRNA 3' ends are probably formed by exonucleolytic trimming, after a piRNA precursor is loaded into its PIWI partner. Secondary piRNAs arise during the adaptive 'ping-pong' cycle, with their 5' termini being formed by the activity of PIWIs themselves. A number of proteins have been implicated genetically in primary piRNA biogenesis. One of these, Drosophila melanogaster Zucchini, is a member of the phospholipase-D family of phosphodiesterases, which includes both phospholipases and nucleases. Here we produced a dimeric, soluble fragment of the mouse Zucchini homologue (mZuc; also known as PLD6) and show that it possesses single-strand-specific nuclease activity. A crystal structure of mZuc at 1.75 Å resolution indicates greater architectural similarity to phospholipase-D family nucleases than to phospholipases. Together, our data suggest that the Zucchini proteins act in primary piRNA biogenesis as nucleases, perhaps generating the 5' ends of primary piRNAs.

  3. Enhancement of nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum YL104 immobilized on activated carbon filter sponge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Ren, Hengfei; Li, Zhenjian; Zhao, Ting; Shi, Xinchi; Cheng, Hao; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Yong; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of current methods for industrial production of the enzyme nuclease P1 is limited. In this study, we sought to improve fermentation methods for the production of nuclease P1. An immobilized fermentation system using an activated carbon filter sponge as a carrier was used for the production of nuclease P1. In an airlift internal loop reactor (ALR), the fermentation performance of three different fermentation modes, including free-cell fermentation, repeated-batch fermentation, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentation, were compared. The fermentation kinetics in the fermentation broth of the three fermentation modes, including dissolved oxygen (DO), pH value, cell concentration, residual sugar concentration, and enzyme activity, were tested. The productivity of semi-continuous immobilized fermentation reached 8.76 U/mL/h, which was 33.3 and 80.2% higher than that of repeated-batch fermentation and free-cell fermentation, respectively. The sugar consumption of free-cell, repeated-batch, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentations was 41.2, 30.8, and 25.9 g/L, respectively. These results showed that immobilized-cell fermentation by using Penicillium citrinum with activated carbon filter sponge in an ALR was advantageous for nuclease P1 production, especially in the semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode. In spite of the significant improvement in nuclease P1 production in semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode, the specific activity of nuclease P1 was almost equal among the three fermentation modes.

  4. Crystal Structure of the First Eubacterial Mre11 Nuclease Reveals Novel Features that may Discriminate Substrates During DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Moiani, Davide; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Miller, Mitchell D.; McMullan, Daniel; Jin, Kevin K.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ernst, Dustin; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Tainer, John A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Mre11 nuclease plays a central role in the repair of cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). As x-ray structural information has only been available for the Pyrococcus furiosus enzyme (PfMre11), the conserved and variable features of this nuclease across the domains of life have not been experimentally defined. Our crystal structure and biochemical studies demonstrate that TM1635 from Thermotoga maritima, originally annotated as a putative nuclease, is the Mre11 endo/exonuclease from T. maritima (TmMre11) and the first such structure from eubacteria. TmMre11 and PfMre11 display similar overall structures, despite sequence identity in the twilight zone of only ∼20%. However, they differ substantially in their DNA specificity domains and in their dimeric organization. Residues in the nuclease domain are highly conserved, but those in the DNA specificity domain are not. The structural differences likely affect how Mre11s from different organisms recognize and interact with single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and DNA hairpin structures during DNA repair. The TmMre11 nuclease active site has no bound metal ions, but is conserved in sequence and structure with exception of a histidine that is important in PfMre11 nuclease activity. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization confirms that TmMre11 possesses both endonuclease and exonuclease activities on ssDNA and dsDNA substrates, respectively. PMID:20122942

  5. Geminivirus-Mediated Genome Editing in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Using Sequence-Specific Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Nathaniel M.; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Douches, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated systems (CRISPR/Cas) for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR) was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1) gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and a novel approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species. PMID:27493650

  6. Distribution of 5-methyldeoxycytidine in products of staphylococcal nuclease digestion of nuclei and purified DNA.

    PubMed

    Barr, F G; Kastan, M B; Lieberman, M W

    1985-03-12

    We have compared the distribution of 5-methyldeoxycytidine (m5dC) between staphylococcal nuclease (SN) sensitive and resistant regions of human diploid fibroblast chromatin to the corresponding distribution in purified DNA. After SN digestion of fibroblast nuclei or purified DNA, nuclease-resistant products were separated from sensitive products by perchloric acid or ethanol precipitation; the radioactively labeled nucleosides were then fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and quantitated. Our results indicate that m5dC is preferentially associated with SN-resistant regions of both chromatin and purified DNA. The magnitudes of these preferences in fibroblast chromatin and DNA are similar; we find that the enrichment of m5dC content in SN-resistant fractions of nuclei and DNA relative to the corresponding sensitive fractions is approximately 2-3-fold. Therefore, highly methylated regions of DNA have an intrinsic resistance to digestion by SN that is of sufficient magnitude to explain the high degree of nuclease resistance of chromatin containing highly methylated DNA.

  7. Enhanced resistance to nuclease degradation of nucleic acids complexed to asialoglycoprotein-polylysine carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, H C; Tangco, M V; Levine, S M; Robertson, D; Kormis, K; Wu, C H; Wu, G Y

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown targeting of DNA to hepatocytes using an asialoorosomucoid-polylysine (AsOR-PL) carrier system. The AsOR-PL conjugate condenses DNA and facilitates entry via specific receptor-ligand interactions. In these studies, our objective was to determine if AsOR-PL conjugates protect bound DNA from nuclease attack. Double-stranded plasmid or single-stranded oligonucleotide DNA, alone or bound to conjugate, was incubated under conditions mimicking those encountered during in vitro and in vivo transfections. The results showed that complexed DNA was effectively protected from degradation by serum nucleases. Degradation of single-stranded oligonucleotides was inhibited 3- to 6-fold in serum during 5 hours of incubation. For complexed plasmids, greater than 90% remained full-length during 1.5 and 3 hour incubations in serum or culture medium containing 10% serum, respectively. Uncomplexed plasmid was completely degraded after 15 minutes in serum or 60 minutes in medium. In cell lysates, the conjugate was not effective in inhibiting endonuclease activity; plasmids were readily converted from supercoiled to open circular and linear forms. However, the resultant nicked forms were substantially protected from further degradation during one hour of incubation compared to plasmid alone. Under all conditions complexed DNA did not readily dissociate from the conjugate. Overall, for both single and double-stranded DNA, AsOR-PL conjugates conferred substantial protection from nuclease degradation. Images PMID:7816636

  8. Geminivirus-Mediated Genome Editing in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Using Sequence-Specific Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Butler, Nathaniel M; Baltes, Nicholas J; Voytas, Daniel F; Douches, David S

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated systems (CRISPR/Cas) for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR) was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1) gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and a novel approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; Silva, George H.; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). The analysis of >15 500 unique TALEN/DNA cleavage profiles allowed us to monitor the specificity gradient of the RVDs along a TALEN/DNA binding array and to present a specificity scoring matrix for RVD/nucleotide association. Furthermore, we report that TALEN can only accommodate a relatively small number of position-dependent mismatches while maintaining a detectable activity at endogenous loci in vivo, demonstrating the high specificity of these molecular tools. We thus envision that the results we provide will allow for more deliberate choices of DNA binding arrays and/or DNA targets, extending our engineering capabilities. PMID:24569350

  10. Geminivirus-Mediated Genome Editing in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Using Sequence-Specific Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Butler, Nathaniel M; Baltes, Nicholas J; Voytas, Daniel F; Douches, David S

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated systems (CRISPR/Cas) for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR) was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1) gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and a novel approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species. PMID:27493650

  11. Efficient homologous recombination-mediated genome engineering in zebrafish using TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jimann; Chen, Jiakun; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2014-10-01

    Custom-designed nucleases afford a powerful reverse genetic tool for direct gene disruption and genome modification in vivo. Among various applications of the nucleases, homologous recombination (HR)-mediated genome editing is particularly useful for inserting heterologous DNA fragments, such as GFP, into a specific genomic locus in a sequence-specific fashion. However, precise HR-mediated genome editing is still technically challenging in zebrafish. Here, we establish a GFP reporter system for measuring the frequency of HR events in live zebrafish embryos. By co-injecting a TALE nuclease and GFP reporter targeting constructs with homology arms of different size, we defined the length of homology arms that increases the recombination efficiency. In addition, we found that the configuration of the targeting construct can be a crucial parameter in determining the efficiency of HR-mediated genome engineering. Implementing these modifications improved the efficiency of zebrafish knock-in generation, with over 10% of the injected F0 animals transmitting gene-targeting events through their germline. We generated two HR-mediated insertion alleles of sox2 and gfap loci that express either superfolder GFP (sfGFP) or tandem dimeric Tomato (tdTomato) in a spatiotemporal pattern that mirrors the endogenous loci. This efficient strategy provides new opportunities not only to monitor expression of endogenous genes and proteins and follow specific cell types in vivo, but it also paves the way for other sophisticated genetic manipulations of the zebrafish genome.

  12. Dna2 nuclease-helicase structure, mechanism and regulation by Rpa

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chun; Pourmal, Sergei; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2015-01-01

    The Dna2 nuclease-helicase maintains genomic integrity by processing DNA double-strand breaks, Okazaki fragments and stalled replication forks. Dna2 requires ssDNA ends, and is dependent on the ssDNA-binding protein Rpa, which controls cleavage polarity. Here we present the 2.3 Å structure of intact mouse Dna2 bound to a 15-nucleotide ssDNA. The nuclease active site is embedded in a long, narrow tunnel through which the DNA has to thread. The helicase domain is required for DNA binding but not threading. We also present the structure of a flexibly-tethered Dna2-Rpa interaction that recruits Dna2 to Rpa-coated DNA. We establish that a second Dna2-Rpa interaction is mutually exclusive with Rpa-DNA interactions and mediates the displacement of Rpa from ssDNA. This interaction occurs at the nuclease tunnel entrance and the 5’ end of the Rpa-DNA complex. Hence, it only displaces Rpa from the 5’ but not 3’ end, explaining how Rpa regulates cleavage polarity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09832.001 PMID:26491943

  13. Non-invasive Imaging of Staphylococcus aureus Infections with a Nuclease-Activated Probe

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Frank J.; Huang, Lingyan; Olson, Michael E.; Powers, Kristy M.; Hernandez, Luiza I.; Meyerholz, David K.; Thedens, Daniel R.; Behlke, Mark A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; McNamara, James O.

    2013-01-01

    Technologies that enable the rapid detection and localization of bacterial infections in living animals could address an unmet need for infectious disease diagnostics. We describe a molecular imaging approach for the specific, non-invasive detection of S. aureus based on the activity of its secreted nuclease, micrococcal nuclease (MN). Several short, synthetic oligonucleotides, rendered resistant to mammalian serum nucleases by various chemical modifications, flanked with a fluorophore and quencher, were activated upon degradation by recombinant MN and in S. aureus culture supernatants. A probe consisting of a pair of deoxythymidines flanked by several 2′-O-methyl-modified nucleotides was activated in culture supernatants of S. aureus but not in culture supernatants of several other pathogenic bacteria. Systemic administration of this probe to mice bearing bioluminescent S. aureus muscle infections resulted in probe activation at the infection sites in an MN-dependent manner. This novel bacterial imaging approach has potential clinical applicability for S. aureus and several other medically significant pathogens. PMID:24487433

  14. Recent developments and clinical studies utilizing engineered zinc finger nuclease technology.

    PubMed

    Jo, Young-Il; Kim, Hyongbum; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2015-10-01

    Efficient methods for creating targeted genetic modifications have long been sought for the investigation of gene function and the development of therapeutic modalities for various diseases, including genetic disorders. Although such modifications are possible using homologous recombination, the efficiency is extremely low. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are custom-designed artificial nucleases that make double-strand breaks at specific sequences, enabling efficient targeted genetic modifications such as corrections, additions, gene knockouts and structural variations. ZFNs are composed of two domains: (i) a DNA-binding domain comprised of zinc finger modules and (ii) the FokI nuclease domain that cleaves the DNA strand. Over 17 years after ZFNs were initially developed, a number of improvements have been made. Here, we will review the developments and future perspectives of ZFN technology. For example, ZFN activity and specificity have been significantly enhanced by modifying the DNA-binding domain and FokI cleavage domain. Advances in culture methods, such as the application of a cold shock and the use of small molecules that affect ZFN stability, have also increased ZFN activity. Furthermore, ZFN-induced mutant cells can be enriched using episomal surrogate reporters. Additionally, we discuss several ongoing clinical studies that are based on ZFN-mediated genome editing in humans. These breakthroughs have substantially facilitated the use of ZFNs in research, medicine and biotechnology.

  15. Cold denaturation and sup 2 H sub 2 O stabilization of a staphylococcal nuclease mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Antonino, L.C.; Nakano, Takayuki; Fink, A.L. ); Kautz, R.A.; Fox, R.O. )

    1991-09-01

    Cold denaturation is now recognized as a general property of proteins but has been observed only under destabilizing conditions, such as moderate denaturant concentration of low pH. By destabilizing the protein using site-directed mutagenesis, the authors have observed cold denaturation at pH 7.0 in the absence of denaturants in a mutant of staphylococcal nuclease, which the authors call NCA S28G for a hybrid protein between staphylococcal nuclease and concanavalin A in which there is the point mutation Ser-28{yields}Gly. The temperature of maximum stability (t{sub max}) as determined by circular dichroism (CD) was 18.1C, and the midpoints of the thermal unfolding transitions (t{sub m}) were 0.6C and 30.0C. These values may be compared with the t{sub m} of 52.5C for wild-type staphylococcal nuclease, for which no cold denaturation was observed under these conditions. When the stability of the mutant was examined in {sup 2}H{sub 2}O by NMR, CD, or fluorescence, a substantial increase in the amount of folded protein at the t{sub max} was noted as well as a decrease in t{sub max}, reflecting increased stability.

  16. Cold adaptation of the mononuclear molybdoenzyme periplasmic nitrate reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; Codd, Rachel

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cold-adapted phenotype of NapA from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein homology model of NapA from S. gelidimarina and mesophilic homologue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six amino acid residues identified as lead candidates governing NapA cold adaptation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular-level understanding of designing cool-temperature in situ oxyanion sensors. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalysed in bacteria by periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) which describes a system of variable protein subunits encoded by the nap operon. Nitrate reduction occurs in the NapA subunit, which contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (Mo-MGD) cofactor and one [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster. The activity of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) isolated as native protein from the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina (Nap{sub Sgel}) and middle-temperature adapted (mesophilic) Shewanella putrefaciens (Nap{sub Sput}) was examined at varied temperature. Irreversible deactivation of Nap{sub Sgel} and Nap{sub Sput} occurred at 54.5 and 65 Degree-Sign C, respectively. When Nap{sub Sgel} was preincubated at 21-70 Degree-Sign C for 30 min, the room-temperature nitrate reductase activity was maximal and invariant between 21 and 54 Degree-Sign C, which suggested that Nap{sub Sgel} was poised for optimal catalysis at modest temperatures and, unlike Nap{sub Sput}, did not benefit from thermally-induced refolding. At 20 Degree-Sign C, Nap{sub Sgel} reduced selenate at 16% of the rate of nitrate reduction. Nap{sub Sput} did not reduce selenate. Sequence alignment showed 46 amino acid residue substitutions in Nap{sub Sgel} that were conserved in NapA from mesophilic Shewanella, Rhodobacter and Escherichia species and could be associated with the Nap{sub Sgel} cold-adapted phenotype. Protein homology modeling of Nap{sub Sgel} using a

  17. Visualization of Periplasmic and Cytoplasmic Proteins with a Self-Labeling Protein Tag

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Na; Landgraf, Dirk; Paulsson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of fluorescent and luminescent proteins in visualizing proteins has become a powerful tool in understanding molecular and cellular processes within living organisms. This success has resulted in an ever-increasing demand for new and more versatile protein-labeling tools that permit light-based detection of proteins within living cells. In this report, we present data supporting the use of the self-labeling HaloTag protein as a light-emitting reporter for protein fusions within the model prokaryote Escherichia coli. We show that functional protein fusions of the HaloTag can be detected both in vivo and in vitro when expressed within the cytoplasmic or periplasmic compartments of E. coli. The capacity to visually detect proteins localized in various prokaryotic compartments expands today's molecular biologist toolbox and paves the path to new applications. IMPORTANCE Visualizing proteins microscopically within living cells is important for understanding both the biology of cells and the role of proteins within living cells. Currently, the most common tool is green fluorescent protein (GFP). However, fluorescent proteins such as GFP have many limitations; therefore, the field of molecular biology is always in need of new tools to visualize proteins. In this paper, we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of HaloTag to visualize proteins in two different compartments within the model prokaryote Escherichia coli. The use of HaloTag as an additional tool to visualize proteins within prokaryotes increases our capacity to ask about and understand the role of proteins within living cells. PMID:26787765

  18. A periplasmic D-alanyl-D-alanine dipeptidase in the gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, F; García-del Portillo, F; Groisman, E A

    1999-04-01

    The VanX protein is a D-alanyl-D-alanine (D-Ala-D-Ala) dipeptidase essential for resistance to the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin. While this enzymatic activity has been typically associated with vancomycin- and teicoplainin-resistant enterococci, we now report the identification of a D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptidase in the gram-negative species Salmonella enterica. The Salmonella enzyme is only 36% identical to VanX but exhibits a similar substrate specificity: it hydrolyzes D-Ala-D-Ala, DL-Ala-DL-Phe, and D-Ala-Gly but not the tripeptides D-Ala-D-Ala-D-Ala and DL-Ala-DL-Lys-Gly or the dipeptides L-Ala-L-Ala, N-acetyl-D-Ala-D-Ala, and L-Leu-Pro. The Salmonella dipeptidase gene, designated pcgL, appears to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer because pcgL-hybridizing sequences were not detected in related bacterial species and the G+C content of the pcgL-containing region (41%) is much lower than the overall G+C content of the Salmonella chromosome (52%). In contrast to wild-type Salmonella, a pcgL mutant was unable to use D-Ala-D-Ala as a sole carbon source. The pcgL gene conferred D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptidase activity upon Escherichia coli K-12 but did not allow growth on D-Ala-D-Ala. The PcgL protein localizes to the periplasmic space of Salmonella, suggesting that this dipeptidase participates in peptidoglycan metabolism.

  19. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate the oxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe] hydrogenase, an [NiFeSe] hydrogenase, and two [NiFe] hydrogenases encoded by the hyd, hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand their cellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hyd and hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those of the wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5 or 50% (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfate reduction. Only strains missing the [Fe] hydrogenase were significantly affected during growth with lactate or with 50% (vol/vol) hydrogen as the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5% [vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate data correlated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarray hybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grown under the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed the order 5% hydrogen > 50% hydrogen > lactate, whereas expression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These results suggest that growth with lactate and 50% hydrogen is associated with high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best captured by the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe] hydrogenase. In contrast, growth with 5% hydrogen is associated with a low intracellular hydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity [NiFeSe] hydrogenase. PMID:17601789

  20. TupA: A Tungstate Binding Protein in the Periplasm of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Otrelo-Cardoso, Ana Rita; Nair, Rashmi R.; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Rivas, Maria G.; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The TupABC system is involved in the cellular uptake of tungsten and belongs to the ABC (ATP binding cassette)-type transporter systems. The TupA component is a periplasmic protein that binds tungstate anions, which are then transported through the membrane by the TupB component using ATP hydrolysis as the energy source (the reaction catalyzed by the ModC component). We report the heterologous expression, purification, determination of affinity binding constants and crystallization of the Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 TupA. The tupA gene (locus tag Dde_0234) was cloned in the pET46 Enterokinase/Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC) expression vector, and the construct was used to transform BL21 (DE3) cells. TupA expression and purification were optimized to a final yield of 10 mg of soluble pure protein per liter of culture medium. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out showing that TupA binds both tungstate and molybdate ions and has no significant interaction with sulfate, phosphate or perchlorate. Quantitative analysis of metal binding by isothermal titration calorimetry was in agreement with these results, but in addition, shows that TupA has higher affinity to tungstate than molybdate. The protein crystallizes in the presence of 30% (w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 using the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method. The crystals diffract X-rays beyond 1.4 Å resolution and belong to the P21 space group, with cell parameters a = 52.25 Å, b = 42.50 Å, c = 54.71 Å, β = 95.43°. A molecular replacement solution was found, and the structure is currently under refinement. PMID:24992597

  1. Catalytic mechanism and mode of action of the periplasmic alginate epimerase AlgG.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Francis; Kitova, Elena N; Robinson, Howard; Walvoort, Marthe T C; Codée, Jeroen D C; Klassen, John S; Howell, P Lynne

    2014-02-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that forms chronic biofilm infections in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. A major component of the biofilm during these infections is the exopolysaccharide alginate, which is synthesized at the inner membrane as a homopolymer of 1-4-linked β-D-mannuronate. As the polymer passages through the periplasm, 22-44% of the mannuronate residues are converted to α-L-guluronate by the C5-epimerase AlgG to produce a polymer of alternating β-D-mannuronate and α-L-guluronate blocks and stretches of polymannuronate. To understand the molecular basis of alginate epimerization, the structure of Pseudomonas syringae AlgG has been determined at 2.1-Å resolution, and the protein was functionally characterized. The structure reveals that AlgG is a long right-handed parallel β-helix with an elaborate lid structure. Functional analysis of AlgG mutants suggests that His(319) acts as the catalytic base and that Arg(345) neutralizes the acidic group during the epimerase reaction. Water is the likely catalytic acid. Electrostatic surface potential and residue conservation analyses in conjunction with activity and substrate docking studies suggest that a conserved electropositive groove facilitates polymannuronate binding and contains at least nine substrate binding subsites. These subsites likely align the polymer in the correct register for catalysis to occur. The presence of multiple subsites, the electropositive groove, and the non-random distribution of guluronate in the alginate polymer suggest that AlgG is a processive enzyme. Moreover, comparison of AlgG and the extracellular alginate epimerase AlgE4 of Azotobacter vinelandii provides a structural rationale for the differences in their Ca(2+) dependence.

  2. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-ReducingBacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He,Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-09-24

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate theoxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe]hydrogenase, an[NiFeSe]hydrogenase, and two [NiFe]hydrogenases encoded by the hyd,hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand theircellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hydand hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those ofthe wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5or 50 percent (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfatereduction. Only strains missing the [Fe]hydrogenase were significantlyaffected during growth with lactate or with 50 percent (vol/vol) hydrogenas the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5 percent[vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate datacorrelated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarrayhybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grownunder the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed theorder 5 percent hydrogen>50 percent hydrogen>lactate, whereasexpression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These resultssuggest that growth with lactate and 50 percent hydrogen is associatedwith high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best capturedby the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe]hydrogenase. In contrast,growth with 5 percent hydrogen is associated with a low intracellularhydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity[NiFeSe]hydrogenase.

  3. The superoxide dismutase SodA is targeted to the periplasm in a SecA-dependent manner by a novel mechanism.

    PubMed

    Krehenbrink, Martin; Edwards, Anne; Downie, J Allan

    2011-10-01

    The manganese/iron-type superoxide dismutase (SodA) of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 is exported to the periplasm of R. l. bv. viciae and Escherichia coli. However, it does not possess a hydrophobic cleaved N-terminal signal peptide typically present in soluble proteins exported by the Sec-dependent (Sec) pathway or the twin-arginine translocation (TAT) pathway. A tatC mutant of R. l. bv. viciae exported SodA to the periplasm, ruling out export of SodA as a complex with a TAT substrate as a chaperone. The export of SodA was unaffected in a secB mutant of E. coli, but its export from R. l. bv. viciae was inhibited by azide, an inhibitor of SecA ATPase activity. A temperature-sensitive secA mutant of E. coli was strongly reduced for SodA export. The 10 N-terminal amino acid residues of SodA were sufficient to target the reporter protein alkaline phosphatase to the periplasm. Our results demonstrate the export of a protein lacking a classical signal peptide to the periplasm by a SecA-dependent, but SecB-independent targeting mechanism. Export of the R. l. bv. viciae SodA to the periplasm was not limited to the genus Rhizobium, but was also observed in other proteobacteria.

  4. Selective and efficient extraction of recombinant proteins from the periplasm of Escherichia coli using low concentrations of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Jalalirad, Reza

    2013-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine chemicals at low concentrations, which can be utilized for selective release of periplasmic proteins. It was revealed that 80-100 % of the activity of alpha-amylase, beta-lactamase, and Fab D1.3 was retained in the presence of 0.05 and 0.1 % Triton X-100, 0.1 % Tween 20, 0.1 % DOC, 0.01 % BAC, 0.01 % CTAB, 10 mM EDTA, 1 mM and 10 mM DEA, 10 mM NTA, 0.1 and 1 % SHMP, 200 mM urea, 100-500 mM GndCl, and 1 % solvents (hexane, xylene, toluene, benzene, pyridine and isoamyl alcohol). Performance of these chemicals, recognized as generally safe, for selective release of proteins from the periplasm of Escherichia coli was investigated. DOC was a general and very efficient agent, and at concentrations as low as 0.05, 0.1, and 0.025 %, released beta-lactamase, alpha-amylase, and Fab D1.3 selectively with yield factors of 2.7, 2.3, and 3.6 times greater than osmotic shock procedure, respectively. EDTA (1 and 10 mM) discharged Fab D1.3 with efficiency more than osmotic shock (target protein yield of 110 and 138 %, correspondingly). Isoamyl alcohol (10 % v/v) was effective for periplasmic release of alpha-amylase and particularly Fab D1.3, with target protein yields of 75 and 168 %, respectively.

  5. A direct screen for c-di-GMP modulators reveals a Salmonella Typhimurium periplasmic ʟ-arginine-sensing pathway.

    PubMed

    Mills, Erez; Petersen, Erik; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-06-01

    Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that transduces internal and external signals and regulates bacterial motility and biofilm formation. Some organisms encode more than 100 c-di-GMP-modulating enzymes, but only for a few has a signal been defined that modulates their activity. We developed and applied a high-throughput, real-time flow cytometry method that uses a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor of free c-di-GMP to screen for signals that modulate its concentration within Salmonella Typhimurium. We identified multiple compounds, including glucose, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, salicylic acid, and ʟ-arginine, that modulated the FRET signal and therefore the free c-di-GMP concentration. By screening a library of mutants, we identified proteins required for the c-di-GMP response to each compound. Furthermore, low micromolar concentrations of ʟ-arginine induced a rapid translation-independent increase in c-di-GMP concentrations and c-di-GMP-dependent cellulose synthesis, responses that required the regulatory periplasmic domain of the diguanylate cyclase STM1987. ʟ-Arginine signaling also required the periplasmic putative ʟ-arginine-binding protein ArtI, implying that ʟ-arginine sensing occurred in the periplasm. Among the 20 commonly used amino acids, S. Typhimurium specifically responded to ʟ-arginine with an increase in c-di-GMP, suggesting that ʟ-arginine may serve as a signal during S. Typhimurium infection. Our results demonstrate that a second-messenger biosensor can be used to identify environmental signals and define pathways that alter microbial behavior.

  6. The role of two periplasmic copper- and zinc-cofactored superoxide dismutases in the virulence of Salmonella choleraesuis.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Assunta; Watson, Patricia R; Wallis, Timothy S; Langford, Paul R; Kroll, J Simon

    2002-03-01

    Periplasmic copper- and zinc-cofactored superoxide dismutases ([Cu,Zn]-SODs, SodC) of several Gram-negative pathogens can protect against superoxide-radical-mediated host defences, and thus contribute to virulence. This role has been previously defined for one [Cu,Zn]-SOD in various Salmonella serovars. Following the recent discovery of a second periplasmic [Cu,Zn]-SOD in Salmonella, the effect of knockout mutations in one or both of the original sodC-1 and the new sodC-2 on the virulence of the porcine pathogen Salmonella choleraesuis is investigated here. In comparison to wild-type, while sodC mutants--whether single or double--showed no impairment in growth, they all showed equally enhanced sensitivity to superoxide and a dramatically increased sensitivity to the combination of superoxide and nitric oxide in vitro. This observation had its correlate in experimental infection both ex vivo and in vivo. Mutation of sodC significantly impaired survival of S. choleraesuis in interferon gamma-stimulated murine macrophages compared to wild-type organisms, and all S. choleraesuis sodC mutants persisted in significantly lower numbers than wild-type in BALB/c (Ity(s)) and C3H/HeN (Ity(r)) mice after experimental infection, but in no experimental system were sodC-1 sodC-2 double mutants more attenuated than either single mutant. These data suggest that both [Cu,Zn]-SODs are needed to protect bacterial periplasmic or membrane components. While SodC plays a role in S. choleraesuis virulence, the data presented here suggest that this is through overcoming a threshold effect, probably achieved by acquisition of sodC-1 on a bacteriophage. Loss of either sodC gene confers maximum vulnerability to superoxide on S. choleraesuis.

  7. sup 32 P-postlabeling detection of thymine glycols: evaluation of adduct recoveries after enhancement with affinity chromatography, nuclease P1, nuclease S1, and polynucleotide kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.V.; Bleicher, W.T.; Blackburn, G.R. )

    1991-04-01

    Thymine glycol (Tg) is a product of DNA damage by oxygen radicals generated by oxidative mutagens and carcinogens and ionizing radiation. The highly sensitive {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay was validated and optimized for the measurement of Tg generated in vitro by the reaction of dTp or calf thymus DNA with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}). Adduct detection was enhanced by purification of Tg adducts using phenylboronate affinity chromatography or by preferential dephosphorylation of unmodified 3'-nucleotides with nuclease P1, nuclease S1, or polynucleotide kinase; Tg nucleotides were found to be resistant to limited enzymatic 3'-dephosphorylation. Two adducts were seen with OsO{sub 4}-modified dTp, which may have been cis-Tg adducts, because they were retained on a phenylboronate column, and because OsO{sub 4} selectively forms cis-Tg adducts. With OsO{sub 4}-modified DNA, several adducts were detected, two major derivatives of which coincided chromatographically with those seen in OsO{sub 4}-modified dTp. The recoveries of major adducts were similar before and after enrichment by different methods, indicating that Tg adducts were resistant to enzymatic dephosphorylation. The efficacy of labeling of the two major Tg adducts by polynucleotide kinase was optimal at 60 microM ATP and higher, whereas it was about 3%, 50%, and 80% of the optimal rate at 2, 10, and 30 microM, respectively. This was in contrast to our previous finding that only 0.25 microM ATP was needed for optimal labeling of benzoquinone-DNA adducts.

  8. The periplasmic domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A can undergo a localized temperature dependent structural transition.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Vogel, Hans J

    2014-12-01

    Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli are surrounded by two membranes with a thin peptidoglycan (PG)-layer located in between them in the periplasmic space. The outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is a 325-residue protein and it is the major protein component of the outer membrane of E. coli. Previous structure determinations have focused on the N-terminal fragment (residues 1-171) of OmpA, which forms an eight stranded transmembrane β-barrel in the outer membrane. Consequently it was suggested that OmpA is composed of two independently folded domains in which the N-terminal β-barrel traverses the outer membrane and the C-terminal domain (residues 180-325) adopts a folded structure in the periplasmic space. However, some reports have proposed that full-length OmpA can instead refold in a temperature dependent manner into a single domain forming a larger transmembrane pore. Here, we have determined the NMR solution structure of the C-terminal periplasmic domain of E. coli OmpA (OmpA(180-325)). Our structure reveals that the C-terminal domain folds independently into a stable globular structure that is homologous to the previously reported PG-associated domain of Neisseria meningitides RmpM. Our results lend credence to the two domain structure model and a PG-binding function for OmpA, and we could indeed localize the PG-binding site on the protein through NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments. On the other hand, we found no evidence for binding of OmpA(180-325) with the TonB protein. In addition, we have also expressed and purified full-length OmpA (OmpA(1-325)) to study the structure of the full-length protein in micelles and nanodiscs by NMR spectroscopy. In both membrane mimetic environments, the recombinant OmpA maintains its two domain structure that is connected through a flexible linker. A series of temperature-dependent HSQC experiments and relaxation dispersion NMR experiments detected structural destabilization in the bulge region of the

  9. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    DOE PAGES

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and amore » putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often stressed in the environment by reactive chlorine species (RCS) of

  10. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and a putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often

  11. Functional Properties of Mouse Chitotriosidase Expressed in the Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Kazutaka; Yoshikawa, Satoshi; Sato, Akira; Okawa, Kazuaki; Kashimura, Akinori; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Ohno, Naohito; Bauer, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Chitotriosidase (Chit1) is an enzyme associated with various diseases, including Gaucher disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Alzheimer disease and cystic fibrosis. In this study, we first expressed mouse mature Chit1 fused with V5 and (His)6 tags at the C-terminus (Chit1-V5-His) in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and found that most of the expressed protein was insoluble. In contrast, Chit1 tagged with Protein A at the N-terminus and V5-His at the C-terminus, was expressed in the periplasmic space of E. coli as a soluble protein and successfully purified. We evaluated the chitinolytic properties of the recombinant enzyme using 4-nitrophenyl N,N’-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside [4NP-chitobioside, 4NP-(GlcNAc)2] and found that its activity was comparable to CHO cells-expressed Chit1-V5-His. Optimal conditions for the E. coli-produced Chit1 were pH ~5.0 at 50°C. Chit1 was stable after 1 h incubation at pH 5.0~11.0 on ice and its chitinolytic activity was lost at pH 2.0, although the affinity to chitin remained unchanged. Chit1 efficiently cleaved crystalline and colloidal chitin substrates as well as oligomers of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) releasing primarily (GlcNAc)2 fragments at pH 5.0. On the other hand, (GlcNAc)3 was relatively resistant to digestion by Chit1. The degradation of 4NP-(GlcNAc)2 and (GlcNAc)3 was less evident at pH 7.0~8.0, while (GlcNAc)2 production from colloidal chitin and (GlcNAc)6 at these pH conditions remained strong at the neutral conditions. Our results indicate that Chit1 degrades chitin substrates under physiological conditions and suggest its important pathophysiological roles in vivo. PMID:27716783

  12. Proline cis-trans isomerization in staphylococcal nuclease: multi-substrate free energy perturbation calculations.

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, A.; Rice, L. M.; Simonson, T.; Fox, R. O.; Brünger, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Staphylococcal nuclease A exists in two folded forms that differ in the isomerization state of the Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond. The dominant form (90% occupancy) adopts a cis peptide bond, which is observed in the crystal structure. NMR studies show that the relatively small difference in free energy between the cis and trans forms (delta Gcis-->trans approximately 1.2 kcal/mol) results from large and nearly compensating differences in enthalpy and entropy (delta Hcis-->trans approximately delta TScis-->trans approximately 10 kcal/mol). There is evidence from X-ray crystal structures that the structural differences between the cis and the trans forms of nuclease are confined to the conformation of residues 112-117, a solvated protein loop. Here, we obtain a thermodynamic and structural description of the conformational equilibrium of this protein loop through an exhaustive conformational search that identified several substates followed by free energy simulations between the substrates. By partitioning the search into conformational substates, we overcame the multiple minima problem in this particular case and obtained precise and reproducible free energy values. The protein and water environment was implicitly modeled by appropriately chosen nonbonded terms between the explicitly treated loop and the rest of the protein. These simulations correctly predicted a small free energy difference between the cis and trans forms composed of larger, compensating differences in enthalpy and entropy. The structural predictions of these simulations were qualitatively consistent with known X-ray structures of nuclease variants and yield a model of the unknown minor trans conformation. PMID:7613463

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Nuc2 is a functional, surface-attached extracellular nuclease.

    PubMed

    Kiedrowski, Megan R; Crosby, Heidi A; Hernandez, Frank J; Malone, Cheryl L; McNamara, James O; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent bacterial pathogen that causes a diverse range of acute and chronic infections. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the secreted nuclease (Nuc) enzyme is a virulence factor in multiple models of infection, and in vivo expression of nuc has facilitated the development of an infection imaging approach based on Nuc-activatable probes. Interestingly, S. aureus strains encode a second nuclease (Nuc2) that has received limited attention. With the growing interest in bacterial nucleases, we sought to characterize Nuc2 in more detail through localization, expression, and biochemical studies. Fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase localization approaches using Nuc2-GFP and Nuc2-PhoA fusions, respectively, demonstrated that Nuc2 is membrane bound with the C-terminus facing the extracellular environment, indicating it is a signal-anchored Type II membrane protein. Nuc2 enzyme activity was detectable on the S. aureus cell surface using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay, and in time courses, both nuc2 transcription and enzyme activity peaked in early logarithmic growth and declined in stationary phase. Using a mouse model of S. aureus pyomyositis, Nuc2 activity was detected with activatable probes in vivo in nuc mutant strains, demonstrating that Nuc2 is produced during infections. To assess Nuc2 biochemical properties, the protein was purified and found to cleave both single- and double-stranded DNA, and it exhibited thermostability and calcium dependence, paralleling the properties of Nuc. Purified Nuc2 prevented biofilm formation in vitro and modestly decreased biomass in dispersal experiments. Altogether, our findings confirm that S. aureus encodes a second, surface-attached and functional DNase that is expressed during infections and displays similar biochemical properties to the secreted Nuc enzyme.

  14. Use of designer nucleases for targeted gene and genome editing in plants.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Donald P; Spalding, Martin H; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-01

    The ability to efficiently inactivate or replace genes in model organisms allowed a rapid expansion of our understanding of many of the genetic, biochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms that support life. With the advent of new techniques for manipulating genes and genomes that are applicable not only to single-celled organisms, but also to more complex organisms such as animals and plants, the speed with which scientists and biotechnologists can expand fundamental knowledge and apply that knowledge to improvements in medicine, industry and agriculture is set to expand in an exponential fashion. At the heart of these advancements will be the use of gene editing tools such as zinc finger nucleases, modified meganucleases, hybrid DNA/RNA oligonucleotides, TAL effector nucleases and modified CRISPR/Cas9. Each of these tools has the ability to precisely target one specific DNA sequence within a genome and (except for DNA/RNA oligonucleotides) to create a double-stranded DNA break. DNA repair to such breaks sometimes leads to gene knockouts or gene replacement by homologous recombination if exogenously supplied homologous DNA fragments are made available. Genome rearrangements are also possible to engineer. Creation and use of such genome rearrangements, gene knockouts and gene replacements by the plant science community is gaining significant momentum. To document some of this progress and to explore the technology's longer term potential, this review highlights present and future uses of designer nucleases to greatly expedite research with model plant systems and to engineer genes and genomes in major and minor crop species for enhanced food production.

  15. Nuclear gene targeting in Chlamydomonas using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sizova, Irina; Greiner, Andre; Awasthi, Mayanka; Kateriya, Suneel; Hegemann, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a versatile model for fundamental and biotechnological research. A wide range of tools for genetic manipulation have been developed for this alga, but specific modification of nuclear genes is still not routinely possible. Here, we present a nuclear gene targeting strategy for Chlamydomonas that is based on the application of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Our approach includes (i) design of gene-specific ZFNs using available online tools, (ii) evaluation of the designed ZFNs in a Chlamydomonas in situ model system, (iii) optimization of ZFN activity by modification of the nuclease domain, and (iv) application of the most suitable enzymes for mutagenesis of an endogenous gene. Initially, we designed a set of ZFNs to target the COP3 gene that encodes the light-activated ion channel channelrhodopsin-1. To evaluate the designed ZFNs, we constructed a model strain by inserting a non-functional aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase VIII (aphVIII) selection marker interspaced with a short COP3 target sequence into the nuclear genome. Upon co-transformation of this recipient strain with the engineered ZFNs and an aphVIII DNA template, we were able to restore marker activity and select paromomycin-resistant (Pm-R) clones with expressing nucleases. Of these Pm-R clones, 1% also contained a modified COP3 locus. In cases where cells were co-transformed with a modified COP3 template, the COP3 locus was specifically modified by homologous recombination between COP3 and the supplied template DNA. We anticipate that this ZFN technology will be useful for studying the functions of individual genes in Chlamydomonas.

