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Sample records for peritrichously flagellated chemotactic

  1. Adaptation and optimal chemotactic strategy for {ital E. coli}

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, S.P.; Bialek, William; Koberle, R. Freedman, B.

    1998-04-01

    Extending the classic works of Berg and Purcell on the biophysics of bacterial chemotaxis, we find the optimal chemotactic strategy for the peritrichous bacterium {ital E. coli} in the high and low signal to noise ratio limits. The optimal strategy depends on properties of the environment and properties of the individual bacterium, and is therefore highly adaptive. We review experiments relevant to testing both the form of the proposed strategy and its adaptability, and propose extensions of them which could test the limits of the adaptability in this simplest sensory processing system. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Flagellate shiitake mushroom dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Luber, Adam J; Ackerman, Lindsay S

    2015-08-15

    An 84-year-old woman presented with 5 days of a pruritic skin eruption that formed arciform and linear patterns. She was diagnosed with flagellate shiitake mushroom dermatitis related to shiitake mushroom consumption the day prior symptom onset.

  3. Flagellates and ciliates.

    PubMed

    Garcia, L S

    1999-09-01

    This article includes information on two human parasites, one protozoan flagellate, Giardia lamblia, and one ciliate, Balantidum coli. Both are transmitted through ingestion of food and water contaminated with fecal material. G. lamblia may be the most common intestinal protozoan found in humans throughout the world and causes a wide range of symptoms, all of which can be confused with other infectious and noninfectious causes. Although B. coli tends to be more restricted and associated with pigs as potential reservoir hosts, this organism can also cause mild to severe symptoms and can be found throughout the world. PMID:10549429

  4. Revealing the Diversity and Quantity of Peritrich Ciliates in Environmental Samples Using Specific Primer-based PCR and Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xihan; Gong, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Peritrichs are a diverse, ecologically important ciliate group usually with a complex life cycle. To date, the community of the peritrichs has been investigated by using morphology-based methods such as living observation and silver staining. Here we show a molecular approach for characterizing the diversity and quantity of free-living peritrichs in environmental samples. We newly designed four peritrich-specific primers targeting 18S rRNA genes that allow clone library construction, screening and analysis. A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay was developed to quantify peritrichs in environmental samples by using rDNA copy number as an indicator. DNA extracted from four water samples of contrasting environmental gradients was analysed. The results showed that the peritrich community was differentiated among these samples, and that the diversity decreased with the increase of water salinity. The qPCR results are consistent with the library sequence analysis in terms of quantity variations from sample to sample. The development of peritrich-specific primers, for the first time, for conventional PCR and qPCR assays, provides useful molecular tools for revealing the diversity and quantity of peritrich ciliates in environmental samples. Also, our study illustrates the potential of these molecular tools to ecological studies of other ciliate groups in diverse environments. PMID:23100023

  5. Growth of the peritrich epibiont Zoothamnium intermedium Precht, 1935 (Ciliophora, Peritrichia) estimated from laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Utz, L R P

    2008-05-01

    Peritrich ciliates are commonly found colonizing living substrates. Although this a well known phenomenon, biological aspects of this relationship need to be studied in more detail. Assessment of growth rates in peritrichs has been the subject of very few studies. Only species in the genera Carchesium Ehrenberg, 1830 and Vorticella Linnaeus, 1767 had their growth rates evaluated in the field and in the laboratory. In the present study, growth, colonization (colonies/host), and proliferation (zooids/colony) rates of the peritrich epibiont Zoothamnium intermedium Precht, 1935 attached to the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa Dana 1848 were evaluated in the laboratory in two food regimes: bacteria only, and algal based diet. Results showed that growth, colonization, and proliferation rates were similar for both diets. Maximum growth rates obtained for Z. intermedium was 0.85 and 0.83 per day, for bacteria and algae respectively. Maximum colonization rates were 0.5 per day for both diets, and the maximum proliferation rates were 0.44 and 0.42 per day for bacteria and algae respectively. These results demonstrate that Z. intermedium is able to grow at the same rate of other peritrichs on bacterial and algal based diets.

  6. Feeding and swimming of flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doelger, Julia; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Kiorboe, Thomas; Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Hydrodynamics plays a dominant role for small planktonic flagellates and shapes their survival strategies. The high diversity of beat patterns and arrangements of appendages indicates different strategies balancing the trade-offs between the general goals, i.e., energy-efficient swimming, feeding, and predator avoidance. One type of flagellated algae that we observe, are haptophytes, which possess two flagella for flow creation and one so-called haptonema, a long, rigid structure fixed on the cell body, which is used for prey capture. We present videos and flow fields obtained using velocimetry methods around freely swimming haptophytes and other flagellates, which we compare to analytical results obtained from point force models. The observed and modelled flows are used to analyse how different morphologies and beat patterns relate to different feeding or swimming strategies, such as the capture mechanism in haptophytes. The Centre for Ocean Life is a VKR center of excellence supported by the Villum foundation.

  7. Flagella number among Naegleria flagellates.

    PubMed

    John, D T; Cole, T B; John, R A

    1991-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the number of flagella on the flagellates of Naegleria australiensis, N. fowleri, N. gruberi, and N. jadini. Although the majority of flagellates had 2 flagella, there was considerable variation among individual cells. The number of flagella per flagellate varied from 1-8, with 2.4 being the average number per cell. For the different species, the average number of flagella per cell ranged from 2.0 in N. jadini to 3.1 for N. australiensis. The greatest amount of variation occurred in N. australiensis, with only 43% of the cells having 2 flagella. By contrast, 92% of N. fowleri cells had 2 flagella. Naegleria jadini and N. gruberi were intermediate with 80% and 74% biflagellates, respectively.

  8. Chemotactic separation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna Kanti; Das, Sambeeta; Poyton, Matthew F; Sengupta, Samudra; Butler, Peter J; Cremer, Paul S; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-12-23

    We demonstrate a procedure for the separation of enzymes based on their chemotactic response toward an imposed substrate concentration gradient. The separation is observed within a two-inlet, five-outlet microfluidic network, designed to allow mixtures of active (ones that catalyze substrate turnover) and inactive (ones that do not catalyze substrate turnover) enzymes, labeled with different fluorophores, to flow through one of the inlets. Substrate solution prepared in phosphate buffer was introduced through the other inlet of the device at the same flow rate. The steady-state concentration profiles of the enzymes were obtained at specific positions within the outlets of the microchannel using fluorescence microscopy. In the presence of a substrate concentration gradient, active enzyme molecules migrated preferentially toward the substrate channel. The excess migration of the active enzyme molecules was quantified in terms of an enrichment coefficient. Experiments were carried out with different pairs of enzymes. Coupling the physics of laminar flow of liquid and molecular diffusion, multiphysics simulations were carried out to estimate the extent of the chemotactic separation. Our results show that, with appropriate microfluidic arrangement, molecular chemotaxis leads to spontaneous separation of active enzyme molecules from their inactive counterparts of similar charge and size.

  9. Progress in understanding the phylogeny of flagellates.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, M A

    1995-01-01

    Heterotrophic free-living flagellates appear to provide the ancestry for all other eukaryote groups. Not only are the oldest surviving anaerobic eukaryotes flagellated protists, but also there appear to be survivors of a lineage of flagellate forms which could have been close to the sources of the main branches of eukaryote evolution. These 'stem' forms of flagellates developed more complex flagellation with anchoring fibres which became the main components of the cytoskeleton and supported the cytostome; by their phagotrophic activities these flagellates established symbiotic relationships, first with aerobic bacteria to form mitochondria, and later with various forms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic algal cells to form chloroplasts of a variety of types having different pigments, different structure and different food storage patterns. The specific patterns of flagellation, cytoskeleton, cytostome, secreted surface structures and cell aggregation into colonies enable groups of organisms to be recognised, whose most primitive survivors in almost all cases are heterotrophic flagellates. The current view of the phylogeny of eukaryotes suggests that heterotrophic flagellates have provided the origins of all major eukaryote groups, and that the phylogeny of these flagellates is the key to understanding the evolution of all eukaryotes. We anticipate that further rRNA analyses, supported by ultrastructural data, will confirm the central role played by these flagellates in eukaryote evolution.

  10. Serum chemotactic inhibitory activity: heat activation of chemotactic inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Epps, D E; Williams, R C

    1976-01-01

    Serum chemotactic inhibitory activity (CIA) was studied in 46 patients with various systemic diseases, using a system consisting of normal human leukocytes as indicator cells and 10% fresh normal serum as a control chemotactic attractant. It was shown, as previously reported, that an association exists between CIA and skin test anergy. Heat treatment of sera at 56 C for 30 min increased both the incidence and the degree of chemotactic inhibition observed in these patients. The effects of heat treatment of sera containing CIA on other chemotactic attractants (C3a, bacteria-derived chemotactic factor (BF), and casein) are shown. Before heat treatment, some sera suppressed chemotaxis mediated by BF in the absence of suppression of normal serum-mediated chemotaxis, indicating the possible involvement of more than one system of inhibition. Multiple systems were further supported by data indicating that room temperature incubation resulted in a loss of CIA as measured by normal serum-mediated chemotoxis with no apparent decrease in the inhibition of BF -mediated chemotaxis. Separation of sera containing CIA by Sephadex G-200 showed chemotactic inhibitory activity to be increased in both the void volume region. Experiments showed that heat treating before separation resulted in similar increases in both peaks, implying the presence of an antagonist to CIA. Experiments demonstrating that sera containing CIA do not suppress casein-mediated chemotaxis by means of an irreversible inactivation of chemotactic factor are included along with experiments demonstrating a cellular mode of action. The possible presence of two systems of chemotactic inhibition, one acting directly upon chemotactic factors and one interacting with the responding cell, are discussed. PMID:773824

  11. A New Flagship Peritrich (Ciliophora, Peritrichida) from the River Rhine, Germany: Apocarchesium arndti n. sp.

    PubMed Central

    NORF, HELGE; FOISSNER, WILHELM

    2011-01-01

    We discovered a free-living peritrich ciliate with outstanding features in the River Rhine. Its morphology and 18S rRNA gene sequence were studied with standard methods. Apocarchesium arndti n. sp. has several peculiarities. (i) There are ordinary zooids, macrozooids, and microzooids, which form a hemispherical rosette on a discoidal base, the stalk dish, locking the ~ 18 μm wide and up to 2 mm long, spirally contracting colony stalk. (ii) The stalk myoneme is connected only to the microzooids. (iii) A rosette contains up to 50 zooids not connected to each other but individually attached to the stalk dish with the scopula. (iv) The ordinary zooids are epistylidid, trumpet-shaped (~ 6:1 length:width), about 180 × 30 μm in size, and have an ellipsoidal macronucleus subapically between oral cavity and dorsal side. (v) The myoneme system of the zooids, which can contract individually, forms a tube-like structure in the narrow posterior half of the cell. (vi) The silverline pattern belongs to the transverse-striate type. (vii) The oral apparatus is of usual structure, with kinety 1 of peniculus 3 distinctly shortened proximally. (viii) The 18S rRNA places A. arndti n. sp. as a distinct lineage near Vorticella and Carchesium. These data are used to provide an improved diagnosis of the genus Apocarchesium. Features (i)–(iii) and the molecular data indicate that Apocarchesium could be the type genus of a new peritrich family. PMID:20337807

  12. Gravitaxis and graviperception in flagellates.

    PubMed

    Hader, D-P; Lebert, M; Richter, P; Ntefidou, M

    2003-01-01

    There is strong evidence that gravitactic orientation in flagellates and ciliates is mediated by an active physiological gravireceptor rather than by passive alignment of the cells in the water column. In flagellates the threshold for graviorientation was found to be at 0.12 x g on a slow rotating centrifuge during the IML-2 mission on the Shuttle Columbia and a subsequent parabolic rocket flight (TEXUS). During the IML-2 mission no adaptation to microgravity was observed over the duration of the space flight, while gravitaxis was lost in a terrestrial closed environmental system over the period of almost two years. Sedimenting statoliths are not likely to be involved in graviperception because of the small size of the cells and their rotation around the longitudinal axis during forward locomotion. Instead the whole cytoplasmic content of the cell, being heavier than the surrounding aqueous medium (1.05 g/ml), exerts a pressure on the lower membrane. This force activates stretch-sensitive calcium specific ion channels which can be inhibited by the addition of gadolinium which therefore abolishes gravitaxis. The channels seem to mainly allow calcium ions to pass since gravitaxis is blocked by the addition of the calcium ionophore A23187 and by vanadate which blocks the Ca-ATPase in the cytoplasmic membrane. Recently, a gene for a mechanosensitive channel, originally sequenced for Saccharomyces, was identified in Euglena by PCR. The increase in intracellular free calcium during reorientation can be visualized by the fluorophore Calcium Crimson using laser excitation and image intensification. This result was confirmed during recent parabolic flights. The gated calcium changes the membrane potential across the membrane which may be the trigger for the reorientation of the flagellum. cAMP plays a role as a secondary messenger. Photosynthetic flagellates are suitable candidates for life support systems since they absorb CO2 and produce oxygen. Preliminary experiments

  13. Spatial genetic variation, phylogeography and barcoding of the peritrichous ciliate Carchesium polypinum.

    PubMed

    Gentekaki, Eleni; Lynn, Denis

    2012-11-01

    Most recent studies of geographic distribution of microbial eukaryotes have focused on marine rather than freshwater protists. Here, we used the freshwater peritrich ciliate Carchesium polypinum to quantify the degree of genetic diversity of four closely related and previously described lineages and to determine whether patterns of genetic differentiation showed geographic partitioning. Using an expanded dataset of 100 isolates and employing the mitochondrial marker cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (cox-1), we enriched the 6 previously identified clades of Carchesium polypinum. We found a large degree of geographic overlap among the different clades (e.g. to the level of range of sampling), but also a spatially restricted clade (e.g. to the level of one river basin). Furthermore, we present evidence of a clear geographic separation in one of the lineages with Canadian and North Carolinian isolates grouping in two distinct clusters.

  14. Attachment of the peritrich epibiont Zoothamnium intermedium Precht, 1935 (Ciliophora, Peritrichia) to artificial substrates in a natural environment.

    PubMed

    Utz, L R P

    2008-11-01

    Peritrich ciliates are commonly found as epibionts, colonizing living organisms, or attached to non-living substrates in freshwater, estuarine and marine environments. Several species of peritrich epibionts are obligate, which means that they are able to only colonize other organisms, while others are facultative attaching to living or non-living substrates. The peritrich Zoothamnium intermedium is commonly found as epibiont on the copepod species Acartia tonsa and Eurytemora affinis in Chesapeake Bay, USA. Previous studies demonstrated that Z. intermedium is not able to attach to non-living substrates in the laboratory; with free-swimming stages (telotrochs) dying when living substrates are not available for colonization. The present study investigated the ability of Z. intermdium to colonize artificial substrates in the field. Observations were carried out while the peritrich ciliate was colonizing copepods in Rhode River, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay. Results demonstrated that four species of Zoothamnium were recovered from artificial substrates, but none of them was Z. intermedium. At the same time, Z. intermedium was colonizing adults and copepodites of E. affinis and A. tonsa during the whole study period. These results, in addition to laboratory observations, suggest that Z. intermedium is an obligate epibiont.

  15. Flagellate dermatitis after consumption of Shiitake mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Burkhard; Marsch, Wolfgang Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellate dermatitis occurs in patients who have eaten Shiitake mushrooms. We are reporting on a 55-year-old man, who developed whiplash-striped, severely itching efflorescences on the trunk 3 days after eating Lentinula edodes. Flagellate dermatitis is also known as a cutaneous side effect of bleomycin therapy. PMID:25097492

  16. Chemotactic collapse and mesenchymal morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We study the effect of chemotactic signaling among mesenchymal cells. We show that the particular physiology of the mesenchymal cells allows one-dimensional collapse in contrast to the case of bacteria, and that the mesenchymal morphogenesis represents thus a more complex type of pattern formation than those found in bacterial colonies. We compare our theoretical predictions with recent in vitro experiments.

  17. Graviperception and gravitaxis in flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.; Richter, P.; Ntefidou, M.; Lebert, M.

    Unicellular flagellates perceive and react to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Previous hypotheses have suggested that the orientation is brought about by a passive physical mechanism such as buoyancy or hydrodynamic alignment. Recent results of experiments on parabolic rocket flights have revealed that in the photosynthetic Euglena only 10 % of the orientation can be explained by passive orientation while the remainder relies on an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. The cellular contents is heavier than the surrounding medium and consequently presses onto the lower membrane where it activates mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. These channels allow a gated influx of calcium (visualized by confocal microscopy) which depolarizes the internal electrical potential and eventually causes a course correction by the flagellar beating. Further elements in the transduction chain are cyclic AMP and related enzymes. Recent experiments during parabolic aircraft flights and on sounding rockets have confirmed this hypothesis and provided detailed insight into the biochemical sensory transduction chain. Currently the molecular mechanisms of graviperception are being studied.

  18. Starvation-Induced Changes in Motility, Chemotaxis, and Flagellation of Rhizobium meliloti†

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xueming; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1998-01-01

    The changes in motility, chemotactic responsiveness, and flagellation of Rhizobium meliloti RMB7201, L5-30, and JJ1c10 were analyzed after transfer of the bacteria to buffer with no available C, N, or phosphate. Cells of these three strains remained viable for weeks after transfer to starvation buffer (SB) but lost all motility within just 8 to 72 h after transfer to SB. The rates of motility loss differed by severalfold among the strains. Each strain showed a transient, two- to sixfold increase in chemotactic responsiveness toward glutamine within a few hours after transfer to SB, even though motility dropped substantially during the same period. Strains L5-30 and JJ1c10 also showed increased responsiveness to the nonmetabolizable chemoattractant cycloleucine. Cycloleucine partially restored the motility of starving cells when added after transfer and prevented the loss of motility when included in the SB used for initial suspension of the cells. Thus, interactions between chemoattractants and their receptors appear to affect the regulation of motility in response to starvation independently of nutrient or energy source availability. Electron microscopic observations revealed that R. meliloti cells lost flagella and flagellar integrity during starvation, but not as fast, nor to such a great extent, as the cells lost motility. Even after prolonged starvation, when none of the cells were actively motile, about one-third to one-half of the initially flagellated cells retained some flagella. Inactivation of flagellar motors therefore appears to be a rapid and important response of R. meliloti to starvation conditions. Flagellar-motor inactivation was at least partially reversible by addition of either cycloleucine or glucose. During starvation, some cells appeared to retain normal flagellation, normal motor activity, or both for relatively long periods while other cells rapidly lost flagella, motor activity, or both, indicating that starvation-induced regulation of

  19. Chemotactic Blebbing in Dictyostelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Zatulovskiy, Evgeny; Kay, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers use the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum as a model organism to study various aspects of the eukaryotic cell chemotaxis. Traditionally, Dictyostelium chemotaxis is considered to be driven mainly by branched F-actin polymerization. However, recently it has become evident that Dictyostelium, as well as many other eukaryotic cells, can also employ intracellular hydrostatic pressure to generate force for migration. This process results in the projection of hemispherical plasma membrane protrusions, called blebs, that can be controlled by chemotactic signaling.Here we describe two methods to study chemotactic blebbing in Dictyostelium cells and to analyze the intensity of the blebbing response in various strains and under different conditions. The first of these methods-the cyclic-AMP shock assay-allows one to quantify the global blebbing response of cells to a uniform chemoattractant stimulation. The second one-the under-agarose migration assay-induces directional blebbing in cells moving in a gradient of chemoattractant. In this assay, the cells can be switched from a predominantly F-actin-driven mode of motility to a bleb-driven chemotaxis, allowing one to compare the efficiency of both modes and explore the molecular machinery controlling chemotactic blebbing. PMID:27271896

  20. Hydrodynamic effects on the tumbling of flagellated bacteria near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    Peritrichously flagellated bacteria use semi-rigid helical flagella to form a bundle during a run to swim forward and to trigger the unbundling during a tumble to change their swimming direction. It is accepted that the hydrodynamic interactions play a significant role in these processes. Recently, using digital holographic microscopy and microfluidics, we discovered that the tumbling events are substantially suppressed near a solid wall. In this paper, we present a two flagellum rigid model to elucidate the hydrodynamic wall interaction mechanism behind the phenomenon. Further implications on cell attachment and detachment during the biofilm formation will be discussed. We apply Slender Body Theory (SBT) to quantify the flow flagellum interaction. The no-slip boundary imposed by the wall is modeled using the image system of the SBT model for the stoke-flow singularity. We show that in the bulk, a repulsive force among flagella initiates the unbundling and consequently tumbling; however, in presence of the wall, the force is strongly mitigated that stabilize the bundle and suppress the tumbling. NIH and NSF.

  1. Putative bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa in immunosuppressed patients.

    PubMed

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Girginkardesler, Nogay; Celik, Pınar; Yereli, Kor; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be "flagellated protozoa" have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells.

  2. Renal flagellate infections in reptiles: 29 cases.

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, Caries; Garner, Michael M; Nordhausen, Robert W; Valls, Xavier; Gallego, Miguel; Soto, Sara

    2014-03-01

    Renal infection with flagellated protozoa was retrospectively evaluated in 29 reptiles, including 12 turtles, 7 tortoises, and 6 chameleons; overall, 20 species of reptiles were represented. Most cases presented with nonspecific clinical signs or a combination of several concurrent diseases. Nineteen of 29 reptiles had tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with flagellates, and this lesion was considered contributory to death in 15 cases, although concurrent diseases were frequent. Infection was invasive into the renal interstitium in three reptiles due to tubular rupture and in one chameleon also spread to adjacent tissues, coelomic cavity, and blood vessels due to renal rupture. Cytologic or ultrastructural evaluation of trophozoites in two cases was consistent with diplomonad flagellates. Renal disease was often complicated with soft-tissue mineralization and/or gout. Gastrointestinal and cloacal infection with flagellates and inflammation were frequent in reptiles in which the digestive tract was available for histopathologic examination, and this supports the possibility of infections ascending the urinary tract from the cloaca. Renal disease associated with flagellate protozoa is rare in vertebrates but appears to be relevant in reptiles, particularly chelonians and chameleons.

  3. Chemosensory response of marine flagellate towards L- and D- dissolved free amino acids generated during heavy grazing on bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ayo, Begoña; Txakartegi, Aitziber; Baña, Zuriñe; Artolozaga, Itxaso; Iriberri, Juan

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the generation of dissolved free amino acids (DFAA) by the bacterivorous flagellate Rhynchomonas nasuta when feeding on abundant prey. Specifically, it examined whether this flagellate protist exhibits a chemosensory response towards those amino acids. The concentrations of glycine and the L- and D-enantiomers of glutamate, serine, threonine, alanine, and leucine were determined in co-cultures of the flagellate and bacteria. Glycine, L- and D-alanine, and L-serine were found to accumulate under these conditions in amounts that correlated positively with flagellate abundance, suggesting that protists are involved in their generation. Investigations of the chemotactic response of young and old foraging protists to the same amino acids, offered in concentrations similar to those previously generated, showed that glycine elicited the strongest attraction in both age groups. Young protists were strongly attracted to all the assayed amino acids, whereas older protists maintained a high level of attraction only for glycine. These results suggest that glycine generated by protists actively grazing in bacterially enriched patches functions as an infochemical, signaling to foraging protists the presence of available prey in the aquatic environment.

  4. Chemotactic predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ankush; Kruppa, Tobias; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-03-01

    A discrete chemotactic predator-prey model is proposed in which the prey secrets a diffusing chemical which is sensed by the predator and vice versa. Two dynamical states corresponding to catching and escaping are identified and it is shown that steady hunting is unstable. For the escape process, the predator-prey distance is diffusive for short times but exhibits a transient subdiffusive behavior which scales as a power law t¹/³ with time t and ultimately crosses over to diffusion again. This allows us to classify the motility and dynamics of various predatory microbes and phagocytes. In particular, there is a distinct region in the parameter space where they prove to be infallible predators.

  5. Ecology of planktonic heterotrophic flagellates. A review.

    PubMed

    Mariottini, Gian Luigi; Pane, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    In aquatic environments heterotrophic flagellates are an important component within the microbial loop and the food web, owing to their involvement in the energy transfer and flux and as an intermediate link between bacteria and primary producers, and greater organisms, such as other protists and metazoan consumers. In the microbial loop heterotrophic flagellates highly contribute to fast biomass and nutrient recycling and to the production in aquatic environments. In fact, these protists consume efficiently viruses, bacteria, cyanobacteria and picophytoplankton, and are grazed mainly by other protists, rotifers and small crustaceans. In this paper the knowledge about these unicellular organisms is reviewed, taking into particular account their ecological relationships and trophic role within the plankton community of marine and freshwater environments.

  6. Relationship between the flagellates and the ciliates.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R E; Kugrens, P

    1992-01-01

    The flagellates and the ciliates have long been considered to be closely related because of their unicellular nature and the similarity in the structures of the axoneme of the flagella and cilia in both groups. Most protozoologists believe that the ciliates arose from a flagellate. The flagellates that are most similar in structure to the ciliates are the dinoflagellates and two genera of uncertain taxonomic position, Colponema and Katablepharis. Structurally, dinoflagellates have a number of similarities with ciliates. These include the similarity of the cortical alveoli in the ciliates to the thecal vesicles in the dinoflagellates, the possession of tubular cristae, the similarity of the parasomal sac of the ciliates to the pusule of the dinoflagellates, the possession of similar trichocysts and mucocysts, and some similarity in the feeding apparatus. Colponema spp. are probably related to the dinoflagellates and have many of the same similarities with the ciliates. Katablepharis spp. are very similar in structure to the swarmer (embryo) of the suctorian ciliates. Indeed, reduction in the number of cilia to two in the suctorian swarmer and elimination of the macronucleus would result in a cell that is very similar to the Katablepharis cell. The feeding apparatus of Katablepharis spp. and the rest of the ciliates consists of two concentric microtubular arrays associated with vesicles. Information available from nucleotide sequencing of rRNA places the dinoflagellates in an ancestral position to the ciliates. The rRNA of Colponema and Katablepharis spp. has not yet been investigated. The use of stop codons in mRNA is discussed in relation to phylogeny. Images PMID:1480107

  7. Evolution of parasitism in kinetoplastid flagellates.

    PubMed

    Lukeš, Julius; Skalický, Tomáš; Týč, Jiří; Votýpka, Jan; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav

    2014-07-01

    Kinetoplastid protists offer a unique opportunity for studying the evolution of parasitism. While all their close relatives are either photo- or phagotrophic, a number of kinetoplastid species are facultative or obligatory parasites, supporting a hypothesis that parasitism has emerged within this group of flagellates. In this review we discuss origin and evolution of parasitism in bodonids and trypanosomatids and specific adaptations allowing these protozoa to co-exist with their hosts. We also explore the limits of biodiversity of monoxenous (one host) trypanosomatids and some features distinguishing them from their dixenous (two hosts) relatives.

  8. Small but Manifold - Hidden Diversity in "Spumella-like Flagellates".

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Lars; Bock, Christina; Schweikert, Michael; Boenigk, Jens

    2016-07-01

    Colourless, nonscaled chrysophytes comprise morphologically similar or even indistinguishable flagellates which are important bacterivors in water and soil crucial for ecosystem functioning. However, phylogenetic analyses indicate a multiple origin of such colourless, nonscaled flagellate lineages. These flagellates are often referred to as "Spumella-like flagellates" in ecological and biogeographic studies. Although this denomination reflects an assumed polyphyly, it obscures the phylogenetic and taxonomic diversity of this important flagellate group and, thus, hinders progress in lineage- and taxon-specific ecological surveys. The smallest representatives of colourless chrysophytes have been addressed in very few taxonomic studies although they are among the dominant flagellates in field communities. To overcome the blurred picture and set the field for further investigation in biogeography and ecology of the organisms in question, we studied a set of strains of specifically small, colourless, nonscaled chrysomonad flagellates by means of electron microscopy and molecular analyses. They were isolated by a filtration-acclimatisation approach focusing on flagellates of around 5 μm. We present the phylogenetic position of eight different lineages on both the ordinal and the generic level. Accordingly, we describe the new genera Apoikiospumella, Chromulinospumella, Segregatospumella, Cornospumella and Acrispumella Boenigk et Grossmann n. g. and different species within them.

  9. Flagellated ectosymbiotic bacteria propel a eucaryotic cell.

    PubMed

    Tamm, S L

    1982-09-01

    A devescovinid flagellate from termites exhibits rapid gliding movements only when in close contact with other cells or with a substrate. Locomotion is powered not by the cell's own flagella nor by its remarkable rotary axostyle, but by the flagella of thousands of rod bacteria which live on its surface. That the ectosymbiotic bacteria actually propel the protozoan was shown by the following: (a) the bacteria, which lie in specialized pockets of the host membrane, bear typical procaryotic flagella on their exposed surface; (b) gliding continues when the devescovinid's own flagella and rotary axostyle are inactivated; (c) agents which inhibit bacterial flagellar motility, but not the protozoan's motile systems, stop gliding movements; (d) isolated vesicles derived from the surface of the devescovinid rotate at speeds dependent on the number of rod bacteria still attached; (e) individual rod bacteria can move independently over the surface of compressed cells; and (f) wave propagation by the flagellar bundles of the ectosymbiotic bacteria is visualized directly by video-enhanced polarization microscopy. Proximity to solid boundaries may be required to align the flagellar bundles of adjacent bacteria in the same direction, and/or to increase their propulsive efficiency (wall effect). This motility-linked symbiosis resembles the association of locomotory spirochetes with the Australian termite flagellate Mixotricha (Cleveland, L. R., and A. V. Grimstone, 1964, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci., 159:668-686), except that in our case propulsion is provided by bacterial flagella themselves. Since bacterial flagella rotate, an additional novelty of this system is that the surface bearing the procaryotic rotary motors is turned by the eucaryotic rotary motor within.

  10. Nicotine is Chemotactic for Neutrophils and Enhances Neutrophil Responsiveness to Chemotactic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totti, Noel; McCusker, Kevin T.; Campbell, Edward J.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils contribute to chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine was found to be chemotactic for human neutrophils but not monocytes, with a peak activity at ~ 31 micromolar. In lower concentrations (comparable to those in smokers' plasma), nicotine enhanced the response of neutrophils to two chemotactic peptides. In contrast to most other chemoattractants for neutrophils, however, nicotine did not affect degranulation or superoxide production. Nicotine thus may promote inflammation and consequent lung injury in smokers.

  11. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Some Peritrichs (Ciliophora: Peritrichida) from Tank Bromeliads, Including Two New Genera: Orborhabdostyla and Vorticellides

    PubMed Central

    FOISSNER, Wilhelm; BLAKE, Natalie; WOLF, Klaus; BREINER, Hans-Werner; STOECK, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Summary Using standard methods, we studied the morphology and 18S rDNA sequence of some peritrich ciliates from tank bromeliads of Costa Rica, Jamaica, and Ecuador. The new genus Orborhabdostyla differs from Rhabdostyla by the discoidal macronucleus. Two species from the literature and a new species from Ecuadoran tank bromeliads are combined with the new genus: O. previpes (Claparède and Lachmann, 1857) nov. comb., O. kahli (Nenninger, 1948) nov. comb., and O. bromelicola nov. spec. Orborhabdostyla bromelicola is a slender species with stalk-like narrowed posterior half and operculariid/epistylidid oral apparatus. An epistylidid relationship is also suggested by the gene sequence. Vorticella gracilis, described by Dujardin (1841) from French freshwater, belongs to the V. convallaria complex but differs by the yellowish colour and the number of silverlines. The classification as a distinct species is supported by the 18S rDNA, which differs nearly 10% from that of V. convallaria s. str. Based on the new data, especially the very stable yellowish colour, we neotypify V. gracilis with the Austrian population studied by Foissner (1979). Vorticella gracilis forms a strongly supported phyloclade together with V. campanula, V. fusca and V. convallaria, while Vorticellides astyliformis and Vorticella microstoma branch in a separate, fully-supported clade that includes Astylozoon and Opisthonecta. The new genus Vorticellides comprises five small (usually < 60 μm), barrel-shaped species with two epistomial membranes: V. aquadulcis (Stokes, 1887) nov. comb., V. astyliformis (Foissner, 1981) nov. comb., V. platysoma (Stokes, 1887) nov. comb., V. infusionum (Dujardin, 1841) nov. comb., and V. (Spinivorticellides) echini (King, 1931) nov. comb. Two of these species are redescribed in the present study: V. astyliformis and V. aquadulcis, which is neotypified with a Costa Rican population. Pseudovorticella bromelicola nov. spec. differs from the congeners by the location of the

  12. Euglenoid flagellates: a multifaceted biotechnology platform.

    PubMed

    Krajčovič, Juraj; Matej Vesteg; Schwartzbach, Steven D

    2015-05-20

    Euglenoid flagellates are mainly fresh water protists growing in highly diverse environments making them well-suited for a multiplicity of biotechnology applications. Phototrophic euglenids possesses complex chloroplasts of green algal origin bounded by three membranes. Euglena nuclear and plastid genome organization, gene structure and gene expression are distinctly different from other organisms. Our observations on the model organism Euglena gracilis indicate that transcription of both the plastid and nuclear genome is insensitive to environmental changes and that gene expression is regulated mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Euglena plastids have been proposed as a site for the production of proteins and value added metabolites of biotechnological interest. Euglena has been shown to be a suitable protist species to be used for production of several compounds that are used in the production of cosmeceuticals and nutraceuticals, such as α-tocopherol, wax esters, polyunsaturated fatty acids, biotin and tyrosine. The storage polysaccharide, paramylon, has immunostimulatory properties and has shown a promise for biomaterials production. Euglena biomass can be used as a nutritional supplement in aquaculture and in animal feed. Diverse applications of Euglena in environmental biotechnology include ecotoxicological risk assessment, heavy metal bioremediation, bioremediation of industrial wastewater and contaminated water.

  13. Synthesis and assembly of the cytoskeleton of Naegleria gruberi flagellates

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    When Naegleria gruberi flagellates were extracted with nonionic detergent and stained by the indirect immunofluorescence method with AA- 4.3 (a monoclonal antibody against Naegleria beta-tubulin), flagella and a network of cytoskeletal microtubules (CSMT) were seen. When Naegleria amebae were examined in the same way, no cytoplasmic tubulin- containing structures were seen. Formation of the flagellate cytoskeleton was followed during the differentiation of amebae into flagellates by staining cells with AA-4.3. The first tubulin containing structures were a few cytoplasmic microtubules that formed at the time amebae rounded up into spherical cells. The formation of these microtubules was followed by the appearance of basal bodies and flagella and then by the formation of the CSMT. The CSMT formed before the cells assumed the flagellate shape. In flagellate shaped cells the CSMT radiate from the base of the flagella and follow a curving path the full length of the cell. Protein synthetic requirements for the formation of CSMT were examined by transferring cells to cycloheximide at various times after initiation. One-half the population completed the protein synthesis essential for formation of CSMT 61 min after initiation of the differentiation. This is 10 min after the time when protein synthesis for formation of flagella is completed and 10-15 min before the time when the protein synthesis necessary for formation of the flagellate shape is completed. PMID:6363422

  14. Synthesis and assembly of the cytoskeleton of Naegleria gruberi flagellates.

    PubMed

    Walsh, C

    1984-02-01

    When Naegleria gruberi flagellates were extracted with nonionic detergent and stained by the indirect immunofluorescence method with AA-4.3 (a monoclonal antibody against Naegleria beta-tubulin), flagella and a network of cytoskeletal microtubules (CSMT) were seen. When Naegleria amebae were examined in the same way, no cytoplasmic tubulin-containing structures were seen. Formation of the flagellate cytoskeleton was followed during the differentiation of amebae into flagellates by staining cells with AA-4.3. The first tubulin containing structures were a few cytoplasmic microtubules that formed at the time amebae rounded up into spherical cells. The formation of these microtubules was followed by the appearance of basal bodies and flagella and then by the formation of the CSMT. The CSMT formed before the cells assumed the flagellate shape. In flagellate shaped cells the CSMT radiate from the base of the flagella and follow a curving path the full length of the cell. Protein synthetic requirements for the formation of CSMT were examined by transferring cells to cycloheximide at various times after initiation. One-half the population completed the protein synthesis essential for formation of CSMT 61 min after initiation of the differentiation. This is 10 min after the time when protein synthesis for formation of flagella is completed and 10-15 min before the time when the protein synthesis necessary for formation of the flagellate shape is completed. PMID:6363422

  15. Spatiotemporal chemotactic model for ant foraging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Laurent, Thomas; Kumar, Manish; Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present a generic theoretical chemotactic model that accounts for certain emergent behaviors observed in ant foraging. The model does not have many of the constraints and limitations of existing models for ants colony dynamics and takes into account the distinctly different behaviors exhibited in nature by ant foragers in search of food and food ferrying ants. Numerical simulations based on the model show trail formation in foraging ant colonies to be an emergent phenomenon and, in particular, replicate behavior observed in experiments involving the species P. megacephala. The results have broader implications for the study of randomness in chemotactic models. Potential applications include the developments of novel algorithms for stochastic search in engineered complex systems such as robotic swarms.

  16. Self-propelled chemotactic ionic liquid droplets.

    PubMed

    Francis, Wayne; Fay, Cormac; Florea, Larisa; Diamond, Dermot

    2015-02-11

    Herein we report the chemotactic behaviour of self-propelled droplets composed solely of the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride ([P(6,6,6,14)][Cl]). These droplets spontaneously move along an aqueous-air boundary in the direction of chloride gradients to specific destinations due to asymmetric release of [P(6,6,6,14)](+) cationic surfactant from the droplet into the aqueous phase.

  17. Kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clément

    2007-10-01

    We derive general kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation that describe certain features of the morphogenesis of biological colonies (like bacteria, amoebae, endothelial cells or social insects). Starting from a stochastic model defined in terms of N coupled Langevin equations, we derive a nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equation governing the evolution of the distribution function of the system in phase space. By taking the successive moments of this kinetic equation and using a local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations involving a damping term. In the limit of small frictions, we obtain a hyperbolic model describing the formation of network patterns (filaments) and in the limit of strong frictions we obtain a parabolic model which is a generalization of the standard Keller-Segel model describing the formation of clusters (clumps). Our approach connects and generalizes several models introduced in the chemotactic literature. We discuss the analogy between bacterial colonies and self-gravitating systems and between the chemotactic collapse and the gravitational collapse (Jeans instability). We also show that the basic equations of chemotaxis are similar to nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equations so that a notion of effective generalized thermodynamics can be developed.

  18. Gravitational sensory transduction chain in flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.; Richter, P.; Ntefidou, M.; Lebert, M.

    Earlier hypotheses have assumed that gravitactic orientation in flagellates, such as the photosynthetic unicell Euglena gracilis, is brought about by passive alignment of the cells in the water column by being tail heavy. A recent experiment on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 40) comparing immobilized cells with mobile cells demonstrated that the passive buoy effect can account for approximately 20% of the orientation of the cells in a gravity field. The cells show either positive or negative gravitaxis depending on other external or internal factors. Shortly after inoculation, the tendency of young cells to swim downward in the water column can be readily reverted by adding micromolar concentrations of some heavy metal ions including copper, cadmium or lead. The negative gravitaxis of older cells is converted into a positive one by stress factors such as increasing salinity or exposure to excessive visible or UV radiation. The mechanism for this switch seems to involve reactive oxygen species since the gravitactic sign change was suppressed when oxygen was removed by flushing the cell suspension with nitrogen. Also, the addition of radical scavengers (Trolox, ascorbic acid or potassium cyanide) abolished or reduced the gravitactic sign change. Addition of hydrogen peroxide induced a gravitactic sign change in the absence of external stress factors. The primary reception for the gravity vector seems to involve mechanosensitive ion channels which specifically gate calcium ions inward. We have identified several gene sequences for putative mechanosensory channels in Euglena and have applied RNAi to identify which of these channels are involved in graviperception. The influx of Ca 2+ activates calmodulin (CaM) which has been shown to be involved in the sensory transduction chain of graviorientation. It is known that an adenylyl cyclase is bound to the flagellar membrane in Euglena which is activated by CaM. This enzyme produces cAMP which has also been shown to be the key

  19. The evolutionary expansion of the trypanosomatid flagellates.

    PubMed

    Vickerman, K

    1994-12-01

    The trypanosomatids combine a relatively uniform morphology with ability to parasitise a very diverse range of hosts including animals, plants and other protists. Along with their sister family, the biflagellate bodonids, they are set apart from other eukaryotes by distinctive organisational features, such as the kinetoplast-mitochondrion and RNA editing, isolation of glycolysis enzymes in the glycosome, use of the flagellar pocket for molecular traffic into and out of the cell, a unique method of generating cortical microtubules, and bizarre nuclear organisation. These features testify to the antiquity and isolation of the kinetoplast-bearing flagellates (Kinetoplastida). Molecular sequencing techniques (especially small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing) are now radically reshaping previous ideas on the phylogeny of these organisms. The idea that the monogenetic (MG) trypanosomatids gave rise to the digenetic (DG) genera is losing ground to a view that, after the bodonids, the African trypanosomes (DG) represent the most ancient lineage, followed by Trypanosoma cruzi (DG), then Blastocrithidia (MG), Herpetomonas (MG) and Phytomonas (DG), with Leptomonas (MG), Crithidia (MG), Leishmania (DG) and Endotrypanum (DG) forming the crown of the evolutionary tree. Vast genetic distances (12% divergence) separate T. brucei and T. cruzi, while the Leishmania species are separated by very short distances (less than 1% divergence). These phylogenetic conclusions are supported by studies on RNA editing and on the nature of the parasite surface. The trypanosomatids seem to be able to adapt with ease their energy metabolism to the availability of substrates and oxygen, and this may give them the ability to institute new life cycles if host behaviour patterns allow. Sexual processes, though present in at least some trypanosomatids, may have played only a minor part in generating diversity during trypanosomatid evolution. On the other hand, the development of altruistic

  20. Investigating Chemotactic Potential Within Crustal Fluid Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, S. A.; Jungbluth, S.; Lin, H. T.; Rappe, M. S.; Orcutt, B.

    2014-12-01

    The oceanic crust constitutes, possibly, the largest but most inaccessible habitat on Earth. Exchange of fluid between the permeable crustal environment and overlying sediments and bottom seawater transports electron donors and acceptors, which create redox gradients exploitable by microbial life. While the presence of microbial communities within the oceanic crust is strongly suggested, the structure of these communities, and survival mechanisms used within the hydrothermally-active basement aquifer remain unclear. Recently, crustal fluids from two subsurface borehole observatories (IODP CORKs U1362A and U1362B), located on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge, were collected for both single cell genomic and metagenomic analyses. Both techniques revealed an abundance of motility and chemotactic genes. Single-cell amplified genomes (SAGs) classified as Marine Benthic Group E had relatively more motility and taxis genes than any other publically available archaeal SAG. Furthermore, metagenomes from these sites had 3.5 times as many motility and taxis genes than those from sedimentary environments. Many of the detected chemotactic genes (such as tsr and aer) are known to monitor electron flow through the electron transport system, thereby serving as "energy receptors," which direct organisms to the most fitting redox zone. Considering fluid advection occurring within the oceanic crust, the observation of chemotaxis suggests an adaptive lifestyle for crustal microbes.

  1. Chemotactic peptide receptor modulation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The binding of the chemotactic peptide N- formylnorleucylleucylphenylalanine (FNLLP) to its receptor on rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) modulates the number of available peptide receptors. Incubation with FNLLP decreases subsequent binding capacity, a phenomenon that has been termed receptor down regulation. Down regulation of the chemotactic peptide receptor is concentration dependent in both the rate and extent of receptor loss. The dose response parallels that of FNLLP binding to the recptor. The time- course is rapid; even at concentrations of FNLLP as low as 3 x 10(-9) M, the new equilibrium concentration of receptors is reached within 15 min. Down regulation is temperature dependent, but does occur even at 4 degrees C. Concomitant with down regulation, some of the peptide becomes irreversibly cell associated. At 4 degrees C, there is a small accumulation of nondissociable peptide that rapidly reaches a plateau. At higher temperatures, accumulation of nondissociable peptide continues after the rceptor number has reached equilibrium, and the amount accumulated can exceed the initial number of receptors by as much as 300%. The dose response of peptide uptake at 37 degrees C reflects that of binding, suggesting that it is receptor mediated. This uptake may occur via a pinocytosis mechanism. Although PMNs have not been considered to be pinocytic, the addition of FNLLP causes a fourfold stimulation of the rate of pinocytosis as measured by the uptake of [3H]sucrose. PMID:7391138

  2. Surface structures (peritrichous fibrils and tufts of fibrils) found on Streptococcus sanguis strains may be related to their ability to coaggregate with other oral genera.

    PubMed Central

    Handley, P S; Carter, P L; Wyatt, J E; Hesketh, L M

    1985-01-01

    We screened 36 strains of Streptococcus sanguis biotype I and 8 strains of S. sanguis biotype II for the presence of surface structures and for their ability to coaggregate with Actinomyces viscosus, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Negative staining under an electron microscope revealed detectable surface structures on all S. sanguis strains. The majority of strains (38 of 44) carried peritrichous fibrils, which have an irregular profile and no distinct width. They usually appeared as a fringe with a constant width around the cell. Strains selected for measurement had a fringe with an average length of 72.4 +/- 8.5 nm on biotype I strains and 51.6 +/- 3.3 nm on biotype II strains. Some fibrillar biotype I strains carried an additional, longer (158.7 +/- 33.1 nm) type of fibril projecting through the shorter fibrils. Fibrillar density was characteristic for each strain, ranging from very dense on all cells in a population to very sparse on a few cells in a population. A small group of six strains carried tufts of fibrils in a lateral or polar position on the cell. Either one or two lengths of fibril were present in the tuft depending on the strain. One strain carried both peritrichous fibrils and fimbriae. Fimbriae are flexible structures with a constant width (4.5 to 5.0 nm) all along their length but very variable lengths (less than or equal to 0.7 micron) on each cell. S. sanguis I and II both included strains with peritrichous fibrils and tufts of fibrils, but the mixed morphotype strain was confined to biotype II. Fibrils were present on cells at all stages throughout the growth cycle for the strains tested. Freshly isolated fibrillar strains coaggregated consistently well with A. viscosus and A. naeslundii, although some fibrillar reference strains lacked the ability. In addition, all tufted strains could not coaggregate, but the strains with the mixed morphotype coaggregated well. Coaggregation with F. nucleatum was very strong for the

  3. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  4. Chemotactic Motility of Sperm in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Zimmer, Richard K.; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Chemical gradients are utilized by plants and animals in sexual reproduction to guide swimming sperm cells toward the egg. This process (``chemotaxis''), which can greatly increase the success of fertilization, is subject to interference by fluid flow, both in the bodily conduits of internal fertilizers (e.g. mammals) and in the aquatic environment of external fertilizers (e.g. benthic invertebrates). We studied the biomechanics of chemotaxing sea urchin spermatozoa using microfluidic devices, which allow for the precise and independent control of attractant gradients and fluid shear. We captured swimming trajectories and flagellar beat patterns using high-speed video-microscopy, to detect chemotactic responses and measure the effect of fluid forces on swimming. This work will ultimately help us to understand how swimming sperm cells actively navigate natural chemoattractant gradients for successful fertilization.

  5. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.

    1994-01-01

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  6. Protistan Bacterivory in an Oligomesotrophic Lake: Importance of Attached Ciliates and Flagellates

    PubMed

    Carrias; Amblard; Bourdier

    1996-05-01

    Seasonal and depth variations of the abundance, biomass, and bacterivory of protozoa (heterotrophic and mixotrophic flagellates and ciliates) were determined during thermal stratification in an oligomesotrophic lake (Lake Pavin, France). Maximal densities of heterotrophic flagellates (1.9x10(3) cells ml-1) and ciliates (6.1 cells ml-1) were found in the metalimnion. Pigmented flagellates dominated the flagellate biomass in the euphotic zone. Community composition of ciliated protists varied greatly with depth, and both the abundance and biomass of ciliates was dominated by oligotrichs. Heterotrophic flagellates dominated grazing, accounting for 84% of total protistan bacterivory. Maximal grazing impact of heterotrophic flagellates was 18.9x10(6) bacteria 1(-1)h-1. On average, 62% of nonpigmented flagellates were found to ingest particles. Ciliates and mixotrophic flagellates averaged 13% and 3% of protistan bacterivory, respectively. Attached protozoa (ciliates and flagellates) were found to colonize the diatom Asterionella formosa. Attached bacterivores had higher ingestion rates than free bacterivorous protozoa and may account for 66% of total protozoa bacterivory. Our results indicated that even in low numbers, epibiotic protozoa may have a major grazing impact on free bacteria.

  7. Extremely high copy numbers and polymorphisms of the rDNA operon estimated from single cell analysis of oligotrich and peritrich ciliates.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Dong, Jun; Liu, Xihan; Massana, Ramon

    2013-05-01

    The copy number and sequence variation of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) operon are of functional significance in evolution and ecology of organisms. However, the relationship between copy number and sequence variation of rDNA in protists has been rarely studied. Here we quantified rDNA copy numbers of oligotrich and peritrich ciliate species using single-cell quantitative PCR. We also examined the rDNA sequence variation by using single-cell PCR, cloning, and sequencing of multiple clones. We found that the rDNA copy numbers per cell were extremely high and different among even congeners, with the highest record of about 310,000. There was substantial intraindividual haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity for the rDNA markers, with sequence differences primarily characterized by single nucleotide polymorphisms. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity was positively correlated to the rDNA copy number. Our findings provide evidence that: (1) ciliates generally have much higher rDNA copy numbers than other protists and fungi, which could lead to overestimation of the relative abundance of ciliates in environmental samples when rDNA sequence-based methodologies are used; and that (2) the rDNA might not always evolve in a strictly concerted manner in ciliates, which may raise problems in rDNA-based inference of species richness and phylogeny.

  8. Control of microfabricated structures powered by flagellated bacteria using phototaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steager, Edward; Kim, Chang-Beom; Patel, Jigarkumar; Bith, Socheth; Naik, Chandan; Reber, Lindsay; Kim, Min Jun

    2007-06-01

    Flagellated bacteria have been employed as microactuators in low Reynolds number fluidic environments. SU-8 microstructures have been fabricated and released on the surface of swarming Serratia marcescens, and the flagella propel the structures along the swarm surface. Phototactic control of these structures is demonstrated by exposing the localized regions of the swarm to ultraviolet light. The authors additionally discuss the control of microstructures in an open channel powered by bacteria which have been docked through a blotting technique. A tracking algorithm has been developed to analyze swarming patterns of the bacteria as well as the kinematics of the microstructures.

  9. Electrochemical monitoring systems of demembranated flagellate algal motility for ATP sensing.

    PubMed

    Shitanda, Isao; Tanaka, Koji; Hoshi, Yoshinao; Itagaki, Masayuki

    2014-02-21

    The ATP-induced behavior of the unicellular flagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was recorded as changes in the redox currents for a coexisting redox marker. The ATP concentration was estimated using the presented compact electrochemical system, which is based on monitoring of the motility of the flagellates. PMID:24336166

  10. Chemotactic factors of Flavobacterium columnare to skin mucus of healthy channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain insight into chemotactic factors involved in chemotaxis, we exposed a virulent strain of Flavobacterium columnare to various treatments followed by analysis of its chemotactic activity. The chemotactic activity of F. columnare was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited when cells were pretreated...

  11. Chemotactic factors of Flavobacterium columnare to skin mucus of healthy channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain insight into chemotactic factors involved in chemotaxis, we exposed a virulent strain of Flavobacterium columnare to various treatments followed by analysis of its chemotactic activity. Chemotactic activity of F. columnare was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited when cells were pretreated by ...

  12. Controlled architectural and chemotactic studies of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Tayalia, Prakriti; Mazur, Eric; Mooney, David

    2010-01-01

    Chemotaxis plays a critical role in tissue development and wound repair, and is widely studied using ex vivo model systems in applications such as immunotherapy. However, typical chemotactic models employ 2D systems that are less physiologically relevant or use end-point assays, that reveal little about the stepwise dynamics of the migration process. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new model system using microfabrication techniques, sustained drug delivery approaches, and theoretical modeling of chemotactic agent diffusion. This model system allows us to study the effects of 3D architecture and chemotactic agent gradient on immune cell migration in real time. We find that dendritic cell migration is characterized by a strong interplay between matrix architecture and chemotactic gradients, and migration is also influenced dramatically by the cell activation state. Our results indicate that Lipopolysaccharide-activated dendritic cells studied in a traditional transwell system actually exhibit anomalous migration behavior. Such a 3D ex vivo system lends itself for analyzing cell migratory behavior in response to single or multiple competitive cues and could prove useful in vaccine development. PMID:21237507

  13. Impaired chemotactic responses of bronchoalveolar leukocytes in experimental pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, K; Brown, G M; Brown, D M; Slight, J; Robertson, M D; Davis, J M

    1990-01-01

    Rats were exposed to clouds of the following pneumoconiotic dusts: quartz, coal-mine dust, and chrysotile asbestos at 10 or 50 mg/m3 for 8, 32, and 75 days; for comparison, rats were also exposed to the non-pathogenic dust titanium dioxide (TiO2). The bronchoalveolar leukocytes (macrophages and neutrophils) from dust-exposed and control rats were obtained by lavage and tested for their ability to migrate toward zymosan-activated serum. Varying amounts of neutrophils were present depending on the ability of the dust to cause inflammation and the length of exposure. There was a marked loss of chemotactic ability in leukocytes from rats inhaling the pneumoconiotic dusts compared with controls; TiO2-exposed leukocytes had some impairment of chemotaxis, but this was substantially less than that found with the pneumoconiotic dusts. The loss of chemotactic activity did not correlate with the percentage of neutrophils in the lavage cells except when there were very high levels of neutrophils, and there was substantial impairment of chemotaxis with negligible numbers of neutrophils, showing that macrophage chemotaxis was impaired. A phagocytic burden within the leucocytes was not sufficient alone to inhibit chemotaxis, nor was the loss of chemotactic activity due to occupied receptors, since incubation failed to restore chemotaxis. Loss to chemotactic activity by leukocytes from pneumoconiotic dust-exposed lung could be an important factor in the development of pneumoconiosis.

  14. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), -2, and -3 are chemotactic for human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Taub, D D; Proost, P; Murphy, W J; Anver, M; Longo, D L; van Damme, J; Oppenheim, J J

    1995-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, -2, and -3 all have been shown to induce monocyte/macrophage migration in vitro and MCP-1, also known as MCAF, chemoattracts basophils and mast cells. We report here that natural MCP-1 as well as synthetic preparations of MCP-2 and MCP-3 stimulate significant in vitro chemotaxis of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes. This MCP-induced migration was dose-dependent and directional, but not chemokinetic. Phenotypic analysis of the T cell population responsive to MCP-1, MCP-2, and MCP-3 demonstrates that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells migrated in response to these chemokines. Similar results were observed using human CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones. Neutralizing antisera to MCAF or MCP-2 abrogated T cell migration in response to MCP-1 and MCP-2, respectively, but not to RANTES. Subcutaneous administration of purified MCP-1 into the hind flanks of SCID mice engrafted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) induced significant human CD3+ T cell infiltration into the site of injection at 4 h. These results demonstrate that MCP-1, MCP-2, and MCP-3 are inflammatory mediators that specifically stimulate the directional migration of T cells as well as monocytes and may play an important role in immune cell recruitment into sites of antigenic challenge. Images PMID:7883984

  15. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  16. Responses of the photosynthetic flagellate, Euglena gracilis, to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hader, D P; Vogel, K; Schafer, J

    1990-09-01

    Motility and orientation have been studied in the unicellular photosynthetic flagellate. Euglena gracilis, using real time image analysis capable of tracking up to 200 cells simultaneously before, during and after a sounding rocket (TEXUS) experiment. The cells orient negative gravitactically under 1 g conditions and the degree of orientation increases with time when kept in a closed system. Under micro-g conditions the cells orient randomly and display no cooperativity between the individuals. Under 1 g conditions the velocity, which has been determined simultaneously to the orientation vectors, depends on the direction of swimming with respect to the gravity vector. Under micro-g conditions the cells swim significantly faster. After retrieval of the rocket the cells returned to normal gravitaxis and motility as observed before the space flight.

  17. Pankinetoplast DNA structure in a primitive bodonid flagellate, Cryptobia helicis.

    PubMed Central

    Lukescaron, J; Jirkû, M; Avliyakulov, N; Benada, O

    1998-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of a primitive kinetoplastid flagellate Cryptobia helicis is composed of 4.2 kb minicircles and 43 kb maxicircles. 85% and 6% of the minicircles are in the form of supercoiled (SC) and relaxed (OC) monomers, respectively. The remaining minicircles (9%) constitute catenated oligomers composed of both the SC and OC molecules. Minicircles contain bent helix and sequences homologous to the minicircle conserved sequence blocks. Maxicircles encode typical mitochondrial genes and are not catenated. The mtDNA, which we describe with the term 'pankinetoplast DNA', is spread throughout the mitochondrial lumen, where it is associated with multiple electron-lucent loci. There are approximately 8400 minicircles per pankinetoplast-mitochondrion, with the pan-kDNA representing approximately 36% of the total cellular DNA. Based on the similarity of the C.helicis minicircles to plasmids, we present a theory on the formation of the kDNA network. PMID:9451008

  18. Telonema antarcticum sp. nov., a common marine phagotrophic flagellate.

    PubMed

    Klaveness, Dag; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Eikrem, Wenche; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2005-11-01

    Telonema is a widely distributed group of phagotrophic flagellates with two known members. In this study, the structural identity and molecular phylogeny of Telonema antarcticum was investigated and a valid description is proposed. Molecular phylogeny was studied using small-subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequences. The pear-shaped cell had two subequal flagella that emerged laterally on the truncated antapical tail. One flagellum had tripartite hairs. The cell was naked, but had subsurface vesicles containing angular paracrystalline bodies of an unknown nature. A unique complex cytoskeletal structure, the subcortical lamina, was found to be an important functional and taxonomic feature of the genus. Telonema has an antero-ventral depression where food particles are ingested and then transferred to a conspicuous anterior food vacuole. The molecular phylogeny inferred from the SSU rRNA gene sequence suggested that Telonema represents an isolated and deep branch among the tubulocristate protists.

  19. Enhancement of flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Sha, Sha; Pelcovits, Robert; Tang, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the swimming speed of many species of flagellated bacteria in polymer solutions have shown that with the addition of high molecular weight polymers, the speed initially increases as a function of the kinematic viscosity. It peaks at around 1.5-2 cP with typically 10-30% higher values than in cell media without added polymers (~ 1 cP). Past the peak, the average speed gradually decreases as the solution becomes more viscous. Swimming motility persists until solution viscosity reaches 5-10 cP. Models have been proposed to account for this behavior, and the magnitude of the peak becomes a crucial test of theoretical predictions. The status of the field is complicated in light of a recent report (Martinez et al., PNAS, 2014), stressing that low-molecular weight impurities account for the peaked speed-viscosity curves in some cases. We measured the swimming speed of a uni-flagellated bacterium, caulobacter crescentus, in solutions of a number of polymers of several different sizes. Our findings confirm the peaked speed-viscosity curve, only as the molecular weight of the flexible polymers used surpassed ~ 50,000 da. The threshold molecular weight required to augment swimming speed varies somewhat with the polymer species, but it generally corresponds to radius of gyration over tens of nanometers. This general feature is consistent with the model of Powers et al. (Physics of Fluid, 2009), predicting that nonlinear viscoelasticity of the fluid enhances swimming motility. Work Supported by the NSF Fluid Physics Program (Award number CBET 1438033).

  20. Characterization of proteins in flagellates and growing amebae of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, T W; Keefe, W E; Bradley, S G

    1982-06-01

    Polypeptides of whole-cell extracts of Naegleria fowleri flagellates and growing amebae were resolved by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiograms of the [35S]methionine-labeled polypeptides of amebae and flagellates were analyzed by two dimensional densitometry to determine whether there were correlations between intracellular concentration of a protein and subunit size or charge. The majority of the polypeptides of amebae and flagellates had molecular sizes in the range of 20 to 60 kilodaltons. The radioactivity per polypeptide species in the size range of 20 to 60 kilodaltons was greater in amebae than in flagellates. The greatest number of polypeptides detected in amebae and flagellates was in the isoelectric focusing range of pH 6 to 7. The radioactivity per polypeptide species in the isoelectric focusing gradient below 6.3 was greater in amebae than in flagellates. Polypeptides in the size range of 20 to 60 kilodaltons had a median isoelectric point below pI 6.3, whereas those larger than 60 kilodaltons had a median pI value above 6.3. These data indicated that molecular size and charge were not entirely independent variables and that the size and charge of a polypeptide might have an important influence in determining its intracellular concentration in both amebae and flagellates. Autoradiograms were also compared so that changes in intracellular protein complement and concentrations occurring during differentiation could be recognized. The relative amounts of a limited number of polypeptides increased markedly, and others decreased markedly, during enflagellation.

  1. Stability and dynamics of anisotropically tumbling chemotactic swimmers.

    PubMed

    Lushi, Enkeleida

    2016-08-01

    Microswimmers such as bacteria perform random walks known as run-and-tumbles to move up chemoattractant gradients and as a result aggregate with others. It is also known that such micro-swimmers can self-organize into macroscopic patterns due to interactions with neighboring cells through the fluidic environment they live in. While the pattern formation resulting from chemotactic and hydrodynamic interactions separately and together have been previously investigated, the effect of the anisotropy in the tumbles of microswimmers has been unexplored. Here we show through linear analysis and full nonlinear simulations that the slight anisotropy in the individual swimmer tumbles can alter the collective pattern formation in nontrivial ways. We show that tumbling anisotropy diminishes the magnitude of the chemotactic aggregates but may result in more such aggregation peaks. PMID:27627341

  2. Interactions and Collective Behaviour of Chemotactic Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suropriya; Hablani, Surbhi; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2015-03-01

    Artificial realizations of motility point in the direction of a new paradigm in engineering, through the design of emergent behavior by manipulating properties at the scale of the individual components. Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of such systems. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of gradient-sensing of an individual swimmer, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior. We use it to study the scattering of such a swimmer off a reactant source and construct a framework for studying their two body interactions and finally their collective behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signalling formation of clusters and asters. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior. We further study the athermal fluctuations of a pointed tracer particle in a bath of such swimmers.

  3. Collective behavior of chemotactic colloids: clusters, asters and oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suropriya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of systems that emulate properties of living matter, such as motility, gradient-sensing, signaling and replication. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of dynamics of an individual patterned catalytic colloid, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signaling formation of clusters and asters. The kinetics of catalysis introduces a natural control parameter for the range of the interaction mediated by the diffusing chemical species. For various regimes in parameter space in the long-ranged limit our system displays precise analogs to gravitational collapse, plasma oscillations and electrostatic screening. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior.

  4. Stability and dynamics of anisotropically tumbling chemotactic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushi, Enkeleida

    2016-08-01

    Microswimmers such as bacteria perform random walks known as run-and-tumbles to move up chemoattractant gradients and as a result aggregate with others. It is also known that such micro-swimmers can self-organize into macroscopic patterns due to interactions with neighboring cells through the fluidic environment they live in. While the pattern formation resulting from chemotactic and hydrodynamic interactions separately and together have been previously investigated, the effect of the anisotropy in the tumbles of microswimmers has been unexplored. Here we show through linear analysis and full nonlinear simulations that the slight anisotropy in the individual swimmer tumbles can alter the collective pattern formation in nontrivial ways. We show that tumbling anisotropy diminishes the magnitude of the chemotactic aggregates but may result in more such aggregation peaks.

  5. Chemotactic cell trapping in controlled alternating gradient fields

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Börn; Zielinski, Alejandro; Weber, Christoph; Arcizet, Delphine; Youssef, Simon; Franosch, Thomas; Rädler, Joachim O.; Heinrich, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Directed cell migration toward spatio-temporally varying chemotactic stimuli requires rapid cytoskeletal reorganization. Numerous studies provide evidence that actin reorganization is controlled by intracellular redistribution of signaling molecules, such as the PI4,5P2/PI3,4,5P3 gradient. However, exploring underlying mechanisms is difficult and requires careful spatio-temporal control of external chemotactic stimuli. We designed a microfluidic setup to generate alternating chemotactic gradient fields for simultaneous multicell exposure, greatly facilitating statistical analysis. For a quantitative description of intracellular response dynamics, we apply alternating time sequences of spatially homogeneous concentration gradients across 300 μm, reorienting on timescales down to a few seconds. Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae respond to gradient switching rates below 0.02 Hz by readapting their migration direction. For faster switching, cellular repolarization ceases and is completely stalled at 0.1 Hz. In this “chemotactically trapped” cell state, external stimuli alternate faster than intracellular feedback is capable to respond by onset of directed migration. To investigate intracellular actin cortex rearrangement during gradient switching, we correlate migratory cell response with actin repolymerization dynamics, quantified by a fluorescence distribution moment of the GFP fusion protein LimEΔcc. We find two fundamentally different cell polarization types and we could reveal the role of PI3-Kinase for cellular repolarization. In the early aggregation phase, PI3-Kinase enhances the capability of D. discoideum cells to readjust their polarity in response to spatially alternating gradient fields, whereas in aggregation competent cells the effect of PI3-Kinase perturbation becomes less relevant. PMID:21709255

  6. Controlling interneuron activity in Caenorhabditis elegans to evoke chemotactic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Askin; Shen, Ching-Han; Guo, Zengcai V; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2012-10-11

    Animals locate and track chemoattractive gradients in the environment to find food. With its small nervous system, Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model system in which to understand how the dynamics of neural activity control this search behaviour. Extensive work on the nematode has identified the neurons that are necessary for the different locomotory behaviours underlying chemotaxis through the use of laser ablation, activity recording in immobilized animals and the study of mutants. However, we do not know the neural activity patterns in C. elegans that are sufficient to control its complex chemotactic behaviour. To understand how the activity in its interneurons coordinate different motor programs to lead the animal to food, here we used optogenetics and new optical tools to manipulate neural activity directly in freely moving animals to evoke chemotactic behaviour. By deducing the classes of activity patterns triggered during chemotaxis and exciting individual neurons with these patterns, we identified interneurons that control the essential locomotory programs for this behaviour. Notably, we discovered that controlling the dynamics of activity in just one interneuron pair (AIY) was sufficient to force the animal to locate, turn towards and track virtual light gradients. Two distinct activity patterns triggered in AIY as the animal moved through the gradient controlled reversals and gradual turns to drive chemotactic behaviour. Because AIY neurons are post-synaptic to most chemosensory and thermosensory neurons, it is probable that these activity patterns in AIY have an important role in controlling and coordinating different taxis behaviours of the animal. PMID:23000898

  7. Polarised clathrin-mediated endocytosis of EGFR during chemotactic invasion.

    PubMed

    Mutch, Laura Jane; Howden, Jake Davey; Jenner, Emma Poppy Louise; Poulter, Natalie Sarah; Rappoport, Joshua Zachary

    2014-06-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for numerous physiological processes including development and wound healing. However chemotaxis is also exploited during cancer progression. Recent reports have suggested links between vesicle trafficking pathways and directed cell migration. Very little is known about the potential roles of endocytosis pathways during metastasis. Therefore we performed a series of studies employing a previously characterised model for chemotactic invasion of cancer cells to assess specific hypotheses potentially linking endocytosis to directed cell migration. Our results demonstrate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is indispensable for epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed chemotactic invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Conversely, caveolar endocytosis is not required in this mode of migration. We further found that chemoattractant receptor (EGFR) trafficking occurs by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is polarised towards the front of migrating cells. However, we found no role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis in focal adhesion disassembly in this migration model. Thus, this study has characterised the role of endocytosis during chemotactic invasion and has identified functions mechanistically linking clathrin-mediated endocytosis to directed cell motility.

  8. [Eye witnesses and the flagellants in the year 1349].

    PubMed

    Jansen-Sieben, R

    1999-01-01

    Deeply affected and often desperately afraid, many contemporaries recorded their observations and emotions. These reports--no matter how obviously subjective they sometimes were--provide valuable information about what happened during the plague pandemic of 1348-1350. Thus many of our fellow countrymen left behind a direct testimony: Bartholomew of Bruges, a canon in Andenne; Gilles li Muisis, the abbot of Saint Martin in Tournai; Ludovicus Sanctus of Beringen; Simon de Couvin, a canon in Liège; Jan van Boendale, an alderman's clerk in Antwerp; John of Burgundy (also known as John of Mandeville), professor of medicine in Liège; but also texts in Middle Dutch that were not known up to now, and therefore not published, such as the important thesis by Arent Schryver, licentiate in medicine (see next article); an account in verse in the Brabant Chronicle, as well as contemporary testimonies in a different language that have been translated into our language, such as that by John of Eschinden, Johannes de Rupescissa or Guy de Chauliac (who had had the plague himself). They describe the precautions, the causes (God, a comet, an eclipse of the sun, the polluted water, the planets, the air), the symptoms, the social groups most likely to be affected (the youth, the lower classes, the clergy), the high mortality, the problems of hygiene,the social and administrative chaos, the general panic, the flight of countless people. One of the most virulent reactions led to the emergence of the flagellant sect. They originated from Hungary and advanced in an unstoppable advance with a growing number of followers as far as our country, singing, praying, dancing and flaying themselves until they drew blood. We only recently discovered what they sang in Dutch: very recently, a unique roll of parchment was discovered that they carried in their processions, and that contains the text of their songs and a flagellant sermon. The existence of this valuable document and its contents are

  9. Effect of flagellates on free-living bacterial abundance in an organically contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Kinner, N E; Harvey, R W; Kazmierkiewicz-Tabaka, M

    1997-07-01

    Little is known about the role of protists in the saturated subsurface. Porous media microcosms, containing bacteria and protists, were used to determine whether flagellates from an organically contaminated aquifer could substantively affect the number of free-living bacteria (FLB). When flagellates were present, the 3-40% maximum breakthrough of fluorescently labelled FLB injected into the microcosms was much lower than the 60-130% observed for killed controls. Grazing and clearance rates (3-27 FLB flag-1 h-1 and 12-23 nl flag-1 h-1, respectively) calculated from the data were in the range reported for flagellates in other aqueous environments. The data provide evidence that flagellate bacterivory is an important control on groundwater FLB populations.

  10. Effect of flagellates on free-living bacterial abundance in an organically contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinner, N.E.; Harvey, R.W.; Kazmierkiewicz-Tabaka, M.

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the role of protists in the saturated subsurface. Porous media microcosms containing bacteria and protists, were used to determine whether flagellates from an organically contaminated aquifer could substantively affect the number of free- living bacteria (FLB). When flagellates were present, the 3-40% maximum breakthrough of fluorescent y labelled FLB injected into the microcosms was much lower than the 60-130% observed for killed controls Grazing and clearance rates (3-27 FLB flag-1 h-1 and 12-23 nI flag-1 h-1, respectively) calculated from the data were in the range reported for flagellates in other aqueous environments. The data provide evidence that flagellate bacterivory is an important control on groundwater FLB populations.

  11. Bleomycin-induced Flagellate Erythema: A Rare and Unique Drug Rash.

    PubMed

    Changal, K H; Raina, H; Changal, Q H; Raina, M

    2014-12-01

    Bleomycin-induced flagellate erythema is a rare rash associated with the use of the drug. The rash has a characteristic and intermingled lacy appearance as if it has been whipped. Lack of detoxifying enzymes for bleomycin in the skin makes it a vulnerable site for the adverse effects of bleomycin, along with the lungs. We report the case of young girl with germ cell tumour who developed bleomycin-induced flagellate erythema. PMID:25867573

  12. Coordinated Swimming: Hydrodynamic interactions between multi-flagellated bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, Nobuhiko; Larson, Ronald

    2011-03-01

    Multi-flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, often have flagella attached at random locations to the cell body, which drive swimming behavior. To study the effect of hydrodynamic interactions on the swimming behavior, we develop a bead-spring model which represents both the body and the flagella using up to 240 Stokeslets, or hydrodynamic drag centers. These beads are bonded by 1) a spring potential, 2) a bending potential, and 3) a torsional potential to adjacent beads. This modeled bacterium swims by rotating the flagella with constant torques. We find that the number and arrangement of the flagella along the bodies of the swimmers affects how two such swimmers approach each other, when swimming either in a line, or side by side, and affects whether or not flagellar rotations are synchronized or not. We show how the flow field generated by each swimmer can be represented using a low order multipole expansion, which can capture the qualitative features of their interactions. With this simple low order expansion, simulations of hundreds or thousands of such swimmers can be carried out, allowing the effects of numbers and locations of flagella on swimming pattern formation to be captured.

  13. Heterotrophic flagellates in the littoral and sublittoral zones of the southeast part of the Pechora Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazei, Yu. A.; Tikhonenkov, D. V.

    2006-05-01

    For the first time, data on the heterotrophic flagellate fauna in the littoral and the sublittoral zones of the southeastern part of the Pechora Sea were obtained. Sixty-six heterotrophic flagellate species were found in the study region: 48 and 42 species were found on the shelf and in the intertidal zone, respectively. The most common species were Cafeteria roenbergensis, Paraphysomonas sp., Ancyromonas sigmoides, Cafeteria minuta, Actinomonas mirabilis, and Spumella sp. The littoral fauna of the heterotrophic flagellates was more peculiar than the sublittoral fauna and equally rich. In the region studied, the community can be divided into two types: (a) the predominantly littoral community characterized by a special composition of the dominant species and by high similarity between its local varieties and (b) the heterogeneous predominantly sublittoral community characterized by a lack of a complex of particular species. The local diversity of the heterotrophic flagellate community was low (on the average, 4.5 species per one sample 1 cm3 in volume). The overall distribution pattern of the flagellates was extremely heterogeneous. The large amount of species that were encountered only once causes a great variability in the species structure from one station to another. The total number of the species monotonously increased with the growth in the number of samples and no manifested saturation of the cumulative curve was reached. This indicates the potentially greater diversity of the heterotrophic flagellate species in the region studied.

  14. Grazing of heterotrophic flagellates on viruses is driven by feeding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Krauss, Steffen; Feichtmayer, Judith; Hofmann, Roland; Arndt, Hartmut; Griebler, Christian

    2014-08-01

    The trophic interactions between viruses, bacteria and protists play a crucial role in structuring microbial communities and regulating nutrient and organic matter flux. Here, we show that the impact on viral density by heterotrophic flagellates is related to their feeding behaviour (feeding on sedimented particles - Thaumatomonas coloniensis, filter feeding of suspended particles - Salpingoeca sp., and actively searching raptorial feeding - Goniomonas truncata). Phage MS2 was co-incubated with flagellates and the natural bacterial and viral community originating from the same groundwater habitats where the flagellates were isolated. Three complementary assays, i.e. flow cytometry, qPCR and plaque assay, were used for enumeration of total viruses, total MS2 phages, and free and infectious MS2, respectively, to provide insights into the grazing mechanisms of the flagellates on viruses. Phage MS2 was actively removed by the suspension feeders T. coloniensis and Salpingoeca sp. in contrast with the actively raptoriale grazer G. truncata. The decline of viral titre was demonstrated to be caused by ingestion rather than random absorption by both qPCR and locating protein fluorescently labelled MS2 inside the flagellates. Further, we indicate that phages can be used as a minor carbon source for flagellates. Collectively, these data demonstrate that eliminating viruses can be an important function of protists in microbial food webs, carbon cycling and potentially water quality control.

