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Sample records for peritrichously flagellated chemotactic

  1. Adaptation and optimal chemotactic strategy for {ital E. coli}

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, S.P.; Bialek, William; Koberle, R. Freedman, B.

    1998-04-01

    Extending the classic works of Berg and Purcell on the biophysics of bacterial chemotaxis, we find the optimal chemotactic strategy for the peritrichous bacterium {ital E. coli} in the high and low signal to noise ratio limits. The optimal strategy depends on properties of the environment and properties of the individual bacterium, and is therefore highly adaptive. We review experiments relevant to testing both the form of the proposed strategy and its adaptability, and propose extensions of them which could test the limits of the adaptability in this simplest sensory processing system. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Predicting Escherichia coli's chemotactic drift under exponential gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Sibendu; Layek, Ritwik; Kar, Shantimoy; Raj, M. Kiran; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial species are known to show chemotaxis, i.e., the directed motions in the presence of certain chemicals, whereas the motion is random in the absence of those chemicals. The bacteria modulate their run time to induce chemotactic drift towards the attractant chemicals and away from the repellent chemicals. However, the existing theoretical knowledge does not exhibit a proper match with experimental validation, and hence there is a need for developing alternate models and validating experimentally. In this paper a more robust theoretical model is proposed to investigate chemotactic drift of peritrichous Escherichia coli under an exponential nutrient gradient. An exponential gradient is used to understand the steady state behavior of drift because of the logarithmic functionality of the chemosensory receptors. Our theoretical estimations are validated through the experimentation and simulation results. Thus, the developed model successfully delineates the run time, run trajectory, and drift velocity as measured from the experiments.

  3. Feeding and swimming of flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doelger, Julia; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Kiorboe, Thomas; Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Hydrodynamics plays a dominant role for small planktonic flagellates and shapes their survival strategies. The high diversity of beat patterns and arrangements of appendages indicates different strategies balancing the trade-offs between the general goals, i.e., energy-efficient swimming, feeding, and predator avoidance. One type of flagellated algae that we observe, are haptophytes, which possess two flagella for flow creation and one so-called haptonema, a long, rigid structure fixed on the cell body, which is used for prey capture. We present videos and flow fields obtained using velocimetry methods around freely swimming haptophytes and other flagellates, which we compare to analytical results obtained from point force models. The observed and modelled flows are used to analyse how different morphologies and beat patterns relate to different feeding or swimming strategies, such as the capture mechanism in haptophytes. The Centre for Ocean Life is a VKR center of excellence supported by the Villum foundation.

  4. Structure and seasonal dynamics of the protozoan community (heterotrophic flagellates, ciliates, amoeboid protozoa) in the plankton of a large river (River Danube, Hungary).

    PubMed

    Kiss, Aron Keve; Acs, Eva; Kiss, Keve Tihamér; Török, Júlia Katalin

    2009-05-01

    Seasonal dynamics of all major protozoan groups were investigated in the plankton of the River Danube, upstream of Budapest (Hungary), by bi-weekly sampling over a 1-year long period. Sixty-one heterotrophic flagellate, 14 naked amoeba, 50 testate amoeba, 4 heliozoan and 83 ciliate morphospecies were identified. The estimated abundance ranges of major groups throughout the year were as follows: heterotrophic flagellates, 0.27-7.8 x 10(6)ind.l(-1); naked amoebae, max. 3300ind.l(-1); testaceans, max. 1600ind.l(-1); heliozoans, max. 8500ind.l(-1); ciliates, 132-34,000ind.l(-1). In terms of biovolume, heterotrophic flagellates dominated throughout the year (max. 0.58mm(3)l(-1)), and ciliates only exceeded their biovolume in summer (max. 0.76mm(3)l(-1)). Naked amoeba and heliozoan biovolume was about one, and testacean biovolume 1-3, orders of magnitude lower than that of ciliates. In winter, flagellates, mainly chrysomonads, had the highest biomass, whilst ciliates were dominated by peritrichs. In 2005 from April to July a long spring/summer peak occurred for all protozoan groups. Beside chrysomonads typical flagellates were choanoflagellates, bicosoecids and abundant microflagellates (large chrysomonads and Collodictyon). Most abundant ciliates were oligotrichs, while Phascolodon, Urotricha, Vorticella, haptorids, Suctoria, Climacostomum and Stokesia also contributed significantly to biovolume during rapid succession processes. In October and November a second high protozoan peak occurred, with flagellate dominance, and slightly different taxonomic composition.

  5. The cell biology of peritrichous flagella in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Guttenplan, Sarah B; Shaw, Sidney; Kearns, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial flagella are highly conserved molecular machines that have been extensively studied for assembly, function and gene regulation. Less studied is how and why bacteria differ based on the number and arrangement of the flagella they synthesize. Here we explore the cell biology of peritrichous flagella in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis by fluorescently labelling flagellar basal bodies, hooks and filaments. We find that the average B. subtilis cell assembles approximately 26 flagellar basal bodies and we show that basal body number is controlled by SwrA. Basal bodies are assembled rapidly (< 5 min) but the assembly of flagella capable of supporting motility is rate limited by filament polymerization (> 40 min). We find that basal bodies are not positioned randomly on the cell surface. Rather, basal bodies occupy a grid-like pattern organized symmetrically around the midcell and that flagella are discouraged at the poles. Basal body position is genetically determined by FlhF and FlhG homologues to control spatial patterning differently from what is seen in bacteria with polar flagella. Finally, spatial control of flagella in B. subtilis seems more relevant to the inheritance of flagella and motility of individual cells than the motile behaviour of populations.

  6. Gravitaxis and graviperception in flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.; Lebert, M.; Richter, P.; Ntefidou, M.

    2003-05-01

    There is strong evidence that gravitactic orientation in flagellates and ciliates is mediated by an active physiological gravireceptor rather than by passive alignment of the cells in the water column. In flagellates the threshold for graviorientation was found to be at 0.12 × g on a slow rotating centrifuge during the IML-2 mission on the Shuttle Columbia and a subsequent parabolic rocket flight (TEXUS). During the IML-2 mission no adaptation to microgravity was observed over the duration of the space flight, while gravitaxis was lost in a terrestrial closed environmental system over the period of almost two years. Sedimenting statoliths are not likely to be involved in graviperception because of the small size of the cells and their rotation around the longitudinal axis during forward locomotion. Instead the whole cytoplasmic content of the cell, being heavier than the surrounding aqueous medium (1.05 g/ml), exerts a pressure on the lower membrane. This force activates stretch-sensitive calcium specific ion channels which can be inhibited by the addition of gadolinium which therefore abolishes gravitaxis. The channels seem to mainly allow calcium ions to pass since gravitaxis is blocked by the addition of the calcium ionophore A23187 and by vanadate which blocks the Ca-ATPase in the cytoplasmic membrane. Recently, a gene for a mechanosensitive channel, originally sequenced for Saccharomyces, was identified in Euglena by PCR. The increase in intracellular free calcium during reorientation can be visualized by the fluorophore Calcium Crimson using laser excitation and image intensification. This result was confirmed during recent parabolic flights. The gated calcium changes the membrane potential across the membrane which may be the trigger for the reorientation of the flagellum. cAMP plays a role as a secondary messenger. Photosynthetic flagellates are suitable candidates for life support systems since they absorb CO 2 and produce oxygen. Preliminary experiments

  7. Hydrodynamics of freely swimming flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolger, Julia; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Kiorboe, Thomas; Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders

    2016-11-01

    Flagellates are a diverse group of unicellular organisms forming an important part of the marine ecosystem. The arrangement of flagella around the cell serves as a key trait optimizing and compromising essential functions. With micro-particle image velocimetry we observed time-resolved near-cell flows around freely swimming flagellates, and we developed an analytical model based on the Stokes flow around a solid sphere propelled by a variable number of differently placed, temporally varying point forces, each representing one flagellum. The model allows us to reproduce the observed flow patterns and swimming dynamics, and to extract quantities such as swimming velocities and prey clearance rates as well as flow disturbances revealing the organism to flow-sensing predators. Our results point to optimal flagellar arrangements and beat patterns, and essential trade-offs. For biflagellates with two symmetrically arranged flagella we contrasted two species using undulatory and ciliary beat patterns, respectively, and found breast-stroke type beat patterns with equatorial power strokes to be favorable for fast as well as quiet swimming. The Centre for Ocean Life is a VKR Centre of Excellence supported by the Villum Foundation.

  8. Flagellate dermatitis after consumption of Shiitake mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Burkhard; Marsch, Wolfgang Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellate dermatitis occurs in patients who have eaten Shiitake mushrooms. We are reporting on a 55-year-old man, who developed whiplash-striped, severely itching efflorescences on the trunk 3 days after eating Lentinula edodes. Flagellate dermatitis is also known as a cutaneous side effect of bleomycin therapy. PMID:25097492

  9. Graviperception and gravitaxis in flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.; Ntefidou, M.

    Many photosynthetic and heterotrophic flagellates perceive and respond to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Some previous hypotheses have suggested that the orientation is brought about by a passive physical mechanism such as buoyancy or hydrodynamic alignment. However, recent results have confirmed that e.g. the photosynthetic Euglena utilizes an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. This unicellular organism senses gravity by the sedimentation of its cellular content, which is heavier than the surrounding medium, onto the lower membrane. This force is believed to activate mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. The channels allow a gated influx of calcium which alters the internal electrical potential and may activate calmodulin. Further elements in the transduction chain are cyclic AMP and related enzymes. Recent flight experiments during parabolic aircraft maneuvers and on sounding rockets have confirmed previous terrestrial results and have provided detailed insight into the biochemical sensory transduction chain.

  10. Chemotactic separation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna Kanti; Das, Sambeeta; Poyton, Matthew F; Sengupta, Samudra; Butler, Peter J; Cremer, Paul S; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-12-23

    We demonstrate a procedure for the separation of enzymes based on their chemotactic response toward an imposed substrate concentration gradient. The separation is observed within a two-inlet, five-outlet microfluidic network, designed to allow mixtures of active (ones that catalyze substrate turnover) and inactive (ones that do not catalyze substrate turnover) enzymes, labeled with different fluorophores, to flow through one of the inlets. Substrate solution prepared in phosphate buffer was introduced through the other inlet of the device at the same flow rate. The steady-state concentration profiles of the enzymes were obtained at specific positions within the outlets of the microchannel using fluorescence microscopy. In the presence of a substrate concentration gradient, active enzyme molecules migrated preferentially toward the substrate channel. The excess migration of the active enzyme molecules was quantified in terms of an enrichment coefficient. Experiments were carried out with different pairs of enzymes. Coupling the physics of laminar flow of liquid and molecular diffusion, multiphysics simulations were carried out to estimate the extent of the chemotactic separation. Our results show that, with appropriate microfluidic arrangement, molecular chemotaxis leads to spontaneous separation of active enzyme molecules from their inactive counterparts of similar charge and size.

  11. Revealing the Diversity and Quantity of Peritrich Ciliates in Environmental Samples Using Specific Primer-based PCR and Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xihan; Gong, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Peritrichs are a diverse, ecologically important ciliate group usually with a complex life cycle. To date, the community of the peritrichs has been investigated by using morphology-based methods such as living observation and silver staining. Here we show a molecular approach for characterizing the diversity and quantity of free-living peritrichs in environmental samples. We newly designed four peritrich-specific primers targeting 18S rRNA genes that allow clone library construction, screening and analysis. A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay was developed to quantify peritrichs in environmental samples by using rDNA copy number as an indicator. DNA extracted from four water samples of contrasting environmental gradients was analysed. The results showed that the peritrich community was differentiated among these samples, and that the diversity decreased with the increase of water salinity. The qPCR results are consistent with the library sequence analysis in terms of quantity variations from sample to sample. The development of peritrich-specific primers, for the first time, for conventional PCR and qPCR assays, provides useful molecular tools for revealing the diversity and quantity of peritrich ciliates in environmental samples. Also, our study illustrates the potential of these molecular tools to ecological studies of other ciliate groups in diverse environments. PMID:23100023

  12. Graviperception and gravitaxis in flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.; Richter, P.; Ntefidou, M.; Lebert, M.

    Unicellular flagellates perceive and react to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Previous hypotheses have suggested that the orientation is brought about by a passive physical mechanism such as buoyancy or hydrodynamic alignment. Recent results of experiments on parabolic rocket flights have revealed that in the photosynthetic Euglena only 10 % of the orientation can be explained by passive orientation while the remainder relies on an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. The cellular contents is heavier than the surrounding medium and consequently presses onto the lower membrane where it activates mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. These channels allow a gated influx of calcium (visualized by confocal microscopy) which depolarizes the internal electrical potential and eventually causes a course correction by the flagellar beating. Further elements in the transduction chain are cyclic AMP and related enzymes. Recent experiments during parabolic aircraft flights and on sounding rockets have confirmed this hypothesis and provided detailed insight into the biochemical sensory transduction chain. Currently the molecular mechanisms of graviperception are being studied.

  13. Growth of the peritrich epibiont Zoothamnium intermedium Precht, 1935 (Ciliophora, Peritrichia) estimated from laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Utz, L R P

    2008-05-01

    Peritrich ciliates are commonly found colonizing living substrates. Although this a well known phenomenon, biological aspects of this relationship need to be studied in more detail. Assessment of growth rates in peritrichs has been the subject of very few studies. Only species in the genera Carchesium Ehrenberg, 1830 and Vorticella Linnaeus, 1767 had their growth rates evaluated in the field and in the laboratory. In the present study, growth, colonization (colonies/host), and proliferation (zooids/colony) rates of the peritrich epibiont Zoothamnium intermedium Precht, 1935 attached to the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa Dana 1848 were evaluated in the laboratory in two food regimes: bacteria only, and algal based diet. Results showed that growth, colonization, and proliferation rates were similar for both diets. Maximum growth rates obtained for Z. intermedium was 0.85 and 0.83 per day, for bacteria and algae respectively. Maximum colonization rates were 0.5 per day for both diets, and the maximum proliferation rates were 0.44 and 0.42 per day for bacteria and algae respectively. These results demonstrate that Z. intermedium is able to grow at the same rate of other peritrichs on bacterial and algal based diets.

  14. Adsorption kinetics of laterally and polarly flagellated Vibrio.

    PubMed Central

    Belas, M R; Colwell, R R

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of laterally and polarly flagellated bacteria to chitin was measured, and from the data obtained, a modified Langmuir adsorption isotherm was derived. Results indicated that the adsorption of laterally flagellated Vibrio parahaemolyticus follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, a type of adsorption referred to as surface saturation kinetics, when conditions are favorable for the production of lateral flagella. When conditions were not favorable for the production of lateral flagella, bacterial adsorption did not follow the Langmuir adsorption isotherm; instead, proportional adsorption kinetics were observed. The adsorption of some polarly flagellated bacteria exhibited surface saturation kinetics. However, the binding index (the product of the number of binding sites and bacterial affinity to the surface) of polarly flagellated bacteria differed significantly from that of laterally flagellated bacteria, suggesting that polarly flagellated bacteria adsorb to chitin by a different mechanism from that used by the laterally flagellated bacteria. From the results of dual-label adsorption competition experiments, in which polarly flagellated V. cholerae competed with increasing concentrations of laterally flagellated V. parahaemolyticus, it was observed that laterally flagellated bacteria inhibited the adsorption of polarly flagellated bacteria. In contrast, polarly flagellated bacteria enhanced the adsorption of V. cholerae. In competition experiments, where V. parahaemolyticus competed against increasing concentrations of other bacteria, polarly flagellated bacteria enhanced V. parahaemolyticus adsorption significantly, whereas laterally flagellated bacteria only slightly enhanced the process. The direct correlation observed between surface saturation kinetics, the production of lateral flagella, and the ability of laterally flagellated bacteria to inhibit the adsorption of polarly flagellated bacteria suggests that lateral flagella represent a

  15. Renal flagellate infections in reptiles: 29 cases.

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, Caries; Garner, Michael M; Nordhausen, Robert W; Valls, Xavier; Gallego, Miguel; Soto, Sara

    2014-03-01

    Renal infection with flagellated protozoa was retrospectively evaluated in 29 reptiles, including 12 turtles, 7 tortoises, and 6 chameleons; overall, 20 species of reptiles were represented. Most cases presented with nonspecific clinical signs or a combination of several concurrent diseases. Nineteen of 29 reptiles had tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with flagellates, and this lesion was considered contributory to death in 15 cases, although concurrent diseases were frequent. Infection was invasive into the renal interstitium in three reptiles due to tubular rupture and in one chameleon also spread to adjacent tissues, coelomic cavity, and blood vessels due to renal rupture. Cytologic or ultrastructural evaluation of trophozoites in two cases was consistent with diplomonad flagellates. Renal disease was often complicated with soft-tissue mineralization and/or gout. Gastrointestinal and cloacal infection with flagellates and inflammation were frequent in reptiles in which the digestive tract was available for histopathologic examination, and this supports the possibility of infections ascending the urinary tract from the cloaca. Renal disease associated with flagellate protozoa is rare in vertebrates but appears to be relevant in reptiles, particularly chelonians and chameleons.

  16. Putative Bronchopulmonary Flagellated Protozoa in Immunosuppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Çelik, Pınar; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be “flagellated protozoa” have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells. PMID:24804259

  17. Putative bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa in immunosuppressed patients.

    PubMed

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Girginkardesler, Nogay; Celik, Pınar; Yereli, Kor; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be "flagellated protozoa" have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells.

  18. Chemotactic behavior of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Hugdahl, M B; Beery, J T; Doyle, M P

    1988-01-01

    The chemotactic behavior of Campylobacter jejuni was determined in the presence of different amino acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, and preparations and constituents of mucin and bile. L-Fucose was the only carbohydrate and L-aspartate, L-cysteine, L-glutamate, and L-serine were the only amino acids producing a chemotactic (positive) response. Several salts of organic acids, including pyruvate, succinate, fumarate, citrate, malate, and alpha-ketoglutarate, were also chemoattractants, as were bile (beef, chicken, and oxgall) and mucin (bovine gallbladder and hog gastric). Most constituents of bile tested individually were chemorepellents, but the mucin component was chemoattractant. The chemotactic behavior of C. jejuni toward L-fucose, a constituent of both bile and mucin, may be an important factor in the affinity of the organism for the gallbladder and intestinal tract. Images PMID:3372020

  19. Hydrodynamic effects on the tumbling of flagellated bacteria near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    Peritrichously flagellated bacteria use semi-rigid helical flagella to form a bundle during a run to swim forward and to trigger the unbundling during a tumble to change their swimming direction. It is accepted that the hydrodynamic interactions play a significant role in these processes. Recently, using digital holographic microscopy and microfluidics, we discovered that the tumbling events are substantially suppressed near a solid wall. In this paper, we present a two flagellum rigid model to elucidate the hydrodynamic wall interaction mechanism behind the phenomenon. Further implications on cell attachment and detachment during the biofilm formation will be discussed. We apply Slender Body Theory (SBT) to quantify the flow flagellum interaction. The no-slip boundary imposed by the wall is modeled using the image system of the SBT model for the stoke-flow singularity. We show that in the bulk, a repulsive force among flagella initiates the unbundling and consequently tumbling; however, in presence of the wall, the force is strongly mitigated that stabilize the bundle and suppress the tumbling. NIH and NSF.

  20. An analytical model of flagellate hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölger, Julia; Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders

    2017-04-01

    Flagellates are unicellular microswimmers that propel themselves using one or several beating flagella. We consider a hydrodynamic model of flagellates and explore the effect of flagellar arrangement and beat pattern on swimming kinematics and near-cell flow. The model is based on the analytical solution by Oseen for the low Reynolds number flow due to a point force outside a no-slip sphere. The no-slip sphere represents the cell and the point force a single flagellum. By superposition we are able to model a freely swimming flagellate with several flagella. For biflagellates with left–right symmetric flagellar arrangements we determine the swimming velocity, and we show that transversal forces due to the periodic movements of the flagella can promote swimming. For a model flagellate with both a longitudinal and a transversal flagellum we determine radius and pitch of the helical swimming trajectory. We find that the longitudinal flagellum is responsible for the average translational motion whereas the transversal flagellum governs the rotational motion. Finally, we show that the transversal flagellum can lead to strong feeding currents to localized capture sites on the cell surface.

  1. Chemotactic collapse and mesenchymal morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We study the effect of chemotactic signaling among mesenchymal cells. We show that the particular physiology of the mesenchymal cells allows one-dimensional collapse in contrast to the case of bacteria, and that the mesenchymal morphogenesis represents thus a more complex type of pattern formation than those found in bacterial colonies. We compare our theoretical predictions with recent in vitro experiments.

  2. Chemotactic Blebbing in Dictyostelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Zatulovskiy, Evgeny; Kay, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers use the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum as a model organism to study various aspects of the eukaryotic cell chemotaxis. Traditionally, Dictyostelium chemotaxis is considered to be driven mainly by branched F-actin polymerization. However, recently it has become evident that Dictyostelium, as well as many other eukaryotic cells, can also employ intracellular hydrostatic pressure to generate force for migration. This process results in the projection of hemispherical plasma membrane protrusions, called blebs, that can be controlled by chemotactic signaling.Here we describe two methods to study chemotactic blebbing in Dictyostelium cells and to analyze the intensity of the blebbing response in various strains and under different conditions. The first of these methods-the cyclic-AMP shock assay-allows one to quantify the global blebbing response of cells to a uniform chemoattractant stimulation. The second one-the under-agarose migration assay-induces directional blebbing in cells moving in a gradient of chemoattractant. In this assay, the cells can be switched from a predominantly F-actin-driven mode of motility to a bleb-driven chemotaxis, allowing one to compare the efficiency of both modes and explore the molecular machinery controlling chemotactic blebbing.

  3. A new flagship peritrich (Ciliophora, Peritrichida) from the River Rhine, Germany: Apocarchesium arndti n. sp.

    PubMed

    Norf, Helge; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    We discovered a free-living peritrich ciliate with outstanding features in the River Rhine. Its morphology and 18S rRNA gene sequence were studied with standard methods. Apocarchesium arndti n. sp. has several peculiarities. (i) There are ordinary zooids, macrozooids, and microzooids, which form a hemispherical rosette on a discoidal base, the stalk dish, locking the approximately 18 microm wide and up to 2 mm long, spirally contracting colony stalk. (ii) The stalk myoneme is connected only to the microzooids. (iii) A rosette contains up to 50 zooids not connected to each other but individually attached to the stalk dish with the scopula. (iv) The ordinary zooids are epistylidid, trumpet-shaped (approximately 6:1 length:width), about 180 x 30 microm in size, and have an ellipsoidal macronucleus subapically between oral cavity and dorsal side. (v) The myoneme system of the zooids, which can contract individually, forms a tube-like structure in the narrow posterior half of the cell. (vi) The silverline pattern belongs to the transverse-striate type. (vii) The oral apparatus is of usual structure, with kinety 1 of peniculus 3 distinctly shortened proximally. (viii) The 18S rRNA places A. arndti n. sp. as a distinct lineage near Vorticella and Carchesium. These data are used to provide an improved diagnosis of the genus Apocarchesium. Features (i)-(iii) and the molecular data indicate that Apocarchesium could be the type genus of a new peritrich family.