  16. Compact denatured state of a staphylococcal nuclease mutant by guanidinium as determined by resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    James, E; Wu, P G; Stites, W; Brand, L

    1992-10-27

    The protein from a mutant clone of staphylococcal nuclease with a cysteine substituting for a lysine at position 78 was prepared and labeled with a cysteine-specific fluorescent probe 5-[[2-[(iodoacetyl)-amino]ethyl]amino]naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS). Time-resolved nonradiative energy-transfer studies were done using the single tryptophan at position 140 as the energy donor and the IAEDANS as the receptor. Changes in distance and distance distributions were observed as a function of increasing guanidinium (GuHCl) concentration (0-2 M) and in the presence or absence of Ca2+ and inhibitor 2'-deoxythymidine 3',5'-diphosphate (pdTp). In the native state, both the ternary complex and the noncomplexed protein are best fit with one population having an average donor-acceptor distance of approximately 23 A and an "apparent" full width at half-maximum (fwhm) of distance distribution of approximately 18 A. Besides the contribution of linker arm of the acceptor, it appears that there are some conformational heterogeneties either due to the disordering of the tryptophan region or due to the whole protein in the native state. During GuHCl unfolding, the average distance remains relatively constant up to GuHCl concentrations where both the ternary complex and the ligand-free protein are denatured (1-1.3 M). The compact denatured states persist up to 2 M GuHCl. At 2 M GuHCl, the heterogeneity of the denatured state in the ternary complex is much larger than that of the ligand-free nuclease. The results show that the denatured states of staphylococcal nuclease mutant K78C by GuHCl are compact and these compact denatured states are likely due to residual structures or incompletely disrupted hydrophobic cores under these conditions.

  17. Selection-Independent Generation of Gene Knockout Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10−6. In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22194948

  18. Nuclease Resistant DNA via High-Density Packing in Polymeric Micellar Nanoparticle Coronas

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Anthony M.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Tatro, Erick T.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe a polymeric micellar nanoparticle capable of rendering nucleic acids resistant to nuclease digestion. This approach relies on utilizing DNA as the polar head group of a DNA-polymer amphiphile in order to assemble well-defined, discrete nanoparticles. Dense packing of DNA in the micelle corona allows for hybridization of complementary oligonucleotides while prohibiting enzymatic degradation. We demonstrate the preparation, purification and characterization of the nanoparticles, then describe their resistance to treatment with endo- and exonucleases including snake-venom phosphodiesterase (SVP) a common, general DNA digestion enzyme. PMID:23379679

  19. DNA binding and nuclease activity of a one-dimensional heterometallic nitrosyl complex.

    PubMed

    Selim, Md; Chowdhury, Sujoy Roy; Mukherjea, Kalyan K

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of a structurally characterized Sr-Fe nitrosyl complex with DNA has been studied by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, viscometric, and gel electrophoresis techniques. From the absorption titration studies the intrinsic binding constant of the complex with DNA was calculated to be 1.6x10(4)M(-1). Fluorimetric studies indicate that the complex compete with EB in binding to DNA. The complex shows nuclease activity on pUC19 supercoiled DNA in presence of H(2)O(2). PMID:17825903

  20. Zinc finger nuclease technology: advances and obstacles in modelling and treating genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Jabalameli, Hamid Reza; Zahednasab, Hamid; Karimi-Moghaddam, Amin; Jabalameli, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are engineered restriction enzymes designed to target specific DNA sequences within the genome. Assembly of zinc finger DNA-binding domain to a DNA-cleavage domain enables the enzyme machinery to target unique locus in the genome and invoke endogenous DNA repair mechanisms. This machinery offers a versatile approach in allele editing and gene therapy. Here we discuss the architecture of ZFNs and strategies for generating targeted modifications within the genome. We review advances in gene therapy and modelling of the disease using these enzymes and finally, discuss the practical obstacles in using this technology.

  1. Virulence regulation with Venus flytrap domains: structure and function of the periplasmic moiety of the sensor-kinase BvgS.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Elian; Herrou, Julien; Lensink, Marc F; Wintjens, René; Vagin, Alexey; Lebedev, Andrey; Crosson, Sean; Villeret, Vincent; Locht, Camille; Antoine, Rudy; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) represent major signal-transduction pathways for adaptation to environmental conditions, and regulate many aspects of bacterial physiology. In the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, the TCS BvgAS controls the virulence regulon, and is therefore critical for pathogenicity. BvgS is a prototypical TCS sensor-kinase with tandem periplasmic Venus flytrap (VFT) domains. VFT are bi-lobed domains that typically close around specific ligands using clamshell motions. We report the X-ray structure of the periplasmic moiety of BvgS, an intricate homodimer with a novel architecture. By combining site-directed mutagenesis, functional analyses and molecular modeling, we show that the conformation of the periplasmic moiety determines the state of BvgS activity. The intertwined structure of the periplasmic portion and the different conformation and dynamics of its mobile, membrane-distal VFT1 domains, and closed, membrane-proximal VFT2 domains, exert a conformational strain onto the transmembrane helices, which sets the cytoplasmic moiety in a kinase-on state by default corresponding to the virulent phase of the bacterium. Signaling the presence of negative signals perceived by the periplasmic domains implies a shift of BvgS to a distinct state of conformation and activity, corresponding to the avirulent phase. The response to negative modulation depends on the integrity of the periplasmic dimer, indicating that the shift to the kinase-off state implies a concerted conformational transition. This work lays the bases to understand virulence regulation in Bordetella. As homologous sensor-kinases control virulence features of diverse bacterial pathogens, the BvgS structure and mechanism may pave the way for new modes of targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25738876

  2. Virulence regulation with Venus flytrap domains: structure and function of the periplasmic moiety of the sensor-kinase BvgS.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Elian; Herrou, Julien; Lensink, Marc F; Wintjens, René; Vagin, Alexey; Lebedev, Andrey; Crosson, Sean; Villeret, Vincent; Locht, Camille; Antoine, Rudy; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) represent major signal-transduction pathways for adaptation to environmental conditions, and regulate many aspects of bacterial physiology. In the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, the TCS BvgAS controls the virulence regulon, and is therefore critical for pathogenicity. BvgS is a prototypical TCS sensor-kinase with tandem periplasmic Venus flytrap (VFT) domains. VFT are bi-lobed domains that typically close around specific ligands using clamshell motions. We report the X-ray structure of the periplasmic moiety of BvgS, an intricate homodimer with a novel architecture. By combining site-directed mutagenesis, functional analyses and molecular modeling, we show that the conformation of the periplasmic moiety determines the state of BvgS activity. The intertwined structure of the periplasmic portion and the different conformation and dynamics of its mobile, membrane-distal VFT1 domains, and closed, membrane-proximal VFT2 domains, exert a conformational strain onto the transmembrane helices, which sets the cytoplasmic moiety in a kinase-on state by default corresponding to the virulent phase of the bacterium. Signaling the presence of negative signals perceived by the periplasmic domains implies a shift of BvgS to a distinct state of conformation and activity, corresponding to the avirulent phase. The response to negative modulation depends on the integrity of the periplasmic dimer, indicating that the shift to the kinase-off state implies a concerted conformational transition. This work lays the bases to understand virulence regulation in Bordetella. As homologous sensor-kinases control virulence features of diverse bacterial pathogens, the BvgS structure and mechanism may pave the way for new modes of targeted therapeutic interventions.

  3. Pyrodictium cannulae enter the periplasmic space but do not enter the cytoplasm, as revealed by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Stephan; Hegerl, Reiner; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Rachel, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrodictium grows in the form of a macroscopically visible network. It consists of cells entrapped in an extracellular matrix of hollow tubules, the "cannulae." Here, we present the three-dimensional structure of a single cell in conjunction with two extracellular cannulae, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. To achieve this, the information from two independent tilt series of the same specimen was combined, with the specimen rotated in the second series. In the three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction, we were able to trace the two cannulae in their full length, in particular, also inside the cell. One cannula enters the periplasmic space, while the other cannula contacts the surface of the cell, the S-layer. This indicates that the cannulae interconnect individual cells with each other on the level of their periplasmic space; we do not, however, have evidence that they enter the cytoplasm of the cells. The implications of these data for possible functions of the cannulae are discussed.

  4. Use of periplasmic target protein capture for phage display engineering of tight-binding protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fryszczyn, Bartlomiej G.; Brown, Nicholas G.; Huang, Wanzhi; Balderas, Miriam A.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful tool to study and engineer protein and peptide interactions. It is not without its limitations, however, such as the requirement for target protein purification and immobilization in a correctly folded state. A protein capture method is described here that allows enrichment of tight-binding protein variants in vivo thereby eliminating the need for target protein purification and immobilization. The linkage of genotype to phenotype is achieved by placing both receptor and ligand encoding genes on the same plasmid. This allows the isolation of the tight-binding ligand–receptor pair complexes after their association in the bacterial periplasm. The interaction between the TEM-1-β-lactamase fused to the gene 3 coat protein displayed on the surface of M13 bacteriophage and the β-lactamse inhibitory protein (BLIP) expressed in soluble form with a signal sequence to export it to the periplasm was used as a model system to test the method. The system was experimentally validated using a previously characterized collection of BLIP alanine mutants with a range of binding affinities for TEM-1 β-lactamase and by isolating tight-binding variants from a library of mutants randomized at residue position Tyr50 in BLIP which contacts β-lactamase. PMID:21900304

  5. Periplasmic domain of the sensor-kinase BvgS reveals a new paradigm for the Venus flytrap mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Herrou, Julien; Bompard, Coralie; Wintjens, René; Dupré, Elian; Willery, Eve; Villeret, Vincent; Locht, Camille; Antoine, Rudy; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Two-component sensory transduction systems control important bacterial programs. In Bordetella pertussis, expression of the virulence regulon is controlled by the unorthodox BvgAS two-component system. BvgS is the prototype of a family of sensor-kinases that harbor periplasmic domains homologous to bacterial solute-binding proteins. Although BvgAS is active under laboratory conditions, no activating signal has been identified, only negative modulators. Here we show that the second periplasmic domain of BvgS interacts with modulators and adopts a Venus flytrap (VFT) fold. X-ray crystallography reveals that the two lobes of VFT2 delimitate a ligand-binding cavity enclosing fortuitous ligands. Most substitutions of putative ligand-binding residues in the VFT2 cavity keep BvgS active, and alteration of the cavity's electrostatic potential affects responsiveness to modulation. The crystal structure of this VFT2 variant conferring constitutive kinase activity to BvgS shows a closed cavity with another nonspecific ligand. Thus, VFT2 is closed and active without a specific agonist ligand, in contrast to typical VFTs. Modulators are antagonists of VFT2 that interrupt signaling. BvgAS is active for most of the B. pertussis infectious cycle, consistent with the proposed mechanism. PMID:20855615

  6. AztD, a Periplasmic Zinc Metallochaperone to an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter System in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Handali, Melody; Roychowdhury, Hridindu; Neupane, Durga P; Yukl, Erik T

    2015-12-11

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of transition metals are essential for acquisition of necessary elements from the environment. A large number of Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens, have a fourth conserved gene of unknown function adjacent to the canonical permease, ATPase, and solute-binding protein (SBP) genes of the AztABC zinc transporter system. To assess the function of this putative accessory factor (AztD) from Paracoccus denitrificans, we have analyzed its transcriptional regulation, metal binding properties, and interaction with the SBP (AztC). Transcription of the aztD gene is significantly up-regulated under conditions of zinc starvation. Recombinantly expressed AztD purifies with slightly substoichiometric zinc from the periplasm of Escherichia coli and is capable of binding up to three zinc ions with high affinity. Size exclusion chromatography and a simple intrinsic fluorescence assay were used to determine that AztD as isolated is able to transfer bound zinc nearly quantitatively to apo-AztC. Transfer occurs through a direct, associative mechanism that prevents loss of metal to the solvent. These results indicate that AztD is a zinc chaperone to AztC and likely functions to maintain zinc homeostasis through interaction with the AztABC system. This work extends our understanding of periplasmic zinc trafficking and the function of chaperones in this process.

  7. Identification and characterization of a periplasmic trilactone esterase, Cee, revealed unique features of ferric enterobactin acquisition in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ximin; Mo, Yiming; Xu, Fuzhou; Lin, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) acquisition is a highly efficient and conserved iron scavenging system in Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, we have characterized two FeEnt receptors (CfrA and CfrB) in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli, the enteric human pathogens that do not produce any siderophores. In this study, whole genome sequencing and comparative genomic analysis identified a unique Ent trilactone esterase Cee (Cj1376) in C. jejuni. Genomic analysis and biochemical assay strongly suggested that Cee is the sole trilactone esterase in C. jejuni. Thin layer chromatography and HPLC analyses showed high efficiency of the purified Cee to hydrolyze Ent. Three Cee homologs previously characterized from other bacteria (IroE, IroD, and Fes) were also purified and analyzed together with Cee, indicating that Cee, Fes, and IroD displayed similar hydrolysis dynamics for both apo and ferric forms of Ent while IroE catalyzed Ent inefficiently. Unlike cytoplasmic Fes and IroD, Cee is localized in the periplasm as demonstrated by immunoblotting using Cee-specific antibodies. Genetic manipulation of diverse Campylobacter strains demonstrated that Cee is not only essential for CfrB-dependent FeEnt acquisition but also involved in CfrA-dependent pathway. Together, this study identified and characterized a novel periplasmic trilactone esterase and suggested a new model of FeEnt acquisition in Campylobacter. PMID:23278903

  8. Rational design of ultrastable and reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins for super-resolution imaging of the bacterial periplasm

    PubMed Central

    El Khatib, Mariam; Martins, Alexandre; Bourgeois, Dominique; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Adam, Virgile

    2016-01-01

    Phototransformable fluorescent proteins are central to several nanoscopy approaches. As yet however, there is no available variant allowing super-resolution imaging in cell compartments that maintain oxidative conditions. Here, we report the rational design of two reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins able to fold and photoswitch in the bacterial periplasm, rsFolder and rsFolder2. rsFolder was designed by hybridisation of Superfolder-GFP with rsEGFP2, and inherited the fast folding properties of the former together with the rapid switching of the latter, but at the cost of a reduced switching contrast. Structural characterisation of the switching mechanisms of rsFolder and rsEGFP2 revealed different scenarios for chromophore cis-trans isomerisation and allowed designing rsFolder2, a variant of rsFolder that exhibits improved switching contrast and is amenable to RESOLFT nanoscopy. The rsFolders can be efficiently expressed in the E. coli periplasm, opening the door to the nanoscale investigation of proteins localised in hitherto non-observable cellular compartments. PMID:26732634

  9. Treponema pallidum Lipoprotein TP0435 Expressed in Borrelia burgdorferi Produces Multiple Surface/Periplasmic Isoforms and mediates Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kamfai; Nasereddin, Thayer; Alter, Laura; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Giacani, Lorenzo; Parveen, Nikhat

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete to colonize various tissues requires the presence of surface-exposed adhesins that have been difficult to identify due to the inability to culture and genetically manipulate T. pallidum. Using a Borrelia burgdorferi-based heterologous system and gain-in-function approach, we show for the first time that a highly immunogenic lipoprotein TP0435 can be differentially processed into multiple isoforms with one variant stochastically displayed on the spirochete surface. TP0435 was previously believed to be exclusively located in T. pallidum periplasm. Furthermore, non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain expressing TP0435 acquires the ability to bind to a variety of host cells including placental cells and exhibits slow opsonophagocytosis in vitro similar to poor ex vivo phagocytosis of T. pallidum by host macrophages reported previously. This phenomenon of production of both surface and periplasmic immunogenic lipoprotein isoforms has possible implications in immune evasion of the obligate pathogen T. pallidum during infection. PMID:27161310

  10. [Transgenic Expression of Serratia marcescens Native and Mutant Nucleases Modulates Tobacco Mosaic Virus Resistance in Nicotiana tabacum L].

    PubMed

    Trifonova, E A; Saveleva, A V; Romanova, A V; Filipenko, E A; Sapotsky, M V; Malinovsky, V I; Kochetov, A V; Shumny, V K

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular Serratia marcescens nuclease is an extremely active enzyme which non-specifically degrades RNA and DNA. Its antiviral activity was previously shown both in animals and in plants when applied exogenously. Transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L cv. SR1) expressing S. marcescens chimeric, mutant, and intracellular mutant nuclease gene variants were regenerated and challenged with tobacco mosaic virus. The transgenic plants exhibited a higher level of resistance to the virus infection than the control non-transgenic plants. The resistance was evidenced by the delay of the appearance of mosaic symptoms and the retarded accumulation of viral antigen. Thus, these results reveal that modulations of both extracellular nuclease activity and intracellular RNA/DNA binding can protect plants against viral diseases. PMID:26410939

  11. The optional E. coli prr locus encodes a latent form of phage T4-induced anticodon nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, R; Chapman, D; Amitsur, M; Green, R; Snyder, L; Kaufmann, G

    1990-01-01

    The optional Escherichia coli prr locus restricts phage T4 mutants lacking polynucleotide kinase or RNA ligase. Underlying this restriction is the specific manifestation of the T4-induced anticodon nuclease, an enzyme which triggers the cleavage-ligation of the host tRNALys. We report here the molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence and mutational analysis of prr-associated DNA. The results indicate that prr encodes a latent form of anticodon nuclease consisting of a core enzyme and cognate masking agents. They suggest that the T4-encoded factors of anticodon nuclease counteract the prr-encoded masking agents, thus activating the latent enzyme. The encoding of a tRNA cleavage-ligation pathway by two separate genetic systems which cohabitate E. coli may provide a clue to the evolution of RNA splicing mechanisms mediated by proteins. Images Fig.3. Fig.4. PMID:1691706

  12. Butyrate-induced changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin cannot be correlated with transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect

    Birren, B.W.; Taplitz, S.J.; Herschman, H.R.

    1987-11-01

    The authors examined in the H4IIE rat heptoma cell line the relationship between butyrate-induced changes in the nuclease sensitivity of chromatin and changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. The butyrate-inducible metallothionein I (MT-I) gene underwent a dramatic increase in DNase I sensitivity after 3 h of butyrate treatment. However, genes not transcribed in H4IIE cells underwent the same changes in DNase I sensitivity. Thus, butyrate-induced increases in DNase I sensitivity are not sufficient for the transcriptional activation of a gene. Butyrate treatment has also been reported to alter the sensitivity of sequence to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) in a manner reflecting their tissue-specific expression. Butyrate exposure caused increased digestion of the MT-I gene by MNase. However, butyrate-induced MNase sensitivity also occurred for genes which are neither transcribed in untreated cells nor butyrate inducible. Moreover, cadmium, a potent transcriptional activator of the MT-I gene, does not alter the sensitivity of the MT-I gene to MNase. Thus, the butyrate-induced alterations in MNase sensitivity are neither sufficient for, necessary for, nor indicative of transcriptional activation.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of two thermostable DNA nucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Pfeifer, Sven; Keim, Antje; Greiner-Stöffele, Thomas; Sträter, Norbert

    2006-12-01

    Two thermostable DNA nucleases from archaea were crystallized in different space groups; the crystals were suitable for X-ray analysis. Temperature-tolerant organisms are an important source to enhance the stability of enzymes used in biotechnological processes. The DNA-cleaving enzyme exonuclease III from Escherichia coli is used in several applications in gene technology. A thermostable variant could expand the applicability of the enzyme in these methods. Two homologous nucleases from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (ExoAf) and Methanothermobacter thermoautrophicus (ExoMt) were studied for this purpose. Both enzymes were crystallized in different space groups using (poly)ethylene glycols, 2,4-methyl pentandiol, dioxane, ethanol or 2-propanol as precipitants. The addition of a 10-mer DNA oligonucleotide was important to obtain monoclinic crystals of ExoAf and ExoMt that diffracted to resolutions better than 2 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structures of the homologous proteins can serve as templates for genetic engineering of the E. coli exonuclease III and will aid in understanding the different catalytic properties of the enzymes.

  14. The adnAB Locus, Encoding a Putative Helicase-Nuclease Activity, Is Essential in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingli; Nguyen, Hoang Chuong; Chipot, Ludovic; Piotrowski, Emilie; Bertrand, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a crucial mechanism that repairs a wide range of DNA lesions, including the most deleterious ones, double-strand breaks (DSBs). This multistep process is initiated by the resection of the broken DNA ends by a multisubunit helicase-nuclease complex exemplified by Escherichia coli RecBCD, Bacillus subtilis AddAB, and newly discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis AdnAB. Here we show that in Streptomyces, neither recBCD nor addAB homologues could be detected. The only putative helicase-nuclease-encoding genes identified were homologous to M. tuberculosis adnAB genes. These genes are conserved as a single copy in all sequenced genomes of Streptomyces. The disruption of adnAB in Streptomyces ambofaciens and Streptomyces coelicolor could not be achieved unless an ectopic copy was provided, indicating that adnAB is essential for growth. Both adnA and adnB genes were shown to be inducible in response to DNA damage (mitomycin C) and to be independently transcribed. Introduction of S. ambofaciens adnAB genes in an E. coli recB mutant restored viability and resistance to UV light, suggesting that Streptomyces AdnAB could be a functional homologue of RecBCD and be involved in DNA damage resistance. PMID:24837284

  15. DNA helicase and helicase-nuclease enzymes with a conserved iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuliang; Brosh, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    Conserved Iron-Sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are found in a growing family of metalloproteins that are implicated in prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA replication and repair. Among these are DNA helicase and helicase-nuclease enzymes that preserve chromosomal stability and are genetically linked to diseases characterized by DNA repair defects and/or a poor response to replication stress. Insight to the structural and functional importance of the conserved Fe-S domain in DNA helicases has been gleaned from structural studies of the purified proteins and characterization of Fe-S cluster site-directed mutants. In this review, we will provide a current perspective of what is known about the Fe-S cluster helicases, with an emphasis on how the conserved redox active domain may facilitate mechanistic aspects of helicase function. We will discuss testable models for how the conserved Fe-S cluster might operate in helicase and helicase-nuclease enzymes to conduct their specialized functions that help to preserve the integrity of the genome.

  16. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O; Baek, Eun J; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-06-16

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine.

  17. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T; Huang, S; Zhao, XF; Wright, DA; Carpenter, S; Spalding, MH; Weeks, DP; Yang, B

    2011-08-08

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  18. Drosophila FANCM Helicase Prevents Spontaneous Mitotic Crossovers Generated by the MUS81 and SLX1 Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, H. Kenny; McMahan, Susan; Rota, Christopher M.; Kohl, Kathryn P.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Several helicases function during repair of double-strand breaks and handling of blocked or stalled replication forks to promote pathways that prevent formation of crossovers. Among these are the Bloom syndrome helicase BLM and the Fanconi anemia group M (FANCM) helicase. To better understand functions of these helicases, we compared phenotypes of Drosophila melanogaster Blm and Fancm mutants. As previously reported for BLM, FANCM has roles in responding to several types of DNA damage in preventing mitotic and meiotic crossovers and in promoting the synthesis-dependent strand annealing pathway for repair of a double-strand gap. In most assays, the phenotype of Fancm mutants is less severe than that of Blm mutants, and the phenotype of Blm Fancm double mutants is more severe than either single mutant, indicating both overlapping and unique functions. It is thought that mitotic crossovers arise when structure-selective nucleases cleave DNA intermediates that would normally be unwound or disassembled by these helicases. When BLM is absent, three nucleases believed to function as Holliday junction resolvases—MUS81-MMS4, MUS312-SLX1, and GEN—become essential. In contrast, no single resolvase is essential in mutants lacking FANCM, although simultaneous loss of GEN and either of the others is lethal in Fancm mutants. Since Fancm mutants can tolerate loss of a single resolvase, we were able to show that spontaneous mitotic crossovers that occur when FANCM is missing are dependent on MUS312 and either MUS81 or SLX1. PMID:25205745

  19. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing.

  20. Genome Editing in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem/Progenitor Cells Using Engineered Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Fanslow, Danielle A.; Wirt, Stacey E.; Barker, Jenny C.; Connelly, Jon P.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Dann, Christina Tenenhaus

    2014-01-01

    Editing the genome to create specific sequence modifications is a powerful way to study gene function and promises future applicability to gene therapy. Creation of precise modifications requires homologous recombination, a very rare event in most cell types that can be stimulated by introducing a double strand break near the target sequence. One method to create a double strand break in a particular sequence is with a custom designed nuclease. We used engineered nucleases to stimulate homologous recombination to correct a mutant gene in mouse “GS” (germline stem) cells, testicular derived cell cultures containing spermatogonial stem cells and progenitor cells. We demonstrated that gene-corrected cells maintained several properties of spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells including the ability to colonize following testicular transplantation. This proof of concept for genome editing in GS cells impacts both cell therapy and basic research given the potential for GS cells to be propagated in vitro, contribute to the germline in vivo following testicular transplantation or become reprogrammed to pluripotency in vitro. PMID:25409432

  1. Highly efficient targeted mutagenesis in axolotl using Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease.

    PubMed

    Flowers, G Parker; Timberlake, Andrew T; McLean, Kaitlin C; Monaghan, James R; Crews, Craig M

    2014-05-01

    Among tetrapods, only urodele salamanders, such as the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum, can completely regenerate limbs as adults. The mystery of why salamanders, but not other animals, possess this ability has for generations captivated scientists seeking to induce this phenomenon in other vertebrates. Although many recent advances in molecular biology have allowed limb regeneration and tissue repair in the axolotl to be investigated in increasing detail, the molecular toolkit for the study of this process has been limited. Here, we report that the CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease system can efficiently create mutations at targeted sites within the axolotl genome. We identify individual animals treated with RNA-guided nucleases that have mutation frequencies close to 100% at targeted sites. We employ this technique to completely functionally ablate EGFP expression in transgenic animals and recapitulate developmental phenotypes produced by loss of the conserved gene brachyury. Thus, this advance allows a reverse genetic approach in the axolotl and will undoubtedly provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms of salamanders' unique regenerative ability.

  2. Highly efficient targeted mutagenesis in axolotl using Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, G. Parker; Timberlake, Andrew T.; Mclean, Kaitlin C.; Monaghan, James R.; Crews, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Among tetrapods, only urodele salamanders, such as the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum, can completely regenerate limbs as adults. The mystery of why salamanders, but not other animals, possess this ability has for generations captivated scientists seeking to induce this phenomenon in other vertebrates. Although many recent advances in molecular biology have allowed limb regeneration and tissue repair in the axolotl to be investigated in increasing detail, the molecular toolkit for the study of this process has been limited. Here, we report that the CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease system can efficiently create mutations at targeted sites within the axolotl genome. We identify individual animals treated with RNA-guided nucleases that have mutation frequencies close to 100% at targeted sites. We employ this technique to completely functionally ablate EGFP expression in transgenic animals and recapitulate developmental phenotypes produced by loss of the conserved gene brachyury. Thus, this advance allows a reverse genetic approach in the axolotl and will undoubtedly provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms of salamanders' unique regenerative ability. PMID:24764077

  3. Targeted deletion and inversion of tandemly arrayed genes in Arabidopsis thaliana using zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yiping; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yong; Starker, Colby G; Baltes, Nicholas J; Zhang, Feng; Sander, Jeffry D; Reyon, Deepak; Joung, J Keith; Voytas, Daniel F

    2013-10-01

    Tandemly arrayed genes (TAGs) or gene clusters are prevalent in higher eukaryotic genomes. For example, approximately 17% of genes are organized in tandem in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The genetic redundancy created by TAGs presents a challenge for reverse genetics. As molecular scissors, engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) make DNA double-strand breaks in a sequence-specific manner. ZFNs thus provide a means to delete TAGs by creating two double-strand breaks in the gene cluster. Using engineered ZFNs, we successfully targeted seven genes from three TAGs on two Arabidopsis chromosomes, including the well-known RPP4 gene cluster, which contains eight resistance (R) genes. The resulting gene cluster deletions ranged from a few kb to 55 kb with frequencies approximating 1% in somatic cells. We also obtained large chromosomal deletions of ~9 Mb at approximately one tenth the frequency, and gene cluster inversions and duplications also were achieved. This study demonstrates the ability to use sequence-specific nucleases in plants to make targeted chromosome rearrangements and create novel chimeric genes for reverse genetics and biotechnology.

  4. DNA Double Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice Is Directed by Distinct MRE11 Nuclease Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Atsushi; Moiani, Davide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Harding, Shane M.; Genois, Marie-Michelle; Maity, Ranjan; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari; Kertokalio, Aryandi; Romoli, Filippo; Ismail, Amani; Ismalaj, Ermal; Petricci, Elena; Matthew, J Neale; Bristow, Robert G; Masson, Jean-Yves; Wyman, Claire; Jeggo, Penny; Tainer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY MRE11 within the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex acts in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), detection and signaling; yet, how its endo- and exonuclease activities regulate DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) versus homologous recombination (HR) remains enigmatic. Here we employed structure-based design with a focused chemical library to discover specific MRE11 endo- or exonuclease inhibitors. With these inhibitors we examined repair pathway choice at DSBs generated in G2 following radiation exposure. Whilst endo- or exonuclease inhibition impairs radiation-induced RPA chromatin binding, suggesting diminished resection, the inhibitors surprisingly direct different repair outcomes. Endonuclease inhibition promotes NHEJ in lieu of HR, whilst exonuclease inhibition confers a repair defect. Collectively, the results describe nuclease-specific MRE11 inhibitors, define distinct nuclease roles in DSB repair, and support a mechanism whereby MRE11 endonuclease initiates resection, thereby licensing HR followed by MRE11 exo and EXO1/BLM bidirectional resection towards and away from the DNA end, which commits to HR. PMID:24316220

  5. Optimized TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) for use in treatment of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Liang, Jing; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin

    2012-04-01

    TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) represent a new class of artificial nucleases capable of cleaving long, specific target DNA sequences in vivo and are powerful tools for genome editing with potential therapeutic applications. Here we report a pair of custom-designed TALENs for targeted genetic correction of the sickle cell disease mutation in human cells, which represents an example of engineered TALENs capable of recognizing and cleaving a human disease-associated gene. By using a yeast reporter system, a systematic study was carried out to optimize TALEN architecture for maximal in vivo cleavage efficiency. In contrast to the previous reports, the engineered TALENs were capable of recognizing and cleaving target binding sites preceded by A, C or G. More importantly, the optimized TALENs efficiently cleaved a target sequence within the human β-globin (HBB) gene associated with sickle cell disease and increased the efficiency of targeted gene repair by >1000-fold in human cells. In addition, these TALENs showed no detectable cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate the potential of optimized TALENs as a powerful genome editing tool for therapeutic applications.

  6. Targeted Mutagenesis in Plant Cells through Transformation of Sequence-Specific Nuclease mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Thomas J.; Clasen, Benjamin M.; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Demorest, Zachary L.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Zhang, Feng; Luo, Song

    2016-01-01

    Plant genome engineering using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) promises to advance basic and applied plant research by enabling precise modification of endogenous genes. Whereas DNA is an effective means for delivering SSNs, DNA can integrate randomly into the plant genome, leading to unintentional gene inactivation. Further, prolonged expression of SSNs from DNA constructs can lead to the accumulation of off-target mutations. Here, we tested a new approach for SSN delivery to plant cells, namely transformation of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding TAL effector nucleases (TALENs). mRNA delivery of a TALEN pair targeting the Nicotiana benthamiana ALS gene resulted in mutation frequencies of approximately 6% in comparison to DNA delivery, which resulted in mutation frequencies of 70.5%. mRNA delivery resulted in three-fold fewer insertions, and 76% were <10bp; in contrast, 88% of insertions generated through DNA delivery were >10bp. In an effort to increase mutation frequencies using mRNA, we fused several different 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions (UTRs) from Arabidopsis thaliana genes to the TALEN coding sequence. UTRs from an A. thaliana adenine nucleotide α hydrolases-like gene (At1G09740) enhanced mutation frequencies approximately two-fold, relative to a no-UTR control. These results indicate that mRNA can be used as a delivery vehicle for SSNs, and that manipulation of mRNA UTRs can influence efficiencies of genome editing. PMID:27176769

  7. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing. PMID:24770325

  8. Highly efficient targeted mutagenesis in axolotl using Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease.

    PubMed

    Flowers, G Parker; Timberlake, Andrew T; McLean, Kaitlin C; Monaghan, James R; Crews, Craig M

    2014-05-01

    Among tetrapods, only urodele salamanders, such as the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum, can completely regenerate limbs as adults. The mystery of why salamanders, but not other animals, possess this ability has for generations captivated scientists seeking to induce this phenomenon in other vertebrates. Although many recent advances in molecular biology have allowed limb regeneration and tissue repair in the axolotl to be investigated in increasing detail, the molecular toolkit for the study of this process has been limited. Here, we report that the CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease system can efficiently create mutations at targeted sites within the axolotl genome. We identify individual animals treated with RNA-guided nucleases that have mutation frequencies close to 100% at targeted sites. We employ this technique to completely functionally ablate EGFP expression in transgenic animals and recapitulate developmental phenotypes produced by loss of the conserved gene brachyury. Thus, this advance allows a reverse genetic approach in the axolotl and will undoubtedly provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms of salamanders' unique regenerative ability. PMID:24764077

  9. Extracellular nucleases and extracellular DNA play important roles in Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Seper, Andrea; Fengler, Vera H I; Roier, Sandro; Wolinski, Heimo; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Bishop, Anne L; Camilli, Andrew; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are a preferred mode of survival for many microorganisms including Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe secretory diarrhoeal disease cholera. The ability of the facultative human pathogen V. cholerae to form biofilms is a key factor for persistence in aquatic ecosystems and biofilms act as a source for new outbreaks. Thus, a better understanding of biofilm formation and transmission of V. cholerae is an important target to control the disease. So far the Vibrio exopolysaccharide was the only known constituent of the biofilm matrix. In this study we identify and characterize extracellular DNA as a component of the Vibrio biofilm matrix. Furthermore, we show that extracellular DNA is modulated and controlled by the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. Our results indicate that extracellular DNA and the extracellular nucleases are involved in diverse processes including the development of a typical biofilm architecture, nutrient acquisition, detachment from biofilms and the colonization fitness of biofilm clumps after ingestion by the host. This study provides new insights into biofilm development and transmission of biofilm-derived V. cholerae. PMID:22032623

  10. Nuclear degraded sperm subpopulation is affected by poor chromatin compaction and nuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; García-Peiró, A; Martínez-Heredia, J; Fernández-Encinas, A; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2015-04-01

    There is an interest in the nuclear degraded sperm subpopulation because, although it is present in a low percentage in all semen samples, patient groups such as varicocele and rearranged genome carriers show high levels of these degraded spermatozoa. This study is designed with two objectives in mind: first, incubations of H2 O2 and nuclease on DTT-treated and untreated samples to show the aetiology of this subpopulation and second, assessment of the correlation between the protamine ratio and nuclear degraded spermatozoa. A very high increase in the nuclear degraded subpopulation has been found with nuclease incubation, and it is even higher when it has been merged with nuclear decompaction using DTT. Alternatively, incubation with H2 O2 with and without DTT did not show such a significant increase in nuclear degraded spermatozoa. The protamine ratio correlated with this subpopulation, showing, in patients, that poor nuclear compaction would turn the sperm susceptible to degradation. Then, the assessment of nuclear degraded spermatozoa might not be only a measure of DNA degradation but also an indicator of chromatin compaction in the spermatozoa. Different patient groups would fit this model for sperm nuclear degradation, such as varicocele patients, who show a high percentage of immature spermatozoa and nuclear degraded spermatozoa, and reorganised genome carriers, where reorganisation might also cause poor chromatin compaction on the sperm nucleus.

  11. Mung Bean Nuclease Treatment Increases Capture Specificity of Microdroplet-PCR Based Targeted DNA Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenming; Cao, Kajia; Tischler, Tanya; Stolle, Catherine A.; Santani, Avni B.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted DNA enrichment coupled with next generation sequencing has been increasingly used for interrogation of select sub-genomic regions at high depth of coverage in a cost effective manner. Specificity measured by on-target efficiency is a key performance metric for target enrichment. Non-specific capture leads to off-target reads, resulting in waste of sequencing throughput on irrelevant regions. Microdroplet-PCR allows simultaneous amplification of up to thousands of regions in the genome and is among the most commonly used strategies for target enrichment. Here we show that carryover of single-stranded template genomic DNA from microdroplet-PCR constitutes a major contributing factor for off-target reads in the resultant libraries. Moreover, treatment of microdroplet-PCR enrichment products with a nuclease specific to single-stranded DNA alleviates off-target load and improves enrichment specificity. We propose that nuclease treatment of enrichment products should be incorporated in the workflow of targeted sequencing using microdroplet-PCR for target capture. These findings may have a broad impact on other PCR based applications for which removal of template DNA is beneficial. PMID:25058678

  12. Nucleases in higher plants and their possible involvement in DNA degradation during leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Wataru; Takami, Tsuneaki

    2014-07-01

    During leaf senescence, macromolecules such as proteins and lipids are known to be degraded for redistribution into upper tissues. Similarly, nucleic acids appear to undergo fragmentation or degradation during senescence, but the physiological role of nucleic acid degradation, particularly of genomic DNA degradation, remains unclear. To date, more than a dozen of plant deoxyribonucleases have been reported, whereas it remains to be verified whether any of them degrade DNA during leaf senescence. This review summarizes current knowledge related to the plant nucleases that are induced developmentally or in a tissue-specific manner and are known to degrade DNA biochemically. Of these, several endonucleases (BFN1, CAN1, and CAN2) and an exonuclease (DPD1) in Arabidopsis seem to act in leaf senescence because they were shown to be inducible at the transcript level. This review specifically examines DPD1, which is dual-targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria. Results show that, among the exonuclease family to which DPD1 belongs, DPD1 expression is extraordinary when estimated using a microarray database. DPD1 is the only example among the nucleases in which DNA degradation has been confirmed in vivo in pollen by mutant analysis. These data imply a significant role of organelle DNA degradation during leaf senescence and implicate DPD1 as a potential target for deciphering nucleotide salvage in plants.

  13. Genetics and complementation of Haemophilus influenzae mutants deficient in adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; Small, G D; Setlow, J K; Shapanka, R

    1976-01-01

    Eight different mutations in Haemophilus influenzae leading to deficiency in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent nuclease have been investigated in strains in which the mutations of the originally mutagenized strains have been transferred into the wild type. Sensitivity to mitomycin C and deoxycholate and complementation between extracts and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-dependent ATPase activity have been measured. Genetic crosses have provided information on the relative position of the mutations on the genome. There are three complementation groups, corresponding to three genetic groups. The strains most sensitive to mitomycin and deoxycholate, derived from mutants originally selected on the basis of sensitivity to mitomycin C or methyl methanesulfonate, are in one group. Apparently all these sensitive strains lack DNA-dependent ATPase activity, as does a strain intermediate in sensitivity to deoxycholate, which is the sole representative of another group. There are four strains that are relatively resistant to deoxycholate and mitomycin C, and all of these contain the ATPase activity. Three of these are in the same genetic and complementation group, whereas the other incongruously belongs in the same group as the sensitive strains. It is postulated that there are three cistrons in H. influenzae that code for the three known subunits of the ATP-dependent nuclease. PMID:177397

  14. Leishmania infantum EndoG is an endo/exo-nuclease essential for parasite survival.

    PubMed

    Rico, Eva; Oliva, Cristina; Gutierrez, Kilian Jesús; Alzate, Juan Fernando; Genes, Carlos Mario; Moreno, David; Casanova, Elena; Gigante, Alba; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Camarasa, María-José; Clos, Joachim; Gago, Federico; Jiménez-Ruiz, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    EndoG, a member of the DNA/RNA non-specific ββα-metal family of nucleases, has been demonstrated to be present in many organisms, including Trypanosomatids. This nuclease participates in the apoptotic program in these parasites by migrating from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, where it takes part in the degradation of genomic DNA that characterizes this process. We now demonstrate that Leishmania infantum EndoG (LiEndoG) is an endo-exonuclease that has a preferential 5' exonuclease activity on linear DNA. Regardless of its role during apoptotic cell death, this enzyme seems to be necessary during normal development of the parasites as indicated by the reduced growth rates observed in LiEndoG hemi-knockouts and their poor infectivity in differentiated THP-1 cells. The pro-life role of this protein is also corroborated by the higher survival rates of parasites that over-express this protein after treatment with the LiEndoG inhibitor Lei49. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this enzyme plays essential roles in both survival and death of Leishmania parasites.