  15. Singly Flagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chemotaxes Efficiently by Unbiased Motor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiuxian; Li, Zhaojun; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that has long been known to chemotax. More recently, it has been established that chemotaxis is an important factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to make biofilms. Genes that allow P. aeruginosa to chemotax are homologous with genes in the paradigmatic model organism for chemotaxis, Escherichia coli. However, P. aeruginosa is singly flagellated and E. coli has multiple flagella. Therefore, the regulation of counterclockwise/clockwise flagellar motor bias that allows E. coli to efficiently chemotax by runs and tumbles would lead to inefficient chemotaxis by P. aeruginosa, as half of a randomly oriented population would respond to a chemoattractant gradient in the wrong sense. How P. aeruginosa regulates flagellar rotation to achieve chemotaxis is not known. Here, we analyze the swimming trajectories of single cells in microfluidic channels and the rotations of cells tethered by their flagella to the surface of a variable-environment flow cell. We show that P. aeruginosa chemotaxes by symmetrically increasing the durations of both counterclockwise and clockwise flagellar rotations when swimming up the chemoattractant gradient and symmetrically decreasing rotation durations when swimming down the chemoattractant gradient. Unlike the case for E. coli, the counterclockwise/clockwise bias stays constant for P. aeruginosa. We describe P. aeruginosa’s chemotaxis using an analytical model for symmetric motor regulation. We use this model to do simulations that show that, given P. aeruginosa’s physiological constraints on motility, its distinct, symmetric regulation of motor switching optimizes chemotaxis. PMID:27048795

  16. Grazing rates and functional diversity of uncultured heterotrophic flagellates.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon; Unrein, Fernando; Rodríguez-Martínez, Raquel; Forn, Irene; Lefort, Thomas; Pinhassi, Jarone; Not, Fabrice

    2009-05-01

    Aquatic assemblages of heterotrophic protists are very diverse and formed primarily by organisms that remain uncultured. Thus, a critical issue is assigning a functional role to this unknown biota. Here we measured grazing rates of uncultured protists in natural assemblages (detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)), and investigated their prey preference over several bacterial tracers in short-term ingestion experiments. These included fluorescently labeled bacteria (FLB) and two strains of the Roseobacter lineage and the family Flavobacteriaceae, of various cell sizes, which were offered alive and detected by catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH after the ingestion. We obtained grazing rates of the globally distributed and uncultured marine stramenopiles groups 4 and 1 (MAST-4 and MAST-1C) flagellates. Using FLB, the grazing rate of MAST-4 was somewhat lower than whole community rates, consistent with its small size. MAST-4 preferred live bacteria, and clearance rates with these tracers were up to 2 nl per predator per h. On the other hand, grazing rates of MAST-1C differed strongly depending on the tracer prey used, and these differences could not be explained by cell viability. Highest rates were obtained using FLB whereas the flavobacteria strain was hardly ingested. Possible explanations would be that the small flavobacteria cells were outside the effective size range of edible prey, or that MAST-1C selects against this particular strain. Our original dual FISH protocol applied to grazing experiments reveals important functional differences between distinct uncultured protists and offers the possibility to disentangle the complexity of microbial food webs.

  17. Lypd8 promotes the segregation of flagellated microbiota and colonic epithelia.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Ryu; Kurakawa, Takashi; Nakano, Takashi; Kayama, Hisako; Kinoshita, Makoto; Motooka, Daisuke; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Taishi; Kamiyama, Naganori; Kusu, Takashi; Ueda, Yoshiyasu; Wu, Hong; Iijima, Hideki; Barman, Soumik; Osawa, Hideki; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Junichi; Ohba, Yusuke; Nakamura, Shota; Iida, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Umemoto, Eiji; Sano, Koichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Colonic epithelial cells are covered by thick inner and outer mucus layers. The inner mucus layer is free of commensal microbiota, which contributes to the maintenance of gut homeostasis. In the small intestine, molecules critical for prevention of bacterial invasion into epithelia such as Paneth-cell-derived anti-microbial peptides and regenerating islet-derived 3 (RegIII) family proteins have been identified. Although there are mucus layers providing physical barriers against the large number of microbiota present in the large intestine, the mechanisms that separate bacteria and colonic epithelia are not fully elucidated. Here we show that Ly6/PLAUR domain containing 8 (Lypd8) protein prevents flagellated microbiota invading the colonic epithelia in mice. Lypd8, selectively expressed in epithelial cells at the uppermost layer of the large intestinal gland, was secreted into the lumen and bound flagellated bacteria including Proteus mirabilis. In the absence of Lypd8, bacteria were present in the inner mucus layer and many flagellated bacteria invaded epithelia. Lypd8(-/-) mice were highly sensitive to intestinal inflammation induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Antibiotic elimination of Gram-negative flagellated bacteria restored the bacterial-free state of the inner mucus layer and ameliorated DSS-induced intestinal inflammation in Lypd8(-/-) mice. Lypd8 bound to flagella and suppressed motility of flagellated bacteria. Thus, Lypd8 mediates segregation of intestinal bacteria and epithelial cells in the colon to preserve intestinal homeostasis. PMID:27027293

  18. Collective cell motility promotes chemotactic prowess and resistance to chemorepulsion.

    PubMed

    Malet-Engra, Gema; Yu, Weimiao; Oldani, Amanda; Rey-Barroso, Javier; Gov, Nir S; Scita, Giorgio; Dupré, Loïc

    2015-01-19

    Collective cell migration is a widespread biological phenomenon, whereby groups of highly coordinated, adherent cells move in a polarized fashion. This migration mode is a hallmark of tissue morphogenesis during development and repair and of solid tumor dissemination. In addition to circulating as solitary cells, lymphoid malignancies can assemble into tissues as multicellular aggregates. Whether malignant lymphocytes are capable of coordinating their motility in the context of chemokine gradients is, however, unknown. Here, we show that, upon exposure to CCL19 or CXCL12 gradients, malignant B and T lymphocytes assemble into clusters that migrate directionally and display a wider chemotactic sensitivity than individual cells. Physical modeling recapitulates cluster motility statistics and shows that intracluster cell cohesion results in noise reduction and enhanced directionality. Quantitative image analysis reveals that cluster migration runs are periodically interrupted by transitory rotation and random phases that favor leader cell turnover. Additionally, internalization of CCR7 in leader cells is accompanied by protrusion retraction, loss of polarity, and the ensuing replacement by new leader cells. These mechanisms ensure sustained forward migration and resistance to chemorepulsion, a behavior of individual cells exposed to steep CCL19 gradients that depends on CCR7 endocytosis. Thus, coordinated cluster dynamics confer distinct chemotactic properties, highlighting unexpected features of lymphoid cell migration. PMID:25578904

  19. Clusters, asters, and collective oscillations in chemotactic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suropriya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-06-01

    The creation of synthetic systems that emulate the defining properties of living matter, such as motility, gradient-sensing, signaling, and replication, is a grand challenge of biomimetics. Such imitations of life crucially contain active components that transform chemical energy into directed motion. These artificial realizations of motility point in the direction of a new paradigm in engineering, through the design of emergent behavior by manipulating properties at the scale of the individual components. Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of such systems. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of gradient-sensing of an individual swimmer, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior, and use it to construct a framework for studying their collective behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signaling formation of clusters and asters. The kinetics of catalysis introduces a natural control parameter for the range of the interaction mediated by the diffusing chemical species. For various regimes in parameter space in the long-ranged limit our system displays precise analogs to gravitational collapse, plasma oscillations, and electrostatic screening. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior.

  20. Clusters, asters, and collective oscillations in chemotactic colloids.

    PubMed

    Saha, Suropriya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-06-01

    The creation of synthetic systems that emulate the defining properties of living matter, such as motility, gradient-sensing, signaling, and replication, is a grand challenge of biomimetics. Such imitations of life crucially contain active components that transform chemical energy into directed motion. These artificial realizations of motility point in the direction of a new paradigm in engineering, through the design of emergent behavior by manipulating properties at the scale of the individual components. Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of such systems. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of gradient-sensing of an individual swimmer, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior, and use it to construct a framework for studying their collective behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signaling formation of clusters and asters. The kinetics of catalysis introduces a natural control parameter for the range of the interaction mediated by the diffusing chemical species. For various regimes in parameter space in the long-ranged limit our system displays precise analogs to gravitational collapse, plasma oscillations, and electrostatic screening. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior.

  1. Bias in the Gradient Sensing Response of Chemotactic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skupsky, Ron; McCann, Colin; Nossal, Ralph; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    We apply linear-stability theory and perform perturbation studies to better characterize, and to generate new experimental predictions from, a model of chemotactic gradient sensing in eukaryotic cells. The model uses reaction-diffusion equations to describe 3′ phosphoinositide signaling and its regulation at the plasma membrane. It demonstrates a range of possible gradient-sensing mechanisms and captures such characteristic behaviors as strong polarization in response to static gradients, adaptation to differing mean levels of stimulus, and plasticity in response to changing gradients. An analysis of the stability of polarized steady-state solutions indicates that the model is most sensitive to off-axis perturbations. This biased sensitivity is reflected in responses to localized external stimuli as well, and leads to a clear experimental prediction, namely, that a cell which is polarized in a background gradient will be most sensitive to transient point-source stimuli lying within a range of angles that are oblique with respect to the polarization axis. Stimuli at angles below this range will elicit responses whose directions overshoot the stimulus angle, while responses to stimuli applied at larger angles will undershoot the stimulus angle. We argue that such a bias is likely to be a general feature of gradient sensing in highly motile cells, particularly if they are optimized to respond to small gradients. Finally, an angular bias in gradient sensing might lead to preferred turn angles and zigzag movements of cells moving up chemotactic gradients, as has been noted under certain experimental conditions. PMID:17462672

  2. Sensory adaptation of Dictyostelium discoideum cells to chemotactic signals

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Postvegetative Dictyostelium discoideum cells react chemotactically to gradients of cAMP, folic acid, and pterin. In the presence of a constant concentration of 10(-5) M cAMP cells move at random. They still are able to respond to superimposed gradients of cAMP, although the response is less efficient than without the high background level of cAMP. Cells which are accommodated to 10(-5) M cAMP do not react to a gradient of cAMP if the mean cAMP concentration is decreasing with time. This indicates the involvement of adaptation in the detection of chemotactic gradients: cells adapt to the mean concentration of chemoattractant and respond to positive deviations from the mean concentration. Cells adapted to high cAMP concentrations react normally to gradients of folic acid or pterin. Adaptation to one of these compounds does not affect the response to the other attractants. This suggests that cAMP, folic acid, and pterin are detected by different receptors, and that adaptation is localized at a step in the transduction process before the signals from these receptors coincide into one pathway. I discuss the implications of adaptation for chemotaxis and cell aggregation. PMID:6304109

  3. Diversity of chemotactic heterotrophic bacteria associated with arctic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sathish; Pratibha, Mambatta Shankaranarayanan; Manasa, Poorna; Buddhi, Sailaja; Begum, Zareena; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2013-01-01

    The abundance and diversity of chemotactic heterotrophic bacteria associated with Arctic cyanobacteria was determined. The viable numbers ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) cell g(-1) cyanobacterial biomass. A total of 112 morphotypes, representing 22 phylotypes based on their 16S rRNA sequence similarity were isolated from the samples. All the phylotypes were Gram-negative with affiliation to the proteobacterial and bacteroidetes divisions. Among the 22 phylotypes, 14 were chemotactic to glucose. Majority of the phylotypes were psychrotolerant showing growth up to 30 °C. Representatives of Alphaproteobacteria, the genus Flavobacterium and the gammaproteobacterial Alcanivorax sp, were psychrophilic with growth at or below 18 °C. A significant percentage of phylotypes were pigmented (~68 %), rich in unsaturated membrane fatty acids and tolerated pH values and NaCl concentrations between 5.0-8.0 and 0.15-1.0 M, respectively. The percentages of phylotypes producing extracellular cold-active enzymes at 4 °C were amylase (18.18 %), lipase and urease (45.45 %), caseinase (59.09 %) and gelatinase (31.8 %). PMID:23053490

  4. Corneal organ cultures in tyrosinemia release chemotactic factors.

    PubMed

    Lohr, K M; Hyndiuk, R A; Hatchell, D L; Kurth, C E

    1985-05-01

    Corneal inflammation with subsequent scarring and blindness occurs in the inherited human metabolic disease tyrosinemia type II, yet putative inflammatory mediators in this disorder and in the avascular cornea in general are poorly defined. In a Tyr-fed rat model of tyrosinemia type II, intracellular crystals, presumably Tyr, are hypothesized to be responsible for the increased lysosomal activity observed in corneal epithelial lesions. Because polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are seen only at the site of these lesions, we used this model to study humoral mediators released from Tyr-fed rat corneal organ cultures. Only Tyr-fed rats developed stromal edema and linear granular opacities in gray edematous corneal epithelium, compatible with a noninfectious keratitis. Electron micrographs confirmed epithelial edema and showed focal epithelial necrosis with PMN invasion of the stroma. Only Tyr-fed rat corneal culture supernatants contained chemotactic activity that was heat labile and moderately trypsin sensitive. Four peaks with varying amounts of chemotactic activity were found on Sephadex G-75 chromatography. Although the identity of these peaks of activity has not yet been established, we suggest that they may be responsible for the PMN infiltration observed in this model of corneal inflammation.

  5. Negative consequences of glacial turbidity for the survival of freshwater planktonic heterotrophic flagellates.

    PubMed

    Sommaruga, Ruben; Kandolf, Georg

    2014-02-17

    Heterotrophic (phagotrophic) flagellates are key components of planktonic food webs in freshwater and marine ecosystems because they are the main consumers of bacteria. Although they are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, they were numerically undetectable in turbid glacier-fed lakes. Here we show that glacial particles had negative effects on the survival and growth of heterotrophic flagellates. The effect of glacial particles was concentration-dependent and was caused by their interference with bacterial uptake rather than by physical damage. These results are the first to reveal why establishment of heterotrophic flagellates populations is hindered in very turbid glacial lakes. Because glaciers are vanishing around the world, recently formed turbid meltwater lakes represent an excellent opportunity to understand the environmental conditions that probably shaped the establishment of lake communities at the end of the last glaciation.

  6. Molecular Comparisons of Freshwater and Marine Isolates of the Same Morphospecies of Heterotrophic Flagellates

    PubMed Central

    Scheckenbach, Frank; Wylezich, Claudia; Mylnikov, Alexander P.; Weitere, Markus; Arndt, Hartmut

    2006-01-01

    Heterotrophic flagellates are key components of all ecosystems. Understanding the patterns of biodiversity of these organisms is thus particularly important. Here we analyzed the intraspecific diversity of 10 morphospecies of heterotrophic flagellates comprising representatives of the Apusozoa (2 morphospecies) and Kinetoplastea (8 morphospecies), all belonging to the most common flagellates with worldwide distribution. Most morphospecies showed a mixing of lineages isolated from diverse habitats, indicating that some lineages of these morphospecies had been able to colonize different habitats several times. Furthermore, our results revealed remarkable levels of genetic divergence within most of the morphospecies studied, underlining the difficulty of correctly determining species by means of morphology alone. Many cryptic or pseudocryptic species seem to occur. Our results revealed clear divergence between marine and freshwater lineages of the morphospecies Ancyromonas sigmoides, showing that freshwater lineages have not been able to colonize marine environments and marine lineages have not been able to colonize freshwater environments for a long time. PMID:17021215

  7. Studies on crystal-induced chemotactic factor. II. Role of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Spilberg, I; Gallacher, A; Mendell, B

    1975-04-01

    The interaction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN's) and urate crystal leads to the formation of a chemotactic factor. The purpose of this study was to determine the need for ingestion of crystals by the cells in the generation of the chemotactic factor. Our studies showed that when PMN's were incubated with cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of phagocytosis, and urate crystals, no chemotactic activity appeared in the lysosomal extract of the cells. Likewise, no chemotactic activity was present in the media of PMN's incubated with crystals although lysosomal enzyme activity was increased. These findings indicate that phagocytosis is required for chemotactic activity to appear. Our studies also show that cytochalasin B increases the release of lysosomal enzyme B-glucuronidase but not of cytoplasmic enzyme lactic dehydrogenase from PMN's when the cell encounters urate crystals. PMID:1120930

  8. Channeling of bacterioplanktonic production toward phagotrophic flagellates and ciliates under different seasonal conditions in a river.

    PubMed

    Iriberri, J; Ayo, B; Unanue, M; Barcina, I; Egea, L

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the flux of biomass through the communities of bacteria and phagotrophic protists in the cold and warm conditions occurring seasonally in Butrón River. Bacterial and heterotrophic protistan (flagellate and ciliate) abundance was determined by epifluorescence direct counts; protistan grazing on planktonic bacteria was measured from fluorescently labeled bacteria uptake rates; and the estimate of bacterial secondary production was obtained from [(3)H]thymidine incorporation rates. The abundance of bacterial, flagellate, and ciliate communities was similar during cold and warm situations. However, we observed that estimates of dynamic parameters, i.e., secondary bacterial production and protistan grazing, in both situations were noticeably different. In the warm situation, grazing rates of flagellates and ciliates (bacteria per protist per hour) were, respectively, 7 times and 18 times higher than those determined in the cold situation, and the grazing rates of the protistan communities (bacteria per protists present in 1 ml of water per hour) increased up to 5 times in the case of flagellates and 42 times in the case of ciliates. Estimates of bacterial secondary production were also higher during the warm situation, showing a ninefold increase. The percentage of bacterial production preyed upon by flagellates or ciliates was not significantly different between the two conditions. These results showed that in the different conditions of a system, the flux of biomass between the trophic levels may be quite different although this process may not be reflected in the abundance of each community of bacteria, flagellates, and ciliates.

  9. The position of flagellated protists in the system of lower eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Starobogatov, Y I

    1995-01-01

    The division of Eukaryota into 8 kingdoms united into 3 superkingdoms is briefly discussed with the rejection of the hypothesis of symbiogenesis and of primary nature of the dinokaryon. It is asserted that Pascher's main hypothesis remains valid. The heterotrophic flagellated and amoeboid forms must be included into different groups of flagellated beings. Some of them: Saprolegniomycetes, Hyphochytridiomycetes, Slopalinata, Cryptaxohelid Heliozoa have been already put into chromophytan branch. Others differ from autotrophic groups more sharply and their taxonomic position may be stated now only tentatively and will be specified as a result of future studies.

  10. Controlling neural activity in Caenorhabditis elegans to evoke chemotactic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabas, Askin; Shen, Ching-Han; Guo, Zengcai V.; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2013-03-01

    Animals locate and track chemoattractive gradients in the environment to find food. With its simple nervous system, Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model system in which to understand how the dynamics of neural activity control this search behavior. To understand how the activity in its interneurons coordinate different motor programs to lead the animal to food, here we used optogenetics and new optical tools to manipulate neural activity directly in freely moving animals to evoke chemotactic behavior. By deducing the classes of activity patterns triggered during chemotaxis and exciting individual neurons with these patterns, we identified interneurons that control the essential locomotory programs for this behavior. Notably, we discovered that controlling the dynamics of activity in just one interneuron pair was sufficient to force the animal to locate, turn towards and track virtual light gradients.

  11. Precise computations of chemotactic collapse using moving mesh methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, C. J.; Carretero-González, R.; Russell, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of computing blow-up solutions of chemotaxis systems, or the so-called chemotactic collapse. In two spatial dimensions, such solutions can have approximate self-similar behaviour, which can be very challenging to verify in numerical simulations [cf. Betterton and Brenner, Collapsing bacterial cylinders, Phys. Rev. E 64 (2001) 061904]. We analyse a dynamic (scale-invariant) remeshing method which performs spatial mesh movement based upon equidistribution. Using a suitably chosen monitor function, the numerical solution resolves the fine detail in the asymptotic solution structure, such that the computations are seen to be fully consistent with the asymptotic description of the collapse phenomenon given by Herrero and Velázquez [Singularity patterns in a chemotaxis model, Math. Ann. 306 (1996) 583-623]. We believe that the methods we construct are ideally suited to a large number of problems in mathematical biology for which collapse phenomena are expected.

  12. Bleomycin-Induced Flagellate Erythema in a Patient Diagnosed with Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Boussios, Stergios; Moschetta, Michele; McLachlan, Jennifer; Banerjee, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate linear hyperpigmentation can rarely be caused by the chemotherapy agent, bleomycin. Herein, we describe the case of a 20-year-old woman treated with bleomycin for an ovarian yolk sac tumor and review the prominent features of this form of dermatitis. PMID:26798532

  13. Contrasting bacterial strategies to coexist with a flagellate predator in an experimental microbial assemblage.

    PubMed

    Pernthaler, J; Posch, T; Simek, K; Vrba, J; Amann, R; Psenner, R

    1997-02-01

    We studied predator-induced changes within a slowly growing mixed microbial assemblage that was sustained by algal exudates in a continuous cultivation system. In situ hybridization with fluorescent monolabeled oligonucleotide probes was used for a tentative community analysis. This method also allowed us to quantify the proportions of predators with ingested bacteria of different taxonomic groups. In addition, we determined grazing rates on bacteria with fluorescently labelled prey. Bacteria belonging to the alpha and beta subdivisions of the phylum Proteobacteria ((alpha)- and (beta)-Proteobacteria, respectively) showed very different responses to the addition of a bacterivorous flagellate, Bodo saltans. Within one day, filamentous protist-inedible bacteria developed; these belonged to the (beta)-Proteobacteria and constituted between 8.7 and 34% of bacteria from this subgroup. Total abundance of (beta)-Proteobacteria decreased from 3.05 x 10(sup6) to 0.23 x 10(sup6) cells ml(sup-1), and estimated cell division rates were low. Other morphologically inconspicuous protist-edible bacteria belonging to the (alpha)-Proteobacteria were found to respond to predation by an increase in growth rate. Although these bacteria were heavily grazed upon, as on average >85% of flagellate cells had ingested (alpha)-Proteobacteria, they numerically dominated after the addition of B. saltans (mean, 1.35 x 10(sup6) cells ml(sup-1)). It was thus mainly those fast-dividing strains of (alpha)-Proteobacteria that supported the growth of the flagellate population. We conclude that bacteria in mixed assemblages can adopt at least two distinct strategies as a reaction to intense flagellate predation: to outgrow predation pressure or to develop inedible, inactive filaments. Since these strategies occurred within 24 h after the addition of the flagellate, we hypothesize that chemical stimuli released by the predator may have triggered bacterial responses. PMID:16535516

  14. Contrasting Bacterial Strategies To Coexist with a Flagellate Predator in an Experimental Microbial Assemblage

    PubMed Central

    Pernthaler, J.; Posch, T.; Simek, K.; Vrba, J.; Amann, R.; Psenner, R.

    1997-01-01

    We studied predator-induced changes within a slowly growing mixed microbial assemblage that was sustained by algal exudates in a continuous cultivation system. In situ hybridization with fluorescent monolabeled oligonucleotide probes was used for a tentative community analysis. This method also allowed us to quantify the proportions of predators with ingested bacteria of different taxonomic groups. In addition, we determined grazing rates on bacteria with fluorescently labelled prey. Bacteria belonging to the alpha and beta subdivisions of the phylum Proteobacteria ((alpha)- and (beta)-Proteobacteria, respectively) showed very different responses to the addition of a bacterivorous flagellate, Bodo saltans. Within one day, filamentous protist-inedible bacteria developed; these belonged to the (beta)-Proteobacteria and constituted between 8.7 and 34% of bacteria from this subgroup. Total abundance of (beta)-Proteobacteria decreased from 3.05 x 10(sup6) to 0.23 x 10(sup6) cells ml(sup-1), and estimated cell division rates were low. Other morphologically inconspicuous protist-edible bacteria belonging to the (alpha)-Proteobacteria were found to respond to predation by an increase in growth rate. Although these bacteria were heavily grazed upon, as on average >85% of flagellate cells had ingested (alpha)-Proteobacteria, they numerically dominated after the addition of B. saltans (mean, 1.35 x 10(sup6) cells ml(sup-1)). It was thus mainly those fast-dividing strains of (alpha)-Proteobacteria that supported the growth of the flagellate population. We conclude that bacteria in mixed assemblages can adopt at least two distinct strategies as a reaction to intense flagellate predation: to outgrow predation pressure or to develop inedible, inactive filaments. Since these strategies occurred within 24 h after the addition of the flagellate, we hypothesize that chemical stimuli released by the predator may have triggered bacterial responses. PMID:16535516

  15. Contrasting bacterial strategies to coexist with a flagellate predator in an experimental microbial assemblage.

    PubMed

    Pernthaler, J; Posch, T; Simek, K; Vrba, J; Amann, R; Psenner, R

    1997-02-01

    We studied predator-induced changes within a slowly growing mixed microbial assemblage that was sustained by algal exudates in a continuous cultivation system. In situ hybridization with fluorescent monolabeled oligonucleotide probes was used for a tentative community analysis. This method also allowed us to quantify the proportions of predators with ingested bacteria of different taxonomic groups. In addition, we determined grazing rates on bacteria with fluorescently labelled prey. Bacteria belonging to the alpha and beta subdivisions of the phylum Proteobacteria ((alpha)- and (beta)-Proteobacteria, respectively) showed very different responses to the addition of a bacterivorous flagellate, Bodo saltans. Within one day, filamentous protist-inedible bacteria developed; these belonged to the (beta)-Proteobacteria and constituted between 8.7 and 34% of bacteria from this subgroup. Total abundance of (beta)-Proteobacteria decreased from 3.05 x 10(sup6) to 0.23 x 10(sup6) cells ml(sup-1), and estimated cell division rates were low. Other morphologically inconspicuous protist-edible bacteria belonging to the (alpha)-Proteobacteria were found to respond to predation by an increase in growth rate. Although these bacteria were heavily grazed upon, as on average >85% of flagellate cells had ingested (alpha)-Proteobacteria, they numerically dominated after the addition of B. saltans (mean, 1.35 x 10(sup6) cells ml(sup-1)). It was thus mainly those fast-dividing strains of (alpha)-Proteobacteria that supported the growth of the flagellate population. We conclude that bacteria in mixed assemblages can adopt at least two distinct strategies as a reaction to intense flagellate predation: to outgrow predation pressure or to develop inedible, inactive filaments. Since these strategies occurred within 24 h after the addition of the flagellate, we hypothesize that chemical stimuli released by the predator may have triggered bacterial responses.

  16. Thrombin cleavage of osteopontin disrupts a pro-chemotactic sequence for dendritic cells, which is compensated by the release of its pro-chemotactic C-terminal fragment.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Morser, John; Leung, Lawrence L K

    2014-09-26

    Thrombin cleavage alters the function of osteopontin (OPN) by exposing an integrin binding site and releasing a chemotactic C-terminal fragment. Here, we examined thrombin cleavage of OPN in the context of dendritic cell (DC) migration to define its functional domains. Full-length OPN (OPN-FL), thrombin-cleaved N-terminal fragment (OPN-R), thrombin- and carboxypeptidase B2-double-cleaved N-terminal fragment (OPN-L), and C-terminal fragment (OPN-CTF) did not have intrinsic chemotactic activity, but all potentiated CCL21-induced DC migration. OPN-FL possessed the highest potency, whereas OPNRAA-FL had substantially less activity, indicating the importance of RGD. We identified a conserved (168)RSKSKKFRR(176) sequence on OPN-FL that spans the thrombin cleavage site, and it demonstrated potent pro-chemotactic effects on CCL21-induced DC migration. OPN-FLR168A had reduced activity, and the double mutant OPNRAA-FLR168A had even lower activity, indicating that these functional domains accounted for most of the pro-chemotactic activity of OPN-FL. OPN-CTF also possessed substantial pro-chemotactic activity, which was fully expressed upon thrombin cleavage and its release from the intact protein, because OPN-CTF was substantially more active than OPNRAA-FLR168A containing the OPN-CTF sequence within the intact protein. OPN-R and OPN-L possessed similar potency, indicating that the newly exposed C-terminal SVVYGLR sequence in OPN-R was not involved in the pro-chemotactic effect. OPN-FL and OPN-CTF did not directly bind to the CD44 standard form or CD44v6. In conclusion, thrombin cleavage of OPN disrupts a pro-chemotactic sequence in intact OPN, and its loss of pro-chemotactic activity is compensated by the release of OPN-CTF, which assumes a new conformation and possesses substantial activity in enhancing chemokine-induced migration of DCs. PMID:25112870

  17. Evolution of chemotactic-signal transducers in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, M K; Boos, W; Manson, M D

    1989-01-01

    The methyl-accepting chemotactic-signal transducers of the enteric bacteria are transmembrane proteins that consist of a periplasmic receptor domain and a cytoplasmic signaling domain. To study their evolution, transducer genes from Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae were compared with transducer genes from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. There are at least two functional transducer genes in the nonmotile species K. pneumoniae, one of which complements the defect in serine taxis of an E. coli tsr mutant. The tse (taxis to serine) gene of E. aerogenes also complements an E. coli tsr mutant; the tas (taxis to aspartate) gene of E. aerogenes complements the defect in aspartate taxis, but not the defect in maltose taxis, of an E. coli tar mutant. The sequence was determined for 5 kilobases of E. aerogenes DNA containing a 3' fragment of the cheA gene, cheW, tse, tas, and a 5' fragment of the cheR gene. The tse and tas genes are in one operon, unlike tsr and tar. The cytoplasmic domains of Tse and Tas are very similar to those of E. coli and S. typhimurium transducers. The periplasmic domain of Tse is homologous to that of Tsr, but Tas and Tar are much less similar in this region. However, several short sequences are conserved in the periplasmic domains of Tsr, Tar, Tse, and Tas but not of Tap and Trg, transducers that do not bind amino acids. These conserved regions include residues implicated in amino-acid binding. Images PMID:2496104

  18. Angiogenic, mitogenic, and chemotactic activity in human follicular fluid (HFF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, S.M.; Frederick, J.L.; Gale, J.A.; Campeau, J.D.; diZerega, G.S.

    1986-03-01

    The capacity of human follicular fluid to induce neovascularization was investigated. Three parameters were employed to assess the extent of angiogenic activity: (1) new vessel formation on the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM); (2) mitogenesis and (3) chemotaxis of bovine aortic endothelial cells. HFF resuspended in hydron induced new blood vessel formation on the CAM, as manifested by a spoke-wheel pattern of vessels radiating from the locus of application after two to six days. Endothelial cells cultured with a 1:10 dilution of HFF for two days demonstrated an enhanced incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into acid-precipitable material when compared to control cells. The ratio of counts-per-minute for HFF stimulated cells versus control cells was 3.02 +/- 0.53 (anti S.E.M., n = 5). Endothelial cells also exhibited a directional migration towards HFF through a polycarbonate membrane with 8..mu..m pores. The ratio of the number of cells migrating completely through the filter towards a 1:10 dilution of HFF compared to those migrating towards medium alone was 5.61 +/- 0.61 (anti +/- S.E.M., n = 3). Human serum at an equivalent protein concentration as HFF demonstrated no activity in the CAM, mitogenic, and chemotaxis assays. These results demonstrate specific angiogenic, mitogenic and chemotactic activity in human follicular fluid.

  19. Effects of Grazing by Flagellates on Competition for Ammonium between Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Chemostats

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Frank J. M.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1992-01-01

    The enhanced mineralization of organic nitrogen by bacteriophagous protozoa is thought to favor the nitrification process in soils, in which nitrifying bacteria have to compete with heterotrophic bacteria for the available ammonium. To obtain more insight into this process, the influence of grazing by the bacteriovorous flagellate Adriamonas peritocrescens on the competition for limiting amounts of ammonium between the ammonium-oxidizing species Nitrosomonas europaea and the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis was studied in the presence of Nitrobacter winogradskyi in continuous cultures at dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h-1. The ammonium concentration in the reservoir was maintained at 2 mM, whereas the glucose concentration was increased stepwise from 0 to 7 mM. A. globiformis won the competition for limiting amounts of ammonium when the glucose concentration in the reservoirs increased, in agreement with previously described experiments in which the flagellates were not included. The numbers of nitrifying bacteria decreased as the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria rose with increasing glucose concentrations. Critical C/N ratios, i.e., ratios between glucose and ammonium in the reservoirs at which no nitrate was found in the culture vessels, of 12.5 and 10.5 were determined at dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h-1, respectively. Below these critical values, coexistence of the competing species was found. The numbers of nitrifying bacteria decreased more in the presence of flagellates than in their absence, presumably by selective predation on the nitrifying bacteria, either in the liquid culture or on the glass wall of the culture vessels. Despite this, the rate of nitrate production did not decrease more in the presence of flagellates than in their absence. This demonstrates that no correlation has to be expected between numbers of nitrifying bacteria and their activity and that a constant nitrification rate per cell cannot be assumed for nitrifying

  20. [Parasitic amoebae and amoebo-flagellates from the Lobosea and heterolobosea classes].

    PubMed

    Sopinina, V A

    1998-01-01

    Different cited evidences on parasitic amoebae and amoebo-flagellates belonging to the Lobosea and Heterolobosea classes (Pages, 1987) have been reviewed. Special attention is paid to various degree of their adaptation to parasitic mode of life, which ranges from a parasitism on a border with commensalism to true parasitism (both facultative and obligatory ones). Besides the coprophilous and commensal species, the number of true parasites among the Lobosea and Heterolobosea classes is comparatively small. In many cases, both facultative and obligatory parasites cause the death of their hosts. Apparently this strongly pronounced pathogenicity of parasitic amoebae and amoebo-flagellates suggest a recent origin of such parasite-host systems. Pathogens of amoebic dysentry, primary amoebic meningoencephalitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis are specially considered. In the Russian text-books on a parasitology the information on most of them, except Entamoeba hystolytica, is either totally absent or very scare and out of date. PMID:9813884

  1. Symbioses of flagellates and prokaryotes in the gut of lower termites.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Moriya

    2008-07-01

    The microbial community in the gut of phylogenetically lower termites, comprising both flagellated protists and prokaryotes, has fascinated many scientists because of the symbiotic relationships that are responsible for the efficient degradation of lignocellulose. However, the complex nature of this microbial community and the formidable unculturability of most members have hampered detailed microbial studies. Comprehensive phylogenetic descriptions of the community members in the past decade still provide little information about their functions because the community contains diverse novel microbial species. Recent advances in molecular approaches have shed new light on species-specific spatial distributions, particularly the cellular associations of flagellated protists and prokaryotes, their functional interactions and coevolutionary relationships. These advances have gradually unveiled how this symbiotic complex functions to efficiently utilize lignocellulose.

  2. [Spatial structure of communities of heterotrophic flagellates from a sphagnum bog].

    PubMed

    Tikhonenkov, D V; Mazeĭ, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    Spatial distribution pattern of heterotrophic flagellates within a macroscopically homogenous sphagnum parcel of a transitional bog in the southern taiga was studied. Under investigation was horizontal pattern at different scales (1 cm, 10 cm, 1 m, 10 m) and the vertical heterogeneity of the community in the sphagnum quagmire. 105 species and forms of heterotrophic flagellates were revealed. Predominating were euglenids, less abundant are kynetoplastids and cercomonads. The most numerous appeared to be Cryptomonas sp., Heteromita minima, Goniomonas truncata, Protaspis simplex, Bodo designis, B. saltans, Phyllomitus apiculatus, Paraphysomonas sp., Petalomonas minuta. More abundant species were characterized by less patchy distribution than less abundant. At a smaller scale, the community was formed by the species with different degree of patchiness while at larger scales, all the species possess nearly the same distribution pattern. The same number of samples of equal sizes revealed nearly the same species numbers independently of distances between the sample sites, as the samples at each scale differ from each other nearly at the same magnitude. An averaged size of the species aggregations in the community is as large as several centimeters. Such a scale is probably a characteristic size (minimum area) of the community of the sphagnum dwelling heterotrophic flagellates. Rather low environmental heterogeneity within the sphagnum quagmire leads to significant homogeneity of the community at larger scales. Vertical differentiation of the heterotrophic flagellate community within that quagmire appeared to be very unstable with the time. The same species are characterized by different preferences to the depths at different spatial-temporal loci. Specific vertical distributions and community patterns are formed under different local conditions.

  3. Size-selective grazing on bacteria by natural assemblages of estuarine flagellates and ciliates.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J M; Sherr, E B; Sherr, B F

    1990-01-01

    The small average cell size of in situ bacterioplankton, relative to cultured cells, has been suggested to be at least partly a result of selection of larger-sized cells by bacterivorous protozoa. In this study, we determined the relative rates of uptake of fluorescence-labeled bacteria (FLB), of various cell sizes and cell types, by natural assemblages of flagellates and ciliates in estuarine water. Calculated clearance rates of bacterivorous flagellates had a highly significant, positive relationship with size of FLB, over a range of average biovolume of FLB of 0.03 to 0.08 microns3. Bacterial cell type or cell shape per se did not appear to affect flagellate clearance rates. The dominant size classes of flagellates which ingested all types of FLB were 3- to 4-microns cells. Ciliates also showed a general preference for larger-sized bacteria. However, ciliates ingested a gram-positive enteric bacterium and a marine bacterial isolate at higher rates than they did a similarly sized, gram-negative enteric bacterium or natural bacterioplankton, respectively. From the results of an experiment designed to test whether the addition of a preferentially grazed bacterial strain stimulated clearance rates of natural bacterioplankton FLB by the ciliates, we hypothesized that measured differences in rates of FLB uptake were due instead to differences in effective retention of bacteria by the ciliates. In general, clearance rates for different FLB varied by a factor of 2 to 4. Selective grazing by protozoa of larger bacterioplankton cells, which are generally the cells actively growing or dividing, may in part explain the small average cell size, low frequency of dividing cells, and low growth rates generally observed for assemblages of suspended bacteria. PMID:2107794

  4. Effects of Grazing by Flagellates on Competition for Ammonium between Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Soil Columns

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Frank J. M.; Duyts, Hendrik; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1993-01-01

    The enhanced mineralization of immobilized nitrogen by bacteriophagous protozoa has been thought to favor the nitrification process in soils in which nitrifying bacteria must compete with heterotrophic bacteria for the available ammonium. To obtain more insight into this process, the influence of grazing by the flagellate Adriamonas peritocrescens on the competition for ammonium between the chemolithotrophic species Nitrosomonas europaea and the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis in the presence of Nitrobacter winogradskyi was studied in soil columns, which were continuously percolated with media containing 5 mM ammonium and different amounts of glucose at a dilution rate of 0.007 h-1 (liquid volumes). A. globiformis won the competition for ammonium. The grazing activities of the flagellates had two prominent effects on the competition between N. europaea and A. globiformis. First, the distribution of ammonium over the profile of the soil columns was more uniform in the presence of flagellates than in their absence. In the absence of flagellates, relatively high amounts of ammonium accumulated in the upper layer (0 to 3 cm), whereas in the underlying layers the ammonium concentrations were low. In the presence of flagellates, however, considerable amounts of ammonium were found in the lower layers, whereas less ammonium accumulated in the upper layer. Second, the potential ammonium-oxidizing activity of N. europaea was stimulated in the presence of flagellates. The numbers of N. europaea at different glucose concentrations in the presence of flagellates were comparable to those in the absence of protozoa. However, in the presence of flagellates, the potential ammonium-oxidizing activities were four to five times greater than those in the absence of protozoa. PMID:16348988

  5. Transmission and ecology of trypanosomatid flagellates of water striders (Hemiptera: Gerridae).

    PubMed

    Tieszen, K L; Molyneux, D H

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of transmission and ecology of the monogenetic trypanosomatids, Blastocrithidia gerridis and Crithidia flexonema, in Gerris is described. Motile free-living flagellates of both species were found in the faeces of Gerris and in the water on which the bugs inhabited. Transmission of both trypanosomatid species occurred from naturally infected wild-caught bugs to flagellate-free laboratory-bred bugs via water. Crithidia flexonema was also transmitted to laboratory-bred bugs after being isolated in culture. Observations of experimentally infected bugs indicate that C. flexonema flagellates are imbibed and pass through the fore- and midgut to the hindgut where they become attached and multiply. There was no evidence to suggest transovarial transmission. In a 3-yr investigation into the prevalence of trypanosomatids in a natural population of adult Gerris odontogaster, it was found that the infection rate varied between 19% and 100%. There was no significant difference in infection rates between females and males. The infection rate peaked for each year in late spring or early summer. The significance of these results is discussed in relation to the ecology and behaviour of Gerris. The results indicate that the infections are maintained in hibernating bugs over winter.

  6. Population structure of Endomicrobia in single host cells of termite gut flagellates (Trichonympha spp.).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Dietrich, Carsten; Thompson, Claire L; Meuser, Katja; Brune, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of many phylogenetically lower termites is dominated by the cellulolytic flagellates of the genus Trichonympha, which are consistently associated with bacterial symbionts. In the case of Endomicrobia, an unusual lineage of endosymbionts of the Elusimicrobia phylum that is also present in other gut flagellates, previous studies have documented strict host specificity, leading to the cospeciation of "Candidatus Endomicrobium trichonymphae" with their respective flagellate hosts. However, it currently remains unclear whether one Trichonympha species is capable of harboring more than one Endomicrobia phylotype. In the present study, we selected single Trichonympha cells from the guts of Zootermopsis nevadensis and Reticulitermes santonensis and characterized their Endomicrobia populations based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences. We found that each host cell harbored a homogeneous population of symbionts that were specific to their respective host species, but phylogenetically distinct between each host lineage, corroborating cospeciation being caused by vertical inheritance. The experimental design of the present study also allowed for the identification of an unexpectedly large amount of tag-switching between samples, which indicated that any high-resolution analysis of microbial community structures using the pyrosequencing technique has to be interpreted with great caution.

  7. Unlocking the secrets of multi-flagellated propulsion: drawing insights from Tritrichomonas foetus

    PubMed Central

    Lenaghan, Scott C.; Nwandu-Vincent, Stefan; Reese, Benjamin E.; Zhang, Mingjun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a high-speed imaging platform and a resistive force theory (RFT) based model were applied to investigate multi-flagellated propulsion, using Tritrichomonas foetus as an example. We discovered that T. foetus has distinct flagellar beating motions for linear swimming and turning, similar to the ‘run and tumble’ strategies observed in bacteria and Chlamydomonas. Quantitative analysis of the motion of each flagellum was achieved by determining the average flagella beat motion for both linear swimming and turning, and using the velocity of the flagella as inputs into the RFT model. The experimental approach was used to calculate the curvature along the length of the flagella throughout each stroke. It was found that the curvatures of the anterior flagella do not decrease monotonically along their lengths, confirming the ciliary waveform of these flagella. Further, the stiffness of the flagella was experimentally measured using nanoindentation, allowing for calculation of the flexural rigidity of T. foetus's flagella, 1.55×10−21 N m2. Finally, using the RFT model, it was discovered that the propulsive force of T. foetus was similar to that of sperm and Chlamydomonas, indicating that multi-flagellated propulsion does not necessarily contribute to greater thrust generation, and may have evolved for greater manoeuvrability or sensing. The results from this study have demonstrated the highly coordinated nature of multi-flagellated propulsion and have provided significant insights into the biology of T. foetus. PMID:24478286

  8. Complex flagellar motions and swimming patterns of the flagellates Paraphysomonas vestita and Pteridomonas danica.

    PubMed

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Karen K; Fenchel, Tom

    2004-03-01

    Most flagellates with hispid flagella, that is, flagella with rigid filamentous hairs (mastigonemes), swim in the direction of the flagellar wave propagation with an anterior position of the flagellum. Previous analysis was based on planar wave propagation showing that the mastigonemes pull fluid along the flagellar axis. In the present study, we investigate the flagellar motions and swimming patterns for two flagellates with hispid flagella: Paraphysomonas vestita and Pteridomonas danica. Studies were carried out using normal and high-speed video recording, and particles were added to visualize flow around cells generating feeding currents. When swimming or generating flow, P. vestita was able to pull fluid normal to, and not just along, the flagellum, implying the use of the mastigonemes in an as yet un-described way. When the flagellum made contact with food particles, it changed the flagellar waveform so that the particle was fanned towards the ingestion area, suggesting mechano-sensitivity of the mastigonemes. Pteridomonas danica was capable of more complex swimming than previously described for flagellated protists. This was associated with control of the flagellar beat as well as an ability to bend the plane of the flagellar waveform.

  9. Crash of a population of the marine heterotrophic flagellate Cafeteria roenbergensis by viral infection.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon; del Campo, Javier; Dinter, Christian; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2007-11-01

    Viruses are known as important mortality agents of marine microorganisms. Most studies focus on bacterial and algal viruses, and few reports exist on viruses infecting marine heterotrophic protists. Here we show results from several incubations initiated with a microbial assemblage from the central Indian Ocean and amended with different amounts of organic matter. Heterotrophic flagellates developed up to 30,000 cells ml(-1) in the most enriched incubation. A 18S rDNA clone library and fluorescent in situ hybridization counts with newly designed probes indicated that the peak was formed by Cafeteria roenbergensis and Caecitellus paraparvulus (90% and 10% of the cells respectively). Both taxa were below detection in the original sample, indicating a strong positive selective bias during the enrichment. During the peak, C. roenbergensis cells were observed with virus-like particles in the cytoplasm, and 4 days later this taxa could not be detected. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the viral nature of these particles, which were large (280 nm), had double-stranded DNA, and were produced with a burst size of approximately 70. This virus was specific of C. roenbergensis as neither C. paraparvulus that was never seen infected, nor other flagellate taxa that developed in later stages of the incubation, appeared attacked. This is one of the few reports on a heterotrophic flagellate virus and the implications of this finding in the Indian Ocean are discussed.

  10. Distribution and abundance of uncultured heterotrophic flagellates in the world oceans.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon; Terrado, Ramon; Forn, Irene; Lovejoy, Connie; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2006-09-01

    Heterotrophic flagellates play fundamental roles in marine ecosystems as picoplankton grazers. This recognized importance contrasts with our ignorance of the taxonomic composition of this functional group, which remains mostly unidentified by microscopical and culturing approaches. Recent molecular marine surveys based on 18S rDNA genes have retrieved many sequences unrelated to cultured organisms and marine stramenopiles were among the first reported uncultured eukaryotes. However, little is known about the organisms corresponding to these sequences. Here we determine the abundance of several marine stramenopile lineages in surface marine waters using molecular probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization. We show that these protists are free-living bacterivorous heterotrophic flagellates. They were widely distributed, occurring in the five world oceans, and accounted for a significant fraction (up to 35%) of heterotrophic flagellates in diverse geographic regions. A single group, MAST-4, represented 9% of cells within this functional assemblage, with the intriguing exception of polar waters where it was absent. MAST-4 cells likely contribute substantially to picoplankton grazing and nutrient re-mineralization in vast areas of the oceans and represent a key eukaryotic group in marine food webs.

  11. Comparison of Rates of Flagellate Bacterivory and Bacterial Production in a Marine Coastal System

    PubMed Central

    Barcina, Isabel; Ayo, Begoña; Unanue, Marian; Egea, Luis; Iriberri, Juan

    1992-01-01

    Protozoan predation on bacteria and bacterioplankton secondary production were simultaneously determined in La Salvaje Beach water during 1990. Protozoan grazing on bacterioplankton was measured from fluorescently labeled bacterium uptake rates; estimates of bacterial secondary production were obtained from [3H]thymidine incorporation rates. Two different conversion factors were used to transform thymidine incorporation rates into bacterial production rates; both of them were specific for La Salvaje Beach and were calculated by using empirical and semitheoretical approaches. The average flagellate predation rate was 14.0 bacteria flagellate-1 h-1; the average population predation rate was 7.35 x 106 bacteria liter-1 h-1. The estimates of bacterial production differed greatly depending on the conversion factor used, and so did the percentages of bacterial production consumed by flagellated protozoa (4.6% when the empirical conversion factor for La Salvaje Beach was used and 113% when the semitheoretical conversion factor specific for this system was used). The ecological implications of each of these values are discussed. PMID:16348819

  12. Speed-dependent chemotactic precision in marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Son, Kwangmin; Menolascina, Filippo; Stocker, Roman

    2016-08-01

    Chemotaxis underpins important ecological processes in marine bacteria, from the association with primary producers to the colonization of particles and hosts. Marine bacteria often swim with a single flagellum at high speeds, alternating "runs" with either 180° reversals or ∼90° "flicks," the latter resulting from a buckling instability of the flagellum. These adaptations diverge from Escherichia coli's classic run-and-tumble motility, yet how they relate to the strong and rapid chemotaxis characteristic of marine bacteria has remained unknown. We investigated the relationship between swimming speed, run-reverse-flick motility, and high-performance chemotaxis by tracking thousands of Vibrio alginolyticus cells in microfluidic gradients. At odds with current chemotaxis models, we found that chemotactic precision-the strength of accumulation of cells at the peak of a gradient-is swimming-speed dependent in V. alginolyticus Faster cells accumulate twofold more tightly by chemotaxis compared with slower cells, attaining an advantage in the exploitation of a resource additional to that of faster gradient climbing. Trajectory analysis and an agent-based mathematical model revealed that this unexpected advantage originates from a speed dependence of reorientation frequency and flicking, which were higher for faster cells, and was compounded by chemokinesis, an increase in speed with resource concentration. The absence of any one of these adaptations led to a 65-70% reduction in the population-level resource exposure. These findings indicate that, contrary to what occurs in E. coli, swimming speed can be a fundamental determinant of the gradient-seeking capabilities of marine bacteria, and suggest a new model of bacterial chemotaxis. PMID:27439872

  13. BUPRENORPHINE DECREASES THE CCL2-MEDIATED CHEMOTACTIC RESPONSE OF MONOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Carvallo, Loreto; Lopez, Lillie; Che, Fa-Yun; Lim, Jihyeon; Eugenin, Eliseo; Williams, Dionna W.; Nieves, Edward; Calderon, Tina M.; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Fiser, Andras; Weiss, Louis; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Berman, Joan W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite successful cART, approximately 60% of HIV infected people exhibit HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). CCL2 is elevated in the CNS of infected people with HAND and mediates monocyte influx into the CNS, which is critical in neuroAIDS. Many HIV infected opiate abusers have increased neuroinflammation that may augment HAND. Buprenorphine is used to treat opiate addiction. However, there are few studies that examine its impact on HIV neuropathogenesis. We show that buprenorphine reduces the chemotactic phenotype of monocytes. Buprenorphine decreases the formation of membrane projections in response to CCL2. It also decreases CCL2-induced chemotaxis and mediates a delay in reinsertion of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, into the cell membrane after CCL2-mediated receptor internalization, suggesting a mechanism of action of buprenorphine. Signaling pathways in CCL2-induced migration include increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and of the junctional protein JAM-A. We show that buprenorphine decreases these phosphorylations in CCL2-treated monocytes. Using DAMGO, CTAP, and Nor-BNI, we demonstrate that the effect of buprenorphine on CCL2 signaling is opioid receptor mediated. To identify additional potential mechanisms by which buprenorphine inhibits CCL2-induced monocyte migration, we performed proteomic analyses to characterize additional proteins in monocytes whose phosphorylation after CCL2 treatment was inhibited by buprenorphine. Leukosialin and S100A9, were identified and had not been shown previously be involved in monocyte migration. We propose that buprenorphine limits CCL2-mediated monocyte transmigration into the CNS, thereby reducing neuroinflammation characteristic of HAND. Our findings underscore the use of buprenorphine as a therapeutic for neuroinflammation as well as for addiction. PMID:25716997

  14. Enhanced Retention of Chemotactic Bacteria in a Pore Network with Residual NAPL Contamination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaopu; Lanning, Larry M; Ford, Roseanne M

    2016-01-01

    Nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants are difficult to eliminate from natural aquifers due, in part, to the heterogeneous structure of the soil. Chemotaxis enhances the mixing of bacteria with contaminant sources in low-permeability regions, which may not be readily accessible by advection and dispersion alone. A microfluidic device was designed to mimic heterogeneous features of a contaminated groundwater aquifer. NAPL droplets (toluene) were trapped within a fine pore network, and bacteria were injected through a highly conductive adjacent macrochannel. Chemotactic bacteria (Pseudomonas putida F1) exhibited greater accumulation near the pore network at 0.5 m/day than both the nonchemotactic control and the chemotactic bacteria at a higher groundwater velocity of 5 m/day. Chemotactic bacteria accumulated in the vicinity of NAPL droplets, and the accumulation was 15% greater than a nonchemotactic mutant. Indirect evidence showed that chemotactic bacteria were retained within the contaminated low-permeability region longer than nonchemotactic bacteria at 0.25 m/day. This retention was diminished at 5 m/day. Numerical solutions of the bacterial-transport equations were consistent with the experimental results. Because toluene is degraded by P. putida F1, the accumulation of chemotactic bacteria around NAPL sources is expected to increase contaminant consumption and improve the efficiency of bioremediation.

  15. Enhanced Retention of Chemotactic Bacteria in a Pore Network with Residual NAPL Contamination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaopu; Lanning, Larry M; Ford, Roseanne M

    2016-01-01

    Nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants are difficult to eliminate from natural aquifers due, in part, to the heterogeneous structure of the soil. Chemotaxis enhances the mixing of bacteria with contaminant sources in low-permeability regions, which may not be readily accessible by advection and dispersion alone. A microfluidic device was designed to mimic heterogeneous features of a contaminated groundwater aquifer. NAPL droplets (toluene) were trapped within a fine pore network, and bacteria were injected through a highly conductive adjacent macrochannel. Chemotactic bacteria (Pseudomonas putida F1) exhibited greater accumulation near the pore network at 0.5 m/day than both the nonchemotactic control and the chemotactic bacteria at a higher groundwater velocity of 5 m/day. Chemotactic bacteria accumulated in the vicinity of NAPL droplets, and the accumulation was 15% greater than a nonchemotactic mutant. Indirect evidence showed that chemotactic bacteria were retained within the contaminated low-permeability region longer than nonchemotactic bacteria at 0.25 m/day. This retention was diminished at 5 m/day. Numerical solutions of the bacterial-transport equations were consistent with the experimental results. Because toluene is degraded by P. putida F1, the accumulation of chemotactic bacteria around NAPL sources is expected to increase contaminant consumption and improve the efficiency of bioremediation. PMID:26633578

  16. Chemotactic Preferences and Strain Variation in the Response of Phytophthora sojae Zoospores to Host Isoflavones

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, B. M.; Wu, M.; Wang, J.; Cheung, W.; Morris, P. F.

    1996-01-01

    The zoospores of Phytophthora sojae are chemotactically attracted to the isoflavones genistein and daidzein that are released by soybean roots. In this study we have examined the response of P. sojae zoospores to a wide range of compounds having some structural similarity to genistein and daidzein, including isoflavones, flavones, chalcones, stilbenes, benzoins, benzoates, benzophenones, acetophenones, and coumarins. Of 59 compounds examined, 43 elicited some response. A comparison of the chemotactic responses elicited by the various compounds revealed a primary role for the phenolic 4(prm1)- and 7-hydroxyl groups on the isoflavone structure. A few compounds acted as repellents, notably methylated flavones with a hydrophobic B ring. The chemotactic response to many of the analogs was markedly different among different strains of P. sojae. PMID:16535375

  17. Bronchial epithelial cells release monocyte chemotactic activity in response to smoke and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, S.; Rennard, S.I.; Leikauf, G.D.; Robbins, R.A. )

    1991-08-01

    An increase in mononuclear phagocytes occurs within the airways during airway inflammation. Bronchial epithelial cells could release monocyte chemotactic activity and contribute to this increase. To test this hypothesis, bovine bronchial epithelial cells were isolated and maintained in culture. Bronchial epithelial cell culture supernatant fluids were evaluated for monocyte chemotactic activity. Epithelial cell culture supernatant fluids attracted significantly greater numbers of monocytes compared to media alone and the number of monocytes attracted increased in a time dependent manner. Endotoxin and smoke extract induced a dose and time dependent release of monocyte chemotactic activity compared with cells cultured in media (52.5 {plus minus} 2.6 (endotoxin), 30.5 {plus minus} 2.3 (smoke) vs 20.5 {plus minus} 2.2 cells/high power field (HPF) p less than 0.001). The released activity was chemotactic by checkerboard analysis. Stimulation of the epithelial cells by opsonized zymosan, calcium ionophore (A23187), and PMA also resulted in an increase in monocyte chemotactic activity (p less than 0.01). Because the release of activity was blocked by the lipoxygenase inhibitors, nordihydroguaiaretic acid and diethycarbamazine, epithelial cell monolayers were cultured with 3 microCi (3H)arachidonic acid for 24 h and then exposed to A23187, PMA, or both stimuli, for 4, 8, and 24 h. Analysis of the released 3H activity was performed with reverse-phase HPLC and revealed that the major lipoxygenase product was leukotriene B4. These data suggest that monocytes may be recruited into airways in response to chemotactic factors released by bronchial epithelial cells.

  18. Character of cellulase activity in the guts of flagellate-free termites with different feeding habits.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Bing-Rong; Zeng, Wen-Hui; Xiao, Wei-Liang; Li, Qiu-Jian; Zhong, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose digestion in termites (Isoptera) is highly important for ecological reasons and applications in biofuel conversion. The speciose Termitidae family has lost flagellates in the hindgut and developed diverse feeding habits. To address the response of cellulase activity to the differentiation of feeding habits, a comparative study of the activity and distribution of composite cellulases, endo-β-1,4-glucanase, and β-glucosidase was performed in seven common flagellate-free termites with three feeding habits: the humus-feeding termites Sinocapritermes mushae (Oshima et Maki), Malaysiocapritermes zhangfengensis Zhu, Yang et Huang and Pericapritermes jiangtsekiangensis (Kemner); the fungus-growing termites Macrotermes barneyi Light and Odontotermes formosanus (Shiraki); and the wood-feeding termites Nasutitermes parvonasutus (Shiraki) and Havilanditermes orthonasus (Tsai et Chen). The results showed that in diverse feeding groups, the wood-feeding group had the highest total composite cellulase and endo-β-1,4-glucanase activities, while the fungus-growing group had the highest β-glucosidase activity. In terms of the distribution of cellulase activity in the alimentary canals, the cellulase activities in wood-feeding termites were concentrated in the midgut, but there was no significant difference between all gut segments in humus-feeding termites. As for the fungus-growing termites, the main site of composite cellulase activity was in the midgut. The endo-β-1,4-glucanase activity was restricted to the midgut, but the primary site of β-glucosidase activity was in the foregut and the midgut (Mac. barneyi). The functions of the gut segments apparently differentiated between feeding groups. The results suggest that the differentiation of feeding habits in flagellate-free termites was characterized by the distribution of cellulases in the gut rather than by variations in cellulase activity.

  19. Ethidium bromide: a fast fluorescent staining procedure for the detection of symbiotic partnership of flagellates and prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, J; König, H

    1999-03-01

    The hindgut of 'lower' termites harbors a dense population of flagellates and bacteria. The flagellates possess ecto- and endosymbiotic prokaryotes. Most of them are hardly visible in the phase contrast microscope. Staining with the DNA-intercalating agent ethidium bromide visualizes the nuclei of the flagellates as well as the ecto- and endosymbiotic bacteria as red objects. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between endosymbiotic methanogens and other bacteria. Following UV excitation, the blue-green autofluorescence of the methanogenic bacteria eclipses the red fluorescence light of the intercalated ethidium bromide. The dye facilitates the observation of symbiotic bacteria and helps identify the number, shape, localization, and dividing status of the nuclei. Thus, it is a powerful tool for the examination of microorganisms in complex habitats, which are rich in strongly autofluorescent material, like wood. PMID:10192044

  20. Platelet factors induce chemotactic migration of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells with different metastatic capabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, M. A.; Rovasio, R. A.; Eynard, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemotactic response of neoplastic cells (NC) induced by soluble platelet factors was investigated. NC suspensions isolated from murine mammary gland adenocarcinomas having different metastatic capabilities were incubated in Boyden's chambers and challenged with (1) 'Early Platelet Factors' (EP), obtained from the soluble fraction of recently collagen-activated human platelets, and (2) 'Late Platelet Factors' (LP), isolated after 24 hours incubation of the platelet aggregates. Chemotaxis was expressed as the distance travelled by NC through nitrocellulose filters. NC isolated from M3, the tumour line having the stronger metastatic potential, showed a significant chemotactic response towards LP factors, whereas NC from the M2 line exhibiting the lower metastatic behaviour, showed a chemotactic response towards EP factors. Both tumour cell lines lacked motion capability towards the well known chemoattractant peptide N-f-Met-Leu-Phe-Phe as well as to serum, plasma, collagen type I or culture medium. The different chemotactic response of both tumour lines when they were challenged by concentration gradients of factors released by early or late collagen-activated human platelets, confirm a relationship between platelet activity and metastatic capabilities and suggests that platelet chemoattractants might play a role in the metastatic dissemination of these mammary gland adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8217786

  1. Chemotactic response of human neutrophils to N-acetyl chitohexaose in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tokoro, A; Suzuki, K; Matsumoto, T; Mikami, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, M

    1988-01-01

    N-Acetyl chitohexaose (NACOS-6) was able to display chemotactic response of human neutrophils in vitro. In order to analyze the mechanism, a series of chemotaxis studies by means of neutrophils treated with inhibitors of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, or lipoxygenase to NACOS-6 was conducted. The treatment of neutrophils with inhibitors of phospholipase A2 or cyclooxygenase resulted in decrease of number of migrated cells. However, the lipoxygenase inhibitors did not exhibit the same effect. On the other hand, the treatment of neutrophils with inhibitors of phospholipase A2 or lipoxygenase resulted in decrease of chemotactic response to Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP), although the cyclooxygenase inhibitors did not inhibit chemotaxis of neutrophils. Neutrophils added to exogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) caused an enhanced chemotactic response to NACOS-6. These results indicate that the mechanism of chemotactic response to NACOS-6 was different from that of FMLP, and that the response was enhanced by PGE2 released from the neutrophils with stimulation of NACOS-6.

  2. [The cell biology of amebas and ameba-flagellates--parasites of man and animals].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    1997-01-01

    The majority of parasitic amoebae and amoeba-flagellates are facultative parasites of animals and humans and only a few of them are obligate parasites (see reviews: Sopina, 1997; Visvesvara, Stehr-Green, 1990). Among the latter Entamoeba histolytica and among the former Naegleria fowleri and several species of Acanthamoeba are most dangerous for humans. It is still unclear whether Balamuthia mandrillaris, pathogenic for monkeys and humans, may be either obligate or facultative parasite (Visvesvara et al., 1993). Endolimax nana and Iodamoeba butschlii are commensals of humans and some animals. This review is devoted to cell biology of the above genera to provide a better understanding of cell-biological aspects of interrelations between these parasites and their hosts. In the Russian text-books on medical and veterinary parasitology these parasitic protozoa have never been regarded in terms of cell biology, and the available information seems to become out of date. This review is aimed to fill these gaps. Evidence on the ultrastructure of the above parasites, in particular that of their mitotic chromosomes, mechanisms of attachment to substratum of many of these, of locomotion and endocytosis, is provided and discussed in addition to the problem of differentiation of Naegleria amoebae into flagellates.

  3. Toxicity assessment of a common laundry detergent using the freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Azizullah, Azizullah; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2011-09-01

    Synthetic detergents are among the commonly used chemicals in everyday life. Detergents, reaching aquatic environments through domestic and municipal wastewater, can cause many different effects in aquatic organisms. The present study was aimed at the toxicity evaluation of a commonly used laundry detergent, Ariel, using the freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis as a biotest organism. Different parameters of the flagellate like motility, swimming velocity, cell shape, gravitactic orientation, photosynthesis and concentration of light harvesting pigments were used as end points for the toxicity assessment. No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) and EC(50) values were calculated for the end point parameters at four different incubation times, i.e. 0, 6, 24 and 72 h. After 72 h incubation, swimming velocity of the cells was found to be the most sensitive parameter giving NOEC and EC(50) values of 10.8 and 34 mg L(-1), respectively. After 72 h exposure to the detergent, chlorophyll a and total carotenoids were significantly decreased in cultures treated with Ariel at concentrations of 50 mg L(-1) and above while chlorophyll b significantly decreased at concentrations above 750 mg L(-1). The maximum inhibitory effect on the quantum yield of photosystem II was observed after 24 h exposure and thereafter a recovery trend was observed. Motility, gravitaxis and cell shape were strongly impaired immediately upon exposure to the detergent, but with increasing exposure time these parameters showed acclimatization to the stress and thus the NOEC values obtained after 72 h were higher than those immediately after exposure.

  4. Flagellar regeneration in the scaly green flagellate Tetraselmis striata (Prasinophyceae): regeneration kinetics and effect of inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reize, I. B.; Melkonian, M.

    1987-06-01

    Flagellar regeneration after experimental amputation was studied in synchronized axenic cultures of the scaly green flagellate Tetraselmis striata (Prasinophyceae). After removal of flagella by mechanical shearing, 95% of the cells regrow all four flagella (incl. the scaly covering) to nearly full length with a linear velocity of 50 nm/min under standard conditions. Flagellar regeneration is independent of photosynthesis (no effect of DCMU; the same regeneration rate in the light or in the dark), but depends on de novo protein synthesis: cycloheximide at a low concentration (0.35 μM) blocks flagellar regeneration reversibly. No pool of flagellar precursors appears to be present throughout the flagellated phase of the cell cycle. A transient pool of flagellar precursors, sufficient to generate 2.5 μm of flagellar length, however, develops during flagellar regeneration. Tunicamycin (2 μg/ml) inhibits flagellar regeneration only after a second flagellar amputation, when flagella reach only one third the length of the control. Flagellar regeneration in T. striata differs considerably from that of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and represents an excellent model system for the study of synchronous Golgi apparatus (GA) activation, and transport and exocytosis of GA-derived macromolecules (scales).

  5. Comparative toxicity of the pesticides carbofuran and malathion to the freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Azizullah, Azizullah; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2011-08-01

    Pesticides are toxic chemicals used for agricultural as well as non-agricultural purposes. The toxicity of pesticides does not remain limited to the site of application but they also cause toxicity to non-target organisms in terrestrial as well as in aquatic environments. This study discusses the comparative toxicity of a carbamate (carbofuran) and an organophosphorus (malathion) pesticide to the freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis during short- and long-term exposures. To evaluate the toxicity of the pesticides, different parameters of the flagellate, like cell density, motility, swimming velocity, cell shape, gravitactic orientation, photosynthetic efficiency, and concentration of light harvesting pigments, were used as end points. Carbofuran was found to be more toxic to E. gracilis than malathion and adversely affected almost all the tested parameters in short- and long-term experiments. The only significant adverse effect by malathion could be demonstrated on the swimming velocity of cells in short-term experiments. The adverse effects of the pesticides were more pronounced during short-term than during long-term exposure.

  6. Genetic evidence for a mitochondriate ancestry in the 'amitochondriate' flagellate Trimastix pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Hampl, Vladimir; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Stechmann, Alexandra; Diaz-Triviño, Sara; Johnson, Patricia J; Roger, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Most modern eukaryotes diverged from a common ancestor that contained the alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to mitochondria. The 'amitochondriate' anaerobic protist parasites that have been studied to date, such as Giardia and Trichomonas harbor mitochondrion-related organelles, such as mitosomes or hydrogenosomes. Yet there is one remaining group of mitochondrion-lacking flagellates known as the Preaxostyla that could represent a primitive 'pre-mitochondrial' lineage of eukaryotes. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an expressed sequence tag (EST) survey on the preaxostylid flagellate Trimastix pyriformis, a poorly-studied free-living anaerobe. Among the ESTs we detected 19 proteins that, in other eukaryotes, typically function in mitochondria, hydrogenosomes or mitosomes, 12 of which are found exclusively within these organelles. Interestingly, one of the proteins, aconitase, functions in the tricarboxylic acid cycle typical of aerobic mitochondria, whereas others, such as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and [FeFe] hydrogenase, are characteristic of anaerobic hydrogenosomes. Since Trimastix retains genetic evidence of a mitochondriate ancestry, we can now say definitively that all known living eukaryote lineages descend from a common ancestor that had mitochondria. PMID:18167542

  7. Enhanced Retention of Chemotactic Bacteria in a Pore Network with Residual NAPL Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants are difficult to eliminate from natural aquifers due, in part, to the heterogeneous structure of the soil matrix. Residual NAPL ganglia remain trapped in regions where the hydraulic conductivity is relatively low. Bioremediation processes depend on adequate mixing of microbial populations and the groundwater contaminants that they degrade. The ability of bacteria to sense a chemical gradient and swim preferentially toward locations of higher concentration, known as chemotaxis, can enhance the mixing of bacteria with contaminant sources that may not be readily accessible by advection and dispersion alone. The impact of chemotaxis on bacterial abundance within a low conductivity NAPL-contaminated region of a well-characterized porous matrix was investigated. A microfluidic device was designed to mimic heterogeneous features of a contaminated groundwater system. NAPL ganglia (toluene) were trapped within a fine pore network, and bacteria were injected into the system through a highly conductive adjacent channel. Chemotactic bacteria (P. putida F1) migrated preferentially towards and accumulated in the vicinity of NAPL contaminant sources. The accumulation of chemotactic bacteria was 15% greater in comparison to a nonchemotactic mutant (P. putida F1 CheA). Bacteria in the microfluidic device were subjected to different flow velocities from 0.25 to 5 m/d encompassing the range of typical groundwater flow rates. Chemotactic bacteria exhibited greater accumulation near the intersection between the macrochannel and the porous network at a flow velocity of 0.5 m/d than both the nonchemotactic mutant control and the chemotactic bacteria at a higher flow velocity of 5 m/d. Breakthrough curves observed at the outlet provided indirect evidence that chemotactic bacteria were retained within the contaminated low permeable region for a longer time than the nonchemotactic bacteria at a flow velocity of 0.25 m/d. This retention was

  8. Molecular phylogeny of methanogens associated with flagellated protists in the gut and with the gut epithelium of termites.

    PubMed

    Tokura; Ohkuma; Kudo

    2000-09-01

    The molecular phylogeny of methanogenic archaea associated with the flagellated protist species Dinenympha and Microjoenia in the gut of termites, Reticulitermes speratus and Hodotermopsis sjoestedti, and those attached to the gut epithelium was examined based on PCR-amplified small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes. The sequences identified were classified into six groups within the genus Methanobrevibacter, including groups of yet uncharacterized novel species. Closely related methanogens were shared between Microjoenia and some Dinenympha cells in each termite. The methanogens harbored by the flagellates were phylogenetically different from the methanogens associated with the gut epithelium, suggesting that distinct methanogen species showed distinct spatial distributions in the termite gut.

  9. Chemotactic activity from rabbit peritoneal neutrophils. Lack of identity with N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-napthyl esterase.

    PubMed

    Tsung, P K; Showell, H J; Kegeles, S W; Becker, E L

    1976-08-12

    The chemotactic and N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-naphthyl esterase activities of rabbit peritoneal neutrophils are separable from each other by both DEAE cellulose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. Partially purified esterase obtained from DEAE-cellulose chromatography had molecular weight of 70 000. However, the partially purified fraction contained chemotactic activities with major activity in molecular weight of 28000 and minor activities in the molecular weights of 45000, 21900, 14500 and 10500. Esterase activity is inhibited by 10(-7) M p-nitrophenylethyl-5-chloropentylphosphonate but chemotactic activity is not.

  10. Inheritance and diversification of symbiotic trichonymphid flagellates from a common ancestor of termites and the cockroach Cryptocercus.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Moriya; Noda, Satoko; Hongoh, Yuichi; Nalepa, Christine A; Inoue, Tetsushi

    2009-01-22

    Cryptocercus cockroaches and lower termites harbour obligate, diverse and unique symbiotic cellulolytic flagellates in their hindgut that are considered critical in the development of social behaviour in their hosts. However, there has been controversy concerning the origin of these symbiotic flagellates. Here, molecular sequences encoding small subunit rRNA and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were identified in the symbiotic flagellates of the order Trichonymphida (phylum Parabasalia) in the gut of Cryptocercus punctulatus and compared phylogenetically to the corresponding species in termites. In each of the monophyletic lineages that represent family-level groups in Trichonymphida, the symbionts of Cryptocercus were robustly sister to those of termites. Together with the recent evidence for the sister-group relationship of the host insects, this first comprehensive study comparing symbiont molecular phylogeny strongly suggests that a set of symbiotic flagellates representative of extant diversity was already established in an ancestor common to Cryptocercus and termites, was vertically transmitted to their offspring, and subsequently became diversified to distinct levels, depending on both the host and the symbiont lineages.

  11. 'Candidatus Ancillula trichonymphae', a novel lineage of endosymbiotic Actinobacteria in termite gut flagellates of the genus Trichonympha.

    PubMed

    Strassert, Jürgen F H; Köhler, Tim; Wienemann, Tobias H G; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Faivre, Nicolas; Franckenberg, Sibylle; Plarre, Rudy; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Termite gut flagellates are colonized by host-specific lineages of ectosymbiotic and endosymbiotic bacteria. Previous studies have shown that flagellates of the genus Trichonympha may harbour more than one type of symbiont. Using a comprehensive approach that combined cloning of SSU rRNA genes with fluorescence in situ hybridization and electron microscopy, we investigated the phylogeny and subcellular locations of the symbionts in a variety of Trichonympha species from different termites. The flagellates in Trichonympha Cluster I were the only species associated with 'Endomicrobia', which were located in the posterior part of the cell, confirming previous results. Trichonympha species of Cluster II from the termite genus Incisitermes (family Kalotermitidae) lacked 'Endomicrobia' and were associated with endosymbiotic Actinobacteria, which is highly unusual. The endosymbionts, for which we suggest the name 'Candidatus Ancillula trichonymphae', represent a novel, deep-branching lineage in the Micrococcineae that consists exclusively of clones from termite guts. They preferentially colonized the anterior part of the flagellate host and were highly abundant in all species of Trichonympha Cluster II except Trichonympha globulosa. Here, they were outnumbered by a Desulfovibrio species associated with the cytoplasmic lamellae at the anterior cell pole. Such symbionts are present in both Trichonympha clusters, but not in all species. Unlike the intracellular location reported for the Desulfovibrio symbionts of Trichonympha agilis (Cluster I), the Desulfovibrio symbionts of T. globulosa (Cluster II) were situated in deep invaginations of the plasma membrane that were clearly connected to the exterior of the host cell.

  12. The bacterivorous soil flagellate Heteromita globosa reduces bacterial clogging under denitrifying conditions in sand-filled aquifer columns.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Richard G; Taki, Hironori; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2002-09-01

    An exopolymer (slime)-producing soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. (strain PS+) rapidly clogged sand-filled columns supplied with air-saturated artificial groundwater containing glucose (500 mg liter(-1)) as a sole carbon source and nitrate (300 mg liter(-1)) as an alternative electron acceptor. After 80 days of operation under denitrifying conditions, the effective porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity (permeability) of sand in these columns had fallen by 2.5- and 26-fold, respectively. Bacterial biofilms appeared to induce clogging by occluding pore spaces with secreted exopolymer, although there may also have been a contribution from biogas generated during denitrification. The bacterivorous soil flagellate Heteromita globosa minimized reductions in effective porosity (1.6-fold) and permeability (13-fold), presumably due to grazing control of biofilms. Grazing may have limited growth of bacterial biomass and hence the rate of exopolymer and biogas secretion into pore spaces. Evidence for reduction in biogas production is suggested by increased nitrite efflux from columns containing flagellates, without a concomitant increase in nitrate consumption. There was no evidence that flagellates could improve flow conditions if added once clogging had occurred (60 days). Presumably, bacterial biofilms and their secretions were well established at that time. Nevertheless, this study provides evidence that bacterivorous flagellates may play a positive role in maintaining permeability in aquifers undergoing remediation treatments.

  13. Expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 by monocytes and endothelial cells exposed to thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Colotta, F.; Sciacca, F. L.; Sironi, M.; Luini, W.; Rabiet, M. J.; Mantovani, A.