  4. A New Flagship Peritrich (Ciliophora, Peritrichida) from the River Rhine, Germany: Apocarchesium arndti n. sp.

    PubMed Central

    NORF, HELGE; FOISSNER, WILHELM

    2011-01-01

    We discovered a free-living peritrich ciliate with outstanding features in the River Rhine. Its morphology and 18S rRNA gene sequence were studied with standard methods. Apocarchesium arndti n. sp. has several peculiarities. (i) There are ordinary zooids, macrozooids, and microzooids, which form a hemispherical rosette on a discoidal base, the stalk dish, locking the ~ 18 μm wide and up to 2 mm long, spirally contracting colony stalk. (ii) The stalk myoneme is connected only to the microzooids. (iii) A rosette contains up to 50 zooids not connected to each other but individually attached to the stalk dish with the scopula. (iv) The ordinary zooids are epistylidid, trumpet-shaped (~ 6:1 length:width), about 180 × 30 μm in size, and have an ellipsoidal macronucleus subapically between oral cavity and dorsal side. (v) The myoneme system of the zooids, which can contract individually, forms a tube-like structure in the narrow posterior half of the cell. (vi) The silverline pattern belongs to the transverse-striate type. (vii) The oral apparatus is of usual structure, with kinety 1 of peniculus 3 distinctly shortened proximally. (viii) The 18S rRNA places A. arndti n. sp. as a distinct lineage near Vorticella and Carchesium. These data are used to provide an improved diagnosis of the genus Apocarchesium. Features (i)–(iii) and the molecular data indicate that Apocarchesium could be the type genus of a new peritrich family. PMID:20337807

  5. Relationship between the flagellates and the ciliates.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R E; Kugrens, P

    1992-01-01

    The flagellates and the ciliates have long been considered to be closely related because of their unicellular nature and the similarity in the structures of the axoneme of the flagella and cilia in both groups. Most protozoologists believe that the ciliates arose from a flagellate. The flagellates that are most similar in structure to the ciliates are the dinoflagellates and two genera of uncertain taxonomic position, Colponema and Katablepharis. Structurally, dinoflagellates have a number of similarities with ciliates. These include the similarity of the cortical alveoli in the ciliates to the thecal vesicles in the dinoflagellates, the possession of tubular cristae, the similarity of the parasomal sac of the ciliates to the pusule of the dinoflagellates, the possession of similar trichocysts and mucocysts, and some similarity in the feeding apparatus. Colponema spp. are probably related to the dinoflagellates and have many of the same similarities with the ciliates. Katablepharis spp. are very similar in structure to the swarmer (embryo) of the suctorian ciliates. Indeed, reduction in the number of cilia to two in the suctorian swarmer and elimination of the macronucleus would result in a cell that is very similar to the Katablepharis cell. The feeding apparatus of Katablepharis spp. and the rest of the ciliates consists of two concentric microtubular arrays associated with vesicles. Information available from nucleotide sequencing of rRNA places the dinoflagellates in an ancestral position to the ciliates. The rRNA of Colponema and Katablepharis spp. has not yet been investigated. The use of stop codons in mRNA is discussed in relation to phylogeny. Images PMID:1480107

  6. Small but Manifold - Hidden Diversity in "Spumella-like Flagellates".

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Lars; Bock, Christina; Schweikert, Michael; Boenigk, Jens

    2016-07-01

    Colourless, nonscaled chrysophytes comprise morphologically similar or even indistinguishable flagellates which are important bacterivors in water and soil crucial for ecosystem functioning. However, phylogenetic analyses indicate a multiple origin of such colourless, nonscaled flagellate lineages. These flagellates are often referred to as "Spumella-like flagellates" in ecological and biogeographic studies. Although this denomination reflects an assumed polyphyly, it obscures the phylogenetic and taxonomic diversity of this important flagellate group and, thus, hinders progress in lineage- and taxon-specific ecological surveys. The smallest representatives of colourless chrysophytes have been addressed in very few taxonomic studies although they are among the dominant flagellates in field communities. To overcome the blurred picture and set the field for further investigation in biogeography and ecology of the organisms in question, we studied a set of strains of specifically small, colourless, nonscaled chrysomonad flagellates by means of electron microscopy and molecular analyses. They were isolated by a filtration-acclimatisation approach focusing on flagellates of around 5 μm. We present the phylogenetic position of eight different lineages on both the ordinal and the generic level. Accordingly, we describe the new genera Apoikiospumella, Chromulinospumella, Segregatospumella, Cornospumella and Acrispumella Boenigk et Grossmann n. g. and different species within them.

  7. Chemotactic predator-prey dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Ankush; Kruppa, Tobias; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-03-01

    A discrete chemotactic predator-prey model is proposed in which the prey secrets a diffusing chemical which is sensed by the predator and vice versa. Two dynamical states corresponding to catching and escaping are identified and it is shown that steady hunting is unstable. For the escape process, the predator-prey distance is diffusive for short times but exhibits a transient subdiffusive behavior which scales as a power law t1/3 with time t and ultimately crosses over to diffusion again. This allows us to classify the motility and dynamics of various predatory microbes and phagocytes. In particular, there is a distinct region in the parameter space where they prove to be infallible predators.

  8. Development and evaluation of specific PCR primers targeting the ribosomal DNA-internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of peritrich ciliates in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lei; Zhang, Qianqian; Gong, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Peritrich ciliates are highly diverse and can be important bacterial grazers in aquatic ecosystems. Morphological identifications of peritrich species and assemblages in the environment are time-consuming and expertise-demanding. In this study, two peritrich-specific PCR primers were newly designed to amplify a fragment including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal rDNA from environmental samples. The primers showed high specificity in silico, and in tests with peritrich isolates and environmental DNA. Application of these primers in clone library construction and sequencing yielded exclusively sequences of peritrichs for water and sediment samples. We also found the ITS1, ITS2, ITS, D1 region of 28S rDNA, and ITS+D1 region co-varied with, and generally more variable than, the V9 region of 18S rDNA in peritrichs. The newly designed specific primers thus provide additional tools to study the molecular diversity, community composition, and phylogeography of these ecologically important protists in different systems.

  9. Euglenoid flagellates: a multifaceted biotechnology platform.

    PubMed

    Krajčovič, Juraj; Matej Vesteg; Schwartzbach, Steven D

    2015-05-20

    Euglenoid flagellates are mainly fresh water protists growing in highly diverse environments making them well-suited for a multiplicity of biotechnology applications. Phototrophic euglenids possesses complex chloroplasts of green algal origin bounded by three membranes. Euglena nuclear and plastid genome organization, gene structure and gene expression are distinctly different from other organisms. Our observations on the model organism Euglena gracilis indicate that transcription of both the plastid and nuclear genome is insensitive to environmental changes and that gene expression is regulated mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Euglena plastids have been proposed as a site for the production of proteins and value added metabolites of biotechnological interest. Euglena has been shown to be a suitable protist species to be used for production of several compounds that are used in the production of cosmeceuticals and nutraceuticals, such as α-tocopherol, wax esters, polyunsaturated fatty acids, biotin and tyrosine. The storage polysaccharide, paramylon, has immunostimulatory properties and has shown a promise for biomaterials production. Euglena biomass can be used as a nutritional supplement in aquaculture and in animal feed. Diverse applications of Euglena in environmental biotechnology include ecotoxicological risk assessment, heavy metal bioremediation, bioremediation of industrial wastewater and contaminated water.

  10. Flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Vincent A; Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Reufer, Mathias; Wilson, Laurence G; Morozov, Alexander N; Poon, Wilson C K

    2014-12-16

    It is widely believed that the swimming speed, v, of many flagellated bacteria is a nonmonotonic function of the concentration, c, of high-molecular-weight linear polymers in aqueous solution, showing peaked v(c) curves. Pores in the polymer solution were suggested as the explanation. Quantifying this picture led to a theory that predicted peaked v(c) curves. Using high-throughput methods for characterizing motility, we measured v and the angular frequency of cell body rotation, Ω, of motile Escherichia coli as a function of polymer concentration in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Ficoll solutions of different molecular weights. We find that nonmonotonic v(c) curves are typically due to low-molecular-weight impurities. After purification by dialysis, the measured v(c) and Ω(c) relations for all but the highest-molecular-weight PVP can be described in detail by Newtonian hydrodynamics. There is clear evidence for non-Newtonian effects in the highest-molecular-weight PVP solution. Calculations suggest that this is due to the fast-rotating flagella seeing a lower viscosity than the cell body, so that flagella can be seen as nano-rheometers for probing the non-Newtonian behavior of high polymer solutions on a molecular scale.

  11. On Flagellar Structure in Certain Flagellates

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, I. R.; Grimstone, A. V.

    1960-01-01

    This paper describes the structure of the flagella, basal bodies, and some of the associated fibre systems in three genera of complex flagellates, Trichonympha, Pseudotrichonympha, and Holomastigotoides. Three groups of longitudinal fibres occur in a flagellum: two central and nine outer fibres such as have been repeatedly described in other material, and an additional set of nine smaller secondary fibres not previously identified as such. Each central fibre shows a helical substructure; the pair of them are enveloped in a common sheath. Each outer fibre is a doublet with one subfibre bearing projections—called arms—that extend toward the adjacent outer fibre. The basal body is formed by a cylinder of nine triplet outer fibres. Two subfibres of each triplet continue into the flagellum and constitute the doublets. The third subfibre terminates at the transition of basal body to flagellum, possibly giving rise to the nine radial transitional fibres that seem to attach the end of the basal body to the surface of the organism. The central and secondary flagellar fibres are not present in the lumen of the basal body, but other complex structures occur there. The form of these intraluminal structures differs from genus to genus. The flagellar unit is highly asymmetrical. All the flagella examined have possessed the same one of the two possible enantiomorphic forms. At least two systems of fibres are associated with the basal bodies of all three genera. PMID:13827900

  12. Dientamoeba fragilis: the unflagellated human flagellate.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J J; Johnson, E H

    1999-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a pathogenic protozoan parasite with a world-wide distribution. Although originally described as an amoeboid organism, it has been reclassified as a flagellate, on the basis of a number of electron microscopic and immunological findings. Except for its lack of a flagellum, D. fragilis closely resembles Histomonas and Trichomonas. Interestingly, a resistant cyst stage has not been demonstrated and it is unlikely that its trophozoites can survive successfully outside the human host. As a consequence of its higher than anticipated coincidence of infection with Enterobius vermicularis, transmission may occur via ova of this pinworm. D. fragilis infection may be acute or chronic, and has been reported in both children and adults. The most common clinical symptoms include abdominal pain, persistent diarrhoea, loss of appetite, weight loss and flatulence. Occasionally, eosinophilia, urticaria and pruritus have been described. Demonstration of the characteristic nuclear structure of D. fragilis, needed for a definitive diagnosis, cannot be achieved in unstained faecal material; therefore, permanently stained smears are essential. Treatment is recommended in symptomatic cases, and iodoquinol, tetracycline and metronidazole have been used successfully.

  13. Flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Vincent A.; Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Reufer, Mathias; Wilson, Laurence G.; Morozov, Alexander N.; Poon, Wilson C. K.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely believed that the swimming speed, v, of many flagellated bacteria is a nonmonotonic function of the concentration, c, of high-molecular-weight linear polymers in aqueous solution, showing peaked v(c) curves. Pores in the polymer solution were suggested as the explanation. Quantifying this picture led to a theory that predicted peaked v(c) curves. Using high-throughput methods for characterizing motility, we measured v and the angular frequency of cell body rotation, Ω, of motile Escherichia coli as a function of polymer concentration in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Ficoll solutions of different molecular weights. We find that nonmonotonic v(c) curves are typically due to low-molecular-weight impurities. After purification by dialysis, the measured v(c) and Ω(c) relations for all but the highest-molecular-weight PVP can be described in detail by Newtonian hydrodynamics. There is clear evidence for non-Newtonian effects in the highest-molecular-weight PVP solution. Calculations suggest that this is due to the fast-rotating flagella seeing a lower viscosity than the cell body, so that flagella can be seen as nano-rheometers for probing the non-Newtonian behavior of high polymer solutions on a molecular scale. PMID:25468981

  14. Gravitational sensory transduction chain in flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.; Richter, P.; Ntefidou, M.; Lebert, M.

    Earlier hypotheses have assumed that gravitactic orientation in flagellates, such as the photosynthetic unicell Euglena gracilis, is brought about by passive alignment of the cells in the water column by being tail heavy. A recent experiment on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 40) comparing immobilized cells with mobile cells demonstrated that the passive buoy effect can account for approximately 20% of the orientation of the cells in a gravity field. The cells show either positive or negative gravitaxis depending on other external or internal factors. Shortly after inoculation, the tendency of young cells to swim downward in the water column can be readily reverted by adding micromolar concentrations of some heavy metal ions including copper, cadmium or lead. The negative gravitaxis of older cells is converted into a positive one by stress factors such as increasing salinity or exposure to excessive visible or UV radiation. The mechanism for this switch seems to involve reactive oxygen species since the gravitactic sign change was suppressed when oxygen was removed by flushing the cell suspension with nitrogen. Also, the addition of radical scavengers (Trolox, ascorbic acid or potassium cyanide) abolished or reduced the gravitactic sign change. Addition of hydrogen peroxide induced a gravitactic sign change in the absence of external stress factors. The primary reception for the gravity vector seems to involve mechanosensitive ion channels which specifically gate calcium ions inward. We have identified several gene sequences for putative mechanosensory channels in Euglena and have applied RNAi to identify which of these channels are involved in graviperception. The influx of Ca 2+ activates calmodulin (CaM) which has been shown to be involved in the sensory transduction chain of graviorientation. It is known that an adenylyl cyclase is bound to the flagellar membrane in Euglena which is activated by CaM. This enzyme produces cAMP which has also been shown to be the key

  15. Platelet factor 4 is chemotactic for neutrophils and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Deuel, T F; Senior, R M; Chang, D; Griffin, G L; Heinrikson, R L; Kaiser, E T

    1981-01-01

    Platelet factor 4 is shown to be a chemotactic protein for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes at concentrations found in human serum and reached locally in injured tissue. The maximum chemotactic response to platelet factor 4 nearly equals that achieved with saturating concentrations of the chemotactic activity derived from the fifth component of human complement, C5. Cells desensitized to C5 chemotactic activity retain chemotactic responsiveness to platelet factor 4. Serum contains inhibitory capacity against the chemotactic activity associated with platelet factor 4. Our results suggest that the local release of platelet factor 4 may be an important stimulus attracting inflammatory cells to sites of blood vessel injury. PMID:6945600

  16. Taxonomic characterization of Vorticella fuscaPrecht, 1935 and Vorticella parapulchella n. sp., two marine peritrichs (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) from China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Song, Weibo; Clamp, John; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2006-01-01

    Two marine peritrich ciliates, Vorticella fuscaPrecht (1935) and Vorticella parapulchella n. sp. were discovered in the littoral zone of Qingdao, northern China. Their morphology, infraciliature, and silverline system were described using live observation and silver impregnation. The poorly known species V. fusca is redescribed, adding information about the oral infraciliature and pellicular morphology. Vorticella parapulchella n. sp. is superficially similar to Vorticella pulchellaSommer (1951) but is distinguished from it by being markedly smaller and having much more widely spaced pellicular ridges. The infundibular infraciliature of V. parapulchella is extremely unusual in having infundibular polykinety 3 reduced to two rows, one of which has almost disappeared.

  17. Nicotine is Chemotactic for Neutrophils and Enhances Neutrophil Responsiveness to Chemotactic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totti, Noel; McCusker, Kevin T.; Campbell, Edward J.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils contribute to chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine was found to be chemotactic for human neutrophils but not monocytes, with a peak activity at ~ 31 micromolar. In lower concentrations (comparable to those in smokers' plasma), nicotine enhanced the response of neutrophils to two chemotactic peptides. In contrast to most other chemoattractants for neutrophils, however, nicotine did not affect degranulation or superoxide production. Nicotine thus may promote inflammation and consequent lung injury in smokers.

  18. Spatiotemporal chemotactic model for ant foraging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Laurent, Thomas; Kumar, Manish; Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present a generic theoretical chemotactic model that accounts for certain emergent behaviors observed in ant foraging. The model does not have many of the constraints and limitations of existing models for ants colony dynamics and takes into account the distinctly different behaviors exhibited in nature by ant foragers in search of food and food ferrying ants. Numerical simulations based on the model show trail formation in foraging ant colonies to be an emergent phenomenon and, in particular, replicate behavior observed in experiments involving the species P. megacephala. The results have broader implications for the study of randomness in chemotactic models. Potential applications include the developments of novel algorithms for stochastic search in engineered complex systems such as robotic swarms.

  19. Kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clément

    2007-10-01

    We derive general kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation that describe certain features of the morphogenesis of biological colonies (like bacteria, amoebae, endothelial cells or social insects). Starting from a stochastic model defined in terms of N coupled Langevin equations, we derive a nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equation governing the evolution of the distribution function of the system in phase space. By taking the successive moments of this kinetic equation and using a local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations involving a damping term. In the limit of small frictions, we obtain a hyperbolic model describing the formation of network patterns (filaments) and in the limit of strong frictions we obtain a parabolic model which is a generalization of the standard Keller-Segel model describing the formation of clusters (clumps). Our approach connects and generalizes several models introduced in the chemotactic literature. We discuss the analogy between bacterial colonies and self-gravitating systems and between the chemotactic collapse and the gravitational collapse (Jeans instability). We also show that the basic equations of chemotaxis are similar to nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equations so that a notion of effective generalized thermodynamics can be developed.

  20. Some Mixotrophic Flagellate Species Selectively Graze on Archaea.

    PubMed

    Ballen-Segura, Miguel; Felip, Marisol; Catalan, Jordi

    2017-01-15

    Many phototrophic flagellates ingest prokaryotes. This mixotrophic trait becomes a critical aspect of the microbial loop in planktonic food webs because of the typical high abundance of these flagellates. Our knowledge of their selective feeding upon different groups of prokaryotes, particularly under field conditions, is still quite limited. In this study, we investigated the feeding behavior of three species (Rhodomonas sp., Cryptomonas ovata, and Dinobryon cylindricum) via their food vacuole content in field populations of a high mountain lake. We used the catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) protocol with probes specific for the domain Archaea and three groups of Eubacteria: Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cytophaga-Flavobacteria of Bacteroidetes Our results provide field evidence that contrasting selective feeding exists between coexisting mixotrophic flagellates under the same environmental conditions and that some prokaryotic groups may be preferentially impacted by phagotrophic pressure in aquatic microbial food webs. In our study, Archaea were the preferred prey, chiefly in the case of Rhodomonas sp., which rarely fed on any other prokaryotic group. In general, prey selection did not relate to prey size among the grazed groups. However, Actinobacteria, which were clearly avoided, mostly showed a size of <0.5 μm, markedly smaller than cells from the other groups.

  1. Chemotactic peptide receptor modulation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The binding of the chemotactic peptide N- formylnorleucylleucylphenylalanine (FNLLP) to its receptor on rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) modulates the number of available peptide receptors. Incubation with FNLLP decreases subsequent binding capacity, a phenomenon that has been termed receptor down regulation. Down regulation of the chemotactic peptide receptor is concentration dependent in both the rate and extent of receptor loss. The dose response parallels that of FNLLP binding to the recptor. The time- course is rapid; even at concentrations of FNLLP as low as 3 x 10(-9) M, the new equilibrium concentration of receptors is reached within 15 min. Down regulation is temperature dependent, but does occur even at 4 degrees C. Concomitant with down regulation, some of the peptide becomes irreversibly cell associated. At 4 degrees C, there is a small accumulation of nondissociable peptide that rapidly reaches a plateau. At higher temperatures, accumulation of nondissociable peptide continues after the rceptor number has reached equilibrium, and the amount accumulated can exceed the initial number of receptors by as much as 300%. The dose response of peptide uptake at 37 degrees C reflects that of binding, suggesting that it is receptor mediated. This uptake may occur via a pinocytosis mechanism. Although PMNs have not been considered to be pinocytic, the addition of FNLLP causes a fourfold stimulation of the rate of pinocytosis as measured by the uptake of [3H]sucrose. PMID:7391138

  2. Chemotactic decision making in swimming microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salek, M. Mehdi; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Swimming cells are often guided by chemical gradients (``chemotaxis'') to search for nutrients, hosts, and mates, and to avoid predators and noxious substances. It remains unclear, however, how variable the chemotactic abilities of cells are among cells of one species, and whether there are better ``decision makers'' within a population. Inspired by studies in macro-organism ecology, we fabricated a microfluidic ``T-maze'' in which marine bacteria are subjected to a chemical attractant gradient at each of a series of consecutive T-junctions. We used video microscopy to capture the motion of thousands of bacteria as they migrate up or down the gradient at each subsequent junction. This approach provides detailed statistics at both the single-cell and population levels, while simultaneously sorting the cells by chemotactic ability. Using a range of bacteria, we demonstrate how the microfluidic T-maze allows us to sort the better decision-making cells in the population, opening the door for improved efficiency of a range of microbial processes in nature and industry.

  3. Investigating Chemotactic Potential Within Crustal Fluid Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, S. A.; Jungbluth, S.; Lin, H. T.; Rappe, M. S.; Orcutt, B.

    2014-12-01

    The oceanic crust constitutes, possibly, the largest but most inaccessible habitat on Earth. Exchange of fluid between the permeable crustal environment and overlying sediments and bottom seawater transports electron donors and acceptors, which create redox gradients exploitable by microbial life. While the presence of microbial communities within the oceanic crust is strongly suggested, the structure of these communities, and survival mechanisms used within the hydrothermally-active basement aquifer remain unclear. Recently, crustal fluids from two subsurface borehole observatories (IODP CORKs U1362A and U1362B), located on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge, were collected for both single cell genomic and metagenomic analyses. Both techniques revealed an abundance of motility and chemotactic genes. Single-cell amplified genomes (SAGs) classified as Marine Benthic Group E had relatively more motility and taxis genes than any other publically available archaeal SAG. Furthermore, metagenomes from these sites had 3.5 times as many motility and taxis genes than those from sedimentary environments. Many of the detected chemotactic genes (such as tsr and aer) are known to monitor electron flow through the electron transport system, thereby serving as "energy receptors," which direct organisms to the most fitting redox zone. Considering fluid advection occurring within the oceanic crust, the observation of chemotaxis suggests an adaptive lifestyle for crustal microbes.

  4. Eosinophil chemotactic factors from cysticercoids of Hymenolepis nana.

    PubMed

    Niwa, A; Asano, K; Ito, A

    1998-09-01

    A comparative study of eosinophil chemotactic factors was carried out using cysticercoids and oncospheres of Hymenolepis nana. Cysticercoids showed twice the chemotactic activity for eosinophils than the oncospheres. Eosinophilia induced by oncospheres and cysticercoids observed in secondary and primary infections, respectively, were discussed from the view point of the immunobiology of this parasite.

  5. Control of microfabricated structures powered by flagellated bacteria using phototaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steager, Edward; Kim, Chang-Beom; Patel, Jigarkumar; Bith, Socheth; Naik, Chandan; Reber, Lindsay; Kim, Min Jun

    2007-06-01

    Flagellated bacteria have been employed as microactuators in low Reynolds number fluidic environments. SU-8 microstructures have been fabricated and released on the surface of swarming Serratia marcescens, and the flagella propel the structures along the swarm surface. Phototactic control of these structures is demonstrated by exposing the localized regions of the swarm to ultraviolet light. The authors additionally discuss the control of microstructures in an open channel powered by bacteria which have been docked through a blotting technique. A tracking algorithm has been developed to analyze swarming patterns of the bacteria as well as the kinematics of the microstructures.