  15. Leishmania infantum EndoG Is an Endo/Exo-Nuclease Essential for Parasite Survival

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Kilian Jesús; Alzate, Juan Fernando; Genes, Carlos Mario; Moreno, David; Casanova, Elena; Gigante, Alba; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Camarasa, María-José; Clos, Joachim; Gago, Federico; Jiménez-Ruiz, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    EndoG, a member of the DNA/RNA non-specific ββα-metal family of nucleases, has been demonstrated to be present in many organisms, including Trypanosomatids. This nuclease participates in the apoptotic program in these parasites by migrating from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, where it takes part in the degradation of genomic DNA that characterizes this process. We now demonstrate that Leishmania infantum EndoG (LiEndoG) is an endo-exonuclease that has a preferential 5′ exonuclease activity on linear DNA. Regardless of its role during apoptotic cell death, this enzyme seems to be necessary during normal development of the parasites as indicated by the reduced growth rates observed in LiEndoG hemi-knockouts and their poor infectivity in differentiated THP-1 cells. The pro-life role of this protein is also corroborated by the higher survival rates of parasites that over-express this protein after treatment with the LiEndoG inhibitor Lei49. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this enzyme plays essential roles in both survival and death of Leishmania parasites. PMID:24651293

  16. [Effect of Mutations in Extracellular Nuclease on the Characteristics of the Pigmented and Nonpigmented Serratia marcescens Strains].

    PubMed

    Nizamutdinova, E Kh; Shirshikova, T V; Mardanova, A M; Sharipova, M R; Bogomol'naya, L M

    2016-01-01

    Comparative characterization of the pigmented and nonpigmented Serratia marcescens strains and their extracellular nuclease mutants was carried out. Biomass accumulation by the mutant strains decreased on average by 20%, while proteolytic activity of the culture liquid was 4-5 times lower than in the case of the wild type strains. The mutants with impaired extracellular nuclease genes exhibited higher sensitivity to reactive oxygen species. Comparative analysis of motility of the strains revealed the highest flagellar activity in the wild type nonpigmented strain, while the cells of its mutant completely lost this feature.

  17. Periplasmic Domains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PilN and PilO Form a Stable Heterodimeric Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sampaleanu, L.M.; Bonanno, J.B.; Ayers, M.; Koo, J.; Tammam, S.; Burley, S.K.; Almo, S.C.; Burrows, L.L.; Howell, P.L.

    2010-01-12

    Type IV pili (T4P) are bacterial virulence factors responsible for attachment to surfaces and for twitching motility, a motion that involves a succession of pilus extension and retraction cycles. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the PilM/N/O/P proteins are essential for T4P biogenesis, and genetic and biochemical analyses strongly suggest that they form an inner-membrane complex. Here, we show through co-expression and biochemical analysis that the periplasmic domains of PilN and PilO interact to form a heterodimer. The structure of residues 69-201 of the periplasmic domain of PilO was determined to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution and reveals the presence of a homodimer in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer consists of two N-terminal coiled coils and a C-terminal ferredoxin-like domain. This structure was used to generate homology models of PilN and the PilN/O heterodimer. Our structural analysis suggests that in vivo PilN/O heterodimerization would require changes in the orientation of the first N-terminal coiled coil, which leads to two alternative models for the role of the transmembrane domains in the PilN/O interaction. Analysis of PilN/O orthologues in the type II secretion system EpsL/M revealed significant similarities in their secondary structures and the tertiary structures of PilO and EpsM, although the way these proteins interact to form inner-membrane complexes appears to be different in T4P and type II secretion. Our analysis suggests that PilN interacts directly, via its N-terminal tail, with the cytoplasmic protein PilM. This work shows a direct interaction between the periplasmic domains of PilN and PilO, with PilO playing a key role in the proper folding of PilN. Our results suggest that PilN/O heterodimers form the foundation of the inner-membrane PilM/N/O/P complex, which is critical for the assembly of a functional T4P complex.

  18. Motor Rotation Is Essential for the Formation of the Periplasmic Flagellar Ribbon, Cellular Morphology, and Borrelia burgdorferi Persistence within Ixodes scapularis Tick and Murine Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Syed Z.; Sekar, Padmapriya; Zhao, Xiaowei; Manne, Akarsh; Liu, Jun; Wooten, R. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi must migrate within and between its arthropod and mammalian hosts in order to complete its natural enzootic cycle. During tick feeding, the spirochete transmits from the tick to the host dermis, eventually colonizing and persisting within multiple, distant tissues. This dissemination modality suggests that flagellar motor rotation and, by extension, motility are crucial for infection. We recently reported that a nonmotile flaB mutant that lacks periplasmic flagella is rod shaped and unable to infect mice by needle or tick bite. However, those studies could not differentiate whether motor rotation or merely the possession of the periplasmic flagella was crucial for cellular morphology and host persistence. Here, we constructed and characterized a motB mutant that is nonmotile but retains its periplasmic flagella. Even though ΔmotB bacteria assembled flagella, part of the mutant cell is rod shaped. Cryoelectron tomography revealed that the flagellar ribbons are distorted in the mutant cells, indicating that motor rotation is essential for spirochetal flat-wave morphology. The ΔmotB cells are unable to infect mice, survive in the vector, or migrate out of the tick. Coinfection studies determined that the presence of these nonmotile ΔmotB cells has no effect on the clearance of wild-type spirochetes during murine infection and vice versa. Together, our data demonstrate that while flagellar motor rotation is necessary for spirochetal morphology and motility, the periplasmic flagella display no additional properties related to immune clearance and persistence within relevant hosts. PMID:25690096

  19. Fatty acid hydration activity of a recombinant Escherichia coli-based biocatalyst is improved through targeting the oleate hydratase into the periplasm.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sang-Min; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Hoo; Park, Jin-Byung; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Whole-cell biotransformation of fatty acids can be influenced by the activities of catalytic enzymes and by the efficiency of substrate transport into host cells. Here, we improved fatty acid hydration activity of the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing an oleate hydratase of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia by targeting the catalytic enzyme into the periplasm instead of the cytoplasm. Recombinant E. coli producing OhyA in the periplasm under guidance of the PelB signal sequence (E. coli OhyA_PP) exhibited significantly greater hydration activity with oleic acid and linoleic acid compared to a recombinant E. coli producing OhyA in the cytoplasm (E. coli OhyA_CS). For example, the oleate double bond hydration rate of E. coli OhyA_PP was >400 μmol/g dry cells/min (400 U/g dry cells), which is >10-fold higher than that of E. coli OhyA_CS. As the specific activities of the enzymes targeted into the cytoplasm and periplasm were comparable, we assumed that targeting OhyA into the periplasm could accelerate fatty acid transport to the catalytic enzymes by skipping the major mass transport barrier of the cytoplasmic membrane. Our results will contribute to the development of whole-cell biocatalysts for fatty acid biotransformation.

  20. Biochemical and functional characterization of the periplasmic domain of the outer membrane protein A from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiguang; Li, Qian; Fang, Yao; Yu, Shu; Tang, Bin; Na, Li; Yu, Bo; Zou, Quanming; Mao, Xuhu; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) plays multiple roles in the physiology and pathogenesis of the zoonotic pathogen enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). The N-terminus of OmpA forms a transmembrane domain (OmpA™), and the roles of this domain in bacterial pathogenesis have been well studied. However, how its C-terminal domain (OmpAper), which is located at the periplasmic space in the bacterial membrane, contributes to virulence remains unclear. Herein, we report that OmpAper forms a dimer and binds to peptidoglycan in vitro. Furthermore, OmpAper is responsible for bacterial resistance to acidic conditions, high osmotic pressure and high SDS environments. In addition, OmpAper contributes to the adhesion of bacteria to HeLa cells in vitro and ex vivo. These results provide an additional understanding of the role of OmpA in EHEC physiology and pathogenesis.

  1. The periplasmic sensing domain of Vibrio fischeri chemoreceptor protein A (VfcA): cloning, purification and crystallographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Salah Ud-Din, Abu Iftiaf Md; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Flagella-mediated motility and chemotaxis towards nutrients are important characteristics of Vibrio fischeri that play a crucial role in the development of its symbiotic relationship with its Hawaiian squid host Euprymna scolopes. The V. fischeri chemoreceptor A (VfcA) mediates chemotaxis toward amino acids. The periplasmic sensory domain of VfcA has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitating agent. The crystals belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.9, b = 57.0, c = 117.0 Å, α = 88.9, β = 80.5, γ = 89.7°. A complete X-ray diffraction data set has been collected to 1.8 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. PMID:27139830

  2. The C. elegans apoptotic nuclease NUC-1 is related in sequence and activity to mammalian DNase II.

    PubMed

    Lyon, C J; Evans, C J; Bill, B R; Otsuka, A J; Aguilera, R J

    2000-07-11

    The Caenorhabditis elegans nuc-1 gene has previously been implicated in programmed cell death due to the presence of persistent undegraded apoptotic DNA in nuc-1 mutant animals. In this report, we describe the cloning and characterization of nuc-1, which encodes an acidic nuclease with significant sequence similarity to mammalian DNase II. Database searches performed with human DNase II protein sequence revealed a significant similarity with the predicted C. elegans C07B5.5 ORF. Subsequent analysis of crude C. elegans protein extracts revealed that wild-type animals contained a potent endonuclease activity with a cleavage preference similar to DNase II, while nuc-1 mutant worms demonstrated a marked reduction in this nuclease activity. Sequence analysis of C07B5.5 DNA and mRNA also revealed that nuc-1(e1392), but not wild-type animals contained a nonsense mutation within the CO7B5.5 coding region. Furthermore, nuc-1 transgenic lines carrying the wild-type C07B5.5 locus demonstrated a complete complementation of the nuc-1 mutant phenotype. Our results therefore provide compelling evidence that the C07B5.5 gene encodes the NUC-1 apoptotic nuclease and that this nuclease is related in sequence and activity to DNase II.

  3. Metazoan Maelstrom is an RNA-binding protein that has evolved from an ancient nuclease active in protists

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Ming; Campbell, Edgar; Pandey, Radha Raman; Yang, Zhaolin; McCarthy, Andrew A.; Pillai, Ramesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) guide Piwi argonautes to their transposon targets for silencing. The highly conserved protein Maelstrom is linked to both piRNA biogenesis and effector roles in this pathway. One defining feature of Maelstrom is the predicted MAEL domain of unknown molecular function. Here, we present the first crystal structure of the MAEL domain from Bombyx Maelstrom, which reveals a nuclease fold. The overall architecture resembles that found in Mg2+- or Mn2+-dependent DEDD nucleases, but a clear distinguishing feature is the presence of a structural Zn2+ ion coordinated by the conserved ECHC residues. Strikingly, metazoan Maelstrom orthologs across the animal kingdom lack the catalytic DEDD residues, and as we show for Bombyx Maelstrom are inactive as nucleases. However, a MAEL domain-containing protein from amoeba having both sequence motifs (DEDD and ECHC) is robustly active as an exoribonuclease. Finally, we show that the MAEL domain of Bombyx Maelstrom displays a strong affinity for single-stranded RNAs. Our studies suggest that the ancient MAEL nuclease domain evolved to function as an RNA-binding module in metazoan Maelstrom. PMID:25778731

  4. Cell wall-anchored nuclease of Streptococcus sanguinis contributes to escape from neutrophil extracellular trap-mediated bacteriocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Morita, Chisato; Sumioka, Ryuichi; Nakata, Masanobu; Okahashi, Nobuo; Wada, Satoshi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Hayashi, Mikako; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a member of the commensal mitis group of streptococci, is a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, and has been implicated in infectious complications including bacteremia and infective endocarditis. During disease progression, S. sanguinis may utilize various cell surface molecules to evade the host immune system to survive in blood. In the present study, we discovered a novel cell surface nuclease with a cell-wall anchor domain, termed SWAN (streptococcal wall-anchored nuclease), and investigated its contribution to bacterial resistance against the bacteriocidal activity of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recombinant SWAN protein (rSWAN) digested multiple forms of DNA including NET DNA and human RNA, which required both Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) for optimum activity. Furthermore, DNase activity of S. sanguinis was detected around growing colonies on agar plates containing DNA. In-frame deletion of the swan gene mostly reduced that activity. These findings indicated that SWAN is a major nuclease displayed on the surface, which was further confirmed by immuno-detection of SWAN in the cell wall fraction. The sensitivity of S. sanguinis to NET killing was reduced by swan gene deletion. Moreover, heterologous expression of the swan gene rendered a Lactococcus lactis strain more resistant to NET killing. Our results suggest that the SWAN nuclease on the bacterial surface contributes to survival in the potential situation of S. sanguinis encountering NETs during the course of disease progression. PMID:25084357

  5. Metazoan Maelstrom is an RNA-binding protein that has evolved from an ancient nuclease active in protists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Ming; Campbell, Edgar; Pandey, Radha Raman; Yang, Zhaolin; McCarthy, Andrew A; Pillai, Ramesh S

    2015-05-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) guide Piwi argonautes to their transposon targets for silencing. The highly conserved protein Maelstrom is linked to both piRNA biogenesis and effector roles in this pathway. One defining feature of Maelstrom is the predicted MAEL domain of unknown molecular function. Here, we present the first crystal structure of the MAEL domain from Bombyx Maelstrom, which reveals a nuclease fold. The overall architecture resembles that found in Mg(2+)- or Mn(2+)-dependent DEDD nucleases, but a clear distinguishing feature is the presence of a structural Zn(2+) ion coordinated by the conserved ECHC residues. Strikingly, metazoan Maelstrom orthologs across the animal kingdom lack the catalytic DEDD residues, and as we show for Bombyx Maelstrom are inactive as nucleases. However, a MAEL domain-containing protein from amoeba having both sequence motifs (DEDD and ECHC) is robustly active as an exoribonuclease. Finally, we show that the MAEL domain of Bombyx Maelstrom displays a strong affinity for single-stranded RNAs. Our studies suggest that the ancient MAEL nuclease domain evolved to function as an RNA-binding module in metazoan Maelstrom.

  6. Simultaneous detection of infectious human echoviruses and adenoviruses by an in situ nuclease-resistant molecular beacon-based assay.

    PubMed

    Dunams, Daniela; Sarkar, Payal; Chen, Wilfred; Yates, Marylynn V

    2012-03-01

    A multiplex methodology using two nuclease-resistant molecular beacons that target specific genomic regions of adenovirus 2 and echovirus 17 during simultaneous infection in A549 cells is presented. Using fluorescence microscopy, visualization of enteroviral and adenoviral replication was possible within 3 h postinfection.

  7. Biophysical and physiological characterization of ZraP from Escherichia coli, the periplasmic accessory protein of the atypical ZraSR two-component system.

    PubMed

    Petit-Härtlein, Isabelle; Rome, Kevin; de Rosny, Eve; Molton, Florian; Duboc, Carole; Gueguen, Erwan; Rodrigue, Agnès; Covès, Jacques

    2015-12-01

    The ZraSR system belongs to the family of TCSs (two-component signal transduction systems). In Escherichia coli, it was proposed to participate in zinc balance and to protect cytoplasmic zinc overload by sequestering this metal ion into the periplasm. This system controls the expression of the accessory protein ZraP that would be a periplasmic zinc scavenger. ZraPSR is functionally homologous with CpxPAR that integrates signals of envelope perturbation, including misfolded periplasmic proteins. The auxiliary periplasmic regulator CpxP inhibits the Cpx pathway by interacting with CpxA. Upon envelope stress sensing, the inhibitory function of CpxP is relieved, resulting in CpxR activation. Similarly to CpxPAR, ZraPSR probably plays a role in envelope stress response as a zinc-dependent chaperone activity was demonstrated for ZraP in Salmonella. We have purified ZraP from E. coli and shown that it is an octamer containing four interfacial metal-binding sites contributing to dimer stability. These sites are located close to the N-terminus, whereas the C-terminus is involved in polymerization of the protein to form a tetramer of dimers. In vitro, ZraP binds copper with a higher affinity than zinc and displays chaperone properties partially dependent on zinc binding. In vivo, zinc-bound ZraP is a repressor of the expression of the zraPSR operon. However, we have demonstrated that none of the Zra proteins are involved in zinc or copper resistance. We propose an integrated mechanism in which zinc is a marker of envelope stress perturbation and ZraPSR TCS is a sentinel sensing and responding to zinc entry into the periplasm.

  8. Involvement of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Galacturonate Tripartite ATP-Independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporter GaaPQM in Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinlei

    2015-01-01

    Monosaccharides capable of serving as nutrients for the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens are also inducers of the vir regulon present in the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid of this plant pathogen. One such monosaccharide is galacturonate, the predominant monomer of pectin found in plant cell walls. This ligand is recognized by the periplasmic sugar binding protein ChvE, which interacts with the VirA histidine kinase that controls vir gene expression. Although ChvE is also a member of the ChvE-MmsAB ABC transporter involved in the utilization of many neutral sugars, it is not involved in galacturonate utilization. In this study, a putative tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporter, GaaPQM, is shown to be essential for the utilization of galacturonic acid; we show that residue R169 in the predicted sugar binding site of the GaaP is required for activity. The gene upstream of gaaPQM (gaaR) encodes a member of the GntR family of regulators. GaaR is shown to repress the expression of gaaPQM, and the repression is relieved in the presence of the substrate for GaaPQM. Moreover, GaaR is shown to bind putative promoter regions in the sequences required for galacturonic acid utilization. Finally, A. tumefaciens strains carrying a deletion of gaaPQM are more sensitive to galacturonate as an inducer of vir gene expression, while the overexpression of gaaPQM results in strains being less sensitive to this vir inducer. This supports a model in which transporter activity is crucial in ensuring that vir gene expression occurs only at sites of high ligand concentration, such as those at a plant wound site. PMID:26637603

  9. Structural and Functional Significance of the FGL Sequence of the Periplasmic Chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, David A. G.; Zavialov, Anton V.; Chernovskaya, Tatiana V.; Karlyshev, Andrey V.; Zav’yalova, Galina A.; Vasiliev, Anatoly M.; Dudich, Igor V.; Abramov, Vyacheslav M.; Zav’yalov, Vladimir P.; MacIntyre, Sheila

    1999-01-01

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis is a typical representative of a subfamily of specific chaperones involved in assembly of surface adhesins with a very simple structure. One characteristic feature of this Caf1M-like subfamily is possession of an extended, variable sequence (termed FGL) between the F1 and subunit binding G1 β-strands. In contrast, FGS subfamily members, characterized by PapD, have a short F1-G1 loop and are involved in assembly of complex pili. To elucidate the structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence, a mutant Caf1M molecule (dCaf1M), in which the 27 amino acid residues between the F1 and G1 β-strands had been deleted, was constructed. Expression of the mutated caf1M in Escherichia coli resulted in accumulation of high levels of dCaf1M. The far-UV circular dichroism spectra of the mutant and wild-type proteins were indistinguishable and exhibited practically the same temperature and pH dependencies. Thus, the FGL sequence of Caf1M clearly does not contribute significantly to the stability of the protein conformation. Preferential cleavage of Caf1M by trypsin at Lys-119 confirmed surface exposure of this part of the FGL sequence in the isolated chaperone and periplasmic chaperone-subunit complex. There was no evidence of surface-localized Caf1 subunit in the presence of the Caf1A outer membrane protein and dCaf1M. In contrast to Caf1M, dCaf1M was not able to form a stable complex with Caf1 nor could it protect the subunit from proteolytic degradation in vivo. This demonstration that the FGL sequence is required for stable chaperone-subunit interaction, but not for folding of a stable chaperone, provides a sound basis for future detailed molecular analyses of the FGL subfamily of chaperones. PMID:10198004

  10. The Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase NapABC Supports Luminal Growth of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium during Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Christopher A.; Rivera-Chávez, Fabian; Byndloss, Mariana X.

    2015-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium benefits from acute inflammation in part by using host-derived nitrate to respire anaerobically and compete successfully with the commensal microbes during growth in the intestinal lumen. The S. Typhimurium genome contains three nitrate reductases, encoded by the narGHI, narZYV, and napABC genes. Work on homologous genes present in Escherichia coli suggests that nitrate reductase A, encoded by the narGHI genes, is the main enzyme promoting growth on nitrate as an electron acceptor in anaerobic environments. Using a mouse colitis model, we found, surprisingly, that S. Typhimurium strains with defects in either nitrate reductase A (narG mutant) or the regulator inducing its transcription in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (narL mutant) exhibited growth comparable to that of wild-type S. Typhimurium. In contrast, a strain lacking a functional periplasmic nitrate reductase (napA mutant) exhibited a marked growth defect in the lumen of the colon. In E. coli, the napABC genes are transcribed maximally under anaerobic growth conditions in the presence of low nitrate concentrations. Inactivation of narP, encoding a response regulator that activates napABC transcription in response to low nitrate concentrations, significantly reduced the growth of S. Typhimurium in the gut lumen. Cecal nitrate measurements suggested that the murine cecum is a nitrate-limited environment. Collectively, our results suggest that S. Typhimurium uses the periplasmic nitrate reductase to support its growth on the low nitrate concentrations encountered in the gut, a strategy that may be shared with other enteric pathogens. PMID:26099579

  11. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Christian; Sherman, William; Pallis, Jani; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable tools to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger. PMID:24808958

  12. Genome-Wide Probing of RNA Structures In Vitro Using Nucleases and Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yue; Qu, Kun; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    RNA structure probing is an important technique that studies the secondary and tertiary conformations of an RNA. While it was traditionally performed on one RNA at a time, recent advances in deep sequencing has enabled the secondary structure mapping of thousands of RNAs simultaneously. Here, we describe the method Parallel Analysis for RNA Structures (PARS), which couples double and single strand specific nuclease probing to high throughput sequencing. Upon cloning of the cleavage sites into a cDNA library, deep sequencing and mapping of reads to the transcriptome, the position of paired and unpaired bases along cellular RNAs can be identified. PARS can be performed under diverse solution conditions and on different organismal RNAs to provide genome-wide RNA structural information. This information can also be further used to constrain computational predictions to provide better RNA structure models under different conditions. PMID:26483021

  13. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    DOE PAGES

    Bach, Christian; Sherman, William; Pallis, Jani; Patra, Prabir; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable toolsmore » to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger.« less

  14. Functional identification of the non-specific nuclease from white spot syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Lin Shumei; Yanga Feng . E-mail: mbiotech@public.xm.fj.cn

    2005-07-05

    The product encoded by the wsv191 gene from shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is homologous with non-specific nucleases (NSN) of other organisms. To functionally identify the protein, the wsv191 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein with 6His-tag at C-terminal. The fusion protein (termed as rWSSV-NSN) was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography under denatured conditions, renatured and characterized by three methods. The results showed that rWSSV-NSN could hydrolyze both DNA and RNA. 5'-RACE result revealed that the transcription initiation site of the wsv191 gene was located at nucleotide residue G of the predicted ATG triplet. Therefore, we concluded that the next ATG should be the genuine translation initiation codon of the wsv191 gene. Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular mass of natural WSSV-NSN was 37 kDa.

  15. A nuclease-hypersensitive region forms de novo after chromosome replication.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M J; Varshavsky, A

    1987-10-01

    Regular nucleosome arrays in eucaryotic chromosomes are punctuated at specific locations, such as active promoters and replication origins, by apparently nucleosome-free sites, also called nuclease-hypersensitive, or exposed, regions. The -400-base pair-exposed region within simian virus 40 (SV40) chromosomes is present in approximately 20% of the chromosomes in lytically infected cells and encompasses the replication origin, transcriptional enhancer, and both late and early SV40 promoters. We report that nearly all SV40 chromosomes lacked the exposed region during replication and that newly formed chromosomes acquired the exposed region of the same degree as did bulk SV40 chromosomes within 1 h after replication. Furthermore, a much lower but significant level of exposure was detectable in late SV40 replication intermediates, indicating that formation of the exposed region could start within minutes after passage of the replication fork. PMID:2824998

  16. Function of the N-terminal segment of the RecA-dependent nuclease Ref.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Angela J; Olsen, Tayla M; Dvorak, Rachel H; Cox, Michael M

    2015-02-18

    The bacteriophage P1 Ref (recombination enhancement function) protein is a RecA-dependent, HNH endonuclease. It can be directed to create targeted double-strand breaks within a displacement loop formed by RecA. The 76 amino acid N-terminal region of Ref is positively charged (25/76 amino acid residues) and inherently unstructured in solution. Our investigation of N-terminal truncation variants shows this region is required for DNA binding, contains a Cys involved in incidental dimerization and is necessary for efficient Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Specifically, Ref N-terminal truncation variants lacking between 21 and 47 amino acids are more effective RecA-mediated targeting nucleases. We propose a more refined set of options for the Ref-mediated cleavage mechanism, featuring the N-terminal region as an anchor for at least one of the DNA strand cleavage events.

  17. Knockout of Myostatin by Zinc-finger Nuclease in Sheep Fibroblasts and Embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Liqin; Wu, Yangsheng; Li, Wenrong; An, Jing; Zhang, Fuchun; Liu, Mingjun

    2016-10-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) can negatively regulate the growth and development of skeletal muscle, and natural mutations can cause "double-muscling" trait in animals. In order to block the inhibiting effect of MSTN on muscle growth, we transferred zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN) which targeted sheep MSTN gene into cultured fibroblasts. Gene targeted colonies were isolated from transfected fibroblasts by serial dilution culture and screened by sequencing. Two colonies were identified with mono-allele mutation and one colony with bi-allelic deletion. Further, we introduced the MSTN-ZFN mRNA into sheep embryos by microinjection. Thirteen of thirty-seven parthenogenetic embryos were targeted by ZFN, with the efficiency of 35%. Our work established the technical foundation for generation of MSTN gene editing sheep by somatic cloning and microinjection ZFN into embryos. PMID:27189642

  18. Site-specific genome editing in Plasmodium falciparum using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Straimer, Judith; Lee, Marcus C S; Lee, Andrew H; Zeitler, Bryan; Williams, April E; Pearl, Jocelynn R; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Llinás, Manuel; Urnov, Fyodor D; Fidock, David A

    2012-10-01

    Malaria afflicts over 200 million people worldwide, and its most lethal etiologic agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is evolving to resist even the latest-generation therapeutics. Efficient tools for genome-directed investigations of P. falciparum-induced pathogenesis, including drug-resistance mechanisms, are clearly required. Here we report rapid and targeted genetic engineering of this parasite using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that produce a double-strand break in a user-defined locus and trigger homology-directed repair. Targeting an integrated egfp locus, we obtained gene-deletion parasites with unprecedented speed (2 weeks), both with and without direct selection. ZFNs engineered against the parasite gene pfcrt, responsible for escape under chloroquine treatment, rapidly produced parasites that carried either an allelic replacement or a panel of specified point mutations. This method will enable a diverse array of genome-editing approaches to interrogate this human pathogen.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus, thermostable nuclease and staphylococcal enterotoxins in raw ewes' milk Manchego cheese.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, M; Bautista, L; Medina, M; Gaya, P

    1988-07-01

    Growth and survival of two enterotoxigenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus were studied during manufacture and ripening of eight batches of raw ewes' milk Manchego cheese. Only 2-3 generations of Staph. aureus occurred in the vat and during pressing. The death rate of Staph. aureus (mean decrease in log cfu/g/week of ripening) from day 1 to day 60 was 0.421 in cheese made with 1% Streptococcus lactis starter and 0.404 in cheese made without starter. Thermostable nuclease was produced in the vat by growing Staph. aureus cells; it was inactivated by rennet during the first 24 h and synthesized again by surviving cells of Staph. aureus from day 1 to day 60. Staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B, C and D were not detected in any batches of cheese, even though Staph. aureus counts exceeded 10(7) cfu/g. PMID:3209513

  20. DNA sensor's selectivity enhancement and protection from contaminating nucleases due to a hydrated ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Pramanik, Smritimoy; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2015-07-01

    The thermodynamic stability of certain mismatched base pairs has made the development of DNA sequence sensing systems challenging. Thus, the stability of fully matched and mismatched DNA oligonucleotides in the hydrated ionic liquid choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) was investigated. Mismatched base pairs were significantly destabilized in choline dhp relative to those in aqueous buffer. A molecular beacon that forms a triplex with a conserved HIV-1 sequence was then designed and tested in choline dhp. The molecular beacon specifically detected the target duplex via triplex formation at concentrations as low as 1 pmol per 10 μL with 10,000-fold sequence selectivity. Moreover, the molecular beacon was protected from a contaminating nuclease in choline dhp, and DNAs in aqueous solutions were not sufficiently stable for practical use.

  1. Site-directed nucleases: a paradigm shift in predictable, knowledge-based plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Podevin, Nancy; Davies, Howard V; Hartung, Frank; Nogué, Fabien; Casacuberta, Josep M

    2013-06-01

    Conventional plant breeding exploits existing genetic variability and introduces new variability by mutagenesis. This has proven highly successful in securing food supplies for an ever-growing human population. The use of genetically modified plants is a complementary approach but all plant breeding techniques have limitations. Here, we discuss how the recent evolution of targeted mutagenesis and DNA insertion techniques based on tailor-made site-directed nucleases (SDNs) provides opportunities to overcome such limitations. Plant breeding companies are exploiting SDNs to develop a new generation of crops with new and improved traits. Nevertheless, some technical limitations as well as significant uncertainties on the regulatory status of SDNs may challenge their use for commercial plant breeding.

  2. Mm19, a Mycoplasma meleagridis Major Surface Nuclease that Is Related to the RE_AlwI Superfamily of Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Elhem; Ben Abdelmoumen Mardassi, Boutheina

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma meleagridis infection is widespread in turkeys, causing poor growth and feathering, airsacculitis, osteodystrophy, and reduction in hatchability. Like most mycoplasma species, M. meleagridis is characterized by its inability to synthesize purine and pyrimidine nucleotides de novo. Consistent with this intrinsic deficiency, we here report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a M. meleagridis gene sequence encoding a major surface nuclease, referred to as Mm19. Mm19 consists of a 1941- bp ORF encoding a 646-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 74,825 kDa. BLASTP analysis revealed a significant match with the catalytic/dimerization domain of type II restriction enzymes of the RE_AlwI superfamily. This finding is consistent with the genomic location of Mm19 sequence, which dispalys characteristics of a typical type II restriction-modification locus. Like intact M. meleagridis cells, the E. coli-expressed Mm19 fusion product was found to exhibit a nuclease activity against plasmid DNA, double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA. The Mm19-associated nuclease activity was consistently enhanced with Mg2+ divalent cations, a hallmark of type II restriction enzymes. A rabbit hyperimmune antiserum raised against the bacterially expressed Mm19 strongly reacted with M. meleagridis intact cells and fully neutralized the surface-bound nuclease activity. Collectively, the results show that M. meleagridis expresses a strong surface-bound nuclease activity, which is the product of a single gene sequence that is related to the RE_AlwI superfamily of endonucleases. PMID:27010566

  3. Rapid and highly efficient construction of TALE-based transcriptional regulators and nucleases for genome modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Lixin; Piatek, Marek J; Atef, Ahmed; Piatek, Agnieszka; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Sabir, J S M; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2012-03-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) can be used as DNA-targeting modules by engineering their repeat domains to dictate user-selected sequence specificity. TALEs have been shown to function as site-specific transcriptional activators in a variety of cell types and organisms. TALE nucleases (TALENs), generated by fusing the FokI cleavage domain to TALE, have been used to create genomic double-strand breaks. The identity of the TALE repeat variable di-residues, their number, and their order dictate the DNA sequence specificity. Because TALE repeats are nearly identical, their assembly by cloning or even by synthesis is challenging and time consuming. Here, we report the development and use of a rapid and straightforward approach for the construction of designer TALE (dTALE) activators and nucleases with user-selected DNA target specificity. Using our plasmid set of 100 repeat modules, researchers can assemble repeat domains for any 14-nucleotide target sequence in one sequential restriction-ligation cloning step and in only 24 h. We generated several custom dTALEs and dTALENs with new target sequence specificities and validated their function by transient expression in tobacco leaves and in vitro DNA cleavage assays, respectively. Moreover, we developed a web tool, called idTALE, to facilitate the design of dTALENs and the identification of their genomic targets and potential off-targets in the genomes of several model species. Our dTALE repeat assembly approach along with the web tool idTALE will expedite genome-engineering applications in a variety of cell types and organisms including plants.

  4. Knockout of exogenous EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masahito; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Matsunari, Hitomi; Takayanagi, Shuko; Haruyama, Erika; Nakano, Kazuaki; Fujiwara, Tsukasa; Ikezawa, Yuka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; and others

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} EGFP gene integrated in porcine somatic cells could be knocked out using the ZFN-KO system. {yields} ZFNs induced targeted mutations in porcine primary cultured cells. {yields} Complete absence of EGFP fluorescence was confirmed in ZFN-treated cells. -- Abstract: Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are expected as a powerful tool for generating gene knockouts in laboratory and domestic animals. Currently, it is unclear whether this technology can be utilized for knocking-out genes in pigs. Here, we investigated whether knockout (KO) events in which ZFNs recognize and cleave a target sequence occur in porcine primary cultured somatic cells that harbor the exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. ZFN-encoding mRNA designed to target the EGFP gene was introduced by electroporation into the cell. Using the Surveyor nuclease assay and flow cytometric analysis, we confirmed ZFN-induced cleavage of the target sequence and the disappearance of EGFP fluorescence expression in ZFN-treated cells. In addition, sequence analysis revealed that ZFN-induced mutations such as base substitution, deletion, or insertion were generated in the ZFN cleavage site of EGFP-expression negative cells that were cloned from ZFN-treated cells, thereby showing it was possible to disrupt (i.e., knock out) the function of the EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that the ZFN-KO system can be applied to pigs. These findings may open a new avenue to the creation of gene KO pigs using ZFN-treated cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  5. Conformational consequences of ionization of Lys, Asp, and Glu buried at position 66 in staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Karp, Daniel A; Stahley, Mary R; García-Moreno, Bertrand

    2010-05-18

    The pK(a) values measured previously for the internal Lys-66, Asp-66, and Glu-66 in variants of a highly stable form of staphylococcal nuclease are shifted by as many as 5 pK(a) units relative to normal pK(a) values in water. These shifts cannot be reproduced with continuum electrostatics calculations with static structures unless the protein is treated with high dielectric constants near 10. These high apparent dielectric constants are inconsistent with the highly hydrophobic microenvironments of the ionizable moieties in crystal structures. To examine the origins of these high apparent dielectric constants, we showed that the pK(a) values of these internal residues are sensitive to the global stability of the protein; the shifts tend to be smaller in less stable forms of nuclease. This implies that the apparent dielectric constants reported by these internal ionizable groups are high because they reflect conformational reorganization coupled to their ionization. To detect this directly, acid-base titrations monitored with Trp fluorescence and near-UV and far-UV CD spectroscopy were performed on variants with Lys-66, Glu-66, or Asp-66 in background proteins with different stabilities. Conformational reorganization coupled to the ionization of the internal groups was spectroscopically detectable, especially in the less stable background proteins. The data show that to improve the accuracy of structure-based pK(a) calculations of internal groups the calculations will have to treat explicitly all structural reorganization coupled to ionization. The data also suggest a novel approach to mapping the folding free energy landscape of proteins by using internal ionizable groups to stabilize partially unfolded states.

  6. Molecular insights into DNA interference by CRISPR-associated nuclease-helicase Cas3.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bei; Shin, Minsang; Sun, Jiali; Jung, Che-Hun; Bolt, Edward L; van der Oost, John; Kim, Jeong-Sun

    2014-11-18

    Mobile genetic elements in bacteria are neutralized by a system based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. Type I CRISPR-Cas systems use a "Cascade" ribonucleoprotein complex to guide RNA specifically to complementary sequence in invader double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), a process called "interference." After target recognition by Cascade, formation of an R-loop triggers recruitment of a Cas3 nuclease-helicase, completing the interference process by destroying the invader dsDNA. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of CRISPR interference, we analyzed crystal structures of Cas3 from the bacterium Thermobaculum terrenum, with and without a bound ATP analog. The structures reveal a histidine-aspartate (HD)-type nuclease domain fused to superfamily-2 (SF2) helicase domains and a distinct C-terminal domain. Binding of ATP analog at the interface of the SF2 helicase RecA-like domains rearranges a motif V with implications for the enzyme mechanism. The HD-nucleolytic site contains two metal ions that are positioned at the end of a proposed nucleic acid-binding tunnel running through the SF2 helicase structure. This structural alignment suggests a mechanism for 3' to 5' nucleolytic processing of the displaced strand of invader DNA that is coordinated with ATP-dependent 3' to 5' translocation of Cas3 along DNA. In agreement with biochemical studies, the presented Cas3 structures reveal important mechanistic details on the neutralization of genetic invaders by type I CRISPR-Cas systems.

  7. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-01

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  8. Formation of an Intramolecular Periplasmic Disulfide Bond in TcpP Protects TcpP and TcpH from Degradation in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Sarah J.; French, Emily L.; Thomson, Joshua J.; Seaborn, Craig P.; Shively, Christian A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT TcpP and ToxR coordinately regulate transcription of toxT, the master regulator of numerous virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae. TcpP and ToxR are membrane-localized transcription factors, each with a periplasmic domain containing two cysteines. In ToxR, these cysteines form an intramolecular disulfide bond and a cysteine-to-serine substitution affects activity. We determined that the two periplasmic cysteines of TcpP also form an intramolecular disulfide bond. Disruption of this intramolecular disulfide bond by mutation of either cysteine resulted in formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. Furthermore, disruption of the intramolecular disulfide bond in TcpP decreased the stability of TcpP. While the decreased stability of TcpP-C207S resulted in a nearly complete loss of toxT activation and cholera toxin (CT) production, the second cysteine mutant, TcpP-C218S, was partially resistant to proteolytic degradation and maintained ∼50% toxT activation capacity. TcpP-C218S was also TcpH independent, since deletion of tcpH did not affect the stability of TcpP-C218S, whereas wild-type TcpP was degraded in the absence of TcpH. Finally, TcpH was also unstable when intramolecular disulfides could not be formed in TcpP, suggesting that the single periplasmic cysteine in TcpH may assist with disulfide bond formation in TcpP by interacting with the periplasmic cysteines of TcpP. Consistent with this finding, a TcpH-C114S mutant was unable to stabilize TcpP and was itself unstable. Our findings demonstrate a periplasmic disulfide bond in TcpP is critical for TcpP stability and virulence gene expression. IMPORTANCE The Vibrio cholerae transcription factor TcpP, in conjunction with ToxR, regulates transcription of toxT, the master regulator of numerous virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae. TcpP is a membrane-localized transcription factor with a periplasmic domain containing two cysteines. We determined that the two periplasmic cysteines of TcpP form an

  9. Production of 5' Nucleotide by Using Halophilic Nuclease H Preferentially Adsorbed on Flocculated Cells of the Halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus.

    PubMed

    Onishi, H; Kamekura, M; Yokoi, H; Kobayashi, T

    1988-11-01

    A bioreactor with a column of flocculated cells of the moderate halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus which adsorbed the halophilic nuclease H was designed to be used in the production of 5' nucleotides from RNA. A remarkable characteristic of the flocculated cells was that they preferentially adsorbed much exogenous nuclease, excluding adsorbed 5' nucleotidase. Furthermore, desalting treatment of the flocculated cells in the presence of 2% MgSO(4) . 7H(2)O gave rise to selective inactivation of 5' nucleotidase without the loss of nuclease H activity, and 5'-guanylic acid was produced with the bioreactor.

  10. Production of 5′ Nucleotide by Using Halophilic Nuclease H Preferentially Adsorbed on Flocculated Cells of the Halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Kamekura, Masahiro; Yokoi, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Takekazu

    1988-01-01

    A bioreactor with a column of flocculated cells of the moderate halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus which adsorbed the halophilic nuclease H was designed to be used in the production of 5′ nucleotides from RNA. A remarkable characteristic of the flocculated cells was that they preferentially adsorbed much exogenous nuclease, excluding adsorbed 5′ nucleotidase. Furthermore, desalting treatment of the flocculated cells in the presence of 2% MgSO4 · 7H2O gave rise to selective inactivation of 5′ nucleotidase without the loss of nuclease H activity, and 5′-guanylic acid was produced with the bioreactor. PMID:16347767

  11. Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris Mutants Lacking Periplasmic Hydrogenases or the Type I Tetraheme Cytochrome c3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, M.; Ono, S.; Bosak, T.