    1994-01-01

    Thrombin, in addition to being a key enzyme in hemostasis, affects a series of endothelial and leukocyte functions and thus may be involved in the regulation of inflammatory reactions. Because leukocyte recruitment and activation are important events in inflammatory and thrombotic processes, in this study we have examined the possibility that thrombin induces the production of a cytokine chemotactic for mononuclear phagocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed in vitro to thrombin expressed transcripts of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1; alternative acronyms: JE, monocyte chemotactic and activating factor, tumor-derived chemotactic factor). Thrombin was two- to threefold less effective than endotoxin in inducing MCP-1 transcripts in PBMC. Among circulating mononuclear cells, monocytes were identified as the cells expressing MCP-1 in response to thrombin. Monocytes expressed thrombin receptor transcripts. Boiling, hirudin, antithrombin III, and mutation of the catalytic site serine 205 into alanine) blocked the capacity of thrombin to induce MCP-1 expression. The thrombin receptor-activating peptide mimicked the effect of thrombin in inducing MCP-1 expression. Induction of MCP-1 transcript by thrombin was not reduced by blocking interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor, suggesting that these mediators are not involved in thrombin-induced expression of MCP-1. In addition to monocytes, endothelial cells (EC) also expressed MCP-1 in response to thrombin, although at lower levels compared with monocytes. Actinomycin D experiments indicated that induction of MCP-1 by thrombin in PBMC and EC was gene transcription dependent. The inhibition of protein synthesis blocked thrombin-induced MCP-1 expression in PBMC, whereas it superinduced both constitutive and thrombin-inducible expression of MCP-1 in EC, indicating different mechanisms of regulation of this gene in mononuclear phagocytes versus endothelial cells. Thrombin stimulated mononuclear

  14. Vertical distribution of the chloromonad flagellate Heterosigma carterae in columns: Implications for bloom development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Rensel, J.E.; Matter, A.L.; Taub, F.B.

    1998-01-01

    Blooms of the marine flagellate Heterosigma carterae have been associated with catastrophic fish kills at mariculture facilities around the world. The precise cause(s) of the sudden appearance and disappearance of Heterosigma surface blooms has not been completely described or understood. Environmental data from prior studies of blooms indicate the presence of vertical stratification of the water column that is often induced by freshwater runoff. We report the relatively rapid concentration of Heterosigma cells at the surface of tubes shortly after the addition of distilled water to the surface. This phenomenon of cell concentration in surface waters may partially explain the sudden appearance of Heterosigma cells near the surface and subsequent disappearance when vertical stratification is lost due to turbulence or mixing. The results may lead to bloom mitigation techniques for net pen aquaculture.

  15. Graviperception in the flagellate Euglena gracilis during a shuttle space flight.

    PubMed

    Häder, D P; Rosum, A; Schäfer, J; Hemmersbach, R

    1996-06-27

    During a recent space flight, gravitaxis of the unicellular photosynthetic flagellate, Euglena gracilis, was studied on board of the American shuttle Columbia. Accelerations were varied between 0 and 1.5 x g using a slow rotating centrifuge microscope (NIZEMI). The cells showed a sigmoidal response curve for the dependence of the precision of gravitaxis on acceleration which is indicative of the involvement of an active, physiological gravireceptor with a threshold at g-values < or = 0.16 x g and a saturation at g-values > or = 1 x g. No adaptation to microgravity was found during the prolonged space mission. After return the cells showed a normal gravitactic behavior at 1 x g. Since the cells are heavier than water, their swimming velocity is affected by sedimentation. The velocity distribution at different accelerations closely follows Stokes' law for sedimentation indicating that, in contrast to the ciliate Paramecium, E. gracilis, does not show any gravikinesis.

  16. Phototaxis in the flagellate, Euglena gracilis, under the effect of microgravity.

    PubMed

    Kuhnel-Kratz, C h; Schafer, J; Hader, D P

    1993-09-01

    Positive phototaxis was analyzed in the unicellular photosynthetic flagellate, Euglena gracilis, under the conditions of microgravity during a parabolic rocket flight (TEXUS experiment). The fluence rate at which positive phototaxis changes to negative phototaxis was the same in a sample which had previously been exposed to microgravity as in a sample which had not been exposed to microgravity. During weightlessness the precision of positive phototaxis is higher than at 1 g at the same fluence rate. The swimming velocity of the cells is higher at 0 g than at 1 g confirming previous results that under terrestrial conditions the cells are subject to simultaneous sedimentation while they swim upward. Tracks of organisms recorded at 0 g show much more frequent deviations from the straight path than those at 1 g.

  17. Phylogeny of the bodonid flagellates (Kinetoplastida) based on small-subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Dolezel, D; Jirků, M; Maslov, D A; Lukes, J

    2000-09-01

    The phylogeny of kinetoplastid flagellates was investigated by determining the sequences of the small-subunit (18S) rRNA from Bodo designis, Bodo saltans K, Bodo saltans P, Bodo sorokini, Bodo sp. (cf. uncinatus), Cruzella marina, Cryptobia helicis, Dimastigella mimosa and Parabodo nitrophilus and analysing these data together with several previously obtained sequences. The root of the kinetoplastid tree was tentatively determined to be attached to the branch of B. designis and/or Cruzella marina. Within this topology, the suborder Trypanosomatina appears as a late-emerging monophyletic group, while the suborder Bodonina is paraphyletic. Within the bodonid subtree, the branches of parasitic organisms were intermingled with free-living ones, implying multiple transitions to parasitism. The tree indicates that the genera Cryptobia and Bodo are artificial taxa. In addition, the separation of the fish cryptobias and Trypanoplasma borreli as different genera was not supported.

  18. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 is released during lethal and sublethal bacteremia in baboons.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P M; van Damme, J; Put, W; de Jong, I W; Taylor, F B; Hack, C E

    1995-06-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) is a cytokine with chemotactic activity specific for mononuclear phagocytes. To investigate the possible involvement of MCP-1 in the pathogenesis of sepsis, its course was studied in baboons challenged intravenously with a sublethal or lethal dose of Escherichia coli. Levels of MCP-1 started to increase in both groups of animals 2 h after injection of E. coli, reaching peak levels 4 and 6 h after a sublethal (186 +/- 21 ng/mL) or a lethal (213 +/- 24 ng/mL) dose, respectively. Levels of MCP-1 correlated significantly with plasma levels of another chemokine, interleukin-8 (IL-8; r = .826. P < .001), suggesting that common stimuli mediate the release of both cytokines in this model.

  19. Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Inactivation of Complement Components and Complement-Derived Chemotactic and Phagocytic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Duane R.; Miller, Kent D.

    1974-01-01

    A purified elastase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was highly destructive for fluid-phase and cell-bound C1 and C3 and fluid-phase C5, C8, and C9. Inactivation of C4, C2, C6, and C7 by the enzyme varied from 0 to 67%. Low concentrations of elastase generated, then inactivated, a chemotactic factor from human C5 but not from C3. Higher enzyme concentrations inactivated the C5 chemotactic activity at a faster rate. Elastase treatment of sensitized pseudomonads containing cell-bound C3 reduced the phagocytic indexes of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The data support the proposed chemopathogenic role of the elastase in generation of the characteristic non-inflammatory Pseudomonas vasculitis. Images PMID:4210424

  20. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  1. Automated Chemotactic Sorting and Single-cell Cultivation of Microbes using Droplet Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Libing; Chen, Dong-Wei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Du, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    We report a microfluidic device for automated sorting and cultivation of chemotactic microbes from pure cultures or mixtures. The device consists of two parts: in the first part, a concentration gradient of the chemoeffector was built across the channel for inducing chemotaxis of motile cells; in the second part, chemotactic cells from the sample were separated, and mixed with culture media to form nanoliter droplets for encapsulation, cultivation, enumeration, and recovery of single cells. Chemotactic responses were assessed by imaging and statistical analysis of droplets based on Poisson distribution. An automated procedure was developed for rapid enumeration of droplets with cell growth, following with scale-up cultivation on agar plates. The performance of the device was evaluated by the chemotaxis assays of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RP437 and E. coli RP1616. Moreover, enrichment and isolation of non-labelled Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 from its 1:10 mixture with E. coli RP437 was demonstrated. The enrichment factor reached 36.7 for CNB-1, based on its distinctive chemotaxis toward 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. We believe that this device can be widely used in chemotaxis studies without necessarily relying on fluorescent labelling, and isolation of functional microbial species from various environments. PMID:27074762

  2. Chemotactic effect of mono- and disaccharides on the unicellular Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Szemes, Áfonya; Lajkó, Eszter; Láng, Orsolya; Kőhidai, László

    2015-04-30

    Chemotaxis is one of the most essential cell physiological responses, which was developed in parallel the molecular evolution of signal molecules. Previously good correlations were found between chemotactic moieties and physicochemical properties (SEA, solubility, pKa) of peptide type ligands in Tetrahymena model. However, references are rather weak in eukaryotic chemotaxis about significance of simple carbohydrates. In the present work our goal is (i) to investigate the chemotactic effect of 10 mono- and disaccharides in the eukaryotic Tetrahymena pyriformis; (ii) to describe effective ligands with physicochemical parameters; (iii) to test whether sugars are acting via induction of metabolic pathways. Our results are: (i) the tested sugars can trigger both significant attractant (D-glucose, D-mannose) and significant repellent (D-glucosamine, D-fructose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-arabinose) effects, while some of the sugars (maltose, lactose, sucrose, D-galactose) had no effect. (ii) Correlations were described between the chemotactic effectiveness of the ligands and their physicochemical characters (TPSA, XLogP), which are supposed to influence the internalization of the sugars. (iii) All ligands proved to have low selection potential, which refers to a 'short-term' receptor moiety or influencing specific metabolic pathways. (iv) Starvation elicited modified, strong chemoattractive responsiveness towards glucose; however, it was independent of concentration while 1 h insulin treatment resulted in an increased and concentration dependent chemotaxis induced by glucose.

  3. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocyte chemotactic hyperresponsiveness in a case of canine acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A L; Thomsen, M K; Aaes, H; Andreasen, M; Søndergaard, J

    1993-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to affect polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocyte (PMN) function and to be secreted by mononuclear cells, indicating that the hormone may be active in an immunophysiologic network, acting as an endo- or paracrine priming agent. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the chemotactic responsiveness of canine peripheral PMN in a dog with acromegaly, caused by spontaneous, progesterone-induced hypersecretion of GH and, secondary to this, a seven-fold increase in insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). The chemotactic responsiveness towards zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was evaluated at a time when the dog suffered from acromegaly and again 57 days after corrective surgery (ovariohysterectomy). The experiments showed that PMN from the patient exhibited enhanced chemotactic migration that appeared to be associated with the hypersomatotropic condition as judged from the reversibility of the phenomenon. The glucose intolerance and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase that were observed in the acromegalic dog were also shown to be reversible following surgery.

  4. Automated Chemotactic Sorting and Single-cell Cultivation of Microbes using Droplet Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Libing; Chen, Dong-Wei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Du, Wenbin

    2016-04-01

    We report a microfluidic device for automated sorting and cultivation of chemotactic microbes from pure cultures or mixtures. The device consists of two parts: in the first part, a concentration gradient of the chemoeffector was built across the channel for inducing chemotaxis of motile cells; in the second part, chemotactic cells from the sample were separated, and mixed with culture media to form nanoliter droplets for encapsulation, cultivation, enumeration, and recovery of single cells. Chemotactic responses were assessed by imaging and statistical analysis of droplets based on Poisson distribution. An automated procedure was developed for rapid enumeration of droplets with cell growth, following with scale-up cultivation on agar plates. The performance of the device was evaluated by the chemotaxis assays of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RP437 and E. coli RP1616. Moreover, enrichment and isolation of non-labelled Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 from its 1:10 mixture with E. coli RP437 was demonstrated. The enrichment factor reached 36.7 for CNB-1, based on its distinctive chemotaxis toward 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. We believe that this device can be widely used in chemotaxis studies without necessarily relying on fluorescent labelling, and isolation of functional microbial species from various environments.

  5. Chemotactic selection with insulin, di-iodotyrosine and histamine alters the phagocytotic responsiveness of Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Schiess, N; Csaba, G; Kohidai, L

    2001-04-01

    Chemotactic selection is a method by which populations of cells exposed to ligands can be isolated and subsequently cultivated. We used Tetrahymena pyriformis GL cultures selected by chemotactic selection to insulin (10 nM), histamine (0.1 nM) and di-iodotyrosine (T2, 10 nM) to study the phagocytotic capacity under the induction of selector hormones. Our results show a long-lasting link between chemotactically selected cultures and phagocytotic activity. Cells selected to histamine produced the highest phagocytotic activity upon a second exposure to the selector hormone. T2 selection was also strongly effective, however, the phagocytosis stimulation was not specific to the hormone given later. Insulin selected sub-populations had different phagocytotic responses to the control substance itself, whereas histamine selected sub-populations seem to be heterogeneous in the phagocytotic response to histamine. For insulin, the increased endocytotic or metabolic activity was demonstrated by the lack of non-phagocytotic cells. These experiments call attention to the evolutionary role of selection in the later developing receptor-hormone relationship.

  6. Sensitivity of the rate of nutrient uptake by chemotactic bacteria to physical and biological parameters in a turbulent environment.

    PubMed

    Watteaux, Romain; Stocker, Roman; Taylor, John R

    2015-12-21

    In this study, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to investigate the response of chemotactic bacteria to an isolated patch of chemoattractant in a turbulent environment. Previous work has shown that by stirring nutrients that are chemoattractants into a network of thin, elongated filaments, turbulence directly influences the rate at which chemotactic bacteria consume nutrients. However, the quantitative outcome of this process is influenced by a host of physical and biological factors, and many of these remain unexplored. Here, we analyse the sensitivity of nutrient uptake by chemotactic bacteria on a wide range of physical and biological parameters using a series of controlled DNS. Starting with uniformly distributed populations of motile and non-motile bacteria in a fully developed homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flow, we inject a patch of dissolved nutrients. We then assess the chemotactic advantage, defined as the difference between the nutrients consumed by motile and non-motile bacteria over the lifetime of the patch. We find that the chemotaxis can enhance the total uptake rate by a factor of 1.6 and allows the population of chemotactic bacteria to absorb nutrients 2.2 times faster than non-motile bacteria Results show that chemotactic bacteria are subject to a trade-off between swimming to leave regions devoid of nutrients and, once a nutrient gradient is detected, staying in regions of large nutrient concentration. These findings could help explain how the physical characteristics of turbulent marine ecosystems influence the optimal biological traits of bacteria through the competition for limited resources.

  7. Actin phylogeny identifies Mesostigma viride as a flagellate ancestor of the land plants.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, D; Weber, K; An, S S; Berning-Koch, W

    1998-11-01

    Green algae and land plants trace their evolutionary history to a unique common ancestor. This "green lineage" is phylogenetically subdivided into two distinct assemblages, the Chlorophyta and the Streptophyta. The Chlorophyta includes the Chlorophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Prasinopohyceae, whereas the Streptophyta includes the Charophyceae plus the bryophytes, ferns, and all other multicellular land plants (Embryophyta). The Prasinophyceae is believed to contain the earliest divergences within the green lineage. Phylogenetic analyses using rDNA sequences identify the prasinophytes as a paraphyletic taxon that diverges at the base of the Chlorophyta. rDNA analyses, however, provide ambiguous results regarding the identity of the flagellate ancestor of the Streptophyta. We have sequenced the actin-encoding cDNAs from Scherffelia dubia (Prasinophyceae), Coleochaete scutata, Spirogyra sp. (Charophyceae), and the single-copy actin gene from Mesostigma viride (Prasinophyceae). Phylogenetic analyses show Mesostigma to be the earliest divergence within the Streptophyta and provide direct evidence for a scaly, biflagellate, unicellular ancestor for this lineage. This result is supported by the existence of two conserved actin-coding region introns (positions 20-3, 152-1), and one intron in the 5'-untranslated region of the actin gene shared by Mesostigma and the embryophytes.

  8. Composition of heterotrophic flagellates in coastal waters of different trophic status.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Man Kit; Nong, Wenyan; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Wong, Chong Kim

    2013-09-01

    Heterotrophic flagellates (HFs) are important members of the aquatic microbial food web. However, information on their spatial patterns in relation to eutrophication is limited. Here, we examined the composition and spatial distributions of HFs (<3 μm) in subtropical coastal waters of different trophic status by re-analyzing two previously published small subunit rDNA pyrosequence datasets using information from the newly launched Protist Ribosomal Reference database (PR(2)). Whereas the contributions of different major clades composing the Marine Stramenopiles (MASTs), picobiliphytes and Chrysophyceae were found relatively comparable between the stations, contrasting compositions of the Marine Alveolates (MALV) groups I and II were observed. The high and relatively stable contribution of MAST-1, -3 and -7 among the MASTs in both stations suggest their importance as bacterial grazers in coastal waters, irrespective of trophic status. By contrast, the dominance of clades 3, 5 and 14 of MALV II in the eutrophic station implies their importance in regulating the dinoflagellate population at the site. Our study provides insights into the ecological importance of different HF groups in eutrophic coastal ecosystems. PMID:23636495

  9. Experimental infection of chickens by a flagellated motile strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Lopes, P D; Freitas Neto, O C; Batista, D F A; Denadai, J; Alarcon, M F F; Almeida, A M; Vasconcelos, R O; Setta, A; Barrow, P A; Berchieri, A

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum (SG) causes fowl typhoid (FT), a septicaemic disease which can result in high mortality in poultry flocks. The absence of flagella in SG is thought to favour systemic invasion, since bacterial recognition via Toll-like receptor (TLR)-5 does not take place during the early stages of FT. In the present study, chicks susceptible to FT were inoculated with a wild type SG (SG) or its flagellated motile derivative (SG Fla(+)). In experiment 1, mortality and clinical signs were assessed, whereas in experiment 2, gross pathology, histopathology, systemic invasion and immune responses were evaluated. SG Fla(+) infection resulted in later development of clinical signs, lower mortality, lower bacterial numbers in the liver and spleen, and less severe pathological changes compared to SG. The CD8(+) T lymphocyte population was higher in the livers of chicks infected with SG at 4 days post-inoculation (dpi). Chicks infected with SG had increased expression of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA in the caecal tonsil at 1 dpi and increased expression of IL-18 mRNA in the spleen at 4 dpi. In contrast, the CD4(+) T lymphocyte population was higher at 6 dpi in the livers of birds infected with SG Fla(+). Therefore, flagella appeared to modulate the chicken immune response towards a CD4(+) T profile, resulting in more efficient bacterial clearance from systemic sites and milder infection. PMID:27387725

  10. Simulation of the flow field and tumbling dynamics of multiply flagellated bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald; Watari, Nobuhiko

    2009-11-01

    To study the hydrodynamics of swimming of multi-flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, we develop a simulation method using a bead-spring model to account for the hydrodynamic and the mechanical interactions between multiple flagella and the cell body, the reversal of the rotation of a flagellum in a tumble and associated polymorphic transformations of the flagellum. This simulation reproduces the experimentally observed behaviors of E. coli, namely, a three-dimensional random-walk trajectory in run-and-tumble motion and steady clockwise swimming near a wall. Here we show using a modeled cell that the polymorphic transformation of flagellum in a tumble facilitates the reorientation of the cell, and that the time-averaged flow field near a cell in a run has double-layered helical streamlines. Moreover, the instantaneous flow field, which is strongly time-dependent, is more than 10-fold larger in magnitude than the time-averaged flow, large enough to affect the migration behavior of surrounding chemoattractants, with the Peclet number for these molecules being larger than one near a swimming cell.

  11. Lineage-specific activities of a multipotent mitochondrion of trypanosomatid flagellates.

    PubMed

    Škodová-Sveráková, Ingrid; Verner, Zdeněk; Skalický, Tomáš; Votýpka, Jan; Horváth, Anton; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-04-01

    Trypanosomatids are a very diverse group composed of monoxenous and dixenous parasites belonging to the excavate class Kinetoplastea. Here we studied the respiration of five monoxenous species (Blechomonas ayalai, Herpetomonas muscarum, H. samuelpessoai, Leptomonas pyrrhocoris and Sergeia podlipaevi) introduced into culture, each representing a novel yet globally distributed and/or species-rich clade, and compare them with well-studied flagellates Trypanosoma brucei, Phytomonas serpens, Crithidia fasciculata and Leishmania tarentolae. Differences in structure and activities of respiratory chain complexes, respiration and other biochemical parameters recorded under laboratory conditions reveal their substantial diversity, likely a reflection of different host environments. Phylogenetic relationships of the analysed trypanosomatids do not correlate with their biochemical parameters, with the differences within clades by far exceeding those among clades. As the S. podlipaevi canonical respiratory chain complexes have very low activities, we believe that its mitochondrion is utilised for purposes other than oxidative phosphorylation. Hence, the single reticulated mitochondrion of diverse trypanosomatids seems to retain multipotency, with the capacity to activate its individual components based on the host environment.

  12. Physiological parameters of gravitaxis in the flagellate Euglena gracilis obtained during a parabolic flight campaign.

    PubMed

    Richter, Peter R; Schuster, Martin; Wagner, Helmut; Lebert, Michael; Hader, Donat-P

    2002-02-01

    The unicellular freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis and its close relative Astasia longa show a pronounced negative gravitaxis. Previous experiments revealed that gravitaxis is most likely mediated by an active physiological mechanism in which changes of the internal calcium concentration and the membrane potential play an important role. In a recent parabolic flight experiment on board an aircraft (ESA 29th parabolic flight campaign), changes of graviorientation, membrane potential and the cytosolic calcium concentration upon changes of the acceleration (between 1 x g(n), 1.8 x g(n), microgravity) were monitored by image analysis and photometric methods using Oxonol VI (membrane potential) and Calcium Crimson (cytosolic calcium concentration). The parabolic flight maneuvers performed by the aircraft resulted in transient phases of 1.8 x g(n) (about 20 s), microgravity (about 22 s) followed by 1.8 x g(n) (about 20 s). A transient increase in the intracellular calcium concentration was detected from lower to higher accelerations (1 x g(n) to 1.8 x g(n) or microgravity to 1.8 x g(n)). Oxonol VI-labeled cells showed a signal, which indicates a depolarization during the transition from 1 x g(n) to 1.8 x g(n), a weak repolarization in microgravity followed by a rapid repolarization in the subsequent 1 x g(n) phase. The results show good coincidence with observations of recent terrestrial and space experiments.

  13. Transient Superdiffusion and Long-Range Correlations in the Motility Patterns of Trypanosomatid Flagellate Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Alves, Luiz G A; Scariot, Débora B; Guimarães, Renato R; Nakamura, Celso V; Mendes, Renio S; Ribeiro, Haroldo V

    2016-01-01

    We report on a diffusive analysis of the motion of flagellate protozoa species. These parasites are the etiological agents of neglected tropical diseases: leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania braziliensis, African sleeping sickness caused by Trypanosoma brucei, and Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. By tracking the positions of these parasites and evaluating the variance related to the radial positions, we find that their motions are characterized by a short-time transient superdiffusive behavior. Also, the probability distributions of the radial positions are self-similar and can be approximated by a stretched Gaussian distribution. We further investigate the probability distributions of the radial velocities of individual trajectories. Among several candidates, we find that the generalized gamma distribution shows a good agreement with these distributions. The velocity time series have long-range correlations, displaying a strong persistent behavior (Hurst exponents close to one). The prevalence of "universal" patterns across all analyzed species indicates that similar mechanisms may be ruling the motion of these parasites, despite their differences in morphological traits. In addition, further analysis of these patterns could become a useful tool for investigating the activity of new candidate drugs against these and others neglected tropical diseases.

  14. [Mitosis in the free-living flagellate Bodo saltans strain PS+ (Kinetoplastidea, Bodonida)].

    PubMed

    Malysheva, M N; Karpova, M S; Frolov, A O

    2007-01-01

    The mitosis in the free-living flagellate Bodo saltans Ps+ with prokaryotic cytobionts in perinuclear space has been studied. The nuclear division in B. saltans Ps+ occurs by closed mitosis type without condensation of chromosomes. Two spatially separated mitotic spindles begin to form consistently at the initial stages of nuclear division. The spindle including about 20 microtubules appears first and later the second spindle with half the number of microtubules comes at the angle of 30-40 degrees. Both spindles rest their ends against the inner nuclear membrane and form 4 distinct poles. The microtubules of the first spindle are associated with 4 pairs of kinetochores, the microtubules of the second one are associated with 2 pairs of kinetochores. The divergence of the kinetochores towards the poles occurs independently in each spindle. The equatorial phase is not revealed in B. saltans Ps+. The poles of both spindles unite in pairs at the elongation phase of mitosis and form the integrated bipolar structure. At this stage of the nuclear division, the kinetochores reach the poles of subspindles and become indistinguishable. Then the nucleus takes the shape of a dumbbell. The inner nuclear membranes of just formed nuclei have layers of condensed chromatin characteristic of the interphase nuclei of kinetoplastidea. The daughter nuclei separate at the phase of reorganization. There are 1-2 prokaryotic endocytobionts in the perinuclear space of the interphase nuclei in B. saltans Ps+. The symbionts multiply during mitosis and their number reaches more than 20 specimens par nucleus.

  15. Morphological and molecular identification of Tetratrichomonas flagellates from the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    PubMed

    Ibañez-Escribano, A; Nogal-Ruiz, J J; Delclaux, M; Martinez-Nevado, E; Ponce-Gordo, F

    2013-08-01

    A tetratrichomonad flagellate found in the diarrhoeic faeces of a 5 years-old male giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) was characterised by morphological and genetic analysis. This protozoan presents four anterior flagella of unequal length and a recurrent flagellum attached to the undulating membrane without a free end portion, and a broad axostyle projection. Numerous vacuoles of different sizes containing bacteria and digestion products were found. The complete sequence of the DNA coding for the 16S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 region was also obtained in order to compare this isolate with other tetratrichomonad species. The sequence obtained was identical to others previously obtained by other researchers from bovines and turtles (Geochelone sp.). It is not easily explainable how the same organism could be found in such different hosts and locations; however these results indicate that some tetratrichomonad species could have a wide host range and could survive in a wide range of environmental conditions.

  16. Transient Superdiffusion and Long-Range Correlations in the Motility Patterns of Trypanosomatid Flagellate Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luiz G. A.; Scariot, Débora B.; Guimarães, Renato R.; Nakamura, Celso V.; Mendes, Renio S.; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a diffusive analysis of the motion of flagellate protozoa species. These parasites are the etiological agents of neglected tropical diseases: leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania braziliensis, African sleeping sickness caused by Trypanosoma brucei, and Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. By tracking the positions of these parasites and evaluating the variance related to the radial positions, we find that their motions are characterized by a short-time transient superdiffusive behavior. Also, the probability distributions of the radial positions are self-similar and can be approximated by a stretched Gaussian distribution. We further investigate the probability distributions of the radial velocities of individual trajectories. Among several candidates, we find that the generalized gamma distribution shows a good agreement with these distributions. The velocity time series have long-range correlations, displaying a strong persistent behavior (Hurst exponents close to one). The prevalence of “universal” patterns across all analyzed species indicates that similar mechanisms may be ruling the motion of these parasites, despite their differences in morphological traits. In addition, further analysis of these patterns could become a useful tool for investigating the activity of new candidate drugs against these and others neglected tropical diseases. PMID:27007779

  17. Chemotactic Motility of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 under Aerobic and Denitrification Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of multiple traits relevant for rhizosphere colonization and plant growth promotion. Among these traits are denitrification and chemotactic motility. Besides aerobic growth, F113 is able to grow anaerobically using nitrate and nitrite as final electron acceptors. F113 is able to perform swimming motility under aerobic conditions and under anaerobic conditions when nitrate is used as the electron acceptor. However, nitrite can not support swimming motility. Regulation of swimming motility is similar under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, since mutants that are hypermotile under aerobic conditions, such as gacS, sadB, kinB, algU and wspR, are also hypermotile under anaerobic conditions. However, chemotactic behavior is different under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Unlike most pseudomonads, the F113 genome encode three complete chemotaxis systems, Che1, Che2 and Che3. Mutations in each of the cheA genes of the three Che systems has shown that the three systems are functional and independent. Mutation of the cheA1 gene completely abolished swimming motility both under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Mutation of the cheA2 gene, showed only a decrease in swimming motility under both conditions, indicating that this system is not essential for chemotactic motility but is necessary for optimal motility. Mutation of the cheA3 gene abolished motility under denitrification conditions but only produced a decrease in motility under aerobic conditions. The three Che systems proved to be implicated in competitive rhizosphere colonization, being the cheA1 mutant the most affected. PMID:26161531

  18. Macrolactone Nuiapolide, Isolated from a Hawaiian Marine Cyanobacterium, Exhibits Anti-Chemotactic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shogo; Williams, Howard; Cagle, Davey; Karanovich, Kristopher; Horgen, F. David; Smith, Roger; Watanabe, Coran M. H.

    2015-01-01

    A new bioactive macrolactone, nuiapolide (1) was identified from a marine cyanobacterium collected off the coast of Niihau, near Lehua Rock. The natural product exhibits anti-chemotactic activity at concentrations as low as 1.3 μM against Jurkat cells, cancerous T lymphocytes, and induces a G2/M phase cell cycle shift. Structural characterization of the natural product revealed the compound to be a 40-membered macrolactone with nine hydroxyl functional groups and a rare tert-butyl carbinol residue. PMID:26473885

  19. Macrolactone Nuiapolide, Isolated from a Hawaiian Marine Cyanobacterium, Exhibits Anti-Chemotactic Activity.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shogo; Williams, Howard; Cagle, Davey; Karanovich, Kristopher; Horgen, F David; Iii, Roger Smith; Watanabe, Coran M H

    2015-10-01

    A new bioactive macrolactone, nuiapolide (1) was identified from a marine cyanobacterium collected off the coast of Niihau, near Lehua Rock. The natural product exhibits anti-chemotactic activity at concentrations as low as 1.3 μM against Jurkat cells, cancerous T lymphocytes, and induces a G2/M phase cell cycle shift. Structural characterization of the natural product revealed the compound to be a 40-membered macrolactone with nine hydroxyl functional groups and a rare tert-butyl carbinol residue. PMID:26473885

  20. On a competitive system under chemotactic effects with non-local terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreanu, Mihaela; Tello, J. Ignacio

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we study a system of partial differential equations describing the evolution of a population under chemotactic effects with non-local reaction terms. We consider an external application of chemoattractant in the system and study the cases of one and two populations in competition. By introducing global competitive/cooperative factors in terms of the total mass of the populations, we obtain, for a range of parameters, that any solution with positive and bounded initial data converges to a spatially homogeneous state with positive components. The proofs rely on the maximum principle for spatially homogeneous sub- and super-solutions.

  1. Epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78: a novel chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A E; Kunkel, S L; Harlow, L A; Mazarakis, D D; Haines, G K; Burdick, M D; Pope, R M; Walz, A; Strieter, R M

    1994-01-01

    We and others have shown that cells obtained from inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients produce interleukin-8, a potent chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils (PMNs). However, IL-8 accounted for only 40% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in these synovial fluids. Currently, we have examined the production of the novel PMN chemotactic cytokine, epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78 (ENA-78), using peripheral blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue from 70 arthritic patients. RA ENA-78 levels were greater in RA synovial fluid (239 +/- 63 ng/ml) compared with synovial fluid from other forms of arthritis (130 +/- 118 ng/ml) or osteoarthritis (2.6 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). RA peripheral blood ENA-78 levels (70 +/- 26 ng/ml) were greater than normal peripheral blood levels (0.12 +/- 0.04 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). Anti-ENA-78 antibodies neutralized 42 +/- 9% (mean +/- SE) of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in RA synovial fluids. Isolated RA synovial tissue fibroblasts in vitro constitutively produced significant levels of ENA-78, and this production was further augmented when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). In addition RA and osteoarthritis synovial tissue fibroblasts as well as RA synovial tissue macrophages were found to constitutively produce ENA-78. RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells spontaneously produced ENA-78, which was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Immunohistochemical localization of ENA-78 from the synovial tissue of patients with arthritis or normal subjects showed that the predominant cellular source of this chemokine was synovial lining cells, followed by macrophages, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Synovial tissue macrophages and fibroblasts were more ENA-78 immunopositive in RA than in normal synovial tissue (P < 0.05). These results, which are the first demonstration of ENA-78 in a human disease state, suggest that ENA-78 may play an important role in the recruitment of PMNs

  2. Macrolactone Nuiapolide, Isolated from a Hawaiian Marine Cyanobacterium, Exhibits Anti-Chemotactic Activity.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shogo; Williams, Howard; Cagle, Davey; Karanovich, Kristopher; Horgen, F David; Iii, Roger Smith; Watanabe, Coran M H

    2015-10-01

    A new bioactive macrolactone, nuiapolide (1) was identified from a marine cyanobacterium collected off the coast of Niihau, near Lehua Rock. The natural product exhibits anti-chemotactic activity at concentrations as low as 1.3 μM against Jurkat cells, cancerous T lymphocytes, and induces a G2/M phase cell cycle shift. Structural characterization of the natural product revealed the compound to be a 40-membered macrolactone with nine hydroxyl functional groups and a rare tert-butyl carbinol residue.

  3. High-affinity no-carrier-added 99mTc-labeled chemotactic peptides for studies of inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baidoo, K E; Scheffel, U; Stathis, M; Finley, P; Lever, S Z; Zhan, Y; Wagner, H N

    1998-01-01

    Nalpha-for-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys, a chemotactic peptide that binds with high affinity to the chemoattractant receptor on granulocytes and monocytes, was labeled with 99mTc using the diaminedithiol (DADT) chelating system to coordinate the Tc. 99mTc labeling of the DADT-coupled peptide was accomplished in 84% overall yield (room temperature for 10 min) using [99mTc]glucoheptonate as the donor of prereduced Tc. HPLC analysis showed two major 99mTc-labeled peptide peaks, 99mTc-DADT-Pep-I and 99mTc-DADT-Pep-II, were obtained in a ratio of 1:0.85. Using an iodoacetamide-derivatized gel to remove unlabeled peptide from the 99mTc labeling mixtures, essentially no-carrier-added (nca) high-specific activity 99mTc-labeled chemotactic peptides were obtained. The 99Tc analogues of the peptides were synthesized (72% yield) in a similar fashion and correlated with 99mTc complexes I and II by HPLC. In vitro competitive receptor binding assays of the isolated 99Tc analogues were performed against the tritiated chemotactic peptide [3H]N-for-Met-Leu-Phe ([3H]fMLF) using isolated granulocytes. The 99Tc-derivatized peptides showed similar binding affinities to the chemoattractant receptor as the unlabeled Nalpha-for-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys. The nca 99mTc-labeled peptides gave high contrast images of experimental inflammation in rabbits without causing neutropenia. Thus, it is feasible to attach the Tc-DADT chelate to low-molecular weight receptor binding chemotactic peptides and retain substantial binding to the receptor. Chemotactic peptides labeled with 99mTc via the DADT ligand system have the potential for imaging focal sites of inflammation without toxic effects, an important consideration in the successful utilization of chemotactic peptide agonists.

  4. Syndecan-4 regulates the bFGF-induced chemotactic migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wu, Han; Xie, Jun; Li, Guannan; Gu, Rong; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-10-01

    Chemotactic migration of endothelial cells (ECs) guided by extracellular attractants is essential for blood vessel formation. Synd4 is a ubiquitous heparin sulfate proteoglycan receptor on the cell surface that has been identified to promote angiogenesis during tissue repair. Here, the role synd4 played in chemotactic migration of ECs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with Lenti-synd4-RNAi or Lenti-null. Cell migration was observed in a 2D-chemotaxis slide with a stable gradient of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for 18 h using time-lapse microscopy. Synd4 knockdown HUVECs showed reduced mobility compared with the control. In animal studies, Matrigel premixed with bFGF was used to induce the migration of ECs. The cells migrated less distance from the skin in the Matrigel plugs of synd4 null mice compared with the control mice. Then recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene (Ad-synd4) or null (Ad-null) were constructed to enhance the synd4 expression of migratory cells in Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice. Migratory cells with synd4 overexpression did not invade further in the Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice, but showed a high ability to proliferate. PMID:27541034

  5. A supplemented soft agar chemotaxis assay demonstrates the Helicobacter pylori chemotactic response to zinc and nickel

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Lisa; Andermann, Tessa M.

    2013-01-01

    Directed motility, or chemotaxis, is required for Helicobacter pylori to establish infection in the stomach, although the full repertoire of this bacterium’s chemotactic responses is not yet known. Here we report that H. pylori responds to zinc as an attractant and nickel as a repellent. To reach this conclusion, we employed both a temporal chemotaxis assay based on bacterial reversals and a supplemented soft agar spatial assay. We refined the temporal assay using a previously described chemorepellent, acid, and found that H. pylori requires rich media with serum to maintain optimal swimming motility. Surprisingly, we found that some strains respond to acid as an attractant, and that the TlpC chemoreceptor correlated with whether acid was sensed as an attractant or repellent. Using this same assay, we detected weak repellent responses to nickel and copper, and a varied response to zinc. We thus developed an alternative spatial chemotactic assay called the supplemented soft agar assay, which utilizes soft agar medium supplemented with the test compound. With Escherichia coli, the attractant serine slowed overall bacterial migration, while the repellent nickel increased the speed of overall migration. In H. pylori we detected slowed migration with doubled tryptone media, as well as zinc, consistent with an attractant response. In contrast, nickel increased migration, consistent with repulsion. PMID:23139399

  6. Distinct CCR7 glycosylation pattern shapes receptor signaling and endocytosis to modulate chemotactic responses.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Mark A; Kindinger, Ilona; Laufer, Julia M; Späte, Anne-Katrin; Bucher, Delia; Vanes, Sarah L; Krueger, Wolfgang A; Wittmann, Valentin; Legler, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 and their common cognate chemokine receptor CCR7 orchestrate immune cell trafficking by eliciting distinct signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that human CCR7 is N-glycosylated on 2 specific residues in the N terminus and the third extracellular loop. Conceptually, CCR7 glycosylation adds steric hindrance to the receptor N terminus and extracellular loop 3, acting as a "swinging door" to regulate receptor sensitivity and cell migration. We found that freshly isolated human B cells, as well as expanded T cells, but not naïve T cells, express highly sialylated CCR7. Moreover, we identified that human dendritic cells imprint T cell migration toward CCR7 ligands by secreting enzymes that deglycosylate CCR7, thereby boosting CCR7 signaling on T cells, permitting enhanced T cell locomotion, while simultaneously decreasing receptor endocytosis. In addition, dendritic cells proteolytically convert immobilized CCL21 to a soluble form that is more potent in triggering chemotactic movement and does not desensitize the receptor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that soluble CCL21 functionally resembles neither the CCL19 nor the CCL21 phenotype but acts as a chemokine with unique features. Thus, we advance the concept of dendritic cell-dependent generation of micromilieus and lymph node conditioning by demonstrating a novel layer of CCR7 regulation through CCR7 sialylation. In summary, we demonstrate that leukocyte subsets express distinct patterns of CCR7 sialylation that contribute to receptor signaling and fine-tuning chemotactic responses. PMID:26819318

  7. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Alan K.; Baldor, Linda C.; Hogan, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement. PMID:16176981

  8. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-01

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  9. Association of calprotectin with leukocyte chemotactic and inflammatory mediators following acute aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Arun; Slusher, Aaron L; Zourdos, Michael C; Whitehurst, Michael; Fico, Brandon G; Huang, Chun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether acute aerobic exercise-mediated calprotectin in plasma would be associated with monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in healthy individuals. Eleven healthy participants, aged 18 to 30 years, were recruited to perform a 30-min bout of aerobic exercise at 75% maximal oxygen uptake. Acute aerobic exercise elicited a significant elevation across time in plasma calprotectin, MCP-1, MPO, and IL-6. Body mass index (BMI) was positively correlated with calprotectin area-under-the-curve with "respect to increase" (AUCi) and IL-6 AUCi. Furthermore, calprotectin AUCi was positively correlated with IL-6 AUCi and MPO AUCi, even after controlling for BMI. Although MPO AUCi was positively correlated with IL-6 AUCi, this relationship no longer existed after controlling for BMI. These results suggest that acute aerobic exercise could mediate innate immune response associated with calprotectin and its related leukocyte chemotactic and inflammatory mediators, especially in individuals with elevated BMI.

  10. Syndecan-4 regulates the bFGF-induced chemotactic migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wu, Han; Xie, Jun; Li, Guannan; Gu, Rong; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-10-01

    Chemotactic migration of endothelial cells (ECs) guided by extracellular attractants is essential for blood vessel formation. Synd4 is a ubiquitous heparin sulfate proteoglycan receptor on the cell surface that has been identified to promote angiogenesis during tissue repair. Here, the role synd4 played in chemotactic migration of ECs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with Lenti-synd4-RNAi or Lenti-null. Cell migration was observed in a 2D-chemotaxis slide with a stable gradient of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for 18 h using time-lapse microscopy. Synd4 knockdown HUVECs showed reduced mobility compared with the control. In animal studies, Matrigel premixed with bFGF was used to induce the migration of ECs. The cells migrated less distance from the skin in the Matrigel plugs of synd4 null mice compared with the control mice. Then recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene (Ad-synd4) or null (Ad-null) were constructed to enhance the synd4 expression of migratory cells in Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice. Migratory cells with synd4 overexpression did not invade further in the Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice, but showed a high ability to proliferate.

  11. Video processing analysis for the determination and evaluation of the chemotactic response in bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Nisenbaum, Melina; Maldonado, Emilio; Martínez Arca, Jorge; González, Jorge F; Passoni, Lucía I; Murialdo, Silvia E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to design a methodology based on video processing to obtain indicators of bacterial population motility that allow the quantitative and qualitative analysis and comparison of the chemotactic phenomenon with different attractants in the agarose-in plug bridge method. Video image sequences were processed applying Shannon's entropy to the intensity time series of each pixel, which conducted to a final pseudo colored image resembling a map of the dynamic bacterial clusters. Processed images could discriminate perfectly between positive and negative attractant responses at different periods of time from the beginning of the assay. An index of spatial and temporal motility was proposed to quantify the bacterial response. With this index, this video processing method allowed obtaining quantitative information of the dynamic changes in space and time from a traditional qualitative assay. We conclude that this computational technique, applied to the traditional agarose-in plug assay, has demonstrated good sensitivity for identifying chemotactic regions with a broad range of motility. PMID:27291715

  12. Video processing analysis for the determination and evaluation of the chemotactic response in bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Nisenbaum, Melina; Maldonado, Emilio; Martínez Arca, Jorge; González, Jorge F; Passoni, Lucía I; Murialdo, Silvia E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to design a methodology based on video processing to obtain indicators of bacterial population motility that allow the quantitative and qualitative analysis and comparison of the chemotactic phenomenon with different attractants in the agarose-in plug bridge method. Video image sequences were processed applying Shannon's entropy to the intensity time series of each pixel, which conducted to a final pseudo colored image resembling a map of the dynamic bacterial clusters. Processed images could discriminate perfectly between positive and negative attractant responses at different periods of time from the beginning of the assay. An index of spatial and temporal motility was proposed to quantify the bacterial response. With this index, this video processing method allowed obtaining quantitative information of the dynamic changes in space and time from a traditional qualitative assay. We conclude that this computational technique, applied to the traditional agarose-in plug assay, has demonstrated good sensitivity for identifying chemotactic regions with a broad range of motility.

  13. Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Victoria, G. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-02-01

    The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

  14. Computational modeling of chemotactic signaling and aggregation of microglia around implantation site during deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silchenko, A. N.; Tass, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    It is well established that prolonged electrical stimulation of brain tissue causes massive release of ATP in the extracellular space. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A and A2A adenosine receptors. The size of the sheath around the electrode formed by the microglial cells is an important criterion for the optimization of the parameters of electrical current delivered to brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards the implanted electrode during deep brain stimulation. We present a computational model describing formation of a stable aggregate around the implantation site due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP together with a mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The model was built in accordance with the classical Keller-Segel approach and includes an equation for the cells' density as well as equations describing the hydrolysis of extracellular ATP via successive reaction steps ATP →ADP →AMP →adenosine. The results of our modeling allowed us to reveal the dependence of the width of the encapsulating layer around the electrode on the amount of ATP released due to permanent electrical stimulation. The dependences of the aggregates' size on the parameter governing the nonlinearity of interaction between extracellular adenosine and adenosine receptors are also analyzed.

  15. Identification criteria of the rare multi-flagellate Lophomonas blattarum: comparison of different staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Alam-Eldin, Yosra Hussein; Abdulaziz, Amany Mamdouh

    2015-09-01

    Bronchopulmonary lophomoniasis (BPL) is an emerging disease of potential importance. BPL is presented by non-specific clinical picture and is usually accompanied by immunosuppression. Culture of Lophomonas blattarum is difficult and its molecular diagnosis has not yet been developed. Therefore, microscopic examination of respiratory samples, e.g., bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or sputum, is the mainstay of BPL diagnosis. Creola bodies and ciliocytophthoria are two forms of bronchial cells which occur in chest diseases with non-specific clinical picture like that of BPL. Both forms could be misrecognized as multi-flagellates because of their motile cilia in the wet mounts and due to shape variability of L. blattarum in stained smears. The aim of the study is to compare different staining techniques for visualizing L. blattarum to improve the recognition and diagnosis of BPL, to distinguish respiratory epithelial cells from L. blattarum and to decide which stain is recommended in suspected cases of BPL. BAL samples from patients which contain L. blattarum, creola bodies, and ciliocytophthoria were collected then wet mounts were examined. The BAL samples were also stained by Papanicolaou (PAP), Giemsa, hematoxylin and eosin (H & E), trichrome, Gram, and Diff-Quik (DQ) stains. The different staining techniques were compared regarding the stain quality. In wet mounts, the ciliary movement was coordinate and synchronous while the flagellar movement was wavy and leaded to active swimming of L. blattarum. In stained slides, bronchial cells were characterized by the presence of basal nucleus and the terminal bar from which the cilia arise. Trichrome was the best stain in demonstration of cellular details of L. blattarum. H & E, PAP, and Giemsa stains showed good quality of stains. Gram and DQ stains showed only pale hues of L. blattarum. We recommended adding Wheatley's trichrome staining to the differential diagnosis workup of cases of non-specific chest infections

  16. Improvement of silver impregnation technique (protargol) to obtain morphological features of protists ciliates, flagellates and opalinates.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Neto, I D

    2000-08-01

    The research on ciliates, flagelates and opalinates have been widespread by the utilization of techniques employing silver impregnation (protargol), modified by several authors. However, these are time consuming and its results are variable. The present work is a variant of the technique described by Tuffrau (1964, 1967) showing some adaptations made in our laboratory. The organisms can be preserved by different fixatives (alcoholic Bouin, Stieve's fluid, 2.5% glutaraldehyde and others) and then rinsed in destilled water followed by a fast clarification by 3% sodium hypochloride. If the organism is very sensitive to hypochloride, 4% sodium lauryl sulfate may be used and then washed 3 times in distilled water. The protista can be adhered to the glass slides with Mayer's glycerinated-albumin (1 glycerin vol. to 1 or 2 albumin vol.), diluted in water at a proportion of 1:10 Cv/v., or with 1% polylysine followed by fast washes with distilled water. After the slide preparation, they were covered with a layer of 0,8% Silver proteinate. Right after that, the slide has to be placed in a glass tray lined with moist tissue and covered to prevent the proteinate to dry. The tray was placed in a incubator at 40 degrees - 50 degrees C for 30 minutes. The slides are rinsed for 1 minute. with warm (35 degrees C) distilled water. The development of the material should be done with 0.4% hydroquinone with a maximum incubation time of 1 minute. It should be developed gradually, controlling the silver impregnation intensity by observation under optical microscope. Next, rinse in distilled water for 1 minute, and then, fix in 2,5% Sodium thiosulfate. Rinse the slide for two minutes before dehydrating it in an alcoholic serial 50-100 degrees. Finally rinse the slides in xylene. Mount the slides with Entellan MerckTM or Canada balsam.

  17. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, A.; Terrado, R.; Thaler, M.; Comeau, A. M.; Medrinal, E.; Lovejoy, C.

    2013-02-01

    The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL) in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8-20 μm cell diameter), mostly phagotrophic protists in the pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) layer. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL across a wide region, and down the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada), targeting the surface, the SCM and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1) to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly implied that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  18. Evolutionary relationships among "jakobid" flagellates as indicated by alpha- and beta-tubulin phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Edgcomb, V P; Roger, A J; Simpson, A G; Kysela, D T; Sogin, M L

    2001-04-01

    Jakobids are free-living, heterotrophic flagellates that might represent early-diverging mitochondrial protists. They share ultrastructural similarities with eukaryotes that occupy basal positions in molecular phylogenies, and their mitochondrial genome architecture is eubacterial-like, suggesting a close affinity with the ancestral alpha-proteobacterial symbiont that gave rise to mitochondria and hydrogenosomes. To elucidate relationships among jakobids and other early-diverging eukaryotic lineages, we characterized alpha- and beta-tubulin genes from four jakobids: Jakoba libera, Jakoba incarcerata, Reclinomonas americana (the "core jakobids"), and Malawimonas jakobiformis. These are the first reports of nuclear genes from these organisms. Phylogenies based on alpha-, beta-, and combined alpha- plus beta-tubulin protein data sets do not support the monophyly of the jakobids. While beta-tubulin and combined alpha- plus beta-tubulin phylogenies showed a sister group relationship between J. libera and R. americana, the two other jakobids, M. jakobiformis and J. incarcerata, had unclear affinities. In all three analyses, J. libera, R. americana, and M. jakobiformis emerged from within a well-supported large "plant-protist" clade that included plants, green algae, cryptophytes, stramenopiles, alveolates, Euglenozoa, Heterolobosea, and several other protist groups, but not animals, fungi, microsporidia, parabasalids, or diplomonads. A preferred branching order within the plant-protist clade was not identified, but there was a tendency for the J. libera-R. americana lineage to group with a clade made up of the heteroloboseid amoeboflagellates and euglenozoan protists. Jakoba incarcerata branched within the plant-protist clade in the beta- and the combined alpha- plus beta-tubulin phylogenies. In alpha- tubulin trees, J. incarcerata occupied an unresolved position, weakly grouping with the animal/fungal/microsporidian group or with amitochondriate parabasalid and

  19. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, A.; Terrado, R.; Thaler, M.; Comeau, A.; Medrinal, E.; Lovejoy, C.

    2013-06-01

    The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL) in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8-20 μm cell diameter), mostly phagotrophic protists in the upper pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer, where light and nutrients are both available. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL from different water masses within the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada), targeting the surface, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer (SCM) and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1) to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly suggested that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate-driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  20. The Structure of the Mitotic Spindle and Nucleolus during Mitosis in the Amebo-Flagellate Naegleria

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Mitosis in the amebo-flagellate Naegleria pringsheimi is acentrosomal and closed (the nuclear membrane does not break down). The large central nucleolus, which occupies about 20% of the nuclear volume, persists throughout the cell cycle. At mitosis, the nucleolus divides and moves to the poles in association with the chromosomes. The structure of the mitotic spindle and its relationship to the nucleolus are unknown. To identify the origin and structure of the mitotic spindle, its relationship to the nucleolus and to further understand the influence of persistent nucleoli on cellular division in acentriolar organisms like Naegleria, three-dimensional reconstructions of the mitotic spindle and nucleolus were carried out using confocal microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies against three different nucleolar regions and α-tubulin were used to image the nucleolus and mitotic spindle. Microtubules were restricted to the nucleolus beginning with the earliest prophase spindle microtubules. Early spindle microtubules were seen as short rods on the surface of the nucleolus. Elongation of the spindle microtubules resulted in a rough cage of microtubules surrounding the nucleolus. At metaphase, the mitotic spindle formed a broad band completely embedded within the nucleolus. The nucleolus separated into two discreet masses connected by a dense band of microtubules as the spindle elongated. At telophase, the distal ends of the mitotic spindle were still completely embedded within the daughter nucleoli. Pixel by pixel comparison of tubulin and nucleolar protein fluorescence showed 70% or more of tubulin co-localized with nucleolar proteins by early prophase. These observations suggest a model in which specific nucleolar binding sites for microtubules allow mitotic spindle formation and attachment. The fact that a significant mass of nucleolar material precedes the chromosomes as the mitotic spindle elongates suggests that spindle elongation drives nucleolar division. PMID:22493714

  1. [Effect of low-frequency ultrasound on the chemotactic and phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages in rats].

    PubMed

    Kochemasova, Z N; Davydova, N V; Matveeva, E A; Dratvin, S A; Lobashevskiĭ, A L

    1983-12-01

    The influence of low-frequency ultrasound on the chemotactic, ingestive and digestive activity of peritoneal macrophages in rats was studied. The intraoperative treatment of the peritoneum with ultrasound enhanced chemotactic activity 3.3-fold in comparison with that in the control animals. The digestive function of peritoneal macrophages considerably increased, the stimulation of their ingestive capacity also occurred. The activation of the phagocytic function of macrophages was observed within 7 days after a single sonar treatment. The authors believe that the stimulation of the macrophage system is probably one of the mechanisms of the sanative action of ultrasound which is used at present in purulent surgery.

  2. EST analysis of the scaly green flagellate Mesostigma viride (Streptophyta): Implications for the evolution of green plants (Viridiplantae)

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Andreas; Glöckner, Gernot; Felder, Marius; Melkonian, Michael; Becker, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    Background The Viridiplantae (land plants and green algae) consist of two monophyletic lineages, the Chlorophyta and the Streptophyta. The Streptophyta include all embryophytes and a small but diverse group of freshwater algae traditionally known as the Charophyceae (e.g. Charales, Coleochaete and the Zygnematales). The only flagellate currently included in the Streptophyta is Mesostigma viride Lauterborn. To gain insight into the genome evolution in streptophytes, we have sequenced 10,395 ESTs from Mesostigma representing 3,300 independent contigs and compared the ESTs of Mesostigma with available plant genomes (Arabidopsis, Oryza, Chlamydomonas), with ESTs from the bryophyte Physcomitrella, the genome of the rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon, the ESTs from the rhodophyte Porphyra, and the genome of the diatom Thalassiosira. Results The number of expressed genes shared by Mesostigma with the embryophytes (90.3 % of the expressed genes showing similarity to known proteins) is higher than with Chlamydomonas (76.1 %). In general, cytosolic metabolic pathways, and proteins involved in vesicular transport, transcription, regulation, DNA-structure and replication, cell cycle control, and RNA-metabolism are more conserved between Mesostigma and the embryophytes than between Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas. However, plastidic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways, cytoskeletal proteins and proteins involved in protein folding are more conserved between Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas than between Mesostigma and the embryophytes. Conclusion Our EST-analysis of Mesostigma supports the notion that this organism should be a suitable unicellular model for the last flagellate common ancestor of the streptophytes. Mesostigma shares more genes with the embryophytes than with the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, although both organisms are flagellate unicells. Thus, it seems likely that several major physiological changes (e.g. in the regulation of photosynthesis and photorespiration

  3. Toll-like receptor 5 is not essential for the promotion of secretory immunoglobulin A antibody responses to flagellated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptor 5 recognizes bacterial flagellin, plays a critical role in innate immunity, and contributes to flagellin-specific humoral immunity. Further, TLR5-expressing dendritic cells play an important role in IgA synthesis in the intestine; however, the contribution of TLR5 to antigen (Ag)-specific mucosal immunity remains unclear. Thus, whether TLR5 is essential for the induction of intestinal secretory (S)IgA antibody (Ab) responses against flagellin and bacterial Ags attached to the bacterial surface in response to an oral flagellated bacterium, Salmonella, was explored in this study. Our results indicate that when TLR5 knockout (TLR5(-/-)) mice are orally immunized with recombinant Salmonella expressing fragment C of tetanus toxin (rSalmonella-Tox C), tetanus toxoid (TT)- and flagellin (FliC)-specific systemic IgG and intestinal SIgA Abs are elicited. The numbers of TT-specific IgG Ab-forming cells (AFCs) in the spleen and IgA AFCs in the lamina propria (LP) of TLR5(-/-) mice were comparable to those in wild-type mice. rSalmonella-Tox C was equally disseminated in TLR5(-/-) mice, TLR5(-/-) mice lacking Peyer's patches (PPs), and wild-type mice. In contrast, TLR5(-/-) PP-null mice failed to induce TT- and FliC-specific SIgA Abs in the intestine and showed significantly reduced numbers of TT-specific IgA AFCs in the LP. These results suggest that TLR5 is dispensable for the induction of flagellin and surface Ag-specific systemic and mucosal immunity against oral flagellated bacteria. Rather, pathogen recognition, which occurs in PPs, is a prerequisite for the induction of mucosal immunity against flagellated bacteria. PMID:26564803

  4. Pirsonia guinardiae, gen. et spec. nov.: A parasitic flagellate on the marine diatom Guinardia flaccida with an unusual mode of food uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, E.; Drebes, G.; Elbrächter, M.

    1990-06-01

    Pirsonia guinardiae gen. et spec. nov. was discovered as a parasite on Guinardia flaccida in the North Sea near List/Sylt during a bloom of this centric planktonic diatom. It is a colourless, small flagellate with an oblique cell apex and two subapically inserting flagella of different length and different orientation. The flagellates attach to a host cell and form an antapical process which pierces the diatom frustule and develops inside into a “trophosome”, consisting of a proximal digestion vacuole and distal pseudopodia which phagocytise host cytoplasm. The main body, the “auxosome”, remains outside the host cell. The trophosome persists for some time after the detachment of the auxosome or its derivatives. There are two types of Pirsonia guinardiae. Type A attaches to the valvae as well as to the girdle region, the auxosome remains flagellated and generally detaches after the feeding process to divide twice (seldom 3 times). Thick-walled (resting?) cysts are formed. Occasionally, a fusion of two sister cells has been observed. Type B attaches only to the valvae; the auxosome lacks flagella; it divides during the feeding process to give rise to a bouquet of 8 to more than 50 daughter cells which become flagellated when they detach. The taxonomical position of the flagellate is discussed. Diagnoses of genus and species are given.

  5. Diversity of cultured photosynthetic flagellates in the North East Pacific and Arctic Oceans in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzano, S.; Gourvil, P.; Siano, R.; Chanoine, M.; Marie, D.; Lessard, S.; Sarno, D.; Vaulot, D.

    2012-06-01

    During the MALINA cruise (summer 2009) an extensive effort was undertaken to isolate phytoplankton strains from the North East (NE) Pacific Ocean, the Bering Strait, and the Beaufort Sea. Strains were isolated by flow cytometry sorting (FCS) and pipetting before or after phytoplankton enrichment of seawater samples. Strains were isolated both onboard and back in the laboratory and cultured at 4 °C under light/dark conditions. Overall, we isolated and characterised by light microscopy and 18S rRNA gene sequencing 104 strains of photosynthetic flagellates which grouped into 21 genotypes (defined by 99.5% 18S rRNA gene sequence similarity) mainly affiliated to Chlorophyta and Heterokontophyta. The taxon most frequently isolated was an Arctic ecotype of the green algal genus Micromonas (Arctic Micromonas) which was almost the only phytoplankter recovered within picoplankton (≤ 2 μm) size range. Strains of Arctic Micromonas as well as three unidentified strains related to the same genus were identified in further details by sequencing the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA operon. The MALINA Micromonas strains share identical 18S rRNA and ITS sequences suggesting high genetic homogeneity within Arctic Micromonas. The unidentified strains form a genotype likely belonging to a new genus within the family Mamiellaceae to which Micromonas belongs. Other green algae genotypes from the genera Nephroselmis, Chlamydomonas, Pyramimonas were also isolated whereas Heterokontophyta included Pelagophyceae, Dictyochophyceae and Chrysophyceae. Dictyochophyceae included Pedinellales which could not be identified to the genus level whereas Chrysophyceae comprised Dinobryon faculiferum. Moreover, we isolated Rhodomonas sp. as well as a few Haptophyta and dinoflagellates. We identified the dinoflagellate Woloszynskia cincta by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and 28S rRNA gene sequencing. Our morphological analyses show that this species possess the diagnostic

  6. Diversity of cultured photosynthetic flagellates in the northeast Pacific and Arctic Oceans in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzano, S.; Gourvil, P.; Siano, R.; Chanoine, M.; Marie, D.; Lessard, S.; Sarno, D.; Vaulot, D.

    2012-11-01

    During the MALINA cruise (summer 2009), an extensive effort was undertaken to isolate phytoplankton strains from the northeast (NE) Pacific Ocean, the Bering Strait, the Chukchi Sea, and the Beaufort Sea. In order to characterise the main photosynthetic microorganisms occurring in the Arctic during the summer season, strains were isolated by flow cytometry sorting (FCS) and single cell pipetting before or after phytoplankton enrichment of seawater samples. Strains were isolated both onboard and back in the laboratory and cultured at 4 °C under light/dark conditions. Overall, we isolated and characterised by light microscopy and 18 S rRNA gene sequencing 104 strains of photosynthetic flagellates which grouped into 21 genotypes (defined by 99.5% 18 S rRNA gene sequence similarity), mainly affiliated to Chlorophyta and Heterokontophyta. The taxon most frequently isolated was an Arctic ecotype of the green algal genus Micromonas (Arctic Micromonas), which was nearly the only phytoplankter recovered within the picoplankton (< 2 μm) size range. Strains of Arctic Micromonas as well as other strains from the same class (Mamiellophyceae) were identified in further detail by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA operon. The MALINA Micromonas strains share identical 18 S rRNA and ITS sequences suggesting high genetic homogeneity within Arctic Micromonas. Three other Mamiellophyceae strains likely belong to a new genus. Other green algae from the genera Nephroselmis, Chlamydomonas, and Pyramimonas were also isolated, whereas Heterokontophyta included some unidentified Pelagophyceae, Dictyochophyceae (Pedinellales), and Chrysophyceae (Dinobryon faculiferum). Moreover, we isolated some Cryptophyceae (Rhodomonas sp.) as well as a few Prymnesiophyceae and dinoflagellates. We identified the dinoflagellate Woloszynskia cincta by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 28 S rRNA gene sequencing. Our morphological analyses show that this species possess

  7. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525].

  8. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525]. PMID:27502013

  9. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency reduces spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is a risk factor for cancer. Adipose tissue produces pro-inflammatory adipokines that contribute obesity-related malignant progression. This study investigated the effects of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) deficiency on pulmonary metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male C57...

  10. A 'chemotactic dipole' mechanism for large-scale vortex motion during primitive streak formation in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Sandersius, S A; Chuai, M; Weijer, C J; Newman, T J

    2011-08-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves significant coordinated cell movement lateral to the streak, in addition to the posterior-anterior movement of cells in the streak proper. Cells lateral to the streak are observed to undergo 'polonaise movements', i.e. two large counter-rotating vortices, reminiscent of eddies in a fluid. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for these movement patterns which relies on chemotactic signals emitted by a dipolar configuration of cells in the posterior region of the epiblast. The 'chemotactic dipole' consists of adjacent regions of cells emitting chemo-attractants and chemo-repellents. We motivate this idea using a mathematical analogy between chemotaxis and electrostatics, and test this idea using large-scale computer simulations. We implement active cell response to both neighboring mechanical interactions and chemotactic gradients using the Subcellular Element Model. Simulations show the emergence of large-scale vortices of cell movement. The length and time scales of vortex formation are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We also provide quantitative estimates for the robustness of the chemotaxis dipole mechanism, which indicate that the mechanism has an error tolerance of about 10% to variation in chemotactic parameters, assuming that only 1% of the cell population is involved in emitting signals. This tolerance increases for larger populations of cells emitting signals.

  11. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen stimulates production of chemotactic factors and inflammatory cytokines by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, N; Yamashita, Y; Ikeda, D; Koga, T

    1996-01-01

    Serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen (SPA) was extracted from whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by autoclaving and purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and Sephacryl S-300. SPA induced the release of monocyte and leukocyte chemotactic factors by human monocytes. Polymyxin B had almost no effect on the release of monocyte chemotactic factor, but a monoclonal antibody against SPA markedly inhibited it. Human monocytes stimulated with SPA exhibited the increased mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and a neutrophil chemotactic factor, interleukin-8 (IL-8). On the other hand, SPA induced the release of IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and enhanced the expression of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Human monocytes expressed MCP-1 and IL-8 mRNAs when stimulated by human recombinant IL-1alpha, I1-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, suggesting that these inflammatory cytokines induced by SPA might participate in the production of chemotactic factors in human monocytes. PMID:8698480

  12. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Jose M; Basheer, Haneen A; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC-19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC-19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  13. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Basheer, Haneen A.; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D.; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC–19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC–19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  14. Biodegradation of naphthalene and anthracene by chemo-tactically active rhizobacteria of populus deltoides

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Sandeep; Pandey, Piyush; Sood, Anchal; Sharma, Shivesh; Bisht, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Several naphthalene and anthracene degrading bacteria were isolated from rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, which were growing in non-contaminated soil. Among these, four isolates, i.e. Kurthia sp., Micrococcus varians, Deinococcus radiodurans and Bacillus circulans utilized chrysene, benzene, toluene and xylene, in addition to anthracene and naphthalene. Kurthia sp and B. circulans showed positive chemotactic response for naphthalene and anthracene. The mean growth rate constant (K) of isolates were found to increase with successive increase in substrate concentration (0.5 to 1.0 mg/50ml). B. circulans SBA12 and Kurthia SBA4 degraded 87.5% and 86.6% of anthracene while, Kurthia sp. SBA4, B. circulans SBA12, and M. varians SBA8 degraded 85.3 %, 95.8 % and 86.8 % of naphthalene respectively after 6 days of incubation as determined by HPLC analysis. PMID:24031572

  15. Ozone inhalation stimulates expression of a neutrophil chemotactic protein, macrophage inflammatory protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, K.E.; Simpson, L.; Carter, J.; Hassenbein, D.; Leikauf, G.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Short-term exposure of humans and animals to ozone results in increased lung neutrophils; however, the mechanisms underlying this response are not completely understood. We examined the potential involvement of the neutrophil chemotactic factor, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), in ozone-induced inflammation. Exposure-response relationships for ozone and MIP-2 expression were characterized by exposing C57B1/6 mice to 0.1-2 ppm ozone for 3 hr and determining lung levels of MIP-2 mRNA 6 hr after exposure. Temporal relationships between ozone and MIP-2 were determined by exposing mice (2 ppm ozone x 3 hr) and characterizing MIP-2 mRNA expression 0, 2, 6, and 24 hr after exposure. Neutrophils in lung lavage fluid were determined in both exposure-response and time course studies. Ozone concentrations > or = 1.0 ppm increased MIP-2 mRNA and this increase corresponded with recruitment of neutrophils. MIP-2 mRNA was increased immediately after ozone exposure and decreased to control levels by 24 hr. To examine the role of direct oxidant effects in ozone-induced MIP-2 expression, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro for 4 hr to 10(-10)-10(-5) M hydrogen peroxide and MIP-2 expression was characterized. MIP-2 mRNA levels in lung macrophages were increased by > or = 10(-9) M hydrogen peroxide. In summary, our findings suggest the chemotactic protein MIP-2 may be responsible, at least in part, for ozone-induced increases in lung neutrophils and indicate that direct exposure of alveolar macrophages to an oxidant is sufficient to induce MIP-2 expression.

  16. Chemotactic effect of odorants and tastants on the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Láng, Júlia; Rákász, Virág; Magyar, Anna; Pállinger, Éva; Kohidai, László

    2011-12-01

    Naturally occurring aroma compounds are able to elicit physiological and migratory responses such as chemotaxis even at nano to femtomolar concentrations in organisms at different levels of phylogeny. Despite the amazing chemical variety of these substances the apparatus by which they can be detected i.e. the chemosensory receptors and the signaling pathways seem to be rather uniform and evolutionary well-conserved. The intracellular signaling process is supposed to be mediated by either cAMP or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The present work aimed to investigate the chemotactic behavior of 11 odorants that occur naturally in foods and are also used by the industry as additives, on the eukaryotic ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Intracellular signaling pathways that might be activated by these compounds were also investigated. Activation of the phospholipase C (PLC) was measured by FACS and the stimulation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinases (IP3K) was measured using two specific inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002. The strongest chemoattractant character was observed for isoamyl acetate (10(⁻6) M), propyl isobutyrate (10(⁻8) M), isobutyl propionate (10(⁻6) M). The strongest repellent action was exerted by benzyl acetate (10(⁻8) M), furfuryl thioacetate (10(⁻12) M). Our results suggest that Tetrahymena responds in a very sensitive way to slight changes in the molecular structure. According to our study, tracer amounts of solvents do not contribute significantly to the chemotactic profile of the respective odorants. No significant activation of PLC or PI3K could be observed following stimulation with attractant odorants which implies that some other pathways may be involved, hence further investigation is needed. PMID:22070385

  17. Binding of formyl peptides to Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells and the chemotactic response of these cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, D.C.; Orr, F.W.; Shiu, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    N-Formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) induces chemotaxis in leukocytes, the response being mediated by peptide binding to a receptor on the plasma membrane. In tumor cells, this peptide has been reported to induce cellular swelling and chemotaxis in vitro and to enhance the localization of circulating tumor cells in vivo. In the Boyden chamber, the authors evaluated the migratory responses of Walker carcinosarcoma 256 cells to varying concentrations of fMLP. Sigmoidal dose-response curves were obtained with the dose of chemotactic factor that elicits a half-maximal chemotactic response of 5.0 +/- 2.5 X 10(-8) M. Checkerboard analysis indicated that these responses were dependent upon a concentration gradient of fMLP with increases in migration of circa 2 to 2.5 times that of random movement. To examine the binding of fMLP, the tumor cells were incubated with 5 X 10(-9) M fML-(/sup 3/H)P in Hanks balanced salt solution. Specific binding (0.5 to 1% of total radioligand, to whole cells inhibited by 5 X 10(-6) M fMLP) approached equilibrium after 4 to 6 h at 4 degrees C and after 6 to 10 h at 22 degrees C. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated heterogeneous binding of the peptide by tumor cells and also showed its intracellular localization. In homogenates of Walker cells prepared in 0.1 M Tris HCl, pH 7.4, with 10 mM MgCl2 and bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml), specific binding of approximately 0.5% of total fML-(/sup 3/H)P reached equilibrium after 60 min at 4 degrees C. In whole cells and homogenates, binding was reversible by addition of unlabeled fMLP.

  18. Enhanced production of monocyte chemotactic protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, J; Lorentz, A; Goke, M; Meier, P; Flemming, P; Dahinden, C; Manns, M; Bischoff, S

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The β chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3) has chemoattractant and activating capabilities in monocytes, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. 
AIMS—To investigate MCP-3 expression in inflammatory conditions of the human intestinal mucosa. 
PATIENTS—Forty five colon biopsy specimens from 18patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; 16 specimens from inflamed and 10 from non-inflamed areas) and 19 control patients were examined. 
METHODS—Immunohistochemical staining and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used for MCP-3 detection in tissue sections. Intestinal epithelial cell lines (HT-29, Caco-2, T-84) were stimulated with interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and examined for MCP-3 protein and mRNA expression using immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR, respectively. 
RESULTS—In tissue sections, MCP-3 protein was detected predominantly in epithelial cells, both in patients with IBD and in controls. MCP-3 staining was particularly pronounced at sites of active mucosal inflammation. The intensity of MCP-3 staining was positively correlated with the extent of epithelial destruction. In intestinal epithelial cell lines, MCP-3 mRNA was expressed, whereas MCP-3 protein was not consistently detected. 
CONCLUSIONS—Our data show that MCP-3 protein is present in normal and inflamed intestinal tissue. MCP-3 production is substantially enhanced in areas of active inflammation, suggesting an immunoregulatory role of MCP-3 in intestinal inflammation. 

 Keywords: ulcerative colitis; Crohn's disease; epithelial cells; monocyte chemotactic protein 3; chemokines PMID:10205198

  19. The candidate phylum 'Termite Group 1' of bacteria: phylogenetic diversity, distribution, and endosymbiont members of various gut flagellated protists.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Moriya; Sato, Tomoyuki; Noda, Satoko; Ui, Sadaharu; Kudo, Toshiaki; Hongoh, Yuichi

    2007-06-01

    The candidate phylum 'Termite Group 1' (TG1) of bacteria, which is abundant in termite guts but has no culturable representative, was investigated with respect to the in situ localization, distribution, and diversity. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and FISH in termite guts, a number of lineages of TG1 members were identified as endosymbionts of a variety of gut flagellated protists from the orders Trichonymphida, Cristamonadida, and Oxymonadida that are mostly unique to termites. However, the survey in various environments using specific PCR primers revealed that TG1 members were also present in termites, a cockroach, and the bovine rumen that typically lack these protist orders. Most of the TG1 members from gut flagellates, termites, cockroaches, and the rumen formed a monophyletic subcluster that showed a shallow branching pattern in the phylogenetic tree, suggesting their recent diversification. Although endosymbionts of the same protist genera tended to be closely related, the endosymbiont lineages were often independent of the higher level classifications of their host protist and were dispersed in the phylogenetic tree. It appears that their cospeciation is not the sole rule for the diversification of TG1 members of endosymbionts. PMID:17391329

  20. The dependence of the swimming efficiency of multi-flagellated bacteria on the geometric arrangement of flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, Nobuhiko; Larson, Ronald

    2010-11-01

    Multi-flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, often have flagella attached at random locations to the cell body. To study the effect of the number of flagella and the geometric arrangement of them to the swimming efficiency, we develop a simulation method using a bead-spring model to account for the hydrodynamic and the mechanical interactions between multiple flagella and the cell body. First, a modeled bacterium is constructed using beads, which represent the hydrodynamic drag centers of the geometric elements of the bacterium. This modeled bacterium swims by rotating the flagella with constant torques at the bases of them. We have found that for modeled bacteria with two flagella, the swimming speed varies by 30% depending on the position of the base of the flagellum along the cell body, which affects the tightness of the bundling. We have also found that overly rigid flagella can slow migration by inhibiting flagellar bundling, since bundling requires some adjustment in flagellar shape to compensate for helical phase miss-match produced by irregular flagellar positioning. In general, by changing the geometric arrangement and the number of flagella, our simulation enables us to determine the optimal designing of a flagellated micro-swimmer.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of coordinate changes in flagellar mRNAs during differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amoebae into flagellates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Walsh, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The nuclear run-on technique was used to measure the rate of transcription of flagellar genes during the differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amebae into flagellates. Synthesis of mRNAs for the axonemal proteins ..cap alpha..- and BETA-tubulin and flagellar calmodulin, as well as a coordinately regulated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA that codes for an unidentified protein, showed transient increases averaging 22-fold. The rate of synthesis of two poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs common to ameobae and flagellates was low until the transcription of the flagellar genes began to decline, at which time synthesis of the RNAs found in ameobae increased 3- to 10-fold. The observed changes in the rate of transcription can account quantitatively for the 20-fold increase in flagellar mRNA concentration during the differentiation. The data for the flagellar calmodulin gene demonstrate transcriptional regulation for a nontubulin axonemal protein. The data also demonstrate at least two programs of transcriptional regulation during the differentiation and raise the intriguing possibility that some significant fraction of the nearly 200 different proteins of the flagellar axoneme is transcriptionally regulated during the 1 h it takes N. gruberi amebae to form visible flagella.