  6. Classification of the peritrich ciliate Opisthonecta matiensis (Martín-Cereceda et al. 1999) as Telotrochidium matiense nov. comb., based on new observations and SSU rDNA phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cereceda, Mercedes; Guinea, Almudena; Bonaccorso, Elisa; Dyal, Patricia; Novarino, Gianfranco; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2007-11-01

    New observations on Opisthonecta matiensis Martín-Cereceda et al. [1999. Description of Opisthonecta matiensis n. sp. (Protozoa, Ciliophora), a new peritrich ciliate from wastewater. J. Eukaryot. Microbiol. 46, 283-289] especially the lack of an epistomial membrane, reveal that the species does not belong to the genus Opisthonecta, but to Telotrochidium, the other genus within the family Opisthonectidae Foissner, 1975. The contractile vacuole and the cytopyge are on the dorsal wall of the vestibulum and the trochal band is limited distally and proximally by rows of narrowly spaced pellicular pores. Thus the species is redefined as Telotrochidium matiense nov. comb. The morphological, cortical and nuclear events occurring during conjugation are illustrated, compared with those in other species, and phylogenetically discussed. Invariably, the microconjugants attach to and penetrate the lateral side of the macroconjugants. Nuclear processes are very similar to those reported from other peritrichs. The small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) is sequenced and the phylogeny within Opisthonectidae and peritrichs examined. T. matiense is more closely related to Epistylis (63% Maximum Parsimony (MP), 85% Maximum Likelihood (ML)) than to any other genus, while another representative of the family, viz., Opisthonecta henneguyi, is closely related to Vorticella microstoma, Astylozoon enriquesi and clone RT3n18 (100% MP, 100% ML). Morphology and gene sequences suggest that Telotrochidium and Opisthonecta have derived from different lineages of stalked peritrichs: Opisthonecta could have arisen from peritrichs with stalk myonemes, while Telotrochidium probably evolved from peritrichs without stalk myonemes.

  7. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  8. Chemotactic Motility of Sperm in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Zimmer, Richard K.; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Chemical gradients are utilized by plants and animals in sexual reproduction to guide swimming sperm cells toward the egg. This process (``chemotaxis''), which can greatly increase the success of fertilization, is subject to interference by fluid flow, both in the bodily conduits of internal fertilizers (e.g. mammals) and in the aquatic environment of external fertilizers (e.g. benthic invertebrates). We studied the biomechanics of chemotaxing sea urchin spermatozoa using microfluidic devices, which allow for the precise and independent control of attractant gradients and fluid shear. We captured swimming trajectories and flagellar beat patterns using high-speed video-microscopy, to detect chemotactic responses and measure the effect of fluid forces on swimming. This work will ultimately help us to understand how swimming sperm cells actively navigate natural chemoattractant gradients for successful fertilization.

  9. Cellulose Metabolism by the Termite Flagellate Trichomitopsis termopsidis

    PubMed Central

    Yamin, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    The end products of cellulose metabolism by the trichomonad flagellate Trichomitopsis termopsidis from the termite Zootermopsis sp. were investigated by growing axenic flagellates on [14C]cellulose. The growth of T. termopsidis resulted in the release of label into the supernatant fraction of the culture fluid, and > 75% was volatile under acid conditions. The label was analyzed for 14CO2 and for [14C]volatile compounds by vacuum distillation under acid and alkaline conditions in disposable micro-distillation vessels. The distillate and undistilled culture supernatant fluid were chromatographed on cellulose thin layers to identify the labeled end product. T. termopsidis produced 14CO2 and [14C]acetate which accounted for 25 to 30% and 55 to 60% of the labeled end products, respectively. The ratio of label in CO2 to acetate suggests that they are produced in equimolar amounts. No neutral volatile compounds were produced. The remaining unidentified end product (10 to 20%) was not volatile nor extractable into ether. Hydrogen was produced by T. termopsidis, and the cells were killed by the drug metronidazole. Enzymatic activities were found which account for these end products: pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and hydrogenase. The results indicate that acetate is the end product of T. termopsidis cellulose metabolism and is available to the termite for energy metabolism and biosynthesis. PMID:16345549

  10. Viruses and flagellates sustain apparent richness and reduce biomass accumulation of bacterioplankton in coastal marine waters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Weinbauer, Markus G; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2007-12-01

    To gain a better understanding of the interactions among bacteria, viruses and flagellates in coastal marine ecosystems, we investigated the effect of viral lysis and protistan bacterivory on bacterial abundance, production and diversity [determined by 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)] in three coastal marine sites with different nutrient supplies in Hong Kong. Six experiments were set up using filtration and dilution methods to develop virus, flagellate and virus+flagellate treatments for natural bacterial populations. All three predation treatments had significant repressing effects on bacterial abundance. Bacterial production was significantly repressed by flagellates and both predators (flagellates and viruses). Bacterial apparent species richness (indicated as the number of DGGE bands) was always significantly higher in the presence of viruses, flagellates and both predators than in the predator-free control. Cluster analysis of the DGGE patterns showed that the effects of viruses and flagellates on bacterial community structure were relatively stochastic while the co-effects of predators caused consistent trends (DGGE always showed the most similar patterns when compared with those of in situ environments) and substantially increased the apparent richness. Overall, we found strong evidence that viral lysis and protist bacterivory act additively to reduce bacterial production and to sustain diversity. This first systematic attempt to study the interactive effects of viruses and flagellates on the diversity and production of bacterial communities in coastal waters suggests that a tight control of bacterioplankton dominants results in relatively stable bacterioplankton communities.

  11. Gradient sensing in defined chemotactic fields

    PubMed Central

    Skoge, Monica; Adler, Micha; Groisman, Alex; Levine, Herbert; Loomis, William F.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Cells respond to a variety of secreted molecules by modifying their physiology, growth patterns, and behavior. Motile bacteria and eukaryotic cells can sense extracellular chemoattractants and chemorepellents and alter their movement. In this way fibroblasts and leukocytes can find their ways to sites of injury and cancer cells can home in on sites that are releasing growth factors. Social amoebae such as Dictyostelium are chemotactic to cAMP which they secrete several hours after they have initiated development. These eukaryotic cells are known to be able to sense extremely shallow gradients but the processes underlying their exquisite sensitivity are still largely unknown. In this study we determine the responses of developed cells of Dictyostelium discoideum to stable linear gradients of cAMP of varying steepness generated in 2 μm deep gradient chambers of microfluidic devices. The gradients are generated by molecular diffusion between two 50 μm deep flow-through channels, one of which is perfused with a solution of cAMP and the other with buffer, serving as continuously replenished source and sink. These low ceiling gradient chambers constrained the cells in the vertical dimension, facilitating confocal imaging, such that subcellular localization of fluorescently tagged proteins could be followed for up to 30 minutes without noticeable phototoxicity. Chemotactic cells enter these low ceiling chambers by flattening and elongating and then move almost as rapidly as unconstrained cells. By following the localization of activated Ras (RasGTP) using a Ras Binding Domain fused to Green Fluorescent Protein (RBD-GFP), we observed the rapid appearance of membrane associated patches at the tips of pseudopods. These patches remained associated with pseudopods while they continued to extend but were rapidly disassembled when pseudopods stalled and the cell moved past them. Likewise, fluorescence associated with localized RasGTP rapidly disappeared when the gradient was

  12. Long-term cultivation of the flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Porst, M; Lebert, M; Hader, D P

    1997-01-01

    Euglena gracilis, a unicellular photosynthetic flagellate, serves as a model system in signal transduction research. To further study its complex gravitaxis, experiments under microgravity are desirable. In preparation for long-term experiments on a space station, an autonomous cultivation unit has been developed and the culture conditions and surveillance methods have been established. The running time of more than 600 d under closed conditions with light as the only source of energy confirmed the stability of the Euglena population and gave new insights into its behavior. Physicochemical parameters such as oxygen concentration, temperature and pH as well as physiological parameters including cell density, motility, gravitactic orientation and pigmentation were recorded on a frequent basis. The suitability of the botanical bioreaction to serve as an oxygen supplier for animals in a closed system was demonstrated.

  13. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  14. Method of Measuring Dinoflagellate Grazing on Flagellate and Bacteria Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, L. M.; Mulholland, M. R.

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellates are a major taxa of phytoplankton that include many species that commonly form harmful algal blooms (HABs) throughout the world. A feature of dinoflagellate physiology that may contribute to their competitive success is their ability to grow mixotrophically. As primary producers and photoautotrophs, these organisms convert inorganic nutrients to organic compounds using sunlight. During blooms inorganic nutrients and light commonly become limited. The ability to grow heterotrophically may offer dinoflagellates a competitive advantage over strict autotrophs during blooms. Using a modification of a method used to measure zooplankton grazing rates, we measured grazing by dinoflagellates on co-occurring microbes, including heterotrophic flagellates and bacteria, in the Lafayette River, a tributary in the Chesapeake Bay estuary during non-bloom and bloom conditions. Initial results of these experiments using this method are presented here.

  15. Numerical simulations of flagellated micro-swimmers and ciliated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Henry; Tripathi, Anurag; Yeomans, Julia; Balazs, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Cilia are filamentous organelles found in many organisms for achieving locomotion or for driving fluid flows within the body. Cilia-like structures can be constructed and have potential for application in microfluidics, where they may be used to locally control flow and the motion of particles in the fluid. We implement a lattice Boltzmann method to simulate fluid flows produced by externally actuated artificial cilia and explore the influence of such cilia on objects in the surrounding fluid. In particular, we show examples of interactive effects between cilia arrays and self-motile swimmers propelled by a rotating helical flagellum. Artificial swimmers mimicking the motion of flagellated bacteria in this way have been experimentally realized in recent years and our simulations produce testable predictions for the behavior of such swimmers in the presence of cilia.

  16. Enhancement of flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Sha, Sha; Pelcovits, Robert; Tang, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the swimming speed of many species of flagellated bacteria in polymer solutions have shown that with the addition of high molecular weight polymers, the speed initially increases as a function of the kinematic viscosity. It peaks at around 1.5-2 cP with typically 10-30% higher values than in cell media without added polymers (~ 1 cP). Past the peak, the average speed gradually decreases as the solution becomes more viscous. Swimming motility persists until solution viscosity reaches 5-10 cP. Models have been proposed to account for this behavior, and the magnitude of the peak becomes a crucial test of theoretical predictions. The status of the field is complicated in light of a recent report (Martinez et al., PNAS, 2014), stressing that low-molecular weight impurities account for the peaked speed-viscosity curves in some cases. We measured the swimming speed of a uni-flagellated bacterium, caulobacter crescentus, in solutions of a number of polymers of several different sizes. Our findings confirm the peaked speed-viscosity curve, only as the molecular weight of the flexible polymers used surpassed ~ 50,000 da. The threshold molecular weight required to augment swimming speed varies somewhat with the polymer species, but it generally corresponds to radius of gyration over tens of nanometers. This general feature is consistent with the model of Powers et al. (Physics of Fluid, 2009), predicting that nonlinear viscoelasticity of the fluid enhances swimming motility. Work Supported by the NSF Fluid Physics Program (Award number CBET 1438033).

  17. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.

    1994-01-01

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  18. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Some Peritrichs (Ciliophora: Peritrichida) from Tank Bromeliads, Including Two New Genera: Orborhabdostyla and Vorticellides.

    PubMed

    Foissner, Wilhelm; Blake, Natalie; Wolf, Klaus; Breiner, Hans-Werner; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2010-01-22

    Using standard methods, we studied the morphology and 18S rDNA sequence of some peritrich ciliates from tank bromeliads of Costa Rica, Jamaica, and Ecuador. The new genus Orborhabdostyla differs from Rhabdostyla by the discoidal macronucleus. Two species from the literature and a new species from Ecuadoran tank bromeliads are combined with the new genus: O. previpes (Claparède and Lachmann, 1857) nov. comb., O. kahli (Nenninger, 1948) nov. comb., and O. bromelicola nov. spec. Orborhabdostyla bromelicola is a slender species with stalk-like narrowed posterior half and operculariid/epistylidid oral apparatus. An epistylidid relationship is also suggested by the gene sequence. Vorticella gracilis, described by Dujardin (1841) from French freshwater, belongs to the V. convallaria complex but differs by the yellowish colour and the number of silverlines. The classification as a distinct species is supported by the 18S rDNA, which differs nearly 10% from that of V. convallaria s. str. Based on the new data, especially the very stable yellowish colour, we neotypify V. gracilis with the Austrian population studied by Foissner (1979). Vorticella gracilis forms a strongly supported phyloclade together with V. campanula, V. fusca and V. convallaria, while Vorticellides astyliformis and Vorticella microstoma branch in a separate, fully-supported clade that includes Astylozoon and Opisthonecta. The new genus Vorticellides comprises five small (usually < 60 μm), barrel-shaped species with two epistomial membranes: V. aquadulcis (Stokes, 1887) nov. comb., V. astyliformis (Foissner, 1981) nov. comb., V. platysoma (Stokes, 1887) nov. comb., V. infusionum (Dujardin, 1841) nov. comb., and V. (Spinivorticellides) echini (King, 1931) nov. comb. Two of these species are redescribed in the present study: V. astyliformis and V. aquadulcis, which is neotypified with a Costa Rican population. Pseudovorticella bromelicola nov. spec. differs from the congeners by the location of the two

  19. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Some Peritrichs (Ciliophora: Peritrichida) from Tank Bromeliads, Including Two New Genera: Orborhabdostyla and Vorticellides

    PubMed Central

    FOISSNER, Wilhelm; BLAKE, Natalie; WOLF, Klaus; BREINER, Hans-Werner; STOECK, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Summary Using standard methods, we studied the morphology and 18S rDNA sequence of some peritrich ciliates from tank bromeliads of Costa Rica, Jamaica, and Ecuador. The new genus Orborhabdostyla differs from Rhabdostyla by the discoidal macronucleus. Two species from the literature and a new species from Ecuadoran tank bromeliads are combined with the new genus: O. previpes (Claparède and Lachmann, 1857) nov. comb., O. kahli (Nenninger, 1948) nov. comb., and O. bromelicola nov. spec. Orborhabdostyla bromelicola is a slender species with stalk-like narrowed posterior half and operculariid/epistylidid oral apparatus. An epistylidid relationship is also suggested by the gene sequence. Vorticella gracilis, described by Dujardin (1841) from French freshwater, belongs to the V. convallaria complex but differs by the yellowish colour and the number of silverlines. The classification as a distinct species is supported by the 18S rDNA, which differs nearly 10% from that of V. convallaria s. str. Based on the new data, especially the very stable yellowish colour, we neotypify V. gracilis with the Austrian population studied by Foissner (1979). Vorticella gracilis forms a strongly supported phyloclade together with V. campanula, V. fusca and V. convallaria, while Vorticellides astyliformis and Vorticella microstoma branch in a separate, fully-supported clade that includes Astylozoon and Opisthonecta. The new genus Vorticellides comprises five small (usually < 60 μm), barrel-shaped species with two epistomial membranes: V. aquadulcis (Stokes, 1887) nov. comb., V. astyliformis (Foissner, 1981) nov. comb., V. platysoma (Stokes, 1887) nov. comb., V. infusionum (Dujardin, 1841) nov. comb., and V. (Spinivorticellides) echini (King, 1931) nov. comb. Two of these species are redescribed in the present study: V. astyliformis and V. aquadulcis, which is neotypified with a Costa Rican population. Pseudovorticella bromelicola nov. spec. differs from the congeners by the location of the

  20. Revisiting chemoaffinity theory: Chemotactic implementation of topographic axonal projection

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Neural circuits are wired by chemotactic migration of growth cones guided by extracellular guidance cue gradients. How growth cone chemotaxis builds the macroscopic structure of the neural circuit is a fundamental question in neuroscience. I addressed this issue in the case of the ordered axonal projections called topographic maps in the retinotectal system. In the retina and tectum, the erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular (Eph) receptors and their ligands, the ephrins, are expressed in gradients. According to Sperry’s chemoaffinity theory, gradients in both the source and target areas enable projecting axons to recognize their proper terminals, but how axons chemotactically decode their destinations is largely unknown. To identify the chemotactic mechanism of topographic mapping, I developed a mathematical model of intracellular signaling in the growth cone that focuses on the growth cone’s unique chemotactic property of being attracted or repelled by the same guidance cues in different biological situations. The model presented mechanism by which the retinal growth cone reaches the correct terminal zone in the tectum through alternating chemotactic response between attraction and repulsion around a preferred concentration. The model also provided a unified understanding of the contrasting relationships between receptor expression levels and preferred ligand concentrations in EphA/ephrinA- and EphB/ephrinB-encoded topographic mappings. Thus, this study redefines the chemoaffinity theory in chemotactic terms. PMID:28792499

  1. Revisiting chemoaffinity theory: Chemotactic implementation of topographic axonal projection.

    PubMed

    Naoki, Honda

    2017-08-01

    Neural circuits are wired by chemotactic migration of growth cones guided by extracellular guidance cue gradients. How growth cone chemotaxis builds the macroscopic structure of the neural circuit is a fundamental question in neuroscience. I addressed this issue in the case of the ordered axonal projections called topographic maps in the retinotectal system. In the retina and tectum, the erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular (Eph) receptors and their ligands, the ephrins, are expressed in gradients. According to Sperry's chemoaffinity theory, gradients in both the source and target areas enable projecting axons to recognize their proper terminals, but how axons chemotactically decode their destinations is largely unknown. To identify the chemotactic mechanism of topographic mapping, I developed a mathematical model of intracellular signaling in the growth cone that focuses on the growth cone's unique chemotactic property of being attracted or repelled by the same guidance cues in different biological situations. The model presented mechanism by which the retinal growth cone reaches the correct terminal zone in the tectum through alternating chemotactic response between attraction and repulsion around a preferred concentration. The model also provided a unified understanding of the contrasting relationships between receptor expression levels and preferred ligand concentrations in EphA/ephrinA- and EphB/ephrinB-encoded topographic mappings. Thus, this study redefines the chemoaffinity theory in chemotactic terms.

  2. Cytokines induce selective granulocyte chemotactic responses.

    PubMed

    Bittleman, D B; Erger, R A; Casale, T B

    1996-02-01

    Neutrophils, eosinophils and cytokines are important in allergic airway inflammatory responses. However, it is unclear how cytokines selectively influence neutrophils versus eosinophils to migrate to an inflammatory site. The cytokines, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-5, IL-8, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), are released subsequent to allergic reactions and affect both neutrophil and eosinophil functions. We studied whether these cytokines differed in capacity to induce human neutrophil versus eosinophil migration through naked filters and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human pulmonary type II-like epithelial (A549) cell monolayers grown on filters. Dose-response experiments using all barriers were performed for each granulocyte and cytokine. TGF-beta1 did not induce granulocyte migration. IL-5 induced eosinophil migration only through naked filters. IL-1alpha stimulated neutrophil migration through cellular barriers, but not through naked filters. TNF-alpha and GM-CSF induced neutrophil and eosinophil migration through filters, but only neutrophil migration through cellular monolayers. Only IL-8 induced significant neutrophil and eosinophil migration; however, there were clear-cut differences between the neutrophilotactic and eosinophilotactic responses through all barriers employed. Thus, our data show that these cytokines induce distinct chemotactic responses for neutrophils versus eosinophils. Moreover, by using relevant cellular barriers versus naked filters, our data better examines the capability of these cytokines to induce selective granulocyte migration to an inflammatory site in lung diseases such as asthma.

  3. [Eye witnesses and the flagellants in the year 1349].

    PubMed

    Jansen-Sieben, R

    1999-01-01

    Deeply affected and often desperately afraid, many contemporaries recorded their observations and emotions. These reports--no matter how obviously subjective they sometimes were--provide valuable information about what happened during the plague pandemic of 1348-1350. Thus many of our fellow countrymen left behind a direct testimony: Bartholomew of Bruges, a canon in Andenne; Gilles li Muisis, the abbot of Saint Martin in Tournai; Ludovicus Sanctus of Beringen; Simon de Couvin, a canon in Liège; Jan van Boendale, an alderman's clerk in Antwerp; John of Burgundy (also known as John of Mandeville), professor of medicine in Liège; but also texts in Middle Dutch that were not known up to now, and therefore not published, such as the important thesis by Arent Schryver, licentiate in medicine (see next article); an account in verse in the Brabant Chronicle, as well as contemporary testimonies in a different language that have been translated into our language, such as that by John of Eschinden, Johannes de Rupescissa or Guy de Chauliac (who had had the plague himself). They describe the precautions, the causes (God, a comet, an eclipse of the sun, the polluted water, the planets, the air), the symptoms, the social groups most likely to be affected (the youth, the lower classes, the clergy), the high mortality, the problems of hygiene,the social and administrative chaos, the general panic, the flight of countless people. One of the most virulent reactions led to the emergence of the flagellant sect. They originated from Hungary and advanced in an unstoppable advance with a growing number of followers as far as our country, singing, praying, dancing and flaying themselves until they drew blood. We only recently discovered what they sang in Dutch: very recently, a unique roll of parchment was discovered that they carried in their processions, and that contains the text of their songs and a flagellant sermon. The existence of this valuable document and its contents are

  4. Effect of flagellates on free-living bacterial abundance in an organically contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinner, N.E.; Harvey, R.W.; Kazmierkiewicz-Tabaka, M.

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the role of protists in the saturated subsurface. Porous media microcosms containing bacteria and protists, were used to determine whether flagellates from an organically contaminated aquifer could substantively affect the number of free- living bacteria (FLB). When flagellates were present, the 3-40% maximum breakthrough of fluorescent y labelled FLB injected into the microcosms was much lower than the 60-130% observed for killed controls Grazing and clearance rates (3-27 FLB flag-1 h-1 and 12-23 nI flag-1 h-1, respectively) calculated from the data were in the range reported for flagellates in other aqueous environments. The data provide evidence that flagellate bacterivory is an important control on groundwater FLB populations.

  5. Automated real-time measurement of chemotactic cell motility.

    PubMed

    Hadjout, N; Laevsky, G; Knecht, D A; Lynes, M A

    2001-11-01

    We have developed a novel method, (ECIS/taxis), for monitoring cell movement in response to chemotactic and chemokinetic factors. In this system, cells migrate in an under-agarose environment, and their positions are monitored using the electric cell-substrate impedance sensor technology to measure the impedance change at a target electrode, that is lithographed onto the substrate, as the cells arrive at the target. In the studies reported here, Dictyostelium discoideum was used as a prototypical, motile eukaryotic cell. Using the ECIS/taxis system, the arrival of cells at the target electrode was proportional to the dose offolate used to stimulate the cells and could be assessed by changes in resistance at the electrode. ECIS/taxis was readily able to distinguish between wild-type cells and a mutant that is deficient in its chemotactic response. Finally, we have shown that an agent that interferes with chemotactic motility leads to the delayed arrival of cells at the target electrode. The multi-well assay configuration allows for simultaneous automated screening of many samples for chemotactic or anti-chemotactic activity. This assay system is compatible with measurements of mammalian cell movement and should be valuable in the assessment of both agonists and antagonists of cell movement.