    2012-12-01

    A large fraction of anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds relies on microbial sulfate reduction. Sulfur isotope fractionation by these microbes has been widely used to trace the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and carbon, but intracellular mechanisms behind the wide range of fractionations observed in nature and cultures are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the influence of electron transport chain components on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by culturing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (Tp1-c3). The mutants were grown both in batch and continuous cultures. All tested mutants grew on lactate or pyruvate as the sole carbon and energy sources, generating sulfide. Mutants lacking cytoplasmic and periplasmic hydrogenases exhibited similar growth physiologies and sulfur isotope fractionations to their parent strains. On the other hand, a mutant lacking Tp1-c3 (ΔcycA) fractionated the 34S/32S ratio more than the wild type, evolving H2 in the headspace and exhibiting a lower specific respiration rate. In the presence of high concentrations of pyruvate, the growth of ΔcycA relied largely on fermentation rather than sulfate reduction, even when sulfate was abundant, producing the largest sulfur isotope effect observed in this study. Differences between sulfur isotope fractionation by ΔcycA and the wild type highlight the effect of electron transfer chains on the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation. Because Tp1-c3 is known to exclusively shuttle electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases to transmembrane complexes, electron transfers in the absence of Tp1-c3 should bypass the periplasmic hydrogen cycling, and the loss of reducing equivalents in the form of H2 can impair the flow of electrons from organic acids to sulfur, increasing isotope fractionation. Larger fractionation by ΔcycA can inform interpretations of sulfur isotope data at an environmental scale as well

  12. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essential for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.

  13. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essentialmore » for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.« less

  14. Modification and periplasmic translocation of the biofilm exopolysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Li, Grace; Ing, Christopher; DiFrancesco, Benjamin R.; Bamford, Natalie C.; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Pomès, Régis; Howell, P. Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) is an exopolysaccharide produced by a wide variety of medically important bacteria. Polyglucosamine subunit B (PgaB) is responsible for the de–N-acetylation of PNAG, a process required for polymer export and biofilm formation. PgaB is located in the periplasm and likely bridges the inner membrane synthesis and outer membrane export machinery. Here, we present structural, functional, and molecular simulation data that suggest PgaB associates with PNAG continuously during periplasmic transport. We show that the association of PgaB’s N- and C-terminal domains forms a cleft required for the binding and de–N-acetylation of PNAG. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of PgaB show a binding preference for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to the N-terminal domain and glucosammonium to the C-terminal domain. Continuous ligand binding density is observed that extends around PgaB from the N-terminal domain active site to an electronegative groove on the C-terminal domain that would allow for a processive mechanism. PgaB’s C-terminal domain (PgaB310–672) directly binds PNAG oligomers with dissociation constants of ∼1–3 mM, and the structures of PgaB310–672 in complex with β-1,6-(GlcNAc)6, GlcNAc, and glucosamine reveal a unique binding mode suitable for interaction with de–N-acetylated PNAG (dPNAG). Furthermore, PgaB310–672 contains a β-hairpin loop (βHL) important for binding PNAG that was disordered in previous PgaB42–655 structures and is highly dynamic in the MD simulations. We propose that conformational changes in PgaB310–672 mediated by the βHL on binding of PNAG/dPNAG play an important role in the targeting of the polymer for export and its release. PMID:24994902

  15. NurA, a novel 5′–3′ nuclease gene linked to rad50 and mre11 homologs of thermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Constantinesco, Florence; Forterre, Patrick; Elie, Christiane

    2002-01-01

    We isolated and characterized a new nuclease (NurA) exhibiting both single-stranded endonuclease activity and 5′–3′ exonuclease activity on single-stranded and double-stranded DNA from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Nuclease homologs are detected in all thermophilic archaea and, in most species, the nurA gene is organized in an operon-like structure with rad50 and mre11 archaeal homologs. This nuclease might thus act in concert with Rad50 and Mre11 proteins in archaeal recombination/repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a 5′–3′ nuclease potentially associated with Rad50 and Mre11-like proteins that may lead to the processing of double-stranded breaks in 3′ single-stranded tails. PMID:12052775

  16. Different residues in periplasmic domains of the CcmC inner membrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 are critical for cytochrome c biogenesis and pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake.

    PubMed

    Gaballa, A; Baysse, C; Koedam, N; Muyldermans, S; Cornelis, P

    1998-11-01

    The inner membrane protein CcmC (CytA) of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC17400, which has homologues in several bacteria and plant mitochondria, is needed for the biogenesis of cytochrome c. A CcmC-deficient mutant is also compromised in the production and utilization of pyoverdine, the high-affinity fluorescent siderophore. A topological model for CcmC, based on the analysis of alkaline phosphatase fusions, predicts six membrane-spanning regions with three periplasmic loops. Site-directed mutagenesis was used in order to assess the importance of some periplasm-exposed residues, conserved in all CcmC homologues, for cytochrome c biogenesis, and pyoverdine production/utilization. Despite the conservation of the residues His-61, Val-62 and Pro-63 in the first periplasmic loop, and Leu-184, His-185 and Gln-186 in the third periplasmic loop, their simultaneous replacement with Ala only partially affected cytochrome c biogenesis and pyoverdine production/utilization. Simultaneous replacements of residues Trp-115 and Gly-116 in the second periplasmic loop substantially affected pyoverdine production/utilization but not cytochrome c production. An Ala substitution of Asp-127, in the second periplasmic loop, resulted in decreased production of cytochrome c, slower growth in conditions of anaerobiosis and reduced pyoverdine production. On the other hand, a mutation in Trp-126, also in the second periplasmic loop, totally suppressed the production of cytochrome c, whereas it had no effect on the production and utilization of pyoverdine. These results show a differential involvement of amino acid residues in periplasmic domains of CcmC in cytochrome c biogenesis and pyoverdine production/utilization. PMID:9822820

  17. Phosphate binding in the active centre of tomato multifunctional nuclease TBN1 and analysis of superhelix formation by the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Stránský, Jan; Koval', Tomáš; Podzimek, Tomáš; Týcová, Anna; Lipovová, Petra; Matoušek, Jaroslav; Kolenko, Petr; Fejfarová, Karla; Dušková, Jarmila; Skálová, Tereza; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Tomato multifunctional nuclease TBN1 belongs to the type I nuclease family, which plays an important role in apoptotic processes and cell senescence in plants. The newly solved structure of the N211D mutant is reported. Although the main crystal-packing motif (the formation of superhelices) is conserved, the details differ among the known structures. A phosphate ion was localized in the active site of the enzyme. The binding of the surface loop to the active centre is stabilized by the phosphate ion, which correlates with the observed aggregation of TBN1 in phosphate buffer. The conserved binding of the surface loop to the active centre suggests biological relevance of the contact in a regulatory function or in the formation of oligomers. PMID:26527269

  18. Detection of HIV-1 DNA in cells and tissue by fluorescent in situ 5'-nuclease assay (FISNA).

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, B K; Jiyamapa, D; Mayrand, E; Hoff, B; Abramson, R; Garcia, P M

    1996-01-01

    The critical aspects of successful in situ amplification include fixation, permeabilization, amplification and detection. We address these aspects and present a novel detection scheme that eliminates hybridization following amplification. We use the 5'-nuclease activity of Taq polymerase to cleave in situ a 5'-reporter dye from an oligonucleotide probe which hybridizes to the target amplicon during amplification. The 5'-reporter dye is disassociated from the 3'-quenching dye and remains localized by charge interactions. In addition, we describe probe design constraints for 5'-nuclease assays both in solution and in situ. Using this technique, we show the sensitive and specific detection of HIV-1 DNA in cells lines and tissue from HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:8836201

  19. CRISPR/Cas-Mediated Site-Specific Mutagenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Using Cas9 Nucleases and Paired Nickases.

    PubMed

    Schiml, Simon; Fauser, Friedrich; Puchta, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system has recently become the most important tool for genome engineering due to its simple architecture that allows for rapidly changing the target sequence and its applicability to organisms throughout all kingdoms of life. The need for an easy-to-use and reliable nuclease is especially high in plant research, as precise genome modifications are almost impossible to achieve by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and the regeneration of plants from protoplast cultures is very labor intensive. Here, we describe the application of the Cas9 nuclease to Arabidopsis thaliana for the induction of heritable targeted mutations, which may also be used for other plant species. To cover the concern for off-target activity, we also describe the generation of stable mutants using paired Cas9 nickases. PMID:27557689

  20. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGES

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  1. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  2. Systematic quantification of HDR and NHEJ reveals effects of locus, nuclease, and cell type on genome-editing.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Berman, Jennifer R; Cooper, Samantha B; Mayerl, Steven J; Chan, Amanda H; Zhang, Bin; Karlin-Neumann, George A; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome-editing relies on the repair of sequence-specific nuclease-induced DNA nicking or double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homology-directed repair (HDR). However, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), an error-prone repair, acts concurrently, reducing the rate of high-fidelity edits. The identification of genome-editing conditions that favor HDR over NHEJ has been hindered by the lack of a simple method to measure HDR and NHEJ directly and simultaneously at endogenous loci. To overcome this challenge, we developed a novel, rapid, digital PCR-based assay that can simultaneously detect one HDR or NHEJ event out of 1,000 copies of the genome. Using this assay, we systematically monitored genome-editing outcomes of CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), Cas9 nickases, catalytically dead Cas9 fused to FokI, and transcription activator-like effector nuclease at three disease-associated endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Although it is widely thought that NHEJ generally occurs more often than HDR, we found that more HDR than NHEJ was induced under multiple conditions. Surprisingly, the HDR/NHEJ ratios were highly dependent on gene locus, nuclease platform, and cell type. The new assay system, and our findings based on it, will enable mechanistic studies of genome-editing and help improve genome-editing technology. PMID:27030102

  3. The pH dependence of staphylococcal nuclease stability is incompatible with a three-state denaturation model.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Daniel; Bertrand, García-Moreno E; Stites, Wesley E

    2013-01-01

    Six single substitution mutations, V66F, V66G, V66N, V66Q, V66S, V66T, and V66Y, were made in the background of a highly stable triple mutant (P117G, H124L, and S128A) of staphylococcal nuclease. The thermodynamic stabilities of wild type staphylococcal nuclease, of the stable triple mutant and of its six variants were determined by guanidine hydrochloride denaturation in thirteen different buffers spanning the pH range 4.5 to 10.2. Within experimental error the values of [Formula: see text] and mGuHCl for the various proteins measured over this wide range of pH maintain a constant offset from one another, tracing a series of approximately parallel curves. This data offers an independent means of determining the error of stabilities and slopes determined by guanidine hydrochloride denaturations and shows that previous error estimates are accurate. More importantly, this behavior cannot be reconciled with a three-state denaturation model for staphylococcal nuclease. The large variations in mGuHCl observed in these mutants must therefore arise from other causes. PMID:23892194

  4. CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated gene knock-in in bovine-induced pluripotent cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young Tae; Quan, Xiaoyuan; Xu, Yong Nan; Baek, Soonbong; Choi, Hwan; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jongpil

    2015-02-01

    Efficient and precise genetic engineering in livestock such as cattle holds great promise in agriculture and biomedicine. However, techniques that generate pluripotent stem cells, as well as reliable tools for gene targeting in livestock, are still inefficient, and thus not routinely used. Here, we report highly efficient gene targeting in the bovine genome using bovine pluripotent cells and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 nuclease. First, we generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from bovine somatic fibroblasts by the ectopic expression of yamanaka factors and GSK3β and MEK inhibitor (2i) treatment. We observed that these bovine iPSCs are highly similar to naïve pluripotent stem cells with regard to gene expression and developmental potential in teratomas. Moreover, CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease, which was specific for the bovine NANOG locus, showed highly efficient editing of the bovine genome in bovine iPSCs and embryos. To conclude, CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated homologous recombination targeting in bovine pluripotent cells is an efficient gene editing method that can be used to generate transgenic livestock in the future.

  5. Repeatable construction method for engineered zinc finger nuclease based on overlap extension PCR and TA-cloning.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Wataru; Kano, Kiyoshi; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) is a useful tool for endogenous site-directed genome modification. The development of an easier, less expensive and repeatedly usable construction method for various sequences of ZFNs should contribute to the further widespread use of this technology. Here, we establish a novel construction method for ZFNs. Zinc finger (ZF) fragments were synthesized by PCR using short primers coding DNA recognition helices of the ZF domain. DNA-binding domains composed of 4 to 6 ZFs were synthesized by overlap extension PCR of these PCR products, and the DNA-binding domains were joined with a nuclease vector by TA cloning. The short primers coding unique DNA recognition helices can be used repeatedly for other ZFN constructions. By using this novel OLTA (OverLap extension PCR and TA-cloning) method, arbitrary ZFN vectors were synthesized within 3 days, from the designing to the sequencing of the vector. Four different ZFN sets synthesized by OLTA showed nuclease activities at endogenous target loci. Genetically modified mice were successfully generated using ZFN vectors constructed by OLTA. This method, which enables the construction of intended ZFNs repeatedly and inexpensively in a short period of time, should contribute to the advancement of ZFN technology.

  6. The pH dependence of staphylococcal nuclease stability is incompatible with a three-state denaturation model

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Daniel; Bertrand García-Moreno, E.; Stites, Wesley E.

    2013-01-01

    Six single substitution mutations, V66F, V66G, V66N, V66Q, V66S, V66T, and V66Y, were made in the background of a highly stable triple mutant (P117G, H124L, and S128A) of staphylococcal nuclease. The thermodynamic stabilities of wild type staphylococcal nuclease, of the stable triple mutant and of its six variants were determined by guanidine hydrochloride denaturation in thirteen different buffers spanning the pH range 4.5 to 10.2. Within experimental error the values of ΔGH2O and mGuHCl for the various proteins measured over this wide range of pH maintain a constant offset from one another, tracing a series of approximately parallel curves. This data offers an independent means of determining the error of stabilities and slopes determined by guanidine hydrochloride denaturations and shows that previous error estimates are accurate. More importantly, this behavior cannot be reconciled with a three-state denaturation model for staphylococcal nuclease. The large variations in mGuHCl observed in these mutants must therefore arise from other causes. PMID:23892194

  7. Effect of magnesium and some nutrients on the growth and nuclease formation of a moderate halophile, Micrococcus varians var. halophilus.

    PubMed

    Kamekura, M; Onishi, H

    1976-10-01

    Production of halophilic nuclease by a moderate halophile, Micrococcus varians, ATCC 21971, was maximal at 2.5 to 3.5 M NaCl concentration in a complex medium (CM) composed of 1% casamino acids, 1% yeast extract, and NaCl. The addition of 81 mM MgSO4 to CM inhibited nuclease production in spite of good growth. Microscopic observation showed that this inhibition was accompanied by complete clumping of the cells. The Sehgal and Gibbons complex medium (SGC) which contained 0.75% vitamin-free casamino acids, 1% yeast extract, and NaCl, however, supported good production of the nuclease in spite of the presence of 81 mM MgSO4. It seemed that both magnesium sulfate and some substances present in CM might be responsible for this inhibition and clumping. A synthetic medium optimal for enzyme production was developed consisting of 16 amino acids, 4 vitamins, 0.73 mM KH2PO4, 2.7 mM KCl, 20 mM MgSO4, and 2.5 M NaCl. The organism required biotin as an essential growth factor, and thiamine, riboflavin, and choline as stimulating factors. Omission of isoleucine from the medium reduced markedly the growth rate. Glutamic acid, proline, and arginine were consumed completely during cultivation in the synthetic medium.

  8. Separation of the prodigiosin-localizing crude vesicles which retain the activity of protease and nuclease in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Ichikawa, Y

    1991-01-01

    Crude vesicles in which prodigiosin is localized were separated from pigmented Serratia marcescens. The bacteria were grown on peptone-glycerol agar plate, suspended in saline, and fractionated into cells, vesicles, and supernatant by differential centrifugation. Electron microscopic observations showed that the fractionation was conducted properly and the separated vesicles were lysed in distilled water. The vesicles suspended in saline retained 100 kilodalton protein of which amount is correlated with prodigiosin level, but the 100 kDa protein was found in the supernatant when the vesicles were lysed in distilled water. The vesicle fraction retained few colony-forming units and little detectable activity of NADH oxidase, but showed much higher activities of protease and nuclease than the cell fraction. The profiles of the activities of the protease and the nuclease in the fractions were different from each other, that is, the protease activity in the vesicle fraction was lower than that in the supernatant fraction, whereas the nuclease activity in the vesicle fraction was higher than that in the supernatant fraction, suggesting that the two extracellular enzymes were released from the pigmented bacteria by different mechanisms.

  9. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  10. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  11. CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated gene knock-in in bovine-induced pluripotent cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young Tae; Quan, Xiaoyuan; Xu, Yong Nan; Baek, Soonbong; Choi, Hwan; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jongpil

    2015-02-01

    Efficient and precise genetic engineering in livestock such as cattle holds great promise in agriculture and biomedicine. However, techniques that generate pluripotent stem cells, as well as reliable tools for gene targeting in livestock, are still inefficient, and thus not routinely used. Here, we report highly efficient gene targeting in the bovine genome using bovine pluripotent cells and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 nuclease. First, we generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from bovine somatic fibroblasts by the ectopic expression of yamanaka factors and GSK3β and MEK inhibitor (2i) treatment. We observed that these bovine iPSCs are highly similar to naïve pluripotent stem cells with regard to gene expression and developmental potential in teratomas. Moreover, CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease, which was specific for the bovine NANOG locus, showed highly efficient editing of the bovine genome in bovine iPSCs and embryos. To conclude, CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated homologous recombination targeting in bovine pluripotent cells is an efficient gene editing method that can be used to generate transgenic livestock in the future. PMID:25209165

  12. Structural and functional analyses of an archaeal XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease: asymmetric DNA binding and cleavage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tatsuya; Komori, Kayoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-08-01

    XPF/Rad1/Mus81/Hef proteins recognize and cleave branched DNA structures. XPF and Rad1 proteins cleave the 5' side of nucleotide excision repair bubble, while Mus81 and Hef cleave similar sites of the nicked Holliday junction, fork, or flap structure. These proteins all function as dimers and consist of catalytic and helix-hairpin-helix DNA binding (HhH) domains. We have determined the crystal structure of the HhH domain of Pyrococcus furiosus Hef nuclease (HefHhH), which revealed the distinct mode of protein dimerization. Our structural and biochemical analyses also showed that each of the catalytic and HhH domains binds to distinct regions within the fork-structured DNA: each HhH domain from two separate subunits asymmetrically binds to the arm region, while the catalytic domain binds near the junction center. Upon binding to DNA, Hef nuclease disrupts base pairs near the cleavage site. It is most likely that this bipartite binding mode is conserved in the XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease family. PMID:16084390

  13. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens.

  14. One-step, multiplexed fluorescence detection of microRNAs based on duplex-specific nuclease signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bin-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2012-03-21

    Traditional molecular beacons, widely applied for detection of nucleic acids, have an intrinsic limitation on sensitivity, as one target molecule converts only one beacon molecule to its fluorescent form. Herein, we take advantage of the duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) to create a new signal-amplifying mechanism, duplex-specific nuclease signal amplification (DSNSA), to increase the detection sensitivity of molecular beacons (Taqman probes). DSN nuclease is employed to recycle the process of target-assisted digestion of Taqman probes, thus, resulting in a significant fluorescence signal amplification through which one target molecule cleaves thousands of probe molecules. We further demonstrate the efficiency of this DSNSA strategy for rapid direct quantification of multiple miRNAs in biological samples. Our experimental results showed a quantitative measurement of sequence-specific miRNAs with the detection limit in the femtomolar range, nearly 5 orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional molecular beacons. This amplification strategy also demonstrated a high selectivity for discriminating differences between miRNA family members. Considering the superior sensitivity and specificity, as well as the multiplex and simple-to-implement features, this method promises a great potential of becoming a routine tool for simultaneously quantitative analysis of multiple miRNAs in tissues or cells, and supplies valuable information for biomedical research and clinical early diagnosis.

  15. Systematic quantification of HDR and NHEJ reveals effects of locus, nuclease, and cell type on genome-editing

    PubMed Central

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Berman, Jennifer R.; Cooper, Samantha B.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Chan, Amanda H.; Zhang, Bin; Karlin-Neumann, George A.; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome-editing relies on the repair of sequence-specific nuclease-induced DNA nicking or double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homology-directed repair (HDR). However, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), an error-prone repair, acts concurrently, reducing the rate of high-fidelity edits. The identification of genome-editing conditions that favor HDR over NHEJ has been hindered by the lack of a simple method to measure HDR and NHEJ directly and simultaneously at endogenous loci. To overcome this challenge, we developed a novel, rapid, digital PCR–based assay that can simultaneously detect one HDR or NHEJ event out of 1,000 copies of the genome. Using this assay, we systematically monitored genome-editing outcomes of CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), Cas9 nickases, catalytically dead Cas9 fused to FokI, and transcription activator–like effector nuclease at three disease-associated endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Although it is widely thought that NHEJ generally occurs more often than HDR, we found that more HDR than NHEJ was induced under multiple conditions. Surprisingly, the HDR/NHEJ ratios were highly dependent on gene locus, nuclease platform, and cell type. The new assay system, and our findings based on it, will enable mechanistic studies of genome-editing and help improve genome-editing technology. PMID:27030102

  16. Distinct properties of proteases and nucleases in the gut, salivary gland and saliva of southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula

    PubMed Central

    Lomate, Purushottam R.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2016-01-01

    Stink bugs negatively impact numerous plant species of agricultural and horticultural importance. While efforts to develop effective control measures are underway, the unique digestive physiology of these pests presents a significant hurdle for either protein- or nucleotide-based management options. Here we report the comparative biochemical and proteomic characterization of proteases and nucleases from the gut, salivary gland and saliva of the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula. The pH optimum for protease activity was acidic (5 to 6) in the gut with the primary proteases being cysteine proteases, and alkaline (8 to 9) in the saliva and salivary gland with the primary proteases being serine proteases. The serine proteases in saliva differ biochemically from trypsin and chymotrypsin, and the cathepsins in the gut and saliva showed distinct properties in inhibitor assays. Nuclease activity (DNase, RNase, dsRNase) was concentrated in the salivary gland and saliva with negligible activity in the gut. The most abundant proteins of the gut (530) and salivary gland (631) identified by proteomic analysis included four gut proteases along with eight proteases and one nuclease from the salivary gland. Understanding of N. viridula digestive physiology will facilitate the design of new strategies for management of this significant pest. PMID:27282882

  17. Cell-associated glucans of Burkholderia solanacearum and Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri: a new family of periplasmic glucans.

    PubMed Central

    Talaga, P; Stahl, B; Wieruszeski, J M; Hillenkamp, F; Tsuyumu, S; Lippens, G; Bohin, J P

    1996-01-01

    The cell-associated glucans produced by Burkholderia solanacearum and Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri were isolated by trichloroacetic acid treatment and gel permeation chromatography. The compounds obtained were characterized by compositional analysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. B. solanacearum synthesizes only a neutral cyclic glucan containing 13 glucose residues, and X. campestris pv. citri synthesizes a neutral cyclic glucan containing 16 glucose residues. The two glucans were further purified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Methylation analysis revealed that these glucans are linked by 1,2-glycosidic bonds and one 1,6-glycosidic bond. Our 600-MHz homonuclear and 1H-13C heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance experiments revealed the presence of a single alpha-1,6-glycosidic linkage, whereas all other glucose residues are beta-1,2 linked. The presence of this single alpha-1,6 linkage, however, induces such structural constraints in these cyclic glucans that all individual glucose residues could be distinguished. The different anomeric proton signals allowed complete sequence-specific assignment of both glucans. The structural characteristics of these glucans contrast with those of the previously described osmoregulated periplasmic glucans. PMID:8636027

  18. Structure-Based Design of Robust Glucose Biosensors using a Thermotoga maritima Periplasmic Glucose-Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Tian,Y.; Cunco, M.; Changela, A.; Hocker, B.; Beese, L.; Hellinga, H.

    2007-01-01

    We report the design and engineering of a robust, reagentless fluorescent glucose biosensor based on the periplasmic glucose-binding protein obtained from Thermotoga maritima (tmGBP). The gene for this protein was cloned from genomic DNA and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, the identity of its cognate sugar was confirmed, ligand binding was studied, and the structure of its glucose complex was solved to 1.7 Angstroms resolution by X-ray crystallography. TmGBP is specific for glucose and exhibits high thermostability (midpoint of thermal denaturation is 119 {+-} 1 C and 144 {+-} 2 C in the absence and presence of 1 mM glucose, respectively). A series of fluorescent conjugates was constructed by coupling single, environmentally sensitive fluorophores to unique cysteines introduced by site-specific mutagenesis at positions predicted to be responsive to ligand-induced conformational changes based on the structure. These conjugates were screened to identify engineered tmGBPs that function as reagentless fluorescent glucose biosensors. The Y13C Cy5 conjugate is bright, gives a large response to glucose over concentration ranges appropriate for in vivo monitoring of blood glucose levels (1-30 mM), and can be immobilized in an orientation-specific manner in microtiter plates to give a reversible response to glucose. The immobilized protein retains its response after long-term storage at room temperature.

  19. Extracellular amylases of starch-fermenting yeast: pH effect on export and residence time in the periplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Calleja, G.B.; Levy-Rick, S.R.; Nasim, A.; Lusena, C.V.

    1987-01-01

    Aerobic cultures of S. alluvius in Wickerham's yeast-nitrogen-base medium with starch as sole carbon source become strongly acidic and contain no detectable extra-cellular amylolytic activity during stationary phase, when the activity in buffered cultures is maximal. The extracellular amylases are irreversibly inactivated at the low pH value (less than 3.5) attained by the cultures. When adequately buffered, the medium yields maximal extracellular amylolytic activity. About 0.2 M phosphate buffer is adequate for substrate concentrations of up to 0.5% starch; higher starch concentrations require more buffer. Unbuffered cultures that are adjusted once with alkali to pH 5.5 also allow maximal extracellular amylolytic activity, provided the adjustment is made prior to the end of exponential growth. Automatic pH control allows use of high starch concentrations of up to 4%. Export is optimal at pH values higher than the optima for enzyme activity and stability and for population growth. The need for pH adjustment prior to the appearance of amylolytic activity in the medium suggests pH dependence of the export process itself and/or acid inactivation of enzymes transiently resident in the periplasm. (Refs. 23).

  20. AlgK is a TPR-containing Protein and the Periplasmic Component of a Novel Exopolysaccharide Secretin

    SciTech Connect

    Keiski, C.; Harwich, M; Jain, S; Neculai, A; Whitney, J; Yip, P; Robinson, H; Riley, L; Burrows, L; et al.

    2010-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Here we show that AlgK, a protein essential for production of high molecular weight alginate, is an outer membrane lipoprotein that contributes to the correct localization of the porin AlgE. Our 2.5 {angstrom} structure shows AlgK is composed of 9.5 tetratricopeptide-like repeats, and three putative sites of protein-protein interaction have been identified. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that BcsA, PgaA, and PelB, involved in the production and export of cellulose, poly-{beta}-1,6-N-Acetyl-d-glucosamine, and Pel exopolysaccharide, respectively, share the same topology as AlgK/E. Together, our data suggest that AlgK plays a role in the assembly of the alginate biosynthetic complex and represents the periplasmic component of a new type of outer membrane secretin that differs from canonical bacterial capsular polysaccharide secretion systems.

  1. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    PubMed

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  2. ComEA Is Essential for the Transfer of External DNA into the Periplasm in Naturally Transformable Vibrio cholerae Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Patrick; Pezeshgi Modarres, Hassan; Borgeaud, Sandrine; Bulushev, Roman D.; Steinbock, Lorenz J.; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Blokesch, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    The DNA uptake of naturally competent bacteria has been attributed to the action of DNA uptake machineries resembling type IV pilus complexes. However, the protein(s) for pulling the DNA across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria remain speculative. Here we show that the competence protein ComEA binds incoming DNA in the periplasm of naturally competent Vibrio cholerae cells thereby promoting DNA uptake, possibly through ratcheting and entropic forces associated with ComEA binding. Using comparative modeling and molecular simulations, we projected the 3D structure and DNA-binding site of ComEA. These in silico predictions, combined with in vivo and in vitro validations of wild-type and site-directed modified variants of ComEA, suggested that ComEA is not solely a DNA receptor protein but plays a direct role in the DNA uptake process. Furthermore, we uncovered that ComEA homologs of other bacteria (both Gram-positive and Gram-negative) efficiently compensated for the absence of ComEA in V. cholerae, suggesting that the contribution of ComEA in the DNA uptake process might be conserved among naturally competent bacteria. PMID:24391524

  3. Iron- and 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline-containing periplasmic inclusion bodies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A chemical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royt, P.W.; Honeychuck, R.V.; Pant, R.R.; Rogers, M.L.; Asher, L.V.; Lloyd, J.R.; Carlos, W.E.; Belkin, H.E.; Patwardhan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Dark aggregated particles were seen on pellets of iron-rich, mid-logarithmic phase Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Transmission electron microscopy of these cells showed inclusion bodies in periplasmic vacuoles. Aggregated particles isolated from the spent medium of these cells contained iron as indicated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy that revealed Fe3+. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis of whole cells revealed the presence of iron-containing particles beneath the surface of the cell, indicating that the isolated aggregates were the intracellular inclusion bodies. Collectively, mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the isolated inclusion bodies revealed the presence of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-heptylquinoline which is the Pseudomonas quinolone signaling compound (PQS) and an iron chelator; 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (pseudan VII), which is an iron chelator, antibacterial compound and precursor of PQS; 4-hydroxy-2-nonylquinoline (pseudan IX) which is an iron chelator and antibacterial compound; 4-hydroxy-2-methylquinoline (pseudan I), and 4-hydroxy-2-nonylquinoline N-oxide. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Serine suppresses the motor function of a periplasmic PomB mutation in the Vibrio flagella stator.

    PubMed

    Nishikino, Tatsuro; Zhu, Shiwei; Takekawa, Norihiro; Kojima, Seiji; Onoue, Yasuhiro; Homma, Michio

    2016-05-01

    The flagellar motor of Vibrio alginolyticus is made of two parts: a stator consisting of proteins PomA and PomB, and a rotor whose main component is FliG. The interaction between FliG and PomA generates torque for flagellar rotation. Based on cross-linking experiments of double-Cys mutants of PomB, we previously proposed that a conformational change in the periplasmic region of PomB caused stator activation. Double-Cys mutants lost their motility due to an intramolecular disulfide bridge. In this study, we found that the addition of serine, a chemotactic attractant, to a PomB(L160C/I186C) mutant restored motility without cleaving the disulfide bridge. We speculate that serine changed the rotor (FliG) conformation, affecting rotational direction. Combined with the counterclockwise (CCW)-biased mutation FliG(G214S), motility of PomB(L160C/I186C) was restored without the addition of serine. Likewise, motility was restored without serine in Che(-) mutants, in either a CCW-locked or clockwise (CW)-locked strain. In contrast, in a ΔcheY (CCW-locked) strain, Vibrio (L160C/I186C) required serine to be rescued. We speculate that CheY affects stator conformation and motility restoration by serine is independent on the chemotaxis signaling pathway. PMID:27004994

  5. Microbial host selection and periplasmic folding in Escherichia coli affect the biochemical characteristics of a cutinase from Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Nikolaivits, Efstratios; Kokkinou, Areti; Karpusas, Michael; Topakas, Evangelos

    2016-11-01

    A cutinase from the mesophilic fungus Fusarium oxysporum (FoCut5a) was functionally expressed in different hosts and their recombinant products were characterized regarding their activity, thermostability and tolerance in organic solvents. The cutinase gene cut5a was expressed in the BL21 and Origami 2 Escherichia coli strains and the resulting protein was folded either in the cytoplasm or in the periplasmic space, with the aim of correct formation of disulfide bonds. Increase of thermostability occurred when the enzyme was expressed in the oxidative cytoplasm of Origami 2. All expression products showed maximum enzyme activity at 40 °C, while thermostability increased by 73% when expressed in the Origami strain compared to the cytoplasmic expression in BL21 cells. The melting temperature of each protein construct was determined by fluorescence spectroscopy showing an additional transition at about 63 °C for enzymes expressed in Origami cells, indicating the co-presence of a different thermostable species. Kinetic studies performed on three p-nitrophenyl synthetic esters of aliphatic acids (C2, C4, C12) indicated that this cutinase shows higher affinity for the hydrolysis of the butyl ester. PMID:27302766

  6. Control of periplasmic nitrate reductase gene expression (napEDABC) from Paracoccus pantotrophus in response to oxygen and carbon substrates.

    PubMed

    Sears, H J; Sawers, G; Berks, B C; Ferguson, S J; Richardson, D J

    2000-11-01

    The napEDABC operon of Paracoccus pantotrophus encodes a periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP), together with electron-transfer components and proteins required for the synthesis of a fully functional enzyme. Previously, it had been shown that high NAP activity was observed when P. pantotrophus was grown aerobically on highly reduced carbon sources such as butyrate or caproate, but not when cultured on more oxidized substrates such as succinate or malate. The enzyme is not present to any extent when the organism is grown anaerobically under denitrifying conditions, regardless of the carbon source. Transcriptional analyses of the nap operon have now identified two initiation sites which were differentially regulated in response to the carbon source, with expression being maximal when cells were grown aerobically with butyrate. Analysis of a P. pantotrophus mutant (M6) deregulated for NAP activity identified a single C-->A transversion in a heptameric inverted-repeat sequence that partially overlapped the proximal promoter. Transcription analysis of this mutant revealed that expression of nap was completely derepressed under all growth conditions examined. Taken together, these findings indicate that nap transcription is negatively regulated during anaerobiosis, such that expression is restricted to aerobic growth, but only when the carbon source is highly reduced. PMID:11065376

  7. Molybdate binding by ModA, the periplasmic component of the Escherichia coli mod molybdate transport system.

    PubMed

    Imperial, J; Hadi, M; Amy, N K

    1998-03-13

    ModA, the periplasmic-binding protein of the Escherichia coli mod transport system was overexpressed and purified. Binding of molybdate and tungstate to ModA was found to modify the UV absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of the protein. Titration of these changes showed that ModA binds molybdate and tungstate in a 1:1 molar ratio. ModA showed an intrinsic fluorescence emission spectrum attributable to its three tryptophanyl residues. Molybdate binding caused a conformational change in the protein characterized by: (i) a shift of tryptophanyl groups to a more hydrophobic environment; (ii) a quenching (at pH 5.0) or enhancement (at pH 7.8) of fluorescence; and (iii) a higher availability of tryptophanyl groups to the polar quencher acrylamide. The tight binding of molybdate did not allow an accurate estimation of the binding constants by these indirect methods. An isotopic binding method with 99MoO42- was used for accurate determination of KD (20 nM) and stoichiometry (1:1 molar ratio). ModA bound tungstate with approximately the same affinity, but did not bind sulfate or phosphate. These KDs are 150- to 250-fold lower than those previously reported, and compatible with the high molybdate transport affinity of the mod system. The affinity of ModA for molybdate was also determined in vivo and found to be similar to that determined in vitro.

  8. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    SciTech Connect

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  9. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components

    PubMed Central

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E.; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, John H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic–abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution. PMID:25143589

  10. SilE is an intrinsically disordered periplasmic “molecular sponge” involved in bacterial silver resistance

    PubMed Central

    Asiani, Karishma R.; Williams, Huw; Bird, Louise; Jenner, Matthew; Searle, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ag+ resistance was initially found on the Salmonella enetrica serovar Typhimurium multi‐resistance plasmid pMG101 from burns patients in 1975. The putative model of Ag+ resistance, encoded by the sil operon from pMG101, involves export of Ag+ via an ATPase (SilP), an effluxer complex (SilCFBA) and a periplasmic chaperon of Ag+ (SilE). SilE is predicted to be intrinsically disordered. We tested this hypothesis using structural and biophysical studies and show that SilE is an intrinsically disordered protein in its free apo‐form but folds to a compact structure upon optimal binding to six Ag+ ions in its holo‐form. Sequence analyses and site‐directed mutagenesis established the importance of histidine and methionine containing motifs for Ag+‐binding, and identified a nucleation core that initiates Ag+‐mediated folding of SilE. We conclude that SilE is a molecular sponge for absorbing metal ions. PMID:27085056

  11. Physiological Roles for Two Periplasmic Nitrate Reductases in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 (ATCC 17025)▿

    PubMed Central

    Hartsock, Angela; Shapleigh, James P.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolically versatile purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 is a denitrifier whose genome contains two periplasmic nitrate reductase-encoding gene clusters. This work demonstrates nonredundant physiological roles for these two enzymes. One cluster is expressed aerobically and repressed under low oxygen while the second is maximally expressed under low oxygen. Insertional inactivation of the aerobically expressed nitrate reductase eliminated aerobic nitrate reduction, but cells of this strain could still respire nitrate anaerobically. In contrast, when the anaerobic nitrate reductase was absent, aerobic nitrate reduction was detectable, but anaerobic nitrate reduction was impaired. The aerobic nitrate reductase was expressed but not utilized in liquid culture but was utilized during growth on solid medium. Growth on a variety of carbon sources, with the exception of malate, the most oxidized substrate used, resulted in nitrite production on solid medium. This is consistent with a role for the aerobic nitrate reductase in redox homeostasis. These results show that one of the nitrate reductases is specific for respiration and denitrification while the other likely plays a role in redox homeostasis during aerobic growth. PMID:21949073

  12. Mechanistic insight into the conserved allosteric regulation of periplasmic proteolysis by the signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Cooley, Richard B; Boyd, Chelsea D; Mehl, Ryan A; O'Toole, George A; Sondermann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Stable surface adhesion of cells is one of the early pivotal steps in bacterial biofilm formation, a prevalent adaptation strategy in response to changing environments. In Pseudomonas fluorescens, this process is regulated by the Lap system and the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP. High cytoplasmic levels of cyclic-di-GMP activate the transmembrane receptor LapD that in turn recruits the periplasmic protease LapG, preventing it from cleaving a cell surface-bound adhesin, thereby promoting cell adhesion. In this study, we elucidate the molecular basis of LapG regulation by LapD and reveal a remarkably sensitive switching mechanism that is controlled by LapD's HAMP domain. LapD appears to act as a coincidence detector, whereby a weak interaction of LapG with LapD transmits a transient outside-in signal that is reinforced only when cyclic-di-GMP levels increase. Given the conservation of key elements of this receptor system in many bacterial species, the results are broadly relevant for cyclic-di-GMP- and HAMP domain-regulated transmembrane signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03650.001 PMID:25182848

  13. Tripartite ATP-independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporters Use an Arginine-mediated Selectivity Filter for High Affinity Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marcus; Hopkins, Adam P.; Severi, Emmanuele; Hawkhead, Judith; Bawdon, Daniel; Watts, Andrew G.; Hubbard, Roderick E.; Thomas, Gavin H.