  2. Flagellated algae protein evolution suggests the prevalence of lineage-specific rules governing evolutionary rates of eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Yan; Liao, Ben-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the general rules governing the rate of protein evolution is fundamental to evolutionary biology. However, attempts to address this issue in yeasts and mammals have revealed considerable differences in the relative importance of determinants for protein evolutionary rates. This phenomenon was previously explained by the fact that yeasts and mammals are different in many cellular and genomic properties. Flagellated algae species have several cellular and genomic characteristics that are intermediate between yeasts and mammals. Using partial correlation analyses on the evolution of 6,921 orthologous proteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri, we examined factors influencing evolutionary rates of proteins in flagellated algae. Previous studies have shown that mRNA abundance and gene compactness are strong determinants for protein evolutionary rates in yeasts and mammals, respectively. We show that both factors also influence algae protein evolution with mRNA abundance having a larger impact than gene compactness on the rates of algae protein evolution. More importantly, among all the factors examined, coding sequence (CDS) length has the strongest (positive) correlation with protein evolutionary rates. This correlation between CDS length and the rates of protein evolution is not due to alignment-related issues or domain density. These results suggest no simple and universal rules governing protein evolutionary rates across different eukaryotic lineages. Instead, gene properties influence the rate of protein evolution in a lineage-specific manner. PMID:23563973

  3. Tsukubamonas globosa n. gen., n. sp., a novel excavate flagellate possibly holding a key for the early evolution in "Discoba".

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Akinori; Nakayama, Takeshi; Yubuki, Naoji; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Inagaki, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    We report the ultrastructure and phylogenetic position of a free-living heterotrophic flagellate, Tsukubamonas globosa n. gen., n. sp. This flagellate was isolated from a pond in the University of Tsukuba, Japan. Under light microscopy, the spherical vegetative cells were naked and highly vacuolated, and always swam with rotating motion. Electron microscopic observations revealed that T. globosa possessed a ventral feeding groove, which is one of the hallmark characteristics of the supergroup Excavata. The position of T. globosa was unresolved in the small subunit ribosomal RNA phylogeny. On the other hand, a multigene phylogeny using α-tubulin, β-tubulin, actin, heat shock protein 90, and translation elongation factor 2 robustly united T. globosa with members of the "Discoba" clade of Excavata, composed of jakobids, euglenozoans, and heteroloboseans, although the precise position of T. globosa in this clade remained unresolved. Our detailed morphological comparisons elucidated that T. globosa possessed a novel set of morphological features, and could not be classified into any taxa in the Discoba clade. Instead we classified T. globosa into Tsukubamonadidae n. fam. under Tsukubamonadida n. ord.

  4. Benthic flagellates and ciliates in fine freshwater sediments: Calibration of a live counting procedure and estimation of their abundances.

    PubMed

    Gasol, J M

    1993-05-01

    Despite the recognized importance of protozoans (flagellates and ciliates) as predators of bacteria, there are very few estimates of their abundance in fine sediments of freshwater lakes. This is due, in part, to the lack of a standard methodology. Because of the low concentration of protists in relation to particles, epifluorescence counts can not always be used. Instead, dilution followed by live counting was used to solve the masking by sediment particles. One to twenty μ1 sample aliquots were diluted with filtered lake water in a Palmer-Maloney counting slide. Four to eight replicates were sufficient to minimize the counting error, while minimizing effort. The method is highly replicable and could potentially be calibrated for different sediment types because sediment masking depends on the mean particle size of the sediment. When this method was applied in a survey of benthic sites in Quebec lakes, flagellate abundances were found to range from 100 to 180,000 cells ml(-1), while ciliate numbers ranged from 26 to 11,000 cells ml(-1). Bacteria are 105 to 10(7) times more abundant than protists and, thus, the impact of these protists on sediment bacterial dynamics is likely to be minimal.

  5. Primer pairs for the specific environmental detection and T-RFLP analysis of the ubiquitous flagellate taxa Chrysophyceae and Kinetoplastea.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Karin; Kuppardt, Anke; Krohn, Sandra; Heidtmann, Anett; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2014-05-01

    Bacterivorous protists play a key role in microbial soil food webs, however due to the lack of specific PCR protocols targeting selected protist taxa, knowledge on the diversity and dynamics of these groups is scarce. We developed specific PCR primers in combination with a T-RFLP protocol for the cultivation-independent analysis of two important taxa of bacterivorous flagellates, the Chrysophyceae and Kinetoplastea, in soil samples. Sequence analysis of clone libraries originating from two soils in temperate regions demonstrated the specificity of the respective primer pairs. Clone sequences affiliating to the Chrysophyceae mainly clustered within the clade C2, which has been known so far for its presence mainly in cold climatic regions, whereas Kinetoplastea sequences were mainly related to the Neobodonid clade. Based on an in silico restriction analysis of database sequence entries, suitable restriction enzymes for a T-RFLP approach were selected. This in silico approach revealed the necessity to use a combination of two restriction enzymes for T-RFLP analysis of the Chrysophyceae. Soil T-RFLP profiles reflected all T-RFs of the clone library sequences obtained from the same soils and allowed to distinguish flagellate communities from different sites. We propose to use these primer pairs for PCR detection and rapid fingerprint screening in environmental samples and envisage their use also for quantitative PCR or next generation sequencing approaches.

  6. The candidate phylum 'Termite Group 1' of bacteria: phylogenetic diversity, distribution, and endosymbiont members of various gut flagellated protists.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Moriya; Sato, Tomoyuki; Noda, Satoko; Ui, Sadaharu; Kudo, Toshiaki; Hongoh, Yuichi

    2007-06-01

    The candidate phylum 'Termite Group 1' (TG1) of bacteria, which is abundant in termite guts but has no culturable representative, was investigated with respect to the in situ localization, distribution, and diversity. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and FISH in termite guts, a number of lineages of TG1 members were identified as endosymbionts of a variety of gut flagellated protists from the orders Trichonymphida, Cristamonadida, and Oxymonadida that are mostly unique to termites. However, the survey in various environments using specific PCR primers revealed that TG1 members were also present in termites, a cockroach, and the bovine rumen that typically lack these protist orders. Most of the TG1 members from gut flagellates, termites, cockroaches, and the rumen formed a monophyletic subcluster that showed a shallow branching pattern in the phylogenetic tree, suggesting their recent diversification. Although endosymbionts of the same protist genera tended to be closely related, the endosymbiont lineages were often independent of the higher level classifications of their host protist and were dispersed in the phylogenetic tree. It appears that their cospeciation is not the sole rule for the diversification of TG1 members of endosymbionts.

  7. The pathogenic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri: environmental isolations, competitors, ecologic interactions, and the flagellate-empty habitat hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J L

    1983-05-01

    From several surveys of environmental sites, the virulent human pathogen, Naegleria fowleri, was isolated from a pond in Georgia, a sewage treatment plant in Missouri, and from the Potomac and Anacostia rivers near and in Washington, D.C. Widely scattered, sparse populations seemed only a potential threat to human health at the time of sampling. The data support an estimate that the sites sampled contain 10,000 typical, low temperature, bactivorous amoebae for each heat tolerant amoeba able to grow at 45 degrees C. Heat tolerant competitors were much more common than N. fowleri. Naegleria lovaniensis, which is heat tolerant but nonpathogenic, was isolated from and downstream from an open air thermal pollution temperature gradient. Hot piles of composting sewage sludge yielded no amoeboflagellates, many heat tolerant (45-49 degrees C) amoebae, and one thermophilic (52 degrees C) Acanthamoeba. Features of the methods used include two-stage incubation to increase isolation of sparse organisms and distinction of N. fowleri from almost all other amoebae on agar plates. The flagellate-empty habitat hypothesis postulates a general model in which human intervention and/or natural events remove usual competitors and the ability to transform to a motile flagellate confers an advantage in recolonizing.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Endomicrobium proavitum, a Free-Living Relative of the Intracellular Symbionts of Termite Gut Flagellates (Phylum Elusimicrobia)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced the complete genome of Endomicrobium proavitum strain Rsa215, the first isolate of the class Endomicrobia (phylum Elusimicrobia). It is the closest free-living relative of the endosymbionts of termite gut flagellates and thereby provides an excellent model for studying the evolutionary processes during the establishment of an intracellular symbiosis. PMID:26184928

  9. The soil flagellate Proleptomonas faecicola: cell organisation and phylogeny suggest that the only described free-living trypanosomatid is not a kinetoplastid but has cercomonad affinities.

    PubMed

    Vickerman, Keith; Le Ray, Dominique; Hoef-Emden, Kerstin; De Jonckheere, Johan

    2002-03-01

    The only putative free-living trypanosomatid is Proleptomonas faecicola described first by Woodcock in 1916 as a coprophilic flagellate with striking Leptomonas-like flagellar movement but lacking a kinetoplast. P faecicola was later identified by Sandon in 1927 as a widespread non-phagotrophic inhabitant of soils. No division stages were seen by either observer. An organism conforming to Woodcock's light microscope description has been isolated from tapwater and cultivated axenically in various serum-containing media. Division has been shown to occur in an aflagellate stage enclosed in a thin cyst wall. Electron microscopy of the flagellate stage reveals that, in addition to the long locomotory flagellum, a second non-motile flagellum is present attached to the body along its entire length. The flagellate's ultrastructure lacks all the major features of the Trypanosomatidae. The several mitochondria of Proleptomonas have tubular cristae and lie between intracytoplasmic microtubules originating as a loose cone associated with the flagellar basal bodies. This cytoskeleton is much reduced in the division cyst. A comparable Proleptomonas-like flagellate with similar division cysts has been observed in soil samples from farmland. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU rRNA gene sequences suggests that the cultured organism identified here as Proleptomonas is unrelated to the Kinetoplastida and has affinities with the Phylum Cercozoa Cavalier-Smith, even though in morphology, life cycle and mode of feeding it bears little resemblance to any member of that diverse grouping. PMID:12022280

  10. Interventional procedure based on nanorobots propelled and steered by flagellated magnetotactic bacteria for direct targeting of tumors in the human body.

    PubMed

    Martel, Sylvain; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste

    2008-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria used as bio-actuators may prove to be efficient propulsion mechanisms for future hybrid medical nanorobots when operating in the microvasculature. Here, we briefly describe a medical interventional procedure where flagellated bacteria and more specifically MC-1 Magnetotactic Bacteria (MTB) can be used to propel and steer micro-devices and nanorobots under computer control to reach remote locations in the human body. In particular, we show through experimental results the potential of using MTB-tagged robots to deliver therapeutic agents to tumors even the ones located in deep regions of the human body. We also show that such bacterial nanorobots can be tracked inside the human body for enhanced targeting under computer guidance using MRI as imaging modality. MTB can not only be guided and controlled directly towards a specific target, but we also show experimentally that these flagellated bacterial nanorobots can be propelled and steered in vivo deeply through the interstitial region of a tumor. The targeting efficacy is increased when combined with larger ferromagnetic micro-carriers being propelled by magnetic gradients generated by a MRI platform to carry and release nanorobots propelled by a single flagellated bacterium near the arteriocapillar entry. Based on the experimental data obtained and the experience gathered during several experiments conducted in vivo with this new approach, a general medical interventional procedure is briefly described here in a biomedical engineering context.

  11. A survey of flagellate diversity at four deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Eastern Pacific Ocean using structural and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Atkins, M S; Teske, A P; Anderson, O R

    2000-01-01

    Eighteen strains of flagellated protists representing nine species were isolated and cultured from four deep-sea hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge (2,200 m), Guaymas Basin (2,000 m), 21 degrees N (2,550 m) and 9 degrees N (2,000 m). Light and electron microscopy were used to identify flagellates to genus and, when possible, species. The small subunit ribosomal RNA genes of each vent species and related strains from shallow-waters and the American Type Culture Collection were sequenced then used for comparative analysis with database sequences to place taxa in an rDNA tree. The hydrothermal vent flagellates belonged to six different taxonomic orders: the Ancyromonadida, Bicosoecida, Cercomonadida, Choanoflagellida, Chrysomonadida, and Kinetoplastida. Comparative analysis of vent isolate and database sequences resolved systematic placement of some well-known species with previously uncertain taxonomic affinities, such as Ancyromonas sigmoides, Caecitellus parvulus, and Massisteria marina. Many of these vent isolates are ubiquitous members of marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, suggesting a global distribution of these flagellate species.

  12. Growth-related gene product {alpha}: A chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.E.; Pope, R.M. |; Shah, M.R.; Hosaka, S.

    1995-10-01

    Leukocyte recruitment is critical in the inflammation seen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To determine whether the chemokine growth-related gene product {alpha} (gro{alpha}) plays a role in this process, we examined synovial tissue (ST), synovial fluid (SF), and plasma samples from 102 patients with arthritis. RA SF contained more antigenic gro{alpha} (mean 5.3 {+-} 1.9 ng/ml) than did SFs from either osteoarthritis (OA) or other forms of arthritis (mean 0.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). RA plasma contained more gro{alpha} (mean 4.3 {+-} 1.8 ng/ml) than normal plasma (mean 0.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). RA ST fibroblasts (1.2 x 10{sup 5}/cells/ml RPMI 1640/24 h) produced antigenic gro{alpha} (mean 0.2 {+-} 0.1 ng/ml), and this production was increased significantly upon incubation with TNF-{alpha} (mean 1.3 {+-} 0.3 ng/ml) or IL-1{beta} (mean 2.3 {+-} 0.6 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). Cells from RA SF also produced gro{alpha}: neutrophils (PMNs) (10{sup 7} cells/ml/24 h) produced 3.7 {+-} 0.7 ng/ml. RA SF mononuclear cells produced gro{alpha}, particularly upon incubation with LPS or PHA. Immunoreactive ST gro{alpha} was found in greater numbers of RA compared with either OA or normal lining cells, as well as in RA compared with OA subsynovial macrophages (p < 0.05). IL-8 accounted for a mean of 36% of the RA SF chemotactic activity for PMNs, while epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide-78 accounted for 34%, and gro{alpha} for 28%, of this activity. Combined neutralization of all three chemokines in RA SFs resulted in a mean decrease of 50% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs present in the RA SFs. These results indicate that gro{alpha} plays an important role in the ingress of PMNs into the RA joint. 54 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Accumulation of natural killer cells in ischemic brain tissues and the chemotactic effect of IP-10

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is accompanied by a distinguished inflammatory reaction that is initiated by the infiltration of immunocytes, expression of cytokines, and other inflammatory mediators. As natural killer cells (NK cells) are a type of cytotoxic lymphocyte critical to the innate immune system, we investigated the mechanism of NK cells-induced brain injuries after cerebral ischemia and the chemotactic effect of IP-10 simultaneously. Methods NK cells infiltration, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and IP-10 expression were detected by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, PCR and flow cytometry in human and C57/BL6 wild type mouse ischemic brain tissues. The ischemia area was detected via 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. CXCR3 mean fluorescence intensity of isolated NK cells was measured by flow cytometry. The neuronal injury made by NK cells was examined via apoptosis experiment. The chemotactic of IP-10 was detected by migration and permeability assays. Results In human ischemic brain tissue, infiltrations of NK cells were observed and reached a peak at 2 to 5 days. In a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) model, infiltration of NK cells into the ischemic infarct region reached their highest levels 12 hours after ischemia. IFN-γ-positive NK cells and levels of the chemokine IP-10 were also detected within the ischemic region, from 6 hours up to 4 days after pMCAO was performed, and IFN-γ levels decreased after NK cells depletion in vivo. Co-culture experiments of neural cells with NK cells also showed that neural necrosis was induced via IFN-γ. In parallel experiments with IP-10, the presence of CXCR3 indicates that NK cells were affected by IP-10 via CXCR3, and the effect was dose-dependent. After IP-10 depletion in vivo, NK cells decreased. In migration assays and permeability experiments, disintegration of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was observed following the addition of NK cells. Moreover, in the presence of IP-10 this injury

  14. Monocyte chemotactic protein 3 is a most effective basophil- and eosinophil-activating chemokine

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    CC chemokines constitute a novel class of cytokines that attract and activate monocytes and lymphocytes, as well as basophil and eosinophil leukocytes, with distinct target cell profiles, and are believed to be involved in the regulation of different types of inflammation. The action of the recently identified monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP- 3) on human basophil and eosinophil function was studied and compared with that of other CC chemokines. In basophils, MCP-3, MCP-1, RANTES, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha all induced cytosolic- free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) changes and, with different efficacies, chemotaxis (RANTES = MCP-3 >> MCP-1 > MIP-1 alpha), histamine release (MCP-1 = MCP-3 >> RANTES > MIP-1 alpha), and leukotriene C4 formation, after IL-3 pretreatment (MCP-1 = MCP-3 >> RANTES > MIP-1 alpha). Thus, MCP-3 was as effective as MCP-1 as an inducer of mediator release, and as effective as RANTES as a stimulus of basophil migration. In contrast to MCP-1, MCP-3 was also a stimulus for eosinophils, and induced [Ca2+]i changes and chemotaxis as effectively as RANTES, which is the most potent chemotactic cytokine for these cells. Desensitization of the transient changes in [Ca2+]i was used to assess receptor usage. In basophils, stimulation with MCP-3 prevented responsiveness to MCP-1 and RANTES, but not to MIP-1 alpha. No single CC chemokine (except for MCP-3 itself) affected the response to MCP-3, however, which was prevented only when the cells were prestimulated with both MCP-1 and RANTES. In eosinophils, by contrast, cross-desensitization between RANTES and MCP-3 was obtained. RANTES and to a lesser extent MCP-3 also desensitized eosinophils toward MIP-1 alpha. The desensitization data suggest the existence of three chemokine receptors: (a) a MCP-1 receptor expressed on basophils but not eosinophils that is activated by MCP-1 and MCP-3; (b) a RANTES receptor in basophils and eosinophils that is activated by RANTES and MCP-3; and

  15. Decreased numbers of chemotactic factor receptors in chronic neutropenia with defective chemotaxis: spontaneous recovery from the neutrophil abnormalities during early childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, K.; Yamazaki, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Akabane, T.

    1987-05-01

    Childhood chronic neutropenia with decreased numbers of chemotactic factor receptors as well as defective chemotaxis was first demonstrated in an 8-month-old girl. Chemotactic factor receptors on neutrophils were assayed using tritiated N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (/sup 3/H-FMLP). The patient's neutrophils had decreased numbers of the receptors: numbers of the receptors were 20,000 (less than 3 SD) as compared with those of control cells of 52,000 +/- 6000 (mean +/- SD) (n = 10). The neutropenia disappeared spontaneously by 28 months of age parallel with the improvement of chemotaxis and increase in numbers of chemotactic factor receptors. These results demonstrate a transient decrease of neutrophil chemotactic factor receptors as one of the pathophysiological bases of a transient defect of neutrophil chemotaxis in this disorder.

  16. CP-10, a chemotactic peptide, is expressed in lesions of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, neuritis, uveitis and in C6 gliomas.

    PubMed

    Deininger, M H; Zhao, Y; Schluesener, H J

    1999-01-01

    CP-10 (chemotactic protein of m.w. 10,000) is a member of the S100 superfamily of Ca2+ binding peptides, which has potent chemotactic activity for murine and human myeloid cells. Here we report on the generation of monoclonal antibodies against CP-10 and accumulation of CP-10+ cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), neuritis (EAN), uveitis (EAU) and in experimentally transplanted C6 gliomas. During acute inflammation, CP-10 is mainly expressed by large ED1+ monocytic perivascular cells that accumulate at days 11-14. CP-10+ cells are predominantly located in areas of cellular infiltration but are as well found in the meninges and infiltrating the brain parenchyma. In transplanted gliomas, CP-10+ cells are located exclusively within the tumor parenchyma. Using double labeling experiments, other cells participating in the inflammatory reaction were found to express CP-10, like few lymphoblastic W3/13+ cells in the vicinity of the inflammatory infiltrate.

  17. Down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by activation of chemotactic formyl peptide receptor in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, W; Li, B; Wetzel, M A; Rogers, T J; Henderson, E E; Su, S B; Gong, W; Le, Y; Sargeant, R; Dimitrov, D S; Oppenheim, J J; Wang, J M

    2000-10-15

    Interactions between cell surface receptors are important regulatory elements in the complex host responses to infections. In this study, it is shown that a classic chemotactic factor, the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenyl-alanine (fMLF), rapidly induced a protein-kinase-C-mediated serine phosphorylation and down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5, which serves as a major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor. The fMLF binding to its receptor, formyl peptide receptor (FPR), resulted in significant attenuation of cell responses to CCR5 ligands and in inhibition of HIV-1-envelope-glycoprotein-mediated fusion and infection of cells expressing CD4, CCR5, and FPR. The finding that the expression and function of CCR5 can be regulated by peptides that use an unrelated receptor may provide a novel approach to the design of anti-inflamatory and antiretroviral agents. (Blood. 2000;96:2887-2894)

  18. Flagellated Magnetotactic Bacteria as Controlled MRI-trackable Propulsion and Steering Systems for Medical Nanorobots Operating in the Human Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Sylvain; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Lu, Zhao; Pouponneau, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Although nanorobots may play critical roles for many applications in the human body such as targeting tumoral lesions for therapeutic purposes, miniaturization of the power source with an effective onboard controllable propulsion and steering system have prevented the implementation of such mobile robots. Here, we show that the flagellated nanomotors combined with the nanometer-sized magnetosomes of a single Magnetotactic Bacterium (MTB) can be used as an effective integrated propulsion and steering system for devices such as nanorobots designed for targeting locations only accessible through the smallest capillaries in humans while being visible for tracking and monitoring purposes using modern medical imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Through directional and magnetic field intensities, the displacement speeds, directions, and behaviors of swarms of these bacterial actuators can be controlled from an external computer. PMID:19890435

  19. Flagellated Magnetotactic Bacteria as Controlled MRI-trackable Propulsion and Steering Systems for Medical Nanorobots Operating in the Human Microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Martel, Sylvain; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Lu, Zhao; Pouponneau, Pierre

    2009-04-01

    Although nanorobots may play critical roles for many applications in the human body such as targeting tumoral lesions for therapeutic purposes, miniaturization of the power source with an effective onboard controllable propulsion and steering system have prevented the implementation of such mobile robots. Here, we show that the flagellated nanomotors combined with the nanometer-sized magnetosomes of a single Magnetotactic Bacterium (MTB) can be used as an effective integrated propulsion and steering system for devices such as nanorobots designed for targeting locations only accessible through the smallest capillaries in humans while being visible for tracking and monitoring purposes using modern medical imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Through directional and magnetic field intensities, the displacement speeds, directions, and behaviors of swarms of these bacterial actuators can be controlled from an external computer.

  20. Modification of β-Defensin-2 by Dicarbonyls Methylglyoxal and Glyoxal Inhibits Antibacterial and Chemotactic Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kiselar, Janna G.; Wang, Xiaowei; Dubyak, George R.; El Sanadi, Caroline; Ghosh, Santosh K.; Lundberg, Kathleen; Williams, Wesley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Beta-defensins (hBDs) provide antimicrobial and chemotactic defense against bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) acts against gram-negative bacteria and chemoattracts immature dendritic cells, thus regulating innate and adaptive immunity. Immunosuppression due to hyperglycemia underlies chronic infection in Type 2 diabetes. Hyperglycemia also elevates production of dicarbonyls methylgloxal (MGO) and glyoxal (GO). Methods The effect of dicarbonyl on defensin peptide structure was tested by exposing recombinant hBD-2 (rhBD-2) to MGO or GO with subsequent analysis by MALDI-TOF MS and LC/MS/MS. Antimicrobial function of untreated rhBD-2 vs. rhBD-2 exposed to dicarbonyl against strains of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in culture was determined by radial diffusion assay. The effect of dicarbonyl on rhBD-2 chemotactic function was determined by chemotaxis assay in CEM-SS cells. Results MGO or GO in vitro irreversibly adducts to the rhBD-2 peptide, and significantly reduces antimicrobial and chemotactic functions. Adducts derive from two arginine residues, Arg22 and Arg23 near the C-terminus, and the N-terminal glycine (Gly1). We show by radial diffusion testing on gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa, and gram-positive S. aureus, and a chemotaxis assay for CEM-SS cells, that antimicrobial activity and chemotactic function of rhBD-2 are significantly reduced by MGO. Conclusions Dicarbonyl modification of cationic antimicrobial peptides represents a potential link between hyperglycemia and the clinical manifestation of increased susceptibility to infection, protracted wound healing, and chronic inflammation in undiagnosed and uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes. PMID:26244639

  1. The significance of functional receptor heterogeneity in the biological responses of the rabbit neutrophil to stimulation by chemotactic formyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Kermode, J C; Freer, R J; Becker, E L

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of binding to the chemotactic receptors on rabbit peritoneal neutrophils were examined for seven formyl peptide analogues. These receptor-binding characteristics were compared with the abilities of the analogues to induce the biological responses of degranulation and chemotaxis. Five of the analogues showed distinct functional heterogeneity in their receptor-binding patterns, whereas the two most potent compounds displayed homogeneous binding patterns. The relative potencies of the formyl peptide analogues for stimulation of degranulation correlated well with their relative potencies for high-affinity, but not low-affinity, binding. The biphasic patterns for stimulation of chemotactic migration were similar for the less potent analogues, and their potencies paralleled those for both degranulation and receptor binding. In contrast, the most potent analogues induced a greater maximal extent of chemotactic migration than the other compounds, but displayed a lower than expected potency (i.e. they required higher than expected concentrations). These anomalies in the patterns of the chemotactic response cannot be reconciled with a simple receptor model comprising two independent classes of receptors. Instead, a model comprising interconvertible states of different affinities is proposed. The state of higher affinity appears to play a central role in initiation of both degranulation and chemotaxis. The more potent formyl peptide analogues are thought to stabilize an activated, higher-affinity, state of the receptor; this can explain their greater efficacy in stimulating chemotaxis. The proposed model may also be applicable to other receptors that are coupled by a guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory protein to their associated effector. PMID:2064609

  2. NADPH Oxidase-derived Reactive Oxygen Species Increases Expression of Monocyte Chemotactic Factor Genes in Cultured Adipocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang Yeop; Umemoto, Tomio; Omer, Mohamed; Den Hartigh, Laura J.; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; LeBoeuf, Renee; Buller, Carolyn L.; Sweet, Ian R.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abel, E. Dale; Chait, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Excess glucose and free fatty acids delivered to adipose tissue causes local inflammation, which contributes to insulin resistance. Glucose and palmitate generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in adipocytes, leading to monocyte chemotactic factor gene expression. Docosahexaenoate (DHA) has the opposite effect. In this study, we evaluated the potential sources of ROS in the presence of excess nutrients. Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were exposed to palmitate and DHA (250 μm) in either 5 or 25 mm glucose to evaluate the relative roles of mitochondrial electron transport and NADPH oxidases (NOX) as sources of ROS. Excess glucose and palmitate did not increase mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. However, glucose exposure increased glycolysis. Of the NOX family members, only NOX4 was expressed in adipocytes. Moreover, its activity was increased by excess glucose and palmitate and decreased by DHA. Silencing NOX4 inhibited palmitate- and glucose-stimulated ROS generation and monocyte chemotactic factor gene expression. NADPH, a substrate for NOX, and pentose phosphate pathway activity increased with glucose but not palmitate and decreased with DHA exposure. Inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors and siRNA suppressed ROS generation and monocyte chemotactic factor gene expression induced by both glucose and palmitate. Finally, both high glucose and palmitate induced NOX4 translocation into lipid rafts, effects that were blocked by DHA. Excess glucose and palmitate generate ROS via NOX4 rather than by mitochondrial oxidation in cultured adipocytes. NOX4 is regulated by both NADPH generated in the PPP and translocation of NOX4 into lipid rafts, leading to expression of monocyte chemotactic factors. PMID:22287546

  3. Transverse chemotactic migration of bacteria from high to low permeability regions in a dual permeability microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajveer; Olson, Mira Stone

    2012-03-20

    Low permeability regions such as clay lenses are difficult to remediate using conventional treatment methods. Bacterial chemotaxis (directed migration toward a contaminant source) may be helpful in enhancing bioremediation of such contaminated sites. This study experimentally simulates a two-dimensional dual-permeability groundwater contamination scenario using a microfluidic device (MFD) and evaluates transverse chemotactic migration of bacteria from high to low permeability regions under various flow velocities. Chemotaxis of Escherichia coli (E. coli) HCB33 to the chemoattractant dl-aspartic acid was quantified in terms of change in total bacterial counts in pore throats in low permeability regions containing attractant. An increase in total bacterial counts, ranging from 1.09 to 1.74 times, was observed in low permeability regions in experiments under chemotactic conditions. Experiments with no attractant showed no increase in total bacterial counts in low permeability regions. A large increase in bacterial counts in the pore throats just outside the low permeability region was also observed in chemotaxis experiments. The bacterial chemotactic response was observed to decrease linearly with increase in flow velocity, with no observed response at the highest flow velocity (Darcy velocity = 0.22 mm/s), where chemotaxis was offset by advective flow.

  4. Plant-Adapted Escherichia coli Show Increased Lettuce Colonizing Ability, Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Dublan, Maria de los Angeles; Ortiz-Marquez, Juan Cesar Federico; Lett, Lina; Curatti, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is a widespread gut commensal and often a versatile pathogen of public health concern. E. coli are also frequently found in different environments and/or alternative secondary hosts, such as plant tissues. The lifestyle of E. coli in plants is poorly understood and has potential implications for food safety. Methods/Principal Findings This work shows that a human commensal strain of E. coli K12 readily colonizes lettuce seedlings and produces large microcolony-like cell aggregates in leaves, especially in young leaves, in proximity to the vascular tissue. Our observations strongly suggest that those cell aggregates arise from multiplication of single bacterial cells that reach those spots. We showed that E. coli isolated from colonized leaves progressively colonize lettuce seedlings to higher titers, suggesting a fast adaptation process. E. coli cells isolated from leaves presented a dramatic rise in tolerance to oxidative stress and became more chemotactic responsive towards lettuce leaf extracts. Mutant strains impaired in their chemotactic response were less efficient lettuce colonizers than the chemotactic isogenic strain. However, acclimation to oxidative stress and/or minimal medium alone failed to prime E. coli cells for enhanced lettuce colonization efficiency. Conclusion/Significance These findings help to understand the physiological adaptation during the alternative lifestyle of E. coli in/on plant tissues. PMID:25313845

  5. Comamonas testosteroni uses a chemoreceptor for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to trigger chemotactic responses towards aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bin; Huang, Zhou; Fan, Zheng; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds has been frequently observed; however, knowledge of how bacteria sense aromatic compounds is limited. Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 is able to grow on a range of aromatic compounds. This study investigated the chemotactic responses of CNB-1 to 10 aromatic compounds. We constructed a chemoreceptor-free, non-chemotactic mutant, CNB-1Δ20, by disruption of all 19 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) and the atypical chemoreceptor in strain CNB-1. Individual complementation revealed that a putative MCP (tagged MCP2201) was involved in triggering chemotaxis towards all 10 aromatic compounds. The recombinant sensory domain of MCP2201 did not bind to 3- or 4-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate, catechol, benzoate, vanillate and gentisate, but bound oxaloacetate, citrate, cis-aconitate, isocitrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate and malate. The mutant CNB-1ΔpmdF that lost the ability to metabolize 4-hydroxybenzoate and protocatechuate also lost its chemotactic response to these compounds, suggesting that taxis towards aromatic compounds is metabolism-dependent. Based on the ligand profile, we proposed that MCP2201 triggers taxis towards aromatic compounds by sensing TCA cycle intermediates. Our hypothesis was further supported by the finding that introduction of the previously characterized pseudomonad chemoreceptor (McpS) for TCA cycle intermediates into CNB-1Δ20 likewise triggered chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds.

  6. Human Papillomavirus Deregulates the Response of a Cellular Network Comprising of Chemotactic and Proinflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rezaul; Meyers, Craig; Backendorf, Claude; Ludigs, Kristina; Offringa, Rienk; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Boer, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the presence of intracellular pathogen recognition receptors that allow infected cells to attract the immune system, undifferentiated keratinocytes (KCs) are the main targets for latent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (hrHPVs). HPV infections are transient but on average last for more than one year suggesting that HPV has developed means to evade host immunity. To understand how HPV persists, we studied the innate immune response of undifferentiated human KCs harboring episomal copies of HPV16 and 18 by genome-wide expression profiling. Our data showed that the expression of the different virus-sensing receptors was not affected by the presence of HPV. Poly(I:C) stimulation of the viral RNA receptors TLR3, PKR, MDA5 and RIG-I, the latter of which indirectly senses viral DNA through non-self RNA polymerase III transcripts, showed dampening in downstream signalling of these receptors by HPVs. Many of the genes downregulated in HPV-positive KCs involved components of the antigen presenting pathway, the inflammasome, the production of antivirals, pro-inflammatory and chemotactic cytokines, and components downstream of activated pathogen receptors. Notably, gene and/or protein interaction analysis revealed the downregulation of a network of genes that was strongly interconnected by IL-1β, a crucial cytokine to activate adaptive immunity. In summary, our comprehensive expression profiling approach revealed that HPV16 and 18 coordinate a broad deregulation of the keratinocyte's inflammatory response, and contributes to the understanding of virus persistence. PMID:21423754

  7. Marangoni-driven chemotaxis, chemotactic collapse, and the Keller-Segel equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael; Masoud, Hassan

    2013-11-01

    Almost by definition, chemotaxis involves the biased motion of motile particles along gradients of a chemical concentration field. Perhaps the most famous model for collective chemotaxis in mathematical biology is the Keller-Segel model, conceived to describe collective aggregation of slime mold colonies in response to an intrinsically produced, and diffusing, chemo-attractant. Heavily studied, particularly in 2D where the system is ``super-critical'', it has been proved that the KS model can develop finite-time singularities - so-called chemotactic collapse - of delta-function type. Here, we study the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D interface above a 3D fluid. These particles are chemically active and produce a diffusing field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. Remarkably, we show that this system involving 3D diffusion and fluid dynamics, exactly yields the 2D Keller-Segel model for the surface-flow of active particles. We discuss the consequences of collapse on the 3D fluid dynamics, and generalizations of the fluid-dynamical model.

  8. Anti-coreceptor therapy drives selective T cell egress by suppressing inflammation-dependent chemotactic cues

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aaron J.; Clark, Matthew; Gojanovich, Gregory; Manzoor, Fatima; Miller, Keith; Kline, Douglas E.; Morillon, Y. Maurice; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There continues to be a need for immunotherapies to treat type 1 diabetes in the clinic. We previously reported that nondepleting anti-CD4 and -CD8 Ab treatment effectively reverses diabetes in new-onset NOD mice. A key feature of the induction of remission is the egress of the majority of islet-resident T cells. How this occurs is undefined. Herein, the effects of coreceptor therapy on islet T cell retention were investigated. Bivalent Ab binding to CD4 and CD8 blocked TCR signaling and T cell cytokine production, while indirectly downregulating islet chemokine expression. These processes were required for T cell retention, as ectopic IFN-γ or CXCL10 inhibited Ab-mediated T cell purging. Importantly, treatment of humanized mice with nondepleting anti–human CD4 and CD8 Ab similarly reduced tissue-infiltrating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings demonstrate that Ab binding of CD4 and CD8 interrupts a feed-forward circuit by suppressing T cell–produced cytokines needed for expression of chemotactic cues, leading to rapid T cell egress from the islets. Coreceptor therapy therefore offers a robust approach to suppress T cell–mediated pathology by purging T cells in an inflammation-dependent manner. PMID:27777971

  9. Squid-derived chitin oligosaccharides are a chemotactic signal during colonization by Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Mark J; Schaefer, Amy L; Brennan, Caitlin A; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Deloney-Marino, Cindy R; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-07-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is noted as the second most abundant biopolymer in nature. Chitin serves many functions for marine bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae ("vibrios"), in some instances providing a physical attachment site, inducing natural genetic competence, and serving as an attractant for chemotaxis. The marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the specific symbiont in the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The bacterium provides the squid with luminescence that the animal uses in an antipredatory defense, while the squid supports the symbiont's nutritional requirements. V. fischeri cells are harvested from seawater during each host generation, and V. fischeri is the only species that can complete this process in nature. Furthermore, chitin is located in squid hemocytes and plays a nutritional role in the symbiosis. We demonstrate here that chitin oligosaccharides produced by the squid host serve as a chemotactic signal for colonizing bacteria. V. fischeri uses the gradient of host chitin to enter the squid light organ duct and colonize the animal. We provide evidence that chitin serves a novel function in an animal-bacterial mutualism, as an animal-produced bacterium-attracting synomone.

  10. Directional memory arises from long-lived cytoskeletal asymmetries in polarized chemotactic cells.

    PubMed

    Prentice-Mott, Harrison V; Meroz, Yasmine; Carlson, Andreas; Levine, Michael A; Davidson, Michael W; Irimia, Daniel; Charras, Guillaume T; Mahadevan, L; Shah, Jagesh V

    2016-02-01

    Chemotaxis, the directional migration of cells in a chemical gradient, is robust to fluctuations associated with low chemical concentrations and dynamically changing gradients as well as high saturating chemical concentrations. Although a number of reports have identified cellular behavior consistent with a directional memory that could account for behavior in these complex environments, the quantitative and molecular details of such a memory process remain unknown. Using microfluidics to confine cellular motion to a 1D channel and control chemoattractant exposure, we observed directional memory in chemotactic neutrophil-like cells. We modeled this directional memory as a long-lived intracellular asymmetry that decays slower than observed membrane phospholipid signaling. Measurements of intracellular dynamics revealed that moesin at the cell rear is a long-lived element that when inhibited, results in a reduction of memory. Inhibition of ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase), downstream of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), stabilized moesin and directional memory while depolymerization of microtubules (MTs) disoriented moesin deposition and also reduced directional memory. Our study reveals that long-lived polarized cytoskeletal structures, specifically moesin, actomyosin, and MTs, provide a directional memory in neutrophil-like cells even as they respond on short time scales to external chemical cues.

  11. Wave Patterns in Cell Membrane and Actin Cortex Uncoupled from Chemotactic Signals.

    PubMed

    Gerisch, Günther; Ecke, Mary

    2016-01-01

    When cells of Dictyostelium discoideum orientate in a gradient of chemoattractant, they are polarized into a protruding front pointing toward the source of attractant, and into a retracting tail. Under the control of chemotactic signal inputs, Ras is activated and PIP3 is synthesized at the front, while the PIP3-degrading phosphatase PTEN decorates the tail region. As a result of signal transduction, actin filaments assemble at the front into dendritic structures associated with the Arp2/3 complex, in contrast to the tail region where a loose actin meshwork is associated with myosin-II and cortexillin, an antiparallel actin-bundling protein. In axenically growing strains of D. discoideum, wave patterns built by the same components evolve in the absence of any external signal input. Since these autonomously generated patterns are constrained to the plane of the substrate-attached cell surface, they are optimally suited to the optical analysis of state transitions between front-like and tail-like states of the membrane and the actin cortex. Here, we describe imaging techniques using fluorescent proteins to probe for the state of the membrane, the reorganization of the actin network, and the dynamics of wave patterns.

  12. Microcystins alter chemotactic behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans by selectively targeting the AWA sensory neuron.

    PubMed

    Moore, Caroline E; Lein, Pamela J; Puschner, Birgit

    2014-06-01

    Harmful algal blooms expose humans and animals to microcystins (MCs) through contaminated drinking water. While hepatotoxicity following acute exposure to MCs is well documented, neurotoxicity after sub-lethal exposure is poorly understood. We developed a novel statistical approach using a generalized linear model and the quasibinomial family to analyze neurotoxic effects in adult Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to MC-LR or MC-LF for 24 h. Selective effects of toxin exposure on AWA versus AWC sensory neuron function were determined using a chemotaxis assay. With a non-monotonic response MCs altered AWA but not AWC function, and MC-LF was more potent than MC-LR. To probe a potential role for protein phosphatases (PPs) in MC neurotoxicity, we evaluated the chemotactic response in worms exposed to the PP1 inhibitor tautomycin or the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid for 24 h. Okadaic acid impaired both AWA and AWC function, while tautomycin had no effect on function of either neuronal cell type at the concentrations tested. These findings suggest that MCs alter the AWA neuron at concentrations that do not cause AWC toxicity via mechanisms other than PP inhibition.

  13. The actin cytoskeleton of chemotactic amoebae operates close to the onset of oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westendorf, Christian; Negrete, Jose, Jr.; Bae, Albert; Sandmann, Rabea; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2013-03-01

    We report evidence that the actin machinery of chemotactic Dictyostelium cells operates close to an oscillatory instability. The averaged F-actin response of many cells to a short-time pulse of cAMP is reminiscent of a damped oscillation. At the single-cell level, however, the response dynamics ranged from short, strongly damped responses to slowly decaying, weakly damped oscillations. Furthermore, in a small subpopulation, we observed self-sustained oscillations in the cortical F-actin concentration. We systematically exposed a large number of cells to periodic pulse trains. The results indicate a resonance peak at periodic inputs of around 20 s. We propose a delayed feedback model that explains our experimental findings based on a time-delay in the actin regulatory network. To quantitatively test the model, we performed stimulation experiments with cells that express GFP-tagged fusion proteins of Coronin and Aip1. These served as markers of the F-actin disassembly process and thus allow us to estimate the delay time. Based on this independent estimate, our model predicts an intrinsic period of 20 s, which agrees with the resonance observed experimentally. Financial support by the Max-Planck Society and the DFG (SFB 937).

  14. Induction of the chemotactic S100 protein, CP-10, in monocyte/macrophages by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Hu, S P; Harrison, C; Xu, K; Cornish, C J; Geczy, C L

    1996-05-01

    The murine S100 protein CP-10 is a potent chemotactic factor for murine and human myeloid cells in vivo and in vitro. This is the first report describing regulations of the CP-10 gene by a proinflammatory stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Murine monocyte/macrophage-like WEHI 265 and RAW 264.7 cells preexposed to 5 to 50 ng/mL LPS expressed significant levels of CP-10 mRNA 4 hours, and maximal at 20 hours, after a secondary LPS challenge. This was accompanied by increasing levels of cell-associated and released CP-10 protein. In contrast, a single dose of LPS upregulated CP-10 mRNA in elicited peritoneal macrophages, whereas mRNA and protein levels decreased following LPS challenge. The state of macrophage differentiation may control responsiveness as LPS had no effect on CP-10 basal levels in bone marrow derived macrophages. LPS-induced CP-10 expression was controlled at the transcriptional level and nuclear run-on and protein synthesis inhibition assays indicated that LPS priming and challenge of RAW cells occurred via distinct pathways. MRP14, another S100 protein generally coordinately expressed with human MRP8, was not induced by LPS under the same conditions. We propose that CP-10 may play a key role in recruitment of leukocytes into tissues in response to gram-negative bacterial infection.

  15. Obesity-associated mouse adipose stem cell secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui Ren; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Hyojung; Claycombe, Kate J

    2007-11-01

    Studies showed that monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) concentrations are increased in obesity. In our current study, we demonstrate that plasma MCP-1 level in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice is significantly higher than in lean mice. Furthermore, we determined that basal adipose tissue MCP-1 mRNA levels are significantly higher in ob/ob mice compared with lean mice. To determine the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated increases in plasma and adipose tissue MCP-1 levels, we determined adipose tissue cell type sources of MCP-1 production. Our data show that adipose tissue stem cells (CD34(+)), macrophages (F4/80(+)), and stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells express significantly higher levels of MCP-1 compared with adipocytes under both basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated conditions. Furthermore, basal and LPS-induced MCP-1 secretion levels were the same for both adipose F4/80(+) and CD34(+) cells, whereas adipose CD34(+) cells have twofold higher cell numbers (30% of total SVF cells) compared with F4/80(+) macrophages (15%). Our data also show that CD34(+) cells from visceral adipose tissue depots secrete significantly higher levels of MCP-1 ex vivo when compared with CD34(+) cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue depots. Taken together, our data suggest that adipose CD34(+) stem cells may play an important role in obesity-associated increases in plasma MCP-1 levels.

  16. Directional memory arises from long-lived cytoskeletal asymmetries in polarized chemotactic cells

    PubMed Central

    Prentice-Mott, Harrison V.; Meroz, Yasmine; Carlson, Andreas; Levine, Michael A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Irimia, Daniel; Charras, Guillaume T.; Mahadevan, L.; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the directional migration of cells in a chemical gradient, is robust to fluctuations associated with low chemical concentrations and dynamically changing gradients as well as high saturating chemical concentrations. Although a number of reports have identified cellular behavior consistent with a directional memory that could account for behavior in these complex environments, the quantitative and molecular details of such a memory process remain unknown. Using microfluidics to confine cellular motion to a 1D channel and control chemoattractant exposure, we observed directional memory in chemotactic neutrophil-like cells. We modeled this directional memory as a long-lived intracellular asymmetry that decays slower than observed membrane phospholipid signaling. Measurements of intracellular dynamics revealed that moesin at the cell rear is a long-lived element that when inhibited, results in a reduction of memory. Inhibition of ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase), downstream of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), stabilized moesin and directional memory while depolymerization of microtubules (MTs) disoriented moesin deposition and also reduced directional memory. Our study reveals that long-lived polarized cytoskeletal structures, specifically moesin, actomyosin, and MTs, provide a directional memory in neutrophil-like cells even as they respond on short time scales to external chemical cues. PMID:26764383

  17. Bound attractant at the leading vs. the trailing edge determines chemotactic prowess.

    PubMed

    Herzmark, Paul; Campbell, Kyle; Wang, Fei; Wong, Kit; El-Samad, Hana; Groisman, Alex; Bourne, Henry R

    2007-08-14

    We have analyzed chemotaxis of neutrophil-differentiated HL60 cells in microfluidic devices that create exponential gradients of the chemoattractant, f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Such gradients expose each cell to a difference in fMLP concentration (DeltaC) across its diameter that is directly proportional to the ambient concentration (C) at that cell's position in the gradient, so the ratio DeltaC/C is constant everywhere. Cells exposed to ambient fMLP concentrations near the constant of dissociation (K(d)) for fMLP binding to its receptor ( approximately 10 nM) crawl much less frequently when DeltaC/C is 0.05 than when it is 0.09 or 0.13. Hence, cells can detect the gradient across their diameter without moving and, thus, without experiencing temporal changes in attractant concentration. At all DeltaC/C ratios tested, the average chemotactic prowess of individual cells (indicated by the distance a cell traveled in the correct direction divided by the length of its migration path) is maximal for cells that start migrating at concentrations near the K(d) and progressively decreases at higher or lower starting concentrations.

  18. A Worldwide Competition to Compare the Speed and Chemotactic Accuracy of Neutrophil-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Skoge, Monica; Wong, Elisabeth; Hamza, Bashar; Bae, Albert; Martel, Joseph; Kataria, Rama; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kortholt, Arjan; Van Haastert, Peter J M; Charras, Guillaume; Janetopoulos, Christopher; Irimia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is the ability to migrate towards the source of chemical gradients. It underlies the ability of neutrophils and other immune cells to hone in on their targets and defend against invading pathogens. Given the importance of neutrophil migration to health and disease, it is crucial to understand the basic mechanisms controlling chemotaxis so that strategies can be developed to modulate cell migration in clinical settings. Because of the complexity of human genetics, Dictyostelium and HL60 cells have long served as models system for studying chemotaxis. Since many of our current insights into chemotaxis have been gained from these two model systems, we decided to compare them side by side in a set of winner-take-all races, the Dicty World Races. These worldwide competitions challenge researchers to genetically engineer and pharmacologically enhance the model systems to compete in microfluidic racecourses. These races bring together technological innovations in genetic engineering and precision measurement of cell motility. Fourteen teams participated in the inaugural Dicty World Race 2014 and contributed cell lines, which they tuned for enhanced speed and chemotactic accuracy. The race enabled large-scale analyses of chemotaxis in complex environments and revealed an intriguing balance of speed and accuracy of the model cell lines. The successes of the first race validated the concept of using fun-spirited competition to gain insights into the complex mechanisms controlling chemotaxis, while the challenges of the first race will guide further technological development and planning of future events. PMID:27332963

  19. Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) is a common form of renal amyloidosis among Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christopher P; Ismail, Wesam; Kurtin, Paul J; Vrana, Julie A; Dasari, Surendra; Nasr, Samih H

    2016-04-01

    Large case series of renal amyloidosis subtypes have recently been published in the United States and Europe showing AL amyloidosis to be the predominant subtype in this part of the world. However, the most common subtypes of renal amyloidosis throughout the rest of the world are unknown. We present here the first large case series detailing the subtypes of renal amyloidosis among Egyptians. In this population, AA amyloidosis was the most common type of amyloidosis on renal biopsy at 48%. The newly described leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) was the second most common type and represented nearly one-third of renal amyloid cases at 31%. AL accounted for only 20% of cases. The pathologic findings in ALECT2 cases were similar to those previously described in other case series. Thus ALECT2, which was initially thought to affect mainly Hispanics in the United States, appears to represent an important and likely underrecognized etiology of chronic kidney disease among Egyptians and probably in other ethnic groups around the world. PMID:26867784

  20. Enhanced clearance of silica from mouse lung after instillation of a leukocyte chemotactic factor.

    PubMed

    Adamson, I Y; Prieditis, H; Bowden, D H

    1994-01-01

    It has been suggested that increased recruitment of phagocytes and subsequent clearance of particles may follow instillation of a leukocyte chemoattractant to lungs containing silica. The present study quantitated serially the silica content in alveolar spaces, in lung tissue and in hilar lymph nodes of mice that received 2 mg silica only, compared to a group that also received 100 micrograms intratracheal chemotactic factor N-formyl-L-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) at 2 and 3 weeks after silica. These mice showed a supplemental increase in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, and an increase in silica was measured in lavaged cells and fluid soon after FMLP injection. At all times to 16 weeks, the silica content of lung tissue was significantly lower in mice that also received FMLP, and in this group, pulmonary fibrosis was much reduced, as shown morphologically and biochemically. In addition, there was reduced translocation of silica to lymph nodes in FMLP-treated mice. The results indicate that induction of a controlled inflammatory response in the alveoli at a time when particles are present in the pulmonary interstitium can accelerate clearance by increasing phagocyte traffic to the alveoli. The subsequent reduction in particle content of the lung is associated with a lower level of pulmonary fibrosis.

  1. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and other inflammatory parameters in Bernese Mountain dogs with disseminated histiocytic sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Nikolic Nielsen, Lise; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between cancer and the immune system, and the production of cytokines by the tumour itself have been associated with altered levels of cytokines in human cancer patients. Bernese Mountain dogs with disseminated histiocytic sarcoma (DHS) show vague and non-specific clinical signs. Although histiocytes can secrete cytokines in response to inflammatory stimuli, serum cytokine concentrations in dogs with DHS have not previously been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunological state of untreated Bernese Mountain dogs with DHS by assessing multiple serum cytokines and to correlate these with other inflammatory markers. As a prospective case control study, 17 Bernese Mountain dogs with DHS were included along with 18 healthy controls (12 Bernese Mountain dogs and 6 dogs of various breeds). Blood samples were examined for fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count, monocyte count and the following cytokines: interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, tumour necrosis factor and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1. Significant differences were observed in Bernese Mountain dogs with DHS compared to healthy control dogs for fibrinogen (P=0.002), CRP (P=0.02) and MCP-1 (P=0.004). Other important pro-inflammatory cytokines were not significantly increased in dogs with DHS and none of the measured cytokines were correlated to either WBC, monocyte count, CRP or fibrinogen concentration. The implications of this increased MCP-1 blood levels in Bernese Mountain dogs with DHS warrant further investigations.

  2. Investigations into the design principles in the chemotactic behavior of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jung, Sung Hoon; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Inspired by the recent studies on the analysis of biased random walk behavior of Escherichia coli[Passino, K.M., 2002. Biomimicry of bacterial foraging for distributed optimization and control. IEEE Control Syst. Mag. 22 (3), 52-67; Passino, K.M., 2005. Biomimicry for Optimization, Control and Automation. Springer-Verlag, pp. 768-798; Liu, Y., Passino, K.M., 2002. Biomimicry of social foraging bacteria for distributed optimization: models, principles, and emergent behaviors. J. Optim. Theory Appl. 115 (3), 603-628], we have developed a model describing the motile behavior of E. coli by specifying some simple rules on the chemotaxis. Based on this model, we have analyzed the role of some key parameters involved in the chemotactic behavior to unravel the underlying design principles. By investigating the target tracking capability of E. coli in a maze through computer simulations, we found that E. coli clusters can be controlled as target trackers in a complex micro-scale-environment. In addition, we have explored the dynamical characteristics of this target tracking mechanism through perturbation of parameters under noisy environments. It turns out that the E. coli chemotaxis mechanism might be designed such that it is sensitive enough to efficiently track the target and also robust enough to overcome environmental noises.

  3. Enhancement of Chemotactic Cell Aggregation by Haptotactic Cell-To-Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Tae-goo; Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-01-01

    The crawling of biological cell is a complex phenomenon involving various biochemical and mechanical processes. Some of these processes are intrinsic to individual cells, while others pertain to cell-to-cell interactions and to their responses to extrinsically imposed cues. Here, we report an interesting aggregation dynamics of mathematical model cells, when they perform chemotaxis in response to an externally imposed global chemical gradient while they influence each other through a haptotaxis-mediated social interaction, which confers intriguing trail patterns. In the absence of the cell-to-cell interaction, the equilibrium population density profile fits well to that of a simple Keller-Segal population dynamic model, in which a chemotactic current density J→chemo∼∇p competes with a normal diffusive current density J→diff∼∇ρ, where p and ρ refer to the concentration of chemoattractant and population density, respectively. We find that the cell-to-cell interaction confers a far more compact aggregation resulting in a much higher peak equilibrium cell density. The mathematical model system is applicable to many biological systems such as swarming microglia and neutrophils or accumulating ants towards a localized food source. PMID:27128310

  4. A Worldwide Competition to Compare the Speed and Chemotactic Accuracy of Neutrophil-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elisabeth; Hamza, Bashar; Bae, Albert; Martel, Joseph; Kataria, Rama; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kortholt, Arjan; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Charras, Guillaume; Janetopoulos, Christopher; Irimia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is the ability to migrate towards the source of chemical gradients. It underlies the ability of neutrophils and other immune cells to hone in on their targets and defend against invading pathogens. Given the importance of neutrophil migration to health and disease, it is crucial to understand the basic mechanisms controlling chemotaxis so that strategies can be developed to modulate cell migration in clinical settings. Because of the complexity of human genetics, Dictyostelium and HL60 cells have long served as models system for studying chemotaxis. Since many of our current insights into chemotaxis have been gained from these two model systems, we decided to compare them side by side in a set of winner-take-all races, the Dicty World Races. These worldwide competitions challenge researchers to genetically engineer and pharmacologically enhance the model systems to compete in microfluidic racecourses. These races bring together technological innovations in genetic engineering and precision measurement of cell motility. Fourteen teams participated in the inaugural Dicty World Race 2014 and contributed cell lines, which they tuned for enhanced speed and chemotactic accuracy. The race enabled large-scale analyses of chemotaxis in complex environments and revealed an intriguing balance of speed and accuracy of the model cell lines. The successes of the first race validated the concept of using fun-spirited competition to gain insights into the complex mechanisms controlling chemotaxis, while the challenges of the first race will guide further technological development and planning of future events. PMID:27332963

  5. Chemotactic systems in the presence of conflicts: A new functional inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolansky, G.

    2016-11-01

    The evolution of a chemotactic system involving a population of cells attracted to self-produced chemicals is described by the Keller-Segel system. In dimension 2, this system demonstrates a balance between the spreading effect of diffusion and the concentration due to self-attraction. As a result, there exists a critical "mass" (i.e. total cell's population) above which the solution of this system collapses in a finite time, while below this critical mass there is global existence in time. In particular, subcritical mass leads under certain additional conditions to the existence of steady states, corresponding to the solution of an elliptic Liouville equation. The existence of this critical mass is related to a functional inequality known as the Moser-Trudinger inequality. An extension of the Keller-Segel model to several cells populations was considered before in the literature. Here we review some of these results and, in particular, consider the case of conflict between two populations, that is, when population one attracts population two, while, at the same time, population two repels population one. This assumption leads to a new functional inequality which generalizes the Moser-Trudinger inequality. As an application of this inequality we derive sufficient conditions for the existence of steady states corresponding to solutions of an elliptic Liouville system.

  6. Ca2+ spikes in the flagellum control chemotactic behavior of sperm

    PubMed Central

    Böhmer, Martin; Van, Qui; Weyand, Ingo; Hagen, Volker; Beyermann, Michael; Matsumoto, Midori; Hoshi, Motonori; Hildebrand, Eilo; Kaupp, Ulrich Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    The events that occur during chemotaxis of sperm are only partly known. As an essential step toward determining the underlying mechanism, we have recorded Ca2+ dynamics in swimming sperm of marine invertebrates. Stimulation of the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata by the chemoattractant or by intracellular cGMP evokes Ca2+ spikes in the flagellum. A Ca2+ spike elicits a turn in the trajectory followed by a period of straight swimming (‘turn-and-run'). The train of Ca2+ spikes gives rise to repetitive loop-like movements. When sperm swim in a concentration gradient of the attractant, the Ca2+ spikes and the stimulus function are synchronized, suggesting that precise timing of Ca2+ spikes controls navigation. We identified the peptide asterosap as a chemotactic factor of the starfish Asterias amurensis. The Ca2+ spikes and swimming behavior of sperm from starfish and sea urchin are similar, implying that the signaling pathway of chemotaxis has been conserved for almost 500 million years. PMID:16001082

  7. Increased expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 during active hepatic fibrogenesis: correlation with monocyte infiltration.

    PubMed Central

    Marra, F.; DeFranco, R.; Grappone, C.; Milani, S.; Pastacaldi, S.; Pinzani, M.; Romanelli, R. G.; Laffi, G.; Gentilini, P.

    1998-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 is a chemoattractant and activator for circulating monocytes and T lymphocytes. We investigated MCP-1 protein and gene expression during chronic liver disease at different stages, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively. In normal liver, a modest expression of MCP-1 was confined to few peri-sinusoidal cells and to bile duct epithelial cells. During chronic hepatitis, MCP-1 immunostaining and gene expression were evident in the inflammatory infiltrate of the portal tract. In tissue from patients with active cirrhosis, MCP-1 expression was clearly up-regulated and was present in the portal tract, in the epithelial cells of regenerating bile ducts, and in the active septa surrounding regenerating nodules. A combination of in situ hybridization for MCP-1 and immunohistochemistry showed that activated stellate cells and monocyte/macrophages contribute to MCP-1 expression in vivo together with bile duct epithelial cells. Comparison of serial sections of liver biopsies from patients with various degrees of necro-inflammatory activity showed that infiltration of the portal tracts with monocytes/macrophages is directly correlated with the expression of MCP-1. These data expand previous in vitro studies showing that secretion of MCP-1 may contribute to the formation and maintenance of the inflammatory infiltrate observed during chronic liver disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9466568

  8. Chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Milan; Avagyan, Hripsime; Merino, Jose Joaquin; Bernas, Michael; Valdivia, Juan; Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Witte, Marlys; Weinand, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To identify the upstream signals of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we evaluated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy brain tissues of 13 TLE patients and 5 control patients regarding expression of chemokines and cell-cycle proteins. The chemokine RANTES (CCR5) and other CC-chemokines and apoptotic markers (caspase-3, -8, -9) were expressed in lateral temporal cortical and hippocampal neurons of TLE patients, but not in neurons of control cases. The chemokine RANTES is usually found in cytoplasmic and extracellular locations. However, in TLE neurons, RANTES was displayed in an unusual location, the neuronal nuclei. In addition, the cell-cycle regulatory transcription factor E2F1 was found in an abnormal location in neuronal cytoplasm. The pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokine interleukin-1β were expressed both in neurons of patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy and from cerebral trauma. The vessels showed fibrin leakage, perivascular macrophages and expression of IL-6 on endothelial cells. In conclusion, the cytoplasmic effects of E2F1 and nuclear effects of RANTES might have novel roles in neuronal apoptosis of TLE neurons and indicate a need to develop new medical and/or surgical neuroprotective strategies against apoptotic signaling by these molecules. Both RANTES and E2F1 signaling are upstream from caspase activation, thus the antagonists of RANTES and/or E2F1 blockade might be neuroprotective for patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The results have implications for the development of new medical and surgical therapies based on inhibition of chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22444245

  9. Proteolytic cleavage of the urokinase receptor substitutes for the agonist-induced chemotactic effect.

    PubMed Central

    Resnati, M; Guttinger, M; Valcamonica, S; Sidenius, N; Blasi, F; Fazioli, F

    1996-01-01

    Physiological concentrations of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) stimulated a chemotactic response in human monocytic THP-1 through binding to the urokinase receptor (uPAR). The effect did not require the protease moiety of uPA, as stimulation was achieved also with the N-terminal fragment (ATF), while the 33 kDa low molecular weight uPA was ineffective. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed association of uPAR with intracellular kinase(s), as demonstrated by in vitro kinase assays. Use of specific antibodies identified p56/p59hck as a kinase associated with uPAR in THP-1 cell extracts. Upon addition of ATF, p56/p59hck activity was stimulated within 2 min and returned to normal after 30 min. Since uPAR lacks an intracellular domain capable of interacting with intracellular kinase, activation of p56/p59hck must require a transmembrane adaptor. Evidence for this was strongly supported by the finding that a soluble form of uPAR (suPAR) was capable of inducing chemotaxis not only in THP-1 cells but also in cells lacking endogenous uPAR (IC50, 5 pM). However, activity of suPAR require chymotrypsin cleavage between the N-terminal domain D1 and D2 + D3. Chymotrypsin-cleaved suPAR also induced activation of p56/p59hck in THP-1 cells, with a time course comparable with ATF. Our data show that uPA-induced signal transduction takes place via uPAR, involves activation of intracellular tyrosine kinase(s) and requires an as yet undefined adaptor capable of connecting the extracellular ligand binding uPAR to intracellular transducer(s). Images PMID:8612581

  10. Plasma levels of the chemokines monocyte chemotactic proteins-1 and -2 are elevated in human sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bossink, A W; Paemen, L; Jansen, P M; Hack, C E; Thijs, L G; Van Damme, J

    1995-11-15

    Because of their effects on monocytes, monocyte chemotactic proteins-1 and -2 (MCP-1 and MCP-2) may participate in the pathophysiology of sepsis. We measured circulating MCP-1 and MCP-2 levels in 42 septic patients having positive local or blood cultures. MCP-1 and MCP-2 levels were elevated in 24 (57%) and 25 (59%) of 42 septic patients, respectively, compared with healthy volunteers. Both patients with gram-positive and gram-negative infections had elevated MCP-1 plasma levels (P = .0001) and P < .0001), respectively; Mann-Whitney-U test), whereas patients with gram-positive infection, but not those with gram-negative infection, had increased MCP-2 plasma levels (P= .0182). No relative differences in MCP-1 and MCP-2 plasma levels were observed between several subgroups of patients (sepsis v septic shock; survivors v nonsurvivors), although levels of MCP-1 were the highest in patients with the more severe forms of sepsis, ie, those with shock or a lethal outcome. Serial observations showed that MCP-1 and MCP-2 plasma levels remained elevated for at least 48 hours. MCP-1 correlated weakly with interleukin-8 and MCP-2, the correlations for which were most pronounced in patients with septic shock. MCP-2 correlated with interleukin-8, and surprisingly, with the complement activation product C3a; these correlations further improved when analyzing patients with septic shock or when applying gram-positive infections. Thus, our results not only show increased MCP-1 and MCP-2 levels in patients with sepsis, but also suggest that the synthesis and release of MCP-1 and MCP-2 in sepsis are differently regulated in part.

  11. Binding characteristics of radioiodinated crystal - induced chemotactic factor to human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Spilberg, I.; Mehta, J.

    1984-12-01

    The binding of radiolabeled crystal-induced chemotactic factor (CCF) to human neutrophils is characterized. Binding of /sup 125/I-CCF to the cells was higher at 4/sup 0/C than at 24/sup 0/ or 37/sup 0/C and was found to be independent of Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration. The binding showed a pH optimum of 6.0. Tosylamido phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone at 100 ..mu..mol/L concentration inhibited 20% of /sup 125/I-CCF binding, but phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride at 200 ..mu..mol/L had no effect. Approximately 50% of the cell-associated /sup 125/I-CCF was released after treatment with proteases. The nonspecific uptake by the cells, as measured by the uptake of /sup 3/H-sucrose and /sup 14/C-inulin in the presence of CCF, was negligible. After the steady-state binding of /sup 125/I-CCF to the cells, approx. 15% of the cell-associated radioactivity at 4/sup 0/C and 40% to 50% at 24/sup 0/ and 37/sup 0/C was released into the medium after 60 minutes of incubation in medium alone. Dissociation of the radioactive material was not affected by the presence of tosylamido phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone or phenanthroline in the media. The dissociated material was determined to be degraded /sup 125/I-CCF, suggesting that degradation of /sup 125/I-CCF occurs after binding to its specific receptor on the human neutrophil. 22 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism as adaptive strategies during citrus canker induction by Xanthomonas citri.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leandro Marcio; Facincani, Agda Paula; Ferreira, Cristiano Barbalho; Ferreira, Rafael Marine; Ferro, Maria Inês Tiraboshi; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Ferro, Jesus Aparecido; Soares, Márcia Regina

    2015-03-01

    The genome of Xanthomonas citri subsp. Citri strain 306 pathotype A (Xac) was completely sequenced more than 10 years; to date, few studies involving functional genomics Xac and its host compatible have been developed, specially related to adaptive events that allow the survival of Xac within the plant. Proteomic analysis of Xac showed that the processes of chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism are key adaptive strategies during the interaction of a pathogenic bacterium with its plant host. The results also indicate the importance of a group of proteins that may not be directly related to the classical virulence factors, but that are likely fundamental to the success of the initial stages of the infection, such as methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (Mcp) and phosphate specific transport (Pst). Furthermore, the analysis of the mutant of the gene pstB which codifies to an ABC phosphate transporter subunit revealed a complete absence of citrus canker symptoms when inoculated in compatible hosts. We also conducted an in silico analysis which established the possible network of genes regulated by two-component systems PhoPQ and PhoBR (related to phosphate metabolism), and possible transcriptional factor binding site (TFBS) motifs of regulatory proteins PhoB and PhoP, detaching high degree of conservation of PhoB TFBS in 84 genes of Xac genome. This is the first time that chemotaxis signal transduction and phosphate metabolism were therefore indicated to be fundamental to the process of colonization of plant tissue during the induction of disease associated with Xanthomonas genus bacteria.

  13. Identification and partial characterization of an exercise-induced neutrophil chemotactic factor in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T H; Nagy, L; Nagakura, T; Walport, M J; Kay, A B

    1982-01-01

    A heat-stable neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF) has been identified in the serum of 13 atopic asthmatic subjects after treadmill exercise. Peak activity was detected at 10 min and returned to prechallenge values by 1 h. No NCF activity was detected in the sera of three nonasthmatic atopic or four normal nonatopic individuals performing the same task. NCF produced by exercise (NCFEX) had a similar time-course of release to NCF provoked by specific antigen (NCFAG). The appearance of circulating NCFEX and NCFAG closely paralleled the fall in peak expiratory flow rate/forced expiratory volume in 1 s (PEFR/FEV1). Histamine challenge in atopic asthmatics at concentrations giving a comparable change in PEFR/FEV1 to that evoked by exercise or inhaled antigen was not associated with the appearance of circulating NCF. In seven subjects NCFEX release was inhibited by prior administration of disodium cromoglycate. NCFEX and NCFAG eluted as single peaks of activity when applied separately to columns of Sephadex G-200, and both were an estimated 750,000 daltons. NCFEX and NCFAG also eluted as single peaks of activity, at between 0.15 and 0.30 M NaCl, following anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel (pH 7.8). The isoelectric points of NCFEX and NCFAG were virtually identical (between pH 6.0 and 6.5) as determined by chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94. The activities of NCFEX and NCFAG were substantially reduced, in both a time- and dose-dependent fashion, after incubation with trypsin and chymotrypsin. Partially purified NCFEX and NCFAG promoted both stimulated random migration (chemokinesis) as well as directional migration (chemotaxis). These experiments indicate that NCFEX and NCFAG might be identical substances and raise the possibility that mediators by hypersensitivity are released during exercise-induced asthma in atopic subjects. PMID:7076852

  14. Phospholipase D catalyzes phospholipid metabolism in chemotactic peptide-stimulated HL-60 granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, J.K.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Billah, M.M.

    1988-09-05

    There exists circumstantial evidence for activation of phospholipase D (PLD) in intact cells. However, because of the complexity of phospholipid remodeling processes, it is essential to distinguish PLD clearly from other phospholipases and phospholipid remodeling enzymes. Therefore, to establish unequivocally PLD activity in dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 granulocytes, to demonstrate the relative contribution of PLD to phospholipid turnover, and to validate the hypothesis that the formation of phosphatidylethanol is an expression of PLD-catalyzed transphosphatidylation, we have developed methodologies to label HL-60 granulocytes in 1-O-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-PC) with 32P without labeling cellular ATP. These methodologies involve (a) synthesis of alkyl-lysoPC containing 32P by a combination of enzymatic and chemical procedures and (b) incubation of HL-60 granulocytes with this alkyl-(32P) lysoPC which enters the cell and becomes acylated into membrane-associated alkyl-(32P)PC. Upon stimulation of these 32P-labeled cells with the chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP), alkyl-(32P)phosphatidic acid (alkyl-(32P)PA) is formed rapidly. Because, under these conditions, cellular ATP has not been labeled with 32P, alkyl-(32P)PA must be formed via PLD-catalyzed hydrolysis of alkyl-(32P)PC at the terminal phosphodiester bond. This result conclusively demonstrates fMLP-induced activation of PLD in HL-60 granulocytes. These 32P-labeled HL-60 granulocytes have also been stimulated in the presence of ethanol to produce alkyl-(32P)phosphatidylethanol (alkyl-(32P)PEt). Formation of alkyl-(32P)PEt parallels that of alkyl-(32P)PA with respect to time course, fMLP concentration, inhibition by a specific fMLP antagonist (t-butoxycarbonyl-Met-Leu-Phe), and Ca2+ concentration.

  15. Coccidioides Endospores and Spherules Draw Strong Chemotactic, Adhesive, and Phagocytic Responses by Individual Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Thompson III, George R.; Hastey, Christine J.; Hodge, Gregory C.; Lunetta, Jennine M.; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Heinrich, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioides spp. are dimorphic pathogenic fungi whose parasitic forms cause coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever) in mammalian hosts. We use an innovative interdisciplinary approach to analyze one-on-one encounters between human neutrophils and two forms of Coccidioides posadasii. To examine the mechanisms by which the innate immune system coordinates different stages of the host response to fungal pathogens, we dissect the immune-cell response into chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Our single-cell technique reveals a surprisingly strong response by initially quiescent neutrophils to close encounters with C. posadasii, both from a distance (by complement-mediated chemotaxis) as well as upon contact (by serum-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis). This response closely resembles neutrophil interactions with Candida albicans and zymosan particles, and is significantly stronger than the neutrophil responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Rhizopus oryzae under identical conditions. The vigorous in vitro neutrophil response suggests that C. posadasii evades in vivo recognition by neutrophils through suppression of long-range mobilization and recruitment of the immune cells. This observation elucidates an important paradigm of the recognition of microbes, i.e., that intact immunotaxis comprises an intricate spatiotemporal hierarchy of distinct chemotactic processes. Moreover, in contrast to earlier reports, human neutrophils exhibit vigorous chemotaxis toward, and frustrated phagocytosis of, the large spherules of C. posadasii under physiological-like conditions. Finally, neutrophils from healthy donors and patients with chronic coccidioidomycosis display subtle differences in their responses to antibody-coated beads, even though the patient cells appear to interact normally with C. posadasii endospores. PMID:26070210

  16. Imaging inflammation with 99Tcm-labeled chemotactic peptides: analogues with reduced neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Pollak, A; Goodbody, A E; Ballinger, J R; Duncan, G S; Tran, L L; Dunn-Dufault, R; Meghji, K; Lau, F; Andrey, T W; Boxen, I; Sumner-Smith, M

    1996-02-01

    Two 99Tcm-labelled analogues of the chemotactic peptide ForMLF were evaluated as potential agents for imaging inflammation and infection, in the hope that they would be simple to use and would give diagnostically useful images shortly after injection. The peptides differed in the chelation site for 99Tcm and the presence of a hydrophilic spacer. The sequences of RP050 and RP056 were ForNleLFNleYK(G)G-C(Acm)-GPic and ForNleLFNleYKK(DG)GC(Acm)SPic respectively, where Pic is picolinic acid. In in vitro tests of binding to the ForMLF receptor on polymorphonuclear neutrophils and potency for release of myeloperoxidase, RP056 was similar in potency to ForMLF, whereas RP050 was 10 times more potent. When administered in 5-nmol doses to rats, RP050 produced less extensive neutropenia than ForMLF, whereas RP056 produced very little neutropenia. Following labelling by ligand exchange from tartrate or glucoheptonate at 100 degrees C and purification using a C-18 solid-phase extraction cartridge, 4-MBq doses were administered to rats bearing infectious (Escherichia coli) or sterile (zymosan) inflammation sites in the thigh. The inflammation-to-normal muscle ratios at 30 min after injection were 3.9 +/- 0.4 for RP050 and 4.7 +/- 0.3 for RP056 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4), and the ratios were maintained for up to 3 h. These peptides are promising agents for imaging inflammation and infection.

  17. Chemotactic properties of Escherichia coli mutants having abnormal Ca2+ content.

    PubMed Central

    Tisa, L S; Adler, J

    1995-01-01

    The calA, calC, and calD mutants of Escherichia coli are known to be sensitive to Ca2+ (R. N. Brey and B. P. Rosen, J. Bacteriol. 139:824-834, 1979). In the absence of any added stimuli for chemotaxis, both the calC and the calD mutants swam with a tumbly bias. Both the calC and the calD mutants were defective in chemotaxis as measured by computer analysis, use of swarm plates, and capillary assays. The calA mutant was only slightly defective in motility and only slightly impaired in chemotaxis. Chemotactically wild-type cells had an intra-cellular free-Ca2+ level of about 105 nM. The intracellular free-Ca2+ levels of the mutants, as determined by use of the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye fura-2 or fluo-3, were about 90, about 1,130, and about 410 nM for calA, calC, and calD, respectively. Lowering the intracellular free-Ca2+ levels in wild-type cells and in the tumbly cal mutants by use of Ca2+ chelators promoted running (smooth swimming). Overexpression of CheZ (which causes dephosphorylation of CheY-phosphate) in the wild type and in the tumbly cal mutants decreased the level of tumbliness (which is caused by CheY-phosphate). The calA mutant was 4- to 10-fold more resistant than the wild type to the inhibitory effect of omega-conotoxin on chemotaxis. omega-Conotoxin had no effect on Ca2+ extrusion by wild-type E. coli; that result suggests that omega-conotoxin affects Ca2+ transport at the point of entry instead of exit. PMID:8522517

  18. Cytokines secreted by macrophages isolated from tumor microenvironment of inflammatory breast cancer patients possess chemotactic properties.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mona M; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A; Nouh, Mohamed A; Schneider, Robert J; Sloane, Bonnie F; El-Shinawi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature describing the role of macrophages in breast cancer, the role of macrophages in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is unclear. The aim of present study was to isolate and characterize tumor associated macrophages of IBC and non-IBC patients and define their role in IBC. Tumor infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (CD14+ and CD68+) were measured by immunohistochemistry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Blood drained from axillary vein tributaries was collected during breast cancer surgery and the percentage of CD14+ in the total isolated leukocytes was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. CD14+ cells were separated from total leukocytes by immuno-magnetic beads technique and were cultured overnight. Media conditioned by CD14+ were collected and subjected to cytokine profiling using cytokine antibody array. Wound healing and invasion assays were used to test whether cytokines highly secreted by tumor drained macrophages induce motility and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that macrophages highly infiltrate into carcinoma tissues of IBC patients. In addition blood collected from axillary tributaries of IBC patients is highly enriched with CD14+ cells as compared to blood collected from non-IBC patients. Cytokine profiling of CD14+ cells isolated from IBC patients revealed a significant increase in secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CC-chemokine ligand 2; interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 as compared to CD14+ cells isolated from non-IBC patients. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 significantly increased motility and invasion of IBC cells in vitro. In conclusion, macrophages isolated from the tumor microenvironment of IBC patients secrete chemotactic cytokines that may augment dissemination and metastasis of IBC carcinoma cells.