  6. Zooplankton Feeding on the Nuisance Flagellate Gonyostomum semen

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Karin S. L.; Vrede, Tobias; Lebret, Karen; Johnson, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    The large bloom-forming flagellate Gonyostomum semen has been hypothesized to be inedible to naturally occurring zooplankton due to its large cell size and ejection of long slimy threads (trichocysts) induced by physical stimulation. In a grazing experiment using radiolabelled algae and zooplankton collected from lakes with recurring blooms of G. semen and lakes that rarely experience blooms, we found that Eudiaptomus gracilis and Holopedium gibberum fed on G. semen at high rates, whereas Daphnia cristata and Ceriodaphnia spp. did not. Grazing rates of E. gracilis were similar between bloom-lakes and lakes with low biomass of G. semen, indicating that the ability to feed on G. semen was not a result of local adaptation. The high grazing rates of two of the taxa in our experiment imply that some of the nutrients and energy taken up by G. semen can be transferred directly to higher trophic levels, although the predominance of small cladocerans during blooms may limit the importance of G. semen as a food resource. Based on grazing rates and previous observations on abundances of E. gracilis and H. gibberum, we conclude that there is a potential for grazer control of G. semen and discuss why blooms of G. semen still occur. PMID:23667489

  7. Dispersion of flagellated swimming microorganisms in planar Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilukuri, Sandeep; Collins, Cynthia H.; Underhill, Patrick T.

    2015-03-01

    The presence of an external fluid flow significantly impacts the properties of swimming microorganisms between two surfaces. By performing computer simulations of dilute populations of flagellated swimming microorganisms, we calculate the dispersivity of the microorganisms at different flow rates by tracking each individual organism in the direction of the flow. Our results show how the dispersion of swimming microorganisms is different from passive particles. For low flow rates, the dispersivity is higher than that of non-motile organisms because of their swimming motion. As the flow rate increases, the dispersivity drops, reaching a minimum before increasing at high flow rates. The minimum occurs approximately when the swimming speed of the organism equals the mean velocity of the external flow. A scaling analysis is used to qualitatively capture the dispersion at both low and high flow rates. Closed-form expressions for the dispersivity were derived at low and high flow rates using an analytical theory. This analysis showed that at low flow rates, the alignment of the organisms by the flow is responsible for the reduction of the dispersion in comparison to the dispersion without any external flow. At high flow rates, the distribution and dynamics across the channel produce a dispersivity that is lower than that of passive particles.

  8. Morphology of four new solitary sessile peritrich ciliates from the Yellow Sea, China, with description of an unidentified species of Paravorticella (Ciliophora, Peritrichia).

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Al-Farraj, Saleh A; Warren, Alan; Ma, Honggang

    2017-02-01

    Sessile peritrichs are a large assemblage of ciliates that have a wide distribution in soil, freshwater and marine waters. Here, we document four new and one unidentified species of solitary sessile peritrichs from aquaculture ponds and coastal waters of the northern Yellow Sea, China. Based on their living morphology, infraciliature and silverline system, four of the five forms were identified as new members belonging to one of three genera, Vorticella, Pseudovorticella and Scyphidia, representing two families, Vorticellidae and Scyphidiidae. The other isolate was found to be an unidentified species of the poorly known genus Paravorticella. Vorticella chiangi sp. nov. is characterized by its inverted bell-shaped zooid, short row 3 in infundibular polykinety 3 and marine habitat. Pseudovorticella liangae sp. nov. posseses a thin, broad peristomial lip and a granular pellicle. Pseudovorticella haiboensis sp. nov. is differentiated from its congeners by having an elongated zooid that is covered by a layer of thin pellicular vesicles, and two rows of kineties in infundibular polykinety 3. Scyphidia perezuzae sp. nov. and Paravorticella sp. are stalkless ectoparasites or ectocommensals of aquatic animals. The former has a short, plump body, a narrow peristomial lip and a conspicuous, flattened, disc-shaped scopula for adhesion. Paravorticella sp. has an extremely elongated clavate body, a broad peristomial lip, and a narrow scopula.

  9. Reconsideration of the phylogenetic positions of five peritrich genera, Vorticella, Pseudovorticella, Zoothamnopsis, Zoothamnium, and Epicarchesium (Ciliophora, Peritrichia, Sessilida), based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifang; Song, Weibo; Warren, Alan; Shin, Mann Kyoon; Chen, Zigui; Ji, Daode; Sun, Ping

    2008-01-01

    In order to re-evaluate the systematics of sessilid peritrich ciliates, small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences were determined for 12 species belonging to five genera: Vorticella, Pseudovorticella, Epicarchesium, Zoothamnium, and Zoothamnopsis. Phylogenetic trees were deduced using Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood methods. The phylogenetic analyses suggest that (1) sessilids which have stalks with continuous myonemes that contract in a zig-zag fashion form a separate clade from those which have stalks that contract independently and in a spiral fashion, supporting the separation of the family Zoothamniidae from the family Vorticellidae and (2) Epicarchesium and Pseudovorticella, both of which have reticulate silverline systems, are more closely related to each other than to other vorticellids, suggesting that differences in the silverline system (i.e. transverse vs. reticulate) may be the result of genuine evolutionary divergence among sessilid peritrichs. However, the newly sequenced Zoothamnopsis sinica, which has a reticulate silverline pattern, nests within the unresolved Zoothamnium species that have transverse silverline patterns. Thus, there were at least two evolutions of the reticulate silverline pattern character state from a plesiomorphic transverse state in the peritrichid ciliates. The molecular work demonstrates the genus Zoothamnium to be paraphyletic in relation to morphological studies, and suggests that Astylozoon, Opisthonecta, and Vorticella microstoma possibly share a SSU rRNA secondary structure in the helix E10-1 region.

  10. Signaling Noise Enhances Chemotactic Drift of E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Marlo; Shimizu, Thomas S.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Tostevin, Filipe

    2012-10-01

    Noise in the transduction of chemotactic stimuli to the flagellar motor of E. coli will affect the random run-and-tumble motion of the cell and the ability to perform chemotaxis. Here we use numerical simulations to show that an intermediate level of noise in the slow methylation dynamics enhances drift while not compromising localization near concentration peaks. A minimal model shows how such an optimal noise level arises from the interplay of noise and the dependence of the motor response on the network output. Our results suggest that cells can exploit noise to improve chemotactic performance.

  11. Singly Flagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chemotaxes Efficiently by Unbiased Motor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiuxian; Li, Zhaojun; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that has long been known to chemotax. More recently, it has been established that chemotaxis is an important factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to make biofilms. Genes that allow P. aeruginosa to chemotax are homologous with genes in the paradigmatic model organism for chemotaxis, Escherichia coli. However, P. aeruginosa is singly flagellated and E. coli has multiple flagella. Therefore, the regulation of counterclockwise/clockwise flagellar motor bias that allows E. coli to efficiently chemotax by runs and tumbles would lead to inefficient chemotaxis by P. aeruginosa, as half of a randomly oriented population would respond to a chemoattractant gradient in the wrong sense. How P. aeruginosa regulates flagellar rotation to achieve chemotaxis is not known. Here, we analyze the swimming trajectories of single cells in microfluidic channels and the rotations of cells tethered by their flagella to the surface of a variable-environment flow cell. We show that P. aeruginosa chemotaxes by symmetrically increasing the durations of both counterclockwise and clockwise flagellar rotations when swimming up the chemoattractant gradient and symmetrically decreasing rotation durations when swimming down the chemoattractant gradient. Unlike the case for E. coli, the counterclockwise/clockwise bias stays constant for P. aeruginosa. We describe P. aeruginosa’s chemotaxis using an analytical model for symmetric motor regulation. We use this model to do simulations that show that, given P. aeruginosa’s physiological constraints on motility, its distinct, symmetric regulation of motor switching optimizes chemotaxis. PMID:27048795

  12. Controlled architectural and chemotactic studies of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Tayalia, Prakriti; Mazur, Eric; Mooney, David J

    2011-04-01

    Chemotaxis plays a critical role in tissue development and wound repair, and is widely studied using ex vivo model systems in applications such as immunotherapy. However, typical chemotactic models employ 2D systems that are less physiologically relevant or use end-point assays, that reveal little about the stepwise dynamics of the migration process. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new model system using microfabrication techniques, sustained drug delivery approaches, and theoretical modeling of chemotactic agent diffusion. This model system allows us to study the effects of 3D architecture and chemotactic agent gradient on immune cell migration in real time. We find that dendritic cell migration is characterized by a strong interplay between matrix architecture and chemotactic gradients, and migration is also influenced dramatically by the cell activation state. Our results indicate that Lipopolysaccharide-activated dendritic cells studied in a traditional transwell system actually exhibit anomalous migration behavior. Such a 3D ex vivo system lends itself for analyzing cell migratory behavior in response to single or multiple competitive cues and could prove useful in vaccine development.

  13. Surface structures (peritrichous fibrils and tufts of fibrils) found on Streptococcus sanguis strains may be related to their ability to coaggregate with other oral genera.

    PubMed Central

    Handley, P S; Carter, P L; Wyatt, J E; Hesketh, L M

    1985-01-01

    We screened 36 strains of Streptococcus sanguis biotype I and 8 strains of S. sanguis biotype II for the presence of surface structures and for their ability to coaggregate with Actinomyces viscosus, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Negative staining under an electron microscope revealed detectable surface structures on all S. sanguis strains. The majority of strains (38 of 44) carried peritrichous fibrils, which have an irregular profile and no distinct width. They usually appeared as a fringe with a constant width around the cell. Strains selected for measurement had a fringe with an average length of 72.4 +/- 8.5 nm on biotype I strains and 51.6 +/- 3.3 nm on biotype II strains. Some fibrillar biotype I strains carried an additional, longer (158.7 +/- 33.1 nm) type of fibril projecting through the shorter fibrils. Fibrillar density was characteristic for each strain, ranging from very dense on all cells in a population to very sparse on a few cells in a population. A small group of six strains carried tufts of fibrils in a lateral or polar position on the cell. Either one or two lengths of fibril were present in the tuft depending on the strain. One strain carried both peritrichous fibrils and fimbriae. Fimbriae are flexible structures with a constant width (4.5 to 5.0 nm) all along their length but very variable lengths (less than or equal to 0.7 micron) on each cell. S. sanguis I and II both included strains with peritrichous fibrils and tufts of fibrils, but the mixed morphotype strain was confined to biotype II. Fibrils were present on cells at all stages throughout the growth cycle for the strains tested. Freshly isolated fibrillar strains coaggregated consistently well with A. viscosus and A. naeslundii, although some fibrillar reference strains lacked the ability. In addition, all tufted strains could not coaggregate, but the strains with the mixed morphotype coaggregated well. Coaggregation with F. nucleatum was very strong for the

  14. Chemotactic factors of Flavobacterium columnare to skin mucus of healthy channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To gain insight into chemotactic factors involved in chemotaxis, we exposed a virulent strain of Flavobacterium columnare to various treatments followed by analysis of its chemotactic activity. The chemotactic activity of F. columnare was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited when cells were pretreated...

  15. Chemotactic factors of Flavobacterium columnare to skin mucus of healthy channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To gain insight into chemotactic factors involved in chemotaxis, we exposed a virulent strain of Flavobacterium columnare to various treatments followed by analysis of its chemotactic activity. Chemotactic activity of F. columnare was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited when cells were pretreated by ...

  16. Culturing bias in marine heterotrophic flagellates analyzed through seawater enrichment incubations.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Javier; Balagué, Vanessa; Forn, Irene; Lekunberri, Itziar; Massana, Ramon

    2013-10-01

    The diversity of heterotrophic flagellates is generally based on cultivated strains, on which ultrastructural, physiological, and molecular studies have been performed. However, the relevance of these cultured strains as models of the dominant heterotrophic flagellates in the marine planktonic environment is unclear. In fact, molecular surveys typically recover novel eukaryotic lineages that have refused cultivation so far. This study was designed to directly address the culturing bias in planktonic marine heterotrophic flagellates. Several microcosms were established adding increasing amounts and sources of organic matter to a confined natural microbial community pre-filtered by 3 μm. Growth dynamics were followed by epifluorescence microscopy and showed the expected higher yield of bacteria and heterotrophic flagellates at increased organic matter additions. Moreover, protist diversity analyzed by molecular tools showed a clear substitution in the community, which differed more and more from the initial sample as the organic matter increased. Within this gradient, there was also an increase of sequences related to cultured organisms as well as a decrease in diversity. Culturing bias is partly explained by the use of organic matter in the isolation process, which drives a shift in the community to conditions closer to laboratory cultures. An intensive culturing effort using alternative isolation methods is necessary to allow the access to the missing heterotrophic flagellates that constitute the abundant and active taxa in marine systems.

  17. Negative consequences of glacial turbidity for the survival of freshwater planktonic heterotrophic flagellates.

    PubMed

    Sommaruga, Ruben; Kandolf, Georg

    2014-02-17

    Heterotrophic (phagotrophic) flagellates are key components of planktonic food webs in freshwater and marine ecosystems because they are the main consumers of bacteria. Although they are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, they were numerically undetectable in turbid glacier-fed lakes. Here we show that glacial particles had negative effects on the survival and growth of heterotrophic flagellates. The effect of glacial particles was concentration-dependent and was caused by their interference with bacterial uptake rather than by physical damage. These results are the first to reveal why establishment of heterotrophic flagellates populations is hindered in very turbid glacial lakes. Because glaciers are vanishing around the world, recently formed turbid meltwater lakes represent an excellent opportunity to understand the environmental conditions that probably shaped the establishment of lake communities at the end of the last glaciation.

  18. Quantitative estimation of flagellate community structure and diversity in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Ekelund, F; Rønn, R; Griffiths, B S

    2001-12-01

    Heterotrophic flagellates occur in nearly all soils and, in most cases, many different species are present. Nevertheless, quantitative data on their community structure and diversity are sparse, possibly due to a lack of suitable techniques. Previous studies have tended to focus on either total flagellate numbers and biomass, or the identification and description of flagellate species present. With the increased awareness of the role of biodiversity and of food web interactions, the quantification of species within the community and their response to environmental change is likely to become more important. The present paper describes a modification of the most probable number method that allows such a quantification of individual flagellate morphotypes in soil samples. Observations were also made on the biomass of flagellate morphotypes in soil. 20 to 25 morphotypes of heterotrophic flagellates were detectable per gram of two different arable soils, which were treated experimentally to test the technique. One of the soils was fumigated with chloroform vapour for different lengths of time (0, 0.5, 2 or 24 hours); this led to a reduction in the number of morphotypes, in the Shannon diversity index and in the evenness. The other soil was planted with wheat, and while rhizosphere soils contained the same morphotypes as bulk soil, the abundance of individual morphotypes was significantly different and the Shannon diversity index in rhizosphere soils was significantly higher. Soil influenced by an elevated CO2 level likewise differed significantly in morphotype abundance when compared to soil exposed to ambient levels of CO2. The technique recovered more than 80% of the discernible morphotypes and could also be used to quantify amoebal and ciliate communities in a similar way.

  19. Some Free-Living Heterotrophic Flagellates from Marine Sediments of Tropical Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je Lee, Won

    2006-06-01

    The diversity of heterotrophic flagellates was examined at marine sediments around Cape Tribulation, Australia. The species described belong to the Alveolates, Apusomonadidae, Cercomonadida, Choanoflagellida, Cry ptomonadida, Diplomonadida, Euglenozoa incertae sedis, Kathablepharidae, Kinetoplastida, Pedinellids, Stephanopogonidae, Stramenopiles, Stramenopiles incertae sedis, Thaumatomonadidae and Protista incertae sedis. Among the 51 species from 38 genera encountered in this study is one new taxon: Glissandra similis n. sp., and two new names are introduced: Goniomonas abrupta (Skvortzov 1924) nomen nodum and Cercomonas skvortzovi (Skvortzov 1977) nomen nodum. There was little evidence for endemism because most flagellates including one new taxon described here have been reported.

  20. Collective behavior of chemotactic colloids: clusters, asters and oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suropriya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of systems that emulate properties of living matter, such as motility, gradient-sensing, signaling and replication. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of dynamics of an individual patterned catalytic colloid, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signaling formation of clusters and asters. The kinetics of catalysis introduces a natural control parameter for the range of the interaction mediated by the diffusing chemical species. For various regimes in parameter space in the long-ranged limit our system displays precise analogs to gravitational collapse, plasma oscillations and electrostatic screening. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior.

  1. Interactions and Collective Behaviour of Chemotactic Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suropriya; Hablani, Surbhi; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2015-03-01

    Artificial realizations of motility point in the direction of a new paradigm in engineering, through the design of emergent behavior by manipulating properties at the scale of the individual components. Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of such systems. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of gradient-sensing of an individual swimmer, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior. We use it to study the scattering of such a swimmer off a reactant source and construct a framework for studying their two body interactions and finally their collective behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signalling formation of clusters and asters. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior. We further study the athermal fluctuations of a pointed tracer particle in a bath of such swimmers.

  2. Analysis of bacterial chemotactic response using dynamic laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murialdo, Silvia E.; Sendra, Gonzalo H.; Passoni, Lucía I.; Arizaga, Ricardo; Gonzalez, J. Froilán; Rabal, Héctor; Trivi, Marcelo

    2009-11-01

    Chemotaxis has a meaningful role in several fields, such as microbial physiology, medicine and biotechnology. We present a new application of dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle) to detect different degrees of bacterial motility during chemotactic response experiments. Encouraging results showed different bacterial dynamic responses due to differences in the hardness of the support in the swarming plates. We compare this method to a conventional technique that uses white light. Both methods showed to be analogous and, in some cases, complementary. The results suggest that biospeckle processed images can be used as an alternative method to evaluate bacterial chemotactic response and can supply additional information about the bacterial motility in different areas of the swarm plate assay that might be useful for biological analysis.

  3. Stability and dynamics of anisotropically tumbling chemotactic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushi, Enkeleida

    2016-08-01

    Microswimmers such as bacteria perform random walks known as run-and-tumbles to move up chemoattractant gradients and as a result aggregate with others. It is also known that such micro-swimmers can self-organize into macroscopic patterns due to interactions with neighboring cells through the fluidic environment they live in. While the pattern formation resulting from chemotactic and hydrodynamic interactions separately and together have been previously investigated, the effect of the anisotropy in the tumbles of microswimmers has been unexplored. Here we show through linear analysis and full nonlinear simulations that the slight anisotropy in the individual swimmer tumbles can alter the collective pattern formation in nontrivial ways. We show that tumbling anisotropy diminishes the magnitude of the chemotactic aggregates but may result in more such aggregation peaks.

  4. Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness during late gestation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parturition has been widely described as an immunological response; however, it is unknown how this is triggered. We hypothesized that an early event in parturition is an increased responsiveness of peripheral leukocytes to chemotactic stimuli expressed by reproductive tissues, and this precedes expression of tissue chemotactic activity, uterine activation and the systemic progesterone/estradiol shift. Methods Tissues and blood were collected from pregnant Long-Evans rats on gestational days (GD) 17, 20 and 22 (term gestation). We employed a validated Boyden chamber assay, flow cytometry, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results We found that GD20 maternal peripheral leukocytes migrated more than those from GD17 when these were tested with GD22 uterus and cervix extracts. Leukocytes on GD20 also displayed a significant increase in chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2) gene expression and this correlated with an increase in peripheral granulocyte proportions and a decrease in B cell and monocyte proportions. Tissue chemotactic activity and specific chemokines (CCL2, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1/CXCL1, and CXCL10) were mostly unchanged from GD17 to GD20 and increased only on GD22. CXCL10 peaked on GD20 in cervical tissues. As expected, prostaglandin F2α receptor and oxytocin receptor gene expression increased dramatically between GD20 and 22. Progesterone concentrations fell and estradiol-17β concentrations increased in peripheral serum, cervical and uterine tissue extracts between GD20 and 22. Conclusion Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness, which leads to their infiltration into the uterus where they may participate in the process of parturition. PMID:23445935

  5. Active Brownian agents with concentration-dependent chemotactic sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Marcel; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Romanczuk, Pawel

    2014-02-01

    We study a biologically motivated model of overdamped, autochemotactic Brownian agents with concentration-dependent chemotactic sensitivity. The agents in our model move stochastically and produce a chemical ligand at their current position. The ligand concentration obeys a reaction-diffusion equation and acts as a chemoattractant for the agents, which bias their motion towards higher concentrations of the dynamically altered chemical field. We explore the impact of concentration-dependent response to chemoattractant gradients on large-scale pattern formation, by deriving a coarse-grained macroscopic description of the individual-based model, and compare the conditions for emergence of inhomogeneous solutions for different variants of the chemotactic sensitivity. We focus primarily on the so-called receptor-law sensitivity, which models a nonlinear decrease of chemotactic sensitivity with increasing ligand concentration. Our results reveal qualitative differences between the receptor law, the constant chemotactic response, and the so-called log law, with respect to stability of the homogeneous solution, as well as the emergence of different patterns (labyrinthine structures, clusters, and bubbles) via spinodal decomposition or nucleation. We discuss two limiting cases, where the model can be reduced to the dynamics of single species: (I) the agent density governed by a density-dependent effective diffusion coefficient and (II) the ligand field with an effective bistable, time-dependent reaction rate. In the end, we turn to single clusters of agents, studying domain growth and determining mean characteristics of the stationary inhomogeneous state. Analytical results are confirmed and extended by large-scale GPU simulations of the individual based model.

  6. Conditions for self-consistent aggregation by chemotactic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Masayo; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2008-04-01

    We have numerically studied chemotactic aggregation of microorganisms by introducing a model consisting of elements with intracellular dynamics, random walks with a state-dependent turnover rate, and secretion of attractant. Three phases with and without aggregation, as well as partial aggregation, were obtained as to the diffusion and degradation rates of the attractant, and conditions for cellular aggregation were analyzed. The size of aggregated clusters was shown to be independent of cell density, as is consistent with experiment.

  7. Polarised clathrin-mediated endocytosis of EGFR during chemotactic invasion.

    PubMed

    Mutch, Laura Jane; Howden, Jake Davey; Jenner, Emma Poppy Louise; Poulter, Natalie Sarah; Rappoport, Joshua Zachary

    2014-06-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for numerous physiological processes including development and wound healing. However chemotaxis is also exploited during cancer progression. Recent reports have suggested links between vesicle trafficking pathways and directed cell migration. Very little is known about the potential roles of endocytosis pathways during metastasis. Therefore we performed a series of studies employing a previously characterised model for chemotactic invasion of cancer cells to assess specific hypotheses potentially linking endocytosis to directed cell migration. Our results demonstrate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is indispensable for epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed chemotactic invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Conversely, caveolar endocytosis is not required in this mode of migration. We further found that chemoattractant receptor (EGFR) trafficking occurs by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is polarised towards the front of migrating cells. However, we found no role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis in focal adhesion disassembly in this migration model. Thus, this study has characterised the role of endocytosis during chemotactic invasion and has identified functions mechanistically linking clathrin-mediated endocytosis to directed cell motility.