    2015-01-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters are secondary transporters that have evolved an obligate dependence on a substrate-binding protein (SBP) to confer unidirectional transport. Different members of the DctP family of TRAP SBPs have binding sites that recognize a diverse range of organic acid ligands but appear to only share a common electrostatic interaction between a conserved arginine and a carboxylate group in the ligand. We investigated the significance of this interaction using the sialic acid-specific SBP, SiaP, from the Haemophilus influenzae virulence-related SiaPQM TRAP transporter. Using in vitro, in vivo, and structural methods applied to SiaP, we demonstrate that the coordination of the acidic ligand moiety of sialic acid by the conserved arginine (Arg-147) is essential for the function of the transporter as a high affinity scavenging system. However, at high substrate concentrations, the transporter can function in the absence of Arg-147 suggesting that this bi-molecular interaction is not involved in further stages of the transport cycle. As well as being required for high affinity binding, we also demonstrate that the Arg-147 is a strong selectivity filter for carboxylate-containing substrates in TRAP transporters by engineering the SBP to recognize a non-carboxylate-containing substrate, sialylamide, through water-mediated interactions. Together, these data provide biochemical and structural support that TRAP transporters function predominantly as high affinity transporters for carboxylate-containing substrates. PMID:26342690

  14. Outer membrane β-barrel protein folding is physically controlled by periplasmic lipid head groups and BamA.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Dennis; Chung, Yong Hee; Danoff, Emily J; Plummer, Ashlee M; Sandlin, Clifford W; Zaccai, Nathan R; Fleming, Karen G

    2014-04-22

    Outer membrane β-barrel proteins (OMPs) are crucial for numerous cellular processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Despite extensive studies on OMP biogenesis, it is unclear why OMPs require assembly machineries to fold into their native outer membranes, as they are capable of folding quickly and efficiently through an intrinsic folding pathway in vitro. By investigating the folding of several bacterial OMPs using membranes with naturally occurring Escherichia coli lipids, we show that phosphoethanolamine and phosphoglycerol head groups impose a kinetic barrier to OMP folding. The kinetic retardation of OMP folding places a strong negative pressure against spontaneous incorporation of OMPs into inner bacterial membranes, which would dissipate the proton motive force and undoubtedly kill bacteria. We further show that prefolded β-barrel assembly machinery subunit A (BamA), the evolutionarily conserved, central subunit of the BAM complex, accelerates OMP folding by lowering the kinetic barrier imposed by phosphoethanolamine head groups. Our results suggest that OMP assembly machineries are required in vivo to enable physical control over the spontaneously occurring OMP folding reaction in the periplasm. Mechanistic studies further allowed us to derive a model for BamA function, which explains how OMP assembly can be conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  15. Outer membrane β-barrel protein folding is physically controlled by periplasmic lipid head groups and BamA

    PubMed Central

    Gessmann, Dennis; Chung, Yong Hee; Danoff, Emily J.; Plummer, Ashlee M.; Sandlin, Clifford W.; Zaccai, Nathan R.; Fleming, Karen G.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane β-barrel proteins (OMPs) are crucial for numerous cellular processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Despite extensive studies on OMP biogenesis, it is unclear why OMPs require assembly machineries to fold into their native outer membranes, as they are capable of folding quickly and efficiently through an intrinsic folding pathway in vitro. By investigating the folding of several bacterial OMPs using membranes with naturally occurring Escherichia coli lipids, we show that phosphoethanolamine and phosphoglycerol head groups impose a kinetic barrier to OMP folding. The kinetic retardation of OMP folding places a strong negative pressure against spontaneous incorporation of OMPs into inner bacterial membranes, which would dissipate the proton motive force and undoubtedly kill bacteria. We further show that prefolded β-barrel assembly machinery subunit A (BamA), the evolutionarily conserved, central subunit of the BAM complex, accelerates OMP folding by lowering the kinetic barrier imposed by phosphoethanolamine head groups. Our results suggest that OMP assembly machineries are required in vivo to enable physical control over the spontaneously occurring OMP folding reaction in the periplasm. Mechanistic studies further allowed us to derive a model for BamA function, which explains how OMP assembly can be conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:24715731

  16. Crystal Structure of the Metallo-β-Lactamase GOB in the Periplasmic Dizinc Form Reveals an Unusual Metal Site.

    PubMed

    Morán-Barrio, Jorgelina; Lisa, María-Natalia; Larrieux, Nicole; Drusin, Salvador I; Viale, Alejandro M; Moreno, Diego M; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Vila, Alejandro J

    2016-10-01

    Metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) are broad-spectrum, Zn(II)-dependent lactamases able to confer resistance to virtually every β-lactam antibiotic currently available. The large diversity of active-site structures and metal content among MBLs from different sources has limited the design of a pan-MBL inhibitor. GOB-18 is a divergent MBL from subclass B3 that is expressed by the opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen Elizabethkingia meningoseptica This MBL is atypical, since several residues conserved in B3 enzymes (such as a metal ligand His) are substituted in GOB enzymes. Here, we report the crystal structure of the periplasmic di-Zn(II) form of GOB-18. This enzyme displays a unique active-site structure, with residue Gln116 coordinating the Zn1 ion through its terminal amide moiety, replacing a ubiquitous His residue. This situation contrasts with that of B2 MBLs, where an equivalent His116Asn substitution leads to a di-Zn(II) inactive species. Instead, both the mono- and di-Zn(II) forms of GOB-18 are active against penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. In silico docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that residue Met221 is not involved in substrate binding, in contrast to Ser221, which otherwise is conserved in most B3 enzymes. These distinctive features are conserved in recently reported GOB orthologues in environmental bacteria. These findings provide valuable information for inhibitor design and also posit that GOB enzymes have alternative functions.

  17. Isolation and sequence analysis of the gene (cpdB) encoding periplasmic 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Burns, D M; Beacham, I R

    1986-01-01

    The cpdB gene encodes a periplasmic 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase (3'-nucleotidase). This enzyme has been purified previously and the gene is located at 96 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. In this study the cpdB gene was cloned from ClaI-cleaved DNA, and the gene product was identified. DNA blotting experiments showed that the recombinant plasmid contains a deletion with respect to the expected genomic fragment of approximately 4 kilobases, which extends into the vector. Furthermore, the gene was absent from three other recombinant libraries. Together, these findings suggest the presence in the genome of an adjacent gene whose product is lethal when it is present on a multicopy plasmid. The nucleotide sequence of the cpdB gene was also determined. The 5' and 3' untranslated sequences contain characteristic sequences that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription, including two possible promoters, one of which may contain two overlapping -10 sequences. A strong Shine-Dalgarno sequence is followed by an open reading frame which corresponds to a protein having a molecular weight of 70,954. The first 19 amino acid residues have the characteristics of a signal peptide. The 3' untranslated sequence contains two putative rho-independent transcription terminators having low thermodynamic stability. Images PMID:3005231

  18. Mechanistic insight into the conserved allosteric regulation of periplasmic proteolysis by the signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Cooley, Richard B; Boyd, Chelsea D; Mehl, Ryan A; O'Toole, George A; Sondermann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Stable surface adhesion of cells is one of the early pivotal steps in bacterial biofilm formation, a prevalent adaptation strategy in response to changing environments. In Pseudomonas fluorescens, this process is regulated by the Lap system and the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP. High cytoplasmic levels of cyclic-di-GMP activate the transmembrane receptor LapD that in turn recruits the periplasmic protease LapG, preventing it from cleaving a cell surface-bound adhesin, thereby promoting cell adhesion. In this study, we elucidate the molecular basis of LapG regulation by LapD and reveal a remarkably sensitive switching mechanism that is controlled by LapD's HAMP domain. LapD appears to act as a coincidence detector, whereby a weak interaction of LapG with LapD transmits a transient outside-in signal that is reinforced only when cyclic-di-GMP levels increase. Given the conservation of key elements of this receptor system in many bacterial species, the results are broadly relevant for cyclic-di-GMP- and HAMP domain-regulated transmembrane signaling.

  19. Structural flexibility of the periplasmic protein, FlgA, regulates flagellar P-ring assembly in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Hideyuki; Yoon, Young-Ho; Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Namba, Keiichi; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    A periplasmic flagellar chaperone protein, FlgA, is required for P-ring assembly in bacterial flagella of taxa such as Salmonella enterica or Escherichia coli. The mechanism of chaperone-mediated P-ring formation is poorly understood. Here we present the open and closed crystal structures of FlgA from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, grown under different crystallization conditions. An intramolecular disulfide cross-linked form of FlgA caused a dominant negative effect on motility of the wild-type strain. Pull-down experiments support a specific protein-protein interaction between FlgI, the P-ring component protein, and the C-terminal domain of FlgA. Surface plasmon resonance and limited-proteolysis indicate that flexibility of the domain is reduced in the covalently closed form. These results show that the structural flexibility of the C-terminal domain of FlgA, which is related to the structural difference between the two crystal forms, is intrinsically associated with its molecular chaperone function in P-ring assembly. PMID:27273476

  20. Editing T cell specificity towards leukemia by zinc-finger nucleases and lentiviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Angelo; Magnani, Zulma; Liu, Pei-Qi; Reik, Andreas; Chu, Victoria; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Kuball, Jurgen; Camisa, Barbara; Bondanza, Attilio; Casorati, Giulia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bordignon, Claudio; Greenberg, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Naldini, Luigi; Bonini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of high-avidity T-cell receptor (TCR) genes isolated from rare tumor-specific lymphocytes into polyclonal T cells is an attractive cancer immunotherapy strategy. However, TCR gene transfer results in competition for surface expression and inappropriate pairing between the exogenous and endogenous TCR chains, resulting in suboptimal activity and potentially harmful unpredicted specificities. We designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) promoting the disruption of endogenous TCR β and α chain genes. ZFN-treated lymphocytes lacked CD3/TCR surface expression and expanded with IL-7 and IL-15. Upon lentiviral transfer of a TCR for the WT1 tumor antigen, these TCR-edited cells expressed the new TCR at high levels, were easily expanded to near-purity, and proved superior in specific antigen recognition to matched TCR-transferred cells. In contrast to TCR-transferred cells, TCR edited lymphocytes did not mediate off-target reactivity while maintaining anti-tumor activity in vivo, thus demonstrating that complete editing of T-cell specificity generate tumor-specific lymphocytes with improved biosafety profile. PMID:22466705

  1. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2013-03-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 'safe harbor' locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform.

  2. LEM-3 - A LEM domain containing nuclease involved in the DNA damage response in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Christina M; Kratz, Katja; Sendoel, Ataman; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Jiricny, Josef; Hengartner, Michael O

    2012-01-01

    The small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans displays a spectrum of DNA damage responses similar to humans. In order to identify new DNA damage response genes, we isolated in a forward genetic screen 14 new mutations conferring hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. We present here our characterization of lem-3, one of the genes identified in this screen. LEM-3 contains a LEM domain and a GIY nuclease domain. We confirm that LEM-3 has DNase activity in vitro. lem-3(lf) mutants are hypersensitive to various types of DNA damage, including ionizing radiation, UV-C light and crosslinking agents. Embryos from irradiated lem-3 hermaphrodites displayed severe defects during cell division, including chromosome mis-segregation and anaphase bridges. The mitotic defects observed in irradiated lem-3 mutant embryos are similar to those found in baf-1 (barrier-to-autointegration factor) mutants. The baf-1 gene codes for an essential and highly conserved protein known to interact with the other two C. elegans LEM domain proteins, LEM-2 and EMR-1. We show that baf-1, lem-2, and emr-1 mutants are also hypersensitive to DNA damage and that loss of lem-3 sensitizes baf-1 mutants even in the absence of DNA damage. Our data suggest that BAF-1, together with the LEM domain proteins, plays an important role following DNA damage - possibly by promoting the reorganization of damaged chromatin. PMID:22383942

  3. Mutational and Biochemical Analysis of the DNA-entry Nuclease EndA from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    M Midon; P Schafer; A Pingoud; M Ghosh; A Moon; M Cuneo; R London; G Meiss

    2011-12-31

    EndA is a membrane-attached surface-exposed DNA-entry nuclease previously known to be required for genetic transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae. More recent studies have shown that the enzyme also plays an important role during the establishment of invasive infections by degrading extracellular chromatin in the form of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), enabling streptococci to overcome the innate immune system in mammals. As a virulence factor, EndA has become an interesting target for future drug design. Here we present the first mutational and biochemical analysis of recombinant forms of EndA produced either in a cell-free expression system or in Escherichia coli. We identify His160 and Asn191 to be essential for catalysis and Asn182 to be required for stability of EndA. The role of His160 as the putative general base in the catalytic mechanism is supported by chemical rescue of the H160A variant of EndA with imidazole added in excess. Our study paves the way for the identification and development of protein or low-molecular-weight inhibitors for EndA in future high-throughput screening assays.

  4. Nuclease Footprints in Sperm Project Past and Future Chromatin Regulatory Events

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Graham D.; Jodar, Meritxell; Pique-Regi, Roger; Krawetz, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear remodeling to a condensed state is a hallmark of spermatogenesis. This is achieved by replacement of histones with protamines. Regions retaining nucleosomes may be of functional significance. To determine their potential roles, sperm from wild type and transgenic mice harboring a single copy insert of the human protamine cluster were subjected to Micrococcal Nuclease-seq. CENTIPEDE, a hierarchical Bayesian model, was used to identify multiple spatial patterns, "footprints", of MNase-seq reads along the sperm genome. Regions predicted by CENTIPEDE analysis to be bound by a regulatory factor in sperm were correlated with genomic landmarks and higher order chromatin structure datasets to identify potential roles for these factors in regulating either prior or post spermatogenic, i.e., early embryonic events. This approach linked robust endogenous protamine transcription and transgene suppression to its chromatin environment within topologically associated domains. Of the candidate enhancer-bound regulatory proteins, Ctcf, was associated with chromatin domain boundaries in testes and embryonic stem cells. The continuity of Ctcf binding through the murine germline may permit rapid reconstitution of chromatin organization following fertilization. This likely reflects its preparation for early zygotic genome activation and comparatively accelerated preimplantation embryonic development program observed in mouse as compared to human and bull. PMID:27184706

  5. Coordinated nuclease activities counteract Ku at single-ended DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Chanut, Pauline; Britton, Sébastien; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P.; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Repair of single-ended DNA double-strand breaks (seDSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) requires the generation of a 3′ single-strand DNA overhang by exonuclease activities in a process called DNA resection. However, it is anticipated that the highly abundant DNA end-binding protein Ku sequesters seDSBs and shields them from exonuclease activities. Despite pioneering works in yeast, it is unclear how mammalian cells counteract Ku at seDSBs to allow HR to proceed. Here we show that in human cells, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of CtIP and the epistatic and coordinated actions of MRE11 and CtIP nuclease activities are required to limit the stable loading of Ku on seDSBs. We also provide evidence for a hitherto unsuspected additional mechanism that contributes to prevent Ku accumulation at seDSBs, acting downstream of MRE11 endonuclease activity and in parallel with MRE11 exonuclease activity. Finally, we show that Ku persistence at seDSBs compromises Rad51 focus assembly but not DNA resection. PMID:27641979

  6. Potential DNA binding and nuclease functions of ComEC domains characterized in silico

    PubMed Central

    Baker, James A.; Simkovic, Felix; Taylor, Helen M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial competence, which can be natural or induced, allows the uptake of exogenous double stranded DNA (dsDNA) into a competent bacterium. This process is known as transformation. A multiprotein assembly binds and processes the dsDNA to import one strand and degrade another yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are relatively poorly understood. Here distant relationships of domains in Competence protein EC (ComEC) of Bacillus subtilis (Uniprot: P39695) were characterized. DNA‐protein interactions were investigated in silico by analyzing models for structural conservation, surface electrostatics and structure‐based DNA binding propensity; and by data‐driven macromolecular docking of DNA to models. Our findings suggest that the DUF4131 domain contains a cryptic DNA‐binding OB fold domain and that the β‐lactamase‐like domain is the hitherto cryptic competence nuclease. Proteins 2016; 84:1431–1442. © 2016 The Authors Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27318187

  7. Staphylococcus aureus nuclease is an SaeRS-dependent virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael E; Nygaard, Tyler K; Ackermann, Laynez; Watkins, Robert L; Zurek, Oliwia W; Pallister, Kyler B; Griffith, Shannon; Kiedrowski, Megan R; Flack, Caralyn E; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Horswill, Alexander R; Voyich, Jovanka M

    2013-04-01

    Several prominent bacterial pathogens secrete nuclease (Nuc) enzymes that have an important role in combating the host immune response. Early studies of Staphylococcus aureus Nuc attributed its regulation to the agr quorum-sensing system. However, recent microarray data have indicated that nuc is under the control of the SaeRS two-component system, which is a major regulator of S. aureus virulence determinants. Here we report that the nuc gene is directly controlled by the SaeRS two-component system through reporter fusion, immunoblotting, Nuc activity measurements, promoter mapping, and binding studies, and additionally, we were unable identify a notable regulatory link to the agr system. The observed SaeRS-dependent regulation was conserved across a wide spectrum of representative S. aureus isolates. Moreover, with community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA MRSA) in a mouse model of peritonitis, we observed in vivo expression of Nuc activity in an SaeRS-dependent manner and determined that Nuc is a virulence factor that is important for in vivo survival, confirming the enzyme's role as a contributor to invasive disease. Finally, natural polymorphisms were identified in the SaeRS proteins, one of which was linked to Nuc regulation in a CA MRSA USA300 endocarditis isolate. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that Nuc is an important S. aureus virulence factor and part of the SaeRS regulon.

  8. Advances in genetic modification of farm animals using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN).

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bjoern; Niemann, Heiner

    2015-02-01

    Genome editing tools (GET), including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like endonucleases (TALENS), and meganucleases possess long recognition sites and are thus capable of cutting DNA in a very specific manner. These genome editing tools mediate targeted genetic alterations by enhancing DNA mutation frequency via induction of double-strand breaks at a predetermined genomic site. Compared to conventional homologous recombination based gene targeting, GETs can increase gene targeting and gene disruption via mutagenic DNA repair more than 10,000-fold. Recently, a novel class of genome editing tools was described that uses RNAs to target a specific genomic site. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is capable of targeting even multiple genomic sites in one shot and thus could be superior to ZFNs or TALEN. Current results indicate that these tools can be successfully employed in a broad range of organisms which renders them useful for improving the understanding of complex physiological systems, producing transgenic animals, including creating large animal models for human diseases, creating specific cell lines, and plants, and even for treating human genetic diseases. This review provides an update on the use of ZFNs to modify the genome of farm animals, summarizes current knowledge on the underlying mechanism, and discusses new opportunities for generating genetically modified farm animals.

  9. Characterization of the stable, acid-induced, molten globule-like state of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, A. L.; Calciano, L. J.; Goto, Y.; Nishimura, M.; Swedberg, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Titration of a salt-free solution of native staphylococcal nuclease by HCl leads to an unfolding transition in the vicinity of pH 4, as determined by near- and far-UV circular dichroism. At pH 2-3, the protein is substantially unfolded. The addition of further HCl results in a second transition, this one to a more structured species (the A state) with the properties of an expanded molten globule, namely substantial secondary structure, little or no tertiary structure, relatively compact size as determined by hydrodynamic radius, and the ability to bind the hydrophobic dye 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonic acid. The addition of anions, in the form of neutral salts, to the acid-unfolded state at pH 2 also causes a transition leading to the A state. Fourier transform infrared analysis of the amide I band was used to compare the amount and type of secondary structure in the native and A states. A significant decrease in alpha-helix structure, with a corresponding increase in beta or extended structure, was observed in the A state, compared to the native state. A model to account for such compact denatured states is proposed. PMID:8358298

  10. Detection and quantification of Citrobacter freundii and C. braakii by 5'-nuclease polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kaclíková, Eva; Krascsenicsová, Klára; Pangallo, Domenico; Kuchta, Tomás

    2005-10-01

    A new 5'-nuclease polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system for the detection and quantification of Citrobacter freundii and C. braakii was developed with primers and the probe oriented to a specific region of the cfa gene encoding a cyclopropane fatty acid synthase. The qualitative variant of the method consisted of a conventional PCR with end-point fluorimetry or agarose gel electrophoresis, and the quantitative variant used kinetic real-time PCR measurement. The PCR system was specific for C. freundii and C. braakii, detecting neither other Citrobacter spp. nor other enteric bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and others). The detection limit of the qualitative variant of the method was 10(3) cfu/mL when the amplification was followed by fluorimetry and 10(4) cfu/mL when the amplification was followed by gel electrophoresis. The real-time PCR variant of the method facilitated quantification over a range of concentrations from 10(2) to 10(8) cfu/mL, with Escherichia coli (10(6) cfu/mL) and Salmonella enterica (10(6) cfu/mL) having no effect on the quantification.

  11. Comparison between different forms of estrogen cytosol receptor and the nuclear receptor extracted by micrococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Rochefort, H; André, J

    1978-11-01

    As an approach to the mechanism of the nuclear translocation of estrogen receptor, the estradiol nuclear receptor (RN) of lamb endometrium was extracted with micrococcal nuclease at 2--4 degrees and compared to the "native" 8S and to the Ca2+-transformed cytosol receptors. After extensive digestion of chromatin, giving up to 10% perchloric acid-soluble DNA and a majority of nucleosome monomers, up to 80% of the RN was extracted and under low ionic strength. This RN was found to be completely different from the partially proteolyzed Ca2+-transformed cytosol receptor. It migrated with a sedimentation constant of 4 and 6 S. The Stokes radius of the predominant form as determined by ACA 34 chromatography was 5.3 nm. The calculated apparent molecular weights were 130,000 and 90,000, respectively. The RN was able to bind DNA and was eluted from a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column at 0.23 and 0.30 M KCl. We conclude that the mechanism proposed by Puca et al., according to which the Ca2+-transformed cytosol receptor is split by a Ca2+ receptor-transforming factor into a smaller form able to cross the nuclear membrane, is very unlikely. PMID:698961

  12. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome.

    PubMed

    Hainer, Sarah J; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2015-10-01

    Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase) footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  13. Duplex-specific nuclease efficiently removes rRNA for prokaryotic RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hana; Cho, Yong-Joon; Won, Sungho; Lee, Jong-Eun; Jin Yu, Hyung; Kim, Sujin; Schroth, Gary P; Luo, Shujun; Chun, Jongsik

    2011-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing has great potential for application in bacterial transcriptomics. However, unlike eukaryotes, bacteria have no clear mechanism to select mRNAs over rRNAs; therefore, rRNA removal is a critical step in sequencing-based transcriptomics. Duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) is an enzyme that, at high temperatures, degrades duplex DNA in preference to single-stranded DNA. DSN treatment has been successfully used to normalize the relative transcript abundance in mRNA-enriched cDNA libraries from eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of this method to remove rRNA from prokaryotic total RNA. We evaluated the efficacy of DSN to remove rRNA by comparing it with the conventional subtractive hybridization (Hyb) method. Illumina deep sequencing was performed to obtain transcriptomes from Escherichia coli grown under four growth conditions. The results clearly showed that our DSN treatment was more efficient at removing rRNA than the Hyb method was, while preserving the original relative abundance of mRNA species in bacterial cells. Therefore, we propose that, for bacterial mRNA-seq experiments, DSN treatment should be preferred to Hyb-based methods.

  14. Heritable targeted gene disruption in zebrafish using designed zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Yannick; McCammon, Jasmine M; Miller, Jeffrey C; Faraji, Farhoud; Ngo, Catherine; Katibah, George E; Amora, Rainier; Hocking, Toby D; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Amacher, Sharon L

    2008-06-01

    We describe the use of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) for somatic and germline disruption of genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio), in which targeted mutagenesis was previously intractable. ZFNs induce a targeted double-strand break in the genome that is repaired to generate small insertions and deletions. We designed ZFNs targeting the zebrafish golden and no tail/Brachyury (ntl) genes and developed a budding yeast-based assay to identify the most active ZFNs for use in vivo. Injection of ZFN-encoding mRNA into one-cell embryos yielded a high percentage of animals carrying distinct mutations at the ZFN-specified position and exhibiting expected loss-of-function phenotypes. Over half the ZFN mRNA-injected founder animals transmitted disrupted ntl alleles at frequencies averaging 20%. The frequency and precision of gene-disruption events observed suggest that this approach should be applicable to any loci in zebrafish or in other organisms that allow mRNA delivery into the fertilized egg.

  15. Conservation of the pro-apoptotic nuclease activity of endonuclease G in unicellular trypanosomatid parasites.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Vedvyas, Chetan; Debrabant, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Endonuclease G is a mitochondrial protein implicated in DNA fragmentation during apoptosis in cell types ranging from fungi to mammals. Features of programmed cell death have been reported in a number of single-celled organisms, including the human trypanosomatid parasites Leishmania and Trypanosoma. However, the protozoan cell death pathways and the effector molecules involved in such processes remain to be identified. In this report, we describe the pro-apoptotic function of endonuclease G in trypanosomatid parasites. Similar to metazoans, trypanosome endoG showed intrinsic nuclease activity, is localized in mitochondria and is released from this organelle when cell death is triggered. Overexpression of endoG strongly promoted apoptotic cell death under oxidant or differentiation-related stress in Leishmania and, conversely, loss of endoG expression conferred robust resistance to oxidant-induced cell death in T. brucei. These data demonstrate the conservation of the pro-apoptotic endonuclease activity of endoG in these evolutionarily ancient eukaryotic organisms. Furthermore, nuclear DNA degradation by endoG upon release from mitochondria might represent a caspase-independent cell death mechanism in trypanosomatid parasites as genes encoding caspase-like proteins have not been identified in their genomes.

  16. Nuclease Footprints in Sperm Project Past and Future Chromatin Regulatory Events.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Graham D; Jodar, Meritxell; Pique-Regi, Roger; Krawetz, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear remodeling to a condensed state is a hallmark of spermatogenesis. This is achieved by replacement of histones with protamines. Regions retaining nucleosomes may be of functional significance. To determine their potential roles, sperm from wild type and transgenic mice harboring a single copy insert of the human protamine cluster were subjected to Micrococcal Nuclease-seq. CENTIPEDE, a hierarchical Bayesian model, was used to identify multiple spatial patterns, "footprints", of MNase-seq reads along the sperm genome. Regions predicted by CENTIPEDE analysis to be bound by a regulatory factor in sperm were correlated with genomic landmarks and higher order chromatin structure datasets to identify potential roles for these factors in regulating either prior or post spermatogenic, i.e., early embryonic events. This approach linked robust endogenous protamine transcription and transgene suppression to its chromatin environment within topologically associated domains. Of the candidate enhancer-bound regulatory proteins, Ctcf, was associated with chromatin domain boundaries in testes and embryonic stem cells. The continuity of Ctcf binding through the murine germline may permit rapid reconstitution of chromatin organization following fertilization. This likely reflects its preparation for early zygotic genome activation and comparatively accelerated preimplantation embryonic development program observed in mouse as compared to human and bull. PMID:27184706

  17. DNA repair defects sensitize cells to anticodon nuclease yeast killer toxins.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Roland; Wemhoff, Sabrina; Krause, Jens; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2011-03-01

    Killer toxins from Kluyveromyces lactis (zymocin) and Pichia acaciae (PaT) were found to disable translation in target cells by virtue of anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activities on tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Gln), respectively. Surprisingly, however, ACNase exposure does not only impair translation, but also affects genome integrity and concomitantly DNA damage occurs. Previously, it was shown that homologous recombination protects cells from ACNase toxicity. Here, we have analyzed whether other DNA repair pathways are functional in conferring ACNase resistance as well. In addition to HR, base excision repair (BER) and postreplication repair (PRR) promote clear resistance to either, PaT and zymocin. Comparative toxin sensitivity analysis of BER mutants revealed that its ACNase protective function is due to the endonucleases acting on apurinic (AP) sites, whereas none of the known DNA glycosylases is involved. Because PaT and zymocin require the presence of the ELP3/TRM9-dependent wobble uridine modification 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl (mcm(5)) for tRNA cleavage, we analyzed toxin response in DNA repair mutants additionally lacking such tRNA modifications. ACNase resistance caused by elp3 or trm9 mutations was found to rescue hypersensitivity of DNA repair defects, consistent with DNA damage to occur as a consequence of tRNA cleavage. The obtained genetic evidence promises to reveal new aspects into the mechanism linking translational fidelity and genome surveillance. PMID:21188417

  18. Structural characterization of the virulence factor Sda1 nuclease from Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Andrea F.; Krahn, Juno M.; Lu, Xun; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Pedersen, Lars C.

    2016-01-01

    Infection by Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is a leading cause of severe invasive disease in humans, including streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. GAS infections lead to nearly 163,000 annual deaths worldwide. Hypervirulent strains of S. pyogenes have evolved a plethora of virulence factors that aid in disease—by promoting bacterial adhesion to host cells, subsequent invasion of deeper tissues and blocking the immune system's attempts to eradicate the infection. Expression and secretion of the extracellular nuclease Sda1 is advantageous for promoting bacterial dissemination throughout the host organism, and evasion of the host's innate immune response. Here we present two crystal structures of Sda1, as well as biochemical studies to address key structural features and surface residues involved in DNA binding and catalysis. In the active site, Asn211 is observed to directly chelate a hydrated divalent metal ion and Arg124, on the putative substrate binding loop, likely stabilizes the transition state during phosphodiester bond cleavage. These structures provide a foundation for rational drug design of small molecule inhibitors to be used in prevention of invasive streptococcal disease. PMID:26969731

  19. Targeting Human MicroRNA Genes Using Engineered Tal-Effector Nucleases (TALENs)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ruozhen; Wallace, Jared; Dahlem, Timothy J.; Grunwald, David Jonah; O'Connell, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have quickly emerged as important regulators of mammalian physiology owing to their precise control over the expression of critical protein coding genes. Despite significant progress in our understanding of how miRNAs function in mice, there remains a fundamental need to be able to target and edit miRNA genes in the human genome. Here, we report a novel approach to disrupting human miRNA genes ex vivo using engineered TAL-effector (TALE) proteins to function as nucleases (TALENs) that specifically target and disrupt human miRNA genes. We demonstrate that functional TALEN pairs can be designed to enable disruption of miRNA seed regions, or removal of entire hairpin sequences, and use this approach to successfully target several physiologically relevant human miRNAs including miR-155*, miR-155, miR-146a and miR-125b. This technology will allow for a substantially improved capacity to study the regulation and function of miRNAs in human cells, and could be developed into a strategic means by which miRNAs can be targeted therapeutically during human disease. PMID:23667577

  20. Coordinated nuclease activities counteract Ku at single-ended DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Chanut, Pauline; Britton, Sébastien; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Repair of single-ended DNA double-strand breaks (seDSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) requires the generation of a 3' single-strand DNA overhang by exonuclease activities in a process called DNA resection. However, it is anticipated that the highly abundant DNA end-binding protein Ku sequesters seDSBs and shields them from exonuclease activities. Despite pioneering works in yeast, it is unclear how mammalian cells counteract Ku at seDSBs to allow HR to proceed. Here we show that in human cells, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of CtIP and the epistatic and coordinated actions of MRE11 and CtIP nuclease activities are required to limit the stable loading of Ku on seDSBs. We also provide evidence for a hitherto unsuspected additional mechanism that contributes to prevent Ku accumulation at seDSBs, acting downstream of MRE11 endonuclease activity and in parallel with MRE11 exonuclease activity. Finally, we show that Ku persistence at seDSBs compromises Rad51 focus assembly but not DNA resection. PMID:27641979

  1. Oligonucleotide-Mediated Genome Editing Provides Precision and Function to Engineered Nucleases and Antibiotics in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Woodward, Melody J; Mihiret, Yohannes A; Lincoln, Tracey A; Segami, Rosa E; Sanders, Steven L; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report a form of oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision genome editing in plants that uses single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODNs) to precisely and efficiently generate genome edits at DNA strand lesions made by DNA double strand break reagents. Employing a transgene model in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we obtained a high frequency of precise targeted genome edits when ssODNs were introduced into protoplasts that were pretreated with the glycopeptide antibiotic phleomycin, a nonspecific DNA double strand breaker. Simultaneous delivery of ssODN and a site-specific DNA double strand breaker, either transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9), resulted in a much greater targeted genome-editing frequency compared with treatment with DNA double strand-breaking reagents alone. Using this site-specific approach, we applied the combination of ssODN and CRISPR/Cas9 to develop an herbicide tolerance trait in flax (Linum usitatissimum) by precisely editing the 5'-ENOLPYRUVYLSHIKIMATE-3-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (EPSPS) genes. EPSPS edits occurred at sufficient frequency that we could regenerate whole plants from edited protoplasts without employing selection. These plants were subsequently determined to be tolerant to the herbicide glyphosate in greenhouse spray tests. Progeny (C1) of these plants showed the expected Mendelian segregation of EPSPS edits. Our findings show the enormous potential of using a genome-editing platform for precise, reliable trait development in crop plants. PMID:26864017

  2. Enzymological characterization of the nuclease domain from the bacterial toxin colicin E9 from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pommer, A J; Wallis, R; Moore, G R; James, R; Kleanthous, C

    1998-09-01

    The cytotoxicity of the bacterial toxin colicin E9 is due to a non-specific DNase that penetrates the cytoplasm of the infected organism and causes cell death. We report the first enzymological characterization of the overexpressed and purified 15 kDa DNase domain (E9 DNase) from this class of toxin. CD spectroscopy shows the E9 DNase to be structured in solution, and analytical ultracentrifugation data indicate that the enzyme is a monomer. The nuclease activity of the E9 DNase was compared with the well-studied, non-specific DNase I by using a spectrophotometric assay with calf thymus DNA as the substrate. Both enzymes require divalent metal ions for activity but, unlike DNase I, the E9 DNase is not activated by Ca2+ ions. Somewhat surprisingly, the E9 DNase shows optimal activity and linear kinetics in the presence of transition metals such as Ni2+ and Co2+ but displays non-linear kinetics with metals such as Mg2+ and Ca2+. Conversely, Ni2+ and other transition metals showed poor activity in a plasmid-based nicking assay, yielding significant amounts of linearized plasmid, whereas Mg2+ was very active, with the main intermediate being open-circle DNA. The results suggest that, on entry into bacterial cells, the E9 DNase is likely to exhibit primarily Mg2+-dependent nicking activity against chromosomal DNA, although other metals could also be utilized to introduce both single- and double-strand cleavages.

  3. Enzymological characterization of the nuclease domain from the bacterial toxin colicin E9 from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pommer, A J; Wallis, R; Moore, G R; James, R; Kleanthous, C

    1998-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of the bacterial toxin colicin E9 is due to a non-specific DNase that penetrates the cytoplasm of the infected organism and causes cell death. We report the first enzymological characterization of the overexpressed and purified 15 kDa DNase domain (E9 DNase) from this class of toxin. CD spectroscopy shows the E9 DNase to be structured in solution, and analytical ultracentrifugation data indicate that the enzyme is a monomer. The nuclease activity of the E9 DNase was compared with the well-studied, non-specific DNase I by using a spectrophotometric assay with calf thymus DNA as the substrate. Both enzymes require divalent metal ions for activity but, unlike DNase I, the E9 DNase is not activated by Ca2+ ions. Somewhat surprisingly, the E9 DNase shows optimal activity and linear kinetics in the presence of transition metals such as Ni2+ and Co2+ but displays non-linear kinetics with metals such as Mg2+ and Ca2+. Conversely, Ni2+ and other transition metals showed poor activity in a plasmid-based nicking assay, yielding significant amounts of linearized plasmid, whereas Mg2+ was very active, with the main intermediate being open-circle DNA. The results suggest that, on entry into bacterial cells, the E9 DNase is likely to exhibit primarily Mg2+-dependent nicking activity against chromosomal DNA, although other metals could also be utilized to introduce both single- and double-strand cleavages. PMID:9716496

  4. Genome Editing in Astyanax mexicanus Using Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Kowalko, Johanna E; Ma, Li; Jeffery, William R

    2016-01-01

    Identifying alleles of genes underlying evolutionary change is essential to understanding how and why evolution occurs. Towards this end, much recent work has focused on identifying candidate genes for the evolution of traits in a variety of species. However, until recently it has been challenging to functionally validate interesting candidate genes. Recently developed tools for genetic engineering make it possible to manipulate specific genes in a wide range of organisms. Application of this technology in evolutionarily relevant organisms will allow for unprecedented insight into the role of candidate genes in evolution. Astyanax mexicanus (A. mexicanus) is a species of fish with both surface-dwelling and cave-dwelling forms. Multiple independent lines of cave-dwelling forms have evolved from ancestral surface fish, which are interfertile with one another and with surface fish, allowing elucidation of the genetic basis of cave traits. A. mexicanus has been used for a number of evolutionary studies, including linkage analysis to identify candidate genes responsible for a number of traits. Thus, A. mexicanus is an ideal system for the application of genome editing to test the role of candidate genes. Here we report a method for using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to mutate genes in surface A. mexicanus. Genome editing using TALENs in A. mexicanus has been utilized to generate mutations in pigmentation genes. This technique can also be utilized to evaluate the role of candidate genes for a number of other traits that have evolved in cave forms of A. mexicanus. PMID:27404092

  5. Targeted mutagenesis in the silkworm Bombyx mori using zinc finger nuclease mRNA injection.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Yoko; Kobayashi, Isao; Beumer, Kelly; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sajwan, Suresh; Carroll, Dana; Tamura, Toshiki; Zurovec, Michal

    2010-10-01

    Targeted mutagenesis is one of the key methods for functional gene analysis. A simplified variant of gene targeting uses direct microinjection of custom-designed Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) mRNAs into Drosophila embryos. To evaluate the applicability of this method to gene targeting in another insect, we mutagenized the Bombyx mori epidermal color marker gene BmBLOS2, which controls the formation of uric acid granules in the larval epidermis. Our results revealed that ZFN mRNA injection is effective to induce somatic, as well as germline, mutations in a targeted gene by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The ZFN-induced NHEJ mutations lack end-filling and blunt ligation products, and include mainly 7 bp or longer deletions, as well as single nucleotide insertions. These observations suggest that the B. mori double-strand break repair system relies on microhomologies rather than on a canonical ligase IV-dependent mechanism. The frequency of germline mutants in G(1) was sufficient to be used for gene targeting relying on a screen based solely on molecular methods.

  6. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells

    PubMed Central

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M.; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A. F. V.

    2013-01-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 ‘safe harbor’ locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform. PMID:23275534

  7. A magnetization-transfer nuclear magnetic resonance study of the folding of staphylococcal nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, P.A.; Kautz, R.A.; Fox, R.O.; Dobson, C.M. )

    1989-01-10

    The equilibrium between alternative folded states of a globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease, has been investigated by using {sup 1}H NMR. Magnetization-transfer experiments have revealed the existence of a related structural heterogeneity of the unfolded state, and quantitative analysis of a series of these experiments has permitted the kinetics of folding and interconversion of the different states to be explored. A model based on cis/trans isomerism at the peptide bond preceding Pro-117 has been developed to account for the results. This model, recently supported by a protein-engineering experiment has been used to interpret the kinetic data, providing insight into the nature of the folding processes. The predominance of the cis-proline form in the folded state is shown to derive from a large favorable enthalpy term resulting from more effective overall folding interactions. The kinetics of folding and isomerization are shown to occur on similar time scales, such that more than one pathway between two states may be significant. It has been possible, however, to compare the direct folding and unfolding rates within the cis- and trans-proline-containing populations, with results suggesting that the specific stabilization of the cis peptide bond is effective only at a late stage in the folding process.

  8. Functional genetics for all: engineered nucleases, CRISPR and the gene editing revolution.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Anna F; Averof, Michalis

    2014-01-01

    Developmental biology, as all experimental science, is empowered by technological advances. The availability of genetic tools in some species - designated as model organisms - has driven their use as major platforms for understanding development, physiology and behavior. Extending these tools to a wider range of species determines whether (and how) we can experimentally approach developmental diversity and evolution. During the last two decades, comparative developmental biology (evo-devo) was marked by the introduction of gene knockdown and deep sequencing technologies that are applicable to a wide range of species. These approaches allowed us to test the developmental role of specific genes in diverse species, to study biological processes that are not accessible in established models and, in some cases, to conduct genome-wide screens that overcome the limitations of the candidate gene approach. The recent discovery of CRISPR/Cas as a means of precise alterations into the genome promises to revolutionize developmental genetics. In this review we describe the development of gene editing tools, from zinc-finger nucleases to TALENs and CRISPR, and examine their application in gene targeting, their limitations and the opportunities they present for evo-devo. We outline their use in gene knock-out and knock-in approaches, and in manipulating gene functions by directing molecular effectors to specific sites in the genome. The ease-of-use and efficiency of CRISPR in diverse species provide an opportunity to close the technology gap that exists between established model organisms and emerging genetically-tractable species.