  19. Cytokines secreted by macrophages isolated from tumor microenvironment of inflammatory breast cancer patients possess chemotactic properties

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mona M.; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A.; Nouh, Mohamed A.; Schneider, Robert J.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; El-Shinawi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature describing the role of macrophages in breast cancer, the role of macrophages in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is unclear. The aim of present study was to isolate and characterize tumor associated macrophages of IBC and non-IBC patients and define their role in IBC. Tumor infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (CD14+ and CD68+) were measured by immunohistochem-istry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Blood drained from axillary vein tributaries was collected during breast cancer surgery and the percentage of CD14+ in the total isolated leukocytes was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. CD14+ cells were separated from total leukocytes by immuno-magnetic beads technique and were cultured overnight. Media conditioned by CD14+ were collected and subjected to cytokine profiling using cytokine antibody array. Wound healing and invasion assays were used to test whether cytokines highly secreted by tumor drained macrophages induce motility and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that macrophages highly infiltrate into carcinoma tissues of IBC patients. In addition blood collected from axillary tributaries of IBC patients is highly enriched with CD14+ cells as compared to blood collected from non-IBC patients. Cytokine profiling of CD14+ cells isolated from IBC patients revealed a significant increase in secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α; monocyte chemoat-tractant protein-1/CC-chemokine ligand 2; interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 as compared to CD14+ cells isolated from non-IBC patients. Tumor necrosis factor-a, interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 significantly increased motility and invasion of IBC cells in vitro. In conclusion, macrophages isolated from the tumor microenvironment of IBC patients secrete chemotactic cytokines that may augment dissemination and metastasis of IBC carcinoma cells. PMID:24291763

  20. Sonic hedgehog is a chemotactic neural crest cell guide that is perturbed by ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Ezequiel J; Fernández-Zapico, Martín E; Battiato, Natalia L; Rovasio, Roberto A

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to understand the involvement of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) morphogen in the oriented distribution of neural crest cells (NCCs) toward the optic vesicle and to look for potential disorders of this guiding mechanism after ethanol exposure. In vitro directional analysis showed the chemotactic response of NCCs up Shh gradients and to notochord co-cultures (Shh source) or to their conditioned medium, a response inhibited by anti-Shh antibody, receptor inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Smo morpholino (MO). Expression of the Ptch-Smo receptor complex on in vitro NCCs was also shown. In whole embryos, the expression of Shh mRNA and protein was seen in the ocular region, and of Ptch, Smo and Gli/Sufu system on cephalic NCCs. Anti-Smo MO or Ptch-mutated plasmid (Ptch1(Δloop2)) impaired cephalic NCC migration/distribution, with fewer cells invading the optic region and with higher cell density at the homolateral mesencephalic level. Beads embedded with cyclopamine (Smo-blocking) or Shh (ectopic signal) supported the role of Shh as an in vivo guide molecule for cephalic NCCs. Ethanol exposure perturbed in vitro and in vivo NCC migration. Early stage embryos treated with ethanol, in a model reproducing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, showed later disruptions of craniofacial development associated with abnormal in situ expression of Shh morphogen. The results show the Shh/Ptch/Smo-dependent migration of NCCs toward the optic vesicle, with the support of specific inactivation with genetic and pharmacological tools. They also help to understand mechanisms of accurate distribution of embryonic cells and of their perturbation by a commonly consumed teratogen, and demonstrate, in addition to its other known developmental functions, a new biological activity of cellular guidance for Shh. PMID:26979762

  1. Melanoma Cells Break Down LPA to Establish Local Gradients That Drive Chemotactic Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Muinonen-Martin, Andrew J.; Susanto, Olivia; Zhang, Qifeng; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Faller, William J.; Veltman, Douwe M.; Kalna, Gabriela; Lindsay, Colin; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Sansom, Owen J.; Herd, Robert; Jones, Robert; Machesky, Laura M.; Wakelam, Michael J. O.; Knecht, David A.; Insall, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality of melanoma is caused by rapid spread of cancer cells, which occurs unusually early in tumour evolution. Unlike most solid tumours, thickness rather than cytological markers or differentiation is the best guide to metastatic potential. Multiple stimuli that drive melanoma cell migration have been described, but it is not clear which are responsible for invasion, nor if chemotactic gradients exist in real tumours. In a chamber-based assay for melanoma dispersal, we find that cells migrate efficiently away from one another, even in initially homogeneous medium. This dispersal is driven by positive chemotaxis rather than chemorepulsion or contact inhibition. The principal chemoattractant, unexpectedly active across all tumour stages, is the lipid agonist lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acting through the LPA receptor LPAR1. LPA induces chemotaxis of remarkable accuracy, and is both necessary and sufficient for chemotaxis and invasion in 2-D and 3-D assays. Growth factors, often described as tumour attractants, cause negligible chemotaxis themselves, but potentiate chemotaxis to LPA. Cells rapidly break down LPA present at substantial levels in culture medium and normal skin to generate outward-facing gradients. We measure LPA gradients across the margins of melanomas in vivo, confirming the physiological importance of our results. We conclude that LPA chemotaxis provides a strong drive for melanoma cells to invade outwards. Cells create their own gradients by acting as a sink, breaking down locally present LPA, and thus forming a gradient that is low in the tumour and high in the surrounding areas. The key step is not acquisition of sensitivity to the chemoattractant, but rather the tumour growing to break down enough LPA to form a gradient. Thus the stimulus that drives cell dispersal is not the presence of LPA itself, but the self-generated, outward-directed gradient. PMID:25313567

  2. [Determination of the neutrophil chemotactic factor in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with diffuse panbronchiolitis].

    PubMed

    Oda, H; Kadota, J; Sakito, O; Mukae, H; Morikawa, N; Shukuwa, C; Senju, R; Sawa, H; Kusano, S; Morikawa, T

    1992-04-01

    It is well known that erythromycin (EM) therapy is effective on chronic lower respiratory tract disease, including diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB). In this study we investigated the relationship between clinical findings and neutrophil chemotactic activity (NCA) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in patients with DPB receiving orally EM therapy. The NCA in post-EM therapy BALF was significantly reduced (p less than 0.001) compared with that in BALF before EM therapy (30.17 +/- 7.84% vs 53.05 +/- 10.65%). On the respiratory function before and after EM therapy, DPB patients (20 cases) showed significant improvement of %VC, FEV1.0, RV/TLC (p less than 0.001, each) and V25 (p less than 0.05). And on the post-EM therapy blood gas, PaO2 and AaDO2 level were confirmed to be significantly improved (p less than 0.001). In addition, we examined the correlation between the improvement ratio of clinical finding and the reduction of NCA in BALF after EM therapy in 10 patients with DPB. We found the significant correlation between the improvement ratio of PaO2 and the reduction NCA in BALF of those patients (p less than 0.05). There were no significant relationships between the improvement ratio in other parameters as stated above and the reduction of NCA in BALF. These findings indicate that EM restrains the NCA in BALF of patients with DPB and impairs the accumulation of neutrophils in respiratory tract, ultimately contributes to the improvement of clinical symptoms such as sputum and clinical findings such as PaO2 in patients with DPB. PMID:1624836

  3. The amoeba-to-flagellate transformation test is not reliable for the diagnosis of the genus Naegleria. Description of three new Naegleria spp.

    PubMed

    De Jonckheere, J F; Brown, S; Dobson, P J; Robinson, B S; Pernin, P

    2001-07-01

    Trophozoites of several isolates from one location in Australia have failed consistently to transform into flagellates, although they display all other characteristics of the genus Naegleria. When changing the standard transformation test, flagellates were produced. In phylogenetic trees derived from partial small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSUrDNA) sequences, one of these strains branches close to a cluster comprising N. clarki, N. australiensis, N. italica and N. jadini. It is proposed that these Australian isolates represent a new species, named N. fultoni (strain NG885). Failing to form flagellates since their isolation, even when different transformation procedures are used, are two Naegleria strains from Chile and Indonesia. In SSUrDNA-based phylogenetic trees the Chilean strain clusters with N. pussardi and the Indonesian strain clusters with N. galeacystis, but the degree of sequence difference from these described species (3.5% and 2.2%, respectively) is sufficient to propose that both of the strains represent new species, named N. chilensis (strain NG946) and N. indonesiensis (strain NG945), respectively. The close relationships between each of the new species and the Naegleria species with which they cluster in SSUrDNA-based trees were confirmed by ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequence comparisons. In France, several non-flagellating N. fowleri strains were isolated from one location. ITS rDNA sequence comparisons indicated that they correspond to a 'type' of N. fowleri found in both Europe and the USA. A redefinition of the genus Naegleria is proposed as a consequence of these and previous findings.

  4. Enhanced production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A. E.; Kunkel, S. L.; Pearce, W. H.; Shah, M. R.; Parikh, D.; Evanoff, H. L.; Haines, G. K.; Burdick, M. D.; Strieter, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory leukocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of human atherosclerotic disease, from early atherogenesis to the late stages of atherosclerosis, such as aneurysm formation. We have shown previously that human abdominal aortic aneurysms are characterized by the presence of numerous chronic inflammatory cells throughout the vessel wall (Am J Pathol 1990, 137: 1199-1213). The signals that attract lymphocytes and monocytes into the aortic wall in aneurysmal disease remain to be precisely defined. We have studied the production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by aortic tissues obtained from 47 subjects. We compared the antigenic production of these cytokines by explants of: 1) human abdominal aneurysmal tissue, 2) occlusive (atherosclerotic) aortas, and 3) normal aortas. IL-8, which is chemotactic for neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells was liberated in greater quantities by abdominal aortic aneurysms than by occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, macrophages, and to a lesser degree endothelial cells, were found to be positive for the expression of antigenic IL-8. Similarly, MCP-1, a potent chemotactic cytokine for monocytes/macrophages, was released by explants from abdominal aortic aneurysms in greater quantities than by explants from occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, the predominant MCP-1 antigen-positive cells were macrophages and to a lesser extent smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate that human abdominal aortic aneurysms produce IL-8 and MCP-1, both of which may serve to recruit additional inflammatory cells into the abdominal aortic wall, hence perpetuating the inflammatory reaction that may result in the pathology of vessel wall destruction and aortic aneurysm formation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8494046

  5. MiR-124 suppresses the chemotactic migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells toward HGF by downregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qing; Zhang, Yu; Li, Xianyang; He, Lihong; Hu, Ya'nan; Wang, Xianyao; Xu, Xiaojing; Shen, Yixin; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibit the potential to repair a wide variety of injured adult tissues. The migration capability of MSCs is an important determinant of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly implicated in regulating the migration of MSCs. Herein, we show that the expression of miR-124 was downregulated in rat MSCs (rMSCs) treated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Overexpression of miR-124 significantly reduced the chemotactic migration of rMSCs toward HGF, while inhibition of endogenous miR-124 promoted the chemotactic migration. A further study revealed that miR-124 directly targeted FZD4 and LRP6, which encode a receptor and co-receptor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, respectively, thus reducing the activity of this signaling. Consistently, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by LiCl and ΔN89β-catenin rescued the inhibitory effect of miR-124 on the chemotactic migration of rMSCs toward HGF, while inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by FH535 abrogated the enhanced chemotactic response achieved by the miR-124 inhibitor. Collectively, our study demonstrates that miR-124 downregulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling via targeting FZD4 and LRP6 and thus suppresses the chemotactic migration of rMSCs toward HGF.

  6. The chemical mediation of delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions. I. Purification of a macrophage-chemotactic factor from bovien gamma-globulin-induced skin reactions in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Kambara, T.; Ueda, K.; Maeda, S.

    1977-01-01

    A macrophage-chemotactic factor (MCFS) was extracted in the pseudoglobulin fraction from delayed hypersensitivity skin lesions induced by bovine gamma-globulin in guinea pigs. Its chemotactic activity was estimated by a modification of Boyden's method using Nuclepore filter. After chromatography of the protein fraction using Sephadex G-50 and DEAE-cellulose, in that order, two chemotactic fractions were obtained. The chemotactic factor with stronger activity (MCFS-1) was further highly purified (488-fold) by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. This factor migrated in a single band on acrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and was found to be a protein that was free of nucleic acid. Gel filtration showed that its molecular weight was similar to that of IgG. Its chemotactic activity was heat labile. Intradermal injection of this factor into normal guinea pigs induced a pronounced mononuclear cell emigration from venules. These findings are pertinent to understanding macrophage reaction in the delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Am J Pathol 87:359-374, 1977). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:66878

  7. Symbionts of the gut flagellate Staurojoenina sp. from Neotermes cubanus represent a novel, termite-associated lineage of Bacteroidales: description of 'Candidatus Vestibaculum illigatum'.

    PubMed

    Stingl, Ulrich; Maass, Annelie; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2004-07-01

    The symbioses between cellulose-degrading flagellates and bacteria are one of the most fascinating phenomena in the complex micro-ecosystem found in the hindgut of lower termites. However, little is known about the identity of the symbionts. One example is the epibiotic bacteria colonizing the surface of hypermastigote protists of the genus Staurojoenina. By using scanning electron microscopy, it was shown that the whole surface of Staurojoenina sp. from the termite Neotermes cubanus is densely covered with long rod-shaped bacteria of uniform size and morphology. PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes from isolated protozoa and subsequent cloning yielded a uniform collection of clones with virtually identical sequences. Phylogenetic analysis placed them as a new lineage among the Bacteroidales, only distantly related to other uncultivated bacteria in the hindgut of other termites, including an epibiont of the flagellate Mixotricha paradoxa. The closest cultivated relative was Tannerella forsythensis (<85 % sequence identity). Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a newly designed clone-specific oligonucleotide probe confirmed that these sequences belong to the rod-shaped epibionts of Staurojoenina sp. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of a Gram-negative cell wall and revealed special attachment sites for the symbionts on the cell envelope of the flagellate host. Based on the isolated phylogenetic position and the specific association with the surface of Staurojoenina sp., we propose to classify this new taxon of Bacteroidales under the provisional name 'Candidatus Vestibaculum illigatum'.

  8. Biogeography of Heterotrophic Flagellate Populations Indicates the Presence of Generalist and Specialist Taxa in the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrophic marine flagellates (HF) are ubiquitous in the world's oceans and represented in nearly all branches of the domain Eukaryota. However, the factors determining distributions of major taxonomic groups are poorly known. The Arctic Ocean is a good model environment for examining the distribution of functionally similar but phylogenetically diverse HF because the physical oceanography and annual ice cycles result in distinct environments that could select for microbial communities or favor specific taxa. We reanalyzed new and previously published high-throughput sequencing data from multiple studies in the Arctic Ocean to identify broad patterns in the distribution of individual taxa. HF accounted for fewer than 2% to over one-half of the reads from the water column and for up to 60% of reads from ice, which was dominated by Cryothecomonas. In the water column, many HF phylotypes belonging to Telonemia and Picozoa, uncultured marine stramenopiles (MAST), and choanoflagellates were geographically widely distributed. However, for two groups in particular, Telonemia and Cryothecomonas, some species level taxa showed more restricted distributions. For example, several phylotypes of Telonemia favored open waters with lower nutrients such as the Canada Basin and offshore of the Mackenzie Shelf. In summary, we found that while some Arctic HF were successful over a range of conditions, others could be specialists that occur under particular conditions. We conclude that tracking species level diversity in HF not only is feasible but also provides a potential tool for understanding the responses of marine microbial ecosystems to rapidly changing ice regimes. PMID:25595764

  9. On Keelungia pulex nov. gen. et nov. sp., a heterotrophic euglenoid flagellate that lacks pellicular plates (Euglenophyceae, Euglenida).

    PubMed

    Chan, Ya-Fan; Moestrup, Øjvind; Chang, Jeng

    2013-01-01

    Keelungia pulex nov. gen. et nov. sp. is described from coastal waters of NE Taiwan. The new species is heterotrophic and feeds on bacteria. Cells are oblong-ovoid, biflagellate and glide along the sides of the flask. Each cell is approximately 8-11μm long, and one of the smallest euglenoid flagellates presently known. Keelungia lacks pellicular plates and in this respect resembles diplonemids and Symbiontida, which are thought to be among the basal groups of Euglenozoa. SEM showed the presence of 10 evenly spaced longitudinal striae in the cell surface, but the striae are difficult to see in the light microscope. TEM showed each stria to comprise a double set of very low longitudinal ridges separated by a shallow furrow, and supported by ca 5 microtubules beneath the plasmalemma, unlike the situation in diplonemids and Symbiontida. The cell surface was further subtended by an extensive system of rough cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum. Keelungia pulex is phylogenetically related to species of Ploeotia and to Lentomonas applanata, but differs in details of the feeding apparatus and in the absence of pellicular plates. Sequencing of SSU rDNA indicates that Ploeotia, Keelungia and Entosiphon form a clade near the base of the euglenoid phylogenetic tree. PMID:22698812

  10. Biogeography of heterotrophic flagellate populations indicates the presence of generalist and specialist taxa in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Mary; Lovejoy, Connie

    2015-03-01

    Heterotrophic marine flagellates (HF) are ubiquitous in the world's oceans and represented in nearly all branches of the domain Eukaryota. However, the factors determining distributions of major taxonomic groups are poorly known. The Arctic Ocean is a good model environment for examining the distribution of functionally similar but phylogenetically diverse HF because the physical oceanography and annual ice cycles result in distinct environments that could select for microbial communities or favor specific taxa. We reanalyzed new and previously published high-throughput sequencing data from multiple studies in the Arctic Ocean to identify broad patterns in the distribution of individual taxa. HF accounted for fewer than 2% to over one-half of the reads from the water column and for up to 60% of reads from ice, which was dominated by Cryothecomonas. In the water column, many HF phylotypes belonging to Telonemia and Picozoa, uncultured marine stramenopiles (MAST), and choanoflagellates were geographically widely distributed. However, for two groups in particular, Telonemia and Cryothecomonas, some species level taxa showed more restricted distributions. For example, several phylotypes of Telonemia favored open waters with lower nutrients such as the Canada Basin and offshore of the Mackenzie Shelf. In summary, we found that while some Arctic HF were successful over a range of conditions, others could be specialists that occur under particular conditions. We conclude that tracking species level diversity in HF not only is feasible but also provides a potential tool for understanding the responses of marine microbial ecosystems to rapidly changing ice regimes.

  11. [The role of monocyte chemotactic peptide (MCP-1) in chronic renal allograft rejection].

    PubMed

    Boratyńska, M

    1998-04-01

    Monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (MCP-1) plays a key role as a mediator of inflammatory infiltration, mainly composed with macrophages. Experimental studies showed that macrophages and their products are pathogenetic factors of chronic renal graft rejection (ch.g.r.). The objective of the present study was to determine the role of MCP-1 in the pathogenesis of human renal ch.g.r. Examined were 34 patients with ch.g.r. (Group I), 50 patients with a stable allograft function (Group II), and 25 healthy subjects (control). Serum and urine levels of MCP-1 were measured by ELISA. The serum level of MCP-1 was found to be higher in transplant patients, than in control group, but this difference was not significant. The serum level of MCP-1 showed a correlation with concentration of triglycerides in both transplant patient groups. This may results from overproduction of MCP-1 through cells of vascular wall affected by hyperlipidemic microenvironment. Considering the lack of relationship between the serum and urine levels of MCP-1, I decided attribute the urine levels of MCP-1 to the secretion through the infiltrating cells and through the kidney cells. In patients with ch.g.r. the urine levels of MCP-1 were significantly higher p < 0.001) than in patients with a stable graft function and control group. MCP-1 levels were particularly high (> 2000 pg/mg creatinine) in patients with enhanced dynamics of ch.g.r. The MCP-1 levels were higher in those patients whose biopsies described cellular infiltration (1385 + 820 pg/mg creatinine vs 680 + 280 pg/mg creatinine). The urine level of MCP-1 showed a correlation with concentration of serum creatinine, cholesterol, level of proteinuria and with arterial pressure in ch.g.r. patients. Increased urine levels of MCP-1 and correlation of MCP-1 with the activity of progressive deterioration of the graft function suggest important role of this chemokine in the pathogenesis of ch.g.r., possibly by activating macrophages and by stimulating

  12. Chemotactic response of marine micro-organisms to micro-scale nutrient layers.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Justin R; Marcos; Stocker, Roman

    2007-01-01

    The degree to which planktonic microbes can exploit microscale resource patches will have considerable implications for oceanic trophodynamics and biogeochemical flux. However, to take advantage of nutrient patches in the ocean, swimming microbes must overcome the influences of physical forces including molecular diffusion and turbulent shear, which will limit the availability of patches and the ability of bacteria to locate them. Until recently, methodological limitations have precluded direct examinations of microbial behaviour within patchy habitats and realistic small-scale flow conditions. Hence, much of our current knowledge regarding microbial behaviour in the ocean has been procured from theoretical predictions. To obtain new information on microbial foraging behaviour in the ocean we have applied soft lithographic fabrication techniques to develop 2 microfluidic devices, which we have used to create (i) microscale nutrient patches with dimensions and diffusive characteristics relevant to oceanic processes and (ii) microscale vortices, with shear rates corresponding to those expected in the ocean. These microfluidic devices have permitted a first direct examination of microbial swimming and chemotactic behaviour within a heterogeneous and dynamic seascape. The combined use of epifluorescence and phase contrast microscopy allow direct examinations of the physical dimensions and diffusive characteristics of nutrient patches, while observing the population-level aggregative response, in addition to the swimming behaviour of individual microbes. These experiments have revealed that some species of phytoplankton, heterotrophic bacteria and phagotrophic protists are adept at locating and exploiting diffusing microscale resource patches within very short time frames. We have also shown that up to moderate shear rates, marine bacteria are able to fight the flow and swim through their environment at their own accord. However, beyond a threshold high shear level

  13. Chemotactic response of marine micro-organisms to micro-scale nutrient layers.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Justin R; Marcos; Stocker, Roman

    2007-01-01

    The degree to which planktonic microbes can exploit microscale resource patches will have considerable implications for oceanic trophodynamics and biogeochemical flux. However, to take advantage of nutrient patches in the ocean, swimming microbes must overcome the influences of physical forces including molecular diffusion and turbulent shear, which will limit the availability of patches and the ability of bacteria to locate them. Until recently, methodological limitations have precluded direct examinations of microbial behaviour within patchy habitats and realistic small-scale flow conditions. Hence, much of our current knowledge regarding microbial behaviour in the ocean has been procured from theoretical predictions. To obtain new information on microbial foraging behaviour in the ocean we have applied soft lithographic fabrication techniques to develop 2 microfluidic devices, which we have used to create (i) microscale nutrient patches with dimensions and diffusive characteristics relevant to oceanic processes and (ii) microscale vortices, with shear rates corresponding to those expected in the ocean. These microfluidic devices have permitted a first direct examination of microbial swimming and chemotactic behaviour within a heterogeneous and dynamic seascape. The combined use of epifluorescence and phase contrast microscopy allow direct examinations of the physical dimensions and diffusive characteristics of nutrient patches, while observing the population-level aggregative response, in addition to the swimming behaviour of individual microbes. These experiments have revealed that some species of phytoplankton, heterotrophic bacteria and phagotrophic protists are adept at locating and exploiting diffusing microscale resource patches within very short time frames. We have also shown that up to moderate shear rates, marine bacteria are able to fight the flow and swim through their environment at their own accord. However, beyond a threshold high shear level

  14. In vitro inhibitory effects of Moringa oleifera leaf extract and its major components on chemiluminescence and chemotactic activity of phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Vongsak, Boonyadist; Gritsanapan, Wandee; Wongkrajang, Yuvadee; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    The ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves and its major constituents, crypto-chlorogenic acid, quercetin 3-O-glucoside and kaempferol 3-O-glucoside, were investigated on the respiratory burst of human whole blood and isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) using a luminol-based chemiluminescence assay. The chemotactic migration of PMNs was also investigated using the Boyden chamber technique. The ethanol extract demonstrated inhibitory activities on the oxidative burst and the chemotactic migration of PMNs. Quercetin 3-O-glucoside, crypto-chlorogenic acid, and kaempferol 3-O-glucoside, isolated from the extract, expressed relatively strong inhibitory activity on the oxidative burst of PMNs with IC50 values of 4.1, 6.7 and 7.0 microM, respectively, comparable with that of aspirin. They also demonstrated strong inhibition of chemotatic migration of PMNs with IC50 values of 9.5, 15.9 and 18.2 microM, respectively. The results suggest that M. oleifera leaves could modulate the immune response of human phagocytes, linking to its ethnopharmacological use as an anti-inflammatory agent. The immunomodulating activity of the plant was mainly due to its major components. PMID:24427941

  15. In vitro inhibitory effects of Moringa oleifera leaf extract and its major components on chemiluminescence and chemotactic activity of phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Vongsak, Boonyadist; Gritsanapan, Wandee; Wongkrajang, Yuvadee; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    The ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves and its major constituents, crypto-chlorogenic acid, quercetin 3-O-glucoside and kaempferol 3-O-glucoside, were investigated on the respiratory burst of human whole blood and isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) using a luminol-based chemiluminescence assay. The chemotactic migration of PMNs was also investigated using the Boyden chamber technique. The ethanol extract demonstrated inhibitory activities on the oxidative burst and the chemotactic migration of PMNs. Quercetin 3-O-glucoside, crypto-chlorogenic acid, and kaempferol 3-O-glucoside, isolated from the extract, expressed relatively strong inhibitory activity on the oxidative burst of PMNs with IC50 values of 4.1, 6.7 and 7.0 microM, respectively, comparable with that of aspirin. They also demonstrated strong inhibition of chemotatic migration of PMNs with IC50 values of 9.5, 15.9 and 18.2 microM, respectively. The results suggest that M. oleifera leaves could modulate the immune response of human phagocytes, linking to its ethnopharmacological use as an anti-inflammatory agent. The immunomodulating activity of the plant was mainly due to its major components.

  16. Distinct expression and function of the novel mouse chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-5 in lung allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse CC chemokine cDNA from the lung during an allergic inflammatory reaction. The protein encoded by this cDNA is chemotactic for eosinophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. Based on its similarities in sequence and function with other CC chemokines, we have named it mouse monocyte chemotactic protein-5 (mMCP- 5). Under noninflammatory conditions, expression of mMCP-5 in the lymph nodes and thymus is constitutive and is generally restricted to stromal cells. Neutralization of mMCP-5 protein with specific antibodies during an allergic inflammatory reaction in vivo resulted in a reduction in the number of eosinophils that accumulated in the lung. Moreover, mMCP- 5 mRNA expression in vivo is regulated differently from that of other major CC chemokines in the lung during the allergic reaction, including Eotaxin. The presence of lymphocytes is essential for expression of mMCP-5 by alveolar macrophages and smooth muscle cells in the lung, and the induction of mMCP-5 RNA occurs earlier than that of the eosinophil chemokine Eotaxin during allergic inflammation. In contrast to Eotaxin, mRNA for mMCP-5 can be produced by mast cells. From these results, we postulate that mMCP-5 plays a pivotal role during the early stages of allergic lung inflammation. PMID:8920881

  17. [Course of hay fever during the pollen season with respect to the effect of specific immunotherapy. II. Cytologic changes and chemotactic activity in nasal lavage].

    PubMed

    Rozniecka, M; Kowałski, M L; Grzegorczyk, J; Wojciechowska, B; Sliwińska-Kowalska, M; Rozniecki, J

    1995-01-01

    The cytological changes and chemotactic activity in nasal lavage fluid were observed in 27 patients with pollen allergy. In one group of patients Pollinex was administered, but in the second--only placebo. Total cell count in nasal secretions was increased after pollen season. The significant increase of eosinophils and metachromatic cells was observed during the season in comparison with the time before and after it. No seasonal dynamic was documented in chemotactic activity of neutrophils in the nasal lavage fluid. Applied immunotherapy gave a some protection on evaluated parameters and observed symptoms.

  18. High Genetic Diversity and Fine-Scale Spatial Structure in the Marine Flagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae) Uncovered by Microsatellite Loci

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Chris D.; Montagnes, David J. S.; Martin, Laura E.; Watts, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    Free-living marine protists are often assumed to be broadly distributed and genetically homogeneous on large spatial scales. However, an increasing application of highly polymorphic genetic markers (e.g., microsatellites) has provided evidence for high genetic diversity and population structuring on small spatial scales in many free-living protists. Here we characterise a panel of new microsatellite markers for the common marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina. Nine microsatellite loci were used to assess genotypic diversity at two spatial scales by genotyping 200 isolates of O. marina from 6 broad geographic regions around Great Britain and Ireland; in one region, a single 2 km shore line was sampled intensively to assess fine-scale genetic diversity. Microsatellite loci resolved between 1–6 and 7–23 distinct alleles per region in the least and most variable loci respectively, with corresponding variation in expected heterozygosities (He) of 0.00–0.30 and 0.81–0.93. Across the dataset, genotypic diversity was high with 183 genotypes detected from 200 isolates. Bayesian analysis of population structure supported two model populations. One population was distributed across all sampled regions; the other was confined to the intensively sampled shore, and thus two distinct populations co-occurred at this site. Whilst model-based analysis inferred a single UK-wide population, pairwise regional FST values indicated weak to moderate population sub-division (0.01–0.12), but no clear correlation between spatial and genetic distance was evident. Data presented in this study highlight extensive genetic diversity for O. marina; however, it remains a substantial challenge to uncover the mechanisms that drive genetic diversity in free-living microorganisms. PMID:21203414

  19. High genetic diversity and fine-scale spatial structure in the marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae) uncovered by microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Chris D; Montagnes, David J S; Martin, Laura E; Watts, Phillip C

    2010-01-01

    Free-living marine protists are often assumed to be broadly distributed and genetically homogeneous on large spatial scales. However, an increasing application of highly polymorphic genetic markers (e.g., microsatellites) has provided evidence for high genetic diversity and population structuring on small spatial scales in many free-living protists. Here we characterise a panel of new microsatellite markers for the common marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina. Nine microsatellite loci were used to assess genotypic diversity at two spatial scales by genotyping 200 isolates of O. marina from 6 broad geographic regions around Great Britain and Ireland; in one region, a single 2 km shore line was sampled intensively to assess fine-scale genetic diversity. Microsatellite loci resolved between 1-6 and 7-23 distinct alleles per region in the least and most variable loci respectively, with corresponding variation in expected heterozygosities (H(e)) of 0.00-0.30 and 0.81-0.93. Across the dataset, genotypic diversity was high with 183 genotypes detected from 200 isolates. Bayesian analysis of population structure supported two model populations. One population was distributed across all sampled regions; the other was confined to the intensively sampled shore, and thus two distinct populations co-occurred at this site. Whilst model-based analysis inferred a single UK-wide population, pairwise regional F(ST) values indicated weak to moderate population sub-division (0.01-0.12), but no clear correlation between spatial and genetic distance was evident. Data presented in this study highlight extensive genetic diversity for O. marina; however, it remains a substantial challenge to uncover the mechanisms that drive genetic diversity in free-living microorganisms.

  20. Ym1, an eosinophilic chemotactic factor, participates in the brain inflammation induced by Angiostrongylus cantonensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Lv, Zhiyue; Wang, Fuzhen; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Qixian; Li, Shuting; Yang, Fan; Zeng, Xin; Wu, Xiaoying; Wu, Zhongdao

    2013-07-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has caused hundreds of cases of human angiostrongyliasis worldwide. The larva in nonpermissive hosts cannot develop into an adult worm and can cause eosinophilic meningitis and ocular angiostrongyliasis. The mechanism of brain inflammation caused by the worm remains poorly defined. According to previous data of GeneChip, Ym1 in the brain of mice 21 days after infection with A. cantonensis was highly upregulated to over 7,300 times than the untreated mice. Ym1 is an eosinophilic chemotactic factor with the alternative names of chitinase-3-like protein 3, eosinophil chemotactic cytokine, and ECF-L. Ym1 displays chemotactic activity for T lymphocytes, bone marrow cells, and eosinophils and may favor inflammatory responses induced by parasitic infections and allergy. It has been reported that Ym1 is synthesized and secreted by activated macrophages during parasitic infection (Chang et al., J Biol Chem 276(20):17497-17506, 2001). In the brain, microglia are alternatively activated macrophage-derived cells which are the key immune cells in central nervous system inflammation. To explore the role of Ym1 in inflammation caused by A. cantonensis-infected mice, we examined the levels of Ym1 in the sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the infected animals, followed by detection of the mRNA expression level of Ym1 in various organs including the brain, lung, liver, spleen, and kidney and of the cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 in the brain of the infected mice with or without intraperitoneal injection of minocycline (an inhibitor of microglial activation) by real-time reserve transcription PCR. Furthermore, immunolocalization of Ym1 in the brains of the infected mice was observed by using a fluorescence microscope. Our results showed that Ym1 was most highly expressed in the brains and CSF of the infected mice along with the process of inflammation. The antibody localized Ym1 to the microglia in the brain of the mice

  1. Interleukin-8 is a major neutrophil chemotactic factor derived from cultured human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with interleukin-1 beta or tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Takashiba, S; Takigawa, M; Takahashi, K; Myokai, F; Nishimura, F; Chihara, T; Kurihara, H; Nomura, Y; Murayama, Y

    1992-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators produced by cells in the gingiva have been implicated in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease, a common infectious disease. In this study, we examined the biological activity of neutrophil chemotactic factors and the kinetics of expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA derived from normal gingival fibroblasts in response to inflammatory mediators in an in vitro model. Gingival fibroblasts stimulated by either recombinant human interleukin-1 beta or recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha produced neutrophil chemotactic factors after 4 h, whereas expression of cell-derived IL-8 mRNA was detected within 1 h after stimulation. Furthermore, in a neutralization assay, rabbit anti-recombinant human IL-8 antiserum inhibited neutrophil chemotactic activity to basal levels. These results provide evidence that gingival fibroblasts synthesize potent chemotactic factors such as IL-8 in the presence of the inflammatory mediators interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha. The activity of these factors may contribute to neutrophil-mediated processes in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Images PMID:1452358

  2. Secretion of monocyte chemotactic activity by cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells in response to PDGF is due predominantly to the induction of JE/MCP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, M.; Hsu, W. C.; Bogdanov, V. Y.; Taubman, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    Inflammation is a critical feature of atherosclerosis and is characterized in part by the migration of circulating monocytes to the atherosclerotic plaque. These monocytes, together with macrophages, are a source of cytokines, growth factors, proteases, and procoagulants, which contribute to the progression of the atherosclerosis lesion. This study employed a modified Boyden chamber to examine the secretion of monocyte chemotactic activity by cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells in response to growth factors and cytokines. The induction of monocyte chemotactic activity showed a surprising specificity for platelet-derived growth factor-BB. This activity was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide and thus required de novo transcription and protein synthesis. The ability to stimulate monocyte migration appeared to be solely due to the secretion of the monocyte chemoattractant protein JE/MCP-1 and was completely blocked by antisense oligonucleotides and antibodies to JE/MCP-1. The induction of chemotactic activity was also blocked by dexamethasone, an inhibitor of JE mRNA accumulation. This study suggests that the secretion of monocyte chemotactic activity by vascular smooth muscle cells is a highly regulatable and specific event and underscores the importance of JE/MCP-1 in the inflammatory response of the vessel wall. Images Figure 5 PMID:8686755

  3. Migration of Chemotactic Bacteria Transverse to Flow in Response to a Benzoate Source Plume Created in a Saturated Sand-Packed Microcosm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Boser, B.

    2012-12-01

    Bioremediation processes depend on contact between microbial populations and the groundwater contaminants that they biodegrade. Chemotaxis, the ability of bacteria to sense a chemical gradient and swim preferentially toward locations of higher concentration, can enhance the transport of bacteria toward contaminant sources that may not be readily accessible by advection and dispersion alone. A two-dimensional rectangular-shaped microcosm packed with quartz sand was used to quantify the effect of chemotaxis on the migration of bacteria within a saturated model aquifer system. Artificial groundwater was pumped through the microcosm at a rate of approximately 1 m/day. A plume of sodium benzoate was created by continuous injection into an upper port of the microcosm to generate a chemical gradient in the vertical direction transverse to flow. Chemotactic bacteria, Pseudomonas putida F1, or the nonchemotactic mutant, P. putida F1 CheA, were injected with a conservative tracer in a port several centimeters below the benzoate position. As the injectates traversed the one-meter length of the microcosm, samples were collected from a dozen effluent ports to determine vertical concentration distributions for the bacteria, benzoate and tracer. A moment analysis was implemented to estimate the center of mass, variance, and skewness of the concentration profiles. The transverse dispersion coefficient and the transverse dispersivity for chemotactic and nonchemotactic bacteria were also evaluated. Experiments performed with a continuous injection of bacteria showed that the center of mass for chemotactic bacteria was closer to the benzoate source on average than the nonchemotactic control (relative to the conservative tracer). These results demonstrated that chemotaxis can increase bacterial transport toward contaminants, potentially enhancing the effectiveness of in situ bioremediation. Experiments with 2 cm and 3 cm spacing between bacteria and benzoate injection locations were

  4. Biafine applied on human epidermal wounds is chemotactic for macrophages and increases the IL-1/IL-6 ratio.

    PubMed

    Coulomb, B; Friteau, L; Dubertret, L

    1997-01-01

    Using a model of pure epidermal wounds in normal human volunteers, we have studied the effects of Biafine emulsion firstly on inflammatory cell migration, vascular permeability and cytokine release during the first 24 h, and secondly on epidermal wound healing by measuring transepidermal water loss from day 1 to day 7. Under these conditions, Biafine does not improve epidermal healing, in contrast to what is observed with bleeding dermoepidermal wounds. Our results suggest that the effects of Biafine are essentially at the dermis level. The analysis of epidermal wound exudates leads to the same conclusion. As a matter of fact, we demonstrated that Biafine is chemotactic for macrophages and increases the IL-1/IL-6 ratio, chiefly by reducing the secretion of IL-6. This study permits to progressively clarify the mode of action of Biafine, that seems to be located at the level of granulation tissue formation and not at the epidermal level.

  5. Multiscale dynamics of biological cells with chemotactic interactions: From a discrete stochastic model to a continuous description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Mark; Chen, Nan; Glimm, Tilmann; Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2006-05-01

    The cellular Potts model (CPM) has been used for simulating various biological phenomena such as differential adhesion, fruiting body formation of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, angiogenesis, cancer invasion, chondrogenesis in embryonic vertebrate limbs, and many others. We derive a continuous limit of a discrete one-dimensional CPM with the chemotactic interactions between cells in the form of a Fokker-Planck equation for the evolution of the cell probability density function. This equation is then reduced to the classical macroscopic Keller-Segel model. In particular, all coefficients of the Keller-Segel model are obtained from parameters of the CPM. Theoretical results are verified numerically by comparing Monte Carlo simulations for the CPM with numerics for the Keller-Segel model.

  6. Chemotactic Activity of Cyclophilin A in the Skin Mucus of Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and Its Active Site for Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Dawar, Farman Ullah; Tu, Jiagang; Xiong, Yang; Lan, Jiangfeng; Dong, Xing Xing; Liu, Xiaoling; Khattak, Muhammad Nasir Khan; Mei, Jie; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Fish skin mucus is a dynamic barrier for invading pathogens with a variety of anti-microbial enzymes, including cyclophilin A (CypA), a multi-functional protein with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Beside various other immunological functions, CypA induces leucocytes migration in vitro in teleost. In the current study, we have discovered several novel immune-relevant proteins in yellow catfish skin mucus by mass spectrometry (MS). The CypA present among them was further detected by Western blot. Moreover, the CypA present in the skin mucus displayed strong chemotactic activity for yellow catfish leucocytes. Interestingly, asparagine (like arginine in mammals) at position 69 was the critical site in yellow catfish CypA involved in leucocyte attraction. These novel efforts do not only highlight the enzymatic texture of skin mucus, but signify CypA to be targeted for anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:27589721

  7. Chemotactic Activity of Cyclophilin A in the Skin Mucus of Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and Its Active Site for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Dawar, Farman Ullah; Tu, Jiagang; Xiong, Yang; Lan, Jiangfeng; Dong, Xing Xing; Liu, Xiaoling; Khattak, Muhammad Nasir Khan; Mei, Jie; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Fish skin mucus is a dynamic barrier for invading pathogens with a variety of anti-microbial enzymes, including cyclophilin A (CypA), a multi-functional protein with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Beside various other immunological functions, CypA induces leucocytes migration in vitro in teleost. In the current study, we have discovered several novel immune-relevant proteins in yellow catfish skin mucus by mass spectrometry (MS). The CypA present among them was further detected by Western blot. Moreover, the CypA present in the skin mucus displayed strong chemotactic activity for yellow catfish leucocytes. Interestingly, asparagine (like arginine in mammals) at position 69 was the critical site in yellow catfish CypA involved in leucocyte attraction. These novel efforts do not only highlight the enzymatic texture of skin mucus, but signify CypA to be targeted for anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:27589721

  8. Prevalence and organ distribution of leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) among decedents in New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christopher P.; Beggs, Marjorie L.; Wilson, Jon D.; Lathrop, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 (LECT2) amyloidosis is one of the most recently described types of amyloidosis. Since its description, it has been found to be one the most common types of amyloidosis in large series of amyloid cases involving the kidney and liver in the United States, where it primarily affects patients of Hispanic ethnicity. We sought to investigate the prevalence of this disease among Hispanic adult decedents who had an autopsy performed at the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator and determine the organ distribution of amyloid deposition. LECT2 amyloid deposits were identified within the kidney in 3.1% of Hispanic decedents. It was consistently deposited in the liver, spleen, adrenals, and lungs but did not involve the myocardium or brain. LECT2 amyloidosis is likely not rare among Hispanics in the Southwest United States and could represent an important but under-recognized etiology of chronic kidney disease in this population. PMID:26912093

  9. TNF-alpha associated with extracellular matrix fibronectin provides a stop signal for chemotactically migrating T cells.

    PubMed

    Franitza, S; Hershkoviz, R; Kam, N; Lichtenstein, N; Vaday, G G; Alon, R; Lider, O

    2000-09-01

    The migration of T cells into extravascular sites of inflammation is regulated by information derived from the molecular structure of the invaded tissue and from chemokine and cytokine gradients in the context of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Although recent studies have highlighted the role of particular chemoattractants in leukocyte migration, to date little is known about how specific combinations of contextual signals control the migration of leukocytes and their localization at sites of inflammation. Here we studied the interplay between a pleiotropic cytokine, TNF-alpha, and two prototypic chemoattractants, RANTES and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha), on human CD45RO+ T cells migrating within an ECM-like context. For this purpose, we used a newly constructed three-dimensional gel system designed to follow, in real time, the migration of individual leukocytes along chemotactic gradients in vitro. We found that TNF-alpha, which binds the ECM protein fibronectin and lacks adhesion- and migration-promoting effects of its own, can act as a proadhesive cytokine on T cells exposed to RANTES and SDF-1alpha. Furthermore, fibronectin-complexed TNF-alpha provided anchorage signals to the T cells as they moved directionally along chemoattractive gradients. This effect of TNF-alpha required an intact TNF-alpha receptor II subtype on the migrating T cells. The anchoring effect of TNF-alpha appears to be specific; IL-2, an integrin-activating proadhesive cytokine, does not transmit stoppage signals to T cell migration induced by RANTES. Thus, TNF-alpha present in the ECM at sites of inflammation may function to anchor T cells recruited to these sites by chemotactic signals. PMID:10946305

  10. Agrobacterium tumefaciens twin-arginine-dependent translocation is important for virulence, flagellation, and chemotaxis but not type IV secretion.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhiyong; Christie, Peter J

    2003-02-01

    chemotactic responses but not to sensory perception of plant signals or the assembly of a type IV secretion system.

  11. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Twin-Arginine-Dependent Translocation Is Important for Virulence, Flagellation, and Chemotaxis but Not Type IV Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhiyong; Christie, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    This study characterized the contribution of the twin-arginine translocation (TAT) pathway to growth, motility, and virulence of the phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In contrast to wild-type strain A348, a tatC null mutant failed to export the green fluorescent protein fused to the trimethylamine N-oxide reductase (TorA) signal sequence or to grow on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor during anaerobic growth. The tatC mutant displayed defects in growth rate and cell division but not in cell viability, and it also released abundant levels of several proteins into the culture supernatant when grown in rich medium or in vir induction minimal medium. Nearly all A348 cells were highly motile in both rich and minimal media. By contrast, approximately 0.1% of the tatC mutant cells were motile in rich medium, and <0.01% were motile in vir induction medium. Nonmotile tatC mutant cells lacked detectable flagella, whereas motile tatC mutant cells collected from the edge of a motility halo possessed flagella but not because of reversion to a functional TAT system. Motile tatC cells failed to exhibit chemotaxis toward sugars under aerobic conditions or towards nitrate under anaerobic conditions. The tatC mutant was highly attenuated for virulence, only occasionally (∼15% of inoculations) inciting formation of small tumors on plants after a prolonged incubation period of 6 to 8 weeks. However, an enriched subpopulation of motile tatC mutants exhibited enhanced virulence compared to the nonmotile variants. Finally, the tatC mutant transferred T-DNA and protein effectors to plant cells and a mobilizable IncQ plasmid to agrobacterial recipients at wild-type levels. Together, our findings establish that, in addition to its role in secretion of folded cofactor-bound enzymes functioning in alternative respiration, the TAT system of A. tumefaciens is an important virulence determinant. Furthermore, this secretion pathway contributes to flagellar biogenesis and chemotactic

  12. Agrobacterium tumefaciens twin-arginine-dependent translocation is important for virulence, flagellation, and chemotaxis but not type IV secretion.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhiyong; Christie, Peter J

    2003-02-01

    chemotactic responses but not to sensory perception of plant signals or the assembly of a type IV secretion system. PMID:12533451

  13. High diversity of the 'Spumella-like' flagellates: an investigation based on the SSU rRNA gene sequences of isolates from habitats located in six different geographic regions.

    PubMed

    Boenigk, Jens; Pfandl, Karin; Stadler, Peter; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2005-05-01

    We isolated 28 strains of 'Spumella-like' flagellates from different freshwater and soil habitats in Austria, People's Republic of China, Nepal, New Zealand, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Hawaii by use of a modified filtration-acclimatization method. 'Spumella-like' flagellates were found in all of the samples and were often among the dominant bacterivorous flagellates in the respective environments. The small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequence of the isolates was determined and aligned with previously published sequences of members belonging to the Chrysophyceae sensu stricto. Phylogenetic analysis of the 28 new sequences confirmed their position within the Chrysophyceae sensu stricto and positioned them within different clades. Most of the sequences grouped within clade C and formed several subclusters separated from each other by green taxa including flagellates belonging to Ochromonas, Dinobryon, Poterioochromonas and others. All soil isolates clustered together (subcluster C1) with the soil strain Spumella elongata and the undescribed soil strain 'Spumella danica'. Aquatic isolates were affiliated with at least two branches (C2 and C3). Sequence similarity to the closest related member of the Chrysophyceae ranged between 92% and 99.6%, sequence divergence among the 'Spumella-like' flagellates was as high as 10%. We conclude that (i) the 'Spumella-like' flagellates are a diverse group both in terms of sequence dissimilarity between isolates and in terms of the number of genotypes, (ii) Spumella and Ochromonas are polyphyletic, and (iii) based on the SSU rRNA gene no biogeographical restriction of certain branches could be observed even though different ecotypes may be represented by the same genotype.

  14. Flagellate Predation on a Bacterial Model Community: Interplay of Size-Selective Grazing, Specific Bacterial Cell Size, and Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Martin W.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of grazing by the bacterivorous nanoflagellate Ochromonas sp. strain DS on the taxonomic and morphological structures of a complex bacterial community was studied in one-stage chemostat experiments. A bacterial community, consisting of at least 30 different strains, was fed with a complex carbon source under conditions of low growth rate (0.5 day−1 when nongrazed) and low substrate concentration (9 mg liter−1). Before and after the introduction of the predator, the bacterial community composition was studied by in situ techniques (immunofluorescence microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization), as well as by cultivation on agar media. The cell sizes of nonspecifically stained and immunofluorescently labeled bacteria were measured by image analysis. Grazing by the flagellate caused a bidirectional change in the morphological structure of the community. Medium-size bacterial cells, which dominated the nongrazed community, were largely replaced by smaller cells, as well as by cells contained in large multicellular flocs. Cell morphological changes were combined with community taxonomic changes. After introduction of the flagellate, the dominating strains with medium-size cells were largely replaced by single-celled strains with smaller cells on the one hand and, on the other hand, by Pseudomonas sp. strain MWH1, which formed the large, floc-like forms. We assume that size-selective grazing was the major force controlling both the morphological and the taxonomic structures of the model community. PMID:10543797

  15. Cloning, bacterial expression and biological characterization of recombinant human granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 and differential expression of granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 and epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Proost, P; Ronsse, I; Mitera, T; Haelens, A; Wuyts, A; Opdenakker, G; Van Damme, J; Billiau, A

    1997-02-01

    Human osteosarcoma cells secrete a novel C-X-C chemokine called granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2), which was previously identified by amino acid sequencing of the purified natural protein. In order to understand the role of this new protein in inflammatory reactions, we cloned GCP-2 DNA sequences to generate recombinant protein and specific DNA probes and primers. By means of PCR on cloned cDNA of osteosarcoma cells induced by interleukin-1 beta and fibroblasts induced by lipopolysaccharide plus dsRNA, the complete coding domain of GCP-2 was isolated. This sequence was cloned into the bacterial expression vector pHEN1 and, after induction, GCP-2 was secreted into the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Recombinant GCP-2 (rGCP-2) was purified and characterized by SDS/PAGE as a monomeric 6.5-kDa protein and by amino-terminal sequencing. The chemoattractive potency of GCP-2 for neutrophilic granulocytes was about 10-times less than that of interleukin-8 and the minimal effective dose was 10 ng/ml. However, at optimal dose (100 ng/ml) the maximal chemotactic response was comparable with that of interleukin-8. Both characteristics correspond with those of natural GCP-2. In addition, intracellular calcium release in neutrophils by recombinant GCP-2 was achieved with as little as 10 ng/ml. Quantitation studies using reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction revealed higher GCP-2 mRNA production in normal fibroblasts than in tumor cells. When compared with epithelial-cell-derived neutrophil-activating peptide-78 (ENA-78) mRNA, the GCP-2 mRNA levels were higher in all cell lines tested. In addition, GCP-2 and ENA-78 expression seem to be differentially regulated in that phorbol ester and lipopolysaccharide have opposing effects on their mRNA induction in diploid fibroblasts and epithelial cells, respectively. Interleukin-1 was demonstrated to be a general inducer for both chemokines, while interferon-gamma down-regulates their mRNA expression. The

  16. Cofactor Regulation of C5a Chemotactic Activity in Physiological Fluids. Requirement for the Vitamin D Binding Protein, Thrombospondin-1 and its Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Glenda; Zhang, Jianhua; Habiel, David M.; Ge, Lingyin; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Kew, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    Factors in physiological fluids that regulate the chemotactic activity of complement activation peptides C5a and C5a des Arg are not well understood. The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) has been shown to significantly enhance chemotaxis to C5a/C5a des Arg. More recently, platelet-derived thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) has been shown to facilitate the augmentation of C5a-induced chemotaxis by DBP. The objective of this study was to better characterize these chemotactic cofactors and investigate the role that cell surface TSP-1 receptors CD36 and CD47 may play in this process. The chemotactic activity in C-activated normal serum, citrated plasma, DBP-depleted serum or C5 depleted serum was determined for both normal human neutrophils and U937 cell line transfected with the C5a receptor (U937-C5aR). In addition, levels of C5a des Arg, DBP and TSP-1 in these fluids were measured by RIA or ELISA. Results show that there is a clear hierarchy with C5a being the essential primary signal (DBP or TSP-1 will not function in the absence of C5a), DBP the necessary cofactor and TSP-1 a dependent tertiary factor, since it cannot function to enhance chemotaxis to C5a without DBP. Measurement of the C5a-induced intracellular calcium flux confirmed the same hierarchy observed with chemotaxis. Moreover, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) demonstrated that C5a-dependent chemotactic activity is significantly decreased after anti-DBP treatment. Finally, results show that TSP-1 utilizes cell surface receptors CD36 and CD47 to augment chemotaxis, but DBP does not bind to TSP-1, CD36 or CD47. The results clearly demonstrate that C5a/C5a des Arg needs both DBP and TSP-1 for maximal chemotactic activity and suggest that the regulation of C5a chemotactic activity in physiological fluids is more complex than previously thought. PMID:22014686

  17. Using optical tweezers to examine the chemotactic force to a single inflammatory cell--eosinophil stimulated by chemoattractants prepared from Toxocara Canis larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Po-Chen; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Ke-Min; Jen, Lin-Ni; Liu, Cheng-tzu; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Granulocytes are a group of white blood cells belonging to the innate immune system in human and in murine in which eosinophils play an important role in worm infection-induced inflammation. The migration of these cells is well characterized and has been separated into four steps: rolling, adhesion, transendothelial migration, and chemotaxis, however, the physical characteristics of the chemotactic force to eosinophils from worm component remain largely unknown. Note that optical tweezers are featured in the manipulation of a single cell and the measurement of biological forces. Therefore, we propose to use optical tweezers to examine the chemotactic force to a eosinophil from a T. canis lavae preparation in terms of distance during the migration of eosinophil.

  18. Renal leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 (LECT2) amyloidosis in First Nations people in Northern British Columbia, Canada: a report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Holly L; DeMarco, Mari L; Magil, Alex B; Taylor, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 (LECT2) amyloidosis is a recently identified type of amyloidosis that may represent an underdiagnosed cause of chronic kidney disease. LECT2 amyloidosis typically is reported as being renal limited and, in the United States, more prevalent in Hispanic patients. We add to the epidemiologic data of this condition by describing 4 First Nations people from Northern British Columbia, Canada, who presented with slowly progressive chronic kidney disease that was found to be due to LECT2 amyloidosis.

  19. B-type receptor for platelet-derived growth factor mediates a chemotactic response by means of ligand-induced activation of the receptor protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Westermark, B; Siegbahn, A; Heldin, C H; Claesson-Welsh, L

    1990-01-01

    Porcine aorta endothelial cells are devoid of receptors for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We have transfected such cells with cDNA for the PDGF B-type receptor, both the wild-type receptor and a mutant form of the receptor (K634A), in which the putative nucleotide-binding lysine of the protein-tyrosine domain has been changed to alanine. Immunoprecipitation studies of metabolically labeled cells showed that both types of receptors were synthesized and processed to the mature form of Mr 190,000. In cells expressing the wild-type receptor, PDGF-BB, the natural ligand for the B-type receptor, induced membrane ruffling and reorganization of actin. Such a response has previously been seen in cells expressing the natural PDGF B-type receptor in response to PDGF-BB. No such effect was induced in nontransfected cells or in cells expressing the K634A mutant receptor. PDGF was also shown to be chemotactic for cells expressing the wild-type receptor, whereas no chemotactic response was elicited in control cells or in cells expressing the K634A mutant receptor. Our study thus provides formal evidence that the PDGF B-type receptor mediates a motility response including actin reorganization and chemotaxis. Furthermore, the results establish a role for the receptor-associated protein-tyrosine kinase in the transduction of the chemotactic signal. Images PMID:2153283

  20. Chemotactic response with a constant delay-time mechanism in Ciona spermatozoa revealed by a high time resolution analysis of flagellar motility.

    PubMed

    Miyashiro, Daisuke; Shiba, Kogiku; Miyashita, Tahahiro; Baba, Shoji A; Yoshida, Manabu; Kamimura, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    During their chemotactic swimming toward eggs, sperm cells detect their species-specific chemoattractant and sense concentration gradients by unknown mechanisms. After sensing the attractant, sperm cells commonly demonstrate a series of responses involving different swimming patterns by changing flagellar beats, gradually approaching a swimming path toward the eggs, which is the source of chemoattractants. Shiba et al. observed a rapid increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in Ciona spermatozoa after sensing chemoattractants; however, the biochemical processes occurring inside the sperm cells are unclear. In the present study, we focused on the timing and sensing mechanism of chemical signal detection in Ciona. One of the most crucial problems to be solved is defining the initial epoch of chemotactic responses. We adopted a high rate of video recording (600 Hz) for detailed analysis of sperm motion and a novel method for detecting subtle signs of beat forms and moving paths of sperm heads. From these analyses, we estimated a virtual sensing point of the attractant before initiation of motility responses and found that the time delay from sensing to motility responses was almost constant. To evaluate the efficiency of this constant delay model, we performed computer simulation of chemotactic behaviors of Ciona spermatozoa. PMID:25572419

  1. Stromal-derived factor-1α/CXCL12-CXCR4 chemotactic pathway promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qinhong; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Xin; Duan, Wanxing; Lei, Jianjun; Zong, Liang; Li, Xuqi; Sheng, Liang; Ma, Jiguang; Han, Liang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lun; Guo, Kun; Ma, Zhenhua; Wu, Zheng; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong

    2015-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is considered as an alternative route for the metastatic spread of pancreatic cancer cells; however, the molecular changes leading to PNI are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis plays a pivotal role in the neurotropism of pancreatic cancer cells to local peripheral nerves. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that CXCR4 elevation correlated with PNI in 78 pancreatic cancer samples. Both in vitro and in vivo PNI models were applied to investigate the function of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in PNI progression and pathogenesis. The results showed that the activation of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis significantly increased pancreatic cancer cells invasion and promoted the outgrowth of the dorsal root ganglia. CXCL12 derived from the peripheral nerves stimulated the invasion and chemotactic migration of CXCR4-positive cancer cells in a paracrine manner, eventually leading to PNI. In vivo analyses revealed that the abrogation of the activated signaling inhibited tumor growth and invasion of the sciatic nerve toward the spinal cord. These data indicate that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis may be a novel therapeutic target to prevent the perineural dissemination of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25605248

  2. Aurantio-obtusin stimulates chemotactic migration and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Vishnuprasad, Chethala N; Tsuchiya, Tomoko; Kanegasaki, Shiro; Kim, Joon Ho; Han, Sung Soo

    2014-05-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the major metabolic bone diseases and is among the most challenging noncommunicable diseases to treat. Although there is an increasing interest in identifying bioactive molecules for the prevention and management of osteoporosis, such studies principally focus only on differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts or inhibition of osteoclast activity. Stimulation of osteoblast migration must be a promising osteoanabolic strategy for improved metabolic bone disease therapy. In this study, we show that an anthraquinone derivative, aurantio-obtusin, stimulated chemotactic migration of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The use of a real-time chemotaxis analyzing system, TAXIScan, facilitated the evaluation of both velocity and directionality of osteoblast migration in response to the compound. Besides migration, the compound stimulated osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. Taken together, the data presented in this paper demonstrate that aurantio-obtusin is a promising osteoanabolic compound of natural origin with potential therapeutic applications in the prevention of osteoporosis and other metabolic bone diseases.

  3. A lipid chemotactic factor from anaerobic coryneform bacteria including Corynebacterium parvum with activity for macrophages and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R J; McInroy, R J; Wilkinson, P C; White, R G

    1976-01-01

    A lipid with chemoattractant (chemotactic) activity for mouse and guinea-pig macrophages and for human blood monocytes is released by anaerobic coryneform bacteria (including Corynebacterium parvum). The active lipid is associated with fibrillar structures which lie on the outside of the bacterial cell and are released spontaneously during growth. The lipid can also be extracted easily by a number of methods. The fibrils are loosely associated with a capsule-like structure composed largely of polysaccharide. Purification of the active lipid was achieved by chloroform-methanol extraction of the whole organisms yielding a chloroform-soluble fraction attracting mononuclear phagocytes at concentrations around 10 microgram/ml. The infra-red spectrum of this material showed lipid but no peptide or sugar. Thin-layer chromatography yielded twelve spots of which three had chemoattractant properties. The most active of these gave staining reactions consistent with the presence of phospholipid, the other two probably contained free fatty acids and triglycerides. Thin-layer electrophoresis also yielded an active phosphorus-containing spot. Saturated fatty acids of chain lengths found in the anaerobic coryne forms had weak monocyte-attractant activity. As the active material was progressively purified, its activity as a monocyte attractant weakened. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1027716

  4. Klotho gene deficiency causes salt-sensitive hypertension via monocyte chemotactic protein-1/CC chemokine receptor 2-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Chen, Kai; Lei, Han; Sun, Zhongjie

    2015-01-01

    Klotho (KL) is a newly discovered aging suppressor gene. In mice, the KL gene extends the lifespan when overexpressed and shortens the lifespan when disrupted. This study investigated if KL deficiency affects BP and salt sensitivity using KL mutant heterozygous (+/-) mice and wild-type (WT) mice (9 weeks of age, 16 mice per group). Notably, systolic BP in KL(+/-) mice began to increase at the age of 15 weeks, reached a peak level at the age of 17 weeks, and remained elevated thereafter, whereas systolic BP remained consistent in WT mice. High salt (HS) intake further increased BP in KL(+/-) mice but did not affect BP in WT mice. Blockade of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2), involved in monocyte chemotaxis, by a specific CCR2 antagonist (INCB3284) abolished the HS-induced increase in BP in KL(+/-) mice. Furthermore, HS loading substantially increased the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and the infiltration of macrophages and T cells in kidneys in KL(+/-) mice, and treatment with INCB3284 abolished these effects. Treatment of KL(+/-) mice with INCB3284 also attenuated the increased renal expressions of serum glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1, thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter, and ATP synthase β along with the renal structural damage and functional impairment induced by HS loading. In conclusion, KL deficiency caused salt-sensitive hypertension and renal damage by CCR2-mediated inflammation.

  5. A new SPH scheme to model transport of chemotactic bacteria in porous media at the continuum scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avesani, Diego; Bellin, Alberto; Dumbser, Michael; Chiogna, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    As recently shown chemotaxis, i.e. the movement of microorganisms toward or away from the concentration gradient of a chemical species, could have a fundamental role in the transport of bacteria through saturated porous media. Chemotactic bacteria could enhance bioremediation by directing their own motions to residual contaminants in less conductive zones of aquifers. The aim of the present work is to develop a proper numerical scheme to define and to quantify the magnitude and the role of chemotaxis in the complex groundwater system framework. We present a new class of meshless Lagrangian particle methods based on the Smooth Particle Hydrodinamics (SPH) formulation of Vila & Ben Moussa, combined with a new Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) reconstruction technique on moving point clouds in multiple space dimensions. The purpose of this new scheme is to fully exploit the advantages of SPH among traditional meshbased and meshfree schemes and to overcome its problems for modeling chemotaxis in porous media. We test the new scheme against analytical reference solutions and we show, under the assumption of complete mixing at the Darcy scale, that chemotaxis may significantly affect the quantification of field-scale bacterial distribution, therefore influencing reactive mixing and degradation of contaminants.

  6. Stromal-derived factor-1α/CXCL12-CXCR4 chemotactic pathway promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinhong; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Xin; Duan, Wanxing; Lei, Jianjun; Zong, Liang; Li, Xuqi; Sheng, Liang; Ma, Jiguang; Han, Liang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lun; Guo, Kun; Ma, Zhenhua; Wu, Zheng; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong

    2015-03-10

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is considered as an alternative route for the metastatic spread of pancreatic cancer cells; however, the molecular changes leading to PNI are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis plays a pivotal role in the neurotropism of pancreatic cancer cells to local peripheral nerves. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that CXCR4 elevation correlated with PNI in 78 pancreatic cancer samples. Both in vitro and in vivo PNI models were applied to investigate the function of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in PNI progression and pathogenesis. The results showed that the activation of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis significantly increased pancreatic cancer cells invasion and promoted the outgrowth of the dorsal root ganglia. CXCL12 derived from the peripheral nerves stimulated the invasion and chemotactic migration of CXCR4-positive cancer cells in a paracrine manner, eventually leading to PNI. In vivo analyses revealed that the abrogation of the activated signaling inhibited tumor growth and invasion of the sciatic nerve toward the spinal cord. These data indicate that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis may be a novel therapeutic target to prevent the perineural dissemination of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Studies of leukotriene B4-specific binding and function in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes: absence of a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    Kreisle, R A; Parker, C W; Griffin, G L; Senior, R M; Stenson, W F

    1985-05-01

    Rat PMN isolated from peripheral blood show a small amount of high-affinity (specific) binding of [3H]-LTB4 at nanomolar concentrations. This binding is reversible and has a stereospecificity similar to rat PMN aggregation in response to several LTB4 analogs. This population of binding sites shares many characteristics with a population of high-affinity binding sites in human PMN; however, human PMN bind a significantly greater amount of [3H]-LTB4 to a second population of specific binding sites that is not present in rat PMN. The aggregation responses of human and rat peripheral blood PMN to LTB4 are similar in magnitude and specificity, but unlike human PMN, LTB4 fails to elicit a chemotactic response in rat PMN at concentrations from 10(-10) M to 10(-6) M. Rat PMN also fail to metabolize exogenous LTB4 when compared with human PMN. These data suggest that different PMN functions, such as chemotaxis and aggregation, may involve different classes of specific receptors. The finding that rat PMN do not exhibit chemotaxis to LTB4 calls for a reevaluation of the relevance to inflammation in humans of studies of inflammation performed in rat models.

  8. Extra-chromosomal DNA maintenance in Bacillus subtilis, dependence on flagellation factor FliF and moonlighting mediator EdmS.

    PubMed

    Hakumai, Yuichi; Shimomoto, Kouko; Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    Extra-chromosomal DNA maintenance (EDM) as an important process in the propagation and genetic engineering of microbes. Bacillus subtilis EdmS (formerly PgsE), a protein comprising 55 amino acids, is a mediator of the EDM process. In this study, the effect of mutation of global regulators on B. subtilis EDM was examined. Mutation of the swrA gene abolished EdmS-mediated EDM. It is known that swrA predominantly regulates expression of the fla/che operon in B. subtilis. We therefore performed EDM analysis using fla/che-deletion mutants and identified an EDM-mediated EDM cooperator in the flgB-fliL region. Further genetic investigation identified the flagellation factor FliF is a crucial EDM cooperator. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of the moonlighting function of FliF in DNA maintenance.

  9. A bead-spring model for running and tumbling of flagellated swimmers: detailed predictions compared to experimental data for E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Miqiu; Wu, Yan; Li, Guangxian; Larson, Ronald G

    2015-02-28

    To study the swimming of the multi-flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli, we deploy a bead-spring hydrodynamic model (Watari and Larson 2010), whose body and flagellar geometry, motor torques, and motor reversals are adjusted to match the experimental observations of the Berg group (Turner et al. 2000; Darnton et al. 2007) during both running and tumbling of the bacterium. In this model, hydrodynamic interactions, which drive swimming, flagellar bundling, and unbundling during swimming and tumbling, are imposed by treating the beads as Stokeslets, imposing torques and counter-torques on the body and flagellum at the flexible joint connecting them to represent the action of motor, and using the Rotne-Prager tensor to model their hydrodynamic interactions with other beads. We explore the behavior of coarse-grained (60-bead) and refined (120-bead) versions of the model, and show that predictions of running speed, helical and body rotation rates, body wobble rates and angles, average tumbling angles, range of tumbling angles, and flagellar re-bundling times are in good agreement with experimental observations by Berg and coworkers. We find that variation in tumbling angle arises from variation in flagellar number and location on the bacterial body, variations in polymorphic transitions of the filaments, and especially from variations in the duration of the tumbling time, which is roughly linearly correlated with tumbling time up to tumbling angles of around 40-50° and more weakly thereafter. The accuracy of the model suggests its usefulness for future studies of swimming of other flagellated swimmers, for predictions of collective phenomena, and for tuning parameters of coarser-grained swimmer models to achieve greater realism.

  10. NMR and SAXS characterization of the denatured state of the chemotactic protein CheY: implications for protein folding initiation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, P; Serrano, L; Durand, D; Rico, M; Bruix, M

    2001-06-01

    The denatured state of a double mutant of the chemotactic protein CheY (F14N/V83T) has been analyzed in the presence of 5 M urea, using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and heteronuclear magnetic resonance. SAXS studies show that the denatured protein follows a wormlike chain model. Its backbone can be described as a chain composed of rigid elements connected by flexible links. A comparison of the contour length obtained for the chain at 5 M urea with the one expected for a fully expanded chain suggests that approximately 25% of the residues are involved in residual structures. Conformational shifts of the alpha-protons, heteronuclear (15)N-[(1)H] NOEs and (15)N relaxation properties have been used to identify some regions in the protein that deviate from a random coil behavior. According to these NMR data, the protein can be divided into two subdomains, which largely coincide with the two folding subunits identified in a previous kinetic study of the folding of the protein. The first of these subdomains, spanning residues 1-70, is shown here to exhibit a restricted mobility as compared to the rest of the protein. Two regions, one in each subdomain, were identified as deviating from the random coil chemical shifts. Peptides corresponding to these sequences were characterized by NMR and their backbone (1)H chemical shifts were compared to those in the intact protein under identical denaturing conditions. For the region located in the first subdomain, this comparison shows that the observed deviation from random coil parameters is caused by interactions with the rest of the molecule. The restricted flexibility of the first subdomain and the transient collapse detected in that subunit are consistent with the conclusions obtained by applying the protein engineering method to the characterization of the folding reaction transition state.

  11. NMR and SAXS characterization of the denatured state of the chemotactic protein Che Y: Implications for protein folding initiation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Pascal; Serrano, Luis; Durand, Dominique; Rico, Manuel; Bruix, Marta

    2001-01-01

    The denatured state of a double mutant of the chemotactic protein CheY (F14N/V83T) has been analyzed in the presence of 5 M urea, using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and heteronuclear magnetic resonance. SAXS studies show that the denatured protein follows a wormlike chain model. Its backbone can be described as a chain composed of rigid elements connected by flexible links. A comparison of the contour length obtained for the chain at 5 M urea with the one expected for a fully expanded chain suggests that ∼25% of the residues are involved in residual structures. Conformational shifts of the α-protons, heteronuclear 15N-{1H} NOEs and 15N relaxation properties have been used to identify some regions in the protein that deviate from a random coil behavior. According to these NMR data, the protein can be divided into two subdomains, which largely coincide with the two folding subunits identified in a previous kinetic study of the folding of the protein. The first of these subdomains, spanning residues 1–70, is shown here to exhibit a restricted mobility as compared to the rest of the protein. Two regions, one in each subdomain, were identified as deviating from the random coil chemical shifts. Peptides corresponding to these sequences were characterized by NMR and their backbone 1H chemical shifts were compared to those in the intact protein under identical denaturing conditions. For the region located in the first subdomain, this comparison shows that the observed deviation from random coil parameters is caused by interactions with the rest of the molecule. The restricted flexibility of the first subdomain and the transient collapse detected in that subunit are consistent with the conclusions obtained by applying the protein engineering method to the characterization of the folding reaction transition state. PMID:11369848

  12. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression as a prognosic biomarker in patients with solid tumor: a meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qiongwen; Kong, Hongyu; Zeng, Yunhui; Hao, Meiqin; Yu, Ting; Peng, Jing; Xu, Zhao; Chen, Jingquan; Shi, Huashan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A great deal of studies have been performed on the prognostic value of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in solid tumors in recent years. However, no consistent outcomes are reported. Therefore, the prognostic value of MCP-1 still remains controversial in patients with solid tumors. Here we aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of MCP-1 expression for patients with solid tumors. Methods: Comprehensive literature was selected from PUBMED and EMBASE and clinical studies which reported analysis of survival data about MCP-1 in solid tumors were included. Stata 11.0 was used for performing a meta-analysis on evaluating the relation between MCP-1 and clinical staging, overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS). Results: Eleven studies with a total of 1324 patients with solid tumors were included into our meta-analysis. The result showed that high concentration of MCP-1 was related to a worse OS (HR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.32-2.88). The subgroup analysis on different location of tumors showed that high concentration of MCP-1 meant bad prognosis in patients with digestive cancer (HR = 2.66, 95% CI 1.44-4.91) and urogenital cancer (HR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.61-3.10), even head and neck cancer (HR = 1.99, 95% CI 0.95-4.18) other than respiratory cancer (HR = 1.10, 95% CI 0.39-3.11). Another subgroup analysed on different sites of cancer and indicated a poor prognosis on adenocarcinoma (HR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.63-2.69). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that MCP-1 can be regarded as a poor prognostic maker for solid tumors and may represent important new therapeutic targets. PMID:25120764

  13. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency reduces spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice fed a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin; Sundaram, Sneha

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-produced pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to obesity and cancer. This 2×2 experiment was designed to investigate effects of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) deficiency on pulmonary metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in MCP-1 deficient and wild-type mice fed a modified AIN93G diet containing 16% and 45% of energy from corn oil, respectively. The high-fat diet significantly increased the number and size (cross-sectional area and volume) of lung metastases compared to the AIN93G control diet. Deficiency in MCP-1 reduced lung metastases by 37% in high-fat diet-fed mice; it reduced metastatic cross-sectional area by 46% and volume by 69% compared to wild-type mice. Adipose and plasma concentrations of MCP-1 were significantly higher in high-fat diet-fed wild-type mice than in their AIN93G-fed counterparts; they were not detectable in MCP-1 deficient mice regardless of diet. Plasma concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 were significantly higher in MCP-1 deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. We conclude that adipose-produced MCP-1 contributes to high-fat diet-enhanced metastasis. While MCP-1 deficiency reduces metastasis, the elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors in the absence of MCP-1 may support the metastatic development and growth of LLC in MCP-1 deficient mice. PMID:27028862

  14. Characteristics of attachment and growth of Thiobacillus caldus on sulphide minerals: a chemotactic response to sulphur minerals?