  8. Polarised Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis of EGFR During Chemotactic Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mutch, Laura Jane; Howden, Jake Davey; Jenner, Emma Poppy Louise; Poulter, Natalie Sarah; Rappoport, Joshua Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for numerous physiological processes including development and wound healing. However chemotaxis is also exploited during cancer progression. Recent reports have suggested links between vesicle trafficking pathways and directed cell migration. Very little is known about the potential roles of endocytosis pathways during metastasis. Therefore we performed a series of studies employing a previously characterised model for chemotactic invasion of cancer cells to assess specific hypotheses potentially linking endocytosis to directed cell migration. Our results demonstrate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is indispensable for epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed chemotactic invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Conversely, caveolar endocytosis is not required in this mode of migration. We further found that chemoattractant receptor (EGFR) trafficking occurs by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is polarised towards the front of migrating cells. However, we found no role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis in focal adhesion disassembly in this migration model. Thus, this study has characterised the role of endocytosis during chemotactic invasion and has identified functions mechanistically linking clathrin-mediated endocytosis to directed cell motility. PMID:24921075

  9. Enhancement of viable Campylobacter detection by chemotactic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wisessombat, Sueptrakool; Kittiniyom, Kanokwan; Srimanote, Potjanee; Wonglumsom, Wijit; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P

    2010-08-01

    The effects of chemotactic stimuli on motility ability of viable Campylobacter to pass through a 0.45 microm pore size filter in viscous condition were investigated. Reference strains including C. jejuni ATCC 33291, C. coli MUMT 18407, C. lari ATCC 43675, and C. upsaliensis DMST 19055 were used. The initial numbers of artificially-inoculated viable cells per g of chicken meat were approximately 10 to 10(4). Constituents of mucin plus bile (1:1), varieties of amino acids, and sodium salts were added into a soft-agar-coated membrane filter and incubated at both 37 degrees C and 42 degrees C for 24h. The drop plate method was used to determine numbers of viable Campylobacter at 6, 12, 18, and 24h. After 6h, constituents of mucin plus bile at the concentrations of 1, 5, and 10% demonstrated significant increases in numbers of viable cells (p<0.05). The numbers of the organisms at 42 degrees C were higher than those at 37 degrees C. In contrast, no significant difference in cell numbers was observed by adding amino acids or sodium salts. In addition, the role of starvation on chemotactic responses was also studied. Starved cells showed lower chemotactic response than non-starved cells. This method permitted rapid detection of viable thermophilic Campylobacter.

  10. CHANGES IN THE MORPHOLOGY AND POLYSACCHARIDE CONTENT OF MICROCYSTIS AERUGINOSA (CYANOBACTERIA) DURING FLAGELLATE GRAZING(1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Kong, Fanxiang; Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Min; Xing, Peng; Cao, Huansheng

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the changes in the morphology and polysaccharide content of Microcystis aeruginosa (Kütz.) Kütz. during flagellate grazing, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to grazing Ochromonas sp. for a period of 9 d under controlled laboratory conditions. M. aeruginosa responded actively to flagellate grazing and formed colonies, most of which were made up of several or dozens of cells, suggesting that flagellate grazing may be one of the biotic factors responsible for colony formation in M. aeruginosa. When colonies were formed, the cell surface ultrastructure changed, and the polysaccharide layer on the surface of the cell wall became thicker. This change indicated that synthesis and secretion of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) of M. aeruginosa cells increased under flagellate grazing pressure. The contents of soluble extracellular polysaccharide (sEPS), bound extracellular polysaccharide (bEPS), and total polysaccharide (TPS) in colonial cells of M. aeruginosa increased significantly compared with those in single cells. This finding suggested that the increased amount of EPS on the cell surface may play a role in keeping M. aeruginosa cells together to form colonies.

  11. Bleomycin-Induced Flagellate Erythema in a Patient Diagnosed with Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Boussios, Stergios; Moschetta, Michele; McLachlan, Jennifer; Banerjee, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate linear hyperpigmentation can rarely be caused by the chemotherapy agent, bleomycin. Herein, we describe the case of a 20-year-old woman treated with bleomycin for an ovarian yolk sac tumor and review the prominent features of this form of dermatitis. PMID:26798532

  12. Stimulation of human neutrophil leukocyte aerobic glucose metabolism by purified chemotactic factors.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E J; Austen, K F

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of human neutrophils adherent to plastic petri dishes with the purified chemotactic factors C5a and kallikrein increased their rate of aerobic glycolysis 25-120% and the activity of their hexose monophosphate shunt (HMPS) 100-600%, reaching a plateau after 2 hr at 37 degrees C. The stimulation of either pathway required a chemotactically active stimulus since neither C5 nor prekallikrein or inactivated kallikrein could enhance metabolic activity. Marked suppression of the neutrophil chemotactic response by preincubation with a chemotactic factor to achieve deactivation, 5 x 10(-7) M diisopropyl fluorophosphate, or the neutrophil immobilizing factor (NIF) did not prevent the stimulation of HMPS activity or glycolysis by chemotactic factors. The metabolic inhibitors iodoacetate and 6-aminonicotinamide at concentrations which blocked enhancement of glycolysis or HMPS activity, respectively, partially suppressed the chemotactic response of neutrophils to the chemotactic factors. The capacity of a chemotactic factor to stimulate glucose metabolism of human neutrophils is associated with a maximal chemotactic response, but this stimulation is not alone sufficient for chemotaxis. Images PMID:11344574

  13. Bifurcation in the chemotactic behavior of Physarum plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomohiro; Gunji, Yukio-Pegio; Sato, Hiroshi; Tsubakino, Hiroto

    2017-07-01

    The plasmodium of true slime mold Physarum polycephalum is a unicellular and multinuclear giant amoeba. Since the cellular organism has some computational abilities, it is attracting much attention in the field of information science. However, previous studies have mainly focused on the optimization behavior of the plasmodium for a single-modality stimulus, and there are few studies on how the organism adapts to multi-modal stimuli. We stimulated the plasmodium with mixture of attractant and repellent stimuli, and we observed bifurcation in the chemotactic behavior of the plasmodium.

  14. Chemotactic signals induce cell differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, M; Brachet, P; Da Silva, L H

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out with the aid of cellophane membranes demonstrate that the morphogenetic block of certain nonaggregating, "aggregateless," mutants may be overcome by diffusible factors excreted by aggregating wild-type cells. The same differentiation process into aggregation-competent cell is observed if mutant amoebae are subjected to external 3':5'-cAMP pulses imposed at 5 min intervals. Wild-type amoebae also respond to cAMP pulses, since the onset of differentiation is more precocious in pulsed than in unpulsed populations. These data suggest that chemotactic signals act as an inducer of cell differentiation. Images PMID:171655

  15. Receptor-directed inhibition of chemotactic factor-induced neutrophil hyperactivity by pyrazolon derivatives. Definition of a chemotactic peptide antagonist.

    PubMed

    Dahinden, C; Fehr, J

    1980-11-01

    The two pyrazolon derivatives, phenylbutazone and sulfinpyrazone, selectively inhibit chemotactic peptide-induced effects on neutrophils. As they antagonize the induction of acute neutropenia in vivo and of cellular hyperadhesiveness, lysosomal enzyme release, hexose monophosphate shunt activity, and superoxide production in vitro, these effects occur with a specificity not shared with other prostaglandin biosynthesis inhibition by these drugs resembles the competitive type of antagonism and occurs at concentrations attainable in vivo under clinical conditions. The locomotory machinery, the direction-finding mechanisms, and the basic metabolic machinery of the cell are unaffected. These drugs interfere with specific binding of the formylpeptide to its receptor on neutrophils.

  16. Receptor-directed inhibition of chemotactic factor-induced neutrophil hyperactivity by pyrazolon derivatives. Definition of a chemotactic peptide antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Dahinden, C; Fehr, J

    1980-01-01

    The two pyrazolon derivatives, phenylbutazone and sulfinpyrazone, selectively inhibit chemotactic peptide-induced effects on neutrophils. As they antagonize the induction of acute neutropenia in vivo and of cellular hyperadhesiveness, lysosomal enzyme release, hexose monophosphate shunt activity, and superoxide production in vitro, these effects occur with a specificity not shared with other prostaglandin biosynthesis inhibition by these drugs resembles the competitive type of antagonism and occurs at concentrations attainable in vivo under clinical conditions. The locomotory machinery, the direction-finding mechanisms, and the basic metabolic machinery of the cell are unaffected. These drugs interfere with specific binding of the formylpeptide to its receptor on neutrophils. PMID:7430350

  17. Diversity of chemotactic heterotrophic bacteria associated with arctic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sathish; Pratibha, Mambatta Shankaranarayanan; Manasa, Poorna; Buddhi, Sailaja; Begum, Zareena; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2013-01-01

    The abundance and diversity of chemotactic heterotrophic bacteria associated with Arctic cyanobacteria was determined. The viable numbers ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) cell g(-1) cyanobacterial biomass. A total of 112 morphotypes, representing 22 phylotypes based on their 16S rRNA sequence similarity were isolated from the samples. All the phylotypes were Gram-negative with affiliation to the proteobacterial and bacteroidetes divisions. Among the 22 phylotypes, 14 were chemotactic to glucose. Majority of the phylotypes were psychrotolerant showing growth up to 30 °C. Representatives of Alphaproteobacteria, the genus Flavobacterium and the gammaproteobacterial Alcanivorax sp, were psychrophilic with growth at or below 18 °C. A significant percentage of phylotypes were pigmented (~68 %), rich in unsaturated membrane fatty acids and tolerated pH values and NaCl concentrations between 5.0-8.0 and 0.15-1.0 M, respectively. The percentages of phylotypes producing extracellular cold-active enzymes at 4 °C were amylase (18.18 %), lipase and urease (45.45 %), caseinase (59.09 %) and gelatinase (31.8 %).

  18. Acquired chemotactic inhibitors during infection with guinea pig cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, R; Myers, M G

    1983-01-01

    Factors involved in neutrophil and monocyte migrations were serially studied in strain 2 guinea pigs undergoing initial cytomegalovirus infection and sham-inoculated controls. All studies remained unchanged in uninfected animals. Monocyte migrations and neutrophil spontaneous migration remained unchanged in infected animals. However, transient abnormalities occurred early in infection, comprising a decrease in neutrophil-directed migration towards C5-derived chemotactic fractions (C5-fr) and a decrease in the chemotactic activity of zymosan-activated plasma. Consequently, the presence of neutrophil- and chemotaxin-directed inhibitors in plasma was investigated. Normal neutrophils, C5-fr, Escherichia coli-derived bacterial factor, and the synthetic peptide F-met-leu-phe were first incubated with control or infected plasmas and then assayed for directed migration and lysosomal enzyme release. Results indicated the de novo appearance of both neutrophil- and chemotaxin-directed inhibitory activities in plasma during early infection. The neutrophil-directed inhibition was heat stable (56 degrees C for 120 min) and nonspecific (responses to all chemotaxins were inhibited). The chemotaxin-directed inhibition was heat stable and C5-fr specific. The cytomegalovirus-induced inhibitors may be important in the enhanced susceptibility to concurrent opportunistic infections. PMID:6305847

  19. Modelling Chemotactic Motion of Cells in Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Vasiev, Bakhtier

    2016-01-01

    Developmental processes in biology are underlined by proliferation, differentiation and migration of cells. The latter two are interlinked since cellular differentiation is governed by the dynamics of morphogens which, in turn, is affected by the movement of cells. Mutual effects of morphogenetic and cell movement patterns are enhanced when the movement is due to chemotactic response of cells to the morphogens. In this study we introduce a mathematical model to analyse how this interplay can result in a steady movement of cells in a tissue and associated formation of travelling waves in a concentration field of morphogen. Using the model we have identified four chemotactic scenarios for migration of single cell or homogeneous group of cells in a tissue. Such a migration can take place if moving cells are (1) repelled by a chemical produced by themselves or (2) attracted by a chemical produced by the surrounding cells in a tissue. Furthermore, the group of cells can also move if cells in surrounding tissue are (3) repelled by a chemical produced by moving cells or (4) attracted by a chemical produced by surrounding cells themselves. The proposed mechanisms can underlie migration of cells during embryonic development as well as spread of metastatic cells. PMID:27798687

  20. Impaired neutrophil directional chemotactic accuracy in chronic periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Helen M; Ling, Martin R; Insall, Robert; Kalna, Gabriela; Spengler, Julia; Grant, Melissa M; Chapple, Iain LC

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the chemotactic accuracy of peripheral blood neutrophils from patients with chronic periodontitis compared with matched healthy controls, before and after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Material & Methods Neutrophils were isolated from patients and controls (n = 18) by density centrifugation. Using the Insall chamber and video microscopy, neutrophils were analysed for directional chemotaxis towards N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine [fMLP (10 nM), or CXCL8 (200 ng/ml)]. Circular statistics were utilized for the analysis of cell movement. Results Prior to treatment, neutrophils from patients with chronic periodontitis had significantly reduced speed, velocity and chemotactic accuracy compared to healthy controls for both chemoattractants. Following periodontal treatment, patient neutrophils continued to display reduced speed in response to both chemoattractants. However, velocity and accuracy were normalized for the weak chemoattractant CXCL8 while they remained significantly reduced for fMLP. Conclusions Chronic periodontitis is associated with reduced neutrophil chemotaxis, and this is only partially restored by successful treatment. Dysfunctional neutrophil chemotaxis may predispose patients with periodontitis to their disease by increasing tissue transit times, thus exacerbating neutrophil-mediated collateral host tissue damage. PMID:25360483

  1. Chemotactic and Phagocytic Activity of Blood Neutrophils in Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Tainá; Menezes, Maria C S; Silva, Ademir Veras; Stirbulov, Roberto; Forte, Wilma C N

    2015-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease, and has been considered a T helper-2-biased response. Studies suggest that neutrophils may be associated with exacerbation and asthma severity. We sought to evaluate the chemotactic activity and phagocytic capacity by peripheral blood neutrophils from individuals with controlled and uncontrolled allergic asthma, and compare the results with non-asthmatic controls groups. Blood neutrophils were isolated from 95 patients: 24 with controlled asthma, 24 uncontrolled asthma, 24 healthy subjects and 23 patients with IgE-mediated allergies other than asthma. The neutrophil chemotaxis, stimulated with LPS, autologous serum or homologous serum, was determined using Boyden chambers. The phagocytic capacity was assessed by ingestion of zimosan particles, and digestion phase was analyzed by NBT test. The phagocytic digestion phase and chemotaxis by neutrophils from asthmatic patients was higher than in non-asthmatic controls (p  < 0.05). Autologous serum-induced neutrophil chemotaxis in patients with uncontrolled asthma was greater (p  < 0.05) than in other study groups. The ingestion phase of phagocytosis showed similar values in asthmatics and non-asthmatics. We conclude that the blood neutrophil from controlled and uncontrolled asthmatic patients exhibit activation markers, particularly phagocytic digestion and chemotactic activities.

  2. Clusters, asters, and collective oscillations in chemotactic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suropriya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-06-01

    The creation of synthetic systems that emulate the defining properties of living matter, such as motility, gradient-sensing, signaling, and replication, is a grand challenge of biomimetics. Such imitations of life crucially contain active components that transform chemical energy into directed motion. These artificial realizations of motility point in the direction of a new paradigm in engineering, through the design of emergent behavior by manipulating properties at the scale of the individual components. Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of such systems. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of gradient-sensing of an individual swimmer, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior, and use it to construct a framework for studying their collective behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signaling formation of clusters and asters. The kinetics of catalysis introduces a natural control parameter for the range of the interaction mediated by the diffusing chemical species. For various regimes in parameter space in the long-ranged limit our system displays precise analogs to gravitational collapse, plasma oscillations, and electrostatic screening. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior.

  3. Global solution for a chemotactic haptotactic model of cancer invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Youshan; Wang, Mingjun

    2008-10-01

    This paper deals with a mathematical model of cancer invasion of tissue recently proposed by Chaplain and Lolas. The model consists of a reaction-diffusion-taxis partial differential equation (PDE) describing the evolution of tumour cell density, a reaction-diffusion PDE governing the evolution of the proteolytic enzyme concentration and an ordinary differential equation modelling the proteolysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition to random motion, the tumour cells are directed not only by haptotaxis (cellular locomotion directed in response to a concentration gradient of adhesive molecules along the ECM) but also by chemotaxis (cellular locomotion directed in response to a concentration gradient of the diffusible proteolytic enzyme). In one space dimension, the global existence and uniqueness of a classical solution to this combined chemotactic-haptotactic model is proved for any chemotactic coefficient χ > 0. In two and three space dimensions, the global existence is proved for small χ/μ (where μ is the logistic growth rate of the tumour cells). The fundamental point of proof is to raise the regularity of a solution from L1 to Lp (p > 1). Furthermore, the existence of blow-up solutions to a sub-model in two space dimensions for large χ shows, to some extent, that the condition that χ/μ is small is necessary for the global existence of a solution to the full model.

  4. Aquacells — Flagellates under long-term microgravity and potential usage for life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, Donat-P.; Richter, Peter R.; Strauch, S. M.; Schuster, M.

    2006-09-01

    The motile behavior of the unicellular photosynthetic flagellate Euglena gracilis was studied during a two-week mission on the Russian satellite Foton M2. The precision of gravitactic orientation was high before launch and, as expected, the cells were unoriented during microgravity. While after previous short-term TEXUS flights the precision of orientation was as high as before launch, it took several hours for the organisms to regain their gravitaxis. Also the percentage of motile cells and the swimming velocity of the remaining motile cells were considerably lower than in the ground control. In preparatory experiments the flagellate Euglena was shown to produce considerable amounts of photosynthetically generated oxygen. In a coupling experiment in a prototype for a planned space mission on Foton M3, the photosynthetic producers were shown to supply sufficient amounts of oxygen to a fish compartment with 35 larval cichlids, Oreochromis mossambicus.

  5. Flagellated bacteria trace out a parabolic arc under low shear condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yongtae; Hashmi, Sara; Walker, Sharon; Hill, Jane

    2010-03-01

    The measurement and prediction of bacterial transport of bacteria in aquatic systems is of fundamental importance to a variety of fields such as groundwater bioremediation ascending urinary tract infection. The motility of pathogenic bacteria is, however, often missing when considering pathogen translocation prediction. Previously, we reported that flagellated E. coli can translate upstream under low shear flow conditions (Hill et al., 2007). The upstream swimming of flagellated microorganisms depends on hydrodynamic interaction between cell body and surrounding fluid flow. In this study, we use a breathable microfluidic device to image swimming E. coli and P. aeruginosa at a glass surface under low shear flow condition. We find the dominant experimental variables that lead to upstream swimming are: fluid shear, bacterium velocity, and bacterium length. We will present data showing that the sum of forces and torques acting on a bacterium lead to them tracing out a parabolic arc as they turn into the flow to swim upstream.

  6. Population Structure of Endomicrobia in Single Host Cells of Termite Gut Flagellates (Trichonympha spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao; Dietrich, Carsten; Thompson, Claire L.; Meuser, Katja; Brune, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of many phylogenetically lower termites is dominated by the cellulolytic flagellates of the genus Trichonympha, which are consistently associated with bacterial symbionts. In the case of Endomicrobia, an unusual lineage of endosymbionts of the Elusimicrobia phylum that is also present in other gut flagellates, previous studies have documented strict host specificity, leading to the cospeciation of “Candidatus Endomicrobium trichonymphae” with their respective flagellate hosts. However, it currently remains unclear whether one Trichonympha species is capable of harboring more than one Endomicrobia phylotype. In the present study, we selected single Trichonympha cells from the guts of Zootermopsis nevadensis and Reticulitermes santonensis and characterized their Endomicrobia populations based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences. We found that each host cell harbored a homogeneous population of symbionts that were specific to their respective host species, but phylogenetically distinct between each host lineage, corroborating cospeciation being caused by vertical inheritance. The experimental design of the present study also allowed for the identification of an unexpectedly large amount of tag-switching between samples, which indicated that any high-resolution analysis of microbial community structures using the pyrosequencing technique has to be interpreted with great caution. PMID:25739443

  7. Unlocking the secrets of multi-flagellated propulsion: drawing insights from Tritrichomonas foetus

    PubMed Central

    Lenaghan, Scott C.; Nwandu-Vincent, Stefan; Reese, Benjamin E.; Zhang, Mingjun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a high-speed imaging platform and a resistive force theory (RFT) based model were applied to investigate multi-flagellated propulsion, using Tritrichomonas foetus as an example. We discovered that T. foetus has distinct flagellar beating motions for linear swimming and turning, similar to the ‘run and tumble’ strategies observed in bacteria and Chlamydomonas. Quantitative analysis of the motion of each flagellum was achieved by determining the average flagella beat motion for both linear swimming and turning, and using the velocity of the flagella as inputs into the RFT model. The experimental approach was used to calculate the curvature along the length of the flagella throughout each stroke. It was found that the curvatures of the anterior flagella do not decrease monotonically along their lengths, confirming the ciliary waveform of these flagella. Further, the stiffness of the flagella was experimentally measured using nanoindentation, allowing for calculation of the flexural rigidity of T. foetus's flagella, 1.55×10−21 N m2. Finally, using the RFT model, it was discovered that the propulsive force of T. foetus was similar to that of sperm and Chlamydomonas, indicating that multi-flagellated propulsion does not necessarily contribute to greater thrust generation, and may have evolved for greater manoeuvrability or sensing. The results from this study have demonstrated the highly coordinated nature of multi-flagellated propulsion and have provided significant insights into the biology of T. foetus. PMID:24478286

  8. Distribution and abundance of uncultured heterotrophic flagellates in the world oceans.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon; Terrado, Ramon; Forn, Irene; Lovejoy, Connie; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2006-09-01

    Heterotrophic flagellates play fundamental roles in marine ecosystems as picoplankton grazers. This recognized importance contrasts with our ignorance of the taxonomic composition of this functional group, which remains mostly unidentified by microscopical and culturing approaches. Recent molecular marine surveys based on 18S rDNA genes have retrieved many sequences unrelated to cultured organisms and marine stramenopiles were among the first reported uncultured eukaryotes. However, little is known about the organisms corresponding to these sequences. Here we determine the abundance of several marine stramenopile lineages in surface marine waters using molecular probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization. We show that these protists are free-living bacterivorous heterotrophic flagellates. They were widely distributed, occurring in the five world oceans, and accounted for a significant fraction (up to 35%) of heterotrophic flagellates in diverse geographic regions. A single group, MAST-4, represented 9% of cells within this functional assemblage, with the intriguing exception of polar waters where it was absent. MAST-4 cells likely contribute substantially to picoplankton grazing and nutrient re-mineralization in vast areas of the oceans and represent a key eukaryotic group in marine food webs.

  9. Unlocking the secrets of multi-flagellated propulsion: drawing insights from Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Lenaghan, Scott C; Nwandu-Vincent, Stefan; Reese, Benjamin E; Zhang, Mingjun

    2014-04-06

    In this work, a high-speed imaging platform and a resistive force theory (RFT) based model were applied to investigate multi-flagellated propulsion, using Tritrichomonas foetus as an example. We discovered that T. foetus has distinct flagellar beating motions for linear swimming and turning, similar to the 'run and tumble' strategies observed in bacteria and Chlamydomonas. Quantitative analysis of the motion of each flagellum was achieved by determining the average flagella beat motion for both linear swimming and turning, and using the velocity of the flagella as inputs into the RFT model. The experimental approach was used to calculate the curvature along the length of the flagella throughout each stroke. It was found that the curvatures of the anterior flagella do not decrease monotonically along their lengths, confirming the ciliary waveform of these flagella. Further, the stiffness of the flagella was experimentally measured using nanoindentation, allowing for calculation of the flexural rigidity of T. foetus's flagella, 1.55×10(-21) N m(2). Finally, using the RFT model, it was discovered that the propulsive force of T. foetus was similar to that of sperm and Chlamydomonas, indicating that multi-flagellated propulsion does not necessarily contribute to greater thrust generation, and may have evolved for greater manoeuvrability or sensing. The results from this study have demonstrated the highly coordinated nature of multi-flagellated propulsion and have provided significant insights into the biology of T. foetus.