  9. Plant Nucleases: VI. GENETIC AND DEVELOPMENTAL VARIABILITY IN RIBONUCLEASE ACTIVITY IN INBRED AND HYBRID CORN ENDOSPERMS.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C M

    1980-07-01

    The nuclease activity of developing corn endosperms was found to consist mainly of plant RNase I during the period of major deposition of dry weight. The RNase concentrations in most inbred lines and hybrids increased throughout development, but there were large differences among genotypes in the enzyme levels at all stages. Crosses were made among inbreds classified as containing high or low RNase levels. In most cases, the general patterns of enzyme levels during development of the hybrid endosperms were not changed greatly, or showed intermediate levels of activity compared to the inbred parents. When Oh43 was used as a maternal parent, two contrasting developmental patterns were produced by using two low RNase inbreds as pollen parents. There appear to be genetic controls not only on the gross RNase levels, but also on the timing of RNase synthesis and on its stability after the cells mature. Environmental influences on RNase levels in the endosperm were noted one year.At 18 days after pollination, the RNase levels in the endosperm crown were as much as 10 times higher than in the base. By 35 days after pollination, the enzyme levels were generally uniform; at 50 days, the basal tissue usually contained the highest levels. In some genotypes, however, the enzyme levels fell in the crown while they rose in the base. These changes suggest that RNase may be associated with developmental controls that operate as the different portions of the endosperm cease cell division and begin synthesis of starch and zein. PMID:16661371

  10. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once.

    PubMed

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Tainer, John A

    2014-07-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by James Watson and Francis Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure

  11. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once

    PubMed Central

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien

    2014-01-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by Watson-Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure twice these nucleases

  12. Release of Periplasmic Nucleotidase Induced by Human Antimicrobial Peptide in E. coli Causes Accumulation of the Immunomodulator Adenosine.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Andreia Bergamo; Türck, Patrick; Stutz, Elaine; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Previous work by our group described that human β-defensin-2 induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine (Ado) in E. coli cultures through a non-lytic mechanism causing severe plasmolysis. Here, we investigate the presence of AMP as a direct precursor and the involvement of a bacterial enzyme in the generation of extracellular Ado by treated bacteria. Following hBD-2 treatment, metabolites were quantified in the supernatants using targeted HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Microbial growth was monitored by optical density and cell viability was determined by colony forming units counts. Phosphatase activity was measured using chromogenic substrate pNPP. The results demonstrate that defensin-treated E. coli strain W releases AMP in the extracellular space, where it is converted to Ado by a bacterial soluble factor. An increase in phosphatase activity in the supernatant was observed after peptide treatment, similar to the effect of sucrose-induced osmotic stress, suggesting that the periplasmic 5'nucleotidase (5'-NT) is released following the plasmolysis event triggered by the peptide. Ado accumulation was enhanced in the presence of Co2+ ion and inhibited by EDTA, further supporting the involvement of a metallo-phosphatase such as 5'-NT in extracellular AMP conversion into Ado. The comparative analysis of hBD-induced Ado accumulation in different E. coli strains and in Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed that the response is not correlated to the peptide's effect on cell viability, but indicates it might be dependent on the subcellular distribution of the nucleotidase. Taken together, these data shed light on a yet undescribed mechanism of host-microbial interaction: a human antimicrobial peptide inducing selective release of a bacterial enzyme (E. coli 5'-NT), leading to the formation of a potent immunomodulator metabolite (Ado).

  13. Release of Periplasmic Nucleotidase Induced by Human Antimicrobial Peptide in E. coli Causes Accumulation of the Immunomodulator Adenosine.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Andreia Bergamo; Türck, Patrick; Stutz, Elaine; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Previous work by our group described that human β-defensin-2 induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine (Ado) in E. coli cultures through a non-lytic mechanism causing severe plasmolysis. Here, we investigate the presence of AMP as a direct precursor and the involvement of a bacterial enzyme in the generation of extracellular Ado by treated bacteria. Following hBD-2 treatment, metabolites were quantified in the supernatants using targeted HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Microbial growth was monitored by optical density and cell viability was determined by colony forming units counts. Phosphatase activity was measured using chromogenic substrate pNPP. The results demonstrate that defensin-treated E. coli strain W releases AMP in the extracellular space, where it is converted to Ado by a bacterial soluble factor. An increase in phosphatase activity in the supernatant was observed after peptide treatment, similar to the effect of sucrose-induced osmotic stress, suggesting that the periplasmic 5'nucleotidase (5'-NT) is released following the plasmolysis event triggered by the peptide. Ado accumulation was enhanced in the presence of Co2+ ion and inhibited by EDTA, further supporting the involvement of a metallo-phosphatase such as 5'-NT in extracellular AMP conversion into Ado. The comparative analysis of hBD-induced Ado accumulation in different E. coli strains and in Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed that the response is not correlated to the peptide's effect on cell viability, but indicates it might be dependent on the subcellular distribution of the nucleotidase. Taken together, these data shed light on a yet undescribed mechanism of host-microbial interaction: a human antimicrobial peptide inducing selective release of a bacterial enzyme (E. coli 5'-NT), leading to the formation of a potent immunomodulator metabolite (Ado). PMID:26371472

  14. Regulation of nap Gene Expression and Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase Activity in the Phototrophic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158

    PubMed Central

    Gavira, Mónica; Roldán, M. Dolores; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial periplasmic nitrate reductases (Nap) can play different physiological roles and are expressed under different conditions depending on the organism. Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158 has a Nap system, encoded by the napKEFDABC gene cluster, but nitrite formed is not further reduced because this strain lacks nitrite reductase. Nap activity increases in the presence of nitrate and oxygen but is unaffected by ammonium. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blots demonstrated that the napKEFDABC genes constitute an operon transcribed as a single 5.5-kb product. Northern blots and nap-lacZ fusions revealed that nap expression is threefold higher under aerobic conditions but is regulated by neither nitrate nor ammonium, although it is weakly induced by nitrite. On the other hand, nitrate but not nitrite causes a rapid enzyme activation, explaining the higher Nap activity found in nitrate-grown cells. Translational nap′-′lacZ fusions reveal that the napK and napD genes are not efficiently translated, probably due to mRNA secondary structures occluding the translation initiation sites of these genes. Neither butyrate nor caproate increases nap expression, although cells growing phototrophically on these reduced substrates show a very high Nap activity in vivo (nitrite accumulation is sevenfold higher than in medium with malate). Phototrophic growth on butyrate or caproate medium is severely reduced in the NapA− mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that nitrate reduction in R. sphaeroides is mainly regulated at the level of enzyme activity by both nitrate and electron supply and confirm that the Nap system is involved in redox balancing using nitrate as an ancillary oxidant to dissipate excess reductant. PMID:11872721

  15. Release of Periplasmic Nucleotidase Induced by Human Antimicrobial Peptide in E. coli Causes Accumulation of the Immunomodulator Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Estrela, Andreia Bergamo; Türck, Patrick; Stutz, Elaine; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Previous work by our group described that human β-defensin-2 induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine (Ado) in E. coli cultures through a non-lytic mechanism causing severe plasmolysis. Here, we investigate the presence of AMP as a direct precursor and the involvement of a bacterial enzyme in the generation of extracellular Ado by treated bacteria. Following hBD-2 treatment, metabolites were quantified in the supernatants using targeted HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Microbial growth was monitored by optical density and cell viability was determined by colony forming units counts. Phosphatase activity was measured using chromogenic substrate pNPP. The results demonstrate that defensin-treated E. coli strain W releases AMP in the extracellular space, where it is converted to Ado by a bacterial soluble factor. An increase in phosphatase activity in the supernatant was observed after peptide treatment, similar to the effect of sucrose-induced osmotic stress, suggesting that the periplasmic 5'nucleotidase (5'-NT) is released following the plasmolysis event triggered by the peptide. Ado accumulation was enhanced in the presence of Co2+ ion and inhibited by EDTA, further supporting the involvement of a metallo-phosphatase such as 5’-NT in extracellular AMP conversion into Ado. The comparative analysis of hBD-induced Ado accumulation in different E. coli strains and in Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed that the response is not correlated to the peptide's effect on cell viability, but indicates it might be dependent on the subcellular distribution of the nucleotidase. Taken together, these data shed light on a yet undescribed mechanism of host-microbial interaction: a human antimicrobial peptide inducing selective release of a bacterial enzyme (E. coli 5'-NT), leading to the formation of a potent immunomodulator metabolite (Ado). PMID:26371472

  16. The CopC Family: Structural and Bioinformatic Insights into a Diverse Group of Periplasmic Copper Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Thomas J; Kenney, Grace E; Hurley, Joseph D; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2016-04-19

    The CopC proteins are periplasmic copper binding proteins believed to play a role in bacterial copper homeostasis. Previous studies have focused on CopCs that are part of seven-protein Cop or Pco systems involved in copper resistance. These canonical CopCs contain distinct Cu(I) and Cu(II) binding sites. Mounting evidence suggests that CopCs are more widely distributed, often present only with the CopD inner membrane protein, frequently as a fusion protein, and that the CopC and CopD proteins together function in the uptake of copper to the cytoplasm. In the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, genes encoding a CopCD pair are located adjacent to the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) operon. The CopC from this organism (Mst-CopC) was expressed, purified, and structurally characterized. The 1.46 Å resolution crystal structure of Mst-CopC reveals a single Cu(II) binding site with coordination somewhat different from that in canonical CopCs, and the absence of a Cu(I) binding site. Extensive bioinformatic analyses indicate that the majority of CopCs in fact contain only a Cu(II) site, with just 10% of sequences corresponding to the canonical two-site CopC. Accordingly, a new classification scheme for CopCs was developed, and detailed analyses of the sequences and their genomic neighborhoods reveal new proteins potentially involved in copper homeostasis, providing a framework for expanded models of CopCD function.

  17. Bacterial lysis liberates the neutrophil migration suppressor YbcL from the periplasm of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lau, Megan E; Danka, Elizabeth S; Tiemann, Kristin M; Hunstad, David A

    2014-12-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) modulates aspects of the innate immune response during urinary tract infection to facilitate bacterial invasion of the bladder epithelium, a requirement for the propagation of infection. For example, UPEC-encoded YbcL suppresses the traversal of bladder epithelia by neutrophils in both an in vitro model and an in vivo murine cystitis model. The suppressive activity of YbcL requires liberation from the bacterial periplasm, though the mechanism of release is undefined. Here we present findings on the site of action of YbcL and demonstrate a novel mode of secretion for a UPEC exoprotein. Suppression of neutrophil migration by purified YbcL(UTI), encoded by cystitis isolate UTI89, required the presence of a uroepithelial layer; YbcL(UTI) did not inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis directly. YbcL(UTI) was released to a greater extent during UPEC infection of uroepithelial cells than during that of neutrophils. Release of YbcL(UTI) was maximal when UPEC and bladder epithelial cells were in close proximity. Established modes of secretion, including outer membrane vesicles, the type II secretion system, and the type IV pilus, were dispensable for YbcL(UTI) release from UPEC. Instead, YbcL(UTI) was liberated during bacterial death, which was augmented upon exposure to bladder epithelial cells, as confirmed by detection of bacterial cytoplasmic proteins and DNA in the supernatant and enumeration of bacteria with compromised membranes. As YbcL(UTI) acts on the uroepithelium to attenuate neutrophil migration, this mode of release may represent a type of altruistic cooperation within a UPEC population during colonization of the urinary tract.

  18. Efficient Immunoglobulin Gene Disruption and Targeted Replacement in Rabbit Using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Sonja; Ros, Francesca; Lifke, Valeria; Zeitler, Bryan; Rottmann, Oswald; Vincent, Anna; Zhang, Lei; Jenkins, Shirin; Niersbach, Helmut; Kind, Alexander J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Schnieke, Angelika E.; Platzer, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM) locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM+ and IgG+ B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields. PMID:21695153

  19. Efficacy of a Marine Bacterial Nuclease against Biofilm Forming Microorganisms Isolated from Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Robert C.; Mokhtar, Norehan; Ford, Michael; Hall, Michael J.; Burgess, J. Grant; ElBadawey, Mohamed Reda; Jakubovics, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The persistent colonization of paranasal sinus mucosa by microbial biofilms is a major factor in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Control of microorganisms within biofilms is hampered by the presence of viscous extracellular polymers of host or microbial origin, including nucleic acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of extracellular DNA in biofilm formation by bacteria associated with CRS. Methods/Principal Findings Obstructive mucin was collected from patients during functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Examination of the mucous by transmission electron microscopy revealed an acellular matrix punctuated occasionally with host cells in varying states of degradation. Bacteria were observed in biofilms on mucosal biopsies, and between two and six different species were isolated from each of 20 different patient samples. In total, 16 different bacterial genera were isolated, of which the most commonly identified organisms were coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and α-haemolytic streptococci. Twenty-four fresh clinical isolates were selected for investigation of biofilm formation in vitro using a microplate model system. Biofilms formed by 14 strains, including all 9 extracellular nuclease-producing bacteria, were significantly disrupted by treatment with a novel bacterial deoxyribonuclease, NucB, isolated from a marine strain of Bacillus licheniformis. Extracellular biofilm matrix was observed in untreated samples but not in those treated with NucB and extracellular DNA was purified from in vitro biofilms. Conclusion/Significance Our data demonstrate that bacteria associated with CRS form robust biofilms which can be reduced by treatment with matrix-degrading enzymes such as NucB. The dispersal of bacterial biofilms with NucB may offer an additional therapeutic target for CRS sufferers. PMID:23441151

  20. Processing of 3'-Phosphoglycolate-Terminated DNA Double-StrandBreaks by Artemis Nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Povrik, Lawrence F.; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Ruizhe; Cowan, Morton J.; Yannone, Steven M.

    2005-10-01

    The Artemis nuclease is required for V(D)J recombination and for repair of an as yet undefined subset of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. To assess the possibility that Artemis functions on oxidatively modified double-strand break termini, its activity toward model DNA substrates, bearing either 3{prime}-hydroxyl or 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate moieties, was examined. A 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate had little effect on Artemis-mediated trimming of long 3{prime} overhangs (>9 nucleotides), which were efficiently trimmed to 4-5 nucleotides. However, 3{prime}-phosphoglycolates on overhangs of 4-5 bases promoted selective Artemis-mediated trimming of a single 3{prime}-terminal nucleotide, while at least 2 nucleotides were trimmed from identical hydroxyl-terminated substrates. Artemis also efficiently removed a single nucleotide from a phosphoglycolate-terminated 3-base 3{prime} overhang, while leaving an analogous hydroxyl-terminated overhang largely intact. Such removal was dependent upon Ku, DNA-dependent protein kinase, and ATP. Together, these data suggest that Artemis-mediated cleavage of 3{prime} overhangs requires a minimum of 2 nucleotides, or a nucleotide plus a phosphoglycolate, 3{prime} to the cleavage site. Shorter 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated overhangs and blunt ends were also processed by Artemis, but much less efficiently. Consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of Artemis, human cells lacking Artemis exhibited hypersensitivity to X-rays, bleomycin and neocarzinostatin, which all induce 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated double-strand breaks. Collectively, these results suggest that 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate termini and/or specific classes of DNA ends that arise from such blocked termini are relevant Artemis substrates in vivo.

  1. Genetic Analysis of Zinc-Finger Nuclease-Induced Gene Targeting in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bozas, Ana; Beumer, Kelly J.; Trautman, Jonathan K.; Carroll, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) to cleave the chromosomal target, we have achieved high frequencies of gene targeting in the Drosophila germline. Both local mutagenesis through nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and gene replacement via homologous recombination (HR) are stimulated by target cleavage. In this study we investigated the mechanisms that underlie these processes, using materials for the rosy (ry) locus. The frequency of HR dropped significantly in flies homozygous for mutations in spnA (Rad51) or okr (Rad54), two components of the invasion-mediated synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) pathway. When single-strand annealing (SSA) was also blocked by the use of a circular donor DNA, HR was completely abolished. This indicates that the majority of HR proceeds via SDSA, with a minority mediated by SSA. In flies deficient in lig4 (DNA ligase IV), a component of the major NHEJ pathway, the proportion of HR products rose significantly. This indicates that most NHEJ products are produced in a lig4-dependent process. When both spnA and lig4 were mutated and a circular donor was provided, the frequency of ry mutations was still high and no HR products were recovered. The local mutations produced in these circumstances must have arisen through an alternative, lig4-independent end-joining mechanism. These results show what repair pathways operate on double-strand breaks in this gene targeting system. They also demonstrate that the outcome can be biased toward gene replacement by disabling the major NHEJ pathway and toward simple mutagenesis by interfering with the major HR process. PMID:19380480

  2. Enthalpy-driven nuclease-like activity and mechanism of peptide-chlorambucil conjugates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Robin C K; Huang, Jonathan T B; Chen, Yu-Ling; Hung, Chia-Chun; Liao, Mokai; Yao, Wen-Chen; Chen, Chiu-Heng; Liou, Chien-Chung; Waring, Michael J; Sheh, Leung

    2014-07-21

    We report the results of attaching the anticancer drug chlorambucil (CLB) to two high-affinity DNA binding peptides: Met-Hyp-Arg-Lys-(Py)4-Lys-Arg-NH2 (HyM-10) and Gln-Hyp-Arg-Lys-(Py)4-Lys-Arg-NH2 (HyQ-10). These CLB-peptide conjugates cleave DNA very effectively and sequence-selectively without the use of chemicals, heat, or UV irradiation. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis identifies the sites where CLB-HyM-10 and CLB-HyQ-10 attack a complementary pair of 5'-(32)P-labeled duplexes derived from pBR322 in the absence of piperidine or other chemical additives. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has confirmed the preferential cleavage sites as well as a novel stepwise cleavage mechanism of sequence-selective DNA cleavage. Resembling restriction endonucleases, the CLB-peptide conjugates appear to be capable of producing double strand DNA breaks. Circular dichroism studies show that CLB-HyM-10 and CLB-HyQ-10 induce significant local conformational changes in DNA via the minor groove, possibly with dimeric binding stoichiometry. The energetic basis of DNA binding by these conjugates has been investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry, revealing that the binding of both the peptides and their CLB conjugates is overwhelmingly enthalpy-driven. The maintenance of a conserved negative binding free energy in DNA-conjugate interactions is a crucial feature of the universal enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon. The strongly enthalpy-driven binding of CLB-peptide conjugates to preferred loci in DNA furnishes the required proximity effect to generate the observed nuclease-like sequence-selective cleavage.

  3. Characteristics of Secretion of Penicillinase, Alkaline Phosphatase, and Nuclease by Bacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Chesbro, William R.; Lampen, J. O.

    1968-01-01

    The distribution of alkaline phosphatase and nuclease activity between cells and medium was examined in one strain of Bacillus licheniformis and four strains of B. subtilis. Over 95% of both activities was found in the medium of the B. licheniformis culture, but in the B. subtilis cultures the amount of enzyme activity found in the medium varied with the strain and the enzyme considered. B. licheniformis 749 and its penicillinase magnoconstitutive mutant 749/C were grown in continuous culture with phosphorous as the growth-limiting factor, and the kinetics of penicillinase formation and secretion were examined. Nutrient arrest halted secretion (usually after a lag of about 30 min) in both the inducible and constitutive strains. Chloramphenicol did not eliminate secretion, but under certain circumstances reduced its rate. In the inducible strain treated with a low level of inducer, the rate of secretion was more affected by the rate of synthesis than by the level of cell-bound enzyme. During induction, the onset of accretion of cell-bound penicillinase and secretion of the exoenzyme were nearly simultaneous. It seems unlikely that a long-lived, membrane- or cell-bound intermediate is mandatory in the secretion of the three enzymes by Bacillus species. In the case of penicillinase secretion, there are at least two different phases. When penicillinase synthesis is proceeding rapidly, the rate of secretion is five to six times greater at equivalent concentrations of membrane-bound penicillinase than it is when penicillinase synthesis is reduced. The data require that any membrane-bound intermediate in the formation of exoenzyme be much shorter-lived in cells with a high rate of synthesis than in cells with a low rate. Either there are two separate routes for the secretion of penicillinase or the characteristics of the process vary substantially between the early stages and the declining phase of induction. PMID:4970649

  4. Nuclease Activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 Promotes Intracellular Infection of Amoebal Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Felizza F.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Fairbairn, Stephanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts. PMID:25547789

  5. Targeted gene addition into a specified location in the human genome using designed zinc finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Moehle, Erica A.; Rock, Jeremy M.; Lee, Ya-Li; Jouvenot, Yann; DeKelver, Russell C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient incorporation of novel DNA sequences into a specific site in the genome of living human cells remains a challenge despite its potential utility to genetic medicine, biotechnology, and basic research. We find that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can stimulate integration of long DNA stretches into a predetermined genomic location, resulting in high-efficiency site-specific gene addition. Using an extrachromosomal DNA donor carrying a 12-bp tag, a 900-bp ORF, or a 1.5-kb promoter-transcription unit flanked by locus-specific homology arms, we find targeted integration frequencies of 15%, 6%, and 5%, respectively, within 72 h of treatment, and with no selection for the desired event. Importantly, we find that the integration event occurs in a homology-directed manner and leads to the accurate reconstruction of the donor-specified genotype at the endogenous chromosomal locus, and hence presumably results from synthesis-dependent strand annealing repair of the break using the donor DNA as a template. This site-specific gene addition occurs with no measurable increase in the rate of random integration. Remarkably, we also find that ZFNs can drive the addition of an 8-kb sequence carrying three distinct promoter-transcription units into an endogenous locus at a frequency of 6%, also in the absence of any selection. These data reveal the surprising versatility of the specialized polymerase machinery involved in double-strand break repair, illuminate a powerful approach to mammalian cell engineering, and open the possibility of ZFN-driven gene addition therapy for human genetic disease. PMID:17360608

  6. Production of Apolipoprotein C-III Knockout Rabbits using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongshan; Zhang, Jifeng; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Tianqing; Fan, Yanbo; Fan, Jianglin; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (Apo) C-III (ApoCIII) resides on the surface of plasma chylomicron (CM), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL). It has been recognized that high levels of plasma ApoCIII constitutea risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Elevated plasma ApoCIII level often correlates with insulin resistance, obesity, and hypertriglyceridemia. Invaluable knowledge on the roles of ApoCIIIin lipid metabolisms and CVD has been obtained from transgenic mouse models including ApoCIII knockout (KO) mice; however, it is noted that the metabolism of lipoprotein in mice is different from that of humans in many aspects. It is not known until now whether elevated plasma ApoCIII is directly atherogenic. We worked to develop ApoCIII KO rabbits in the present study based on the hypothesis that rabbits can serve as a reasonablemodelfor studying human lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis. Zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) sets targeting rabbit ApoCIIIgene were subjected to in vitro validation prior to embryo microinjection. The mRNA was injected to the cytoplasm of 35 rabbit pronuclear stage embryos, and evaluated the mutation rates at the blastocyst state. Of sixteen blastocysts that were assayed, a satisfactory 50% mutation rate (8/16) at the targeting site was achieved, supporting the use of Set 1 for in vivo experiments. Next, we microinjected 145 embryos with Set 1 mRNA, and transferred these embryos to 7 recipient rabbits. After 30 days gestation, 21 kits were born, out of which five were confirmed as ApoCIII KO rabbits after PCR sequencing assays. The KO animal rate (#KO kits/total born) was 23.8%. The overall production efficiency is 3.4% (5 kits/145 embryos transferred). The present work demonstrated that ZFN is a highly efficient method to produce KO rabbits. These ApoCIII KO rabbits are novel resources to study the roles of ApoCIII in lipid metabolisms. PMID:24301055

  7. Zebrafish foxP2 zinc finger nuclease mutant has normal axon pathfinding.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lingyan; Hoshijima, Kazuyuki; Grunwald, David J; Fujimoto, Esther; Quist, Tyler S; Sneddon, Jacob; Chien, Chi-Bin; Stevenson, Tamara J; Bonkowsky, Joshua L

    2012-01-01

    foxP2, a forkhead-domain transcription factor, is critical for speech and language development in humans, but its role in the establishment of CNS connectivity is unclear. While in vitro studies have identified axon guidance molecules as targets of foxP2 regulation, and cell culture assays suggest a role for foxP2 in neurite outgrowth, in vivo studies have been lacking regarding a role for foxP2 in axon pathfinding. We used a modified zinc finger nuclease methodology to generate mutations in the zebrafish foxP2 gene. Using PCR-based high resolution melt curve analysis (HRMA) of G0 founder animals, we screened and identified three mutants carrying nonsense mutations in the 2(nd) coding exon: a 17 base-pair (bp) deletion, an 8bp deletion, and a 4bp insertion. Sequence analysis of cDNA confirmed that these were frameshift mutations with predicted early protein truncations. Homozygous mutant fish were viable and fertile, with unchanged body morphology, and no apparent differences in CNS apoptosis, proliferation, or patterning at embryonic stages. There was a reduction in expression of the known foxP2 target gene cntnap2 that was rescued by injection of wild-type foxP2 transcript. When we examined axon pathfinding using a pan-axonal marker or transgenic lines, including a foxP2-neuron-specific enhancer, we did not observe any axon guidance errors. Our findings suggest that foxP2 is not necessary for axon pathfinding during development.

  8. MCCE analysis of the pKas of introduced buried acids and bases in staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Zhu, Xuyu; Klein, Max C

    2011-12-01

    The pK(a)s of 96 acids and bases introduced into buried sites in the staphylococcal nuclease protein (SNase) were calculated using the multiconformation continuum electrostatics (MCCE) program and the results compared with experimental values. The pK(a)s are obtained by Monte Carlo sampling of coupled side chain protonation and position as a function of pH. The dependence of the results on the protein dielectric constant (ε(prot)) in the continuum electrostatics analysis and on the Lennard-Jones non-electrostatics parameters was evaluated. The pK(a)s of the introduced residues have a clear dependence on ε(prot,) whereas native ionizable residues do not. The native residues have electrostatic interactions with other residues in the protein favoring ionization, which are larger than the desolvation penalty favoring the neutral state. Increasing ε(prot) scales both terms, which for these residues leads to small changes in pK(a). The introduced residues have a larger desolvation penalty and negligible interactions with residues in the protein. For these residues, changing ε(prot) has a large influence on the calculated pK(a). An ε(prot) of 8-10 and a Lennard-Jones scaling of 0.25 is best here. The X-ray crystal structures of the mutated proteins are found to provide somewhat better results than calculations carried out on mutations made in silico. Initial relaxation of the in silico mutations by Gromacs and extensive side chain rotamer sampling within MCCE can significantly improve the match with experiment.

  9. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  10. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-02-18

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  11. Small-molecule inhibitors of bacterial AddAB and RecBCD helicase-nuclease DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Susan K; Spicer, Timothy; Karabulut, Ahmet C; Londoño, Luz Marina; Eberhart, Christina; Fernandez Vega, Virneliz; Bannister, Thomas D; Hodder, Peter; Smith, Gerald R

    2012-05-18

    The AddAB and RecBCD helicase-nucleases are related enzymes prevalent among bacteria but not eukaryotes and are instrumental in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and in genetic recombination. Although these enzymes have been extensively studied both genetically and biochemically, inhibitors specific for this class of enzymes have not been reported. We developed a high-throughput screen based on the ability of phage T4 gene 2 mutants to grow in Escherichia coli only if the host RecBCD enzyme, or a related helicase-nuclease, is inhibited or genetically inactivated. We optimized this screen for use in 1536-well plates and screened 326,100 small molecules in the NIH molecular libraries sample collection for inhibitors of the Helicobacter pylori AddAB enzyme expressed in an E. coli recBCD deletion strain. Secondary screening used assays with cells expressing AddAB or RecBCD and a viability assay that measured the effect of compounds on cell growth without phage infection. From this screening campaign, 12 compounds exhibiting efficacy and selectivity were tested for inhibition of purified AddAB and RecBCD helicase and nuclease activities and in cell-based assays for recombination; seven were active in the 0.1-50 μM range in one or another assay. Compounds structurally related to two of these were similarly tested, and three were active in the 0.1-50 μM range. These compounds should be useful in further enzymatic, genetic, and physiological studies of these enzymes, both purified and in cells. They may also lead to useful antibacterial agents, since this class of enzymes is needed for successful bacterial infection of mammals.

  12. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template

    PubMed Central

    Sather, Blythe D.; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S.; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F.; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Rawlings, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4+ T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV) – mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP – modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34+ cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties. PMID:26424571

  13. Degradation of Single Stranded Nucleic Acids by the Chemical Nuclease Activity of the Metal Complex [Cu(phen)(nal)]+

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Ramírez, Norma; Mendoza-Díaz, Guillermo; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The chemical design of metal complexes of the type [Cu(phen)(antib)]+ (where antib is a quinolone or a fluoroquinolone) has been carried out in an approach to better understand how the coordination of their components affect the activity of quinolones. The ability of [Cu(phen)(nal)]+ to interact with DNA in vivo and its capacity to promote the degradation of plasmid and chromosomal DNA, under reductive conditions has been previously reported. However whether this compound utilizes other intracellular targets to promote bacterial killing was a question that deserved to be answered. In this paper, the studies of the chemical nuclease properties encoded by the metal complex [Cu(phen)(nal)]+ were extended by using different types of single chain nucleic acids, i.e, ribosomal and tumor mosaic virus RNAs as well as poly-dA-dT. Our results showed that degradation of the nucleic acids occurred only under reductive conditions. Although MPA and [3-mercaptoethanol were the chemical reducers that best assisted the nuclease reaction, other biological compounds such as citric and succinic acid also were shown to act like reducers in that reaction. All.hough the nuclease activity of [Cu(phen)(nal)]+ was comparable to that exhibited by bis copper phenanthroline [Cu(phen)z]2+our results showed that none of the individual components of [Cu(phen)(nal)]+ was able to promote the degradation of either the RNAs or poly(dA-dT). These results strongly support the hypothesis that the metal complex [Cu(phen)(nal)] uses not only DNA but also RNA as targets to promote bacterial killing. PMID:18365040

  14. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template.

    PubMed

    Sather, Blythe D; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-30

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP-modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34(+) cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties.

  15. Tandem overproduction and characterisation of the nuclease domain of colicin E9 and its cognate inhibitor protein Im9.

    PubMed

    Wallis, R; Reilly, A; Barnes, K; Abell, C; Campbell, D G; Moore, G R; James, R; Kleanthous, C

    1994-03-01

    We report the overproduction of the non-specific endonuclease domain of the bacterial toxin colicin E9 and its preliminary characterisation in vitro. The enzymatic colicins (61 kDa) are normally released from producing cells in a complex with their cognate inhibitors, known as the immunity proteins (9.5 kDa). Tryptic digestion of the purified ColE9 complex was found to generate two major components, a monomer derived from the N-terminal and central regions of the toxin and a heterodimer comprising the catalytically active C-terminal domain of the colicin bound to its intact immunity protein, Im9. N-terminal amino acid sequencing, in conjunction with electrospray mass spectrometry, shows that preparations of the DNase domain isolated by this method are heterogeneous, thus making subsequent mechanistic and structural analysis difficult. This problem was circumvented by selectively overexpressing the C-terminal 15-kDa nuclease domain of colicin E9 in tandem with its cognate inhibitor in Escherichia coli. This tandem overexpression strategy allowed high-level production of a 25-kDa protein complex comprising the C-terminal DNase domain of colicin E9 tightly bound to its specific inhibitor Im9, thus masking the anticipated toxicity of the nuclease. The DNase domain was then separated from Im9 under denaturing conditions, refolded by removal of the denaturant and the renatured protein shown to possess both endonuclease and Im9 binding activity. These results describe a novel method for the overproduction of a nuclease in bacteria by co-expressing its specific inhibitor and lay the foundations for a full mechanistic, biophysical and structural characterization of the isolated DNase domain of the colicin E9 toxin. PMID:8125102

  16. The Structure of the Periplasmic Sensor Domain of the Histidine Kinase CusS Shows Unusual Metal Ion Coordination at the Dimeric Interface.

    PubMed

    Affandi, Trisiani; Issaian, Aaron V; McEvoy, Megan M

    2016-09-20

    In bacteria, two-component systems act as signaling systems to respond to environmental stimuli. Two-component systems generally consist of a sensor histidine kinase and a response regulator, which work together through histidyl-aspartyl phosphorelay to result in gene regulation. One of the two-component systems in Escherichia coli, CusS-CusR, is known to induce expression of cusCFBA genes at increased periplasmic Cu(I) and Ag(I) concentrations to help maintain metal ion homeostasis. CusS is a membrane-associated histidine kinase with a periplasmic sensor domain connected to the cytoplasmic ATP binding and catalytic domains through two transmembrane helices. The mechanism of how CusS senses increasing metal ion concentrations and activates CusR is not yet known. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Ag(I)-bound periplasmic sensor domain of CusS at a resolution of 2.15 Å. The structure reveals that CusS forms a homodimer with four Ag(I) binding sites per dimeric complex. Two symmetric metal binding sites are found at the dimeric interface, which are each formed by two histidines and one phenylalanine with an unusual cation-π interaction. The other metal ion binding sites are in a nonconserved region within each monomer. Functional analyses of CusS variants with mutations in the metal sites suggest that the metal ion binding site at the dimer interface is more important for function. The structural and functional data provide support for a model in which metal-induced dimerization results in increases in kinase activity in the cytoplasmic domains of CusS.

  17. The Conserved Candida albicans CA3427 Gene Product Defines a New Family of Proteins Exhibiting the Generic Periplasmic Binding Protein Structural Fold

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sébastien; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Mouz, Nicolas; Rousselle, Tristan; Maza, Caroline; Monchois, Vincent; Abergel, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial diseases due to Candida albicans infections are in constant rise in hospitals, where they cause serious complications to already fragile intensive care patients. Antifungal drug resistance is fast becoming a serious issue due to the emergence of strains resistant to currently available antifungal agents. Thus the urgency to identify new potential protein targets, the function and structure of which may guide the development of new antifungal drugs. In this context, we initiated a comparative genomics study in search of promising protein coding genes among the most conserved ones in reference fungal genomes. The CA3427 gene was selected on the basis of its presence among pathogenic fungi contrasting with its absence in the non pathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report the crystal 3D-structure of the Candida albicans CA3427 protein at 2.1 Å resolution. The combined analysis of its sequence and structure reveals a structural fold originally associated with periplasmic binding proteins. The CA3427 structure highlights a binding site located between the two protein domains, corresponding to a sequence segment conserved among fungi. Two crystal forms of CA3427 were found, suggesting that the presence or absence of a ligand at the proposed binding site might trigger a “Venus flytrap” motion, coupled to the previously described activity of bacterial periplasmic binding proteins. The conserved binding site defines a new subfamily of periplasmic binding proteins also found in many bacteria of the bacteroidetes division, in a choanoflagellate (a free-living unicellular and colonial flagellate eukaryote) and in a placozoan (the closest multicellular relative of animals). A phylogenetic analysis suggests that this gene family originated in bacteria before its horizontal transfer to an ancestral eukaryote prior to the radiation of fungi. It was then lost by the Saccharomycetales which include Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:21494601

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of exogenous anion exchange in FeFbpA-NTA: significance of periplasmic anion lability and anion binding activity of ferric binding protein A.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Jared J; Gabricević, Mario; Mietzner, Timothy A; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2010-02-01

    The bacterial transferrin ferric binding protein A (FbpA) requires an exogenous anion to facilitate iron sequestration, and subsequently to shuttle the metal across the periplasm to the cytoplasmic membrane. In the diverse conditions of the periplasm, numerous anions are known to be present. Prior in vitro experiments have demonstrated the ability of multiple anions to fulfill the synergistic iron-binding requirement, and the identity of the bound anion has been shown to modulate important physicochemical properties of iron-bound FbpA (FeFbpA). Here we address the kinetics and mechanism of anion exchange for the FeFbpA-nitrilotriacetate (NTA) assembly with several biologically relevant anions (citrate, oxalate, phosphate, and pyrophosphate), with nonphysiologic NTA serving as a representative synergistic anion/chelator. The kinetic data are consistent with an anion-exchange process that occurs in multiple steps, dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion. The exchange mechanism may proceed either as a direct substitution or through an intermediate FeFbpA-X* assembly based on anion (X) identity. Our kinetic results further develop an understanding of exogenous anion lability in the periplasm, as well as address the final step of the iron-free FbpA (apo-FbpA)/Fe(3+) sequestration mechanism. Our results highlight the kinetic significance of the FbpA anion binding site, demonstrating a correlation between apo-FbpA/anion affinity and the FeFbpA rate of anion exchange, further supporting the requirement of an exogenous anion to complete tight sequestration of iron by FbpA, and developing a mechanism for anion exchange within FeFbpA that is dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion. PMID:19813031

  19. The Structure of the Periplasmic Sensor Domain of the Histidine Kinase CusS Shows Unusual Metal Ion Coordination at the Dimeric Interface

    PubMed Central

    Affandi, Trisiani; Issaian, Aaron V.; McEvoy, Megan M.