    PubMed

    Edwards, K J; Bond, P L; Banfield, J F

    2000-06-01

    To further our understanding of the ecological role of sulphur-oxidizing microorganisms in the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD), growth and attachment of the chemoautotrophic sulphur-oxidizing bacterium, Thiobacillus caldus, on the sulphide minerals pyrite, marcasite and arsenopyrite was studied. Growth curves were estimated based on total cells detected in the system (in suspension and attached to mineral surfaces). In general, higher cell numbers were detected on surfaces than in suspension. Fluorescent in situ hybridizations to cells on surfaces at mid-log growth confirmed that cells on surfaces were metabolically active. Total cell (both surface and solution phase) generation times on pyrite and marcasite (both FeS2) were calculated to be approximately equals 7 and 6 h respectively. When grown on pyrite (not marcasite), the number of T. caldus cells in the solution phase decreased, while the total number of cells (both surface and solution) increased. Additionally, marcasite supported about three times more total cells (approximately equals 3 x 10(9)) than pyrite (approximately equals 8 x 10(8)). This may be attributed to the dissolution rate of marcasite, which is twice that of pyrite. Epifluorescent and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyse the cell orientation on surfaces. Results of Fourier transform analysis of fluorescent images confirmed that attachment to all three sulphides occurred in an oriented manner. Results from high-resolution SEM imaging showed that cell orientation coincides with dissolution pit edges and secondary sulphur minerals that develop during dissolution. Preferential colonization of surfaces relative to solution and oriented cell attachment on these sulphide surfaces suggest that T. caldus may chemotactically select the optimal site for chemoautotrophic growth on sulphur (i.e. the mineral surface). PMID:11200434

  15. Dose-Response Analysis of Chemotactic Signaling Response in Salmonella typhimurium LT2 upon Exposure to Cysteine / Cystine Redox Pair

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The chemotaxis system enables motile bacteria to search for an optimum level of environmental factors. Salmonella typhimurium senses the amino acid cysteine as an attractant and its oxidized dimeric form, cystine, as a repellent. We investigated the dose-response dependence of changes in chemotactic signaling activity upon exposure to cysteine and cystine of S. typhimurium LT2 using in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. The dose-response curve of the attractant response to cysteine had a sigmoidal shape, typical for receptor-ligand interactions. However, in a knockout strain of the chemoreceptor genes tsr and tar, we detected a repellent response to cysteine solutions, scaling linearly with the logarithm of the cysteine concentration. Interestingly, the magnitude of the repellent response to cystine also showed linear dependence to the logarithm of the cystine concentration. This linear dependence was observed over more than four orders of magnitude, where detection started at nanomolar concentrations. Notably, low concentrations of another oxidized compound, benzoquinone, triggered similar responses. In contrast to S. typhimurium 14028, where no response to cystine was observed in a knockout strain of chemoreceptor genes mcpB and mcpC, here we showed that McpB / McpC-independent responses to cystine existed in the strain S. typhimurium LT2 even at nanomolar concentrations. Additionally, knocking out mcpB and mcpC did not affect the linear dose-response dependence, whereas enhanced responses were only observed to solutions that where not pH neutral (>100 μM cystine) in the case of McpC overexpression. We discuss that the linear dependence of the response on the logarithm of cystine concentrations could be a result of a McpB / C-independent redox-sensing pathway that exists in S. typhimurium LT2. We supported this hypothesis with experiments with defined cysteine / cystine mixed solutions, where a transition from repellent to

  16. A novel trypanoplasm-like flagellate Jarrellia atramenti n. g., n. sp. (Kinetoplastida: Bodonidae) and ciliates from the blowhole of a stranded pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps (Physeteridae): morphology, life cycle and potential pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Poynton, S L; Whitaker, B R; Heinrich, A B

    2001-04-10

    The successful 6 mo rehabilitation of a stranded juvenile pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps afforded the opportunity to study the poorly known protozoan fauna of the upper respiratory tract of cetaceans. Mucus samples were collected by holding either a petri dish or glass slides over the blowhole for 3 to 5 exhalations; preparations were examined as wet mounts, and then stained with Wrights-Giemsa or Gram stain. Blood smears were stained with Wrights-Giemsa. Unidentified spindle-shaped and unidentified broad ciliates, reported from the blowhole of the pygmy sperm whale for the first time, were seen only initially, while yeast-like organisms and bacteria were seen intermittently. Epithelial cells and white blood cells were often present in the blowhole mucus, but red blood cells were never seen. A novel trypanoplasm-like bodonid kinetoplastid biflagellate (Order Kinetoplastida) was commonly encountered in the blowhole mucus, but never in the blood. Both mature flagellates and those undergoing longitudinal binary fission were present. The elongate flagellate had a long whiplash anterior flagellum; the recurrent flagellum was attached along at least two-thirds of the body length, forming a prominent undulating membrane, and the trailing portion was short. The kinetoplast was irregularly fragmented. The flagellates were either free-swimming, or attached to host material via the free portion of the posterior flagellum. The prominent undulating membrane was characteristic of Trypanoplasma, while the fragmented kinetoplast was characteristic of some species of Cryptobia. For the novel bodonid kinetoplastid, with its unique combination of morphological features (prominent undulating membrane and fragmented kinetoplast), we propose the creation of a new genus Jarrellia. We believe this to be the first published description of a flagellate from a marine mammal, and among the first reports of a trypanoplasm-like flagellate from a warm-blooded host. We expect that a diversity

  17. Effect of a short-term diet and exercise intervention on oxidative stress, inflammation, MMP-9, and monocyte chemotactic activity in men with metabolic syndrome factors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christian K; Won, Dean; Pruthi, Sandeep; Kurtovic, Silvia; Sindhu, Ram K; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Barnard, R James

    2006-05-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effects of lifestyle modification on key contributing factors to atherogenesis, including oxidative stress, inflammation, chemotaxis, and cell adhesion. Obese men (n = 31), 15 of whom had metabolic syndrome, were placed on a high-fiber, low-fat diet in a 3-wk residential program where food was provided ad libitum and daily aerobic exercise was performed. In each subject, pre- and postintervention fasting blood was drawn for circulating levels of serum lipids, glucose and insulin (for estimation of insulin sensitivity), oxidative stress-generating enzyme myeloperoxidase and marker 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha, the inflammatory protein C-reactive protein, soluble ICAM-1 as an indicator of endothelial activation, sP-selectin as a marker of platelet activation, the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and total matrix metalloproteinase-9. Using subject sera and human aortic endothelial cell culture systems, we measured VCAM-1 cell surface abundance and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, nitric oxide, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide production in vitro by fluorometric detection. Also determined in vitro was serum-induced, monocyte adhesion and monocyte chemotactic activity. After 3 wk, significant reductions (P < 0.05) in body mass index, all serum lipids and lipid ratios, fasting glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, myeloperoxidase, 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha, C-reactive protein, soluble ICAM-1, soluble P-selectin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were noted. In vitro, serum-stimulated cellular VCAM-1 expression, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 production, and fluorometric detection of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production decreased, whereas a concomitant increase in NO production was noted (all P < 0.01). Additionally, both monocyte adhesion (P < 0.05) and MCA (P < 0.01) decreased. Nine of 15 were no longer positive for metabolic

  18. Rabbit neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) activates both CXCR1 and CXCR2 and is the functional homologue for human CXCL6.

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Struyf, Sofie; Wuyts, Anja; Weyler, Myke; Loos, Tamara; Gijsbers, Klara; Gouwy, Mieke; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo

    2004-11-15

    Neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) is a rabbit CXC chemokine with activating and chemotactic properties on neutrophilic granulocytes. Although its selective activity on neutrophils is demonstrated, its interactions with specific chemokine receptors are not defined. For further functional characterization, NCP was chemically synthesized and was found to be equipotent as natural NCP in neutrophil chemotaxis. To identify its human homologue, we separately expressed two potential rabbit NCP receptors (CXCR1 and CXCR2) in Jurkat cells. Pure synthetic NCP was equally efficient to promote chemotaxis through either rabbit CXCR1 or CXCR2. Moreover, chemotaxis assays on rabbit CXCR1 and CXCR2 transfectants showed that NCP uses the same receptors as interleukin-8 (IL-8), a major rabbit CXC chemokine, but not rabbit GROalpha, which only recognized CXCR2. In addition, specific inhibitors for CXCR1 or CXCR2 reduced rabbit neutrophil chemotaxis induced by NCP and rabbit IL-8. Furthermore, NCP and the structurally related human CXCR1/CXCR2 agonist CXCL6/GCP-2 (granulocyte chemotactic protein-2) cross-desensitized each other in intracellular calcium release assays on human neutrophils, further indicating that both chemokines share the same receptors. The inflammatory role of NCP was also evidenced by its potent granulocytosis inducing capacity in rabbits upon systemic administration. This study provides in vitro and in vivo evidences that NCP is the functional rabbit homologue for human CXCL6/GCP-2 rather than the most related CXCR2 agonist CXCL5/ENA-78 (epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78). It is concluded that the rabbit is a better model to study human neutrophil activation compared to mice, which lack CXCL8/IL-8.

  19. Critical chemotactic collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2010-04-01

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  20. Coprophilic amoebae and flagellates, including Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, characterise a divergent and diverse rhizarian radiation and contribute to a large diversity of faecal-associated protists.

    PubMed

    Bass, David; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Brown, Matthew W; Pearce, Rebecca A; Tice, Alexander K; Jousset, Alexandre; Geisen, Stefan; Hartikainen, Hanna

    2016-05-01

    A wide diversity of organisms utilize faecal habitats as a rich nutrient source or a mechanism to traverse through animal hosts. We sequenced the 18S rRNA genes of the coprophilic, fruiting body-forming amoeba Guttulinopsis vulgaris and its non-fruiting relatives Rosculus 'ithacus' CCAP 1571/3, R. terrestris n. sp. and R. elongata n. sp. and demonstrate that they are related to the coprophilic flagellate Helkesimastix in a strongly supported, but highly divergent 18S sister clade. PCR primers specific to both clades were used to generate 18S amplicons from a range of environmental and faecal DNA samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the cloned sequences demonstrated a high diversity of uncharacterised sequence types within this clade, likely representing previously described members of the genera Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, as well as so-far unobserved organisms. Further, an Illumina MiSeq sequenced set of 18S V4-region amplicons generated from faecal DNAs using universal eukaryote primers showed that core-cercozoan assemblages in faecal samples are as diverse as those found in more conventionally examined habitats. These results reveal many novel lineages, some of which appear to occur preferentially in faecal material, in particular cercomonads and glissomonads. More broadly, we show that faecal habitats are likely untapped reservoirs of microbial eukaryotic diversity. PMID:26914587

  1. Ultrastructure and 18S rDNA sequence analysis of Wobblia lunata gen. et sp. nov., a new heterotrophic flagellate (Stramenopiles, Incertae sedis).

    PubMed

    Moriya, M; Nakayama, T; Inouye, I

    2000-05-01

    A new heterotrophic flagellate Wobblia lunata gen. et sp. nov. is described. This organism usually attaches to the substratum showing a wobbling motion, and sometimes glides on the substratum or swims freely in the medium. W. lunata has various features characteristic of the stramenopiles. These include a hairy flagellum with tripartite tubular hairs, a mitochondrion with tubular cristae, arrangement of flagellar apparatus components and a double helix in the flagellar transition zone. W. lunata shares a double helix with heterotrophic stramenopiles, including Developayella elegans, oomycetes, hyphochytrids, opalinids and proteromonads, and could be placed in the phylum Bigyra Cavalier-Smith. However, from 18S rDNA tree analysis, these organisms form two distantly-related clades in the stramenopiles, and Wobblia appears at the base of the stramenopiles. Evaluation of morphological features and comparison of 18S rDNA sequences indicate that W. lunata is a member of the stramenopiles, but it is distinct from any other stramenopiles so far described. Its phylogenetic position within the stramenopiles is uncertain and therefore W. lunata is described as a stramenopile incertae sedis. PMID:10896132

  2. 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an endosymbiont of termite gut flagellates, is the first representative of a deep-branching clade of Deltaproteobacteria and a putative homoacetogen.

    PubMed

    Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Strassert, Jürgen F H; Köhler, Tim; Mikaelyan, Aram; Gregor, Ivan; McHardy, Alice C; Tringe, Susannah Green; Hugenholtz, Phil; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Termite gut flagellates are typically colonized by specific bacterial symbionts. Here we describe the phylogeny, ultrastructure and subcellular location of 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an intracellular symbiont of Trichonympha collaris in the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis. It represents a novel, deep-branching clade of uncultured Deltaproteobacteria widely distributed in intestinal tracts of termites and cockroaches. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy localized the endosymbiont near hydrogenosomes in the posterior part and near the ectosymbiont 'Candidatus Desulfovibrio trichonymphae' in the anterior part of the host cell. The draft genome of 'Ca. Adiutrix intracellularis' obtained from a metagenomic library revealed the presence of a complete gene set encoding the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, including two homologs of fdhF encoding hydrogenase-linked formate dehydrogenases (FDHH ) and all other components of the recently described hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase (HDCR) complex, which substantiates previous claims that the symbiont is capable of reductive acetogenesis from CO2 and H2 . The close phylogenetic relationship between the HDCR components and their homologs in homoacetogenic Firmicutes and Spirochaetes suggests that the deltaproteobacterium acquired the capacity for homoacetogenesis via lateral gene transfer. The presence of genes for nitrogen fixation and the biosynthesis of amino acids and cofactors indicate the nutritional nature of the symbiosis.

  3. 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an endosymbiont of termite gut flagellates, is the first representative of a deep-branching clade of Deltaproteobacteria and a putative homoacetogen.

    PubMed

    Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Strassert, Jürgen F H; Köhler, Tim; Mikaelyan, Aram; Gregor, Ivan; McHardy, Alice C; Tringe, Susannah Green; Hugenholtz, Phil; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Termite gut flagellates are typically colonized by specific bacterial symbionts. Here we describe the phylogeny, ultrastructure and subcellular location of 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an intracellular symbiont of Trichonympha collaris in the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis. It represents a novel, deep-branching clade of uncultured Deltaproteobacteria widely distributed in intestinal tracts of termites and cockroaches. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy localized the endosymbiont near hydrogenosomes in the posterior part and near the ectosymbiont 'Candidatus Desulfovibrio trichonymphae' in the anterior part of the host cell. The draft genome of 'Ca. Adiutrix intracellularis' obtained from a metagenomic library revealed the presence of a complete gene set encoding the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, including two homologs of fdhF encoding hydrogenase-linked formate dehydrogenases (FDHH ) and all other components of the recently described hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase (HDCR) complex, which substantiates previous claims that the symbiont is capable of reductive acetogenesis from CO2 and H2 . The close phylogenetic relationship between the HDCR components and their homologs in homoacetogenic Firmicutes and Spirochaetes suggests that the deltaproteobacterium acquired the capacity for homoacetogenesis via lateral gene transfer. The presence of genes for nitrogen fixation and the biosynthesis of amino acids and cofactors indicate the nutritional nature of the symbiosis. PMID:26914459

  4. [Mutants of bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 with Omegon insertion in mmsB or fabG genes of lipid metabolism are defective in motility and flagellation].

    PubMed

    Kovtunov, E A; Shelud'ko, A V; Chernyshova, M P; Petrova, L P; Katsy, E I

    2013-11-01

    Bacteria Azospirillum brasilense have mixed flagellation: in addition to the polar flagellum, numerous lateral flagella are formed in their cells on medium with increased density. Flagella determine the active swimming and swarming capacities of azospirilla. Using A. brasilense Sp245 as an example, we showed that the Omegon-Km artificial transposon insertion into the chromosomal gene for 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (mmsB) was concurrent with the appearance of significant defects in the formation of polar flagella and with the paralysis of lateral flagella. The Sp245 mutant with the Omegon insertion into the plasmid AZOBR_p1-borne gene for 3-oxoacyl-[acyl-carrier protein]-reductase (fabG) showed the complete loss of flagella and the swarming capacity, as well as significant defects in polar flagellar assembly (though some cells are still motile in liquid medium). The viability of the A. brasilense Sp245 mutants with the Omegon insertion into the mmsB or fabG gene was not reduced. No considerable differences in the fatty acid composition of whole cell lipid extracts were found for the A. brasilense Sp245 strain and its mmsB and fabG mutants.

  5. Mitochondrial and nuclear localization of topoisomerase II in the flagellate Bodo saltans (Kinetoplastida), a species with non-catenated kinetoplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Gaziová, Ivana; Lukes, Julius

    2003-03-28

    We have studied topoisomerase II (topo II) in the cells of Bodo saltans, a free-living bodonid (Kinetoplastida). Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequence of the entire topo II gene, which is a single-copy gene, confirmed that B. saltans is a predecessor of parasitic trypanosomatids. Antibodies generated against either an overexpressed unique C-terminal region of topo II or a synthetic oligopeptide derived from the same region did not cross-react with cell lysates of related trypanosomatids, while they recognized a single specific band in the B. saltans lysate. Immunolocalization experiments using both antibodies showed that topo II is evenly dispersed throughout the kinetoplast. This is in striking difference from the localization of topo II in other flagellates, where it occurs in two antipodal centers flanking the kinetoplast disk. Moreover, the same topo II has a distinct localization in multiple loci at the periphery of the nucleus of B. saltans. With a minicircle probe derived from the conserved region we have shown that all relaxed non-catenated minicircles are confined to the globular kinetoplast DNA bundle. Therefore, in the mitochondrion of this primitive eukaryote topo II does not catenate relaxed DNA circles into a network in vivo, while a decatenating activity is present in partially purified cell lysates.

  6. Phylogenetic diversity and whole-cell hybridization of oxymonad flagellates from the hindgut of the wood-feeding lower termite Reticulitermes flavipes.

    PubMed

    Stingl, Ulrich; Brune, Andreas

    2003-04-01

    SSU rRNA genes of oxymonad protists from the hindgut of the wood-feeding termite Reticulitermes flavipes were PCR-amplified using a newly designed oxymonad-specific forward primer and a newly designed reverse primer specific for termite gut flagellates. After cloning, the clone library was sorted into four groups by RFLP analysis and nearly full-length SSU rRNA gene sequences were obtained for representative clones from each group. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that sequences of all four groups formed a monophyletic cluster with the only other existing SSU rRNA gene sequence of oxymonads. Using whole-cell hybridization with clone-specific fluorescently labeled probes, each of the four clone groups could be assigned to a specific morphotype, which were identified as Dinenympha gracilis, Dinenympha fimbriata, and so-far undescribed species of Pyrsonympha and Dinenympha. Our results demonstrate that the morphological variety of oxymonads is not caused by the presence of different developmental stages of the same organism, but that the various morphotypes represent different species.

  7. Identification and characterization of ectosymbionts of distinct lineages in Bacteroidales attached to flagellated protists in the gut of termites and a wood-feeding cockroach.

    PubMed

    Noda, Satoko; Inoue, Tetsushi; Hongoh, Yuichi; Kawai, Miho; Nalepa, Christine A; Vongkaluang, Charunee; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial attachments to nearly the entire surface of flagellated protists in the guts of termites and the wood-feeding cockroach Cryptocercus are often observed. Based on the polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships of the rod-shaped, attached bacteria (ectosymbionts) of several protist species from five host taxa and confirmed their identity by fluorescence in situ hybridizations. These ectosymbionts are affiliated with the order Bacteroidales but formed three distinct lineages, each of which may represent novel bacterial genera. One lineage consisted of the closely related ectosymbionts of two species of the protist genus Devescovina (Cristamonadida). The second lineage comprised three phylotypes identified from the protist Streblomastix sp. (Oxymonadida). The third lineage included ectosymbionts of the three protist genera Hoplonympha, Barbulanympha and Urinympha in the family Hoplonymphidae (Trichonymphida). The ultrastructural observations indicated that these rod-shaped ectosymbionts share morphological similarities of their cell walls and their point of attachment with the protist but differ in shape. Elongated forms of the ectosymbionts appeared in all the three lineages. The protist cells Streblomastix sp. and Hoplonympha sp. display deep furrows and vane-like structures, but these impressive structures are probably evolutionarily convergent because both the host protists and their ectosymbionts are distantly related.

  8. Coprophilic amoebae and flagellates, including Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, characterise a divergent and diverse rhizarian radiation and contribute to a large diversity of faecal-associated protists.

    PubMed

    Bass, David; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Brown, Matthew W; Pearce, Rebecca A; Tice, Alexander K; Jousset, Alexandre; Geisen, Stefan; Hartikainen, Hanna

    2016-05-01

    A wide diversity of organisms utilize faecal habitats as a rich nutrient source or a mechanism to traverse through animal hosts. We sequenced the 18S rRNA genes of the coprophilic, fruiting body-forming amoeba Guttulinopsis vulgaris and its non-fruiting relatives Rosculus 'ithacus' CCAP 1571/3, R. terrestris n. sp. and R. elongata n. sp. and demonstrate that they are related to the coprophilic flagellate Helkesimastix in a strongly supported, but highly divergent 18S sister clade. PCR primers specific to both clades were used to generate 18S amplicons from a range of environmental and faecal DNA samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the cloned sequences demonstrated a high diversity of uncharacterised sequence types within this clade, likely representing previously described members of the genera Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, as well as so-far unobserved organisms. Further, an Illumina MiSeq sequenced set of 18S V4-region amplicons generated from faecal DNAs using universal eukaryote primers showed that core-cercozoan assemblages in faecal samples are as diverse as those found in more conventionally examined habitats. These results reveal many novel lineages, some of which appear to occur preferentially in faecal material, in particular cercomonads and glissomonads. More broadly, we show that faecal habitats are likely untapped reservoirs of microbial eukaryotic diversity.

  9. Establishment of Azotobacter on plant roots: chemotactic response, development and analysis of root exudates of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhatia, Ranjana; Kukreja, K; Behl, Rishi Kumar; Dudeja, Surjit Singh; Narula, Neeru

    2007-10-01

    Biofertilizers contribute in N(2) fixation, P solubilization, phytohormone production and thus enhance plant growth. Beneficial plant-microbe interactions and the stability and effectiveness of biofertilizer depend upon the establishment of bacterial strains in the rhizosphere of the plant. This interaction depends upon many factors, one of them being plant exudates. Root exudates are composed of small organic molecules like carbonic acids, amino acids or sugars etc., which are released into the soil and bacteria can be attracted towards these exudates due to chemotaxis. The chemotactic behaviour of Azotobacter strains was studied using cotton (Desi HD 123 and American H 1098) and wheat (WH 711) seedlings and the root exudates of these two plants were chemically characterized. Analysis of the root exudates revealed the presence of sugars and simple polysaccharides (glucose), amino acids (glutamate, lysine) and organic acids (citric acid, succinic acid, maleic acid, malonic acid). Differences between cotton cultivars in root exudates were observed which influenced chemotactic response in Azotobacter. These results indicate colonization with rhizobacteria which implies that optimal symbionts, on the sides of both plant cultivar and bioinoculant bacteria can lead to better plant growth under cultivation conditions.

  10. Mitochondrial group II introns in the raphidophycean flagellate Chattonella spp. suggest a diatom-to-Chattonella lateral group II intron transfer.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Masuda, Isao; Demura, Mikihide; Oyama, Kenichi; Yoshimatsu, Sadaaki; Kawachi, Masanobu; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2009-08-01

    In the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene of four raphidophycean flagellates Chattonella antiqua, C. marina, C. ovata, and C. minima we found two group II introns described here as Chattonella cox1-i1 and Chattonella cox1-i2 encoding an open reading frame (ORF) comprised of three domains: reverse transcriptase (RT), RNA maturase (Ma) and zinc finger (H-N-H) endonuclease domains. The secondary structures show both Chattonella cox1-i1 and Chattonella cox1-i2 belong to group IIA1, albeit the former possesses a group IIB-like secondary structural character in the epsilon' region of arm I. Our phylogenetic analysis inferred from RT domain sequences of the intronic ORF, comparison of the insertion sites, and the secondary structures of the introns suggests that Chattonella cox1-i1 likely shares an evolutionary origin with the group II introns inserted in cox1 genes of five phylogenetically diverged eukaryotes. In contrast, Chattonella cox1-i2 was suggested to bear a close evolutionary affinity to the group II introns found in diatom cox1 genes. The RT domain-based phylogeny shows a tree topology in which Chattonella cox1-i2 is nested in the diatom sequences suggesting that a diatom-to-Chattonella intron transfer has taken place. Finally, we found no intron in cox1 genes from deeper-branching raphidophyceans. Based on parsimonious discussion, Chattonella cox1-i1 and Chattonella cox1-i2 have invaded into the cox1 gene of an ancestral Chattonella cell after diverging from C. subsalsa.

  11. Molecular analysis of the graviperception signal transduction in the flagellate Euglena gracilis: Involvement of a transient receptor potential-like channel and a calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, Donat-Peter; Richter, Peter R.; Schuster, Martin; Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Euglena gracilis, a unicellular, photosynthetic flagellate is a model system for environmentally controlled behavior responses. The organism shows pronounced negative gravitaxis. This movement is based on physiological mechanisms, which in the past had been only indirectly assessed. It was shown that mechano-sensitive calcium channels are involved in the gravitaxis response. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family function as mechano-sensitive channels in several different cell types. We have sequenced part of a TRP gene in Euglena and applied RNA interference (RNAi) to confirm that these channels are involved in graviperception. It was found that RNAi against the putative TRP channel abolished gravitaxis. The genes of three calmodulins were sequences in Euglena, one of which was previously known in its protein structure (cal 1). The other two were unknown (cal 2 and cal 3). Cal 2 has been analyzed in detail. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of cal 1 and cal 2 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to see whether this blockage impairs gravitaxis. RNAi of cal 1 leads to a long-term loss of free swimming in the cells (while euglenoid movement persists). It induced pronounced cell form aberrations and the division of cells was hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Thus cal 1 does not seem to be involved in gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of cal 2 has no pronounced influence on motility and cell form but leads to a complete loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days showing that this calmodulin is an element in the signal transduction chain. The data are discussed in the context of the current model of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis.

  12. Cloning, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of the periplasmic sensing domain of Pseudomonas fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA).

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Abu Iftiaf Md Salah; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Chemotaxis towards nutrients plays a crucial role in root colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens. The P. fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA) mediates movement towards amino acids present in root exudates. In this study, the periplasmic sensory domain of CtaA has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitating agent. A complete data set was collected to 1.9 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.2, b = 76.0, c = 113.3 Å. This is an important step towards elucidation of the structural basis of how CtaA recognizes its signal molecules and transduces the signal across the membrane. PMID:27251445

  13. Quasi-elastic light scattering from migrating chemotactic bands of Escherichia coli. III. Studies of band formation propagation and motility in oxygen and serine substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, P C; Chen, S H

    1986-01-01

    A series of light scattering experiments have been performed to study both macroscopic aspects of band formation and propagation and microscopic motility parameters of Escherichia coli in the combined substrate gradients of oxygen and serine. From the band formation experiment the conclusion is drawn that a minimum threshold gradient of the substrate is required for bacteria to form a band. From the band propagation experiment in the serine substrate the motility coefficient mu and chemotactic coefficient delta are determined. A separate quasi-elastic scattering experiment has been made with a propagating band to obtain three microscopic motility parameters: mean twiddle time tau 1, mean run time tau 2, and mean run speed V2. Finally, a scaling argument is made to connect the macroscopic parameters mu and delta with the microscopic parameters tau 1, tau 2, and V2, thus achieving a unified understanding of macroscopic and microscopic aspect of chemotaxis. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3087435

  14. [A mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of nedocromil; inhibition of both adhesion molecule expression on eosinophils and endothelial cells, and eosinophil chemotactic activities].

    PubMed

    Okada, T; Sagara, H; Nakano, Y; Hiyama, T; Fukuda, T

    1999-12-01

    The accumulation of eosinophils in the airway is one of the characteristics seen in patients with bronchial asthma. One of the newly developed anti-asthma drugs (controller), nedocromil sodium (nedocromil) is known to suppress the influx of eosinophils into allergic lesions. However, little is known about this mechanism. Therefore, in this report we investigated the effects of nedocromil on Mac-1 expression on PAF-stimulated eosinophils, and adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells stimulated by either IL-1 beta or IL-4. We also investigated the eosinophil chemotaxis. A significant suppression of the Mac-1 expression on PAF-induced eosinophils was observed at both concentrations of 10(-5) and 10(-7) M of nedocromil. The expression of adhesion molecules, particularly ICAM-1 and E-selectin, on IL-1 beta-stimulated human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) was significantly suppressed at these concentrations, whereas the VCAM-1 expression was not changed. No significant suppression of VCAM-1 expression on IL-4-stimulated HUVEC was observed, although there was a tendency of suppression at these concentrations. On the other hand, the expression of the E-selectin molecule was significantly suppressed by nedocromil even under resting (non-stimulated) condition. PAF-induced eosinophil chemotactic activities were also suppressed at these concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested that nedocromil suppressed the influx of eosinophils to inflammatory lesions by inhibiting not only the expression of the Mac-1 on eosinophils and of E-selectin and ICAM-1 molecules on HUVEC, but also the eosinophil chemotactic activities.

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate inhibits PDGF-induced chemotaxis of human arterial smooth muscle cells: spatial and temporal modulation of PDGF chemotactic signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Activation of the PDGF receptor on human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC) induces migration and proliferation via separable signal transduction pathways. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (Sph-1-P) can be formed following PDGF receptor activation and therefore may be implicated in PDGF-receptor signal transduction. Here we show that Sph-1-P does not significantly affect PDGF-induced DNA synthesis, proliferation, or activation of mitogenic signal transduction pathways, such as the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade and PI 3-kinase, in human arterial SMC. On the other hand, Sph-1-P strongly mimics PDGF receptor-induced chemotactic signal transduction favoring actin filament disassembly. Although Sph-1-P mimics PDGF, exogenously added Sph-1-P induces more prolonged and quantitatively greater PIP2 hydrolysis compared to PDGF-BB, a markedly stronger calcium mobilization and a subsequent increase in cyclic AMP levels and activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This excessive and prolonged signaling favors actin filament disassembly by Sph-1-P, and results in inhibition of actin nucleation, actin filament assembly and formation of focal adhesion sites. Sph-1-P-induced interference with the dynamics of PDGF-stimulated actin filament disassembly and assembly results in a marked inhibition of cell spreading, of extension of the leading lamellae toward PDGF, and of chemotaxis toward PDGF. The results suggest that spatial and temporal changes in phosphatidylinositol turnover, calcium mobilization and actin filament disassembly may be critical to PDGF-induced chemotaxis and suggest a possible role for endogenous Sph-1-P in the regulation of PDGF receptor chemotactic signal transduction. PMID:7790372

  16. FLAGELLAR REGENERATION IN PROTOZOAN FLAGELLATES

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Child, F. M.

    1967-01-01

    The flagella of populations of three protozoan species (Ochromonas, Euglena, and Astasia) were amputated and allowed to regenerate. The kinetics of regeneration in all species were characterized by a lag phase during which there was no apparent flagellar elongation; this phase was followed by elongation at a rate which constantly decelerated as the original length was regained. Inhibition by cycloheximide applied at the time of flagellar amputation showed that flagellar regeneration was dependent upon de novo protein synthesis. This was supported by evidence showing that a greater amount of leucine was incorporated into the proteins of regenerating than nonregenerating flagella. The degree of inhibition of flagellar elongation observed with cycloheximide depended on how soon after flagellar amputation it was applied: when applied to cells immediately following amputation, elongation was almost completely inhibited, but its application at various times thereafter permitted considerable elongation to occur prior to complete inhibition of flagellar elongation. Hence, a sufficient number of precursors were synthesized and accumulated prior to addition of cycloheximide so that their assembly (elongation) could occur for a time under conditions in which protein synthesis had been inhibited. Evidence that the site of this assembly may be at the tip of the elongating flagellum was obtained from radioautographic studies in which the flagella of Ochromonas were permitted to regenerate part way in the absence of labeled leucine and to complete their regeneration in the presence of the isotope. Possible mechanisms which may be operating to control flagellar regeneration are discussed in light of these and other observations. PMID:6033540

  17. Rat and human neutrophil N-formyl-peptide chemotactic receptors. Species difference in the glycosylation of similar 35-38 kDa polypeptide cores.

    PubMed Central

    Remes, J J; Petäjä-Repo, U E; Rajaniemi, H J

    1991-01-01

    Rat and human neutrophil N-formyl-peptide chemotactic receptors were subjected to glycosidase and proteinase treatments to determine the extent and species differences of glycosylation and the carbohydrate requirement in the high-affinity ligand binding. N-Formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-125I-Tyr-Lys was attached to rat and human neutrophils either before or after glycosidase and proteinase treatments, and the labelled receptors were solubilized after glutaraldehyde cross-linking and analysed by SDS/PAGE and autoradiography. Both the rat and human N-formyl-peptide chemotactic receptors contain only N-linked oligosaccharides, as demonstrated by their sensitivity to peptide N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) and resistance to O-glycanase treatment. The N-linked oligosaccharides seem to be of the complex type rather than the high-mannose or hybrid type and lack terminal sialic acid, as demonstrated by their resistance to endoglycosidases D and H and neuraminidase treatments. This sensitivity pattern was similar in both species, and the shift in the molecular size of the receptors to 35-38 kDa after PNGase F treatment occurred through one intermediate product, suggesting that both receptors contain a similar 35-38 kDa polypeptide core with two N-linked complex-type oligosaccharides, the heterogeneity of which is responsible for the species difference in receptor size. Papain treatment alone or followed by PNGase F produced in both species a 33-36 kDa membrane-bound fragment that was still able to bind the ligand, suggesting that the oligosaccharides are located on the approx. 2 kDa papain-cleavable polypeptide fragment of the receptors. The cleavage sites for both papain and PNGase F were hidden in occupied receptors, suggesting a conformational or topographical change in these upon ligand binding. Scatchard analyses and cross-linking experiments demonstrated that carbohydrates are not required for high-affinity ligand binding and that the 33-36 kDa membrane-bound papain fragment of

  18. Effects of dexamethasone on chemotactic activity and inflammatory mediators in tracheobronchial aspirates of preterm infants at risk for chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Groneck, P; Reuss, D; Götze-Speer, B; Speer, C P

    1993-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of dexamethasone on pulmonary inflammation and permeability in preterm infants at high risk for chronic lung disease (birth weight < 1200 gm), we assessed tracheobronchial aspirate fluid for chemotactic activity and concentrations of mediators of inflammation. In a prospective study, 21 infants still undergoing mechanical ventilation at day 10 of postnatal age who required a fraction of inspired oxygen > or = 0.3, a peak inspiratory pressure > or = 16 cm H2O, or both were randomly assigned to treatment with dexamethasone at day 10 (early treatment group, n = 10) or day 16 (late treatment group, n = 11). The groups were compared with respect to all measurements on day 15; the late treatment group served as a control group. Additionally, the effects of dexamethasone within both groups were evaluated. In the early treatment group, the chemotactic response of peripheral blood neutrophils exposed to tracheobronchial aspirate fluid was significantly reduced 5 days after initiation of dexamethasone treatment compared with pretreatment values of the late treatment group (median (25th to 75th percentile): migratory distance before dexamethasone, 149 microns (140 to 173 microns); after dexamethasone, 81 microns (68 to 114 microns); p < 0.01). In addition, the following values were decreased after dexamethasone therapy in the early treatment group: number of neutrophils in tracheobronchial aspirate fluid (p < 0.05), and concentrations of leukotriene B4 (p < 0.01), interleukin-1 (p < 0.01), elastase-alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (p < 0.01), and albumin (p < 0.01). Free elastase activity was found in only two infants; detectable activity of protective alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was present in the others. Analysis of dexamethasone effects within the groups showed that all measurements were significantly decreased after both the early and the late treatment regimens, with the exception of leukotriene B4 and interleukin-1, which declined only after early

  19. Osteopontin, a chemotactic protein with cytokine-like properties, is up-regulated in muscle injury caused by Bothrops lanceolatus (fer-de-lance) snake venom.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Souza, Valéria; Contin, Daniel Kiss; Filho, Waldemar Bonventi; de Araújo, Albetiza Lôbo; Irazusta, Silvia Pierre; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2011-10-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a chemotactic, adhesive protein whose receptors include some integrins and matrix proteins known to have role in inflammatory and repair processes. We examined the time course of OPN expression at acute and chronic stages after intramuscular injection of Bothrops lanceolatus venom in rats. Additionally, we examined the expression of CD68 (a marker for phagocytic macrophages) and the myogenic factors, myoD and myogenin. There was a biphasic upregulation of OPN (6-48 h and 3-14 days post-venom), i.e., during acute inflammation and myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation phases. OPN was detected in CD68 + macrophages, fibroblasts, normal and damaged myofibers, myoblasts and myotubes. Myogenin was expressed in the cytoplasm (atypical pattern) and nucleus of myoblasts and myotubes from 18 h to 7 days, after which it was expressed only in nuclei. Macrophage numbers, OPN and myogenin expression were still elevated at 7, 14 and 7 days. At 3 days, when OPN achieved the peak, some clusters of myoblasts were within regions of intense collagen deposition. Fibrosis may represent limitation for repairing processes and may explain the small diameter of regenerated fibers at 21 days post-venom. The expression of OPN in the course of venom-induced damage and regeneration suggests stages-specific mediation role along the whole process. PMID:21839764

  20. The role of innate immunity in trafficking of hematopoietic stem cells-an emerging link between activation of complement cascade and chemotactic gradients of bioactive sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Kim, ChiHwa; Wu, Wan; Shin, Dong Myung; Bryndza, Ewa; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Janina

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) circulate under steady-state conditions at detectable levels in peripheral blood (PB). The phenomenon of enforced release of HSPCs from BM into PB is called mobilization and may be envisioned as a danger-sensing response mechanism triggered by hypoxia or mechanical- or infection-induced tissue damage and is a part of stress response. It is unquestionable that the a-chemokine stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1)-CXCR4 axis plays crucial role in retention of HSPCs in BM. However, all factors that direct mobilization of HSPCs into PB and homing back to the BM or their allocation to damaged organs are not characterized very well. In this chapter we will present mounting evidence that elements of innate immunity such as complement cascade (CC) cleavage fragments (e.g., C3a and C5a), granulocytes, generation of membrane attack complex (MAC) together with sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) orchestrate HSPC mobilization. On other hand some other bioactive lipids e.g., ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) that is released from damaged/"leaky" cells in BM after myeloablative conditioning for transplant may play an opposite important role in homing of HSPCs to BM. Finally, the chemotactic activity of all chemoattractants for HSPCs including SDF-1, S1P and C1P is enhanced in presence of CC cleavage fragments (e.g., C3a) and MAC that is a final product of CC activation.

  1. Monocyte tethering by P-selectin regulates monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion. Signal integration and NF-kappa B translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, A S; McIntyre, T M; McEver, R P; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1995-01-01

    Adhesion molecules that tether circulating leukocytes to endothelial cells may also transduce or modulate outside-in signals for cellular activation, providing an initial regulatory point in the inflammatory response. Adhesion of human monocytes to P-selectin, the most rapidly expressed endothelial tethering factor, increased the secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by the leukocytes when they were stimulated with platelet-activating factor. Increased cytokine secretion was specifically inhibited by G1, an anti-P-selectin mAb that prevents P-selectin from binding to its ligand (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) on myeloid cells. Moreover, tethering by P-selectin specifically enhanced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), a transcription factor required for expression of MCP-1, TNF-alpha, and other immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate that P-selectin, through its ligands on monocytes, may locally regulate cytokine secretion in inflamed tissues. Images PMID:7537762

  2. Overexpression of Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1/CCL2 in β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Transgenic Mice Show Accelerated Diffuse β-Amyloid Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Horiba, Masahide; Buescher, James L.; Huang, DeReng; Gendelman, Howard E.; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2005-01-01

    Microglia accumulation at the site of amyloid plaques is a strong indication that microglia play a major role in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. However, how microglia affect amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) deposition remains poorly understood. To address this question, we developed a novel bigenic mouse that overexpresses both amyloid precursor protein (APP) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1; CCL2 in systematic nomenclature). CCL2 expression, driven by the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, induced mononuclear phagocyte (MP; monocyte-derived macrophage and microglial) accumulation in the brain. When APP/CCL2 transgenic mice were compared to APP mice, a fivefold increase in Aβ deposition was present despite increased MP accumulation around hippocampal and cortical amyloid plaques. Levels of full-length APP, its C-terminal fragment, and Aβ-degrading enzymes (insulin-degrading enzyme and neprilysin) in APP/CCL2 and APP mice were indistinguishable. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble Aβ (an indicator of fibrillar Aβ) was increased in APP/CCL2 mice at 5 months of age. Apolipoprotein E, which enhances Aβ deposition, was also increased (2.2-fold) in aged APP/CCL2 as compared to APP mice. We propose that although CCL2 stimulates MP accumulation, it increases Aβ deposition by reducing Aβ clearance through increased apolipoprotein E expression. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these events could be used to modulate microglial function in Alzheimer’s disease and positively affect disease outcomes. PMID:15855647

  3. Chemotactic and enzyme-releasing activity of amphipathic proteins for neutrophils. A possible role for protease in chemotaxis on substratum-bound protein gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P C; Bradley, G R

    1981-01-01

    The purified amphipathic proteins, alpha s 1-casein, beta-casein, and alkali-denatured serum albumin were studied for chemotactic and enzyme-releasing effects on human neutrophil leucocytes. Evidence for chemotaxis both in fluid-phase gradients and on solid-phase gradients was obtained using visual assays. In fluid-phase gradients, neutrophils showed good orientation to gradient sources of these proteins at concentrations of 10(-4) to 10(-5) M. Solid-phase gradients of casein and of denatured albumin were prepared on glass coverslips, and the locomotion of neutrophils attached to these coverslips was filmed by time-lapse cinematography. Displacement of neutrophils towards the highest concentration of substratum-bound protein was observed, suggesting that neutrophils can show true chemotaxis on a solid-phase gradient. All three proteins induced enzyme release from neutrophils in the absence of cytochalasin B. Lysozyme release was equivalent to that released by stimulation with formyl methionyl peptide in the presence of cytochalasin B, but the proteins stimulated a smaller release of beta-glucuronidase than the peptide. The proteins stimulated release of neutrophil proteases which were able to digest both casein and denatured albumin extracellularly. It is suggested that this proteolytic activity may assist locomotion of neutrophils, especially on solid-phase protein gradients, by cleaving membrane-attached protein, thus both freeing cell-surface receptors and allowing the cell to detach itself from the substratum and continue movement. Images Figure 1 PMID:7016748

  4. A Novel Basal Apparatus Protein of 90 kD (BAp90) from the Flagellate Green Alga Spermatozopsis similis is a Component of the Proximal Plates and Identifies the d-(dexter)Surface of the Basal Body.

    PubMed

    Geimer, S; Lechtreck, K F; Melkonian, M

    1998-05-01

    The flagellar basal apparatus consists of the basal bodies and associated fibrous structures, and represents the organizing center for the microtubular cytoskeleton in many flagellate protists. To identify novel proteins associated with the basal bodies, basal apparatuses from the flagellate green alga Spermatozopsis similis (Chlorophyceae) were isolated and purified. A polyclonal antibody raised against a 95kD protein band enriched in purified basal apparatuses was used to screen a cDNA library of S. similis which resulted in the isolation of a full length clone coding for a novel protein of 812 amino acids (85.3kD). Sequence analysis of this clone identified extended a-helical regions and predicted several coiled-coil forming domains interrupted by spacer segments of variable lengths. A polyclonal antibody (anti-BAp90) raised against the bacterially expressed protein recognized a 90kD band (BAp90) in SDS-PAGE of isolated basal apparatuses of S. similis. Immunogold labeling using anti-BAp90 decorated the proximal plates (two striated, triangular fibers which serve as spacers between the basal bodies in their proximal region) and parts of the d-fibers (df) which interconnect the basal bodies with the microtubular d-roots and the striated microtubule-associated fibers (SMAFs). Thus, the 90kD basal apparatus protein of S. similis represents a biochemical landmark for the lateral asymmetry of the basal body identifying its d-(dexter)surface. Cytoskeletal elements containing BAp90 or structurally related proteins may be involved in the organization and/or maintenance of the positional relationship between basal bodies and the cellular cytoskeleton, and hence cell polarity.

  5. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1, Fractalkine, and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Different Pathological Types of Lupus Nephritis and Their Value in Different Treatment Prognoses

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lan; Han, Fei; Lang, Xiabing; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis is important for the outcome of lupus nephritis (LN). However, the pathological type of lupus nephritis closely related to the clinical manifestations; therefore, the treatment of lupus nephritis depends on the different pathological types. Objective To assess the level of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1), fractalkine (Fkn), and receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) in different pathological types of lupus nephritis and to explore the value of these biomarkers for predicting the prognosis of lupus nephritis. Methods Patients included in this study were assessed using renal biopsy. Class III and class IV were defined as the proliferative group, class V as non-proliferative group, and class V+III and class V+IV as the mixed group. During the follow-up, 40 of 178 enrolled patients had a poor response to the standard immunosuppressant therapy. The level of markers in the different response groups was tested. Results The levels of urine and serum MCP-1, urine and serum fractalkine, and serum RAGE were higher in the proliferative group, and lower in the non-proliferative group, and this difference was significant. The levels of urine and serum MCP-1 and serum RAGE were lower in the poor response group, and these differences were also significant. The relationship between urine MCP-1 and urine and serum fractalkine with the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index was evaluated. Conclusion The concentration of cytokines MCP-1, fractalkine, and RAGE may be correlated with different pathology type of lupus nephtitis. Urine and serum MCP-1 and serum RAGE may help in predicting the prognosis prior to standard immunosuppressant therapy. PMID:27458981

  6. Dose-Response Analysis of Chemotactic Signaling Response in Salmonella typhimurium LT2 upon Exposure to Cysteine/Cystine Redox Pair.

    PubMed

    Rosier, Bob T; Lazova, Milena D

    2016-01-01

    The chemotaxis system enables motile bacteria to search for an optimum level of environmental factors. Salmonella typhimurium senses the amino acid cysteine as an attractant and its oxidized dimeric form, cystine, as a repellent. We investigated the dose-response dependence of changes in chemotactic signaling activity upon exposure to cysteine and cystine of S. typhimurium LT2 using in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. The dose-response curve of the attractant response to cysteine had a sigmoidal shape, typical for receptor-ligand interactions. However, in a knockout strain of the chemoreceptor genes tsr and tar, we detected a repellent response to cysteine solutions, scaling linearly with the logarithm of the cysteine concentration. Interestingly, the magnitude of the repellent response to cystine also showed linear dependence to the logarithm of the cystine concentration. This linear dependence was observed over more than four orders of magnitude, where detection started at nanomolar concentrations. Notably, low concentrations of another oxidized compound, benzoquinone, triggered similar responses. In contrast to S. typhimurium 14028, where no response to cystine was observed in a knockout strain of chemoreceptor genes mcpB and mcpC, here we showed that McpB/McpC-independent responses to cystine existed in the strain S. typhimurium LT2 even at nanomolar concentrations. Additionally, knocking out mcpB and mcpC did not affect the linear dose-response dependence, whereas enhanced responses were only observed to solutions that where not pH neutral (>100 μM cystine) in the case of McpC overexpression. We discuss that the linear dependence of the response on the logarithm of cystine concentrations could be a result of a McpB/C-independent redox-sensing pathway that exists in S. typhimurium LT2. We supported this hypothesis with experiments with defined cysteine/cystine mixed solutions, where a transition from repellent to attractant

  7. Real-time analysis of integrin-mediated chemotactic migration of T lymphocytes within 3-D extracellular matrix-like gels.

    PubMed

    Franitza, S; Alon, R; Lider, O

    1999-05-27

    We have developed a novel 3-D gel reconstituted with major extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins to follow the dynamics of migration of human T cells locomoting, in real-time, on gradients formed by representative chemoattractants: the C-C chemokine RANTES, and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-2. In the absence of chemoattractants, none of the T cells migrated directionally and the levels of random migration or cell polarization were low. However, major fractions of T cells placed in IL-2 and RANTES gradients in the gels polarized immediately after exposure to the chemoattractants. Shortly after polarization, 25% of the T cells migrated, in either a random or directional fashion, towards the sources of the chemoattractants; additional 5-10% of the cells remained polarized but stationary. The number of T cells migrating directionally towards RANTES or IL-2 peaked along with the formation of the chemotactic gradients. The directional migration of T cells was increased by a short pre-exposure to low doses of IL-2, which did not alter the level of expression of the beta1 integrins. The directional migration of T cells towards IL-2 and RANTES was mediated by IL-2R and pertussis toxin-sensitive receptors, respectively, and the directional, and to a lesser degree, the random locomotion of T cells induced by both chemoattractants required intact tyrosine kinase signaling and activities of the alpha4, alpha5, and, to a lesser degree, the alpha2 and alpha6 members the beta1 integrins. Our system enables the real-time tracking of individual locomoting lymphocytes and the analysis of their dynamic interactions with ECM components and cytokines. PMID:10365778

  8. MONOCYTE CHEMOTACTIC PROTEIN AND RESPONSE TO PEGYLATED INTERFERON-ALPHA-2A TREATMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C (CHC) GENOTYPE 4.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amal A; Sayed, Ola; Ali, Omnia E; Sayed, Ghadir A; Moustfa, Zainab; Elagawy, Waleed Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection varies across the world, with the highest number of infections reported in Egypt. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemokine, and its hepatic expression is up-regulated during chronic HCV infection. Fifty naive patients with chronic hepatitis C in National Hepatology & Tropical Medicine Research Institute and 20 healthy volunteers as controls were enrolled in a prospective study designed with strict inclusion criteria to nullify the effect of confounding variables and further minimize selection bias. Fifty naive patients were treated with PEG-IFN-a2b, at a dose of 1801 g/kg subcutaneously every week plus ribavirin at a dose of 1000- 1200 mg/day, according to the patient's body weight, for 48 weeks. Quantification of HCV-RNA by real-time PCR and MCP-1 by ELISA were performed for every patient and controls. There was a sta- tistically significant difference between patients and control group as regards the quantity of MCP-1 (P < 0.05) (Mann-Whitney test) (P = 0.004). There was a significant difference between responders and nonresponses regarding MCP-1 (P < 0.05), responders showed a higher percentage of cases with initial MCP-1 < 306 (P < 0.05). We conclude the importance of the detection of MCP-1 expression at the start of therapy as a factor for assessing the likelihood of HCV genotype 4 patients to achieving a sustained virological response to treatment with IFN-a2 in combination with ribavirin. PMID:27363047

  9. Inhibitory effects of resveratrol on foam cell formation are mediated through monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and lipid metabolism-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenpeng; Wang, Xianyue; Bi, Shenghui; Pan, Zhiguo; Liu, Shenxi; Yu, Hao; Lu, Hua; Lin, Xi; Wang, Xiaowu; Ma, Tao; Zhang, Weida

    2014-05-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to exert anti-atherosclerotic effects. 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) play key roles in foam cell formation, which is considered as the initiation of atherosclerosis. Thus, in this study, we investigated whether resveratrol inhibits foam cell formation by regulating lipid accumulation and inflammation. For this purpose, THP-1 cells were treated with 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to induce their differentiation into macrophages. The macrophages were then pre-treated with 2.5 µM resveratrol and subsequently with serum-free (SF) medium alone or SF medium containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 ng/ml) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL; 50 µg/ml) for 24 h to detect foam cell formation. To detect the expression of lipid accumulation-related proteins, the macrophages were treated with resveratrol. For the detection MCP-1 expression, the macrophages were treated with LPS and resveratrol, or with resveratrol alone. We incubated the THP-1-derived macrophages in resveratrol (2.5 µM) for 6 h in the presence or absence of 30 µM compound C for 4 h to detect the influence of compound C on the effects of resveratrol. The foam cells were examined using Red O staining. Gene expression levels were determined by qRT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA; lipid analysis was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results revealed that resveratrol effectively suppressed foam cell formation induced by LPS. Resveratrol also suppressed lipid accumulation and downregulated the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and PPARα, but had no effect on the expression of PPARβ/δ. Resveratrol also upregulated the expression of AMPK and Silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1). However, the effects of resveratrol on SIRT1, PPARγ and PPARα expression and lipid accumulation were reversed when the cells were pre-treated with compound C

  10. Inhibitory effects of resveratrol on foam cell formation are mediated through monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and lipid metabolism-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenpeng; Wang, Xianyue; Bi, Shenghui; Pan, Zhiguo; Liu, Shenxi; Yu, Hao; Lu, Hua; Lin, Xi; Wang, Xiaowu; Ma, Tao; Zhang, Weida

    2014-05-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to exert anti-atherosclerotic effects. 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) play key roles in foam cell formation, which is considered as the initiation of atherosclerosis. Thus, in this study, we investigated whether resveratrol inhibits foam cell formation by regulating lipid accumulation and inflammation. For this purpose, THP-1 cells were treated with 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to induce their differentiation into macrophages. The macrophages were then pre-treated with 2.5 µM resveratrol and subsequently with serum-free (SF) medium alone or SF medium containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 ng/ml) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL; 50 µg/ml) for 24 h to detect foam cell formation. To detect the expression of lipid accumulation-related proteins, the macrophages were treated with resveratrol. For the detection MCP-1 expression, the macrophages were treated with LPS and resveratrol, or with resveratrol alone. We incubated the THP-1-derived macrophages in resveratrol (2.5 µM) for 6 h in the presence or absence of 30 µM compound C for 4 h to detect the influence of compound C on the effects of resveratrol. The foam cells were examined using Red O staining. Gene expression levels were determined by qRT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA; lipid analysis was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results revealed that resveratrol effectively suppressed foam cell formation induced by LPS. Resveratrol also suppressed lipid accumulation and downregulated the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and PPARα, but had no effect on the expression of PPARβ/δ. Resveratrol also upregulated the expression of AMPK and Silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1). However, the effects of resveratrol on SIRT1, PPARγ and PPARα expression and lipid accumulation were reversed when the cells were pre-treated with compound C

  11. Maze Solving by Chemotactic Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Soh, Siowling; Wesson, Paul J.; Browne, Kevin P.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-01-11

    Droplets emitting surface-active chemicals exhibit chemotaxis toward low-pH regions. Such droplets are self-propelled and navigate through a complex maze to seek a source of acid placed at one of the maze’s exits. In doing so, the droplets find the shortest path through the maze. Chemotaxis and maze solving are due to an interplay between acid/base chemistry and surface tension effects.

  12. Comparison of acute toxicity of process chemicals used in the oil refinery industry, tested with the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis, the flagellate Isochrysis galbana, and the zebra fish, Brachydanio rerio

    SciTech Connect

    Roseth, S.; Edvardsson, T.; Botten, T.M.; Fuglestad, J.; Fonnum, F.; Stenersen, J.

    1996-07-01

    Chemicals under the trade names Nalco 537-DA, Nalco 625, Nalco 7607, Nalco 5165, Ivamin, and technical monoethanolamine are used extensively in the oil refinery industry. Aquatic toxicity tests were conducted using zebra fish fry (Brachydanio rerio) and the unicellular algae Isochrysis galbana (a flagellate) and Chaetoceros gracilis (a diatom). Inhibition of cell division, chlorophyll content, and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} uptake in the algae were sensitive end points. The effective concentrations (EC50s) of growth inhibition were 0.1 mg/L (Ivamin; I. galbana), 0.8 mg/L (Nalco 7607; I. galbana), 6 mg/L (Nalco 625; I. galbana), 10 mg/L (Nalco 5165; C. gracilis), and 15 mg/L (Nalco 537-DA; C. gracilis). The lethal concentrations (LC50s) (96 h) toward zebra fish fry was 1 mg/L for Nalco 7607, 6.5 mg/L for Nalco 537-DA, 7.1 mg/L for Nalco 625, and 20 mg/L for Ivamin 803. Monoethanolamine had an LC50 higher than 5,000 mg/L. Nalco 5165 was not tested on fish fry. The heartbeat frequency of fish embryos was reduced by 2.5 mg/L Nalco 537-DA, but this was an insensitive end point for the other chemicals.

  13. Activation of superoxide formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils by the synthetic lipopeptide Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4. Involvement of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins and synergism with chemotactic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, R; Schultz, G; Richter-Freund, M; Metzger, J; Wiesmüller, K H; Jung, G; Bessler, W G; Hauschildt, S

    1990-01-01

    Upon exposure to the bacterial chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe, human neutrophils release lysozyme and generate superoxide anions (O2.-). The synthetic lipoamino acid N-palmitoyl-S-[2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl]-(R)-cysteine (Pam3Cys), which is derived from the N-terminus of bacterial lipoprotein, when attached to Ser-(Lys)4 [giving Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4], activated O2.- formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils with an effectiveness amounting to about 15% of that of fMet-Leu-Phe. Palmitic acid, muramyl dipeptide, lipopolysaccharide and the lipopeptides Pam3Cys-Ala-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser, Pam3Cys-OMe and Pam3Cys-OH did not activate O2.- formation. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) and functionally uncouples formyl peptide receptors from G-proteins, prevented activation of O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and inhibited Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4-induced O2.- formation by 85%. Lipopeptide-induced exocytosis was pertussis-toxin-insensitive. O2.- formation induced by Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 and fMet-Leu-Phe was enhanced by cytochalasin B, by a phorbol ester and by a diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor. Addition of activators of adenylate cyclase and removal of extracellular Ca2+ inhibited O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 to different extents. Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 synergistically enhanced fMet-Leu-Phe-induced O2.- formation and primed neutrophils to respond to the chemotactic peptide at non-stimulatory concentrations. Our data suggest the following. (1) Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 activates neutrophils through G-proteins, involving pertussis-toxin-sensitive and -insensitive processes. (2) The signal transduction pathways activated by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 are similar but not identical. (3) In inflammatory processes, bacterial lipoproteins and chemotactic peptides may interact synergistically to activate O2.- formation, leading to enhanced bactericidal activity. PMID:2160237

  14. The evolution and diversity of kinetoplastid flagellates.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Alastair G B; Stevens, Jamie R; Lukes, Julius

    2006-04-01

    Five years ago, little was known about kinetoplastid evolution. Recent improvements in the taxon sampling for nuclear rRNA genes and several protein markers have transformed this understanding. Parasitism evolved at least four times in kinetoplastids. Obligate parasitic trypanosomatids are a relatively 'derived' group within kinetoplastids; their closest relative is likely to be the free-living Bodo saltans, and the ancestral trypanosomatids were probably parasites of insects. Although subject to recent controversy, trypanosomes (genus Trypanosoma) probably constitute a monophyletic group. Several unusual features of trypanosomatid genomes (e.g. trans-splicing, mitochondrial RNA editing and intron poverty) are common in kinetoplastids and pre-date the adoption of parasitism. The framework of relationships is becoming robust enough for real comparative approaches to be used to understand kinetoplastid biology.

  15. Graviresponses of certain ciliates and flagellates.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach, R; Häder, D P

    1999-01-01

    Protozoa are eukaryotic cells and represent suitable model systems to study the mechanisms of gravity perception and signal transduction due to their clear gravity-induced responses (gravitaxis and gravikinesis). Among protists, parallel evolution for graviperception mechanisms have been identified: either sensing by distinct stato-organelles (e.g., the Müller vesicles of the ciliate Loxodes) or by sensing the density difference between the whole cytoplasm and the extracellular medium (as proposed for Paramecium and Euglena). These two models are supported by experiments in density-adjusted media, as the gravitaxis of Loxodes was not affected, whereas the orientation of Paramecium and Euglena was completely disturbed. Both models include the involvement of ion channels in the cell membrane. Diverse experiments gave new information on the mechanism of graviperception in unicellular systems, such as threshold values in the range of 10% of gravity, relaxation of the responses after removal of the stimulus, and no visible adaptation phenomena during exposure to hypergravity or microgravity conditions for up to 12 days.

  16. High concentrations of circulating interleukin-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 with low concentrations of interleukin-8 were associated with severe chikungunya fever during the 2009-2010 outbreak in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lohachanakul, Jindarat; Phuklia, Weerawat; Thannagith, Montri; Thonsakulprasert, Tipparat; Ubol, Sukathida

    2012-02-01

    The recent outbreak of Chikungunya virus in Thailand caused a rheumatic fever associated with considerable morbidity and fatalities. Thus, it is important to identify biomarker(s) of severe disease induced by this threatening arbovirus. Putative biomarkers in cases of chikungunya fever during an outbreak in the southern part of Thailand in 2009-2010 were identified. Sixty-two patients who had developed fever and myalgia, with or without arthralgia/arthritis, were enrolled and grouped into severe chikungunya fever (CHIKF) (n= 15), mild CHIKF (n= 20) and non-CHIKF (n= 27) to investigate circulating immunological mediators that might serve as markers of severity. Blood samples were taken at presentation (day 1) and 30 days later (day 30) and plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinase-1, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and viral load were measured by ELISA. On day 1, severe CHIKF and mild CHIKF groups had viral loads of 10(8.5) and 10(8.3) of RNA copies/mL, respectively. At presentation, all CHIKF patients had circulating concentrations of IL-6 and MCP-1 higher than did non-CHIKF patients, whereas amongst the CHKF patients, the severe CHIKF patients had higher IL-6 concentrations than did mild CHIKF patients. Interestingly, severe CHIKF patients had significantly lower concentrations of circulating IL-8 than the other groups of patients, suggesting that high concentrations of IL-6 and MCP-1 with low concentrations of IL-8 may be a determinant of severe chikungunya virus infection.

  17. Mouse Macrophages Completely Lacking Rho Subfamily GTPases (RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC) Have Severe Lamellipodial Retraction Defects, but Robust Chemotactic Navigation and Altered Motility*

    PubMed Central

    Königs, Volker; Jennings, Richard; Vogl, Thomas; Horsthemke, Markus; Bachg, Anne C.; Xu, Yan; Grobe, Kay; Brakebusch, Cord; Schwab, Albrecht; Bähler, Martin; Knaus, Ulla G.; Hanley, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    RhoA is thought to be essential for coordination of the membrane protrusions and retractions required for immune cell motility and directed migration. Whether the subfamily of Rho (Ras homolog) GTPases (RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC) is actually required for the directed migration of primary cells is difficult to predict. Macrophages isolated from myeloid-restricted RhoA/RhoB (conditional) double knock-out (dKO) mice did not express RhoC and were essentially “pan-Rho”-deficient. Using real-time chemotaxis assays, we found that retraction of the trailing edge was dissociated from the advance of the cell body in dKO cells, which developed extremely elongated tails. Surprisingly, velocity (of the cell body) was increased, whereas chemotactic efficiency was preserved, when compared with WT macrophages. Randomly migrating RhoA/RhoB dKO macrophages exhibited multiple small protrusions and developed large “branches” due to impaired lamellipodial retraction. A mouse model of peritonitis indicated that monocyte/macrophage recruitment was, surprisingly, more rapid in RhoA/RhoB dKO mice than in WT mice. In comparison with dKO cells, the phenotypes of single RhoA- or RhoB-deficient macrophages were mild due to mutual compensation. Furthermore, genetic deletion of RhoB partially reversed the motility defect of macrophages lacking the RhoGAP (Rho GTPase-activating protein) myosin IXb (Myo9b). In conclusion, the Rho subfamily is not required for “front end” functions (motility and chemotaxis), although both RhoA and RhoB are involved in pulling up the “back end” and resorbing lamellipodial membrane protrusions. Macrophages lacking Rho proteins migrate faster in vitro, which, in the case of the peritoneum, translates to more rapid in vivo monocyte/macrophage recruitment. PMID:25213860

  18. The kinetics of allergen-induced transcription of messenger RNA for monocyte chemotactic protein-3 and RANTES in the skin of human atopic subjects: relationship to eosinophil, T cell, and macrophage recruitment

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The C-C chemokines RANTES and monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3) are potent chemoattractants in vitro for eosinophils and other cell types associated with allergic reactions. We tested the hypothesis that the allergen-induced infiltration of eosinophils, T cells, and macrophages in the skin of atopic subjects is accompanied by the appearance of mRNA+ cells for RANTES and MCP-3. Cryostat sections were obtained from skin biopsies from six subjects 6, 24, and 48 h after allergen challenge. Tissue was processed for immunocytochemistry (ICC) and for in situ hybridization using 35S-labeled riboprobes for RANTES and MCP-3. In contrast to diluent controls, allergen provoked a significant increase in mRNA+ cells for MCP-3, which peaked at 6 h and progressively declined at 24 and 48 h. This paralleled the kinetics of total (major basic protein positive [MBP]+) and activated (cleaved form of eosinophil cationic protein [EG2]+) eosinophil infiltration. The allergen-induced expression of cells mRNA+ for RANTES was also clearly demonstrable at 6 h. However, the numbers were maximal at 24 h and declined slightly at the 48-h time point. The number of mRNA+ cells for RANTES paralleled the kinetics of infiltration of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells whereas the number of CD68+ macrophages was still increasing at 48 h. These data support the view that MCP-3 is involved in the regulation of the early eosinophil response to specific allergen, whereas RANTES may have more relevance to the later accumulation of T cells and macrophages. PMID:7539041

  19. The CC chemokine thymus-derived chemotactic agent 4 (TCA-4, secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine, 6Ckine, exodus-2) triggers lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1-mediated arrest of rolling T lymphocytes in peripheral lymph node high endothelial venules.

    PubMed

    Stein, J V; Rot, A; Luo, Y; Narasimhaswamy, M; Nakano, H; Gunn, M D; Matsuzawa, A; Quackenbush, E J; Dorf, M E; von Andrian, U H

    2000-01-01

    T cell homing to peripheral lymph nodes (PLNs) is defined by a multistep sequence of interactions between lymphocytes and endothelial cells in high endothelial venules (HEVs). After initial tethering and rolling via L-selectin, firm adhesion of T cells requires rapid upregulation of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) adhesiveness by a previously unknown pathway that activates a Galpha(i)-linked receptor. Here, we used intravital microscopy of murine PLNs to study the role of thymus-derived chemotactic agent (TCA)-4 (secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine, 6Ckine, Exodus-2) in homing of adoptively transferred T cells from T-GFP mice, a transgenic strain that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) selectively in naive T lymphocytes (T(GFP) cells). TCA-4 was constitutively presented on the luminal surface of HEVs, where it was required for LFA-1 activation on rolling T(GFP) cells. Desensitization of the TCA-4 receptor, CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7), blocked T(GFP) cell adherence in wild-type HEVs, whereas desensitization to stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha (the ligand for CXC chemokine receptor 4 [CXCR4]) did not affect T(GFP) cell behavior. TCA-4 protein was not detected on the luminal surface of PLN HEVs in plt/plt mice, which have a congenital defect in T cell homing to PLNs. Accordingly, T(GFP) cells rolled but did not arrest in plt/plt HEVs. When TCA-4 was injected intracutaneously into plt/plt mice, the chemokine entered afferent lymph vessels and accumulated in draining PLNs. 2 h after intracutaneous injection, luminal presentation of TCA-4 was detectable in a subset of HEVs, and LFA-1-mediated T(GFP) cell adhesion was restored in these vessels. We conclude that TCA-4 is both required and sufficient for LFA-1 activation on rolling T cells in PLN HEVs. This study also highlights a hitherto undocumented role for chemokines contained in afferent lymph, which may modulate leukocyte recruitment in draining PLNs.

  20. Chemotactic Signaling by Single-Chain Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mowery, Patricia; Ames, Peter; Reiser, Rebecca H.; Parkinson, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) family operate in commingled clusters that enable cells to detect and track environmental chemical gradients with high sensitivity and precision. MCP homodimers of different detection specificities form mixed trimers of dimers that facilitate inter-receptor communication in core signaling complexes, which in turn assemble into a large signaling network. The two subunits of each homodimeric receptor molecule occupy different locations in the core complexes. One subunit participates in trimer-stabilizing interactions at the trimer axis, the other lies on the periphery of the trimer, where it can interact with two cytoplasmic proteins: CheA, a signaling autokinase, and CheW, which couples CheA activity to receptor control. As a possible tool for independently manipulating receptor subunits in these two structural environments, we constructed and characterized fused genes for the E. coli serine chemoreceptor Tsr that encoded single-chain receptor molecules in which the C-terminus of the first Tsr subunit was covalently connected to the N-terminus of the second with a polypeptide linker. We showed with soft agar assays and with a FRET-based in vivo CheA kinase assay that single-chain Tsr~Tsr molecules could promote serine sensing and chemotaxis responses. The length of the connection between the joined subunits was critical. Linkers nine residues or shorter locked the receptor in a kinase-on state, most likely by distorting the native structure of the receptor HAMP domain. Linkers 22 or more residues in length permitted near-normal Tsr function. Few single-chain molecules were found as monomer-sized proteolytic fragments in cells, indicating that covalently joined receptor subunits were responsible for mediating the signaling responses we observed. However, cysteine-directed crosslinking, spoiling by dominant-negative Tsr subunits, and rearrangement of ligand-binding site lesions revealed subunit swapping interactions that will need to be taken into account in experimental applications of single-chain chemoreceptors. PMID:26709829

  1. Suppression of Chemotactic Explosion by Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Alexander; Xu, Xiaoqian

    2016-06-01

    Chemotaxis plays a crucial role in a variety of processes in biology and ecology. In many instances, processes involving chemical attraction take place in fluids. One of the most studied PDE models of chemotaxis is given by the Keller-Segel equation, which describes a population density of bacteria or mold which is attracted chemically to substance they secrete. Solutions of the Keller-Segel equation can exhibit dramatic collapsing behavior, where density concentrates positive mass in a measure zero region. A natural question is whether the presence of fluid flow can affect singularity formation by mixing the bacteria thus making concentration harder to achieve. In this paper, we consider the parabolic-elliptic Keller-Segel equation in two and three dimensions with an additional advection term modeling ambient fluid flow. We prove that for any initial data, there exist incompressible fluid flows such that the solution to the equation stays globally regular. On the other hand, it is well known that when the fluid flow is absent, there exists initial data leading to finite time blow up. Thus the presence of fluid flow can prevent the singularity formation. We discuss two classes of flows that have the explosion arresting property. Both classes are known as very efficient mixers. The first class are the relaxation enhancing (RE) flows of (Ann Math:643-674, 2008). These flows are stationary. The second class of flows are the Yao-Zlatos near-optimal mixing flows (Mixing and un-mixing by incompressible flows. arXiv:1407.4163, 2014), which are time dependent. The proof is based on the nonlinear version of the relaxation enhancement construction of (Ann Math:643-674, 2008), and on some variations of the global regularity estimate for the Keller-Segel model.

  2. Suppression of Chemotactic Explosion by Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Alexander; Xu, Xiaoqian

    2016-11-01

    Chemotaxis plays a crucial role in a variety of processes in biology and ecology. In many instances, processes involving chemical attraction take place in fluids. One of the most studied PDE models of chemotaxis is given by the Keller-Segel equation, which describes a population density of bacteria or mold which is attracted chemically to substance they secrete. Solutions of the Keller-Segel equation can exhibit dramatic collapsing behavior, where density concentrates positive mass in a measure zero region. A natural question is whether the presence of fluid flow can affect singularity formation by mixing the bacteria thus making concentration harder to achieve. In this paper, we consider the parabolic-elliptic Keller-Segel equation in two and three dimensions with an additional advection term modeling ambient fluid flow. We prove that for any initial data, there exist incompressible fluid flows such that the solution to the equation stays globally regular. On the other hand, it is well known that when the fluid flow is absent, there exists initial data leading to finite time blow up. Thus the presence of fluid flow can prevent the singularity formation. We discuss two classes of flows that have the explosion arresting property. Both classes are known as very efficient mixers. The first class are the relaxation enhancing (RE) flows of (Ann Math:643-674, 2008). These flows are stationary. The second class of flows are the Yao-Zlatos near-optimal mixing flows (Mixing and un-mixing by incompressible flows. arXiv:1407.4163, 2014), which are time dependent. The proof is based on the nonlinear version of the relaxation enhancement construction of (Ann Math:643-674, 2008), and on some variations of the global regularity estimate for the Keller-Segel model.

  3. Description of a bacterium associated with redmouth disease of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1966-01-01

    A description was given of a gram-negative, peritrichously flagellated, fermentative bacterium that was isolated on numerous occasions from kidney tissues of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) afflicted with redmouth disease. Although the bacteria apparently were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, it was impossible to determine their taxonomic position within the family with certainty. Hence it was recommended that their taxonomic position remain sub judice for the present. As a temporary designation RM bacterium was used. Redmouth disease was transmitted from infected to normal fish through the medium of water.

  4. Computational and experimental study of chemotaxis of an ensemble of bacteria attached to a microbead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traoré, Mahama A.; Sahari, Ali; Behkam, Bahareh

    2011-12-01

    Micro-objects propelled by whole cell actuators, such as flagellated bacteria, are being increasingly studied and considered for a wide variety of applications. In this work we present theoretical and experimental investigations of chemotactic motility of a 10 μm diameter microbead propelled by an ensemble of attached flagellated bacteria. The stochastic model presented here encompasses the behavior of each individual bacterium attached to the microbead in a spatiotemporally varying chemoattractant field. The computational model shows that in a chemotactic environment, the ensemble of bacteria, although constrained, propel the bead in a chemotactic manner with a 67% enhancement in displacement to distance ratio (defined as directionality) compared to nonchemotactic propulsion. The simulation results are validated experimentally. Close agreement between theory and experiments demonstrates the possibility of using the presented model as a predictive tool for other similar biohybrid systems.

  5. Interplay between flagellation and cell cycle control in Caulobacter.

    PubMed

    Ardissone, Silvia; Viollier, Patrick H

    2015-12-01

    The assembly of the flagellum, a sophisticated nanomachine powering bacterial locomotion in liquids and across surfaces, is highly regulated. In the synchronizable α-Proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum is built at a pre-selected cell pole and flagellar transcript abundance oscillates during the cell cycle. Conserved regulators not only dictate when the transcripts encoding flagellar structural proteins peak, but also those encoding polarization factors. Additionally, post-transcriptional cell cycle cues facilitate flagellar (dis-)assembly at the new cell pole. Because of this regulatory complexity and the power of bacterial genetics, motility is a suitable and simple proxy for dissecting how bacteria implement cell cycle progression and polarity, while also providing clues on how bacteria might decide when and where to display other surface structures. PMID:26476805

  6. Waltzing Volvox/: Orbiting Bound States of Flagellated Multicellular Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, K.; Leptos, K.; Pedley, T. J.; Goldstein, R. E.; Ishikawa, T.

    2008-11-01

    The spherical colonial alga Volvox swims by means of flagella on thousands of surface somatic cells. This geometry and its large size makes it a model organism for the fluid dynamics of multicellularity. Remarkably, when two nearby colonies swim close to a solid surface, they are attracted together and can form a stable bound state in which they continuously waltz around each other. A surface-mediated hydrodynamic attraction between colonies combined with the rotational motion of bottom-heavy Volvox are shown to explain the stability and dynamics of the bound state. This phenomenon is suggested to underlie observed clustering of colonies at surfaces.

  7. "Flagellated" cancer cells propel anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Garaude, Johan; Blander, J Magarian

    2012-09-01

    The use of innate immune receptor agonists in cancer therapies has suffered from many drawbacks. Our recent observations suggest that some of these hurdles can be overcome by introducing flagellin into tumor cells to promote tumor antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) and simultaneously trigger two types of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs).

  8. Cell morphology and flagellation of nitrogen-fixing spirilla.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, N A; Vlassak, K

    1979-01-01

    Twenty isolates of N2-fixing spirilla were isolated from the rhizosphere of maize and sugar cane grown in Egyptian and Belgian soils. Electron microscopy distinguished two morphological groups. The first includes short and thick curved rods with an unipolar flagellum while cells of the second group are much longer with the typical appearance of spiral cells and most probably possess a bipolar tuft of flagella. PMID:527912

  9. In vitro culture of the flagellate protozoan Hexamita salmonis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uzmann, J.R.; Hayduk, S.H.

    1963-01-01

    Trophozoites of Hexamita salmonis, asserted pathogen of juvenile salmonid fishes, were isolated from two species of Pacific salmon hosts and cultured repeatedly in an organic medium saturated with nitrogen. Primary isolates and serial subcultures usually exhibited five- to tenfold population increases per passage.

  10. The macrophage chemotactic activity of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemoattractant capabilities of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products (ECP) were investigated from two isolates, the virulent FL6-60 parent and less virulent RET-04 mutant. Chemotaxis and chemokinesis were assayed in vitro using blind well chambers with peritoneal macrophages obtained from ...