  10. Transmission and ecology of trypanosomatid flagellates of water striders (Hemiptera: Gerridae).

    PubMed

    Tieszen, K L; Molyneux, D H

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of transmission and ecology of the monogenetic trypanosomatids, Blastocrithidia gerridis and Crithidia flexonema, in Gerris is described. Motile free-living flagellates of both species were found in the faeces of Gerris and in the water on which the bugs inhabited. Transmission of both trypanosomatid species occurred from naturally infected wild-caught bugs to flagellate-free laboratory-bred bugs via water. Crithidia flexonema was also transmitted to laboratory-bred bugs after being isolated in culture. Observations of experimentally infected bugs indicate that C. flexonema flagellates are imbibed and pass through the fore- and midgut to the hindgut where they become attached and multiply. There was no evidence to suggest transovarial transmission. In a 3-yr investigation into the prevalence of trypanosomatids in a natural population of adult Gerris odontogaster, it was found that the infection rate varied between 19% and 100%. There was no significant difference in infection rates between females and males. The infection rate peaked for each year in late spring or early summer. The significance of these results is discussed in relation to the ecology and behaviour of Gerris. The results indicate that the infections are maintained in hibernating bugs over winter.

  11. Controlling neural activity in Caenorhabditis elegans to evoke chemotactic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabas, Askin; Shen, Ching-Han; Guo, Zengcai V.; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2013-03-01

    Animals locate and track chemoattractive gradients in the environment to find food. With its simple nervous system, Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model system in which to understand how the dynamics of neural activity control this search behavior. To understand how the activity in its interneurons coordinate different motor programs to lead the animal to food, here we used optogenetics and new optical tools to manipulate neural activity directly in freely moving animals to evoke chemotactic behavior. By deducing the classes of activity patterns triggered during chemotaxis and exciting individual neurons with these patterns, we identified interneurons that control the essential locomotory programs for this behavior. Notably, we discovered that controlling the dynamics of activity in just one interneuron pair was sufficient to force the animal to locate, turn towards and track virtual light gradients.

  12. Precise computations of chemotactic collapse using moving mesh methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, C. J.; Carretero-González, R.; Russell, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of computing blow-up solutions of chemotaxis systems, or the so-called chemotactic collapse. In two spatial dimensions, such solutions can have approximate self-similar behaviour, which can be very challenging to verify in numerical simulations [cf. Betterton and Brenner, Collapsing bacterial cylinders, Phys. Rev. E 64 (2001) 061904]. We analyse a dynamic (scale-invariant) remeshing method which performs spatial mesh movement based upon equidistribution. Using a suitably chosen monitor function, the numerical solution resolves the fine detail in the asymptotic solution structure, such that the computations are seen to be fully consistent with the asymptotic description of the collapse phenomenon given by Herrero and Velázquez [Singularity patterns in a chemotaxis model, Math. Ann. 306 (1996) 583-623]. We believe that the methods we construct are ideally suited to a large number of problems in mathematical biology for which collapse phenomena are expected.

  13. The DEK Nuclear Autoantigen Is a Secreted Chemotactic Factor▿

    PubMed Central

    Mor-Vaknin, Nirit; Punturieri, Antonello; Sitwala, Kajal; Faulkner, Neil; Legendre, Maureen; Khodadoust, Michael S.; Kappes, Ferdinand; Ruth, Jeffrey H.; Koch, Alisa; Glass, David; Petruzzelli, Lilli; Adams, Barbara S.; Markovitz, David M.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear DNA-binding protein DEK is an autoantigen that has been implicated in the regulation of transcription, chromatin architecture, and mRNA processing. We demonstrate here that DEK is actively secreted by macrophages and is also found in synovial fluid samples from patients with juvenile arthritis. Secretion of DEK is modulated by casein kinase 2, stimulated by interleukin-8, and inhibited by dexamethasone and cyclosporine A, consistent with a role as a proinflammatory molecule. DEK is secreted in both a free form and in exosomes, vesicular structures in which transcription-modulating factors such as DEK have not previously been found. Furthermore, DEK functions as a chemotactic factor, attracting neutrophils, CD8+ T lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Therefore, the DEK autoantigen, previously described as a strictly nuclear protein, is secreted and can act as an extracellular chemoattractant, suggesting a direct role for DEK in inflammation. PMID:17030615

  14. The Autophagy Machinery: A New Player in Chemotactic Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Coly, Pierre-Michaël; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène; Morin, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved self-degradative process that plays a key role in diverse cellular processes such as stress response or differentiation. A growing body of work highlights the direct involvement of autophagy in cell migration and cancer metastasis. Specifically, autophagy has been shown to be involved in modulating cell adhesion dynamics as well as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. After providing a general overview of the mechanisms controlling autophagosome biogenesis and cell migration, we discuss how chemotactic G protein-coupled receptors, through the repression of autophagy, may orchestrate membrane trafficking and compartmentation of specific proteins at the cell front in order to support the critical steps of directional migration. PMID:28261054

  15. Active stress driven convection in a suspension of chemotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyap, T. V.; Koch, Donald

    2011-11-01

    We examine the linear stability of a suspension of swimming bacteria producing dipolar hydrodynamic disturbances confined in a channel subjected to a linear chemo-attractant gradient across the channel. At the continuum level swimming bacteria exert an ``active'' stress on the fluid which is a function of the bacterial concentration and orientation fields. In the base-state without any fluid flow, the fluxes from the chemotactic and diffusive motion of the bacteria balance to yield exponential number density and active stress profiles across the channel. We show that such a base-state is unstable to perturbations in the number density parallel to the channel walls if the bacterial concentration exceeds a critical value determined by a Peclet number measuring the strength of chemotaxis relative to diffusion. Active stress gradients resulting from the perturbation in the number density drive convective fluid flow, which transports bacteria into the regions of highest perturbed bacteria concentration reinforcing the original perturbation. We examine the linear stability of a suspension of swimming bacteria producing dipolar hydrodynamic disturbances confined in a channel subjected to a linear chemo-attractant gradient across the channel. At the continuum level swimming bacteria exert an ``active'' stress on the fluid which is a function of the bacterial concentration and orientation fields. In the base-state without any fluid flow, the fluxes from the chemotactic and diffusive motion of the bacteria balance to yield exponential number density and active stress profiles across the channel. We show that such a base-state is unstable to perturbations in the number density parallel to the channel walls if the bacterial concentration exceeds a critical value determined by a Peclet number measuring the strength of chemotaxis relative to diffusion. Active stress gradients resulting from the perturbation in the number density drive convective fluid flow, which transports

  16. Spasmogenic activity of chemotactic N-formylated oligopeptides: identity of structure--function relationships for chemotactic and spasmogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Marasco, W A; Fantone, J C; Ward, P A

    1982-12-01

    The chemotactic N-formylated oligopeptides are potent spasmogenic agents for guinea pig ileum. Structure-activity studies with various N-formylated peptides suggest the presence of a specific receptor that resembles in specificity the formyl peptide receptor on leukocytes. A competitive antagonist of the formyl peptide receptor on leukocytes also inhibits formyl peptide-induced ileum contraction, whereas the antihistamine diphenhydramine is without effect. The contractile response caused by the synthetic N-formylated peptides differs from those induced by acetylcholine, histamine, and substance P. In particular, a latent period after treatment with the N-formyl peptides is seen before the onset of the response, and a sustained contractile response is not maintained. In addition, tachyphylaxis does occur, but complete recovery of activity is seen after a 20- to 30-min rest period. These observations suggest broad biological roles of prokaryotic signal peptides from bacteria as acute inflammatory mediators.

  17. Enhancement of chemotactic response to sodium acetate in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Oda, Takayuki; Hayashi, Genta; Sugisaki, Daisuke; Ichinose, Mitsuyuki

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the chemotactic response of a wild-type (N2) nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) to a water-soluble attractant, sodium acetate, after pre-exposure to the chemical. The chemotactic response to 1.0 M sodium acetate of the non-exposed control nematodes was lower than that of the nematodes that were pre-exposed to 1.0 M sodium acetate for 90 min (p < 0.05). The increase in the response to sodium acetate was observed up to 6 hr, but not at 12 hr after exposure. To clarify the mechanism of this enhancement of the chemotactic response, several mutants were used. The chemotactic response of pre-exposed tph-1 and bas-1 mutants, whose main defect was serotonin secretion, was enhanced in comparison with that of the control mutants (p < 0.01). However, cat-1 and cat-2 mutants, which are respectively defective in serotonin and dopamine secretion and dopamine secretion only, showed no enhancement of the chemotactic response to sodium acetate, even when pre-exposed to this chemical. When the cat-1 and cat-2 mutants were pre-exposed to sodium acetate and bred in the presence of 40 mM dopamine, these mutants showed enhanced chemotactic response to sodium acetate (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the enhancement of chemotactic response to sodium acetate after pre-exposure to this chemical is modulated by dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  18. Meisoindigo, but not its core chemical structure indirubin, inhibits zebrafish interstitial leukocyte chemotactic migration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Baixin; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Deng, Xu; Gu, Lijuan; Wang, Qiongyu; Zeng, Zhi; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Qingping; Wang, Yueying

    2017-12-01

    Inflammatory disease is a big threat to human health. Leukocyte chemotactic migration is required for efficient inflammatory response. Inhibition of leukocyte chemotactic migration to the inflammatory site has been shown to provide therapeutic targets for treating inflammatory diseases. Our study was designed to discover effective and safe compounds that can inhibit leukocyte chemotactic migration, thus providing possible novel therapeutic strategy for treating inflammatory diseases. In this study, we used transgenic zebrafish model (Tg:zlyz-EGFP line) to visualize the process of leukocyte chemotactic migration. Then, we used this model to screen the hit compound and evaluate its biological activity on leukocyte chemotactic migration. Furthermore, western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of the hit compound on the AKT or ERK-mediated pathway, which plays an important role in leukocyte chemotactic migration. In this study, using zebrafish-based chemical screening, we identified that the hit compound meisoindigo (25 μM, 50 μM, 75 μM) can significantly inhibit zebrafish leukocyte chemotactic migration in a dose-dependent manner (p = 0.01, p = 0.0006, p < 0.0001). Also, we found that meisoindigo did not affect the process of leukocyte reverse migration (p = 0.43). Furthermore, our results unexpectedly showed that indirubin, the core structure of meisoindigo, had no significant effect on zebrafish leukocyte chemotactic migration (p = 0.6001). Additionally, our results revealed that meisoindigo exerts no effect on the Akt or Erk-mediated signalling pathway. Our results suggest that meisoindigo, but not indirubin, is effective for inhibiting leukocyte chemotactic migration, thus providing a potential therapeutic agent for treating inflammatory diseases.

  19. Character of cellulase activity in the guts of flagellate-free termites with different feeding habits.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Bing-Rong; Zeng, Wen-Hui; Xiao, Wei-Liang; Li, Qiu-Jian; Zhong, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose digestion in termites (Isoptera) is highly important for ecological reasons and applications in biofuel conversion. The speciose Termitidae family has lost flagellates in the hindgut and developed diverse feeding habits. To address the response of cellulase activity to the differentiation of feeding habits, a comparative study of the activity and distribution of composite cellulases, endo-β-1,4-glucanase, and β-glucosidase was performed in seven common flagellate-free termites with three feeding habits: the humus-feeding termites Sinocapritermes mushae (Oshima et Maki), Malaysiocapritermes zhangfengensis Zhu, Yang et Huang and Pericapritermes jiangtsekiangensis (Kemner); the fungus-growing termites Macrotermes barneyi Light and Odontotermes formosanus (Shiraki); and the wood-feeding termites Nasutitermes parvonasutus (Shiraki) and Havilanditermes orthonasus (Tsai et Chen). The results showed that in diverse feeding groups, the wood-feeding group had the highest total composite cellulase and endo-β-1,4-glucanase activities, while the fungus-growing group had the highest β-glucosidase activity. In terms of the distribution of cellulase activity in the alimentary canals, the cellulase activities in wood-feeding termites were concentrated in the midgut, but there was no significant difference between all gut segments in humus-feeding termites. As for the fungus-growing termites, the main site of composite cellulase activity was in the midgut. The endo-β-1,4-glucanase activity was restricted to the midgut, but the primary site of β-glucosidase activity was in the foregut and the midgut (Mac. barneyi). The functions of the gut segments apparently differentiated between feeding groups. The results suggest that the differentiation of feeding habits in flagellate-free termites was characterized by the distribution of cellulases in the gut rather than by variations in cellulase activity.

  20. Character of Cellulase Activity in the Guts of Flagellate-Free Termites with Different Feeding Habits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Bing-Rong; Zeng, Wen-Hui; Xiao, Wei-Liang; Li, Qiu-Jian; Zhong, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose digestion in termites (Isoptera) is highly important for ecological reasons and applications in biofuel conversion. The speciose Termitidae family has lost flagellates in the hindgut and developed diverse feeding habits. To address the response of cellulase activity to the differentiation of feeding habits, a comparative study of the activity and distribution of composite cellulases, endo-β-1, 4-glucanase, and β-glucosidase was performed in seven common flagellate-free termites with three feeding habits: the humus-feeding termites Sinocapritermes mushae (Oshima et Maki), Malaysiocapritermes zhangfengensis Zhu, Yang et Huang and Pericapritermes jiangtsekiangensis (Kemner); the fungus-growing termites Macrotermes barneyi Light and Odontotermes formosanus (Shiraki); and the wood-feeding termites Nasutitermes parvonasutus (Shiraki) and Havilanditermes orthonasus (Tsai et Chen). The results showed that in diverse feeding groups, the wood-feeding group had the highest total composite cellulase and endo-β-1, 4-glucanase activities, while the fungus-growing group had the highest β-glucosidase activity. In terms of the distribution of cellulase activity in the alimentary canals, the cellulase activities in wood-feeding termites were concentrated in the midgut, but there was no significant difference between all gut segments in humus-feeding termites. As for the fungus-growing termites, the main site of composite cellulase activity was in the midgut. The endo-β-1, 4-glucanase activity was restricted to the midgut, but the primary site of β-glucosidase activity was in the foregut and the midgut (Mac. barneyi). The functions of the gut segments apparently differentiated between feeding groups. The results suggest that the differentiation of feeding habits in flagellate-free termites was characterized by the distribution of cellulases in the gut rather than by variations in cellulase activity. PMID:23895662

  1. Viral and flagellate control of prokaryotic production and community structure in offshore Mediterranean waters.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Findji, Osana; Herndl, Gerhard J; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Weinbauer, Markus G

    2009-07-01

    A dilution and size fractionation approach was used to study the separate and combined effects of viruses and flagellates on prokaryotic production ([(3)H]leucine incorporation) and community composition (16S rRNA gene PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE]) in the upper mixed layer and the deep chlorophyll maximum in the offshore Mediterranean Sea. Four experiments were established using differential filtration: a resource control without predators (C treatment), treatment in the presence of viruses (V treatment), treatment in the presence of flagellates (F treatment), and treatment in the presence of both predators (VF treatment). The V and VF treatments increased prokaryotic abundance (1.4- to 2.3-fold) and the number of DGGE bands (by up to 43%) and decreased prokaryotic production compared to the level for the C treatment (by 22 to 99%). For the F treatment, significant differences compared to the level for the C treatment were found as well, but trends were not consistent across experiments. The relative abundances of the high-nucleic-acid subgroups of prokaryotes with high scatter (HNAhs) in flow cytometer settings were lower in the V and VF treatments than in the C and F treatments. These differences were probably due to lysis of very active HNA prokaryotes in the V and VF treatments. Our results indicate that the presence of viruses or viruses plus flagellates sustains prokaryotic diversity and controls prokaryotic production by regulating the proportion of the highly active members of the community. Our data also suggest that lysis and grazing control influences the relationship between bacterial community composition and prokaryotic production.

  2. Is there a relation between the distribution of heterotrophic flagellates and the zonation of a marine intertidal flat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonenkov, D. V.; Burkovsky, I. V.; Mazei, Yu. A.

    2015-09-01

    The species distribution of heterotrophic flagellates has been investigated in accordance with the zonation of the White Sea silty-sandy intertidal flat. In Gryaznaya Bay of the Chernaya River Estuary (Kandalaksha Bay), 64 species and forms of flagellates have been identified. Three species ( Ploeotia tenuis, Salpingoeca tuba, and Thecamonas trahens) are newly recorded for the White Sea. The species diversity, abundance, and biomass of heterotrophic flagellates were the highest in the upper and lower littoral horizons, as compared to the middle littoral and transitional zones. The species composition and community structure of heterotrophic flagellates depend on the local combinations of salinity and Eh rather than on the littoral zone and related sediments and the type and amount of organic material. The heterotrophic flagellate community within the intertidal zone has been subdivided into three groups: 1) species preferring biotopes of higher salinity at lower and upper boundaries of the mid intertidal zone, 2) species tending to silty sediments of the upper intertidal zone with lower salinity and Eh, and 3) species preferring the well-aerated slightly silted sands of the lower intertidal zone.

  3. Ethidium bromide: a fast fluorescent staining procedure for the detection of symbiotic partnership of flagellates and prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, J; König, H

    1999-03-01

    The hindgut of 'lower' termites harbors a dense population of flagellates and bacteria. The flagellates possess ecto- and endosymbiotic prokaryotes. Most of them are hardly visible in the phase contrast microscope. Staining with the DNA-intercalating agent ethidium bromide visualizes the nuclei of the flagellates as well as the ecto- and endosymbiotic bacteria as red objects. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between endosymbiotic methanogens and other bacteria. Following UV excitation, the blue-green autofluorescence of the methanogenic bacteria eclipses the red fluorescence light of the intercalated ethidium bromide. The dye facilitates the observation of symbiotic bacteria and helps identify the number, shape, localization, and dividing status of the nuclei. Thus, it is a powerful tool for the examination of microorganisms in complex habitats, which are rich in strongly autofluorescent material, like wood.

  4. Bacterial chemotactic oligopeptides and the intestinal mucosal barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D.M.; Butt, T.J.; Broom, M.F.; Hunter, J.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1989-07-01

    Intestinal absorption and enterohepatic circulation of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-/sup 125/I-tyrosine, a bioactive synthetic analog of the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine has been investigated in the rat. In ileum and proximal and distal colon, dithiothreitol, which increases mucosal permeability, increased peptide absorption and biliary recovery fourfold, 70-fold, and 20-fold over control values, respectively. When dithiothreitol was combined with d-l-benzyl succinate, a potent inhibitor of intestinal carboxypeptidase, absorption and biliary recovery from ileal loops increased markedly to 40-fold over control, whereas there was no further increase in absorption from colon loops. There was a strong correlation between biliary N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-/sup 125/I-tyrosine recovery and intestinal absorption of /sup 51/Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetate, a marker of passive mucosal permeability (r = 0.97). We conclude that in the ileum both enzymic degradation and restricted mucosal permeability contribute to the intestinal barrier to luminal bacterial formyl oligopeptides. In the colon, however, enzymic mechanisms are less active and restricted mucosal permeability is the major factor. Abnormalities of the intestinal mucosal barrier to proinflammatory bacterial peptides could play a role in inflammatory disorders of the gut.

  5. Statins Inhibit Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 1 Expression in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Hakan; Basar, Murat; Seval-Celik, Yasemin; Osteen, Kevin G.; Duleba, Antoni J.; Taylor, Hugh S.; Lockwood, Charles J.; Arici, Aydin

    2012-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of the endogenous mevalonate pathway. Besides inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis, statins may also demonstrate anti-inflammatory properties. Inflammation is implicated in the attachment and invasion of endometrial cells to the peritoneal surface and growth of ectopic endometrium by inducing proliferation and angiogenesis. In this study, the effect of statins on monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) expression in endometriotic implants in nude mouse model and in cultured endometriotic cells was evaluated. In mouse model, simvastatin decreased MCP-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in endometriotic implants (P < .05). Similarly, both simvastatin and mevastatin revealed a dose-dependent inhibition of MCP-1 production in cultured endometriotic cells (P < .01). This inhibitory effect of the statins on MCP-1 production was reversed by the downstream substrates of the mevalonate pathway. Moreover, statins decreased MCP-1 messenger RNA expression in cultured endometriotic cells (P < .05). In conclusion, statins exert anti-inflammatory effect in endometriotic cells and could provide a potential treatment of endometriosis in the future. PMID:22267540

  6. Optimal Noise Filtering in the Chemotactic Response of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Burton W; Yi, Tau-Mu; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2006-01-01

    Information-carrying signals in the real world are often obscured by noise. A challenge for any system is to filter the signal from the corrupting noise. This task is particularly acute for the signal transduction network that mediates bacterial chemotaxis, because the signals are subtle, the noise arising from stochastic fluctuations is substantial, and the system is effectively acting as a differentiator which amplifies noise. Here, we investigated the filtering properties of this biological system. Through simulation, we first show that the cutoff frequency has a dramatic effect on the chemotactic efficiency of the cell. Then, using a mathematical model to describe the signal, noise, and system, we formulated and solved an optimal filtering problem to determine the cutoff frequency that bests separates the low-frequency signal from the high-frequency noise. There was good agreement between the theory, simulations, and published experimental data. Finally, we propose that an elegant implementation of the optimal filter in combination with a differentiator can be achieved via an integral control system. This paper furnishes a simple quantitative framework for interpreting many of the key notions about bacterial chemotaxis, and, more generally, it highlights the constraints on biological systems imposed by noise. PMID:17112312

  7. Sperm from sneaker male squids exhibit chemotactic swarming to CO₂.

    PubMed

    Hirohashi, Noritaka; Alvarez, Luis; Shiba, Kogiku; Fujiwara, Eiji; Iwata, Yoko; Mohri, Tatsuma; Inaba, Kazuo; Chiba, Kazuyoshi; Ochi, Hiroe; Supuran, Claudiu T; Kotzur, Nico; Kakiuchi, Yasutaka; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Baba, Shoji A

    2013-05-06

    Behavioral traits of sperm are adapted to the reproductive strategy that each species employs. In polyandrous species, spermatozoa often form motile clusters, which might be advantageous for competing with sperm from other males. Despite this presumed advantage for reproductive success, little is known about how sperm form such functional assemblies. Previously, we reported that males of the coastal squid Loligo bleekeri produce two morphologically different euspermatozoa that are linked to distinctly different mating behaviors. Consort and sneaker males use two distinct insemination sites, one inside and one outside the female's body, respectively. Here, we show that sperm release a self-attracting molecule that causes only sneaker sperm to swarm. We identified CO2 as the sperm chemoattractant and membrane-bound flagellar carbonic anhydrase as its sensor. Downstream signaling results from the generation of extracellular H(+), intracellular acidosis, and recovery from acidosis. These signaling events elicit Ca(2+)-dependent turning behavior, resulting in chemotactic swarming. These results illuminate the bifurcating evolution of sperm underlying the distinct fertilization strategies of this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CXCL17 is a major chemotactic factor for lung macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Maravillas-Montero, José L.; Carnevale, Christina D.; Vilches-Cisneros, Natalia; Flores, Juan P.; Hevezi, Peter A.; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of chemotactic cytokines that direct the movement of cells throughout the body under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. The mucosal chemokine CXCL17 was the last ligand of this superfamily to be characterized. Several recent studies have provided greater insight into the basic biology of this chemokine and have implicated CXCL17 in several human diseases. We sought to better characterize CXCL17's activity in vivo. To this end, we analyzed its chemoattractant properties in vivo and characterized a Cxcl17-/- mouse. This mouse has a significantly reduced number of macrophages in their lungs compared to WT mice. Additionally, we observed a concurrent increase in a new population of macrophage-like cells that are F4/80+CDllcmid. These results indicate that CXCL17 is a novel macrophage chemoattractant that operates in mucosal tissues. Given the importance of macrophages in inflammation, these observations strongly suggest that CXCL17 is a major regulator of mucosal inflammatory responses. PMID:24973458

  9. Functions of LIM proteins in cell polarity and chemotactic motility.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Bharat; Khurana, Taruna; Khaire, Nandkumar; Noegel, Angelika A

    2002-10-15

    LimC and LimD are two novel LIM proteins of Dictyostelium, which are comprised of double and single LIM domains, respectively. Green fluorescent protein-fused LimC and LimD proteins preferentially accumulate at areas of the cell cortex where they co-localize with actin and associate transiently with cytoskeleton-dependent dynamic structures like phagosomes, macropinosomes and pseudopods. Furthermore, both LimC and LimD interact directly with F-actin in vitro. Mutant cells that lack either LimC or LimD, or both, exhibit normal growth. They are, however, significantly impaired in growth under stress conditions and are highly sensitive to osmotic shock, suggesting that LimC and LimD contribute towards the maintenance of cortical strength. Moreover, we noted an altered morphology and F-actin distribution in LimD(-) and LimC(-)/D(-) mutants, and changes in chemotactic motility associated with an increased pseudopod formation. Our results reveal both unique and overlapping roles for LimC and LimD, and suggest that both act directly on the actin cytoskeleton and provide rigidity to the cortex.