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, two-component systems act as signaling systems to respond to environmental stimuli. Two-component systems generally consist of a sensor histidine kinase and a response regulator, which work together through histidyl-aspartyl phospho-relay to result in gene regulation. One of the two-component systems in Escherichia coli, CusS-CusR, is known to induce expression of cusCFBA genes under increased periplasmic Cu(I) and Ag(I) concentrations to help maintain metal ion homeostasis. CusS is a membrane-associated histidine kinase with a periplasmic sensor domain connected to the cytoplasmic ATP-binding and catalytic domains through two transmembrane helices. The mechanism of how CusS senses increasing metal ion concentrations and activates CusR is not yet known. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Ag(I)-bound periplasmic sensor domain of CusS at a resolution of 2.15 Å. The structure reveals that CusS forms a homodimer with four Ag(I) binding sites per dimeric complex. Two symmetric metal binding sites are found at the dimeric interface, which are each formed by two histidines and one phenylalanine with an unusual cation-π interaction. The other metal ion binding sites are in a non-conserved region within each monomer. Functional analyses of CusS variants with mutations in the metal sites suggest that the metal ion binding site at the dimer interface is more important for function. The structural and functional data provide support for a model in which metal-induced dimerization results in increases in kinase activity in the cytoplasmic domains of CusS. PMID:27583660

  20. Zinc Finger Nuclease: A New Approach to Overcome Beta-Lactam Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi Dastjerdeh, Mansoureh; Kouhpayeh, Shirin; Sabzehei, Faezeh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Salehi, Mansour; Mohammadi, Zahra; Shariati, Laleh; Hejazi, Zahra; Rabiei, Parisa; Manian, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: The evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) has been accelerated recently by the indiscriminate application of antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance has challenged the success of medical interventions and therefore is considered a hazardous threat to human health. Objectives: The present study aimed to describe the use of zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology to target and disrupt a plasmid-encoded β-lactamase, which prevents horizontal gene transfer-mediated evolution of ARBs. Materials and Methods: An engineered ZFN was designed to target a specific sequence in the ampicillin resistance gene (ampR) of the pTZ57R plasmid. The Escherichia coli bacteria already contained the pZFN kanamycin-resistant (kanaR) plasmid as the case or the pP15A, kanaR empty vector as the control, were transformed with the pTZ57R; the ability of the designed ZFN to disrupt the β-lactamase gene was evaluated with the subsequent disturbed ability of the bacteria to grow on ampicillin (amp) and ampicillin-kanamycin (amp-kana)-containing media. The effect of mild hypothermia on the ZFN gene targeting efficiency was also evaluated. Results: The growth of bacteria in the case group on the amp and amp-kana-containing media was significantly lower compared with the control group at 37°C (P < 0.001). Despite being more efficient in hypothermic conditions at 30°C (P < 0.001), there were no significant associations between the incubation temperature and the ZFN gene targeting efficiency. Conclusions: Our findings revealed that the ZFN technology could be employed to overcome ampicillin resistance by the targeted disruption of the ampicillin resistance gene, which leads to inactivation of β-lactam synthesis. Therefore, ZFN technology could be engaged to decrease the antibiotic resistance issue with the construction of a ZFN archive against different ARGs. To tackle the resistance issue at the environmental level, recombinant phages

  1. A fungal anticodon nuclease ribotoxin exploits a secondary cleavage site to evade tRNA repair.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Birthe; Kast, Alene; Schwer, Beate; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Shuman, Stewart; Klassen, Roland

    2012-09-01

    PaOrf2 and γ-toxin subunits of Pichia acaciae toxin (PaT) and Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin are tRNA anticodon nucleases. These secreted ribotoxins are assimilated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, wherein they arrest growth by depleting specific tRNAs. Toxicity can be recapitulated by induced intracellular expression of PaOrf2 or γ-toxin in S. cerevisiae. Mutational analysis of γ-toxin has identified amino acids required for ribotoxicity in vivo and RNA transesterification in vitro. Here, we report that PaOrf2 residues Glu9 and His287 (putative counterparts of γ-toxin Glu9 and His209) are essential for toxicity. Our results suggest a similar basis for RNA transesterification by PaOrf2 and γ-toxin, despite their dissimilar primary structures and distinctive tRNA target specificities. PaOrf2 makes two sequential incisions in tRNA, the first of which occurs 3' from the mcm(5)s(2)U wobble nucleoside and depends on mcm(5). A second incision two nucleotides upstream results in the net excision of a di-nucleotide. Expression of phage and plant tRNA repair systems can relieve PaOrf2 toxicity when tRNA cleavage is restricted to the secondary site in elp3 cells that lack the mcm(5) wobble U modification. Whereas the endogenous yeast tRNA ligase Trl1 can heal tRNA halves produced by PaOrf2 cleavage in elp3 cells, its RNA sealing activity is inadequate to complete the repair. Compatible sealing activity can be provided in trans by plant tRNA ligase. The damage-rescuing ability of tRNA repair systems is lost when PaOrf2 can break tRNA at both sites. These results highlight the logic of a two-incision mechanism of tRNA anticodon damage that evades productive repair by tRNA ligases. PMID:22836353

  2. ZFNGenome: A comprehensive resource for locating zinc finger nuclease target sites in model organisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) have tremendous potential as tools to facilitate genomic modifications, such as precise gene knockouts or gene replacements by homologous recombination. ZFNs can be used to advance both basic research and clinical applications, including gene therapy. Recently, the ability to engineer ZFNs that target any desired genomic DNA sequence with high fidelity has improved significantly with the introduction of rapid, robust, and publicly available techniques for ZFN design such as the Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN) method. The motivation for this study is to make resources for genome modifications using OPEN-generated ZFNs more accessible to researchers by creating a user-friendly interface that identifies and provides quality scores for all potential ZFN target sites in the complete genomes of several model organisms. Description ZFNGenome is a GBrowse-based tool for identifying and visualizing potential target sites for OPEN-generated ZFNs. ZFNGenome currently includes a total of more than 11.6 million potential ZFN target sites, mapped within the fully sequenced genomes of seven model organisms; S. cerevisiae, C. reinhardtii, A. thaliana, D. melanogaster, D. rerio, C. elegans, and H. sapiens and can be visualized within the flexible GBrowse environment. Additional model organisms will be included in future updates. ZFNGenome provides information about each potential ZFN target site, including its chromosomal location and position relative to transcription initiation site(s). Users can query ZFNGenome using several different criteria (e.g., gene ID, transcript ID, target site sequence). Tracks in ZFNGenome also provide "uniqueness" and ZiFOpT (Zinc Finger OPEN Targeter) "confidence" scores that estimate the likelihood that a chosen ZFN target site will function in vivo. ZFNGenome is dynamically linked to ZiFDB, allowing users access to all available information about zinc finger reagents, such as the effectiveness of a given

  3. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-Guided FokI-dCas9 Nucleases Directed by Truncated gRNAs for Highly Specific Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Topkar, Ved V.; Khayter, Cyd; Joung, J. Keith; Tsai, Shengdar Q.

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) nucleases have been widely adopted for simple and robust targeted genome editing but also have the potential to induce high-frequency off-target mutations. In principle, two orthogonal strategies for reducing off-target cleavage, truncated guide RNAs (tru-gRNAs) and dimerization-dependent RNA-guided FokI-dCas9 nucleases (RFNs), could be combined as tru-RFNs to further improve genome editing specificity. Here we identify a robust tru-RFN architecture that shows high activity in human cancer cell lines and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that tru-gRNAs reduce the undesirable mutagenic effects of monomeric FokI-dCas9. Tru-RFNs combine the advantages of two orthogonal strategies for improving the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases and therefore provide a highly specific platform for performing genome editing. PMID:26068112

  4. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-Guided FokI-dCas9 Nucleases Directed by Truncated gRNAs for Highly Specific Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Topkar, Ved V; Khayter, Cyd; Joung, J Keith; Tsai, Shengdar Q

    2015-07-01

    Monomeric clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) nucleases have been widely adopted for simple and robust targeted genome editing but also have the potential to induce high-frequency off-target mutations. In principle, two orthogonal strategies for reducing off-target cleavage, truncated guide RNAs (tru-gRNAs) and dimerization-dependent RNA-guided FokI-dCas9 nucleases (RFNs), could be combined as tru-RFNs to further improve genome editing specificity. Here we identify a robust tru-RFN architecture that shows high activity in human cancer cell lines and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that tru-gRNAs reduce the undesirable mutagenic effects of monomeric FokI-dCas9. Tru-RFNs combine the advantages of two orthogonal strategies for improving the specificity of CRISPR-Cas nucleases and therefore provide a highly specific platform for performing genome editing.

  5. Periplasmic binding protein-based detection of maltose using liposomes: a new class of biorecognition elements in competitive assays.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Katie A; Baeumner, Antje J

    2013-03-01

    A periplasmic binding protein (PBP) was investigated as a novel binding species in a similar manner to an antibody in a competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), resulting in a highly sensitive and specific assay utilizing liposome-based signal amplification. PBPs are located at high concentrations (10(-4) M) between the inner and outer membranes of gram negative bacteria and are involved in the uptake of solutes and chemotaxis of bacteria toward nutrient sources. Previous sensors relying on PBPs took advantage of the change in local environment or proximity of site-specific fluorophore labels resulting from the significant conformational shift of these proteins' two globular domains upon target binding. Here, rather than monitoring conformational shifts, we have instead utilized the maltose binding protein (MBP) in lieu of an antibody in an ELISA. To our knowledge, this is the first PBP-based sensor without the requirement for engineering site-specific modifications within the protein. MBP conjugated fluorescent dye-encapsulating liposomes served to provide recognition and signal amplification in a competitive assay for maltose using amylose magnetic beads in a microtiter plate-based format. The development of appropriate binding buffers and competitive surfaces are described, with general observations expected to extend to PBPs for other analytes. The resulting assay was specific for d-(+)-maltose versus other sugar analogs including d-(+)-raffinose, sucrose, d-trehalose, d-(+)-xylose, d-fructose, 1-thio-β-d-glucose sodium salt, d-(+)-galactose, sorbitol, glycerol, and dextrose. Cross-reactivity with d-lactose and d-(+)-glucose occurred only at concentrations >10(4)-fold greater than d-(+)-maltose. The limit of detection was 78 nM with a dynamic range covering over 3 orders of magnitude. Accurate detection of maltose as an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical preparation was demonstrated. This method offers a significant improvement over existing

  6. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated female-specific sterility in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Wang, Y; Li, Z; Ling, L; Zeng, B; James, A A; Tan, A; Huang, Y

    2014-12-01

    Engineering sex-specific sterility is critical for developing transgene-based sterile insect technology. Targeted genome engineering achieved by customized zinc-finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) or clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems has been exploited extensively in a variety of model organisms; however, screening mutated individuals without a detectable phenotype is still challenging. In addition, genetically recessive mutations only detectable in homozygotes make the experiments time-consuming. In the present study, we model a novel genetic system in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, that results in female-specific sterility by combining transgenesis with TALEN technologies. This system induces sex-specific sterility at a high efficiency by targeting the female-specific exon of the B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) gene, which has sex-specific splicing isoforms regulating somatic sexual development. Transgenic animals co-expressing TALEN left and right arms targeting the female-specific Bmdsx exon resulted in somatic mutations and female mutants lost fecundity because of lack of egg storage and abnormal external genitalia. The wild-type sexual dimorphism of abdominal segment was not evident in mutant females. In contrast, there were no deleterious effects in mutant male moths. The current somatic TALEN technologies provide a promising approach for future insect functional genetics, thus providing the basis for the development of attractive genetic alternatives for insect population management. PMID:25125145

  7. High-fidelity CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with no detectable genome-wide off-target effects.

    PubMed

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Pattanayak, Vikram; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Joung, J Keith

    2016-01-28

    CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations. Existing strategies for reducing genome-wide off-target effects of the widely used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) are imperfect, possessing only partial or unproven efficacies and other limitations that constrain their use. Here we describe SpCas9-HF1, a high-fidelity variant harbouring alterations designed to reduce non-specific DNA contacts. SpCas9-HF1 retains on-target activities comparable to wild-type SpCas9 with >85% of single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) tested in human cells. Notably, with sgRNAs targeted to standard non-repetitive sequences, SpCas9-HF1 rendered all or nearly all off-target events undetectable by genome-wide break capture and targeted sequencing methods. Even for atypical, repetitive target sites, the vast majority of off-target mutations induced by wild-type SpCas9 were not detected with SpCas9-HF1. With its exceptional precision, SpCas9-HF1 provides an alternative to wild-type SpCas9 for research and therapeutic applications. More broadly, our results suggest a general strategy for optimizing genome-wide specificities of other CRISPR-RNA-guided nucleases.

  8. Caffeine impairs resection during DNA break repair by reducing the levels of nucleases Sae2 and Dna2.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Eapen, Vinay V; Mason, Jennifer M; Memisoglu, Gonen; Waterman, David P; Long, Marcus J; Bishop, Douglas K; Haber, James E

    2015-08-18

    In response to chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs), eukaryotic cells activate the DNA damage checkpoint, which is orchestrated by the PI3 kinase-like protein kinases ATR and ATM (Mec1 and Tel1 in budding yeast). Following DSB formation, Mec1 and Tel1 phosphorylate histone H2A on serine 129 (known as γ-H2AX). We used caffeine to inhibit the checkpoint kinases after DSB induction. We show that prolonged phosphorylation of H2A-S129 does not require continuous Mec1 and Tel1 activity. Unexpectedly, caffeine treatment impaired homologous recombination by inhibiting 5' to 3' end resection, independent of Mec1 and Tel1 inhibition. Caffeine treatment led to the rapid loss, by proteasomal degradation, of both Sae2, a nuclease that plays a role in early steps of resection, and Dna2, a nuclease that facilitates one of two extensive resection pathways. Sae2's instability is evident in the absence of DNA damage. A similar loss is seen when protein synthesis is inhibited by cycloheximide. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, blocking the formation of RPA and Rad51 foci that depend on 5' to 3' resection of broken chromosome ends. Our findings provide insight toward the use of caffeine as a DNA damage-sensitizing agent in cancer cells.

  9. Engineering HIV-Resistant Human CD4+ T Cells with CXCR4-Specific Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Wilen, Craig B.; Wang, Jianbin; Tilton, John C.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Kim, Kenneth A.; Rebar, Edward J.; Sherrill-Mix, Scott A.; Patro, Sean C.; Secreto, Anthony J.; Jordan, Andrea P. O.; Lee, Gary; Kahn, Joshua; Aye, Pyone P.; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Hoxie, James A.; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn A.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Riley, James L.; Gregory, Philip D.; June, Carl H.; Holmes, Michael C.; Doms, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 entry requires the cell surface expression of CD4 and either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptors on host cells. Individuals homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 polymorphism do not express CCR5 and are protected from infection by CCR5-tropic (R5) virus strains. As an approach to inactivating CCR5, we introduced CCR5-specific zinc-finger nucleases into human CD4+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer, but the need to protect cells from virus strains that use CXCR4 (X4) in place of or in addition to CCR5 (R5X4) remains. Here we describe engineering a pair of zinc finger nucleases that, when introduced into human T cells, efficiently disrupt cxcr4 by cleavage and error-prone non-homologous DNA end-joining. The resulting cells proliferated normally and were resistant to infection by X4-tropic HIV-1 strains. CXCR4 could also be inactivated in ccr5Δ32 CD4+ T cells, and we show that such cells were resistant to all strains of HIV-1 tested. Loss of CXCR4 also provided protection from X4 HIV-1 in a humanized mouse model, though this protection was lost over time due to the emergence of R5-tropic viral mutants. These data suggest that CXCR4-specific ZFNs may prove useful in establishing resistance to CXCR4-tropic HIV for autologous transplant in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21533216

  10. A genetic screen identifies FAN1, a Fanconi anemia associated nuclease necessary for DNA interstrand crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Smogorzewska, Agata; Desetty, Rohini; Saito, Takamune T.; Schlabach, Michael; Lach, Francis P.; Sowa, Mathew E.; Clark, Alan B.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Harper, J. Wade; Colaiácovo, Monica P.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway is responsible for interstrand crosslink repair. At the heart of this pathway is the FANCI-FAND2 (ID) complex, which, upon ubiquitination by the FA core complex, travels to sites of damage to coordinate repair that includes nucleolytic modification of the DNA surrounding the lesion and translesion synthesis. How the ID complex regulates these events is unknown. Here we describe a shRNA screen that led to the identification of two nucleases necessary for crosslink repair, FAN1 and EXDL2. FAN1 co-localizes at sites of DNA damage with the ID complex in a manner dependent on FAN1’s ubiquitin binding domain (UBZ), the ID complex, and monoubiquitination of FANCD2. FAN1 possesses intrinsic 5′-3′ exonuclease activity and endonuclease activity that cleaves nicked and branched structures. We propose that FAN1 is a repair nuclease that is recruited to sites of crosslink damage in part through binding the ubiquitinated ID complex through its UBZ domain. PMID:20603073

  11. Apollo, an Artemis-related nuclease, interacts with TRF2 and protects human telomeres in S phase.

    PubMed

    van Overbeek, Megan; de Lange, Titia

    2006-07-11

    Human chromosome ends are protected by shelterin, an abundant six-subunit protein complex that binds specifically to the telomeric-repeat sequences, regulates telomere length, and ensures that chromosome ends do not elicit a DNA-damage response (reviewed in). Using mass spectrometry of proteins associated with the shelterin component Rap1, we identified an SMN1/PSO2 nuclease family member that is closely related to Artemis. We refer to this protein as Apollo and report that Apollo has the ability to localize to telomeres through an interaction with the shelterin component TRF2. Although its low abundance at telomeres indicates that Apollo is not a core component of shelterin, Apollo knockdown with RNAi resulted in senescence and the activation of a DNA-damage signal at telomeres as evidenced by telomere-dysfunction-induced foci (TIFs). The TIFs occurred primarily in S phase, suggesting that Apollo contributes to a processing step associated with the replication of chromosome ends. Furthermore, some of the metaphase chromosomes showed two telomeric signals at single-chromatid ends, suggesting an aberrant telomere structure. We propose that the Artemis-like nuclease Apollo is a shelterin accessory factor required for the protection of telomeres during or after their replication.

  12. Structural Basis of Duplex Thermodynamic Stability and Enhanced Nuclease Resistance of 5'-C-Methyl Pyrimidine-Modified Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kel'in, Alexander V; Zlatev, Ivan; Harp, Joel; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Bisbe, Anna; O'Shea, Jonathan; Taneja, Nate; Manoharan, Rajar M; Khan, Saeed; Charisse, Klaus; Maier, Martin A; Egli, Martin; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2016-03-18

    Although judicious use of chemical modifications has contributed to the success of nucleic acid therapeutics, poor systemic stability remains a major hurdle. The introduction of functional groups around the phosphate backbone can enhance the nuclease resistance of oligonucleotides (ONs). Here, we report the synthesis of enantiomerically pure (R)- and (S)-5'-C-methyl (C5'-Me) substituted nucleosides and their incorporation into ONs. These modifications generally resulted in a decrease in thermal stability of oligonucleotide (ON) duplexes in a manner dependent on the stereoconfiguration at C5' with greater destabilization characteristic of (R)-epimers. Enhanced stability against snake venom phosphodiesterase resulted from modification of the 3'-end of an ON with either (R)- or (S)-C5'-Me nucleotides. The (S)-isomers with different 2'-substituents provided greater resistance against 3'-exonucleases than the corresponding (R)-isomers. Crystal structure analyses of RNA octamers with (R)- or (S)-5'-C-methyl-2'-deoxy-2'-fluorouridine [(R)- or (S)-C5'-Me-2'-FU, respectively] revealed that the stereochemical orientation of the C5'-Me and the steric effects that emanate from the alkyl substitution are the dominant determinants of thermal stability and are likely molecular origins of resistance against nucleases. X-ray and NMR structural analyses showed that the (S)-C5'-Me epimers are spatially and structurally more similar to their natural 5' nonmethylated counterparts than the corresponding (R)-epimers.

  13. Structural Basis of Duplex Thermodynamic Stability and Enhanced Nuclease Resistance of 5'-C-Methyl Pyrimidine-Modified Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kel'in, Alexander V; Zlatev, Ivan; Harp, Joel; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Bisbe, Anna; O'Shea, Jonathan; Taneja, Nate; Manoharan, Rajar M; Khan, Saeed; Charisse, Klaus; Maier, Martin A; Egli, Martin; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2016-03-18

    Although judicious use of chemical modifications has contributed to the success of nucleic acid therapeutics, poor systemic stability remains a major hurdle. The introduction of functional groups around the phosphate backbone can enhance the nuclease resistance of oligonucleotides (ONs). Here, we report the synthesis of enantiomerically pure (R)- and (S)-5'-C-methyl (C5'-Me) substituted nucleosides and their incorporation into ONs. These modifications generally resulted in a decrease in thermal stability of oligonucleotide (ON) duplexes in a manner dependent on the stereoconfiguration at C5' with greater destabilization characteristic of (R)-epimers. Enhanced stability against snake venom phosphodiesterase resulted from modification of the 3'-end of an ON with either (R)- or (S)-C5'-Me nucleotides. The (S)-isomers with different 2'-substituents provided greater resistance against 3'-exonucleases than the corresponding (R)-isomers. Crystal structure analyses of RNA octamers with (R)- or (S)-5'-C-methyl-2'-deoxy-2'-fluorouridine [(R)- or (S)-C5'-Me-2'-FU, respectively] revealed that the stereochemical orientation of the C5'-Me and the steric effects that emanate from the alkyl substitution are the dominant determinants of thermal stability and are likely molecular origins of resistance against nucleases. X-ray and NMR structural analyses showed that the (S)-C5'-Me epimers are spatially and structurally more similar to their natural 5' nonmethylated counterparts than the corresponding (R)-epimers. PMID:26940174

  14. Characterization of a putative periplasmic transport system for octopine accumulation encoded by Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid pTiA6.

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, R H; Wang, L; Winans, S C

    1991-01-01

    Neoplastic crown gall tumors incited by Agrobacterium tumefaciens release novel amino acid or sugar derivatives known as opines, whose synthesis is directed by genes transferred to plant cells. Agrobacterium cells can transport and catabolize these compounds as sources of carbon and nitrogen. This article describes a region of the pTiA6 plasmid which is required for catabolism of the opine octopine and whose transcription is induced by octopine. This region of the plasmid contains four open reading frames, occQ, occM, occP, and occJ, which show homology to the family of so-called shock-sensitive permeases. TnphoA mutagenesis demonstrated that the OccJ and OccM proteins lie fully or partly in the periplasmic space. The OccJ protein was identified by electrophoresis and found to be fully localized in the periplasmic space. When these proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, radiolabeled octopine became cell-associated. Images FIG. 6 PMID:1655707

  15. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the periplasmic domain of outer membrane protein A from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Soon; Lee, Woo Cheol; Choi, Saehae; Yeo, Kwon Joo; Song, Jung Hyun; Han, Young Hyun; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Seung Il; Jeon, Young Ho; Cheong, Chaejoon; Kim, Hye Yeon

    2011-12-01

    Outer membrane protein A from Acinetobacter baumannii (AbOmpA) is a major outer membrane protein and a key player in the bacterial pathogenesis that induces host cell death. AbOmpA is presumed to consist of an N-terminal β-barrel transmembrane domain and a C-terminal periplasmic OmpA-like domain. In this study, the recombinant C-terminal periplasmic domain of AbOmpA was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. A native diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 2.0 Å using synchrotron radiation. The space group of the crystal was P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 58.24, b = 98.59, c = 97.96 Å, β = 105.92°. The native crystal contained seven or eight molecules per asymmetric unit and had a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.93 or 2.56 Å(3) Da(-1).

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the periplasmic domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor Tar and its complex with aspartate

    SciTech Connect

    Mise, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.; Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-08-27

    The periplasmic domain of the E. coli aspartate receptor Tar was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized with and without bound ligand. The crystals obtained diffracted to resolutions of 1.58 and 1.95 Å, respectively. The cell-surface receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni{sup 2+}. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by its ligands, the Escherichia coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate (Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively) were each crystallized in two different forms. Using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 2.10 and 2.40 Å, respectively. Alternatively, using sodium chloride as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 1.95 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 adopted space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, while those of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 adopted space groups P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C2, respectively.

  17. Salt Bridges Regulate Both Dimer Formation and Monomeric Flexibility in HdeB and May Have a Role in Periplasmic Chaperone Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjian; Rasmussen, Tim; Harding, Amanda J.; Booth, Nuala A.; Booth, Ian R.; Naismith, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli and Gram-negative bacteria that live in the human gut must be able to tolerate rapid and large changes in environmental pH. Low pH irreversibly denatures and precipitates many bacterial proteins. While cytoplasmic proteins are well buffered against such swings, periplasmic proteins are not. Instead, it appears that some bacteria utilize chaperone proteins that stabilize periplasmic proteins, preventing their precipitation. Two highly expressed and related proteins, HdeA and HdeB, have been identified as acid-activated chaperones. The structure of HdeA is known and a mechanism for activation has been proposed. In this model, dimeric HdeA dissociates at low pH, and the exposed dimeric interface binds exposed hydrophobic surfaces of acid-denatured proteins, preventing their irreversible aggregation. We now report the structure and biophysical characterization of the HdeB protein. The monomer of HdeB shares a similar structure with HdeA, but its dimeric interface is different in composition and spatial location. We have used fluorescence to study the behavior of HdeB as pH is lowered, and like HdeA, it dissociates to monomers. We have identified one of the key intersubunit interactions that controls pH-induced monomerization. Our analysis identifies a structural interaction within the HdeB monomer that is disrupted as pH is lowered, leading to enhanced structural flexibility. PMID:22138344

  18. Vibrio cholerae NspS, a homologue of ABC-type periplasmic solute binding proteins, facilitates transduction of polyamine signals independent of their transport

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, Steven R.; Rutkovsky, Alex C.; Zayner, Josiah P.; Cooper, Rebecca E.; Porter, Lindsay R.; Pendergraft, Sam S.; Parker, Zach M.; McGinnis, Marcus W.

    2014-01-01

    The polyamines norspermidine and spermidine are among the environmental signals that regulate Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation. The effects of these polyamines are mediated by NspS, a member of the bacterial periplasmic solute binding protein superfamily. Almost all members of this superfamily characterized to date are components of ATP-binding cassette-type transporters involved in nutrient uptake. Consequently, in the current annotation of the V. cholerae genome, NspS has been assigned a function in transport. The objective of this study was to further characterize NspS and investigate its potential role in transport. Our results support a role for NspS in signal transduction in response to norspermidine and spermidine, but not their transport. In addition, we provide evidence that these polyamine signals are processed by c-di-GMP signalling networks in the cell. Furthermore, we present comparative genomics analyses which reveal the presence of NspS-like proteins in a variety of bacteria, suggesting that periplasmic ligand binding proteins may be widely utilized for sensory transduction. PMID:24530989

  19. Export of functional Streptomyces coelicolor alditol oxidase to the periplasm or cell surface of Escherichia coli and its application in whole-cell biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    van Bloois, Edwin; Winter, Remko T; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2009-06-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) alditol oxidase (AldO) is a soluble monomeric flavoprotein in which the flavin cofactor is covalently linked to the polypeptide chain. AldO displays high reactivity towards different polyols such as xylitol and sorbitol. These characteristics make AldO industrially relevant, but full biotechnological exploitation of this enzyme is at present restricted by laborious and costly purification steps. To eliminate the need for enzyme purification, this study describes a whole-cell AldO biocatalyst system. To this end, we have directed AldO to the periplasm or cell surface of Escherichia coli. For periplasmic export, AldO was fused to endogenous E. coli signal sequences known to direct their passenger proteins into the SecB, signal recognition particle (SRP), or Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway. In addition, AldO was fused to an ice nucleation protein (INP)-based anchoring motif for surface display. The results show that Tat-exported AldO and INP-surface-displayed AldO are active. The Tat-based system was successfully employed in converting xylitol by whole cells, whereas the use of the INP-based system was most likely restricted by lipopolysaccharide LPS in wild-type cells. It is anticipated that these whole-cell systems will be a valuable tool for further biological and industrial exploitation of AldO and other cofactor-containing enzymes. PMID:19224207

  20. Analysis of periplasmic sensor domains from Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-C: Structure of one sensor domain from a histidine kinase and another from a chemotaxis protein

    PubMed Central

    Pokkuluri, P Raj; Dwulit-Smith, Jeff; Duke, Norma E; Wilton, Rosemarie; Mack, Jamey C; Bearden, Jessica; Rakowski, Ella; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Szurmant, Hendrik; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schiffer, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans is a δ-proteobacterium found in diverse soils and sediments. It is of interest in bioremediation efforts due to its dechlorination and metal-reducing capabilities. To gain an understanding on A. dehalogenans' abilities to adapt to diverse environments we analyzed its signal transduction proteins. The A. dehalogenans genome codes for a large number of sensor histidine kinases (HK) and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP); among these 23 HK and 11 MCP proteins have a sensor domain in the periplasm. These proteins most likely contribute to adaptation to the organism's surroundings. We predicted their three-dimensional folds and determined the structures of two of the periplasmic sensor domains by X-ray diffraction. Most of the domains are predicted to have either PAS-like or helical bundle structures, with two predicted to have solute-binding protein fold, and another predicted to have a 6-phosphogluconolactonase like fold. Atomic structures of two sensor domains confirmed the respective fold predictions. The Adeh_2942 sensor (HK) was found to have a helical bundle structure, and the Adeh_3718 sensor (MCP) has a PAS-like structure. Interestingly, the Adeh_3718 sensor has an acetate moiety bound in a binding site typical for PAS-like domains. Future work is needed to determine whether Adeh_3718 is involved in acetate sensing by A. dehalogenans. PMID:23897711

  1. MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein of the macrolide transporter MacAB-TolC, binds lipopolysaccharide core specifically and with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2013-11-01

    The Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC transporter has been implicated in efflux of macrolide antibiotics and secretion of enterotoxin STII. In this study, we found that purified MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, contains one tightly bound rough core lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) molecule per MacA molecule. R-LPS was bound specifically to MacA protein with affinity exceeding that of polymyxin B. Sequence analyses showed that MacA contains two high-density clusters of positively charged amino acid residues located in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain and the periplasmic C-terminal domain. Substitutions in the C-terminal cluster reducing the positive-charge density completely abolished binding of R-LPS. At the same time, these substitutions significantly reduced the functionality of MacA in the protection of E. coli against macrolides in vivo and in the in vitro MacB ATPase stimulation assays. Taken together, our results suggest that R-LPS or a similar glycolipid is a physiological substrate of MacAB-TolC. PMID:23974027

  2. Reconstitution of the Escherichia coli macrolide transporter: the periplasmic membrane fusion protein MacA stimulates the ATPase activity of MacB.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Elena B; Devroy, Vishakha K; Lau, Sze Yi; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2007-02-01

    Periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) are essential components of the type I protein secretion systems and drug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies suggested that MFPs connect the inner and outer membrane components of the transport systems and by this means co-ordinate the transfer of substrates across the two membranes. In this study, we purified and reconstituted the macrolide transporter MacAB from Escherichia coli. Here, MacA is a periplasmic MFP and MacB is an ABC-type transporter. Similar to other MFP-dependent transporters from E. coli, the in vivo function of MacAB requires the outer membrane channel TolC. The purified MacB displayed a basal ATPase activity in detergent micelles. This activity conformed to Michaelis-Menten kinetics but was unresponsive to substrates or accessory proteins. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, the ATPase activity of MacB was strictly dependent on MacA. The catalytic efficiency of MacAB ATPase was more than 45-fold higher than the activity of MacB alone. Both the N- and C-terminal regions of MacA were essential for this activity. MacA stimulated MacB ATPase only in phospholipid bilayers and did not need the presence of macrolides. Our results suggest that MacA is a functional subunit of the MacB transporter. PMID:17214741

  3. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C; Braga-Dias, Luciene P; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Atila D; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-03-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity.

  4. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C.; Braga-Dias, Luciene P.; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Átila D.; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S.; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity. PMID:24688299

  5. Global analysis of the acid-induced and urea-induced unfolding of staphylococcal nuclease and two of its variants.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, R M; Eftink, M R

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the equilibrium unfolding staphylococcal nuclease and two of its variants, V66W and V66W', over two perturbation axes (acid-induced unfolding as a function of urea concentration and urea-induced unfolding as a function of pH). The transitions were monitored by simultaneous measurements of circular dichroism and fluorescence. With this multidimensional array of data (2 perturbation axes and 2 signals), we present a strategy of performing a global analysis, over as many as 12 individual data sets, to test various models for the unfolding process, to determine with greater confidence the pertinent thermodynamic parameters, and to characterize unfolding intermediates. For example, wildtype nuclease shows a cooperative two-state transition with either urea or pH as denaturant, but the global fits are improved when the model is expanded to include a pH dependence of the urea m value or when two distinct classes of protonic groups are considered. The best fit for wild-type nuclease is with delta G degree 0,UN = 6.4 kcal/mol at pH 7, with the acid-induced unfolding being triggered by protonation of three to five carboxylate groups (with possible contribution from His121), and with the urea m = 2.5 kcal mol-1 M-1. V66W' lacks the last 13 amino acids on the C-terminus, has a tryptophan at position 66, has a predominantly beta-sheet structure, and is less stable than the wild type. For V66W', delta G degree 0,UN = 1.6 kcal/mol, m = 1.2 kcal mol-1 M-1, and there are two or three groups responsible for acid unfolding. V66W, a full-length mutant with two tryptophan residues, unfolds via a three-state mechanism: native reversible intermediate reversible unfolded. It appears that its beta-barrel subdomain retains structure in the intermediate state. Assuming that the unfolding of V66W' and the beta-barrel subdomain of V66W can be described by the same thermodynamic parameters, a global analysis enabled a description of the alpha subdomain of V66W with delta G

  6. Label-Free Fluorescence Assay of S1 Nuclease and Hydroxyl Radicals Based on Water-Soluble Conjugated Polymers and WS2 Nanosheets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junting; Zhao, Qi; Tang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new method for detecting S1 nuclease and hydroxyl radicals based on the use of water-soluble conjugated poly[9,9-bis(6,6-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)-fluorene)-2,7-ylenevinylene-co-alt-2,5-dicyano-1,4-phenylene)] (PFVCN) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheets. Cationic PFVCN is used as a signal reporter, and single-layer WS2 is used as a quencher with a negatively charged surface. The ssDNA forms complexes with PFVCN due to much stronger electrostatic interactions between cationic PFVCN and anionic ssDNA, whereas PFVCN emits yellow fluorescence. When ssDNA is hydrolyzed by S1 nuclease or hydroxyl radicals into small fragments, the interactions between the fragmented DNA and PFVCN become weaker, resulting in PFVCN being adsorbed on the surface of WS2 and the fluorescence being quenched through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The new method based on PFVCN and WS2 can sense S1 nuclease with a low detection limit of 5 × 10−6 U/mL. Additionally, this method is cost-effective by using affordable WS2 as an energy acceptor without the need for dye-labeled ssDNA. Furthermore, the method provides a new platform for the nuclease assay and reactive oxygen species, and provides promising applications for drug screening. PMID:27304956

  7. Two distinct modes of metal ion binding in the nuclease active site of a viral DNA-packaging terminase: insight into the two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Anna Y; Varnado, Brittany; Beutler, John A; Murelli, Ryan P; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Tang, Liang

    2015-12-15

    Many dsDNA viruses encode DNA-packaging terminases, each containing a nuclease domain that resolves concatemeric DNA into genome-length units. Terminase nucleases resemble the RNase H-superfamily nucleotidyltransferases in folds, and share a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism. Here we show that residue K428 of a bacteriophage terminase gp2 nuclease domain mediates binding of the metal cofactor Mg(2+). A K428A mutation allows visualization, at high resolution, of a metal ion binding mode with a coupled-octahedral configuration at the active site, exhibiting an unusually short metal-metal distance of 2.42 Å. Such proximity of the two metal ions may play an essential role in catalysis by generating a highly positive electrostatic niche to enable formation of the negatively charged pentacovalent phosphate transition state, and provides the structural basis for distinguishing Mg(2+) from Ca(2+). Using a metal ion chelator β-thujaplicinol as a molecular probe, we observed a second mode of metal ion binding at the active site, mimicking the DNA binding state. Arrangement of the active site residues differs drastically from those in RNase H-like nucleases, suggesting a drifting of the active site configuration during evolution. The two distinct metal ion binding modes unveiled mechanistic details of the two-metal-ion catalysis at atomic resolution.

  8. Efficient Modification of the CCR5 Locus in Primary Human T Cells With megaTAL Nuclease Establishes HIV-1 Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Paul, Biswajit; Sather, Blythe D; Younan, Patrick M; Sommer, Karen; Kowalski, John P; Hale, Malika; Stoddard, Barry; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Rawlings, David J

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring 32-base pair deletion of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 has demonstrated protection against HIV infection of human CD4+ T cells. Recent genetic engineering approaches using engineered nucleases to disrupt the gene and mimic this mutation show promise for HIV therapy. We developed a megaTAL nuclease targeting the third extracellular loop of CCR5 that we delivered to primary human T cells by mRNA transfection. The CCR5 megaTAL nuclease established resistance to HIV in cell lines and disrupted the expression of CCR5 on primary human CD4+ T cells with a high efficiency, achieving up to 80% modification of the locus in primary cells as measured by molecular analysis. Gene-modified cells engrafted at levels equivalent to unmodified cells when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, genetically modified CD4+ cells were preferentially expanded during HIV-1 infection in vivo in an immunodeficient mouse model. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting CCR5 in primary T cells using an engineered megaTAL nuclease, and the potential to use gene-modified cells to reconstitute a patient's immune system and provide protection from HIV infection.

  9. Label-Free Fluorescence Assay of S1 Nuclease and Hydroxyl Radicals Based on Water-Soluble Conjugated Polymers and WS₂ Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Li, Junting; Zhao, Qi; Tang, Yanli

    2016-06-13

    We developed a new method for detecting S1 nuclease and hydroxyl radicals based on the use of water-soluble conjugated poly[9,9-bis(6,6-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)-fluorene)-2,7-ylenevinylene-co-alt-2,5-dicyano-1,4-phenylene)] (PFVCN) and tungsten disulfide (WS₂) nanosheets. Cationic PFVCN is used as a signal reporter, and single-layer WS₂ is used as a quencher with a negatively charged surface. The ssDNA forms complexes with PFVCN due to much stronger electrostatic interactions between cationic PFVCN and anionic ssDNA, whereas PFVCN emits yellow fluorescence. When ssDNA is hydrolyzed by S1 nuclease or hydroxyl radicals into small fragments, the interactions between the fragmented DNA and PFVCN become weaker, resulting in PFVCN being adsorbed on the surface of WS₂ and the fluorescence being quenched through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The new method based on PFVCN and WS₂ can sense S1 nuclease with a low detection limit of 5 × 10(-6) U/mL. Additionally, this method is cost-effective by using affordable WS₂ as an energy acceptor without the need for dye-labeled ssDNA. Furthermore, the method provides a new platform for the nuclease assay and reactive oxygen species, and provides promising applications for drug screening.

  10. Creating Directed Double-strand Breaks with the Ref Protein: A Novel Rec A-Dependent Nuclease from Bacteriophage P1

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenig, Marielle C.; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L.; Manlick, Angela J.; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2012-03-16

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded {beta}-hairpin that is sandwiched between several {alpha}-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  11. Creating directed double-strand breaks with the Ref protein: a novel RecA-dependent nuclease from bacteriophage P1.

    PubMed

    Gruenig, Marielle C; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L; Manlick, Angela J; Keck, James L; Cox, Michael M

    2011-03-11

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 Å resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded β-hairpin that is sandwiched between several α-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  12. Mouse SLX4 Is a Tumor Suppressor that Stimulates the Activity of the Nuclease XPF-ERCC1 in DNA Crosslink Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hodskinson, Michael R.G.; Silhan, Jan; Crossan, Gerry P.; Garaycoechea, Juan I.; Mukherjee, Shivam; Johnson, Christopher M.; Schärer, Orlando D.; Patel, Ketan J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary SLX4 binds to three nucleases (XPF-ERCC1, MUS81-EME1, and SLX1), and its deficiency leads to genomic instability, sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, and Fanconi anemia. However, it is not understood how SLX4 and its associated nucleases act in DNA crosslink repair. Here, we uncover consequences of mouse Slx4 deficiency and reveal its function in DNA crosslink repair. Slx4-deficient mice develop epithelial cancers and have a contracted hematopoietic stem cell pool. The N-terminal domain of SLX4 (mini-SLX4) that only binds to XPF-ERCC1 is sufficient to confer resistance to DNA crosslinking agents. Recombinant mini-SLX4 enhances XPF-ERCC1 nuclease activity up to 100-fold, directing specificity toward DNA forks. Mini-SLX4-XPF-ERCC1 also vigorously stimulates dual incisions around a DNA crosslink embedded in a synthetic replication fork, an essential step in the repair of this lesion. These observations define vertebrate SLX4 as a tumor suppressor, which activates XPF-ERCC1 nuclease specificity in DNA crosslink repair. PMID:24726326

  13. Leishmania infantum expresses a mitochondrial nuclease homologous to EndoG that migrates to the nucleus in response to an apoptotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Rico, Eva; Alzate, Juan Fernando; Arias, Andrés Augusto; Moreno, David; Clos, Joachim; Gago, Federico; Moreno, Inmaculada; Domínguez, Mercedes; Jiménez-Ruiz, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that single-celled organisms, such as Leishmania parasites, are able to undergo a cell death process that resembles apoptosis in metazoans and is induced by a variety of stimuli. However, the molecular mechanisms that participate and regulate this death process are still very poorly described, and very few of the participating molecules have been identified. Because DNA degradation is probably the most frequently characterized event during programmed cell death in Leishmania parasites, we have focused on identifying a candidate nuclease responsible for this effect during the cell death process. The results presented herein demonstrate that Leishmania infantum promastigotes express a nuclease similar to the endonuclease G of higher eukaryotes which, according to its predicted structure, belongs to the beta beta alpha metal superfamily of nucleases. Its cation dependence resembles that of the EndoGs present in other organisms and, similarly to them, it is inhibited by moderate concentrations of K+ or Na+. L. infantum EndoG contains a signal peptide that causes its translocation to the mitochondrion where it is maintained under normal growth conditions. However, under the pressure of a death stimulus such as edelfosine treatment, L. infantum EndoG is released from the single mitochondrion and translocates to the nucleus, where it is thought to participate in the process of DNA degradation that is associated with programmed cell death. Our results also demonstrate that overexpression of the nuclease in edelfosine-treated promastigotes causes a significant increase in the percentage of TUNEL-positive parasites.