  11. Noninvasive inference of the molecular chemotactic response using bacterial trajectories.

    PubMed

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Voisinne, Guillaume; Wong-Ng, Jerome; Celani, Antonio; Vergassola, Massimo

    2012-01-31

    The quality of sensing and response to external stimuli constitutes a basic element in the selective performance of living organisms. Here we consider the response of Escherichia coli to chemical stimuli. For moderate amplitudes, the bacterial response to generic profiles of sensed chemicals is reconstructed from its response function to an impulse, which then controls the efficiency of bacterial motility. We introduce a method for measuring the impulse response function based on coupling microfluidic experiments and inference methods: The response function is inferred using Bayesian methods from the observed trajectories of bacteria swimming in microfluidically controlled chemical fields. The notable advantages are that the method is based on the bacterial swimming response, it is noninvasive, without any genetic and/or mechanical preparation, and assays the behavior of the whole flagella bundle. We exploit the inference method to measure responses to aspartate and α-methylaspartate--measured previously by other methods--as well as glucose, leucine, and serine. The response to the attractant glucose is shown to be biphasic and perfectly adapted, as for aspartate. The response to the attractant serine is shown to be biphasic yet imperfectly adapted, that is, the response function has a nonzero (positive) integral. The adaptation of the response to the repellent leucine is also imperfect, with the sign of the two phases inverted with respect to serine. The diversity in the bacterial population of the response function and its dependency upon the background concentration are quantified. PMID:22307649

  12. Noisy Oscillations in the Actin Cytoskeleton of Chemotactic Amoeba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrete, Jose; Pumir, Alain; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Westendorf, Christian; Tarantola, Marco; Beta, Carsten; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-09-01

    Biological systems with their complex biochemical networks are known to be intrinsically noisy. Here we investigate the dynamics of actin polymerization of amoeboid cells, which are close to the onset of oscillations. We show that the large phenotypic variability in the polymerization dynamics can be accurately captured by a generic nonlinear oscillator model in the presence of noise. We determine the relative role of the noise with a single dimensionless, experimentally accessible parameter, thus providing a quantitative description of the variability in a population of cells. Our approach, which rests on a generic description of a system close to a Hopf bifurcation and includes the effect of noise, can characterize the dynamics of a large class of noisy systems close to an oscillatory instability.

  13. Chemotactic behavior of the sperm of chitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Miller, R L

    1977-11-01

    Observations of sperm behavior in the vicinity of gradients of egg-water or alcohol extracts of whole freshly-spawned eggs of several chitons reveal what appear to be directed movements of sperm up the gradient, resulting in the aggregation of motile sperm at the gradient source. Plots of the tracks of the sperm approaching the gradient source show that the cells increase the time during which they move toward the source and decrease the time spent moving away. Although this resembles the kinesis behavior shown by bacteria in a gradient, the path directions are markedly non-random. The reorientation behavior of thigmotactic sperm involves enlargement of the normal circular path diameter in the direction of the source and an alternation of tight loops and wide circular arcs, with the latter made in the direction of the source. The form of the path of attracted chiton sperm is like that observed during chemotaxis of the sperm of the hydroid Tubularia and the tunicate Ciona and resembles the behavior of Ciona sperm in that there is no increase in velocity as the cells move up the gradient. However, unlike the cnidarian and urochordate cases, the attracting substances extracted from chiton eggs do not act species-specifically.

  14. Modelling of microscale patch encounter by chemotactic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, N; Fenchel, T

    1999-10-01

    A model of protozoan chemotaxis, based on the rate of change of chemoreceptor occupancy, was used to analyse the efficiency of chemotaxis in a variety of situations. Simulated swimming behaviour replicated patterns observed experimentally. These were classified into three forms of chemosensory behaviour; run-tumble, steered turning, and helical klinotaxis. All three could be simulated from a basic model of chemotaxis by modifying memory times and rotational velocities. In order to steer during helical klinotaxis, the cell must have a short term memory for responding to a signal within a fraction of the time period of the helix. Steered turning was identified as a form where cells react to negative changes in concentration by steering around the turn to swim back up the gradient. All 3 forms were quite effective for encountering targets within the response radius. A response to negative changes in concentration, experienced when the cell is moving away from a target, was found to be important in the absence of periodic changes in swimming direction. The frequency of patch encounter at a fixed density was calculated to be roughly proportional to swimming speed. On the basis of the model, cells are only able to sense point sources within a radius of a few mm. However, even a response radius of 1 mm is enough to increase encounter probability of otherwise minute targets by 2 orders of magnitude. The mean time for patch encounter was calculated to be an exponential function of the mean distance between patches. This results in a very sharp threshold at approximately 6 cm, above which they are not encountered by protozoa within time periods of several days.

  15. Chemotactic peptide analogues. Synthesis and chemotactic activity of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe analogues containing (S)-phenylalaninol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zecchini, G P; Paradisi, M P; Torrini, I; Spisani, S

    1995-09-01

    The synthesis and the biological activity towards human neutrophils of some N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-OMe analogues containing (S)-phenylalaninol (Pheol) or its derivatives in place of the native phenylalanine are reported. While the analogue containing Pheol (4) was found to be devoid of significant biological activity, its esters 3 and 5, although inactive as chemoattractants, are able to strongly stimulate superoxide production and are active with a lower efficacy in the lysozyme release. PMID:7487425

  16. Characterization and phylogenetic identification of a species of spherical multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes that produces both magnetite and greigite crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Yi-Ran; Du, Hai-Jian; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Pan, Hong-Miao; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-Fei

    2014-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of Gram-negative bacteria synthesizing magnetic crystals that allow them aligning along magnetic field lines. They have diverse morphologies including cocci, rods, vibrio, spirilla, and multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMPs). MMPs are composed of 10-57 cells with peritrichous flagella on their outer surfaces and swim as an entire unit. Here, we describe a species of spherical MMPs isolated from intertidal sediments of Lake Yuehu (Yellow Sea, China). They were mainly found in the subsurface layer of gray-black sediments. Microscopy revealed that these spherical MMPs were 5.6 ± 0.9 μm in diameter and composed of approximately 16-32 ovoid cells with a helical arrangement and peritrichous flagellation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that the MMPs contained both bullet-shaped magnetite and irregular greigite magnetosomes that were arranged in chains or clusters. These MMPs displayed typical escape motility and negative phototaxis. The 16S rRNA genes of micromanipulation-purified spherical MMPs were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MMP species was affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria and displayed >2.8% sequence divergence with respect to previously reported MMPs. This is the first phylogenetic identification of a spherical MMP that produces both magnetite and greigite magnetosomes.

  17. Bugs on a Slippery Plane : Understanding the Motility of Microbial Pathogens with Mathematical Modelling.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Dmitri O; Bees, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Many pathogenic microorganisms live in close association with surfaces, typically in thin films that either arise naturally or that they themselves create. In response to this constrained environment, the cells adjust their behaviour and morphology, invoking communication channels and inducing physical phenomena that allow for rapid colonization of biomedically relevant surfaces or the promotion of virulence factors. Thus, it is very important to measure and theoretically understand the key mechanisms for the apparent advantage obtained from swimming in thin films. We discuss experimental measurements of flows around a peritrichously flagellated bacterium constrained in a thin film, derive a simplified mathematical theory and Green's functions for flows in a thin film with general slip boundary conditions, and establish connections between theoretical and experimental results. This article aims to highlight the importance of mathematics as a tool to unlock qualitative mechanisms associated with experimental observations in the medical and biological sciences. PMID:27193544

  18. Chlamydomonas swims with two "gears" in a eukaryotic version of run-and-tumble locomotion.

    PubMed

    Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Drescher, Knut; Gollub, J P; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2009-07-24

    The coordination of eukaryotic flagella is essential for many of the most basic processes of life (motility, sensing, and development), yet its emergence and regulation and its connection to locomotion are poorly understood. Previous studies show that the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas, widely regarded as an ideal system in which to study flagellar biology, swims forward by the synchronous action of its two flagella. Using high-speed imaging over long intervals, we found a richer behavior: A cell swimming in the dark stochastically switches between synchronous and asynchronous flagellar beating. Three-dimensional tracking shows that these regimes lead, respectively, to nearly straight swimming and to abrupt large reorientations, which yield a eukaryotic version of the "run-and-tumble" motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria.

  19. Comparison of thirty-seven strains of Vd-3 bacteria with Agrobacterium radiobacter: morphological and physiological observations.

    PubMed

    Riley, P S; Weaver, R E

    1977-02-01

    Thirty-seven cultures of Vd-3 bacteria, isolated from clinical specimens, were characterized morphologically and physiologically. The cultures produced positive reactions when tested for oxidase, urease, nitrate reduction, phenylalanine deaminase, oxidative metabolism of carbohydrate substrates, and 3-ketolactose production. These peritrichously flagellated microorganisms were isolated primarily from the respiratory tract. When compared to authentic strains of Agrobacterium, they appeared to be most similar to A. radiobacter. Gas-liquid chromatography of trimethylsilyl derivatives of whole-cell hydrolysates of some of the Vd-3 strains and A. radiobacter yielded nearly identical elution patterns. The Vd-3 cultures were identified as probable strains of A. radiobacter. A method is presented for differentiating cultures of A. radiobacter from other similar bacteria encountered in clinical specimens. Although these bacteria rarely occur in clinical specimens, the clinical microbiologist should be familiar withe their outstanding characteristics.

  20. High-Level Genetic Diversity but No Population Structure Inferred from Nuclear and Mitochondrial Markers of the Peritrichous Ciliate Carchesium polypinum in the Grand River Basin (North America)▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gentekaki, E.; Lynn, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    Studies that assess intraspecific genetic variation in ciliates are few and quite recent. Consequently, knowledge of the subject and understanding of the processes that underlie it are limited. We sought to assess the degree of intraspecific genetic variation in Carchesium polypinum (Ciliophora: Peritrichia), a cosmopolitan, freshwater ciliate. We isolated colonies of C. polypinum from locations in the Grand River basin in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. We then used the nuclear markers—ITS1, ITS2, and the hypervariable regions of the large subunit rRNA—and an 819-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene (cox-1) to investigate the intraspecific genetic variation of C. polypinum and the degree of resolution of the above-mentioned markers at the population level. We also sought to determine whether the organism demonstrated any population structure that mapped onto the geography of the region. Our study shows that there is a high degree of genetic diversity at the isolate level, revealed by the mitochondrial markers but not the nuclear markers. Furthermore, our results indicate that C. polypinum is likely not a single morphospecies as previously thought. PMID:19304815

  1. The microaerophilic flagellate, Trichomonas vaginalis, contains unusual acyl lipids but no detectable cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Guschina, Irina A; Harris, Kristina M; Maskrey, Ben; Goldberg, Burt; Lloyd, David; Harwood, John L

    2009-01-01

    Previous lipid analysis of trichomonads has led to controversy as to whether these hydrogenosome-containing organisms contain cardiolipin (CL), which is a characteristic component of mitochondria. Here we report a careful lipid analysis of the sexually transmitted protist Trichomonas vaginalis. Major lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine (42%) and phosphatidylcholine (20%) with lesser amounts of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) (12%) and non-polar components. Two unusual lipids, acyl-PG (8%) and ceramide phosphorylethanolamine (2%), were also significant components. The structures of these lipids were confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry following reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. This is the first time ceramide phosphorylethanolamine has been reported in a trichomonad. In contrast, CL (diphosphatidylglycerol) could not be detected either by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography or by mass spectrometry. These data are discussed in relation to the organism's phylogenetic origin as a parasite showing secondary adaptation to microaerobic conditions. PMID:19335774

  2. Phylogenomics demonstrates that breviate flagellates are related to opisthokonts and apusomonads.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew W; Sharpe, Susan C; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Heiss, Aaron A; Lang, B Franz; Simpson, Alastair G B; Roger, Andrew J

    2013-10-22

    Most eukaryotic lineages belong to one of a few major groups. However, several protistan lineages have not yet been robustly placed in any of these groups. Both the breviates and apusomonads are two such lineages that appear to be related to the Amoebozoa and Opisthokonta (i.e. the 'unikonts' or Amorphea); however, their precise phylogenetic positions remain unclear. Here, we describe a novel microaerophilic breviate, Pygsuia biforma gen. nov. sp. nov., isolated from a hypoxic estuarine sediment. Ultrastructurally, this species resembles the breviate genera Breviata and Subulatomonas but has two cell morphologies, adherent and swimming. Phylogenetic analyses of the small sub-unit rRNA gene show that Pygsuia is the sister to the other breviates. We constructed a 159-protein supermatrix, including orthologues identified in RNA-seq data from Pygsuia. Phylogenomic analyses of this dataset show that breviates, apusomonads and Opisthokonta form a strongly supported major eukaryotic grouping we name the Obazoa. Although some phylogenetic methods disagree, the balance of evidence suggests that the breviate lineage forms the deepest branch within Obazoa. We also found transcripts encoding a nearly complete integrin adhesome from Pygsuia, indicating that this protein complex involved in metazoan multicellularity may have evolved earlier in eukaryote evolution than previously thought.

  3. Contribution of cell body to the thrust production of flagellate bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Powers, Thomas R.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-11-01

    We trace individual motile microorganisms using a digital 3D tracking microscope in which the microscope stage follows the motion of the target. Using this technology, we not only trace a single cell over extended duration but also obtain the cell kinematics with high spatial and temporal resolution. We apply this tracking microscope to a study of Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium that moves up to 100 microns (or 50 body lengths) per second and reverses its direction of motion by switching the rotation direction of its single helical flagellum. We show that when the cell reverses the rotation direction of the right-handed flagellum, e.g., switching from CW (a pusher) to CCW (a puller), its cell-kinematics is not completely reversible. In case of a puller, the cell almost spins along its long axis. However, in case of a pusher, besides spinning, the cell body precesses along its swimming direction, following a helical trajectory. These two types of cell-kinematics contribute to different cell motilities: the pusher rotates slower for the same swimming speed. We present a resistive force theory to account for this behavior, and by computing the torque on the cell body, we show that the finite precession angle of the bacterial pusher is optimized for swimming with fixed torque.

  4. Significance of Viral Lysis and Flagellate Grazing as Factors Controlling Bacterioplankton Production in a Eutrophic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Weinbauer, Markus G.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of viral lysis and heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) grazing on bacterial mortality were estimated in a eutrophic lake (Lake Plußsee in northern Germany) which was separated by a steep temperature and oxygen gradient into a warm and oxic epilimnion and a cold and anoxic hypolimnion. Two transmission electron microscopy-based methods (whole-cell examination and thin sections) were used to determine the frequency of visibly infected cells, and a model was used to estimate bacterial mortality due to viral lysis. Examination of thin sections also showed that between 20.2 and 29.2% (average, 26.1%) of the bacterial cells were empty (ghosts) and thus could not contribute to viral production. The most important finding was that the mechanism for regulating bacterial production shifted with depth from grazing control in the epilimnion to control due to viral lysis in the hypolimnion. We estimated that in the epilimnion viral lysis accounted on average for 8.4 to 41.8% of the summed mortality (calculated by determining the sum of the mortalities due to lysis and grazing), compared to 51.3 to 91.0% of the summed mortality in the metalimninon and 88.5 to 94.2% of the summed mortality in the hypolimnion. Estimates of summed mortality values indicated that bacterial production was controlled completely or almost completely in the epilimnion (summed mortality, 66.6 to 128.5%) and the hypolimnion (summed mortality, 43.4 to 103.3%), whereas in the metalimnion viral lysis and HNF grazing were not sufficient to control bacterial production (summed mortality, 22.4 to 56.7%). The estimated contribution of organic matter released by viral lysis of cells into the pool of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was low; however, since cell lysis products are very likely labile compared to the bulk DOM, they might stimulate bacterial production. The high mortality of bacterioplankton due to viral lysis in anoxic water indicates that a significant portion of bacterial production in the metalimnion and hypolimnion is cycled in the bacterium-virus-DOM loop. This finding has major implications for the fate and cycling of organic nutrients in lakes. PMID:16349497

  5. The Immune Response of Hemocytes of the Insect Oncopeltus fasciatus against the Flagellate Phytomonas serpens

    PubMed Central

    Alves e Silva, Thiago L.; Vasconcellos, Luiz R. C.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Phytomonas includes parasites that are etiological agents of important plant diseases, especially in Central and South America. These parasites are transmitted to plants via the bite of an infected phytophagous hemipteran. Despite the economic impact of these parasites, many basic questions regarding the genus Phytomonas remain unanswered, such as the mechanism by which the parasites cope with the immune response of the insect vector. In this report, using a model of systemic infection, we describe the function of Oncopeltus fasciatus hemocytes in the immune response towards the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens. Hemocytes respond to infection by trapping parasites in nodular structures and phagocytizing the parasites. In electron microscopy of hemocytes, parasites were located inside vacuoles, which appear fused with lysosomes. The parasites reached the O. fasciatus salivary glands at least six hours post-infection. After 72 hours post-infection, many parasites were attached to the salivary gland outer surface. Thus, the cellular responses did not kill all the parasites. PMID:24015207

  6. Chronic toxicity of a laundry detergent to the freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Azizullah, Azizullah; Richter, Peter; Jamil, Muhammad; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2012-10-01

    Chronic toxicity of the common laundry detergent Ariel on the freshwater alga Euglena gracilis was investigated by growing the alga in a medium containing the detergent for 7 days. Cell density, motility, swimming velocity, gravitactic orientation, cell shape, photosynthesis and concentration of light-harvesting pigments were used as end point parameters for the assessment of toxicity. Cell density was significantly reduced at a concentration of 1 mg l(-1) or above. Among the other tested parameters, with the exception of cell shape, gravitaxis and chlorophyll b, all were adversely affected by the detergent at concentrations exceeding 1 mg l(-1). It is concluded that long-term (7-days) exposure to the detergent caused significant toxicity to E. gracilis. Furthermore, long-term tests with E. gracilis can be used as sensitive indicator for the toxicity assessment of laundry detergents in aquatic environments.

  7. Hydrodynamic analysis of flagellated bacteria swimming in corners of rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Henry; Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of nearby solid surfaces on the motility of bacteria is of fundamental importance as these interactions govern the ability of the microorganisms to explore their environment and form sessile colonies. Reducing biofouling in medical implants and controlling the transport of bacterial cells in a microfluidic device are two applications that could benefit from a detailed understanding of swimming in microchannels. In this study, we investigate the self-propelled motion of a model bacterium, driven by rotating a single helical flagellum, in such an environment. In particular, we focus on the corner region of a large channel modeled as two perpendicular sections of no-slip planes joined with a rounded corner. We numerically solve the equations of Stokes flow using the boundary element method to obtain the swimming velocities at different positions and orientations relative to the channel corner. From these velocities, we construct many trajectories to ascertain the general behavior of the swimmers. Considering only hydrodynamic interactions between the bacterium and the channel walls, we show that some swimmers can become trapped near the corner while moving, on average, along the axis of the channel. This result suggests that such bacteria may be found at much higher densities in corners than in other parts of the channel. Another implication is that these corner accumulating bacteria may travel quickly through channels since they are guided directly along the corner and do not turn back or swim transversely across the channel.

  8. Preliminary identification schemes for some unicellular ciliated and flagellated parasites of warmwater fishes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are few keys for the identification of small unicellular parasites of warmwater fishes and few experts who can confidently identify these parasites to species. Molecular identification tools for these parasites are largely unavailable. For fishery biologists and even fish health diagnosticia...

  9. UV-B affects photosynthesis, ROS production and motility of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter.

    PubMed

    Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Shin, Woongghi; Brown, Murray T; Han, Taejun

    2012-10-15

    The effects of ultraviolet B (UV-B; 295-320 nm) radiation on certain vital physiological (photosynthesis), biochemical (production of reactive oxygen species - ROS) and behavioral (motility and orientation) characteristics were investigated in the unicellular photoautotroph, Euglena agilis Carter. The photosynthetic performance of E. agilis was recorded after exposure of between 15 and 60 min followed by a period of recovery lasting 6-24h under dim light (5-10 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). The maximum quantum yield of PS II (F(v)/F(m)) was reduced to 65% and 14% of initial values immediately following 15 and 30 min UV-B exposure, but recovered to 100 and 86% of the initials, respectively. Values of rETR(max) in E. agilis exposed to 15 min UV-B were similar to those of the initials, but a 30 min UV exposure resulted in 75% reduction of rETR(max) with only a 43% recovery as compared with the initial after 24h recovery. After a 60 min UV-B exposure, there were no Chl a fluorescence signals, and hence no F(v)/F(m) or rETR(max). A UV dose-dependent increase in DCFH-DA fluorescence was found in E. agilis cells, reflecting an increase in ROS production. After exposures to UV-B for between 15 and 60 min, the percentages of motile cells in the population decreased to 76, 39 and 15%, respectively. Following 24h in dim light, the percentage of motile cells increased to between 66% and 95% of the initial value. The velocity of non-irradiated cells was 60 μm s(-1), which decreased to 16-35 μm s(-1) immediately following exposure for 15-60 min. After periods of time in dim light (6, 12 and 24h) velocities had recovered to between 44 and 81% of the initial value. In untreated controls, the r-value was 0.23, indicating random movement of E. agilis, but it increased to 0.35 and 0.72 after exposure to UV-B for 30 and 60 min, respectively. There was a tendency towards vertical downward movement of cells proportional to the duration of exposure. The compactness of E. agilis decreased from 2.9 in controls to 1.8-2.3 in cells treated with UV-B although significant recovery followed. UV-B dose-dependent interaction between photosynthetic activity, ROS production and movement is discussed in terms of a UV-protective mechanism in E. agilis.

  10. Chitinous fibrils in the lorica of the flagellate chrysophyte Poteriochromonas stipitata (syn. Ochromonas malhamensis)

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Ordered microfibrils are formed on the membrane of the cytoplasmic tail of the alga Poteriochromonas after attachment to a substrate. The ultrastructure of native and extracted stalk fibrils was studied with electron microscope methods. In addition, the structural polysaccharide was characterized by hydrolyses, separation of the monomers by thin- layer chromatography, gas-liquid chromatography and amino acid analysis, and by X-ray diffraction. The alkali-resistant fibrils yielded mostly glucosamine upon extensive hydrolysis, and showed X-ray diffraction patterns similar to those of fugal chitin. It is concluded that the resistant core of the fibrils is chitinous. PMID:858740

  11. Microwave irradiation for shortening the processing time of samples of flagellated bacteria for scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Chavarría, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Microwave irradiation (MWI) has been applied to the development of rapid methods to process biological samples for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this paper we propose two simple and quick techniques for processing bacteria (Proteus mirabilis and Vibrio mimicus) for SEM using MWI. In the simplest methodology, the bacteria were placed on a cover-glass, air-dried, and submitted to conductivity stain. The reagent used for the conductivity stain was the mordant of a light microscopy staining method (10 ml of 5% carbolic acid solution, 2 g of tannic acid, and 10 ml of saturated aluminum sulfate 12-H2O). In the second method the samples were double fixed (glutaraldehyde and then osmium), submitted to conductivity stain, dehydrated through a series of ethanol solutions of increasing concentration, treated with hexamethyldisilazine (HMDS), and dried at 35 degrees C for 5 minutes. In both methods the steps from fixation to treatment with HMDS were done under MWI for 2 minutes in an ice-water bath, in order to dissipate the heat generated by the MWI. Although both techniques preserve bacterial morphology adequately, the latter, technique showed the best preservation, including the appearance of flagella, and that process was completed in less than 2 hours at temperatures of MWI between 4 to 5 degrees C. PMID:17061527

  12. Fuel for thought: chemically powered nanomotors out-swim nature's flagellated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mirkovic, Tihana; Zacharia, Nicole S; Scholes, Gregory D; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2010-04-27

    Half a century ago, Richard Feynman envisioned tiny machines able to perform chemistry by mechanical manipulation of atoms. While this vision has not yet been realized in practice, researchers have recently discovered how to use chemistry to drive tiny engines and to operate tiny machines in the liquid phase, in much the same way Nature uses biochemistry to power a myriad of biological motors and machines. Herein, we provide a brief Perspective on the rapidly growing research activity in the emerging field of chemically powered nanomotors and nanomachines, consider some of the challenges facing its continued rapid development, and imagine a future in which these tiny motors and machines can get down to doing some serious work.

  13. SKELETAL DEVELOPMENT IN HERMESINUM ADRIATICUM ZACHARIAS, A FLAGELLATE FROM THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. FLAGELLATE CRYPTOBIA BRANCHIALIS (BODONIDA: KINETOPLASTIDA), ECTOPARASITE OF TILAPIA FROM THE SALTON SEA. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Ribosomal RNA phylogeny of bodonid and diplonemid flagellates and the evolution of euglenozoa.

    PubMed

    von der Heyden, Sophie; Chao, Ema E; Vickerman, Keith; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Euglenozoa is a major phylum of excavate protozoa (comprising euglenoids, kinetoplastids, and diplonemids) with highly unusual nuclear, mitochondrial, and chloroplast genomes. To improve understanding of euglenozoan evolution, we sequenced nuclear small-subunit rRNA genes from 34 bodonids (Bodo, Neobodo, Parabodo, Dimastigella-like, Rhynchobodo, Rhynchomonas, and unidentified strains), nine diplonemids (Diplonema, Rhynchopus), and a euglenoid (Entosiphon). Phylogenetic analysis reveals that diplonemids and bodonids are more diverse than previously recognised, but does not clearly establish the branching order of kinetoplastids, euglenoids, and diplonemids. Rhynchopus is holophyletic; parasitic species arose from within free-living species. Kinetoplastea (bodonids and trypanosomatids) are robustly holophyletic and comprise a major clade including all trypanosomatids and most bodonids ('core bodonids') and a very divergent minor one including Ichthyobodo. The root of the major kinetoplastid clade is probably between trypanosomatids and core bodonids. Core bodonids have three distinct subclades. Clade 1 has two distinct Rhynchobodo-like lineages; a lineage comprising Dimastigella and Rhynchomonas; and another including Cruzella and Neobodo. Clade 2 comprises Cryptobia/ Trypanoplasma, Procryptobia, and Parabodo. Clade 3 is an extensive Bodo saltans species complex. Neobodo designis is a vast genetically divergent species complex with mutually exclusive marine and freshwater subclades. Our analysis supports three phagotrophic euglenoid orders: Petalomonadida (holophyletic), Ploeotiida (probably holophyletic), Peranemida (paraphyletic).

  16. Patterns of genetic diversity in the marine heterotrophic flagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Alveolata: Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Lowe, Chris D; Montagnes, David J S; Martin, Laura E; Watts, Phillip C

    2010-04-01

    Oxyrrhis marina is an important model in ecological studies of free-living protists. Despite this, O. marina has rarely been studied in the environment and no explicit distributional studies exist. Further, phylogenetic data for a small number of isolates indicate that O. marina constitutes two divergent lineages. Here, we quantify phylogenetic variation between 58 globally distributed O. marina isolates using 5.8S--internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 rDNA (5.8S ITS) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) partial sequences. 5.8S ITS and COI phylogenies both partitioned O. marina into four clades, which formed two lineages; mean sequence identity for 5.8S ITS and COI respectively was approximately 40 and 90% between these two lineages. Sequence identities for 5.8S ITS/ COI between clades within lineages were 66.3/99.4% (lineage 1: clade 1 vs 2) and 42.3/99.1% (lineage 2: clade 3 vs 4). rDNA mutation rates in O. marina appear to be abnormally high and were not interpreted in a species delineation context. Based on variation in COI sequence and comparisons with other protists, we suggest that O. marina lineages may constitute two species. In a geographic context, evidence of spatial restriction but also extensive overlap between O. marina clades occurred. Further, clade abundances varied considerably: clades 1 and 2 (belonging to one lineage) were abundant and widespread; in contrast, clades 3 and 4 (belonging to the second lineage) were rare and spatially restricted (occurring only in the Mediterranean or in culture collection). There is need for further phylogenetic and taxonomic studies to assess species delineation in O. marina, and for the application of high resolution genetic markers to resolve processes driving genetic diversity in this important model organism.

  17. Exploring the environmental diversity of kinetoplastid flagellates in the high-throughput DNA sequencing era.

    PubMed

    d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini; Boucinha, Carolina; Kostygov, Alexei; Santos, Helena Lúcia Carneiro; Morelli, Karina Alessandra; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, Anastasiia; Duval, Linda; Votýpka, Jan; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Grellier, Philippe; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-12-01

    The class Kinetoplastea encompasses both free-living and parasitic species from a wide range of hosts. Several representatives of this group are responsible for severe human diseases and for economic losses in agriculture and livestock. While this group encompasses over 30 genera, most of the available information has been derived from the vertebrate pathogenic genera Leishmaniaand Trypanosoma. Recent studies of the previously neglected groups of Kinetoplastea indicated that the actual diversity is much higher than previously thought. This article discusses the known segment of kinetoplastid diversity and how gene-directed Sanger sequencing and next-generation sequencing methods can help to deepen our knowledge of these interesting protists.

  18. The chaperonin genes of jakobid and jakobid-like flagellates: implications for eukaryotic evolution.

    PubMed

    Archibald, John M; O'Kelly, Charles J; Doolittle, W Ford

    2002-04-01

    The jakobids are free-living mitochondriate protists that share ultrastructural features with certain amitochondriate groups and possess the most bacterial-like mitochondrial genomes described thus far. Jakobids belong to a diverse group of mitochondriate and amitochondriate eukaryotes, the excavate taxa. The relationships among the various excavate taxa and their relationships to other putative deep-branching protist groups are largely unknown. With the hope of clarifying these issues, we have isolated the cytosolic chaperonin CCTalpha gene from the jakobid Reclinomonas americana (strains 50394 and 50283), the jakobid-like malawimonad Malawimonas jakobiformis, two heteroloboseans (Acrasis rosea and Naegleria gruberi), a euglenozoan (Trypanosoma brucei), and a parabasalid (Monocercomonas sp.). We also amplified the CCTdelta gene from M. jakobiformis. The Reclinomonas and Malawimonas sequences presented here are among the first nuclear protein-coding genes to be described from these organisms. Unlike other putative early diverging protist lineages, a high density of spliceosomal introns was found in the jakobid and malawimonad CCTs-similar to that observed in vertebrate protein-coding genes. An analysis of intron positions in CCT genes from protists, plants, animals, and fungi suggests that many of the intron-sparse or intron-lacking protist lineages may not be primitively so but have lost spliceosomal introns during their evolutionary history. In phylogenetic trees constructed from CCTalpha protein sequences, R. americana (but not M. jakobiformis) shows a weak but consistent affinity for the Heterolobosea and Euglenozoa.

  19. Eight unique basal bodies in the multi-flagellated diplomonad Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    McInally, Shane G; Dawson, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an intestinal parasitic protist that causes significant acute and chronic diarrheal disease worldwide. Giardia belongs to the diplomonads, a group of protists in the supergroup Excavata. Diplomonads are characterized by eight motile flagella organized into four bilaterally symmetric pairs. Each of the eight Giardia axonemes has a long cytoplasmic region that extends from the centrally located basal body before exiting the cell body as a membrane-bound flagellum. Each basal body is thus unique in its cytological position and its association with different cytoskeletal features, including the ventral disc, axonemes, and extra-axonemal structures. Inheritance of these unique and complex cytoskeletal elements is maintained through basal body migration, duplication, maturation, and their subsequent association with specific spindle poles during cell division. Due to the complex composition and inheritance of specific basal bodies and their associated structures, Giardia may require novel basal body-associated proteins. Thus, protists such as Giardia may represent an undiscovered source of novel basal body-associated proteins. The development of new tools that make Giardia genetically tractable will enable the composition, structure, and function of the eight basal bodies to be more thoroughly explored.

  20. Observations on the ovulating process of the red flagellated shrimp Acetes chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiu

    1986-12-01

    Acetes chinensis always ovulate in the dark at night. Two to five hours before ovulation, the mature oocytes change from white to orange. In the meantime, meiosis of the oocytes occurs, and reaches the metaphase just prior to ovulation. If ovarian colour change starts in the dark at night but ovulation does not start by break of dawn, ovulation will be inhibited and meiosis of the cells will be blocked.

  1. A hybrid actuated microrobot using an electromagnetic field and flagellated bacteria for tumor-targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Donghai; Choi, Hyunchul; Cho, Sunghoon; Jeong, Semi; Jin, Zhen; Lee, Cheong; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new concept for a hybrid actuated microrobot for tumor-targeting therapy. For drug delivery in tumor therapy, various electromagnetic actuated microrobot systems have been studied. In addition, bacteria-based microrobot (so-called bacteriobot), which use tumor targeting and the therapeutic function of the bacteria, has also been proposed for solid tumor therapy. Compared with bacteriobot, electromagnetic actuated microrobot has larger driving force and locomotive controllability due to their position recognition and magnetic field control. However, because electromagnetic actuated microrobot does not have self-tumor targeting, they need to be controlled by an external magnetic field. In contrast, the bacteriobot uses tumor targeting and the bacteria's own motility, and can exhibit self-targeting performance at solid tumors. However, because the propulsion forces of the bacteria are too small, it is very difficult for bacteriobot to track a tumor in a vessel with a large bloodstream. Therefore, we propose a hybrid actuated microrobot combined with electromagnetic actuation in large blood vessels with a macro range and bacterial actuation in small vessels with a micro range. In addition, the proposed microrobot consists of biodegradable and biocompatible microbeads in which the drugs and magnetic particles can be encapsulated; the bacteria can be attached to the surface of the microbeads and propel the microrobot. We carried out macro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot along a desired path through electromagnetic field control and the micro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot toward a chemical attractant through the chemotaxis of the bacteria. For the validation of the hybrid actuation of the microrobot, we fabricated a hydrogel microfluidic channel that can generate a chemical gradient. Finally, we evaluated the motility performance of the hybrid actuated microrobot in the hydrogel microfluidic channel. We expect that the hybrid actuated microrobot will be utilized for tumor targeting and therapy in future. PMID:25944679

  2. Exploring the environmental diversity of kinetoplastid flagellates in the high-throughput DNA sequencing era

    PubMed Central

    d’Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini; Boucinha, Carolina; Kostygov, Alexei; Santos, Helena Lúcia Carneiro; Morelli, Karina Alessandra; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, Anastasiia; Duval, Linda; Votýpka, Jan; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Grellier, Philippe; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    The class Kinetoplastea encompasses both free-living and parasitic species from a wide range of hosts. Several representatives of this group are responsible for severe human diseases and for economic losses in agriculture and livestock. While this group encompasses over 30 genera, most of the available information has been derived from the vertebrate pathogenic genera Leishmaniaand Trypanosoma. Recent studies of the previously neglected groups of Kinetoplastea indicated that the actual diversity is much higher than previously thought. This article discusses the known segment of kinetoplastid diversity and how gene-directed Sanger sequencing and next-generation sequencing methods can help to deepen our knowledge of these interesting protists. PMID:26602872

  3. A hybrid actuated microrobot using an electromagnetic field and flagellated bacteria for tumor-targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Donghai; Choi, Hyunchul; Cho, Sunghoon; Jeong, Semi; Jin, Zhen; Lee, Cheong; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new concept for a hybrid actuated microrobot for tumor-targeting therapy. For drug delivery in tumor therapy, various electromagnetic actuated microrobot systems have been studied. In addition, bacteria-based microrobot (so-called bacteriobot), which use tumor targeting and the therapeutic function of the bacteria, has also been proposed for solid tumor therapy. Compared with bacteriobot, electromagnetic actuated microrobot has larger driving force and locomotive controllability due to their position recognition and magnetic field control. However, because electromagnetic actuated microrobot does not have self-tumor targeting, they need to be controlled by an external magnetic field. In contrast, the bacteriobot uses tumor targeting and the bacteria's own motility, and can exhibit self-targeting performance at solid tumors. However, because the propulsion forces of the bacteria are too small, it is very difficult for bacteriobot to track a tumor in a vessel with a large bloodstream. Therefore, we propose a hybrid actuated microrobot combined with electromagnetic actuation in large blood vessels with a macro range and bacterial actuation in small vessels with a micro range. In addition, the proposed microrobot consists of biodegradable and biocompatible microbeads in which the drugs and magnetic particles can be encapsulated; the bacteria can be attached to the surface of the microbeads and propel the microrobot. We carried out macro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot along a desired path through electromagnetic field control and the micro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot toward a chemical attractant through the chemotaxis of the bacteria. For the validation of the hybrid actuation of the microrobot, we fabricated a hydrogel microfluidic channel that can generate a chemical gradient. Finally, we evaluated the motility performance of the hybrid actuated microrobot in the hydrogel microfluidic channel. We expect that the hybrid actuated microrobot will be utilized for tumor targeting and therapy in future.

  4. Effect of quantity and configuration of attached bacteria on bacterial propulsion of microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behkam, Bahareh; Sitti, Metin

    2008-12-01

    Flagellated chemotactic bacteria have been utilized as actuators for propulsion of polystyrene microbeads by randomly attaching several bacteria on their surface. In this work, a plasma-based bacteria patterning technique is developed and used to limit bacteria attachment to approximately half of the microbead's surface. Consequently, the effect of quantity and configuration of the attached bacteria on propulsion speed is studied experimentally. It is shown that the correlation between the propulsion speed and the number of bacteria is a strong function of the configuration of the bacteria and it follows one of the two distinct trends quantified by the proposed stochastic model.

  5. Chemotaxis-mediated biodegradation of cyclic nitramine explosives RDX, HMX, and CL-20 by Clostridium sp. EDB2.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Halasz, Annamaria; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2004-04-01

    Cyclic nitramine explosives, RDX, HMX, and CL-20 are hydrophobic pollutants with very little aqueous solubility. In sediment and soil environments, they are often attached to solid surfaces and/or trapped in pores and distribute heterogeneously in aqueous environments. For efficient bioremediation of these explosives, the microorganism(s) must access them by chemotaxis ability. In the present study, we isolated an obligate anaerobic bacterium Clostridium sp. strain EDB2 from a marine sediment. Strain EDB2, motile with numerous peritrichous flagella, demonstrated chemotactic response towards RDX, HMX, CL-20, and NO(2)(-). The three explosives were biotransformed by strain EDB2 via N-denitration with concomitant release of NO(2)(-). Biotransformation rates of RDX, HMX, and CL-20 by the resting cells of strain EDB2 were 1.8+/-0.2, 1.1+/-0.1, and 2.6+/-0.2nmol h(-1)mgwet biomass(-1) (mean+/-SD; n=3), respectively. We found that commonly seen RDX metabolites such as TNX, methylenedinitramine, and 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal neither produced NO(2)(-) during reaction with strain EDB2 nor they elicited chemotaxis response in strain EDB2. The above data suggested that NO(2)(-) released from explosives during their biotransformation might have elicited chemotaxis response in the bacterium. Biodegradation and chemotactic ability of strain EDB2 renders it useful in accelerating the bioremediation of explosives under in situ conditions. PMID:15033473

  6. Single-Cell E. coli Response to an Instantaneously Applied Chemotactic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Sagawa, Takashi; Kikuchi, Yu; Inoue, Yuichi; Takahashi, Hiroto; Muraoka, Takahiro; Kinbara, Kazushi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Fukuoka, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    In response to an attractant or repellant, an Escherichia coli cell controls the rotational direction of its flagellar motor by a chemotaxis system. When an E. coli cell senses an attractant, a reduction in the intracellular concentration of a chemotaxis protein, phosphorylated CheY (CheY-P), induces counterclockwise (CCW) rotation of the flagellar motor, and this cellular response is thought to occur in several hundred milliseconds. Here, to measure the signaling process occurring inside a single E. coli cell, including the recognition of an attractant by a receptor cluster, the inactivation of histidine kinase CheA, and the diffusion of CheY and CheY-P molecules, we applied a serine stimulus by instantaneous photorelease from a caged compound and examined the cellular response at a temporal resolution of several hundred microseconds. We quantified the clockwise (CW) and CCW durations immediately after the photorelease of serine as the response time and the duration of the response, respectively. The results showed that the response time depended on the distance between the receptor and motor, indicating that the decreased CheY-P concentration induced by serine propagates through the cytoplasm from the receptor-kinase cluster toward the motor with a timing that is explained by the diffusion of CheY and CheY-P molecules. The response time included 240 ms for enzymatic reactions in addition to the time required for diffusion of the signaling molecule. The measured response time and duration of the response also revealed that the E. coli cell senses a similar serine concentration regardless of whether the serine concentration is increasing or decreasing. These detailed quantitative findings increase our understanding of the signal transduction process that occurs inside cells during bacterial chemotaxis. PMID:25099812

  7. The effect of vacuum pump oil on the chemotactic behavior of soil bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Dunifon, R.E.; Hazen, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    The use of biodegradation in the cleanup and transformation of waste materials is an economical and environmentally safe practice. Using chemotaxis, or the movement of bacteria toward or away from compounds, in biodegradation is an area that is being studied at the Savannah River Laboratory. This study investigates the inhibition of vacuum pump oil on the chemotaxis of soil bacteria. It was found that vacuum pump oil does have an inhibitory effect on the movement of bacteria. This inhibition will have to be considered when studying the possibility of using chemotaxis to degrade vacuum pump oil, or any other petroleum products. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Characterization and Reactivity of Broiler Chicken Sera to Selected Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Chemotactic Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod bacterium, is the leading causative agent of human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Consumption and handling of raw or undercooked poultry are regarded as a major source for human infection. Because bacterial chemotaxis guides microorganisms to c...

  9. A hybrid computational model to predict chemotactic guidance of growth cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccasalvo, Iolanda Morana; Micera, Silvestro; Sergi, Pier Nicola

    2015-06-01

    The overall strategy used by growing axons to find their correct paths during the nervous system development is not yet completely understood. Indeed, some emergent and counterintuitive phenomena were recently described during axon pathfinding in presence of chemical gradients. Here, a novel computational model is presented together with its ability to reproduce both regular and counterintuitive axonal behaviours. In this model, the key role of intracellular calcium was phenomenologically modelled through a non standard Gierer-Meinhardt system, as a crucial factor influencing the growth cone behaviour both in regular and complex conditions. This model was able to explicitly reproduce neuritic paths accounting for the complex interplay between extracellular and intracellular environments, through the sensing capability of the growth cone. The reliability of this approach was proven by using quantitative metrics, numerically supporting the similarity between in silico and biological results in regular conditions (control and attraction). Finally, the model was able to qualitatively predict emergent and counterintuitive phenomena resulting from complex boundary conditions.

  10. Mononuclear Phagocyte-Mediated Antifungal Immunity: The Role of Chemotactic Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Break, Timothy J.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, fungal infections have emerged as significant causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies, hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Besides neutrophils and CD4+ T lymphocytes, which have long been known to play an indispensable role in promoting protective antifungal immunity, mononuclear phagocytes are now being increasingly recognized as critical mediators of host defense against fungi. Thus, a recent surge of research studies has focused on understanding the mechanisms by which resident and recruited monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells accumulate and become activated at the sites of fungal infection. Herein, we critically review how a variety of G-protein coupled chemoattractant receptors and their ligands mediate mononuclear phagocyte recruitment and effector function during infection by the most common human fungal pathogens. PMID:25715741

  11. Inducing chemotactic and haptotactic cues in microfluidic devices for three-dimensional in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arotzena, O; Mendoza, G; Cóndor, M; Rüberg, T; García-Aznar, J M

    2014-11-01

    Microfluidic devices allow for the production of physiologically relevant cellular microenvironments by including biomimetic hydrogels and generating controlled chemical gradients. During transport, the biomolecules interact in distinct ways with the fibrillar networks: as purely diffusive factors in the soluble fluid or bound to the matrix proteins. These two main mechanisms may regulate distinct cell responses in order to guide their directional migration: caused by the substrate-bound chemoattractant gradient (haptotaxis) or by the gradient established within the soluble fluid (chemotaxis). In this work 3D diffusion experiments, in combination with ELISA assays, are performed using microfluidic platforms in order to quantify the distribution of PDGF-BB and TGF-β1 across collagen and fibrin gels. Furthermore, to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental processes, the experiments are reproduced by computer simulations based on a reaction-diffusion transport model. This model yields an accurate prediction of the experimental results, confirming that diffusion and binding phenomena are established within the microdevice.

  12. Self-Guided Supramolecular Cargo-Loaded Nanomotors with Chemotactic Behavior towards Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Fei; Tu, Yingfeng; van Hest, Jan C M; Wilson, Daniela A

    2015-01-01

    Delivery vehicles that are able to actively seek and precisely locate targeted tissues using concentration gradients of signaling molecules have hardly been explored. The directed movement toward specific cell types of cargo-loaded polymeric nanomotors along a hydrogen peroxide concentration gradient (chemotaxis) is reported. Through self-assembly, bowl-shaped poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polystyrene nanomotors, or stomatocytes, were formed with platinum nanoparticles entrapped in the cavity while a model drug was encapsulated in the inner compartment. Directional movement of the stomatocytes in the presence of a fuel gradient (chemotaxis) was first demonstrated in both static and dynamic systems using glass channels and a microfluidic flow. The highly efficient response of these motors was subsequently shown by their directional and autonomous movement towards hydrogen peroxide secreting neutrophil cells. PMID:26277327

  13. Amide hydrogen exchange and internal dynamics in the chemotactic protein CheY from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, E; Bruix, M; López-Hernández, E; Serrano, L; Rico, M

    1997-08-22

    The backbone internal dynamics of the wild-type 129 amino acid alpha/beta parallel protein CheY and its double mutant F14N/P110G are analysed here by the hydrogen-exchange method. The F14N mutation is known to stabilise the protein and to accelerate refolding while P110G is destabilising and accelerates unfolding. We first assigned and characterised the double mutant by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), to try and discover any possible conformational change induced by the two mutations. The main difference between the two proteins is a favourable N-capping interaction of the newly introduced Asn14 side-chain at the beginning of the first alpha-helix (alpha-helix A). Second, we have measured the exchange rates in the wild-type and mutant CheY. In the first case the observed protection factors are slightly dispersed around an average value. According to their distribution in the structure, protein stability is highest on one face of the central beta-sheet, in the surroundings of the main hydrophobic core formed by side-chains of residues in beta-strands I, II and III and helices A and E. The mutations in the double mutant protein affect two distinct subdomains differently (from beta-strand I to III and from alpha-helix C to the end). In the second subdomain the number of protected protons is reduced with respect to those in the wild-type. This differential behaviour can be explained by a selective decrease in stability of the second folding subdomain produced by the P110G mutation and the opposite effect in the first subdomain, produced by the F14N mutation. alpha-Helix A, which is involved together with beta-strands I and III in the folding nucleus of CheY, shows the largest protection factors in both proteins.

  14. Myosin-II sets the optimal response time scale of chemotactic amoeba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Westendorf, Christian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2014-03-01

    The response dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton to external chemical stimuli plays a fundamental role in numerous cellular functions. One of the key players that governs the dynamics of the actin network is the motor protein myosin-II. Here we investigate the role of myosin-II in the response of the actin system to external stimuli. We used a microfluidic device in combination with a photoactivatable chemoattractant to apply stimuli to individual cells with high temporal resolution. We directly compare the actin dynamics in Dictyostelium discodelium wild type (WT) cells to a knockout mutant that is deficient in myosin-II (MNL). Similar to the WT a small population of MNL cells showed self-sustained oscillations even in absence of external stimuli. The actin response of MNL cells to a short pulse of chemoattractant resembles WT during the first 15 sec but is significantly delayed afterward. The amplitude of the dominant peak in the power spectrum from the response time series of MNL cells to periodic stimuli with varying period showed a clear resonance peak at a forcing period of 36 sec, which is significantly delayed as compared to the resonance at 20 sec found for the WT. This shift indicates an important role of myosin-II in setting the response time scale of motile amoeba. Institute of Physics und Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany.

  15. The development of concentration gradients in a suspension of chemotactic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillesdon, A. J.; Pedley, T. J.; Kessler, J. O.

    1995-01-01

    When a suspension of bacterial cells of the species Bacillus subtilis is placed in a chamber with its upper surface open to the atmosphere complex bioconvection patterns are observed. These arise because the cells: (1) are denser than water; and (2) usually swim upwards, so that the density of an initially uniform suspension becomes greater at the top than the bottom. When the vertical density gradient becomes large enough, an overturning instability occurs which ultimately evolves into the observed patterns. The reason that the cells swim upwards is that they are aerotactic, i.e., they swim up gradients of oxygen, and they consume oxygen. These properties are incorporated in conservation equations for the cell (N) and oxygen (C) concentrations, and these are solved in the pre-instability phase of development when N and C depend only on the vertical coordinate and time. Numerical results are obtained for both shallow- and deep-layer chambers, which are intrinsically different and require different mathematical and numerical treatments. It is found that, for both shallow and deep chambers, a thin boundary layer, densely packed with cells, forms near the surface. Beneath this layer the suspension becomes severely depleted of cells. Furthermore, in the deep chamber cases, a discontinuity in the cell concentration arises between this cell-depleted region and a cell-rich region further below, where no significant oxygen concentration gradients develop before the oxygen is fully consumed. The results obtained from the model are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  16. Adrenergic regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 leads to enhanced macrophage recruitment and ovarian carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Nagaraja, Archana S; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Sadaoui, Nouara C; Stone, Rebecca L; Matsuo, Koji; Dalton, Heather J; Previs, Rebecca A; Jennings, Nicholas B; Dorniak, Piotr; Hansen, Jean M; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-02-28

    Increased adrenergic signaling facilitates tumor progression, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We examined factors responsible for stress-mediated effects on monocyte/macrophage recruitment into the tumor microenvironment, and the resultant effects on tumor growth. In vitro, MCP1 was significantly increased after catecholamine exposure, which was mediated by cAMP and PKA. Tumor samples from mice subjected to daily restraint stress had elevated MCP1 gene and protein levels, increased CD14+ cells, and increased infiltration of CD68+ cells. hMCP1 siRNA-DOPC nanoparticles significantly abrogated daily restraint stress-induced tumor growth and inhibited infiltration of CD68+ and F4/80+ cells. In ovarian cancer patients, elevated peripheral blood monocytes and tumoral macrophages were associated with worse overall survival. Collectively, we demonstrate that increased adrenergic signaling is associated with macrophage infiltration and mediated by tumor cell-derived MCP1 production. PMID:25738355

  17. Onset of nonlinearity in a stochastic model for auto-chemotactic advancing epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amar, Martine; Bianca, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of auto-chemotaxis in the growth and motility of an epithelium advancing on a solid substrate. In this process, cells create their own chemoattractant allowing communications among neighbours, thus leading to a signaling pathway. As known, chemotaxis provokes the onset of cellular density gradients and spatial inhomogeneities mostly at the front, a phenomenon able to predict some features revealed in in vitro experiments. A continuous model is proposed where the coupling between the cellular proliferation, the friction on the substrate and chemotaxis is investigated. According to our results, the friction and proliferation stabilize the front whereas auto-chemotaxis is a factor of destabilization. This antagonist role induces a fingering pattern with a selected wavenumber k0. However, in the planar front case, the translational invariance of the experimental set-up gives also a mode at k = 0 and the coupling between these two modes in the nonlinear regime is responsible for the onset of a Hopf-bifurcation. The time-dependent oscillations of patterns observed experimentally can be predicted simply in this continuous non-linear approach. Finally the effects of noise are also investigated below the instability threshold. PMID:27669998

  18. Modeling the self-organized phosphatidylinositol lipid signaling system in chemotactic cells using quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tatsuo; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Satomi; Ueda, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    A key signaling event that is responsible for gradient sensing in eukaryotic cell chemotaxis is a phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) lipid reaction system. The self-organization activity of this PtdIns lipid system induces an inherent polarity, even in the absence of an external chemoattractant gradient, by producing a localized PtdIns (3,4,5)-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)]-enriched domain on the membrane. Experimentally, we found that such a domain could exhibit two types of behavior: (1) it could be persistent and travel on the membrane, or (2) be stochastic and transient. Taking advantage of the simultaneous visualization of PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) and the enzyme phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), for which PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) is a substrate, we statistically demonstrated the inter-dependence of their spatiotemporal dynamics. On the basis of this statistical analysis, we developed a theoretical model for the self-organization of PtdIns lipid signaling that can accurately reproduce both persistent and transient domain formation; these types of formations can be explained by the oscillatory and excitability properties of the system, respectively. PMID:22899720

  19. Enhancement of Swimming Speed Leads to a More-Efficient Chemotactic Response to Repellent

    PubMed Central

    Uday Bhaskar, R. V. S.; Jesudasan, Rajesh E.; Venkatesh, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    Negative chemotaxis refers to the motion of microorganisms away from regions with high concentrations of chemorepellents. In this study, we set controlled gradients of NiCl2, a chemorepellent, in microchannels to quantify the motion of Escherichia coli over a broad range of concentrations. The experimental technique measured the motion of the bacteria in space and time and further related the motion to the local concentration profile of the repellent. Results show that the swimming speed of bacteria increases with an increasing concentration of repellent, which in turn enhances the drift velocity. The contribution of the increased swimming speed to the total drift velocity was in the range of 20 to 40%, with the remaining contribution coming from the modulation of the tumble frequency. A simple model that incorporates receptor dynamics, including adaptation, intracellular signaling, and swimming speed variation, was able to qualitatively capture the observed trend in drift velocity. PMID:26655753

  20. Variables affecting production of monocyte chemotactic factor 1 from human leukocytes stimulated with Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; North, E A; Jiang, Y; Nong, S H; Kornfeld, H; Harrison, T S

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is produced predominantly by mononuclear phagocytes and stimulates recruitment into infected tissues of blood monocytes and T cells. These cell types are thought to be critical to host defenses against infections due to Cryptococcus neoformans, a major cause of disease in persons with AIDS and other disorders of cell-mediated immunity. Accordingly, in the present study, we examined the conditions under which human monocytes and bronchoalveolar macrophages (BAM) are stimulated by C. neoformans to produce MCP-1. C. neoformans was a potent inducer of MCP-1 release from monocytes, with levels of chemokine secreted similar to that seen following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). BAM, in contrast, were stimulated by LPS, but not by C. neoformans, to secrete MCP-1. A peak in MCP-1 mRNA was seen 8 h following cryptococcal stimulation of monocytes. Nine strains of C. neoformans stimulated monocytes to release MCP-1, and there was only modest variation between strains. However, when an individual strain was used, the capacity of C. neoformans to stimulate monocyte MCP-1 release did vary, depending upon the conditions used to grow the fungal stimuli. Finally, C. neoformans stimulated comparable quantities of MCP-1 release in monocytes from donors with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection. These data establish C. neoformans as a potent stimulator of MCP-1 in monocytes, but not in BAM. The failure of C. neoformans to stimulate MCP-1 in BAM, if occurring in vivo, could result in a diminished cell-mediated inflammatory response following inhalation of airborne fungi. PMID:9038295

  1. Self-Guided Supramolecular Cargo-Loaded Nanomotors with Chemotactic Behavior towards Cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Tu, Yingfeng; van Hest, Jan C M; Wilson, Daniela A

    2015-09-28

    Delivery vehicles that are able to actively seek and precisely locate targeted tissues using concentration gradients of signaling molecules have hardly been explored. The directed movement toward specific cell types of cargo-loaded polymeric nanomotors along a hydrogen peroxide concentration gradient (chemotaxis) is reported. Through self-assembly, bowl-shaped poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polystyrene nanomotors, or stomatocytes, were formed with platinum nanoparticles entrapped in the cavity while a model drug was encapsulated in the inner compartment. Directional movement of the stomatocytes in the presence of a fuel gradient (chemotaxis) was first demonstrated in both static and dynamic systems using glass channels and a microfluidic flow. The highly efficient response of these motors was subsequently shown by their directional and autonomous movement towards hydrogen peroxide secreting neutrophil cells. PMID:26277327

  2. Structure of bacterial cytoplasmic chemoreceptor arrays and implications for chemotactic signaling.

    PubMed

    Briegel, Ariane; Ladinsky, Mark S; Oikonomou, Catherine; Jones, Christopher W; Harris, Michael J; Fowler, Daniel J; Chang, Yi-Wei; Thompson, Lynmarie K; Armitage, Judith P; Jensen, Grant J

    2014-01-01

    Most motile bacteria sense and respond to their environment through a transmembrane chemoreceptor array whose structure and function have been well-studied, but many species also contain an additional cluster of chemoreceptors in their cytoplasm. Although the cytoplasmic cluster is essential for normal chemotaxis in some organisms, its structure and function remain unknown. Here we use electron cryotomography to image the cytoplasmic chemoreceptor cluster in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Vibrio cholerae. We show that just like transmembrane arrays, cytoplasmic clusters contain trimers-of-receptor-dimers organized in 12-nm hexagonal arrays. In contrast to transmembrane arrays, however, cytoplasmic clusters comprise two CheA/CheW baseplates sandwiching two opposed receptor arrays. We further show that cytoplasmic fragments of normally transmembrane E. coli chemoreceptors form similar sandwiched structures in the presence of molecular crowding agents. Together these results suggest that the 12-nm hexagonal architecture is fundamentally important and that sandwiching and crowding can replace the stabilizing effect of the membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02151.001.

  3. Expression of Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-3 Following Simulated Birth Trauma in a Murine Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Vricella, Gino J.; Tao, Mingfang; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Liu, Guiming; Kavran, Michael; Daneshgari, Firouz; Hijaz, Adonis K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of obesity on simulated birth trauma in leptin-deficient obese mice as measured by relative MCP-3 expression. Materials and Methods A total of 25 wild-type and 25 obese C57BL/6 virgin female mice underwent 1 hour of vaginal distension (VD), sham VD or anesthesia without VD. Pelvic organ tissues were then harvested either immediately or 24-hours post VD and subsequent real-time PCR analysis was performed. Results Urethral MCP-3 levels in wild-type mice were elevated from baseline at 0-hours with a return to baseline at 24-hours in both VD and sham VD groups. In obese mice, there was a 6-fold elevation in MCP-3 levels at 0-hours after sham VD versus control (P < 0.05), which then returned to baseline levels at 24-hours. After undergoing VD, MCP-3 levels increased to 6-fold baseline values (P = 0.002) at 0-hours, with continued elevation in MCP-3 levels to 15 times control levels (P = 0.0003) at 24-hours. Conclusions MCP-3 is significantly over expressed in the urethral tissues of both wild-type and obese mice immediately after any urethral manipulation. At 24-hours, the MCP-3 expression patterns become divergent between VD and sham VD in obese mice. With a greater degree of trauma, MCP-3 continued to rise at 24-hours, suggesting that the underlying obesity resulted in alterations in response to tissue injury paralleling the degree of injury. Such associations warrant further investigation into the role of MCP-3 as a chemokine for stem cell migration with implications for subsequent tissue repair mechanisms after birth trauma. PMID:20970834

  4. Mononuclear phagocyte-mediated antifungal immunity: the role of chemotactic receptors and ligands.

    PubMed

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Break, Timothy J; Lionakis, Michail S

    2015-06-01

    Over the past two decades, fungal infections have emerged as significant causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies, hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Besides neutrophils and CD4(+) T lymphocytes, which have long been known to play an indispensable role in promoting protective antifungal immunity, mononuclear phagocytes are now being increasingly recognized as critical mediators of host defense against fungi. Thus, a recent surge of research studies has focused on understanding the mechanisms by which resident and recruited monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells accumulate and become activated at the sites of fungal infection. Herein, we critically review how a variety of G-protein coupled chemoattractant receptors and their ligands mediate mononuclear phagocyte recruitment and effector function during infection by the most common human fungal pathogens. PMID:25715741

  5. An Assay to Quantify Chemotactic Properties of Degradation Products from Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Sicari, Brian M.; Zhang, Li; Londono, Ricardo; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous chemotaxis of cells toward sites of tissue injury and/or biomaterial implantation is an important component of the host response. Implanted biomaterials capable of recruiting host stem/progenitor cells to a site of interest may obviate challenges associated with cell transplantation. An assay for the identification and quantification of chemotaxis induced by surgically placed biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix is described herein. PMID:24155230

  6. Adrenergic regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 leads to enhanced macrophage recruitment and ovarian carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Nagaraja, Archana S; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Sadaoui, Nouara C; Stone, Rebecca L; Matsuo, Koji; Dalton, Heather J; Previs, Rebecca A; Jennings, Nicholas B; Dorniak, Piotr; Hansen, Jean M; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-02-28

    Increased adrenergic signaling facilitates tumor progression, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We examined factors responsible for stress-mediated effects on monocyte/macrophage recruitment into the tumor microenvironment, and the resultant effects on tumor growth. In vitro, MCP1 was significantly increased after catecholamine exposure, which was mediated by cAMP and PKA. Tumor samples from mice subjected to daily restraint stress had elevated MCP1 gene and protein levels, increased CD14+ cells, and increased infiltration of CD68+ cells. hMCP1 siRNA-DOPC nanoparticles significantly abrogated daily restraint stress-induced tumor growth and inhibited infiltration of CD68+ and F4/80+ cells. In ovarian cancer patients, elevated peripheral blood monocytes and tumoral macrophages were associated with worse overall survival. Collectively, we demonstrate that increased adrenergic signaling is associated with macrophage infiltration and mediated by tumor cell-derived MCP1 production.

  7. Inducing chemotactic and haptotactic cues in microfluidic devices for three-dimensional in vitro assays

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Arotzena, O.; Mendoza, G.; Cóndor, M.; Rüberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices allow for the production of physiologically relevant cellular microenvironments by including biomimetic hydrogels and generating controlled chemical gradients. During transport, the biomolecules interact in distinct ways with the fibrillar networks: as purely diffusive factors in the soluble fluid or bound to the matrix proteins. These two main mechanisms may regulate distinct cell responses in order to guide their directional migration: caused by the substrate-bound chemoattractant gradient (haptotaxis) or by the gradient established within the soluble fluid (chemotaxis). In this work 3D diffusion experiments, in combination with ELISA assays, are performed using microfluidic platforms in order to quantify the distribution of PDGF-BB and TGF-β1 across collagen and fibrin gels. Furthermore, to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental processes, the experiments are reproduced by computer simulations based on a reaction-diffusion transport model. This model yields an accurate prediction of the experimental results, confirming that diffusion and binding phenomena are established within the microdevice. PMID:25587374

  8. Null mutations of the Dictyostelium cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase gene block chemotactic cell movement in developing aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sucgang, R; Weijer, C J; Siegert, F; Franke, J; Kessin, R H

    1997-12-01

    Extracellular cAMP is a critical messenger in the multicellular development of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The levels of cAMP are controlled by a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) that is secreted by the cells. The PDE gene (pdsA) is controlled by three promoters that permit expression during vegetative growth, during aggregation, and in prestalk cells of the older structures. Targeted disruption of the gene aborts development, and complementation with a modified pdsA restores development. Two distinct promoters must be used for full complementation, and an inhibitory domain of the PDE must be removed. We took advantage of newly isolated PDE-null cells and the natural chimerism of the organism to ask whether the absence of PDE affected individual cell behavior. PDE-null cells aggregated with isogenic wild-type cells in chimeric mixtures, but could not move in a coordinated manner in mounds. The wild-type cells move inward toward the center of the mound, leaving many of the PDE-null cells at the periphery of the aggregate. During the later stages of development, PDE-null cells in the chimera segregate to regions which correspond to the prestalk region and the rear of the slug. Participation in the prespore/spore population returns with the restoration of a modified pdsA to the null cells. PMID:9405107

  9. Inducing chemotactic and haptotactic cues in microfluidic devices for three-dimensional in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arotzena, O; Mendoza, G; Cóndor, M; Rüberg, T; García-Aznar, J M

    2014-11-01

    Microfluidic devices allow for the production of physiologically relevant cellular microenvironments by including biomimetic hydrogels and generating controlled chemical gradients. During transport, the biomolecules interact in distinct ways with the fibrillar networks: as purely diffusive factors in the soluble fluid or bound to the matrix proteins. These two main mechanisms may regulate distinct cell responses in order to guide their directional migration: caused by the substrate-bound chemoattractant gradient (haptotaxis) or by the gradient established within the soluble fluid (chemotaxis). In this work 3D diffusion experiments, in combination with ELISA assays, are performed using microfluidic platforms in order to quantify the distribution of PDGF-BB and TGF-β1 across collagen and fibrin gels. Furthermore, to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental processes, the experiments are reproduced by computer simulations based on a reaction-diffusion transport model. This model yields an accurate prediction of the experimental results, confirming that diffusion and binding phenomena are established within the microdevice. PMID:25587374

  10. A hybrid computational model to predict chemotactic guidance of growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Roccasalvo, Iolanda Morana; Micera, Silvestro; Sergi, Pier Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The overall strategy used by growing axons to find their correct paths during the nervous system development is not yet completely understood. Indeed, some emergent and counterintuitive phenomena were recently described during axon pathfinding in presence of chemical gradients. Here, a novel computational model is presented together with its ability to reproduce both regular and counterintuitive axonal behaviours. In this model, the key role of intracellular calcium was phenomenologically modelled through a non standard Gierer-Meinhardt system, as a crucial factor influencing the growth cone behaviour both in regular and complex conditions. This model was able to explicitly reproduce neuritic paths accounting for the complex interplay between extracellular and intracellular environments, through the sensing capability of the growth cone. The reliability of this approach was proven by using quantitative metrics, numerically supporting the similarity between in silico and biological results in regular conditions (control and attraction). Finally, the model was able to qualitatively predict emergent and counterintuitive phenomena resulting from complex boundary conditions. PMID:26086936

  11. Opposite and Coordinated Rotation of Amphitrichous Flagella Governs Oriented Swimming and Reversals in a Magnetotactic Spirillum

    PubMed Central

    Hérisse, Marion; Espinosa, Leon; Bossa, Alicia; Alberto, François; Wu, Long-Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current knowledge regarding the mechanism that governs flagellar motor rotation in response to environmental stimuli stems mainly from the study of monotrichous and peritrichous bacteria. Little is known about how two polar flagella, one at each cell pole of the so-called amphitrichous bacterium, are coordinated to steer the swimming. Here we fluorescently labeled the flagella of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells and took advantage of the magnetically controllable swimming of this bacterium to investigate flagellar rotation in moving cells. We identified three motility behaviors (runs, tumbles, and reversals) and two characteristic fluorescence patterns likely corresponding to flagella rotating in opposite directions. Each AMB-1 locomotion mode was systematically associated with particular flagellar patterns at the poles which led us to conclude that, while cell runs are allowed by the asymmetrical rotation of flagellar motors, their symmetrical rotation triggers cell tumbling. Our observations point toward a precise coordination of the two flagellar motors which can be temporarily unsynchronized during tumbling. IMPORTANCE Motility is essential for bacteria to search for optimal niches and survive. Many bacteria use one or several flagella to explore their environment. The mechanism by which bipolarly flagellated cells coordinate flagellar rotation is poorly understood. We took advantage of the genetic amenability and magnetically controlled swimming of the spirillum-shaped magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 to correlate cell motion with flagellar rotation. We found that asymmetric rotation of the flagella (counterclockwise at the lagging pole and clockwise at the leading pole) enables cell runs whereas symmetric rotation triggers cell tumbling. Taking into consideration similar observations in spirochetes, bacteria possessing bipolar ribbons of periplasmic flagella, we propose a conserved motility paradigm for spirillum

  12. Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense sp. nov., a slightly acidophilic, anaerobic thermophile isolated from various hot springs in New Zealand, and emendation of the genus Thermoanaerobacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Shu-Ying Liu; Wiegel, J.; Rainey, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    Six moderately acidophilic, thermophilic bacterial strains with similar properties were isolated from geothermally heated water and sediment samples collected in New Zealand. These Gram stain-negative but Gram type-positive, rod-shaped bacteria formed oval terminal endospores. The cells were peritrichously flagellated and exhibited tumbling motility. At 60{degrees}C the pH range for growth was 3.8 to 6.8, and the optimum pH was 5.2 when the organisms were grown with xylose. At pH 5.2 the temperature range for growth was 35 to 66{degrees}C, and the optimum temperature was 60 to 63{degrees}C. The fermentation products from flucose or xylose were ethanol, acetate, lactate, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The DNA G+C content was 34.5 to 35 mol%. On the basis of properties such as formation of elemental sulfur from thiosulfate, growth at acidic pH values at elevated temperatures, and the results of a 16S rRNA sequence comparison performed with previously validly published species belonging to the genus Thermoanaerobacterium, we propose that strain JW/SL-NZ613{sup T} (T = type strain) and five similar strains isolated from samples collected in New Zealand represent a new species, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense. Strain JW/SL-NZ613{sup T} (= DSM 10170) is the type strain of this species.

  13. Stochastic and Deterministic Flagellar Dynamics Provide a Mechanism for Eukaryotic Swimming Reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond

    2009-03-01

    The biflagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a good model organism to study the origin of flagellar synchronization. Here we employ high-speed imaging to study the beating of the two flagella of Chlamydomonas, and show that a single cell can alternate between two distinct dynamical regimes: asynchronous and synchronous. The asynchronous state is characterized by a large interflagellar frequency difference. In the synchronous state, the flagella beat in phase for lengthy periods, interrupted episodically by an extra beat of either flagellum. The statistics of these events are consistent with a model of hydrodynamically coupled noisy oscillators. Previous observations have suggested that the two flagella have well separated intrinsic beat frequencies, and are synchronized by their mutual coupling. Our analysis shows instead that the synchronized state is incompatible with coupling-induced synchronization of flagella with those intrinsic frequencies. This suggests that the beat frequencies themselves are under the control of the cell. Moreover, high-resolution three-dimensional tracking of swimming cells provides strong evidence that these dynamical states are related to non-phototactic reorientation events in the trajectories, yielding a eukaryotic equivalent of the ``run and tumble'' motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria.

  14. Roseomonas aceris sp. nov. isolated from a mono maple tree in the Shirakami Mountains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tonouchi, Akio; Tazawa, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain belonging to the genus Roseomonas was isolated from the trunk surface of a mono maple (Acer mono) tree growing in the Shirakami Mountains. The strain, designated R-1(T), was Gram-negative, non-motile, and oval-rod, and formed reddish colonies on agar plates, as has previously been described for Roseomonas species. Although motility was not observed, cells were peritrichously flagellated. Strain R-1(T) preferred organic acids over carbohydrates as growth substrates. The major cellular fatty acid was C₁₈:₁ ω7c (48.79%). Ubiquinone-10 was the major respiratory quinone. Strain R-1(T) demonstrated the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Roseomonas pecuniae N75(T) (96.9%). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences confirmed that strain R-1(T) was a member of the genus Roseomonas and formed a cluster with R. pecuniae N75(T). DNA-DNA hybridization between strain R-1(T) and R. pecuniae N75(T) yielded 21.7% relatedness. On the basis of its phenotypic, phylogenetic, and chemotaxonomic char-acteristics, strain R-1(T) represents a novel species within the genus Roseomonas, for which the name Roseomonas aceris sp. nov. has been proposed. The type strain is R-1(T) (NBRC 109410(T) = DSM 26554 (T)).

  15. BASE COMPOSITION OF THE DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Nicole; Senez, Jacques C.; Le Gall, Jean; Sebald, Madeleine

    1963-01-01

    Sigal, Nicole (Laboratoire de Chimie Bactérienne du CNRS, Marseille, France), Jacques C. Senez, Jean Le Gall, and Madeleine Sebald. Base composition of the deoxyribonucleic acid of sulfate-reducing bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 85:1315–1318. 1963—The deoxyribonucleic acid constitution of several strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria has been analytically determined. The results of these studies show that this group of microorganisms includes at least four subgroups characterized by significantly different values of the adenine plus thymine to guanine plus cytosine ratio. The nonsporulated forms with polar flagellation, containing both cytochrome c3 and desulfoviridin, are divided into two subgroups. One includes the fresh-water, nonhalophilic strains with base ratio from 0.54 to 0.59, and the other includes the halophilic or halotolerant strains with base ratio from 0.74 to 0.77. The sporulated, peritrichous strains without cytochrome and desulfoviridin (“nigrificans” and “orientis”) are distinct from the above two types and differ from each other, having base ratios of 1.20 and 1.43, respectively. PMID:14047223

  16. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Andrea; Foladori, Paola; Ponti, Benedetta; Bettinetti, Roberta; Gambino, Michela; Villa, Federica; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (−97%) and thickness (−50%), and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition. PMID:24879523

  17. Occurrence and microscopic analyses of multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes from coastal sediments in the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ke; Pan, Hongmiao; Zhang, Shengda; Yue, Haidong; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Longfei

    2011-03-01

    Multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMPs) are a group of aggregates composed of 7-45 gram-negative cells synthesizing intracellular magnetic crystals. Although they are thought to be globally distributed, MMPs have been observed only in marine environments in America and Europe. Most MMPs share a rosette-like morphology and biomineralize iron sulfide crystals. In the present study, abundant MMPs were observed, with a density of 26 ind./cm3, in the sediments of a coastal lagoon, Lake Yuehu, in the Yellow Sea. Optical microscopy showed that all of them were rosette shaped with a diameter of 5.5±0.8 μm. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these MMPs were composed of 10-16 ovoid cells and flagellated peritrichously. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that they biomineralized bullet-shaped magnetite crystals in highly organized parallel chains within which the magnetosomes were oriented in the same direction. This is the first report of MMPs from Asia and demonstrates the ubiquitous distribution of MMPs.

  18. Photosynthesis and photosynthetic pigments in the flagellate Euglena gracilis - as sensitive endpoints for toxicity evaluation of liquid detergents.

    PubMed

    Azizullah, Azizullah; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2014-04-01

    The present study was designed to validate the applicability of photosynthetic performance using a PAM fluorometer and photosynthetic pigments in Euglena gracilis as endpoint parameters in toxicity assessment of liquid detergents using a dish washing liquid detergent during short- (0-72h) and long-term (7days) exposure. In short-term experiments, the detergent affected the photosynthetic efficiency with EC50 values (calculated for Fv/Fm) of 22.07%, 7.27%, 1.4% and 2.34%, after 0, 1, 24 and 72h, respectively. The relative electron transport rate (rETR) and quantum yield measured with increasing irradiances were also inhibited by the detergent. The most severe effect of the detergent on the light-harvesting pigments (μgmL(-1)) was observed after 72h where chlorophyll a and total carotenoids were decreased at concentrations above 0.1% and chlorophyll b was decreased at concentrations above 0.5%. In long-term experiments, the detergent reduced the photosynthetic efficiency of cultures giving an EC50 value of 0.867% for Fv/Fm. rETR and quantum yield with increasing irradiance were shown to be adversely affected at concentrations of 0.1% or above. A decrease in chlorophyll a and total carotenoids (μgmL(-1)) was observed at concentrations of 0.05% detergent or above. Chlorophyll b was shown to be comparatively less affected by detergent stress, and a significant decrease was observed at concentrations of 0.5% or above. However, there was no prominent decrease in per cell (Euglena) concentration of any pigment. It can be concluded that photosynthesis and light-harvesting pigments in E. gracilis were sensitive to detergent stress and can be used as sensitive parameters in toxicity assessment of detergents in aquatic environments.