  10. Functions of LIM proteins in cell polarity and chemotactic motility

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Bharat; Khurana, Taruna; Khaire, Nandkumar; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2002-01-01

    LimC and LimD are two novel LIM proteins of Dictyostelium, which are comprised of double and single LIM domains, respectively. Green fluorescent protein-fused LimC and LimD proteins preferentially accumulate at areas of the cell cortex where they co-localize with actin and associate transiently with cytoskeleton-dependent dynamic structures like phagosomes, macropinosomes and pseudopods. Furthermore, both LimC and LimD interact directly with F-actin in vitro. Mutant cells that lack either LimC or LimD, or both, exhibit normal growth. They are, however, significantly impaired in growth under stress conditions and are highly sensitive to osmotic shock, suggesting that LimC and LimD contribute towards the maintenance of cortical strength. Moreover, we noted an altered morphology and F-actin distribution in LimD– and LimC–/D– mutants, and changes in chemotactic motility associated with an increased pseudopod formation. Our results reveal both unique and overlapping roles for LimC and LimD, and suggest that both act directly on the actin cytoskeleton and provide rigidity to the cortex. PMID:12374734

  11. The relationship of granulocyte ATP to chemotactic response during storage.

    PubMed

    McCullough, J J; Weiblen, B J

    1979-01-01

    During the storage of granulocytes, bactericidal activity declines more slowly than does chemotactic response (CTR). Bacterial killing involves increased activity of the hexose monophosphate shunt, oxygen utilization and the generation of toxic products of oxygen. Chemotaxis is probably a contractile process involving myosin and actin filaments and possibly ATP as a source of energy. Thus, maintainance of ATP may be important in granulocyte preservation. During storage at 1 to 6 C of granulocytes collected by continuous and intermittent flow centrifuge leukapheresis, both CTR and ATP decreased approximately 33 percent. Decreases in CTR and ATP were 12 and 10 percent respectively when cells were stored at 20 to 24 C. Further decreases in CTR and ATP occurred between 24 and 48 hours of storage, although levels of both were higher in cells stored at 20 to 24 C compared with those stored at 1 to 6 C. When the results from all storage conditions were combined, the overall coefficient of correlation between CTR and ATP was 0.71 (p less than .05). Although ATP is probably not the only important variable in granulocyte preservation, granulocytes may resemble red blood cells in that a minimal level of ATP may be necessary for adequate function.

  12. Toxicity assessment of a common laundry detergent using the freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Azizullah, Azizullah; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2011-09-01

    Synthetic detergents are among the commonly used chemicals in everyday life. Detergents, reaching aquatic environments through domestic and municipal wastewater, can cause many different effects in aquatic organisms. The present study was aimed at the toxicity evaluation of a commonly used laundry detergent, Ariel, using the freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis as a biotest organism. Different parameters of the flagellate like motility, swimming velocity, cell shape, gravitactic orientation, photosynthesis and concentration of light harvesting pigments were used as end points for the toxicity assessment. No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) and EC(50) values were calculated for the end point parameters at four different incubation times, i.e. 0, 6, 24 and 72 h. After 72 h incubation, swimming velocity of the cells was found to be the most sensitive parameter giving NOEC and EC(50) values of 10.8 and 34 mg L(-1), respectively. After 72 h exposure to the detergent, chlorophyll a and total carotenoids were significantly decreased in cultures treated with Ariel at concentrations of 50 mg L(-1) and above while chlorophyll b significantly decreased at concentrations above 750 mg L(-1). The maximum inhibitory effect on the quantum yield of photosystem II was observed after 24 h exposure and thereafter a recovery trend was observed. Motility, gravitaxis and cell shape were strongly impaired immediately upon exposure to the detergent, but with increasing exposure time these parameters showed acclimatization to the stress and thus the NOEC values obtained after 72 h were higher than those immediately after exposure.

  13. Flagellar regeneration in the scaly green flagellate Tetraselmis striata (Prasinophyceae): regeneration kinetics and effect of inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reize, I. B.; Melkonian, M.

    1987-06-01

    Flagellar regeneration after experimental amputation was studied in synchronized axenic cultures of the scaly green flagellate Tetraselmis striata (Prasinophyceae). After removal of flagella by mechanical shearing, 95% of the cells regrow all four flagella (incl. the scaly covering) to nearly full length with a linear velocity of 50 nm/min under standard conditions. Flagellar regeneration is independent of photosynthesis (no effect of DCMU; the same regeneration rate in the light or in the dark), but depends on de novo protein synthesis: cycloheximide at a low concentration (0.35 μM) blocks flagellar regeneration reversibly. No pool of flagellar precursors appears to be present throughout the flagellated phase of the cell cycle. A transient pool of flagellar precursors, sufficient to generate 2.5 μm of flagellar length, however, develops during flagellar regeneration. Tunicamycin (2 μg/ml) inhibits flagellar regeneration only after a second flagellar amputation, when flagella reach only one third the length of the control. Flagellar regeneration in T. striata differs considerably from that of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and represents an excellent model system for the study of synchronous Golgi apparatus (GA) activation, and transport and exocytosis of GA-derived macromolecules (scales).

  14. A new flagellated dispersion stage in Paraphysoderma sedebokerense, a pathogen of Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Martina; Guerra, Tiago; Silva, Joana; Gachon, Claire M M

    The blastocladialean fungus Paraphysoderma sedebokerense Boussiba, Zarka and James is a devastating pathogen of the commercially valuable green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis, a natural source of the carotenoid pigment astaxanthin. First identified in commercial Haematococcus cultivation facilities, P. sedebokerense is hypothesised to have a complex life cycle that switches between a vegetative and a resting phase depending on favourable or unfavourable growth conditions. Rather unusually for blastocladialean fungi, P. sedebokerense was described as lacking flagellated zoospores and only propagating via aplanosporic amoeboid cells. However, during repeated microscopic observation of P. sedebokerense cultivated in optimal conditions, we detected fast-swimming, transiently uniflagellated zoospores which rapidly transform into infectious amoeboid swarmers, the existence of which suggests a closer than previously thought relatedness of P. sedebokerense to its sister genera Physoderma and Urophlyctis. Additionally, we found some morphological and physiological differences between amoeboid swarmers and discuss hypotheses about their significance. These amoeboid and flagellated propagules are key to the dissemination of P. sedebokerense and are probably also the life stages most vulnerable to adverse environmental conditions. They are therefore a prime target for the development of disease management protocols in industrial cultivation facilities, a goal which requires a detailed understanding of their physiology.

  15. Discocelis saleuta gen. nov. et sp. nov. (Protista incertae sedis): - A new heterotrophic marine flagellate.

    PubMed

    Vørs, N

    1988-10-01

    The colourless flagellate Discocelis saleuta, a new genus from marine sediments, has been studied by light microscopy and single-cell sectioning for electron microscopy. The cell is discshaped and possesses an anterior velum and two anteriorly inserted unequal flagella. The cell body periphery and the velum are supported by ribbons of microtubules. Three flagellar roots, each of which comprises relatively few microtubules, arise from the flagellar basal bodies. Two of these roots run posteriorly under the ventral cell membrane, whereas the third root mainly runs along the posterior edge of the velum. The cell is further characterized by a microbody-like paranuclear organelle, and by a row of extrusomes bordering the cell periphery. Mitochondria have short tubular cristae. This minute flagellate adheres tightly to sand grains. The ultrastructure is unlike that of any well circumscribed higher order taxon, and the new genus is consequently placed incertae sedis in the kingdom Protista. Copyright © 1988 Gustav Fischer Verlag · Stuttgart · New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined effects of the herbicide terbuthylazine and temperature on different flagellates from the Northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Emanuela; Mazzotti, Matilde; Guerrini, Franca; Pistocchi, Rossella

    2013-03-15

    The triazinic herbicide terbuthylazine (TBA) is becoming an emergent contaminant in Italian rivers and in coastal and groundwater. A preliminary analysis of the sensitivity of marine flagellates to TBA was performed by monitoring the photosynthetic efficiency of nine species (belonging to the Dinophyceae or Raphidophyceae class) isolated from the Adriatic Sea. Different sensitivity levels for each flagellate were observed and the most sensitive microalgae, based on PSII inhibition, were: Gonyaulax spinifera>Fibrocapsa japonica>Lingulodinium polyedrum while the most resistant were two species belonging to the Prorocentrum genus. Then the response of two microalgae to drivers, such as temperature and terbuthylazine, applied in combination was also investigated. Two potentially toxic flagellates, Prorocentrum minimum and G. spinifera, were exposed, under different temperature conditions (15, 20 and 25°C), to TBA concentrations that did not completely affect PSII. For both flagellates, effects of TBA on algal growth, measured through cell density and carbon analysis, as well as on the photosynthetic activity are reported. All parameters analyzed showed a negative effect of TBA from the exponential phase. TBA effect on algal growth was significantly enhanced at the optimal temperature conditions (20 and 25°C), while no difference between control and herbicide treatments were detected for G. spinifera grown at 15°C, which represented a stress condition for this species. The maximum inhibition of photosynthetic efficiency was found at 20°C for both organisms. Both flagellates increased cell carbon and nitrogen content in herbicide treatments compared to the control, except G. spinifera grown at 15°C. Chlorophyll-a production was increased only in G. spinifera exposed to 5 μg L(-1) of TBA and the effect was enhanced with the increase of temperature. Herbicide-induced variations in cellular components determined changes in cellular carbon:nitrogen (C:N) and

  17. Inactivation of chemotactic activity of C5a by the serratial 56-kilodalton protease.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, T; Kojima, Y; Akaike, T; Ijiri, S; Molla, A; Maeda, H

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the 56-kilodalton protease (56K protease) from Serratia marcescens on complement-derived chemotactic activity were examined. Fresh human serum was incubated with zymosan to produce C5a. This activated serum was then incubated with various concentrations of 56K protease, and the chemotactic activity of mouse peritoneal exudate polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and macrophages was evaluated. A significant dose-dependent decrease of chemotactic activity was observed after protease treatment. Furthermore, treatment of human recombinant C5a with 56K protease at a dose of 1.0 microgram/ml resulted in a complete loss of chemotactic activity. When the living bacteria of the virulent strain, which produced about 10 times more protease than did the less virulent strain, were injected intraperitoneally into mice, the magnitude of infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into the peritoneal cavity was much lower than that caused by the less virulent strain. Because complement-dependent chemotactic activity is an initial response to bacterial infection, these results suggest indirect pathogenic functions of serratial proteases that suppress chemotactic activity. PMID:1691142

  18. Chemotactic G protein-coupled receptors control cell migration by repressing autophagosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coly, Pierre-Michaël; Perzo, Nicolas; Le Joncour, Vadim; Lecointre, Céline; Schouft, Marie-Thérèse; Desrues, Laurence; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Wurtz, Olivier; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène; Morin, Fabrice

    2016-12-01

    Chemotactic migration is a fundamental behavior of cells and its regulation is particularly relevant in physiological processes such as organogenesis and angiogenesis, as well as in pathological processes such as tumor metastasis. The majority of chemotactic stimuli activate cell surface receptors that belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. Although the autophagy machinery has been shown to play a role in cell migration, its mode of regulation by chemotactic GPCRs remains largely unexplored. We found that ligand-induced activation of 2 chemotactic GPCRs, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and the urotensin 2 receptor UTS2R, triggers a marked reduction in the biogenesis of autophagosomes, in both HEK-293 and U87 glioblastoma cells. Chemotactic GPCRs exert their anti-autophagic effects through the activation of CAPNs, which prevent the formation of pre-autophagosomal vesicles from the plasma membrane. We further demonstrated that CXCR4- or UTS2R-induced inhibition of autophagy favors the formation of adhesion complexes to the extracellular matrix and is required for chemotactic migration. Altogether, our data reveal a new link between GPCR signaling and the autophagy machinery, and may help to envisage therapeutic strategies in pathological processes such as cancer cell invasion.

  19. Novel chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine against cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuren; Zhang, Youhui

    2008-04-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in immune induction. Dendritic cells perform antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T cells only when they are matured and in the functional state. In the development of a vaccine, it is of utmost importance to consider how to make dendritic cells' functions immunologically adequate. In this paper, we report the development of a series of antitumor DNA vaccines with similar structural framework, in which a gene encoding tumor-associated antigenic peptide is ligated upstream to the gene coding secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine and downstream to the gene encoding the Fc portion of IgG (named chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine [CADV]). CCR7(+) T, B, natural killer and dendritic cells can be attracted by secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine, and Fc facilitates antigen uptake via Fc receptors expressed on dendritic cells. In a series of experiments in mice vaccinated by CADV with such tumor-associated antigenic specificities as HPV-16 E7, PSA-PSM-PAP, HER-2/neu, p53 and hTERT, CADV can attract immune cells to the vaccine inoculation site, remarkably inhibit tumor growth and extend survival time in tumor-bearing mice. The antitumor effect is more efficacious than that in mice treated with SLC-Ag or Ag-Fc hybrid gene. Tumor-associated antigenic-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be induced by in vitro experiment in a human system. When combined with measures blocking the negative immune feedback circuits, the therapeutic effect of the vaccine can be further enhanced. Large-scale production of CADV is possible for clinical application.

  20. Speed-dependent chemotactic precision in marine bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kwangmin; Menolascina, Filippo; Stocker, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis underpins important ecological processes in marine bacteria, from the association with primary producers to the colonization of particles and hosts. Marine bacteria often swim with a single flagellum at high speeds, alternating “runs” with either 180° reversals or ∼90° “flicks,” the latter resulting from a buckling instability of the flagellum. These adaptations diverge from Escherichia coli’s classic run-and-tumble motility, yet how they relate to the strong and rapid chemotaxis characteristic of marine bacteria has remained unknown. We investigated the relationship between swimming speed, run–reverse–flick motility, and high-performance chemotaxis by tracking thousands of Vibrio alginolyticus cells in microfluidic gradients. At odds with current chemotaxis models, we found that chemotactic precision—the strength of accumulation of cells at the peak of a gradient—is swimming-speed dependent in V. alginolyticus. Faster cells accumulate twofold more tightly by chemotaxis compared with slower cells, attaining an advantage in the exploitation of a resource additional to that of faster gradient climbing. Trajectory analysis and an agent-based mathematical model revealed that this unexpected advantage originates from a speed dependence of reorientation frequency and flicking, which were higher for faster cells, and was compounded by chemokinesis, an increase in speed with resource concentration. The absence of any one of these adaptations led to a 65–70% reduction in the population-level resource exposure. These findings indicate that, contrary to what occurs in E. coli, swimming speed can be a fundamental determinant of the gradient-seeking capabilities of marine bacteria, and suggest a new model of bacterial chemotaxis. PMID:27439872

  1. Phylogenetic Position and Molecular Chronology of a Colonial Green Flagellate, Stephanosphaera pluvialis (Volvocales, Chlorophyceae), among Unicellular Algae.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Hidehito; Nakada, Takashi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-05-01

    The genus Balticola comprises a group of unicellular green flagellate algae and is composed of four species formerly classified in the genus Haematococcus. Balticola is closely related to a colonial green flagellate, Stephanosphaera pluvialis. Although the phylogeny among these genera was previously investigated based on two nuclear gene sequences, the phylogenetic sister of S. pluvialis has yet to be determined. In the present study, the species diversity of Balticola and Stephanosphaera was investigated using 18S rRNA gene sequences, and phylogenetic analyses of combined nuclear and chloroplast gene sequences were performed to understand the evolutionary origin of coloniality in Stephanosphaera. The divergence times of four colonial volvocalean flagellates from their respective unicellular sisters were also estimated. Six Balticola genotypes and a single Stephanosphaera genotype were recognized, and one Balticola genotype was resolved as the sister of S. pluvialis, showing that Balticola is a nonmonophyletic genus. The divergence time of Stephanosphaera from its nearest Balticola relative was estimated to be 4-63 million years ago, and these genera represent the most recently diverged pair of unicellular and colonial flagellates among the Volvocales.

  2. Inheritance and diversification of symbiotic trichonymphid flagellates from a common ancestor of termites and the cockroach Cryptocercus.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Moriya; Noda, Satoko; Hongoh, Yuichi; Nalepa, Christine A; Inoue, Tetsushi

    2009-01-22

    Cryptocercus cockroaches and lower termites harbour obligate, diverse and unique symbiotic cellulolytic flagellates in their hindgut that are considered critical in the development of social behaviour in their hosts. However, there has been controversy concerning the origin of these symbiotic flagellates. Here, molecular sequences encoding small subunit rRNA and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were identified in the symbiotic flagellates of the order Trichonymphida (phylum Parabasalia) in the gut of Cryptocercus punctulatus and compared phylogenetically to the corresponding species in termites. In each of the monophyletic lineages that represent family-level groups in Trichonymphida, the symbionts of Cryptocercus were robustly sister to those of termites. Together with the recent evidence for the sister-group relationship of the host insects, this first comprehensive study comparing symbiont molecular phylogeny strongly suggests that a set of symbiotic flagellates representative of extant diversity was already established in an ancestor common to Cryptocercus and termites, was vertically transmitted to their offspring, and subsequently became diversified to distinct levels, depending on both the host and the symbiont lineages.

  3. Vertical distribution of the chloromonad flagellate Heterosigma carterae in columns: Implications for bloom development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Rensel, J.E.; Matter, A.L.; Taub, F.B.

    1998-01-01

    Blooms of the marine flagellate Heterosigma carterae have been associated with catastrophic fish kills at mariculture facilities around the world. The precise cause(s) of the sudden appearance and disappearance of Heterosigma surface blooms has not been completely described or understood. Environmental data from prior studies of blooms indicate the presence of vertical stratification of the water column that is often induced by freshwater runoff. We report the relatively rapid concentration of Heterosigma cells at the surface of tubes shortly after the addition of distilled water to the surface. This phenomenon of cell concentration in surface waters may partially explain the sudden appearance of Heterosigma cells near the surface and subsequent disappearance when vertical stratification is lost due to turbulence or mixing. The results may lead to bloom mitigation techniques for net pen aquaculture.

  4. Bronchopulmonary Disease Caused by Flagellated Protozoa Infection in 15 Chinese Children.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinrong; Li, Shaogang; Li, Huimin; Fan, Yimu; Yang, Haiming; Xu, Hui; Shen, Yuelin; Zhao, Shunying

    2017-04-01

    Bronchopulmonary disease caused by flagellated protozoa infection (BPFP) is thought to be rare in children but may be an emerging or underestimated disease, especially in developing countries. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed records of 15 patients who were presented with a cough, wheezing or bronchopulmonary disease of unknown causes during admission, and patients who were finally diagnosed with BPFP from January 2014 to January 2015 were enrolled. Protozoa were observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by light microscopy. A total of 15 pediatric cases (11 male and 4 female individuals, from 1 year 8 months to 12 years 1 month of age) with flagellated protozoa infection diagnosed by light microscopy were recruited. The course of the disease at the time of diagnosis was from 10 days to 11 months. Patients presented with a fever (N = 9), cough (N = 11), wheezing (N = 5) and chest pain (N = 5). Laboratory data showed elevated peripheral blood leucocytes (N = 6), eosinophilic granulocytes (N = 3), C-reactive protein (N = 5) and immunoglobulin E (N = 3). Bronchoscopy revealed a mucus plug (N = 3) and bronchiectasis (N = 1). Lung computed tomography results indicated ground-glass opacification (N = 2), atelectasis (N = 3), bronchiectasis (N = 1), bronchial wall thickening (N = 3) or nodular opacity (N = 6, including 1 case of pulmonary embolism). All children responded to metronidazole for a 2- to 5-week treatment period. Patients with BPFP often have a chronic or recurrent course and present with recurrent fever, cough, wheezing and chest pain. Chest imaging may reveal ground-glass opacification, atelectasis, bronchiectasis or nodular opacity (including pulmonary embolism). BPFP responds favorably to metronidazole treatment.

  5. Enhanced Retention of Chemotactic Bacteria in a Pore Network with Residual NAPL Contamination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaopu; Lanning, Larry M; Ford, Roseanne M

    2016-01-05

    Nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants are difficult to eliminate from natural aquifers due, in part, to the heterogeneous structure of the soil. Chemotaxis enhances the mixing of bacteria with contaminant sources in low-permeability regions, which may not be readily accessible by advection and dispersion alone. A microfluidic device was designed to mimic heterogeneous features of a contaminated groundwater aquifer. NAPL droplets (toluene) were trapped within a fine pore network, and bacteria were injected through a highly conductive adjacent macrochannel. Chemotactic bacteria (Pseudomonas putida F1) exhibited greater accumulation near the pore network at 0.5 m/day than both the nonchemotactic control and the chemotactic bacteria at a higher groundwater velocity of 5 m/day. Chemotactic bacteria accumulated in the vicinity of NAPL droplets, and the accumulation was 15% greater than a nonchemotactic mutant. Indirect evidence showed that chemotactic bacteria were retained within the contaminated low-permeability region longer than nonchemotactic bacteria at 0.25 m/day. This retention was diminished at 5 m/day. Numerical solutions of the bacterial-transport equations were consistent with the experimental results. Because toluene is degraded by P. putida F1, the accumulation of chemotactic bacteria around NAPL sources is expected to increase contaminant consumption and improve the efficiency of bioremediation.