  14. Cas3 is a single-stranded DNA nuclease and ATP-dependent helicase in the CRISPR/Cas immune system.

    PubMed

    Sinkunas, Tomas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Fremaux, Christophe; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Horvath, Philippe; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2011-04-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a recently discovered adaptive prokaryotic immune system that provides acquired immunity against foreign nucleic acids by utilizing small guide crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs) to interfere with invading viruses and plasmids. In Escherichia coli, Cas3 is essential for crRNA-guided interference with virus proliferation. Cas3 contains N-terminal HD phosphohydrolase and C-terminal Superfamily 2 (SF2) helicase domains. Here, we provide the first report of the cloning, expression, purification and in vitro functional analysis of the Cas3 protein of the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR4 (Ecoli subtype) system. Cas3 possesses a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-stimulated ATPase activity, which is coupled to unwinding of DNA/DNA and RNA/DNA duplexes. Cas3 also shows ATP-independent nuclease activity located in the HD domain with a preference for ssDNA substrates. To dissect the contribution of individual domains, Cas3 separation-of-function mutants (ATPase(+)/nuclease(-) and ATPase(-)/nuclease(+)) were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. We propose that the Cas3 ATPase/helicase domain acts as a motor protein, which assists delivery of the nuclease activity to Cascade-crRNA complex targeting foreign DNA. PMID:21343909

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase H(35) Functions in RNA Primer Removal during Lagging-Strand DNA Synthesis, Most Efficiently in Cooperation with Rad27 Nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Junzhuan; Qian, Ying; Frank, Peter; Wintersberger, Ulrike; Shen, Binghui

    1999-01-01

    Correct removal of RNA primers of Okazaki fragments during lagging-strand DNA synthesis is a critical process for the maintenance of genome integrity. Disturbance of this process has severe mutagenic consequences and could contribute to the development of cancer. The role of the mammalian nucleases RNase HI and FEN-1 in RNA primer removal has been substantiated by several studies. Recently, RNase H(35), the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of mammalian RNase HI, was identified and its possible role in DNA replication was proposed (P. Frank, C. Braunshofer-Reiter, and U. Wintersberger, FEBS Lett. 421:23–26, 1998). This led to the possibility of moving to the genetically powerful yeast system for studying the homologues of RNase HI and FEN-1, i.e., RNase H(35) and Rad27p, respectively. In this study, we have biochemically defined the substrate specificities and the cooperative as well as independent cleavage mechanisms of S. cerevisiae RNase H(35) and Rad27 nuclease by using Okazaki fragment model substrates. We have also determined the additive and compensatory pathological effects of gene deletion and overexpression of these two enzymes. Furthermore, the mutagenic consequences of the nuclease deficiencies have been analyzed. Based on our findings, we suggest that three alternative RNA primer removal pathways of different efficiencies involve RNase H(35) and Rad27 nucleases in yeast. PMID:10567561

  16. Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cells differentiation using quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation via quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status Chandler KJ,Hansen JM, Knudsen T,and Hunter ES 1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  17. SPECIES-SPECIFIC DETECTION OF THREE HUMAN-PATHOGENIC MICROSPORIDIAL SPECIES FROM THE GENUS ENCEPHALITOZOON VIA FLUOROGENIC 5' NUCLEASE PCR ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This describes fluorogenic 5' nuclease PCR assays suitable for rapid, sensitive, quantitative, high-throughput detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidial species Encephalitozoon hellem, E. cunicli and E. intestinalis. The assays utilize species-specific primer sets and a g...

  18. The immunologically protective P-4 antigen of Leishmania amastigotes. A developmentally regulated single strand-specific nuclease associated with the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kar, S; Soong, L; Colmenares, M; Goldsmith-Pestana, K; McMahon-Pratt, D

    2000-12-01

    The purified membrane-associated Leishmania pifanoi amastigote protein P-4 has been shown to induce protective immunity against infection and to elicit preferentially a T helper 1-like response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis. As this molecule is potentially important for future vaccine studies, the L. pifanoi gene encoding the P-4 membrane protein was cloned and sequenced. Southern blot analyses indicate the presence of six tandemly arrayed copies of the P-4 gene in L. pifanoi; homologues of the P-4 gene are found in all other species of the genus Leishmania examined. DNA-derived protein sequence data indicated an identity to the P1 zinc-dependent nuclease of Penicillium citrinum (20.8%) and the C-terminal domain of the 3' nucleotidase of Leishmania donovani (33.7%). Consistent with these sequence analyses, purified L. pifanoi P-4 protein possesses single strand nuclease (DNA and RNA) and phosphomonoesterase activity, with a preference for UMP > TMP > AMP > CMP. Double-labeling immunofluorescence microscopic analyses employing anti-binding protein antibodies revealed that the P-4 protein is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum of the amastigote. Northern blot analyses indicated that the gene is selectively expressed in the intracellular amastigote stage (mammalian host) but not in the promastigote stage (insect) of the parasite. Based upon its subcellular localization and single-stranded specific nuclease activity, possible roles of the P-4 nuclease in the amastigote in RNA stability (gene expression) or DNA repair are discussed.

  19. Efficient Modification of the CCR5 Locus in Primary Human T Cells With megaTAL Nuclease Establishes HIV-1 Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Paul, Biswajit; Sather, Blythe D; Younan, Patrick M; Sommer, Karen; Kowalski, John P; Hale, Malika; Stoddard, Barry; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Rawlings, David J

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring 32-base pair deletion of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 has demonstrated protection against HIV infection of human CD4+ T cells. Recent genetic engineering approaches using engineered nucleases to disrupt the gene and mimic this mutation show promise for HIV therapy. We developed a megaTAL nuclease targeting the third extracellular loop of CCR5 that we delivered to primary human T cells by mRNA transfection. The CCR5 megaTAL nuclease established resistance to HIV in cell lines and disrupted the expression of CCR5 on primary human CD4+ T cells with a high efficiency, achieving up to 80% modification of the locus in primary cells as measured by molecular analysis. Gene-modified cells engrafted at levels equivalent to unmodified cells when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, genetically modified CD4+ cells were preferentially expanded during HIV-1 infection in vivo in an immunodeficient mouse model. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting CCR5 in primary T cells using an engineered megaTAL nuclease, and the potential to use gene-modified cells to reconstitute a patient's immune system and provide protection from HIV infection. PMID:27741222

  20. Protein A-mouse acidic mammalian chitinase-V5-His expressed in periplasmic space of Escherichia coli possesses chitinase functions comparable to CHO-expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Kashimura, Akinori; Okawa, Kazuaki; Ishikawa, Kotarou; Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N'-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase.

  1. Protein A-Mouse Acidic Mammalian Chitinase-V5-His Expressed in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli Possesses Chitinase Functions Comparable to CHO-Expressed Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N′-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase. PMID:24244337

  2. Production of Mutated Porcine Embryos Using Zinc Finger Nucleases and a Reporter-based Cell Enrichment System

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ok Jae; Park, Sol Ji; Lee, Choongil; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Sujin; Moon, Joon Ho; Choi, Ji Yei; Kim, Hyojin; Jang, Goo; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Seokjoong; Lee, Byeong-Chun

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate the construction of genetically-modified pigs, we produced cloned embryos derived from porcine fibroblasts transfected with a pair of engineered zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) plasmids to create targeted mutations and enriched using a reporter plasmid system. The reporter expresses RFP and eGFP simultaneously when ZFN-mediated site-specific mutations occur. Thus, double positive cells (RFP+/eGFP+) were selected and used for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Two types of reporter based enrichment systems were used in this study; the cloned embryos derived from cells enriched using a magnetic sorting-based system showed better developmental competence than did those derived from cells enriched by flow cytometry. Mutated sequences, such as insertions, deletions, or substitutions, together with the wild-type sequence, were found in the cloned porcine blastocysts. Therefore, genetic mutations can be achieved in cloned porcine embryos reconstructed with ZFN-treated cells that were enriched by a reporter-based system. PMID:25049958

  3. Structure and activity of the Cas3 HD nuclease MJ0384, an effector enzyme of the CRISPR interference

    SciTech Connect

    Beloglazova, Natalia; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2012-03-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and Cas proteins represent an adaptive microbial immunity system against viruses and plasmids. Cas3 proteins have been proposed to play a key role in the CRISPR mechanism through the direct cleavage of invasive DNA. Here, we show that the Cas3 HD domain protein MJ0384 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii cleaves endonucleolytically and exonucleolytically (3'-5') single-stranded DNAs and RNAs, as well as 3'-flaps, splayed arms, and R-loops. The degradation of branched DNA substrates by MJ0384 is stimulated by the Cas3 helicase MJ0383 and ATP. The crystal structure of MJ0384 revealed the active site with two bound metal cations and together with site-directed mutagenesis suggested a catalytic mechanism. Our studies suggest that the Cas3 HD nucleases working together with the Cas3 helicases can completely degrade invasive DNAs through the combination of endo- and exonuclease activities.

  4. OutKnocker: a web tool for rapid and simple genotyping of designer nuclease edited cell lines.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Schmidt, Tobias; Gaidt, Moritz M; Pelka, Karin; Latz, Eicke; Ebert, Thomas S; Hornung, Veit

    2014-10-01

    The application of designer nucleases allows the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at user-defined genomic loci. Due to imperfect DNA repair mechanisms, DSBs can lead to alterations in the genomic architecture, such as the disruption of the reading frame of a critical exon. This can be exploited to generate somatic knockout cell lines. While high genome editing activities can be achieved in various cellular systems, obtaining cell clones that contain all-allelic frameshift mutations at the target locus of interest remains a laborious task. To this end, we have developed an easy-to-follow deep sequencing workflow and the evaluation tool OutKnocker (www.OutKnocker.org), which allows convenient, reliable, and cost-effective identification of knockout cell lines.

  5. Killing of cancer cells through the use of eukaryotic expression vectors harbouring genes encoding nucleases and ribonuclease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Elena M

    2015-05-01

    Cancer gene therapy vectors are promising tools for killing cancer cells with the purpose of eradicating malignant tumours entirely. Different delivery methods of vectors into the cancer cells, including both non-viral and viral, as well as promoters for the targeted expression of genes encoding anticancer proteins were developed for effective and selective killing of cancer cells without harming healthy cells. Many vectors have been created to kill cancer cells, and some vectors suppress malignant tumours with high efficiency. This review is focused on vectors bearing genes for nucleases such as deoxyribonucleases (caspase-activated DNase, deoxyribonuclease I-like 3, endonuclease G) and ribonucleases (human polynucleotide phosphorylase, ribonuclease L, α-sarcin, barnase), as well as vectors harbouring gene encoding ribonuclease inhibitor. The data concerning the functionality and the efficacy of such vectors are presented.

  6. Probing force-induced unfolding intermediates of a single staphylococcal nuclease molecule and the effect of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Takaaki Murayama, Yoshihiro; Katano, Atsuto; Maki, Kosuke; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Sano, Masaki

    2008-10-31

    Single-molecule manipulation techniques have given experimental access to unfolding intermediates of proteins that are inaccessible in conventional experiments. A detailed characterization of the intermediates is a challenging problem that provides new possibilities for directly probing the energy landscape of proteins. We investigated single-molecule mechanical unfolding of a small globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), using atomic force microscopy. The unfolding trajectories of the protein displayed sub-molecular and stochastic behavior with typical lengths corresponding to the size of the unfolded substructures. Our results support the view that the single protein unfolds along multiple pathways as suggested in recent theoretical studies. Moreover, we found the drastic change, caused by the ligand and inhibitor bindings, in the mechanical unfolding dynamics.

  7. Cloning, Purification and Initial Characterization of E. coli McrA, a Putative 5-methylcytosine-specific Nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan,E.; Dunn, J.

    2008-01-01

    Expression strains of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) overproducing the E. coli m5C McrA restriction protein were produced by cloning the mcrA coding sequence behind a T7 promoter. The recombinant mcrA minus BL21(DE3) host produces active McrA as evidenced by its acquired ability to selectively restrict the growth of T7 phage containing DNA methylated in vitro by HpaII methylase. The mcrA coding region contains several non-optimal E. coli triplets. Addition of the pACYC-RIL tRNA encoding plasmid to the BL21(DE3) host increased the yield of recombinant McrA (rMcrA) upon induction about 5- to 10-fold. McrA protein expressed at 37 C is insoluble but a significant fraction is recovered as soluble protein after autoinduction at 20 C. rMcrA protein, which is predicted to contain a Cys4-Zn2+ finger and a catalytically important histidine triad in its putative nuclease domain, binds to several metal chelate resins without addition of a poly-histidine affinity tag. This feature was used to develop an efficient protocol for the rapid purification of nearly homogeneous rMcrA. The native protein is a dimer with a high a-helical content as measured by circular dichroism analysis. Under all conditions tested purified rMcrA does not have measurable nuclease activity on HpaII methylated (Cm5CGG) DNA, although the purified protein does specifically bind HpaII methylated DNA. These results have implications for understanding the in vivo activity of McrA in 'restricting' m5C-containing DNA and suggest that rMcrA may have utility as a reagent for affinity purification of DNA fragments containing m5C residues.

  8. An Over Expression APP Model for Anti-Alzheimer Disease Drug Screening Created by Zinc Finger Nuclease Technology

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yiqing; Li, Zhixin; Wang, Rong; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Ling; Song, Rongjing; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Na; Zhang, Yizhuang; Hu, Ruobi; Wang, Xi; Huang, Huakang; Lei, Zhen; Niu, Gang; Irwin, David M.; Tan, Huanran

    2013-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), famous for their ability to precisely and efficiently modify specific genomic loci, have been employed in numerous transgenic model organism and cell constructions. Here we employ the ZFNs technology, with homologous recombination (HR), to construct sequence-specific Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) knock-in cells. With the use of ZFNs, we established APP knock in cell lines with gene-modification efficiencies of about 7%. We electroporated DNA fragment containing the promoter and the protein coding regions of the zinc finger nucleases into cells, instead of the plasmids, to avoid problems associated with off target homologous recombination, and adopted a pair of mutated FokI cleavage domains to reduce the toxic effects of the ZFNs on cell growth. Since over-expression of APP, or a subdomain of it, might lead to an immediately lethal effect, we used the Cre-LoxP System to regulate APP expression. Our genetically transformed cell lines, w5c1 and s12c8, showed detectable APP and Amyloid β (Aβ) production. The Swedish double mutation in the APP coding sequence enhanced APP and Aβ abundance. What is more, the activity of the three key secretases in Aβ formation could be modulated, indicating that these transgenic cells have potential for drug screening to modify amyloid metabolism in cells. Our transformed cells could readily be propagated in culture and should provide an excellent experimental medium for elucidating aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, especially those concerning the amyloidogenic pathways involving mutations in the APP coding sequence. The cellular models may also serve as a tool for deriving potentially useful therapeutic agents. PMID:24223114

  9. An over expression APP model for anti-Alzheimer disease drug screening created by zinc finger nuclease technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Li, Hui; Mao, Yiqing; Li, Zhixin; Wang, Rong; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Ling; Song, Rongjing; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Na; Zhang, Yizhuang; Hu, Ruobi; Wang, Xi; Huang, Huakang; Lei, Zhen; Niu, Gang; Irwin, David M; Tan, Huanran

    2013-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), famous for their ability to precisely and efficiently modify specific genomic loci, have been employed in numerous transgenic model organism and cell constructions. Here we employ the ZFNs technology, with homologous recombination (HR), to construct sequence-specific Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) knock-in cells. With the use of ZFNs, we established APP knock in cell lines with gene-modification efficiencies of about 7%. We electroporated DNA fragment containing the promoter and the protein coding regions of the zinc finger nucleases into cells, instead of the plasmids, to avoid problems associated with off target homologous recombination, and adopted a pair of mutated FokI cleavage domains to reduce the toxic effects of the ZFNs on cell growth. Since over-expression of APP, or a subdomain of it, might lead to an immediately lethal effect, we used the Cre-LoxP System to regulate APP expression. Our genetically transformed cell lines, w5c1 and s12c8, showed detectable APP and Amyloid β (Aβ) production. The Swedish double mutation in the APP coding sequence enhanced APP and Aβ abundance. What is more, the activity of the three key secretases in Aβ formation could be modulated, indicating that these transgenic cells have potential for drug screening to modify amyloid metabolism in cells. Our transformed cells could readily be propagated in culture and should provide an excellent experimental medium for elucidating aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, especially those concerning the amyloidogenic pathways involving mutations in the APP coding sequence. The cellular models may also serve as a tool for deriving potentially useful therapeutic agents.

  10. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC Transporter HI1470/71 through Its Cognate Molybdate Periplasmic Binding Protein, MolA

    SciTech Connect

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W.

    2014-10-02

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB{sub 2}C{sub 2} (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The {approx}100 {mu}M binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.

  11. Cloning, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of the periplasmic sensing domain of Pseudomonas fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA).

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Abu Iftiaf Md Salah; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Chemotaxis towards nutrients plays a crucial role in root colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens. The P. fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA) mediates movement towards amino acids present in root exudates. In this study, the periplasmic sensory domain of CtaA has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitating agent. A complete data set was collected to 1.9 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.2, b = 76.0, c = 113.3 Å. This is an important step towards elucidation of the structural basis of how CtaA recognizes its signal molecules and transduces the signal across the membrane. PMID:27251445

  12. Periplasmic Binding Proteins in Thermophiles: Characterization and Potential Application of an Arginine-Binding Protein from Thermotoga maritima: A Brief Thermo-Story.

    PubMed

    Ausili, Alessio; Staiano, Maria; Dattelbaum, Jonathan; Varriale, Antonio; Capo, Alessandro; D'Auria, Sabato

    2013-01-01

    Arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima is a 27.7 kDa protein possessing the typical two-domain structure of the periplasmic binding proteins family. The protein is characterized by a very high specificity and affinity to bind to arginine, also at high temperatures. Due to its features, this protein could be taken into account as a potential candidate for the design of a biosensor for arginine. It is important to investigate the stability of proteins when they are used for biotechnological applications. In this article, we review the structural and functional features of an arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima with a particular eye on its potential biotechnological applications. PMID:25371336

  13. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-04-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detail. However, it remained unclear how Lol factors interact with each other to conduct very efficient lipoprotein transfer in the periplasm where ATP is not available. To address this issue, a photo-reactive phenylalanine analogue, p-benzoyl-phenylalanine, was introduced at various positions of LolA and LolB, of which the overall structures are very similar and comprise an incomplete beta-barrel with a hydrophobic cavity inside. Cells expressing LolA or LolB derivatives containing the above analogue were irradiated with UV for in vivo photo-cross-linking. These analyses revealed a hot area in the same region of LolA and LolB, through which LolA and LolB interact with each other. This area is located at the entrance of the hydrophobic cavity. Moreover, this area in LolA is involved in the interaction with a membrane subunit, LolC, whereas no cross-linking occurs between LolA and the other membrane subunit, LolE, or ATP-binding subunit LolD, despite the structural similarity between LolC and LolE. The hydrophobic cavities of LolA and LolB were both found to bind lipoproteins inside. These results indicate that the transfer of lipoproteins through Lol proteins occurs in a mouth-to-mouth manner. PMID:19307584

  14. The Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase Nap Is Required for Anaerobic Growth and Involved in Redox Control of Magnetite Biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingjie; Katzmann, Emanuel; Borg, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The magnetosomes of many magnetotactic bacteria consist of membrane-enveloped magnetite crystals, whose synthesis is favored by a low redox potential. However, the cellular redox processes governing the biomineralization of the mixed-valence iron oxide have remained unknown. Here, we show that in the alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, magnetite biomineralization is linked to dissimilatory nitrate reduction. A complete denitrification pathway, including gene functions for nitrate (nap), nitrite (nir), nitric oxide (nor), and nitrous oxide reduction (nos), was identified. Transcriptional gusA fusions as reporters revealed that except for nap, the highest expression of the denitrification genes coincided with conditions permitting maximum magnetite synthesis. Whereas microaerobic denitrification overlapped with oxygen respiration, nitrate was the only electron acceptor supporting growth in the entire absence of oxygen, and only the deletion of nap genes, encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase, and not deletion of nor or nos genes, abolished anaerobic growth and also delayed aerobic growth in both nitrate and ammonium media. While loss of nosZ or norCB had no or relatively weak effects on magnetosome synthesis, deletion of nap severely impaired magnetite biomineralization and resulted in fewer, smaller, and irregular crystals during denitrification and also microaerobic respiration, probably by disturbing the proper redox balance required for magnetite synthesis. In contrast to the case for the wild type, biomineralization in Δnap cells was independent of the oxidation state of carbon substrates. Altogether, our data demonstrate that in addition to its essential role in anaerobic respiration, the periplasmic nitrate reductase Nap has a further key function by participating in redox reactions required for magnetite biomineralization. PMID:22730130

  15. Site-directed fluorescence labeling reveals a revised N-terminal membrane topology and functional periplasmic residues in the Escherichia coli cell division protein FtsK.

    PubMed

    Berezuk, Alison M; Goodyear, Mara; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2014-08-22

    In Escherichia coli, FtsK is a large integral membrane protein that coordinates chromosome segregation and cell division. The N-terminal domain of FtsK (FtsKN) is essential for division, and the C terminus (FtsKC) is a well characterized DNA translocase. Although the function of FtsKN is unknown, it is suggested that FtsK acts as a checkpoint to ensure DNA is properly segregated before septation. This may occur through modulation of protein interactions between FtsKN and other division proteins in both the periplasm and cytoplasm; thus, a clear understanding of how FtsKN is positioned in the membrane is required to characterize these interactions. The membrane topology of FtsKN was initially determined using site-directed reporter fusions; however, questions regarding this topology persist. Here, we report a revised membrane topology generated by site-directed fluorescence labeling. The revised topology confirms the presence of four transmembrane segments and reveals a newly identified periplasmic loop between the third and fourth transmembrane domains. Within this loop, four residues were identified that, when mutated, resulted in the appearance of cellular voids. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of these voids showed asymmetric division of the cytoplasm in the absence of outer membrane invagination or visible cell wall ingrowth. This uncoupling reveals a novel role for FtsK in linking cell envelope septation events and yields further evidence for FtsK as a critical checkpoint of cell division. The revised topology of FtsKN also provides an important platform for future studies on essential interactions required for this process.

  16. Origin of eukaryotic cells as a symbiosis of parasitic α-proteobacteria in the periplasm of two-membrane-bounded sexual pre-karyotes

    PubMed Central

    Krajčovič, Juraj

    2008-01-01

    The last universal common ancestor (LUCA) might have been either prokaryotic- or eukaryotic-like. Nevertheless, the universally distributed components suggest rather LUCA consistent with the pre-cell theory of Kandler. The hypotheses for the origin of eukaryotes are briefly summarized. The models under which prokaryotes or their chimeras were direct ancestors of eukaryotes are criticized. It is proposed that the pre-karyote (a host entity for α-proteobacteria) was a remnant of pre-cellular world, and was unlucky to have evolved fusion prohibiting cell surface, and thus could have evolved sex. The DNA damage checkpoint pathway could have represented the only pre-karyotic checkpoint control allowing division only when DNA was completely replicated without mistakes. The fusion of two partially diploid (in S-phase blocked) pre-karyotes might have represented another repair strategy. After completing replication of both haploid sets, DNA damage checkpoint would allow two subsequent rounds of fission. Alternatively, pre-karyote might have possessed two membranes inherited from LUCA. Under this hypothesis symbiotic α-proteobacterial ancestors of mitochondria might have ancestrally been selfish parasites of pre-karyote intermembrane space whose infection might have been analogous to infection of G--bacterial periplasm by Bdellovibrio sp. It is suggested that eukaryotic plasma membrane might be derived from pre-karyote outer membrane and nuclear/ER membrane might be derived from pre-karyote inner membrane. Thus the nucleoplasm might be derived from pre-karyote cytoplasm and eukaryotic cytoplasm might be homologous to pre-karyote periplasm. PMID:19513207

  17. The periplasmic nitrate reductase nap is required for anaerobic growth and involved in redox control of magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Katzmann, Emanuel; Borg, Sarah; Schüler, Dirk

    2012-09-01

    The magnetosomes of many magnetotactic bacteria consist of membrane-enveloped magnetite crystals, whose synthesis is favored by a low redox potential. However, the cellular redox processes governing the biomineralization of the mixed-valence iron oxide have remained unknown. Here, we show that in the alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, magnetite biomineralization is linked to dissimilatory nitrate reduction. A complete denitrification pathway, including gene functions for nitrate (nap), nitrite (nir), nitric oxide (nor), and nitrous oxide reduction (nos), was identified. Transcriptional gusA fusions as reporters revealed that except for nap, the highest expression of the denitrification genes coincided with conditions permitting maximum magnetite synthesis. Whereas microaerobic denitrification overlapped with oxygen respiration, nitrate was the only electron acceptor supporting growth in the entire absence of oxygen, and only the deletion of nap genes, encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase, and not deletion of nor or nos genes, abolished anaerobic growth and also delayed aerobic growth in both nitrate and ammonium media. While loss of nosZ or norCB had no or relatively weak effects on magnetosome synthesis, deletion of nap severely impaired magnetite biomineralization and resulted in fewer, smaller, and irregular crystals during denitrification and also microaerobic respiration, probably by disturbing the proper redox balance required for magnetite synthesis. In contrast to the case for the wild type, biomineralization in Δnap cells was independent of the oxidation state of carbon substrates. Altogether, our data demonstrate that in addition to its essential role in anaerobic respiration, the periplasmic nitrate reductase Nap has a further key function by participating in redox reactions required for magnetite biomineralization.

  18. High Resolution Structures of Periplasmic Glucose-binding Protein of Pseudomonas putida CSV86 Reveal Structural Basis of Its Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suman; Modak, Arnab; Phale, Prashant S; Bhaumik, Prasenjit

    2016-04-01

    Periplasmic substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) bind to the specific ligand with high affinity and mediate their transport into the cytoplasm via the cognate inner membrane ATP-binding cassette proteins. Because of low sequence identities, understanding the structural basis of substrate recognition by SBPs has remained very challenging. There are several structures available for the ligand-bound sugar SBPs, but very few unliganded structures are reported. No structural data are available for sugar SBPs fromPseudomonassp. to date. This study reports the first high resolution crystal structures of periplasmic glucose-binding protein fromPseudomonas putidaCSV86 (ppGBP) in unliganded form (2.5 Å) and complexed with glucose (1.25 Å) and galactose (1.8 Å). Asymmetric domain closure of ppGBP was observed upon substrate binding. The ppGBP was found to have an affinity of ∼ 0.3 μmfor glucose. The structural analysis showed that the sugars are bound to the protein mainly by hydrogen bonds, and the loss of two strong hydrogen bonds between ppGBP and galactose compared with glucose may be responsible for lowering its affinity toward galactose. The higher stability of ppGBP-glucose complex was also indicated by an 8 °C increase in the melting temperature compared with unliganded form and ppGBP-galactose complex. ppGBP binds to monosaccharide, but the structural features revealed it to have an oligosaccharide-binding protein fold, indicating that during evolution the sugar binding pocket may have undergone structural modulation to accommodate monosaccharide only.

  19. Isolation and characterisation of EfeM, a periplasmic component of the putative EfeUOBM iron transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Mohan B; Mitchell, Sue A; Gibson, Trevor M; Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano; Andrews, Simon C; Watson, Kimberly A

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Bioinformatic analysis reveals EfeM is a metallopeptidase with conserved HXXE motif. {yields} Mass spectrometry confirms EfeM consists of 251 residues, molecular weight 27,772Da. {yields} SRCD spectroscopy shows an {alpha}-helical secondary structure. {yields} Single crystals of EfeM are orthorhombic and diffract to 1.6A resolution. {yields} Space group is P22{sub 1}2{sub 1} with cell dimensions a = 46.74, b = 95.17 and c = 152.61 A. -- Abstract: The EfeM protein is a component of the putative EfeUOBM iron-transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae and is thought to act as a periplasmic, ferrous-iron binding protein. It contains a signal peptide of 34 amino acid residues and a C-terminal 'Peptidase{sub M}75' domain of 251 residues. The C-terminal domain contains a highly conserved 'HXXE' motif thought to act as part of a divalent cation-binding site. In this work, the gene (efeM or 'Psyr{sub 3}370') encoding EfeM was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the mature protein was purified from the periplasm. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of the protein (M{sub W} 27,772 Da). Circular dichroism spectroscopy of EfeM indicated a mainly {alpha}-helical structure, consistent with bioinformatic predictions. Purified EfeM was crystallised by hanging-drop vapor diffusion to give needle-shaped crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 A. This is the first molecular study of a peptidase M75 domain with a presumed iron transport role.

  20. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-04-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detail. However, it remained unclear how Lol factors interact with each other to conduct very efficient lipoprotein transfer in the periplasm where ATP is not available. To address this issue, a photo-reactive phenylalanine analogue, p-benzoyl-phenylalanine, was introduced at various positions of LolA and LolB, of which the overall structures are very similar and comprise an incomplete beta-barrel with a hydrophobic cavity inside. Cells expressing LolA or LolB derivatives containing the above analogue were irradiated with UV for in vivo photo-cross-linking. These analyses revealed a hot area in the same region of LolA and LolB, through which LolA and LolB interact with each other. This area is located at the entrance of the hydrophobic cavity. Moreover, this area in LolA is involved in the interaction with a membrane subunit, LolC, whereas no cross-linking occurs between LolA and the other membrane subunit, LolE, or ATP-binding subunit LolD, despite the structural similarity between LolC and LolE. The hydrophobic cavities of LolA and LolB were both found to bind lipoproteins inside. These results indicate that the transfer of lipoproteins through Lol proteins occurs in a mouth-to-mouth manner.

  1. Site-directed Fluorescence Labeling Reveals a Revised N-terminal Membrane Topology and Functional Periplasmic Residues in the Escherichia coli Cell Division Protein FtsK*

    PubMed Central

    Berezuk, Alison M.; Goodyear, Mara; Khursigara, Cezar M.

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, FtsK is a large integral membrane protein that coordinates chromosome segregation and cell division. The N-terminal domain of FtsK (FtsKN) is essential for division, and the C terminus (FtsKC) is a well characterized DNA translocase. Although the function of FtsKN is unknown, it is suggested that FtsK acts as a checkpoint to ensure DNA is properly segregated before septation. This may occur through modulation of protein interactions between FtsKN and other division proteins in both the periplasm and cytoplasm; thus, a clear understanding of how FtsKN is positioned in the membrane is required to characterize these interactions. The membrane topology of FtsKN was initially determined using site-directed reporter fusions; however, questions regarding this topology persist. Here, we report a revised membrane topology generated by site-directed fluorescence labeling. The revised topology confirms the presence of four transmembrane segments and reveals a newly identified periplasmic loop between the third and fourth transmembrane domains. Within this loop, four residues were identified that, when mutated, resulted in the appearance of cellular voids. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of these voids showed asymmetric division of the cytoplasm in the absence of outer membrane invagination or visible cell wall ingrowth. This uncoupling reveals a novel role for FtsK in linking cell envelope septation events and yields further evidence for FtsK as a critical checkpoint of cell division. The revised topology of FtsKN also provides an important platform for future studies on essential interactions required for this process. PMID:25002583

  2. A Periplasmic Complex of the Nitrite Reductase NirS, the Chaperone DnaK, and the Flagellum Protein FliC Is Essential for Flagellum Assembly and Motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Borrero-de Acuña, José Manuel; Molinari, Gabriella; Rohde, Manfred; Dammeyer, Thorben; Wissing, Josef; Jänsch, Lothar; Arias, Sagrario; Jahn, Martina; Schobert, Max; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitously occurring environmental bacterium and opportunistic pathogen responsible for various acute and chronic infections. Obviously, anaerobic energy generation via denitrification contributes to its ecological success. To investigate the structural basis for the interconnection of the denitrification machinery to other essential cellular processes, we have sought to identify the protein interaction partners of the denitrification enzyme nitrite reductase NirS in the periplasm. We employed NirS as an affinity-purifiable bait to identify interacting proteins in vivo. Results obtained revealed that both the flagellar structural protein FliC and the protein chaperone DnaK form a complex with NirS in the periplasm. The interacting domains of NirS and FliC were tentatively identified. The NirS-interacting stretch of amino acids lies within its cytochrome c domain. Motility assays and ultrastructure analyses revealed that a nirS mutant was defective in the formation of flagella and correspondingly in swimming motility. In contrast, the fliC mutant revealed an intact denitrification pathway. However, deletion of the nirF gene, coding for a heme d1 biosynthetic enzyme, which leads to catalytically inactive NirS, did not abolish swimming ability. This pointed to a structural function for the NirS protein. FliC and NirS were found colocalized with DnaK at the cell surface of P. aeruginosa. A function of the detected periplasmic NirS-DnaK-FliC complex in flagellum formation and motility was concluded and discussed. IMPORTANCE Physiological functions in Gram-negative bacteria are connected with the cellular compartment of the periplasm and its membranes. Central enzymatic steps of anaerobic energy generation and the motility mediated by flagellar activity use these cellular structures in addition to multiple other processes. Almost nothing is known about the protein network functionally connecting these processes in the periplasm

  3. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structures and biological activity of set of Cu(II) benzothiazole complexes: artificial nucleases with cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ramsey A; Foreman, David; Lin, Han X; Carney, Bruce K; Fox, Kristin M; Cassimeris, Lynne; Tanski, Joseph M; Tyler, Laurie A

    2014-08-01

    A series of Cu(II) complexes with ligand frames based on quinoline derivatives appended with a benzothiazole substituent has been isolated. The complexes, Cu(Q(oBt))(NO3)2(H2O)∙CH3OH (1∙CH3OH), Cu(8OHQ(oBt))Cl2∙CH3OH (2∙CH3OH), Cu(8OQ(oBt))Cl(CH3OH)∙CH3OH (3∙CH3OH) and [Cu(8OH1/2Q(oBt))(CH3OH)(NO3)]2(NO3) (4) have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR and UV-visible spectroscopies, and elemental analysis. The ligand frame within the set of complexes differs in the substituent on the quinoline ring: complex 1 remains unsubstituted at this position while complexes 2-4 have a substituted OH group. In complex 2, the bound phenol remains protonated while in 3 it is a phenolato group. Complex 4 contains two complexes within the unit cell and one NO3(-) giving rise to an overall 'half-protonation'. The interaction between complexes 1-3 with CT-DNA was investigated using fluorescence emission spectroscopy and revealed 2 and 3 strongly intercalate DNA with Kapp values of 1.47×10(7)M(-1) and 3.09×10(7)M(-1), respectively. The ability of complexes 1-3 to cleave SC-DNA was monitored using gel electrophoresis. Each complex exhibits potent, concentration dependent nuclease activity forming single and double-nicked DNA as low as 10μM. The nuclease activity of complexes 1-3 is primarily dependent on (1)O2 species while ·OH radicals play a secondary role in the cleavage by complexes 2 and 3. The cytotoxic effects of 1-3 were examined using HeLa cells and show cell death in the micromolar range. The distribution of cell cycle stages remains unchanged when complexes are present indicating DNA damage may be occurring throughout the cell cycle. PMID:24794274

  4. RecQ helicase and RecJ nuclease provide complementary functions to resect DNA for homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Morimatsu, Katsumi; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinational DNA repair by the RecF pathway of Escherichia coli requires the coordinated activities of RecA, RecFOR, RecQ, RecJ, and single-strand DNA binding (SSB) proteins. These proteins facilitate formation of homologously paired joint molecules between linear double-stranded (dsDNA) and supercoiled DNA. Repair starts with resection of the broken dsDNA by RecQ, a 3′→5′ helicase, RecJ, a 5′→3′ exonuclease, and SSB protein. The ends of a dsDNA break can be blunt-ended, or they may possess either 5′- or 3′-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhangs of undefined length. Here we show that RecJ nuclease alone can initiate nucleolytic resection of DNA with 5′-ssDNA overhangs, and that RecQ helicase can initiate resection of DNA with blunt-ends or 3′-ssDNA overhangs by DNA unwinding. We establish that in addition to its well-known ssDNA exonuclease activity, RecJ can display dsDNA exonuclease activity, degrading 100–200 nucleotides of the strand terminating with a 5′-ssDNA overhang. The dsDNA product, with a 3′-ssDNA overhang, is an optimal substrate for RecQ, which unwinds this intermediate to reveal the complementary DNA strand with a 5′-end that is degraded iteratively by RecJ. On the other hand, RecJ cannot resect duplex DNA that is either blunt-ended or terminated with 3′-ssDNA; however, such DNA is unwound by RecQ to create ssDNA for RecJ exonuclease. RecJ requires interaction with SSB for exonucleolytic degradation of ssDNA but not dsDNA. Thus, complementary action by RecJ and RecQ permits initiation of recombinational repair from all dsDNA ends: 5′-overhangs, blunt, or 3′-overhangs. Such helicase–nuclease coordination is a common mechanism underlying resection in all organisms. PMID:25411316

  5. Efficient Gene Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells by Bacterial Injection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingyue; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Santostefano, Katherine E.; Ha, Un-Hwan; Wu, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a powerful tool for direct protein delivery into mammalian cells and has successfully been used to deliver various exogenous proteins into mammalian cells. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) proteins have been efficiently delivered using the P. aeruginosa T3SS into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for genome editing. This bacterial delivery system offers an alternative method of TALEN delivery that is highly efficient in cleavage of the chromosomal target and presumably safer by avoiding plasmid DNA introduction. We combined the method of bacterial T3SS-mediated TALEN protein injection and transfection of an oligonucleotide template to effectively generate precise genetic modifications in the stem cells. Initially, we efficiently edited a single-base in the gfp gene of a mESC line to silence green fluorescent protein (GFP) production. The resulting GFP-negative mESC was cloned from a single cell and subsequently mutated back to a GFP-positive mESC line. Using the same approach, the gfp gene was also effectively knocked out in hESCs. In addition, a defined single-base edition was effectively introduced into the X-chromosome-linked HPRT1 gene in hiPSCs, generating an in vitro model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. T3SS-mediated TALEN protein delivery provides a highly efficient alternative for introducing precise gene editing within pluripotent stem cells for the purpose of disease genotype-phenotype relationship studies and cellular replacement therapies. Significance The present study describes a novel and powerful tool for the delivery of the genome editing enzyme transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) directly into pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), achieving desired base changes on the genomes of PSCs with high efficiency. This novel approach uses bacteria as a protein delivery

  6. A quantitative multiplex nuclease protection assay reveals immunotoxicity gene expression profiles in the rabbit model for vaginal drug safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fichorova, Raina N.; Mendonca, Kevin; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Murray, Ryan; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2015-06-15

    Any vaginal product that alters the mucosal environment and impairs the immune barrier increases the risk of sexually transmitted infections, especially HIV infection, which thrives on mucosal damage and inflammation. The FDA-recommended rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) model serves as a first line selection tool for vaginal products; however, for decades it has been limited to histopathology scoring, insufficient to select safe anti-HIV microbicides. In this study we incorporate to the RVI model a novel quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) to quantify mRNA levels of 25 genes representing leukocyte differentiation markers, toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokines, chemokines, epithelial repair, microbicidal and vascular markers, by designing two multiplex arrays. Tissue sections were obtained from 36 rabbits (6 per treatment arm) after 14 daily applications of a placebo gel, saline, 4% nonoxynol-9 (N-9), and three combinations of the anti-HIV microbicides tenofovir (TFV) and UC781 in escalating concentrations (highest: 10% TFV + 2.5%UC781). Results showed that increased expression levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, interleukin (IL)-1β, CXCL8, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 (P < 0.05), and decreased levels of TLR2 (P < 0.05), TLR3 and bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI) (P < 0.001) were associated with cervicovaginal mucosal alteration (histopathology). Seven markers showed a significant linear trend predicting epithelial damage (up with CD4, IL-1β, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL21, EMP1 and down with BPI). Despite the low tissue damage RVI scores, the high-dose microbicide combination gel caused activation of HIV host cells (SLC and CD4) while N-9 caused proinflammatory gene upregulation (IL-8 and TLR4) suggesting a potential for increasing risk of HIV via different mechanisms depending on the chemical nature of the test product. - Highlights: • A transcriptome nuclease protection assay assessed microbicides for vaginal safety. • Biomarkers were

  7. Spermidine-condensed phi X174 DNA cleavage by micrococcal nuclease: torus cleavage model and evidence for unidirectional circumferential DNA wrapping.

    PubMed Central

    Marx, K A; Reynolds, T C

    1982-01-01

    Spermidine-condensed phi X174 replicative form (RF) II DNA was digested with micrococcal nuclease to yield seven identifiable DNA bands forming an arithmetic fragment-length series. The DNA monomer unit length was found to be 780 +/- 80 base pairs. This result is most consistent with a proposed model for micrococcal nuclease cleavage of a DNA torus organized by the unidirectional, circumferential wrapping of B-geometry DNA. By a topological consideration, the blunt-end-rod-fusion model for torus forma