  19. Pigmented nanoflagellates grazing on Synechococcus: seasonal variations and effect of flagellate size in the coastal ecosystem of subtropical Western Pacific.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ya-Fan; Tsai, An-Yi; Chiang, Kuo-Ping; Hsieh, Chih-Hao

    2009-10-01

    We investigated seasonal variation of grazing impact of the pigmented nanoflagellates (PNF) with different sizes upon Synechococcus in the subtropical western Pacific coastal waters using grazing experiments with fluorescently labeled Synechococcus (FLS). For total PNF, conspicuous seasonal variations of ingestion rates on Synechococcus were found, and a functional response was observed. To further investigate the impact of different size groups, we separated the PNF into four categories (<3, 3-5, 5-10, and >10 microm). Our results indicated that the smallest PNF (<3 microm PNF) did not ingest FLS and was considered autotrophic. PNF of 3-5 microm in size made up most of the PNF community; however, their ingestion on Synechococcus was too low (0.1-1.9 Syn PNF(-1) h(-1)) to support their growth, and they had to depend on other prey or photosynthesis to survive. The ingestion rate of the 3-5 microm group exhibited no significant seasonal variation; by contrast, the ingestion rates of 5-10 and >10 microm PNFs showed significant seasonal variation. During the warm season, 3-5 microm PNF were responsible for the grazing of 12% of Synechococcus production, 5-10 microm PNF for 48%, and >10 microm PNF for 2%. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the PNF of 3-10 microm consumed most Synechococcus during the warm season and exhibited a significant functional response to the increase in prey concentration. PMID:19655080

  20. Methanocaldococcus villosus sp. nov., a heavily flagellated archaeon that adheres to surfaces and forms cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Bellack, Annett; Huber, Harald; Rachel, Reinhard; Wanner, Gerhard; Wirth, Reinhard

    2011-06-01

    A novel chemolithoautotrophic, hyperthermophilic methanogen was isolated from a submarine hydrothermal system at the Kolbeinsey Ridge, north of Iceland. Based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence, the strain belongs to the order Methanococcales within the genus Methanocaldococcus, with approximately 95 % sequence similarity to Methanocaldococcus jannaschii as its closest relative. Cells of the novel organism stained Gram-negative and appeared as regular to irregular cocci possessing more than 50 polar flagella. These cell appendages mediated not only motility but also adherence to abiotic surfaces and the formation of cell-cell contacts. The new isolate grew at 55-90 °C, with optimum growth at 80 °C. The optimum NaCl concentration for growth was 2.5 % (w/v), and the optimal pH was 6.5. The cells gained their energy exclusively by reduction of CO(2) with H(2). Selenate, tungstate and yeast extract stimulated growth significantly. The genome size was determined to be in the range 1.8-2.0 kb, and the G+C content of the genomic DNA was 30 mol%. Despite being physiologically nearly identical to the other members of the genus Methanocaldococcus, analysis of whole-cell proteins revealed significant differences. Based on the results from phylogenetic, morphological and protein analyses, we conclude that the novel strain represents a novel species of the genus Methanocaldococcus, for which the name Methanocaldococcus villosus sp. nov. is proposed (type strain KIN24-T80(T)  = DSM 22612(T)  = JCM 16315(T)). PMID:20622057

  1. A simple mapping between cell swimming behavior and single-motor state in multi-flagellated E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mears, Patrick; Koirala, Santosh; Rao, Christopher; Golding, Ido; Chemla, Yann

    2014-03-01

    We present new data that resolve a long-standing question on bacterial motility: How does the cell's swimming behavior depend on the number and state of the flagella that propel it? Addressing this question brings us closer to a full understanding of bacterial chemotaxis, arguably still our best paradigm for the way cells modulate their behavior based on signals from the environment. This new is enabled by technical innovation: we combine optical traps, fluorescence microscopy, and microfluidics to simultaneously track the swimming behavior and flagellar rotation state of individual, immobilized E. coli cells. We reveal a simple mathematical relationship between the number of flagella on the cell, their rotational bias, and the resulting probability of tumbling. Importantly, inter-flagella correlations result in E. colibehaving as if they possess a smaller number of effectively independent flagella than the actual number of flagella. Data from a chemotaxis mutant and stochastic modeling of the network suggest that temporal fluctuations of the key regulator CheY-P are the source of the observed flagellar correlations. A consequence of inter-flagellar correlations is that a cell's run/tumble behavior is only weakly dependent on number of flagella. The work was supported primarily by NSF Grant 082265, Physics Frontiers Center: Center for the Physics of Living Cells.

  2. Tetraflagellochloris mauritanica gen. et sp. nov. (Chlorophyceae), a New Flagellated Alga from the Mauritanian Desert: Morphology, Ultrastructure, and Phylogenetic Framing.

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Laura; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Etebari, Maryam; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Lupetti, Pietro; Lenzi, Paola; Verni, Franco; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Morphological, ultrastructural, and molecular-sequence data were used to assess the phylogenetic position of a tetraflagellate green alga isolated from soil samples of a saline dry basin near F'derick, Mauritania. This alga can grow as individual cells or form non-coenobial colonies of up to 12 individuals. It has a parietal chloroplast with an embedded pyrenoid covered by a starch sheath and traversed by single parallel thylakoids, and an eyespot located in a parietal position opposite to the flagellar insertion. Lipid vacuoles are present in the cytoplasm. Microspectroscopy indicated the presence of chlorophylls a and b, with lutein as the major carotenoid in the chloroplast, while the eyespot spectrum has a shape typical of green-algal eyespots. The cell has four flagella, two of them long and two considerably shorter. Sequence data from the 18S rRNA gene and ITS2 were obtained and compared with published sequences for green algae. Results from morphological and ultrastructural examinations and sequence analysis support the placement of this alga in the Chlorophyceae, as Tetraflagellochloris mauritanica L. Barsanti et A. Barsanti, gen. et sp. nov. PMID:27008399

  3. Tetraflagellochloris mauritanica gen. et sp. nov. (Chlorophyceae), a New Flagellated Alga from the Mauritanian Desert: Morphology, Ultrastructure, and Phylogenetic Framing.

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Laura; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Etebari, Maryam; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Lupetti, Pietro; Lenzi, Paola; Verni, Franco; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Morphological, ultrastructural, and molecular-sequence data were used to assess the phylogenetic position of a tetraflagellate green alga isolated from soil samples of a saline dry basin near F'derick, Mauritania. This alga can grow as individual cells or form non-coenobial colonies of up to 12 individuals. It has a parietal chloroplast with an embedded pyrenoid covered by a starch sheath and traversed by single parallel thylakoids, and an eyespot located in a parietal position opposite to the flagellar insertion. Lipid vacuoles are present in the cytoplasm. Microspectroscopy indicated the presence of chlorophylls a and b, with lutein as the major carotenoid in the chloroplast, while the eyespot spectrum has a shape typical of green-algal eyespots. The cell has four flagella, two of them long and two considerably shorter. Sequence data from the 18S rRNA gene and ITS2 were obtained and compared with published sequences for green algae. Results from morphological and ultrastructural examinations and sequence analysis support the placement of this alga in the Chlorophyceae, as Tetraflagellochloris mauritanica L. Barsanti et A. Barsanti, gen. et sp. nov.

  4. Structure of the bc1 complex from Seculamonas ecuadoriensis, a jakobid flagellate with an ancestral mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Marx, Stefanie; Baumgärtner, Maja; Kannan, Sivakumar; Braun, Hans-Peter; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud; Kunnan, Sivakumar

    2003-01-01

    In eubacteria, the respiratory bc(1) complex (complex III) consists of three or four different subunits, whereas that of mitochondria, which have descended from an alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont, contains about seven additional subunits. To understand better how mitochondrial protein complexes evolved from their simpler bacterial predecessors, we purified complex III of Seculamonas ecuadoriensis, a member of the jakobid protists, which possess the most bacteria-like mitochondrial genomes known. The S. ecuadoriensis complex III has an apparent molecular mass of 460 kDa and exhibits antimycin-sensitive quinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity. It is composed of at least eight subunits between 6 and 46 kDa in size, including two large "core" subunits and the three "respiratory" subunits. The molecular mass of the S. ecuadoriensis bc(1) complex is slightly lower than that reported for other eukaryotes, but about 2x as large as complex III in bacteria. This indicates that the departure from the small bacteria-like complex III took place at an early stage in mitochondrial evolution, prior to the divergence of jakobids. We posit that the recruitment of additional subunits in mitochondrial respiratory complexes is a consequence of the migration of originally alpha-proteobacterial genes to the nucleus.

  5. The ultrastructure of Commation gen. nov. (Stramenopiles incertae sedis), a genus of heterotrophic nanoplanktonic flagellates from antarctic waters.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, H A; Larsen, J

    1993-11-12

    Commation gen. nov. is a genus of planktonic, unicellular protists characterized by a circular to oval (sometimes flattened) cell body and a proboscis. Cells move predominantly by gliding. The mitochondria are tubulocristate and the two flagellar basal bodies are furnished with microtubular roots as well as a rhizoplast. The single emerging flagellum, which is rarely observed, apparently carries tripartite hairs. These features suggest that Commation should be listed among the genera and groups of organisms assembled in the informal group stramenopiles. Two species, C. eposianum sp. nov. (previously referred to as the "comma-shaped amoeba") and C. cryoporinum sp. nov., are described from Antarctic waters. The species are distinguished by differences in, e.g., the morphology of the proboscis, the complexity and details of the cytoskeleton, and the number of types of extrusomes present. Commation spp. appear to be ubiquitous in Antarctic waters at cell abundancies typically ranging from 10(3)-10(4) cells per litre.

  6. Endosymbiotic Bacteroidales bacteria of the flagellated protist Pseudotrichonympha grassii in the gut of the termite Coptotermes formosanus.

    PubMed

    Noda, Satoko; Iida, Toshiya; Kitade, Osamu; Nakajima, Hideaki; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2005-12-01

    A unique lineage of bacteria belonging to the order Bacteroidales was identified as an intracellular endosymbiont of the protist Pseudotrichonympha grassii (Parabasalia, Hypermastigea) in the gut of the termite Coptotermes formosanus. We identified the 16S rRNA, gyrB, elongation factor Tu, and groEL gene sequences in the endosymbiont and detected a very low level of sequence divergence (<0.9% of the nucleotides) in the endosymbiont population within and among protist cells. The Bacteroidales endosymbiont sequence was affiliated with a cluster comprising only sequences from termite gut bacteria and was not closely related to sequences identified for members of the Bacteroidales attached to the cell surfaces of other gut protists. Transmission electron microscopy showed that there were numerous rod-shaped bacteria in the cytoplasm of the host protist, and we detected the endosymbiont by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with an oligonucleotide probe specific for the 16S rRNA gene identified. Quantification of the abundance of the Bacteroidales endosymbiont by sequence-specific cleavage of rRNA with RNase H and FISH cell counting revealed, surprisingly, that the endosymbiont accounted for 82% of the total bacterial rRNA and 71% of the total bacterial cells in the gut community. The genetically nearly homogeneous endosymbionts of Pseudotrichonympha were very abundant in the gut symbiotic community of the termite.

  7. Microcephaly, short stature, and developmental delay associated with a chemotactic defect and transient hypogammaglobulinaemia in two brothers.

    PubMed Central

    Say, B; Barber, N; Miller, G C; Grogg, S E

    1986-01-01

    Two brothers presented with unusual facial features, microcephaly, developmental delay, and severe postnatal growth retardation. They both developed eczema in infancy and have had recurrent infections. Additional physical findings in both boys included hypogonadism, flexion contractures, hypoplastic patellae, and scoliosis. Their facial similarity was striking with sloping foreheads, beaked noses, large, protruding ears, and micrognathia. Low levels of serum gammaglobulins and defective chemotaxis were present in both boys in infancy. The hypogammaglobulinaemia was transient and improved, reaching normal levels by 3 1/2 years and 15 months, respectively. Defective chemotaxis and recurrent infections have persisted to the present. Both parents were normal. The mode of inheritance was not clear, as both X linked and autosomal recessive patterns were possible. Although patients with congenital malformations who also had immunodeficiency have previously been reported, immune system abnormalities, especially those of a transient nature, may frequently go unrecognised. Images PMID:3746838

  8. 1H- and 15N-NMR assignment and solution structure of the chemotactic Escherichia coli Che Y protein.

    PubMed

    Bruix, M; Pascual, J; Santoro, J; Prieto, J; Serrano, L; Rico, M

    1993-08-01

    Che Y is a 129-residue parallel alpha/beta protein involved in bacterial chemotaxis. We have used this protein as a model to study the folding reaction of parallel alpha/beta proteins. As a first step we carried out the complete assignment of the 1H and 15N spectra from Escherichia coli Che Y protein on the basis of two-dimensional 1H homonuclear and 1H-15N heteronuclear experiments by using sequence-specific methods. Our assignments differ from the preliminary assignments made by Kar et al. [Kar, L., Matsumura, P. & Johnson, M.E. (1992) Biochem. J. 287, 521-531] of aromatic residues obtained by comparison of NOEs with short proton-proton distances in the crystal structure of Che Y. The analysis of the extension of the secondary elements, as well as a preliminary calculation of the three-dimensional structure, indicate that the solution structure is closely coincident with the single crystal structure determined by X-ray diffraction.

  9. CXCL6 (Granulocyte Chemotactic Protein-2): a novel chemokine involved in the innate immune response of the amniotic cavity

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Pooja; Romero, Roberto; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Edwin, Samuel S.; Gotsch, Francesca; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Espinoza, Jimmy; Erez, Offer; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Than, Nandor G; Vaisbuch, Edi; Hassan, Sonia S

    2008-01-01

    PROBLEM CXCL6 is a potent pro-inflammatory neutrophil chemoattractant and activator whose activity during pregnancy is not well-established. The purpose of this study was to determine if CXCL6 is present in amniotic fluid (AF) and if CXCL6 concentrations in AF change with labor (preterm and term) or intra-amniotic infection/inflammation (IAI). METHOD OF STUDY A cross-sectional study was conducted with the following groups: 1) mid-trimester (n=65); 2) term no labor (n=20); 3) term labor (n=44); 4) patients with PTL with subsequent term delivery (n=57); 5) preterm labor (PTL) without IAI who delivered preterm (n=47); and 6) PTL with IAI (n=62). AF CXCL6 concentrations were determined by ELISA. RESULTS CXCL6 was present in all term samples, but undetectable in 64/65 mid-trimester specimens. Patients with PTL and IAI had a significantly higher median CXCL6 AF concentration than those with PTL without IAI [228.9 pg/ml (0.0–8344.8) vs. 55.7 pg/ml (0–454.4); p<0.05] and those with PTL and term delivery [41.5 pg/ml (0–279.0); p<0.05]. Median AF CXCL6 concentration did not change with spontaneous term labor [term no labor: 81.1 pg/ml (8.5–201.7) vs. term labor: 75.2 pg/ml (6.7–378.7): p=0.74]. CONCLUSIONS 1) CXCL6 is detectable in AF and its concentration increases with gestational age; 2) IAI results in increased CXCL6 AF concentrations, suggesting that CXCL6 plays a role in the deployment of an inflammatory response; 3) In contrast to related chemokines, specifically IL-8, AF CXCL6 does not appear to be involved in spontaneous term parturition. These observations are novel, and suggest a role for CXCL6 in the innate immune response to microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity. PMID:18782286

  10. CHEMOTACTIC ROLE OF NEUROTROPIN 3 IN THE EMBRYONIC TESTIS THAT FACILITATES MORPHOLOGICAL MALE SEX DETERMINATION. (R827405)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. An extended Filament Based Lamellipodium Model produces various moving cell shapes in the presence of chemotactic signals.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Angelika; Oelz, Dietmar; Schmeiser, Christian; Sfakianakis, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    The Filament Based Lamellipodium Model (FBLM) is a two-phase two-dimensional continuum model, describing the dynamics of two interacting families of locally parallel actin filaments (Oelz and Schmeiser, 2010b). It contains accounts of the filaments' bending stiffness, of adhesion to the substrate, and of cross-links connecting the two families. An extension of the model is presented with contributions from nucleation of filaments by branching, from capping, from contraction by actin-myosin interaction, and from a pressure-like repulsion between parallel filaments due to Coulomb interaction. The effect of a chemoattractant is described by a simple signal transduction model influencing the polymerization speed. Simulations with the extended model show its potential for describing various moving cell shapes, depending on the signal transduction procedure, and for predicting transients between non-moving and moving states as well as changes of direction.

  12. Extracellular and intracellular factors regulating the migration direction of a chemotactic cell in traveling-wave chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwata, R.; Iwasa, M.

    2015-04-01

    This report presents a simple model that describes the motion of a single Dictyostelium discoideum cell exposed to a traveling wave of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The model incorporates two types of responses to stimulation by cAMP: the changes in the polarity and motility of the cell. The periodic change in motility is assumed to be induced by periodic cAMP stimulation on the basis of previous experimental studies. Consequently, the net migration of the cell occurs in a particular direction with respect to wave propagation, which explains the migration of D. discoideum cells in aggregation. The wave period and the difference between the two response times are important parameters that determine the direction of migration. The theoretical prediction compared with experiments presented in another study. The transition from the single-cell state of the population of D. discoideum cells to the aggregation state is understood to be a specific example of spontaneous breakage of symmetry in biology.

  13. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xufang; Jiang, Hongwei; Gong, Qimei; Fan, Chen; Huang, Yihua; Ling, Junqi

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  14. cDNA-AFLP analysis of differential gene expression related to cell chemotactic and encystment of Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Li, Huamin; Cui, Yanhua; Wu, Lixian; Tu, Ran; Chen, Sanfeng

    2011-12-20

    Our previous study indicated org35 was involved in chemotaxis and interacted with nitrogen fixation transcriptional activator NifA via PAS domain. In order to reveal the role of org35 in nitrogen regulation, the downstream target genes of org35 were identified. We here report differentially expressed genes in org35 mutants comparing with wild type Sp7 by means of cDNA-AFLP. Four up-regulated transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) homologues of chemotaxis transduction proteins were found, including CheW, methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein and response regulator CheY-like receiver. Three distinct TDFs (AB46, AB58 and AB63) were similar to PHB de-polymerase C-terminus, cell shape-determining protein and flagellin domain protein. And 11 TDFs showed similarities with signal transduction proteins, including homologous protein of the nitrogen regulation protein NtrY and nitrate/nitrite response regulator protein NarL. These data suggested that the Azospirillum brasilense org35 was a multi-effecter and involved in chemotaxis, cyst development and regulation of nitrogen fixation.

  15. Microfluidic study of the chemotactic response of Escherichia coli to amino acids, signaling molecules and secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Krisztina; Sipos, Orsolya; Valkai, Sándor; Gombai, Éva; Hodula, Orsolya; Kerényi, Ádám; Ormos, Pál; Galajda, Péter

    2015-07-01

    Quorum sensing and chemotaxis both affect bacterial behavior on the population level. Chemotaxis shapes the spatial distribution of cells, while quorum sensing realizes a cell-density dependent gene regulation. An interesting question is if these mechanisms interact on some level: Does quorum sensing, a density dependent process, affect cell density itself via chemotaxis? Since quorum sensing often spans across species, such a feedback mechanism may also exist between multiple species. We constructed a microfluidic platform to study these questions. A flow-free, stable linear chemical gradient is formed in our device within a few minutes that makes it suitable for sensitive testing of chemoeffectors: we showed that the amino acid lysine is a weak chemoattractant for Escherichia coli, while arginine is neutral. We studied the effect of quorum sensing signal molecules of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on E. coli chemotaxis. Our results show that N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (oxo-C12-HSL) and N-(butryl)-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) are attractants. Furthermore, we tested the chemoeffector potential of pyocyanin and pyoverdine, secondary metabolites under a quorum sensing control. Pyocyanin is proved to be a weak attractant while pyoverdine are repellent. We demonstrated the usability of the device in co-culturing experiments, where we showed that various factors released by P. aeruginosa affect the dynamic spatial rearrangement of a neighboring E. coli population, while surface adhesion of the cells is also modulated. PMID:26339306

  16. Synthetic Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Medium Regulates Flagellar Biosynthesis through the flhF Gene in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Brijesh; Cardona, Silvia T

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of at least 18 distinct species that establish chronic infections in the lung of people with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). The sputum of CF patients is rich in amino acids and was previously shown to increase flagellar gene expression in B. cenocepacia. We examined flagellin expression and flagellar morphology of B. cenocepacia grown in synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium (SCFM) compared to minimal medium. We found that CF nutritional conditions induce increased motility and flagellin expression. Individual amino acids added at the same concentrations as found in SCFM also increased motility but not flagellin expression, suggesting a chemotactic effect of amino acids. Electron microscopy and flagella staining demonstrated that the increase in flagellin corresponds to a change in the number of flagella per cell. In minimal medium, the ratio of multiple: single: aflagellated cells was 2:3.5:4.5; while under SCFM conditions, the ratio was 7:2:1. We created a deletion mutant, ΔflhF, to study whether this putative GTPase regulates the flagellation pattern of B. cenocepacia K56-2 during growth in CF conditions. The ΔflhF mutant exhibited 80% aflagellated, 14% single and 6% multiple flagellated bacterial subpopulations. Moreover, the ratio of multiple to single flagella in WT and ΔflhF was 3.5 and 0.43, respectively in CF conditions. The observed differences suggest that FlhF positively regulates flagellin expression and the flagellation pattern in B. cenocepacia K56-2 during CF nutritional conditions. PMID:27379216

  17. Synthetic Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Medium Regulates Flagellar Biosynthesis through the flhF Gene in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Brijesh; Cardona, Silvia T.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of at least 18 distinct species that establish chronic infections in the lung of people with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). The sputum of CF patients is rich in amino acids and was previously shown to increase flagellar gene expression in B. cenocepacia. We examined flagellin expression and flagellar morphology of B. cenocepacia grown in synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium (SCFM) compared to minimal medium. We found that CF nutritional conditions induce increased motility and flagellin expression. Individual amino acids added at the same concentrations as found in SCFM also increased motility but not flagellin expression, suggesting a chemotactic effect of amino acids. Electron microscopy and flagella staining demonstrated that the increase in flagellin corresponds to a change in the number of flagella per cell. In minimal medium, the ratio of multiple: single: aflagellated cells was 2:3.5:4.5; while under SCFM conditions, the ratio was 7:2:1. We created a deletion mutant, ΔflhF, to study whether this putative GTPase regulates the flagellation pattern of B. cenocepacia K56-2 during growth in CF conditions. The ΔflhF mutant exhibited 80% aflagellated, 14% single and 6% multiple flagellated bacterial subpopulations. Moreover, the ratio of multiple to single flagella in WT and ΔflhF was 3.5 and 0.43, respectively in CF conditions. The observed differences suggest that FlhF positively regulates flagellin expression and the flagellation pattern in B. cenocepacia K56-2 during CF nutritional conditions. PMID:27379216

  18. Noise-Induced Increase of Sensitivity in Bacterial Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    He, Rui; Zhang, Rongjing; Yuan, Junhua

    2016-07-26

    Flagellated bacteria, like Escherichia coli, can swim toward beneficial environments by modulating the rotational direction of their flagellar motors through a chemotaxis signal transduction network. The noise of this network, the random fluctuation of the intracellular concentration of the signal protein CheY-P with time, has been identified in studies of single cell behavioral variability, and found to be important in coordination of multiple motors in a bacterium and in enhancement of bacterial drift velocity in chemical gradients. Here, by comparing the behavioral difference between motors of wild-type E. coli and mutants without signal noise, we measured the magnitude of this noise in wild-type cells, and found that the noise increases the sensitivity of the bacterial chemotaxis network downstream at the level of the flagellar motor. This provided a simple mechanism for the noise-induced enhancement of chemotactic drift, which we confirmed by simulating the E. coli chemotactic motion in various spatial profiles of chemo-attractant concentration. PMID:27463144

  19. Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis sp. nov., a novel thermophilic facultative aerobic bacterium with a broad pH optimum from the Geyser valley, Kamchatka.

    PubMed

    Kevbrin, Vadim V; Zengler, Karsten; Lysenko, Anatolii M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2005-10-01

    A facultative aerobic, moderately thermophilic, spore forming bacterium, strain JW/VK-KG4 was isolated from an enrichment culture obtained from the Geyser valley, a geo-thermally heated environment located in the Kamchatka peninsula (Far East region of Russia). The cells were rod shaped, motile, peritrichous flagellated stained Gram positive and had a Gram positive type cell wall. Aerobically, the strain utilized a range of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, trehalose, proteinuous substrates, and pectin as well. Anaerobically, only carbohydrates are utilized. When growing on carbohydrates, the strain required yeast extract and vitamin B(12). Anaerobically, glucose was fermented to lactate as main product and acetate, formate, ethanol as minor products. Aerobically, even in well-aerated cultures (agitated at 500 rpm), glucose oxidation was incomplete and lactate and acetate were found in culture supernatants as by-products. Optimal growth of the isolate was observed at pH(25 C) 6.8-8.5 and 60 degrees C. The doubling times on glucose at optimal growth conditions were 34 min (aerobically) and 40 min (anaerobically). The G+C content was 42.3 mol% as determined by T(m) assay. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated an affiliation of strain JW/VK-KG4 with Anoxybacillus species. Based on its morphology, physiology, phylogenetic relationship and its low DNA-DNA homology with validly published species of Anoxybacillus, it is proposed that strain JW/VK-KG4 represents a new species in the genus Anoxybacillus as A. kamchatkensis sp. nov. The type strain for the novel species is JW/VK-KG4(T) (=DSM 14988, =ATCC BAA-549). The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence is AF510985.

  20. Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis sp. nov., a novel thermophilic facultative aerobic bacterium with a broad pH optimum from the Geyser valley, Kamchatka.

    PubMed

    Kevbrin, Vadim V; Zengler, Karsten; Lysenko, Anatolii M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2005-10-01

    A facultative aerobic, moderately thermophilic, spore forming bacterium, strain JW/VK-KG4 was isolated from an enrichment culture obtained from the Geyser valley, a geo-thermally heated environment located in the Kamchatka peninsula (Far East region of Russia). The cells were rod shaped, motile, peritrichous flagellated stained Gram positive and had a Gram positive type cell wall. Aerobically, the strain utilized a range of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, trehalose, proteinuous substrates, and pectin as well. Anaerobically, only carbohydrates are utilized. When growing on carbohydrates, the strain required yeast extract and vitamin B(12). Anaerobically, glucose was fermented to lactate as main product and acetate, formate, ethanol as minor products. Aerobically, even in well-aerated cultures (agitated at 500 rpm), glucose oxidation was incomplete and lactate and acetate were found in culture supernatants as by-products. Optimal growth of the isolate was observed at pH(25 C) 6.8-8.5 and 60 degrees C. The doubling times on glucose at optimal growth conditions were 34 min (aerobically) and 40 min (anaerobically). The G+C content was 42.3 mol% as determined by T(m) assay. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated an affiliation of strain JW/VK-KG4 with Anoxybacillus species. Based on its morphology, physiology, phylogenetic relationship and its low DNA-DNA homology with validly published species of Anoxybacillus, it is proposed that strain JW/VK-KG4 represents a new species in the genus Anoxybacillus as A. kamchatkensis sp. nov. The type strain for the novel species is JW/VK-KG4(T) (=DSM 14988, =ATCC BAA-549). The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence is AF510985. PMID:16142505

  1. The sensory transduction pathways in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is a useful model for investigating in molecular detail the behavioral response of cells to changes in their environment. Peritrichously flagellated bacteria such as coli and typhimurium swim by rotating helical flagella in a counterclockwise direction. If flagellar rotation is briefly reversed, the bacteria tumble and change the direction of swimming. The bacteria continuously sample the environment and use a temporal sensing mechanism to compare the present and immediate past environments. Bacteria respond to a broad range of stimuli including changes in temperature, oxygen concentration, pH and osmotic strength. Bacteria are attracted to potential sources of nutrition such as sugars and amino acids and are repelled by other chemicals. In the methylation-dependent pathways for sensory transduction and adaptation in E. coli and S. typhimurium, chemoeffectors bind to transducing proteins that span the plasma membrane. The transducing proteins are postulated to control the rate of autophosphorylation of the CheA protein, which in turn phosphorylates the CheY protein. The phospho-CheY protein binds to the switch on the flagellar motor and is the signal for clockwise rotation of the motor. Adaptation to an attractant is achieved by increasing methylation of the transducing protein until the attractant stimulus is cancelled. Responses to oxygen and certain sugars involve methylation-independent pathways in which adaption occurs without methylation of a transducing protein. Taxis toward oxygen is mediated by the electron transport system and changes in the proton motive force. Recent studies have shown that the methylation-independent pathway converges with the methylation-dependent pathway at or before the CheA protein.

  2. An integrative approach to phylogeny reveals patterns of environmental distribution and novel evolutionary relationships in a major group of ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ping; Clamp, John; Xu, Dapeng; Huang, Bangqin; Shin, Mann Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    Peritrichs are a major group of ciliates with worldwide distribution. Yet, its internal phylogeny remains unresolved owing to limited sampling. Additionally, ecological distributions of peritrichs are poorly known. We performed substantially expanded phylogenetic analyses of peritrichs that incorporated SSU rDNA sequences of samples collected from three continents, revealing a number of new relationships between and within major lineages that greatly challenged the classic view of the group. Interrogation of a dataset comprising new environmental sequences from an estuary and the open ocean generated with high throughput sequencing and clone libraries plus putative environmental peritrich sequences at Genbank, produced a comprehensive tree of peritrichs from a variety of habitats and revealed unique ecological distribution patterns of several lineages for the first time. Also, evidence of adaptation to extreme environments in the Astylozoidae clade greatly broadened the phylogenetic range of peritrichs capable of living in extreme environments. Reconstruction of ancestral states revealed that peritrichs may have transitioned repeatedly from freshwater to brackish/marine/hypersaline environments. This work establishes a phylogenetic framework for more mature investigations of peritrichs in the future, and the approach used here provides a model of how to elucidate evolution in the context of ecological niches in any lineage of microbial eukaryotes. PMID:26880590

  3. MRI-based Medical Nanorobotic Platform for the Control of Magnetic Nanoparticles and Flagellated Bacteria for Target Interventions in Human Capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Sylvain; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Chanu, Arnaud; Tamaz, Samer; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Mankiewicz, Martin; Tabatabaei, Nasr

    2009-01-01

    Medical nanorobotics exploits nanometer-scale components and phenomena with robotics to provide new medical diagnostic and interventional tools. Here, the architecture and main specifications of a novel medical interventional platform based on nanorobotics and nanomedicine, and suited to target regions inaccessible to catheterization are described. The robotic platform uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for feeding back information to a controller responsible for the real-time control and navigation along pre-planned paths in the blood vessels of untethered magnetic carriers, nanorobots, and/or magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) loaded with sensory or therapeutic agents acting like a wireless robotic arm, manipulator, or other extensions necessary to perform specific remote tasks. Unlike known magnetic targeting methods, the present platform allows us to reach locations deep in the human body while enhancing targeting efficacy using real-time navigational or trajectory control. The paper describes several versions of the platform upgraded through additional software and hardware modules allowing enhanced targeting efficacy and operations in very difficult locations such as tumoral lesions only accessible through complex microvasculature networks. PMID:19890446

  4. Comparative study on the toxic effects of red tide flagellates Heterocapsa circularisquama and Chattonella marina on the short-necked clam (Ruditapes philippinarum).

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyung; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jiang, Zedong; Zou, Yanan; Choi, Kyu-Sung; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuyama, Yukihiko; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2011-01-01

    Heterocapsa circularisquama showed much higher toxic effects on short-necked clams than Chattonella marina. Clams exposed to H. circularisquama exhibited morphological changes concomitant with an accumulation of mucus-like substances in the gills, a profound reduction in filtration activity, and lysosomal destabilization in hemocytes. Chattonella marina was less effective than H. circularisquama, and Heterocapsa triquetra was almost harmless in all these criteria. These results suggest that H. circularisquama exerted its lethal effect on short-necked clams through gill tissue damage and subsequent induction of physiological stress.

  5. Genetic and environmental factors affecting T-pilin export and T-pilus biogenesis in relation to flagellation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Lai, E M; Chesnokova, O; Banta, L M; Kado, C I

    2000-07-01

    The T pilus, primarily composed of cyclic T-pilin subunits, is essential for the transmission of the Ti-plasmid T-DNA from Agrobacterium tumefaciens to plant cells. Although the virB2 gene of the 11-gene virB operon was previously demonstrated to encode the full-length propilin, and other genes of this operon have been implicated as members of a conserved transmembrane transport apparatus, the role of each virB gene in T-pilin synthesis and transport and T-pilus biogenesis remained undefined. In the present study, each virB gene was examined and was found to be unessential for T-pilin biosynthesis, except virB2, but was determined to be essential for the export of the T-pilin subunits and for T-pilus formation. We also find that the genes of the virD operon are neither involved in T-pilin export nor T-pilus formation. Critical analysis of three different virD4 mutants also showed that they are not involved in T-pilus biogenesis irrespective of the A. tumefaciens strains used. With respect to the environmental effects on T-pilus biogenesis, we find that T pili are produced both on agar and in liquid culture and are produced at one end of the A. tumefaciens rod-shaped cell in a polar manner. We also report a novel phenomenon whereby flagellum production is shut down under conditions which turn on T-pilus formation. These conditions are the usual induction with acetosyringone at pH 5.5 of Ti-plasmid vir genes. A search of the vir genes involved in controlling this biphasic reaction in induced A. tumefaciens cells revealed that virA on the Ti plasmid is involved and that neither virB nor virD genes are needed for this reaction. The biphasic reaction therefore appears to be mediated through a two-component signal transducing system likely involving an unidentified vir gene in A. tumefaciens. PMID:10850985

  6. Caspase-1 but Not Caspase-11 Is Required for NLRC4-Mediated Pyroptosis and Restriction of Infection by Flagellated Legionella Species in Mouse Macrophages and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Daiane M; Pereira, Marcelo S F; Silva, Alexandre L N; Cunha, Larissa D; Zamboni, Dario S

    2015-09-01

    Gram-negative bacteria from the Legionella genus are intracellular pathogens that cause a severe form of pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. The bacteria replicate intracellularly in macrophages, and the restriction of bacterial replication by these cells is critical for host resistance. The activation of the NAIP5/NLRC4 inflammasome, which is readily triggered in response to bacterial flagellin, is essential for the restriction of bacterial replication in murine macrophages. Once activated, this inflammasome induces pore formation and pyroptosis and facilitates the restriction of bacterial replication in macrophages. Because investigations related to the NLRC4-mediated restriction of Legionella replication were performed using mice double deficient for caspase-1 and caspase-11, we assessed the participation of caspase-1 and caspase-11 in the functions of the NLRC4 inflammasome and the restriction of Legionella replication in macrophages and in vivo. By using several species of Legionella and mice singly deficient for caspase-1 or caspase-11, we demonstrated that caspase-1 but not caspase-11 was required for pore formation, pyroptosis, and restriction of Legionella replication in macrophages and in vivo. By generating F1 mice in a mixed 129 × C57BL/6 background deficient (129 × Casp-11(-/-) ) or sufficient (129 × C57BL/6) for caspase-11 expression, we found that caspase-11 was dispensable for the restriction of Legionella pneumophila replication in macrophages and in vivo. Thus, although caspase-11 participates in flagellin-independent noncanonical activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, it is dispensable for the activities of the NLRC4 inflammasome. In contrast, functional caspase-1 is necessary and sufficient to trigger flagellin/NLRC4-mediated restriction of Legionella spp. infection in macrophages and in vivo.

  7. An investigation of the fine structure, cell surface carbohydrates, and appeal of the diatom Extubocellulus sp. as prey for small flagellates.

    PubMed

    Martin-Cereceda, M; Williams, R; Guinea, A; Novarino, G

    2007-01-01

    The fine structure and surface exopolymers of a coastal planktonic nanodiatom of the sparsely reported genus Extubocellulus were studied respectively by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy in conjunction with fluorescent lectins. Monitoring the suitability of the species as prey food for other protists was also investigated by video microscopy coupled with digital film. Cells are rectangular in girdle view, with a pervalvar axis longer than the apical axis. Valves are almost circular with a diameter of 2.8 to 3.6 microm. The valve face bears randomly distributed areolae (ca. 50 in 10 microm), which may be either open or occluded. Two small raised ocelluli occur at the apices, with a rim devoid of perforations and about 6-7 porelli. Glucose and N-acetyl-glucosamine moieties present on the surface of the live diatom were labelled with fluorescent lectins, and a differential pattern of distribution for both carbohydrates was observed. The potential role of fluorescent lectins as cellular probes of taxonomic value in small diatoms is compared with that of nucleotide and antibody probes. We provide the first illustrative evidence of the presence of Extubocellulus sp. in the cytoplasm of the nanoflagellate Goniomonas amphinema and of the egestion of diatom frustules. Results obtained are discussed in the light of the present knowledge of the role of carbohydrate-protein interactions in phagocytosis of prey by free-living protozoa.

  8. Multiple origins of Heliozoa from flagellate ancestors: New cryptist subphylum Corbihelia, superclass Corbistoma, and monophyly of Haptista, Cryptista, Hacrobia and Chromista.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Chao, Ema E; Lewis, Rhodri

    2015-12-01

    Heliozoan protists have radiating cell projections (axopodia) supported by microtubular axonemes nucleated by the centrosome and bearing granule-like extrusomes for catching prey. To clarify previously confused heliozoan phylogeny we sequenced partial transcriptomes of two tiny naked heliozoa, the endohelean Microheliella maris and centrohelid Oxnerella marina, and the cercozoan pseudoheliozoan Minimassisteria diva. Phylogenetic analysis of 187 genes confirms that all are chromists; but centrohelids (microtubules arranged as hexagons and triangles) are not sisters to Endohelea having axonemes in transnuclear cytoplasmic channels (triangular or square microtubular arrays). Centrohelids are strongly sister to haptophytes (together phylum Haptista); we explain the common origins of their axopodia and haptonema. Microheliella is sister to new superclass Corbistoma (zooflagellate Telonemea and Picomonadea, with asymmetric microfilamentous pharyngeal basket), showing that these axopodial protists evolved independently from zooflagellate ancestors. We group Corbistoma and Endohelea as new cryptist subphylum Corbihelia with dense fibrillar interorganellar connections; endohelean axopodia and Telonema cortex are ultrastructurally related. Differently sampled trees clarify why corticate multigene eukaryote phylogeny is problematic: long-branch artefacts probably distort deep multigene phylogeny of corticates (Plantae, Chromista); basal radiations may be contradictorily reconstructed because of their extreme closeness and the Bayesian star-tree paradox. Haptista and Hacrobia are holophyletic, and Chromista probably are.

  9. MRI-based Medical Nanorobotic Platform for the Control of Magnetic Nanoparticles and Flagellated Bacteria for Target Interventions in Human Capillaries.

    PubMed

    Martel, Sylvain; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Chanu, Arnaud; Tamaz, Samer; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Mankiewicz, Martin; Tabatabaei, Nasr

    2009-09-01

    Medical nanorobotics exploits nanometer-scale components and phenomena with robotics to provide new medical diagnostic and interventional tools. Here, the architecture and main specifications of a novel medical interventional platform based on nanorobotics and nanomedicine, and suited to target regions inaccessible to catheterization are described. The robotic platform uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for feeding back information to a controller responsible for the real-time control and navigation along pre-planned paths in the blood vessels of untethered magnetic carriers, nanorobots, and/or magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) loaded with sensory or therapeutic agents acting like a wireless robotic arm, manipulator, or other extensions necessary to perform specific remote tasks. Unlike known magnetic targeting methods, the present platform allows us to reach locations deep in the human body while enhancing targeting efficacy using real-time navigational or trajectory control. The paper describes several versions of the platform upgraded through additional software and hardware modules allowing enhanced targeting efficacy and operations in very difficult locations such as tumoral lesions only accessible through complex microvasculature networks.

  10. Moramonas marocensis gen. nov., sp. nov.: a jakobid flagellate isolated from desert soil with a bacteria-like, but bloated mitochondrial genome

    PubMed Central

    Strassert, Jürgen F. H.; Tikhonenkov, Denis V.; Pombert, Jean-François; Kolisko, Martin; Tai, Vera; Mylnikov, Alexander P.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    A new jakobid genus has been isolated from Moroccan desert soil. The cyst-forming protist Moramonas marocensis gen. nov., sp. nov. has two anteriorly inserted flagella of which one points to the posterior cell pole accompanying the ventral feeding groove and is equipped with a dorsal vane—a feature typical for the Jakobida. It further shows a flagellar root system consisting of singlet microtubular root, left root (R1), right root (R2) and typical fibres associated with R1 and R2. The affiliation of M. marocensis to the Jakobida was confirmed by molecular phylogenetic analyses of the SSU rRNA gene, five nuclear genes and 66 mitochondrial protein-coding genes. The mitochondrial genome has the high number of genes typical for jakobids, and bacterial features, such as the four-subunit RNA polymerase and Shine–Dalgarno sequences upstream of the coding regions of several genes. The M. marocensis mitochondrial genome encodes a similar number of genes as other jakobids, but is unique in its very large genome size (greater than 264 kbp), which is three to four times higher than that of any other jakobid species investigated yet. This increase seems to be due to a massive expansion in non-coding DNA, creating a bloated genome like those of plant mitochondria. PMID:26887409

  11. Isolation of Terpenoids from the Stem of Ficus aurantiaca Griff and their Effects on Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Chemotactic Activity of Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Mawa, Shukranul; Jantan, Ibrahim; Husain, Khairana

    2016-01-01

    Three new triterpenoids; namely 28,28,30-trihydroxylupeol (1); 3,21,21,26-tetrahydroxy-lanostanoic acid (2) and dehydroxybetulinic acid (3) and seven known compounds; i.e., taraxerone (4); taraxerol (5); ethyl palmitate (6); herniarin (7); stigmasterol (8); ursolic acid (9) and acetyl ursolic acid (10) were isolated from the stem of Ficus aurantiaca Griff. The structures of the compounds were established by spectroscopic techniques. The compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotaxis by using the Boyden chamber technique and on human whole blood and neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by using a luminol-based chemiluminescence assay. Among the compounds tested, compounds 1-4, 6 and 9 exhibited strong inhibition of PMN migration towards the chemoattractant N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) with IC50 values of 6.8; 2.8; 2.5; 4.1; 3.7 and 3.6 μM, respectively, comparable to that of the positive control ibuprofen (6.7 μM). Compounds 2-4, 6, 7 and 9 exhibited strong inhibition of ROS production of PMNs with IC50 values of 0.9; 0.9; 1.3; 1.1; 0.5 and 0.8 μM, respectively, which were lower than that of aspirin (9.4 μM). The bioactive compounds might be potential lead molecules for the development of new immunomodulatory agents to modulate the innate immune response of phagocytes. PMID:26742027

  12. THE EFFECTS OF COMBINATORIAL EXPOSURE OF PRO-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES ON AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RELEASE OF CHEMOTACTIC MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 15 million individuals nationally. Within the inflamed asthmatic airway there exist complex interactions between many cells and the cytokines they release, in particular mast cells, eosinophils, T-lymphocy...

  13. Chemotactic and Inflammatory Responses in the Liver and Brain Are Associated with Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Juelich, Terry L.; Agar, Stacy L.; Poussard, Allison; Ragland, Dan; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a major human and animal pathogen associated with severe disease including hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis. RVFV is endemic to parts of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, but there is significant concern regarding its introduction into non-endemic regions and the potentially devastating effect to livestock populations with concurrent infections of humans. To date, there is little detailed data directly comparing the host response to infection with wild-type or vaccine strains of RVFV and correlation with viral pathogenesis. Here we characterized clinical and systemic immune responses to infection with wild-type strain ZH501 or IND vaccine strain MP-12 in the C57BL/6 mouse. Animals infected with live-attenuated MP-12 survived productive viral infection with little evidence of clinical disease and minimal cytokine response in evaluated tissues. In contrast, ZH501 infection was lethal, caused depletion of lymphocytes and platelets and elicited a strong, systemic cytokine response which correlated with high virus titers and significant tissue pathology. Lymphopenia and platelet depletion were indicators of disease onset with indications of lymphocyte recovery correlating with increases in G-CSF production. RVFV is hepatotropic and in these studies significant clinical and histological data supported these findings; however, significant evidence of a pro-inflammatory response in the liver was not apparent. Rather, viral infection resulted in a chemokine response indicating infiltration of immunoreactive cells, such as neutrophils, which was supported by histological data. In brains of ZH501 infected mice, a significant chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine response was evident, but with little pathology indicating meningoencephalitis. These data suggest that RVFV pathogenesis in mice is associated with a loss of liver function due to liver necrosis and hepatitis yet the long-term course of disease for those that might survive the initial hepatitis is neurologic in nature which is supported by observations of human disease and the BALB/c mouse model. PMID:22389738

  14. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-induced Protein 1 and 4 Form a Complex but Act Independently in Regulation of Interleukin-6 mRNA Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shengping; Liu, Shufeng; Fu, Jia J.; Tony Wang, T.; Yao, Xiaolan; Kumar, Anil; Liu, Gang; Fu, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that MCPIP1 is a critical factor that controls inflammation and immune homeostasis; however, the relationship between MCPIP1 and other members of this protein family is largely unknown. Here, we report that MCPIP1 interacts with MCPIP4 to form a protein complex, but acts independently in the regulation of IL-6 mRNA degradation. In an effort to identify MCPIP1-interacting proteins by co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and mass-spec analysis, MCPIP4 was identified as a MCPIP1-interacting protein, which was further confirmed by Co-IP and mammalian two-hybrid assay. Immunofluorescence staining showed that MCPIP4 was co-localized with MCPIP1 in the GW-body, which features GW182 and Argonaute 2. Further studies showed that MCPIP1 and MCPIP4 act independently in regulation of IL-6 mRNA degradation. These results suggest that MCPIP1 and MCPIP4 may additively contribute to control IL-6 production in vivo. PMID:26134560

  15. Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibits the Motility of Pathogenic Salmonella by Affecting the Driving Forces of Motility and the Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Islam, Md. Shafiqul; Guo, Yijie; Ihara, Kohei; Tomioka, Rintaro; Masuda, Mizuki; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key pattern recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system, an important component of innate immunity. MBL functions as an opsonin which enhances the sequential immune process such as phagocytosis. We here report an inhibitory effect of MBL on the motility of pathogenic bacteria, which occurs by affecting the energy source required for motility and the signaling pathway of chemotaxis. When Salmonella cells were treated with a physiological concentration of MBL, their motile fraction and free-swimming speed decreased. Rotation assays of a single flagellum showed that the flagellar rotation rate was significantly reduced by the addition of MBL. Measurements of the intracellular pH and membrane potential revealed that MBL affected a driving force for the Salmonella flagellum, the electrochemical potential difference of protons. We also found that MBL treatment increased the reversal frequency of Salmonella flagellar rotation, which interfered with the relative positive chemotaxis toward an attractive substrate. We thus propose that the motility inhibition effect of MBL may be secondarily involved in the attack against pathogens, potentially facilitating the primary role of MBL in the complement system. PMID:27104738

  16. Pinoresinol-4,4'-di-O-beta-D-glucoside from Valeriana officinalis root stimulates calcium mobilization and chemotactic migration of mouse embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Do, Kee Hun; Choi, Young Whan; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sun Young; Ha, Jung Min; Kim, Jae Ho; Kim, Chi Dae; Son, Beung Gu; Kang, Jum Soon; Khan, Ikhlas A; Bae, Sun Sik

    2009-06-01

    Lignans are major constituents of plant extracts and have important pharmacological effects on mammalian cells. Here we showed that pinoresinol-4,4'-di-O-beta-D-glucoside (PDG) from Valeriana officinalis induced calcium mobilization and cell migration through the activation of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor subtypes. Stimulation of mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells with 10 microM PDG resulted in strong stimulation of MEF cell migration and the EC(50) was about 2 microM. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of G(i) protein, completely blocked PDG-induced cell migration demonstrating that PDG evokes MEF cell migration through the activation of the G(i)-coupled receptor. Furthermore, pretreatment of MEF cells with Ki16425 (10 microM), which is a selective antagonist for LPA(1) and LPA(3) receptors, completely blocked PDG-induced cell migration. Likewise, PDG strongly induced calcium mobilization, which was also blocked by Ki16425 in a dose-dependent manner. Prior occupation of the LPA receptor with LPA itself completely blocked PDG-induced calcium mobilization. Finally, PDG-induced MEF cell migration was attenuated by pretreatment with a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor such as LY294002. Cells lacking downstream mediator of PI3K such as Akt1 and Akt2 (DKO cells) showed loss of PDG-induced migration. Re-expression of Akt1 (but not Akt2) completely restored PDG-induced DKO cell migration. Given these results, we conclude that PDG is a strong inducer of cell migration. We suggest that the pharmacological action of PDG may occur through the activation of an LPA receptor whereby activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway mediates PDG-induced MEF cell migration.

  17. Lower concentrations of chemotactic cytokines and soluble innate factors in the lower female genital tract associated with use of injectable hormonal contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Ngcapu, Sinaye; Masson, Lindi; Sibeko, Sengeziwe; Werner, Lise; McKinnon, Lyle R.; Mlisana, Koleka; Shey, Muki; Samsunder, Natasha; Karim, Salim Abdool; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone-based injectable hormonal contraceptives (HCs) potentially modulate genital barrier integrity and regulate the innate immune environment in the female genital tract, thereby enhancing risk for STIs or HIV infection. We investigated the effects of injectable HC use on concentrations of inflammatory cytokines and other soluble factors associated with genital epithelial repair and integrity. The concentrations of 42 inflammatory, regulatory, adaptive, growth factors and hematopoetic cytokines, five matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were measured in cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs) from 64 HIV negative women using injectable HCs and 64 control women not using any HCs, in a matched case-control study. There were no differences between groups in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV; nugent score ≥7), or common sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In multivariate analyses adjusting for condom use, sex work status, marital status, BV and STIs, median concentrations of chemokines (eotaxin, MCP-1, MDC), adaptive cytokines (IL-15), growth factors (PDGF-AA) and a metalloproteinase (TIMP-2) were significantly lower in CVLs from women using injectable HCs than controls. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12p40 and chemokine fractalkine were less likely to have detectable levels in women using injectable HCs compared to those not using HCs. We conclude that injectable HC use was associated with an immunosuppressive female genital tract innate immune profile. While the relationship between injectable HC use and STI or HIV risk is yet to be resolved, our data suggest that injectable HCs effects were similar between STI positive and STI negative participants. PMID:25956139

  18. Lower concentrations of chemotactic cytokines and soluble innate factors in the lower female genital tract associated with the use of injectable hormonal contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Ngcapu, Sinaye; Masson, Lindi; Sibeko, Sengeziwe; Werner, Lise; McKinnon, Lyle R; Mlisana, Koleka; Shey, Muki; Samsunder, Natasha; Karim, Salim Abdool; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Passmore, Jo-Ann S

    2015-08-01

    Progesterone-based injectable hormonal contraceptives (HCs) potentially modulate genital barrier integrity and regulate the innate immune environment in the female genital tract, thereby enhancing the risk of STIs or HIV infection. We investigated the effects of injectable HC use on concentrations of inflammatory cytokines and other soluble factors associated with genital epithelial repair and integrity. The concentrations of 42 inflammatory, regulatory, adaptive growth factors and hematopoietic cytokines, five matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were measured in cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs) from 64 HIV-negative women using injectable HCs and 64 control women not using any HCs, in a matched case-control study. There were no differences between groups in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV; Nugent score ≥7), or common sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In multivariate analyses adjusting for condom use, sex work status, marital status, BV and STIs, median concentrations of chemokines (eotaxin, MCP-1, MDC), adaptive cytokines (IL-15), growth factors (PDGF-AA) and a metalloproteinase (TIMP-2) were significantly lower in CVLs from women using injectable HCs than controls. In addition, the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12p40 and the chemokine fractalkine were less likely to have detectable levels in women using injectable HCs compared with those not using HCs. We conclude that injectable HC use was broadly associated with an immunosuppressive female genital tract innate immune profile. While the relationship between injectable HC use and STI or HIV risk is yet to be resolved, our data suggest that the effects of injectable HCs were similar in STI-positive and STI-negative participants.

  19. Zoothamnium duplicatum infestation of cultured horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus).

    PubMed

    Shinn, Andrew P; Mühlhölzl, Alexander P; Coates, Christopher J; Metochis, Christoforos; Freeman, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    An outbreak of the sessile peritrich Zoothamnium duplicatum in a pilot, commercial-scale Limulus polyphemus hatchery resulted in the loss of ∼96% (40,000) second/third instar larvae over a 61day period. peritrich growth was heavy, leading to mechanical obstruction of the gills and physical damage. The peritrichs were controlled without resultant loss of juvenile crabs by administering 10ppm chlorine in freshwater for 1h and the addition of aquarium grade sand; a medium into which the crabs could burrow and facilitate cleaning of the carapace. Peritrich identity was confirmed from a partial SSU rDNA contiguous sequence of 1343bp (99.7% similarity to Z. duplicatum). PMID:25499897

  20. Zoothamnium duplicatum infestation of cultured horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus).

    PubMed

    Shinn, Andrew P; Mühlhölzl, Alexander P; Coates, Christopher J; Metochis, Christoforos; Freeman, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    An outbreak of the sessile peritrich Zoothamnium duplicatum in a pilot, commercial-scale Limulus polyphemus hatchery resulted in the loss of ∼96% (40,000) second/third instar larvae over a 61day period. peritrich growth was heavy, leading to mechanical obstruction of the gills and physical damage. The peritrichs were controlled without resultant loss of juvenile crabs by administering 10ppm chlorine in freshwater for 1h and the addition of aquarium grade sand; a medium into which the crabs could burrow and facilitate cleaning of the carapace. Peritrich identity was confirmed from a partial SSU rDNA contiguous sequence of 1343bp (99.7% similarity to Z. duplicatum).

  1. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella and the Evolution of Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond

    2009-03-01

    Flagella, among the most highly conserved structures in eukaryotes, are responsible for such tasks as fluid transport, motility and phototaxis, establishment of embryonic left-right asymmetry, and intercellular communication, and are thought to have played a key role in the development of multicellularity. These tasks are usually performed by the coordinated action of groups of flagella (from pairs to thousands), which display various types of spatio-temporal organization. The origin and quantitative characterization of flagellar synchronization has remained an important open problem, involving interplay between intracellular biochemistry and interflagellar mechanical/hydrodynamic coupling. The Volvocine green algae serve as useful model organisms for the study of these phenomena, as they form a lineage spanning from unicellular Chlamydomonas to germ-soma differentiated Volvox, having as many as 50,000 biflagellated surface somatic cells. In this talk I will describe extensive studies [1], using micromanipulation and high-speed imaging, of the flagellar synchronization of two key species - Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri - over tens of thousands of cycles. With Chlamydomonas we find that the flagellar dynamics moves back and forth between a stochastic synchronized state consistent with a simple model of hydrodynamically coupled noisy oscillators, and a deterministic one driven by a large interflagellar frequency difference. These results reconcile previously contradictory studies, based on short observations, showing only one or the other of these two states, and, more importantly, show that the flagellar beat frequencies themselves are regulated by the cell. Moreover, high-resolution three-dimensional tracking of swimming cells provides strong evidence that these dynamical states are related to reorientation events in the trajectories, yielding a eukaryotic equivalent of the ``run and tumble'' motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria. The degree

  2. Halomonas titanicae sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from the RMS Titanic.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Kaur, Bhavleen; Mann, Henrietta; Ventosa, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    A Gram-negative, heterotrophic, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, peritrichously flagellated and motile bacterial strain, designated BH1(T), was isolated from samples of rusticles, which are formed in part by a consortium of micro-organisms, collected from the RMS Titanic wreck site. The strain grew optimally at 30-37°C, pH 7.0-7.5 and in the presence of 2-8 % (w/v) NaCl. We carried out a polyphasic taxonomic study in order to characterize the strain in detail. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison indicated that strain BH1(T) clustered within the branch consisting of species of Halomonas. The most closely related type strains were Halomonas neptunia (98.6 % 16S rRNA sequence similarity), Halomonas variabilis (98.4 %), Halomonas boliviensis (98.3 %) and Halomonas sulfidaeris (97.5 %). Other closely related species were Halomonas alkaliphila (96.5 % sequence similarity), Halomonas hydrothermalis (96.3 %), Halomonas gomseomensis (96.3 %), Halomonas venusta (96.3 %) and Halomonas meridiana (96.2 %). The major fatty acids of strain BH1(T) were C(18 : 1)ω7c (36.3 %), C(16 : 0) (18.4 %) and C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c (17.9 %). The DNA G+C content was 60.0 mol% (T(m)). Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the major lipoquinone. The phenotypic features, fatty acid profile and DNA G+C content further supported the placement of strain BH1(T) in the genus Halomonas. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain BH1(T) and H. neptunia CECT 5815(T), H. variabilis DSM 3051(T), H. boliviensis DSM 15516(T) and H. sulfidaeris CECT 5817(T) were 19, 17, 30 and 29 %, respectively, supporting the differential taxonomic status of BH1(T). On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain BH1(T) is considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Halomonas titanicae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BH1(T) (=ATCC BAA-1257(T) =CECT 7585(T) =JCM 16411(T) =LMG 25388(T)).

  3. Flagella of Salmonella typhimurium are a virulence factor in infected C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Carsiotis, M; Weinstein, D L; Karch, H; Holder, I A; O'Brien, A D

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether flagella, chemotaxis, and motility of Salmonella typhimurium are virulence factors in infected C57BL/6J mice, we constructed isogenic pairs of derivatives of the nonfimbriated virulent strain SL3201. Of each pair, one member contained a mutation in a single gene that is required for expression of normal chemotactically directed motility, whereas the other member contained the wild-type form of the gene. No additional differences between the members of a pair were evident. The phenotypic parameters examined for all derivatives included in vitro growth rate, sensitivity to P22 phage, amino acid auxotrophy, and biotype. For a flagellated and nonflagellated pair, the electron microscopic appearance of each member was examined as well as its lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane profiles by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The virulence of the various derivatives was then assessed in mice challenged orally, intraperitoneally, or intravenously. The results established that flagella, whether functional or nonfunctional as organelles of motility, were S. typhimurium virulence factors and that neither chemotaxis nor motility was required for virulence. Images PMID:6389363

  4. Quantitative investigation of bacterial chemotaxis at the single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Taejin

    Living cells sense and respond to constantly changing environmental conditions. Depending on the type of stimuli, the cell may response by altering gene expression pattern, secreting molecules, or migrating to a different environment. Directed movement of cells in response to chemical stimuli is called chemotaxis. In bacterial chemotaxis, small extracellular molecules bind receptor proteins embedded in the cell membrane, which then transmit the signal inside the cell through a cascade of protein-protein interactions. This chain of events influences the behavior of motor proteins that drive the rotation of helical filaments called flagella. Individual cells of the gut-dwelling bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) have many such flagella, whose collective action results in the swimming behavior of the cell. A recent study found that in absence of chemical stimuli, fluctuations in the protein cascade can cause non-Poissonian switching behavior in the flagellar motor (2). A corollary was that extension of such behavior to the whole-cell swimming level would have implications for E. coli's foraging strategy. However, existence of such behavior at the swimming cell level could not be predicted a priori, since the mapping from single flagellum behavior to the swimming behavior of a multi-flagellated cell is complex and poorly understood (3, 4). Here we characterize the chemotactic behavior of swimming E. coli cells using a novel optical trap-based measurement technique. This technique allows us to trap individual cells and monitor their swimming behavior over long time periods with high temporal resolution. We find that swimming cells exhibit non-Poissonian switching statistics between different swimming states, in a manner similar to the rotational direction-switching behavior seen in individual flagella. Furthermore, we develop a data analysis routine that allows us to characterize higher order swimming features such as reversal of swimming direction and existence of

  5. Whole-Transcriptome Shotgun Sequencing (RNA-seq) Screen Reveals Upregulation of Cellobiose and Motility Operons of Lactobacillus ruminis L5 during Growth on Tetrasaccharides Derived from Barley β-Glucan

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Blair; Sims, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus ruminis is an inhabitant of human bowels and bovine rumens. None of 10 isolates (three from bovine rumen, seven from human feces) of L. ruminis that were tested could utilize barley β-glucan for growth. Seven of the strains of L. ruminis were, however, able to utilize tetrasaccharides (3-O-β-cellotriosyl-d-glucose [LDP4] or 4-O-β-laminaribiosyl-d-cellobiose [CDP4]) present in β-glucan hydrolysates for growth. The tetrasaccharides were generated by the use of lichenase or cellulase, respectively. To learn more about the utilization of tetrasaccharides by L. ruminis, whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) was tested as a transcriptional screen to detect altered gene expression when an autochthonous human strain (L5) was grown in medium containing CDP4. RNA-seq results were confirmed and extended by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR assays of selected genes in two upregulated operons when cells were grown as batch cultures in medium containing either CDP4 or LDP4. The cellobiose utilization operon had increased transcription, particularly in early growth phase, whereas the chemotaxis/motility operon was upregulated in late growth phase. Phenotypic changes were seen in relation to upregulation of chemotaxis/flagellar operons: flagella were rarely seen by electron microscopy on glucose-grown cells but cells cultured in tetrasaccharide medium were commonly flagellated. Chemotactic movement toward tetrasaccharides was demonstrated in capillary cultures. L. ruminis utilized 3-O-β-cellotriosyl-d-glucose released by β-glucan hydrolysis due to bowel commensal Coprococcus sp., indicating that cross feeding of tetrasaccharide between bacteria could occur. Therefore, the RNA-seq screen and subsequent experiments had utility in revealing foraging attributes of gut commensal Lactobacillus ruminis. PMID:23851085

  6. Fertilization of sea urchin eggs and sperm motility are negatively impacted under low hypergravitational forces significant to space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tash, J. S.; Kim, S.; Schuber, M.; Seibt, D.; Kinsey, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    Sperm and other flagellates swim faster in microgravity (microG) than in 1 G, raising the question of whether fertilization is altered under conditions of space travel. Such alterations have implications for reproduction of plant and animal food and for long-term space habitation by man. We previously demonstrated that microG accelerates protein phosphorylation during initiation of sperm motility but delays the sperm response to the egg chemotactic factor, speract. Thus sperm are sensitive to changes in gravitational force. New experiments using the NiZeMi centrifugal microscope examined whether low hypergravity (hyperG) causes effects opposite to microG on sperm motility, signal transduction, and fertilization. Sperm % motility and straight-line velocity were significantly inhibited by as little as 1.3 G. The phosphorylation states of FP130, an axonemal phosphoprotein, and FP160, a cAMP-dependent salt-extractable flagellar protein, both coupled to motility activation, showed a more rapid decline in hyperG. Most critically, hyperG caused an approximately 50% reduction in both the rate of sperm-egg binding and fertilization. The similar extent of inhibition of both fertilization parameters in hyperG suggests that the primary effect is on sperm rather than eggs. These results not only support our earlier microG data demonstrating that sperm are sensitive to small changes in gravitational forces but more importantly now show that this sensitivity affects the ability of sperm to fertilize eggs. Thus, more detailed studies on the impact of space flight on development should include studies of sperm function and fertilization.

  7. Fertilization of sea urchin eggs and sperm motility are negatively impacted under low hypergravitational forces significant to space flight.

    PubMed

    Tash, J S; Kim, S; Schuber, M; Seibt, D; Kinsey, W H

    2001-10-01

    Sperm and other flagellates swim faster in microgravity (microG) than in 1 G, raising the question of whether fertilization is altered under conditions of space travel. Such alterations have implications for reproduction of plant and animal food and for long-term space habitation by man. We previously demonstrated that microG accelerates protein phosphorylation during initiation of sperm motility but delays the sperm response to the egg chemotactic factor, speract. Thus sperm are sensitive to changes in gravitational force. New experiments using the NiZeMi centrifugal microscope examined whether low hypergravity (hyperG) causes effects opposite to microG on sperm motility, signal transduction, and fertilization. Sperm % motility and straight-line velocity were significantly inhibited by as little as 1.3 G. The phosphorylation states of FP130, an axonemal phosphoprotein, and FP160, a cAMP-dependent salt-extractable flagellar protein, both coupled to motility activation, showed a more rapid decline in hyperG. Most critically, hyperG caused an approximately 50% reduction in both the rate of sperm-egg binding and fertilization. The similar extent of inhibition of both fertilization parameters in hyperG suggests that the primary effect is on sperm rather than eggs. These results not only support our earlier microG data demonstrating that sperm are sensitive to small changes in gravitational forces but more importantly now show that this sensitivity affects the ability of sperm to fertilize eggs. Thus, more detailed studies on the impact of space flight on development should include studies of sperm function and fertilization.

  8. Interleukin 4 receptor signaling in human monocytes and U937 cells involves the activation of a phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C: a comparison with chemotactic peptide, FMLP, phospholipase D, and sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) diminishes cytokine activation of human macrophage. IL-4 binding to monocyte IL-4R is associated with protein kinase C (PKC) translocation to a nuclear fraction. The cleavage of diacyglycerol (DAG), an activator of PKC, from membrane phospholipids was investigated to define the proximal events of IL-4R signaling. IL-4 induced a statistically significant time-and dose-dependent generation of DAG. The IL-4-triggered production of DAG was not derived from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) hydrolysis, since neither cytosolic calcium flux nor liberation of inositol phosphates was detected in response to IL-4. Experiments were performed using [14C- methyl]choline-labeled U937 cells and monocytes to determine whether IL- 4R activated phospholipase C (PLC), PLD, or PLA2 to use membrane phosphatidylcholine (PC) to form DAG. IL-4 induced a time- and dose- dependent increase of phosphocholine (pchol) with concomitant degradation of membrane PC (p < 0.05 compared with control). The finding that the peak reduction of PC was equivalent to peak production of pchol suggested that IL-4R signaling involved the activation of a PC- specific PLC. Changes in choline (chol) or lyso-PC and glycerolphosphocholine, the respective products of PC cleavage by PLD or PLA2, were not detected in IL-4-treated cells. In contrast, exogenous PLD induced an increase in chol and concomitant loss of membrane PC. Additional investigation suggested that IL-4R signaling does not involve PLD. In cells labeled with L-lyso-3-PC 1-[1- 14C]palmitoyl, PLD but not IL-4, increased the production of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidyl-ethanol when pretreated with ethanol. Propranolol, an inhibitor of phosphatidate phosphohydrolase, and calyculin A, a phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitor, blocked DAG production in response to FMLP but not to IL-4. In propranolol pretreated cells, PMA but not IL-4 triggered the production of PA and lowered the amount of DAG. Evidence that PLA2 is not coupled to IL-4R is the detection of arachidonate production in response to FMLP but not to IL-4. Furthermore, IL-4R is not coupled to sphingomyelinase (SMase) since IL-4, unlike exogenous SMase, did not generate ceramide but induced the hydrolysis of PC to pchol that was comparable to exogenous PLC. In summary, IL-4R signaling in monocytes and U937 cells involves PLC and not PLD, PLA2, or SMase, and it uses PC and not PIP2 to form DAG. PMID:7931078

  9. Human skin melanocyte migration towards stromal cell-derived factor-1α demonstrated by optical real-time cell mobility assay: modulation of their chemotactic ability by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Akira; Hadjur, Christophe; Takahashi, Tadahito; Suzuki, Itaru; Hirose, Kunitaka; Mahe, Yann F

    2013-10-01

    To identify potential regulators of normal human melanocyte behaviour, we have developed an in vitro human melanocyte migration assay, using the optically accessible, real-time cell motility assay device TAXIScan. Coating of the glass surface with an extracellular matrix that served as scaffolding molecule was essential to demonstrate efficient melanocyte migration. Among several chemokines tested, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α/CXCL12 was the most effective driver of human normal skin melanocytes. Incubation of melanocytes with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) before the assay specifically enhanced CXCR4 expression and consequently chemotaxis towards SDF-1α/CXCL12. These results suggest that α-MSH acts on melanocytes to produce melanin as well as stimulates the cells to migrate to the site where they work through CXCR4 up-regulation, which is a new dynamic mode of action of α-MSH on melanocyte physiology.

  10. Some dinophycean red tide plankton species generate a superoxide scavenging substance.

    PubMed

    Sato, Emiko; Niwano, Yoshimi; Matsuyama, Yukihiko; Kim, Daekyung; Nakashima, Takuji; Oda, Tatsuya; Kohno, Masahiro

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that some raphidophycean red tide flagellates produce substances able to scavenge superoxide, whereas there have been no reports on superoxide scavenger production by dinophycean red tide flagellates. In this study, we examined the superoxide-scavenging activity of aqueous extracts from dinophycean red tide flagellates, Gymnodinium spp., Scrippsiella trochoidea, and Karenia sp., by a luminol analog L-012-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) method and an electron spin resonance (ESR)-spin trapping method, and compared the activity to that of raphidophycean red tide flagellates, Chattonella spp., Heterosigma akashiwo, and Fibrocapsa japonica. In the experiment applying the L-012-dependent CL method, only the aqueous extracts from raphidophycean red tide flagellates showed superoxide-scavenging activity. On the other hand, applying the ESR-spin trapping method, we found that the aqueous extracts from dinophycean red tide flagellates also showed superoxide-scavenging activity. This is the first report on the production of a superoxide-scavenger by dinophycean red tide flagellates.

  11. [Research of chemotaxis response of Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria panax on total ginsenosides].

    PubMed

    Chi, Kun; Xu, Yong-hua; Lei, Feng-jie; Yin, Min-jing; Wang, Zhuang; Zhang, Ai-hua; Zhang, Lian-xue

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, three kinds of chemotactic parameters (concentration, temperature and pH) were determined by plate assay and spore germination method to research the chemotactic response of Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria panax, and their spores on total ginsenosides. The results showed that Botrytis cinerea had strong chemotactic response at the mid-concentration of total ginsenosides (cultivation temperature was 20 degrees C and pH value was 6), and the data of chemotactic migration index (CMI) was 1.293 0, chemotactic growth rate (CGR) was 0.476 0, spore germination rate (SGR) was 53%, and dry weight of mycelial (DWM) was 0.452 6 g x L(-1); however, Alternaria panax had strong chemotactic response at the low-concentration of total ginsenosides (cultivation temperature was 25 degrees C and pH value was 6), and the data of chemotactic migration index (CMI) was 1.235 4, chemotactic growth rate (CGR) was 0.537 0, spore germination rate (SGR) was 67%, and dry weight of mycelial (DWM) was 0.494 8 g x L(-1). The results indicated that the low and middle concentration (2, 20 mg x L(-1)) of total ginsenosides had significant promoting effect on chemotactic response of these two pathogens, and the spore germination, mycelial growth rate, dry weight of mycelial of them were also significantly improved by this chemotactic response, whereas it decreased as the increase of total ginsenosides concentration. PMID:26975095

  12. [Research of chemotaxis response of Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria panax on total ginsenosides].

    PubMed

    Chi, Kun; Xu, Yong-hua; Lei, Feng-jie; Yin, Min-jing; Wang, Zhuang; Zhang, Ai-hua; Zhang, Lian-xue

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, three kinds of chemotactic parameters (concentration, temperature and pH) were determined by plate assay and spore germination method to research the chemotactic response of Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria panax, and their spores on total ginsenosides. The results showed that Botrytis cinerea had strong chemotactic response at the mid-concentration of total ginsenosides (cultivation temperature was 20 degrees C and pH value was 6), and the data of chemotactic migration index (CMI) was 1.293 0, chemotactic growth rate (CGR) was 0.476 0, spore germination rate (SGR) was 53%, and dry weight of mycelial (DWM) was 0.452 6 g x L(-1); however, Alternaria panax had strong chemotactic response at the low-concentration of total ginsenosides (cultivation temperature was 25 degrees C and pH value was 6), and the data of chemotactic migration index (CMI) was 1.235 4, chemotactic growth rate (CGR) was 0.537 0, spore germination rate (SGR) was 67%, and dry weight of mycelial (DWM) was 0.494 8 g x L(-1). The results indicated that the low and middle concentration (2, 20 mg x L(-1)) of total ginsenosides had significant promoting effect on chemotactic response of these two pathogens, and the spore germination, mycelial growth rate, dry weight of mycelial of them were also significantly improved by this chemotactic response, whereas it decreased as the increase of total ginsenosides concentration.

  13. Generation of reactive oxygen species by raphidophycean phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Nakamura, A; Shikayama, M; Kawano, I; Ishimatsu, A; Muramatsu, T

    1997-10-01

    Chattonella marina, a raphidophycean flagellate, is one of the most toxic red tide phytoplankton and causes severe damage to fish farming. Recent studies demonstrated that Chattonella sp. generates superoxide (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (.OH), which may be responsible for the toxicity of C. marina. In this study, we found the other raphidophycean flagellates such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Olisthodiscus luteus, and Fibrocapsa japonica also produce O2- and H2O2 under normal growth condition. Among the flagellate species tested, Chattonella has the highest rates of production of O2- and H2O2 as compared on the basis of cell number. This seems to be partly due to differences in their cell sizes, since Chattonella is larger than other flagellate species. The generation of O2- by these flagellate species was also confirmed by a chemiluminescence assay by using 2-methyl-6-(p-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin++ +-3-one (MCLA). All these raphidophycean flagellates inhibited the proliferation of a marine bacterium, Vibrio alginolyticus, in a flagellates/bacteria co-culture system, and their toxic effects were suppressed by the addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase. Our results suggest that the generation of reactive oxygen species is a common feature of raphidophycean flagellates.

  14. Comparison of growth efficiencies of protozoa growing on bacteria deposited on surfaces and in suspension.

    PubMed

    Zubkov, M V; Sleigh, M A

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria were deposited in tubes as compact pellets by centrifuging suspensions of cultured Vibrio at stationary phase. Numbers and protein biomass of flagellates added to these tubes and of the Vibrio, were followed and compared with the growth of the same and other protists on identical, uncentrifuged Vibrio. The flagellates Bodo saliens and Caecitellus parvulus, which could not be seen to multiply in tubes of suspended bacteria, grazed deposited bacteria actively as did the more versatile flagellate Cafeteria roenbergensis. The growth of these flagellates and their consumption of deposited bacteria were very similar to those of the flagellate Pteridomonas danica or the ciliate Uronema marinum fed with suspended bacteria, although deposit-feeders grew more slowly. Gross growth efficiencies (30-60%) of deposit-feeding flagellates were similar to those of the suspension-feeding protists. Caecitellus consumed 55 Vibrio to produce one flagellate, while 4,500 Vibrio were consumed to produce one Uronema. Surface-feeding flagellates are shown to be efficient bacterivores, capable of restricting the numbers of bacteria deposited on surfaces just as other protozoa control numbers of suspended bacteria.

  15. Progesterone sperm chemoattraction may be modulated by its corticosteroid-binding globulin carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Teves, Maria Eugenia; Guidobaldi, Hector Alejandro; Uñates, Diego Rafael; Sanchez, Raul; Miska, Werner; Giojalas, Laura Cecilia

    2010-05-01

    Progesterone, the main steroidal component secreted by the cumulus cells that surround the egg, chemotactically guides human spermatozoa. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the carrier protein corticosteroid-binding globulin also participates in the sperm P chemotactic response. By means of videomicroscopy and image analysis, we observed that corticosteroid-binding globulin modulates the chemotactic activity of P, when a solution of corticosteroid-binding globulin + P is at the nanomolar range.

  16. The natural mediator for PMN emigration in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Maeda, S.; Hayashi, H.

    1971-01-01

    In earlier work, a chemotactic factor (leucoegresin) specific for polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes had been isolated from the sites of Arthus reactions or cutaneous burns. The substance shared antigenic sites with IgG. The possible existence precursor of the chemotactic factor in the γ2-globulin fraction of normal rabbit sera is suggested since the protein fraction on incubation with a purified neutral SH-dependent protease from inflammatory tissue became strongly chemotactic. PMID:4137989

  17. Flagella and pili of iron-oxidizing thiobacilli isolated from a uranium mine in northern Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    DiSpirito, A.A.; Silver, M.; Voss, L.; Tuovinen, O.H.

    1982-05-01

    Five strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, which included three recent isolates from a uranium mine, possessed flagella. Three of the strains had several pili per cell. The dimensions, fine structure, and orientation of the flagella were different. Both polar and peritrichous flagella were observed, indicating strain-dependent ultrastructural variation in acidophilic thiobacilli. Neither flagella nor pili were detected in eight other strains of T. ferrooxidans and two strains of Thiobacillus acidophilus by electron microscopy, although all of the cultures contained motile cells.

  18. Morphological characterization and intraspeci