  6. An intact acrosome is required for the chemotactic response to progesterone in mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Guidobaldi, Hector A; Hirohashi, Noritaka; Cubilla, Marisa; Buffone, Mariano G; Giojalas, Laura C

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian sperm become fertilization-competent in the oviduct, during a process known as capacitation that involves the acquisition of the ability to exocytose the acrosome but also the chemotactic responses-both of which contribute to successful fertilization. Chemotaxis is used by spermatozoa to orient and to locate the egg; the acrosome reaction facilitates sperm binding to and fusing with the egg membrane. Mammalian spermatozoa are able to sense picomolar concentrations of progesterone, which drives chemotactic behavior. The state of the acrosome during the chemotactic response, however, is unknown. Genetically modified mouse spermatozoa were employed in a chemotaxis assay under fluorescence microscopy to evaluate their acrosome status while swimming, allowing us to elucidate the acrosome integrity of sperm responding to progesterone-induced chemotaxis. We first showed that wild-type mouse spermatozoa chemotactically respond to a gradient of progesterone, and that the genetic modifications employed do not affect the chemotactic behavior of sperm to progesterone. Next, we found that acrosome-intact, but not acrosome-reacted, spermatozoa orient and respond to picomolar concentrations of progesterone and that chemotaxis normally occurs prior to the acrosome reaction. Our results suggest that premature commitment to acrosome exocytosis leads to navigation failure, so proper control and timing of the acrosome reaction is required for fertilization success and male fertility. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Collective chemotactic dynamics in the presence of self-generated fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Lushi, Enkeleida; Goldstein, Raymond E; Shelley, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    In microswimmer suspensions locomotion necessarily generates fluid motion, and it is known that such flows can lead to collective behavior from unbiased swimming. We examine the complementary problem of how chemotaxis is affected by self-generated flows. A kinetic theory coupling run-and-tumble chemotaxis to the flows of collective swimming shows separate branches of chemotactic and hydrodynamic instabilities for isotropic suspensions, the first driving aggregation, the second producing increased orientational order in suspensions of "pushers" and maximal disorder in suspensions of "pullers." Nonlinear simulations show that hydrodynamic interactions can limit and modify chemotactically driven aggregation dynamics. In puller suspensions the dynamics form aggregates that are mutually repelling due to the nontrivial flows. In pusher suspensions chemotactic aggregation can lead to destabilizing flows that fragment the regions of aggregation.

  8. Collective chemotactic dynamics in the presence of self-generated fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushi, Enkeleida; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2012-10-01

    In microswimmer suspensions locomotion necessarily generates fluid motion, and it is known that such flows can lead to collective behavior from unbiased swimming. We examine the complementary problem of how chemotaxis is affected by self-generated flows. A kinetic theory coupling run-and-tumble chemotaxis to the flows of collective swimming shows separate branches of chemotactic and hydrodynamic instabilities for isotropic suspensions, the first driving aggregation, the second producing increased orientational order in suspensions of “pushers” and maximal disorder in suspensions of “pullers.” Nonlinear simulations show that hydrodynamic interactions can limit and modify chemotactically driven aggregation dynamics. In puller suspensions the dynamics form aggregates that are mutually repelling due to the nontrivial flows. In pusher suspensions chemotactic aggregation can lead to destabilizing flows that fragment the regions of aggregation.

  9. Nutrient exposure of chemotactic organisms in small-scale turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-García, Javier; Neufeld, Zoltán; Torney, Colin

    2010-10-01

    Micro-organisms living in a turbulent fluid environment often use directed motility to locate regions of higher than average nutrient concentrations. Here, we consider a simple continuum model for the distribution of such chemotactic particles when the particles and the chemoattractant are both advected by a turbulent flow. The influence of chemotactic sensitivity on the spatial distribution of the particles is characterized for different types of advected chemical fields. Using an effective diffusion approximation, we obtain an analytical expression for the nutrient exposure resulting from the chemotactic activity of the particles, generalizing previous results obtained for the case of phototaxis in flows. We show that the biological advantage of chemotaxis in such systems is determined by the spatial variability of the averaged chemoattractant field and the effective diffusivity of the turbulent flow.

  10. Bronchial epithelial cells release monocyte chemotactic activity in response to smoke and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, S.; Rennard, S.I.; Leikauf, G.D.; Robbins, R.A. )

    1991-08-01

    An increase in mononuclear phagocytes occurs within the airways during airway inflammation. Bronchial epithelial cells could release monocyte chemotactic activity and contribute to this increase. To test this hypothesis, bovine bronchial epithelial cells were isolated and maintained in culture. Bronchial epithelial cell culture supernatant fluids were evaluated for monocyte chemotactic activity. Epithelial cell culture supernatant fluids attracted significantly greater numbers of monocytes compared to media alone and the number of monocytes attracted increased in a time dependent manner. Endotoxin and smoke extract induced a dose and time dependent release of monocyte chemotactic activity compared with cells cultured in media (52.5 {plus minus} 2.6 (endotoxin), 30.5 {plus minus} 2.3 (smoke) vs 20.5 {plus minus} 2.2 cells/high power field (HPF) p less than 0.001). The released activity was chemotactic by checkerboard analysis. Stimulation of the epithelial cells by opsonized zymosan, calcium ionophore (A23187), and PMA also resulted in an increase in monocyte chemotactic activity (p less than 0.01). Because the release of activity was blocked by the lipoxygenase inhibitors, nordihydroguaiaretic acid and diethycarbamazine, epithelial cell monolayers were cultured with 3 microCi (3H)arachidonic acid for 24 h and then exposed to A23187, PMA, or both stimuli, for 4, 8, and 24 h. Analysis of the released 3H activity was performed with reverse-phase HPLC and revealed that the major lipoxygenase product was leukotriene B4. These data suggest that monocytes may be recruited into airways in response to chemotactic factors released by bronchial epithelial cells.

  11. Colloidal silver nanoparticles/rhamnolipid (SNPRL) composite as novel chemotactic antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Bharali, P; Saikia, J P; Paul, S; Konwar, B K

    2013-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles and rhamnolipid are well known individually. In the present research, antibacterial and chemotactic activity due to colloidal silver nanoparticles (SNP), rhamnolipid (RL) and silver nanoparticles/rhamnolipid composite (SNPRL) were evaluated using Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC3160), Escherichia coli (MTCC40), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC8163) and Bacillus subtilis (MTCC441) as test strains. Further, the SNPRL nanoparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The observation clearly indicates that SNPRL shows prominent antibacterial and chemotactic activity in comparison to all of its individual precursor components.

  12. Detection of a complement-derived chemotactic factor for tumor cells in human inflammatory and neoplastic effusions.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, F. W.; Delikatny, E. J.; Mokashi, S.; Krepart, G. V.; Stiver, H. G.

    1983-01-01

    A chemotactic factor for neoplastic cells can be generated in vitro by incubating human C5 or C5a with leukocytic or pancreatic lysosomal enzymes and is also detectable in experimental inflammatory exudates. The authors therefore sought evidence for the existence of this factor in human effusions. Using the Boyden chamber assay, they detected chemotactic activity for MB-MDA-231 human breast carcinoma cells and Walker ascites tumor cells in human inflammatory and neoplastic exudates, including ascites, pleural effusions, synovial fluids and cerebrospinal fluids. Chemotactic activity was not found in transudates, normal cerebrospinal fluid, or normal serum. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells from one of the effusions migrated toward autologous ascites and towards the C5-derived chemotactic factor that had been prepared in vitro. In gel filtration the chemotactic factor behaved generally as a molecule having a molecular weight of approximately 6000 daltons. The activity was blocked after incubation with antiserums directed against C5 but not by antiserums directed against C3 or C4. In vitro, chemotactic activity for tumor cells could be generated by incubating extracts of exudate cells with autologous plasma or with purified C5. The authors conclude that a chemotactic factor for tumor cells can be formed in human effusions and that this factor has properties similar to those of a previously described C5-derived chemotactic factor. PMID:6185003

  13. Attachment of human C5a des Arg to its cochemotaxin is required for maximum expression of chemotactic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, H D; Chenoweth, D E; Goldstein, I M

    1986-01-01

    The chemotactic activity of human C5a des Arg is enhanced significantly by an anionic polypeptide (cochemotaxin) in normal human serum and plasma. We have found that the cochemotaxin attaches to the oligosaccharide chain of native C5a des Arg to form a complex with potent chemotactic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Although capable of enhancing the chemotactic activity of native C5a des Arg, the cochemotaxin had no effect on the chemotactic activity of either deglycosylated C5a des Arg, native C5a, or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Of the known components of the oligosaccharide chain, only sialic acid prevented enhancement by the cochemotaxin of the chemotactic activity exhibited by native C5a des Arg. Sialic acid also prevented the formation of C5a des Arg-cochemotaxin complexes, detected by acid polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, molecular sieve chromatography on polyacrylamide gels, and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. Images PMID:3782473

  14. Ultrastructure and phylogenetic placement within Heterolobosea of the previously unclassified, extremely halophilic heterotrophic flagellate Pleurostomum flabellatum (Ruinen 1938).

    PubMed

    Park, Jong S; Simpson, Alastair G B; Lee, Won J; Cho, Byung C

    2007-07-01

    Although Pleurostomum was described almost a century ago, flagellates assigned to this taxon have been recorded only in very occasional faunistic studies of highly saline habitats, and their phylogenetic position has remained uncertain. We report the cultivation, ultrastructure, and phylogenetic relationships of Pleurostomum flabellatum isolated from a Korean saltern pond of 313 per thousand salinity. This isolate is biflagellated with a cytostomal groove, and is not distinguishable from previous accounts of P. flabellatum from saturated brines in India and Australia. Pleurostomum flabellatum shows ultrastructural features characteristic of many Heterolobosea: (1) a striated rhizoplast, (2) an absence of stacked Golgi bodies, (3) parallel basal bodies and flagella, and (4) a large number of peripheral microtubules supporting a rostrum. 18S rRNA gene phylogenies strongly confirm the affinities of P. flabellatum within Heterolobosea. Furthermore, the 18S rRNA gene of P. flabellatum has the heterolobosean-specific helix 17_1, and a group I intron in the same position as in Acrasis rosea. Within Heterolobosea, the 'amoeboflagellate' genera Naegleria and Willaertia were its closest relatives with high bootstrap support and posterior probability. P. flabellatum was observed only as a flagellate, and never as an amoeba. Since light microscopy and electron microscopy observations indicate that P. flabellatum flagellates are capable both of feeding and division, there might be no amoeba stage. Being morphologically distinct from its closest relatives and phylogenetically distant from other flagellate-only Heterolobosea, P. flabellatum cannot be moved into any previously described heterolobosean genus. Instead, we move Pleurostomum into Heterolobosea, and assign as the type species Pleurostomum salinum Namyslowski 1913, a species that closely resembles P. flabellatum. The optimal temperature for growth of P. flabellatum is 40 degrees C. Interestingly, P. flabellatum grows

  15. Photosynthetic flagellates as model systems for accessing the impact of space conditions on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat

    Plants are an integral part of the exploration attempts for the planned missions to Mars and Moon. Photosynthetic, motile flagellates like Euglena gracilis can serve as model systems for the better understanding of the impact of microgravity and cosmic radiation on plants. Recent parabolic flights indicate that photosynthesis is impaired by microgravity. While oxygen production decreased during the short-term microgravity phases, other photosynthetic parameters remained constant or increased (photosynthetic yield and Ft as indicated by Pulse Amplitude Modulated Fluorescence measurements (PAM)). Ground-based long-term measurements in static bioreactors indicate a strong circadian rhythm of the related PAM-accessible parameters including oxygen production. Besides the problem of scientific analysis of these findings, practical implications with respect to life support systems or controlled environmental systems (CES) are significant. In two FOTON missions a CES system (AQUACELLS and its successor OMEGAHAB) was flown. The detailed analysis is still ongoing. In the paper oxygen production rates are compared to reference experiments on ground. In addition, the results of an upcoming parabolic flight campaign centred around fast PAM kinetics for a closer understanding of the impaired photosynthetic parameters will be presented.

  16. Molecular Analysis of the Graviperception Signal Transduction in the Flagellate Euglena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, Donat; Daiker, Viktor; Richter, Peter; Lebert, Michael

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis perceives and reacts to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Recent results of experiments on parabolic rocket flights have revealed that the orientation can be explained by passive orientation only to a small extend while the remainder relies on an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. Our current working hypothesis is based on the fact that the cellular contents is heavier than the surrounding medium and consequently exerts pressure onto the lower membrane where it activates mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. We recently succeeded in identifying these channels as gene products of the TRP family. RNAi of the corresponding gene abolished graviperception. These channels allow a gated influx of calcium which depolarizes the internal electrical potential and eventually causes a course correction by the flagellar beating. The inwardly gated calcium binds to a specific calmodulin which is likewise an intrinsic element of the signal transduction chain. RNAi of the related mRNA also stopped graviperception. This calmodulin is thought to activate an adenylyl cyclase which generates cyclic AMP which in turn modulates the beating pattern of the flagellum.

  17. Physiological parameters of gravitaxis in the flagellate Euglena gracilis obtained during a parabolic flight campaign.

    PubMed

    Richter, Peter R; Schuster, Martin; Wagner, Helmut; Lebert, Michael; Hader, Donat-P

    2002-02-01

    The unicellular freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis and its close relative Astasia longa show a pronounced negative gravitaxis. Previous experiments revealed that gravitaxis is most likely mediated by an active physiological mechanism in which changes of the internal calcium concentration and the membrane potential play an important role. In a recent parabolic flight experiment on board an aircraft (ESA 29th parabolic flight campaign), changes of graviorientation, membrane potential and the cytosolic calcium concentration upon changes of the acceleration (between 1 x g(n), 1.8 x g(n), microgravity) were monitored by image analysis and photometric methods using Oxonol VI (membrane potential) and Calcium Crimson (cytosolic calcium concentration). The parabolic flight maneuvers performed by the aircraft resulted in transient phases of 1.8 x g(n) (about 20 s), microgravity (about 22 s) followed by 1.8 x g(n) (about 20 s). A transient increase in the intracellular calcium concentration was detected from lower to higher accelerations (1 x g(n) to 1.8 x g(n) or microgravity to 1.8 x g(n)). Oxonol VI-labeled cells showed a signal, which indicates a depolarization during the transition from 1 x g(n) to 1.8 x g(n), a weak repolarization in microgravity followed by a rapid repolarization in the subsequent 1 x g(n) phase. The results show good coincidence with observations of recent terrestrial and space experiments.

  18. Ultrastructure of Amastigomonas bermudensis ATCC 50234 sp. nov.: A new heterotrophic marine flagellate.

    PubMed

    Molina, F I; Nerad, T A

    1991-11-29

    The ultrastructure of a new marine heterotrophic flagellate is described. The cell is dorso-ventrally flattened and displays a steady gliding forward movement. A longitudinal groove whose lips are appressed to the substrate runs along the ventral aspect of the cell. The two heterodynamic flagella originate from the proximal end of a cytoplasmic sheath that enfolds most of the length of the anterior flagellum. The lips of this sheath are continuous with the margins of the ventral groove. The posterior trailing flagellum is held closely appressed to the cell body on one side of the ventral groove. Three bands of microtubules extend posteriorly into the cell body and are associated with the kinetosomes. The part of the surface membrane extending over the cell's dorsal and lateral aspect is five-layered, giving the semblance of two fused cell membranes. There is a fibrillar layer underneath these membranes. There is also a fibrous network whose arrays are oriented in different directions within the cytoplasm. Mitochondria have tubular cristae. Based on a comparison with previously described species of Amastigomonas, we establish the species, A. bermudensis n.sp. We further conclude that Thecamonas is a junior synonym of Amastigomonas and move the three nominal species to the latter genus.

  19. Lineage-specific activities of a multipotent mitochondrion of trypanosomatid flagellates.

    PubMed

    Škodová-Sveráková, Ingrid; Verner, Zdeněk; Skalický, Tomáš; Votýpka, Jan; Horváth, Anton; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-04-01

    Trypanosomatids are a very diverse group composed of monoxenous and dixenous parasites belonging to the excavate class Kinetoplastea. Here we studied the respiration of five monoxenous species (Blechomonas ayalai, Herpetomonas muscarum, H. samuelpessoai, Leptomonas pyrrhocoris and Sergeia podlipaevi) introduced into culture, each representing a novel yet globally distributed and/or species-rich clade, and compare them with well-studied flagellates Trypanosoma brucei, Phytomonas serpens, Crithidia fasciculata and Leishmania tarentolae. Differences in structure and activities of respiratory chain complexes, respiration and other biochemical parameters recorded under laboratory conditions reveal their substantial diversity, likely a reflection of different host environments. Phylogenetic relationships of the analysed trypanosomatids do not correlate with their biochemical parameters, with the differences within clades by far exceeding those among clades. As the S. podlipaevi canonical respiratory chain complexes have very low activities, we believe that its mitochondrion is utilised for purposes other than oxidative phosphorylation. Hence, the single reticulated mitochondrion of diverse trypanosomatids seems to retain multipotency, with the capacity to activate its individual components based on the host environment.

  20. Indications for acceleration-dependent changes of membrane potential in the flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Richter, P R; Schuster, M; Meyer, I; Lebert, M; Häder, D-P

    2006-12-01

    The effects of the calcium sequester EGTA on gravitactic orientation and membrane potential changes in the unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis were investigated during a recent parabolic-flight experiment aboard of an Airbus A300. In the course of a flight parabola, an acceleration profile is achieved which yields subsequently about 20 s of hypergravity (1.8 g(n)), about 20 s of microgravity, and another 20 s of hypergravity phases. The movement behavior of the cells was investigated with real-time, computer-based image analysis. Membrane potential changes were detected with a newly developed photometer which measures absorption changes of the membrane potential-sensitive probe oxonol VI. To test whether the data obtained by the oxonol device were reliable, the signal of non-oxonol-labelled cells was recorded. In these samples, no absorption shift was detected. Changes of the oxonol VI signals indicate that the cells depolarize during acceleration (very obvious in the step from microgravity to hypergravity) and slightly hyperpolarize in microgravity, which can possibly be explained with the action of Ca-ATPases. These signals (mainly the depolarization) were significantly suppressed in the presence of EGTA (5 mM). Gravitaxis in parallel was also inhibited after addition of EGTA. Initially, negative gravitaxis was inverted into a positive one. Later, gravitaxis was almost undetectable.

  1. Transient Superdiffusion and Long-Range Correlations in the Motility Patterns of Trypanosomatid Flagellate Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luiz G. A.; Scariot, Débora B.; Guimarães, Renato R.; Nakamura, Celso V.; Mendes, Renio S.; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a diffusive analysis of the motion of flagellate protozoa species. These parasites are the etiological agents of neglected tropical diseases: leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania braziliensis, African sleeping sickness caused by Trypanosoma brucei, and Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. By tracking the positions of these parasites and evaluating the variance related to the radial positions, we find that their motions are characterized by a short-time transient superdiffusive behavior. Also, the probability distributions of the radial positions are self-similar and can be approximated by a stretched Gaussian distribution. We further investigate the probability distributions of the radial velocities of individual trajectories. Among several candidates, we find that the generalized gamma distribution shows a good agreement with these distributions. The velocity time series have long-range correlations, displaying a strong persistent behavior (Hurst exponents close to one). The prevalence of “universal” patterns across all analyzed species indicates that similar mechanisms may be ruling the motion of these parasites, despite their differences in morphological traits. In addition, further analysis of these patterns could become a useful tool for investigating the activity of new candidate drugs against these and others neglected tropical diseases. PMID:27007779

  2. Identification of putative miRNAs from the deep-branching unicellular flagellates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lin, Wei-Chen; Chen, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Yong-Han; Sun, Chin-Hung; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Tang, Petrus

    2012-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of extensively studied RNAi-associated small RNAs that play a critical role in eukaryotic gene regulation. However, knowledge on the miRNA and its regulation in unicellular eukaryotes is very limited. In order to obtain a better understanding on the origin of miRNA regulation system, we used deep-sequencing technology to investigate the miRNA expression pattern in four deep-branching unicellular flagellates: Giardia lamblia, Trichomonas vaginalis, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Pentatrichomonas hominis. In addition to the known miRNAs that have been described in G. lamblia and T. vaginalis, we identified 14 ancient animal miRNA families and 13 plant-specific families. Bioinformatics analysis also identified four novel miRNA candidates with reliable precursor structures derived from mature tRNAs. Our results indicated that miRNAs are likely to be a general feature for gene regulation throughout unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes and some of them may derive from unconventional ncRNAs such as snoRNA and tRNA.

  3. A molecular phylogeny of the flagellated fungi (Chytridiomycota) and description of a new phylum (Blastocladiomycota).

    PubMed

    James, Timothy Y; Letcher, Peter M; Longcore, Joyce E; Mozley-Standridge, Sharon E; Porter, David; Powell, Martha J; Griffith, Gareth W; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2006-01-01

    Chytridiomycota (chytrids) is the only phylum of true Fungi that reproduces with motile spores (zoospores). Chytrids currently are classified into five orders based on habitat, zoospore characters and life cycles. In this paper we estimate the phylogeny of the chytrids with DNA sequences from the ribosomal RNA operon (18S+5.8S+28S subunits). To our surprise the morphologically reduced parasites Olpidium and Rozella comprise two entirely new, and separate, lineages on the fungal tree. Olpidium brassicae groups among the Zygomycota, and Rozella spp. are the earliest branch to diverge in the fungal kingdom. The phylogeny also suggests that Chytridiomycota is not monophyletic and there are four major lineages of chytrids: Rozella spp., Olpidium brassicae, the Blastocladiales and a "core chytrid clade" containing the remaining orders and families and the majority of flagellated fungi. Within the core chytrid group 11 subclades can be identified, each of which correlates well with zoospore ultrastructure or morphology. We provide a synopsis of each clade and its morphological circumscription. The Blastocladiales appears to be the sister taxon of most nonflagellated fungi. Based on molecular phylogenetic and ultrastructural characters this order is elevated to a phylum, the Blastocladiomycota.

  4. Migration of Chemotactic Bacteria in Soft Agar: Role of Gel Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Croze, Ottavio A.; Ferguson, Gail P.; Cates, Michael E.; Poon, Wilson C.K.

    2011-01-01

    We study the migration of chemotactic wild-type Escherichia coli populations in semisolid (soft) agar in the concentration range C = 0.15–0.5% (w/v). For C≲0.35%, expanding bacterial colonies display characteristic chemotactic rings. At C = 0.35%, however, bacteria migrate as broad circular bands rather than sharp rings. These are growth/diffusion waves arising because of suppression of chemotaxis by the agar and have not been previously reported experimentally to our knowledge. For C = 0.4–0.5%, expanding colonies do not span the depth of the agar and develop pronounced front instabilities. The migration front speed is weakly dependent on agar concentration at C < 0.25%, but decreases sharply above this value. We discuss these observations in terms of an extended Keller-Segel model for which we derived novel transport parameter expressions accounting for perturbations of the chemotactic response by collisions with the agar. The model makes it possible to fit the observed front speed decay in the range C = 0.15–0.35%, and its solutions qualitatively reproduce the observed transition from chemotactic to growth/diffusion bands. We discuss the implications of our results for the study of bacteria in porous media and for the design of improved bacteriological chemotaxis assays. PMID:21806920

  5. Platelet factors induce chemotactic migration of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells with different metastatic capabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, M. A.; Rovasio, R. A.; Eynard, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemotactic response of neoplastic cells (NC) induced by soluble platelet factors was investigated. NC suspensions isolated from murine mammary gland adenocarcinomas having different metastatic capabilities were incubated in Boyden's chambers and challenged with (1) 'Early Platelet Factors' (EP), obtained from the soluble fraction of recently collagen-activated human platelets, and (2) 'Late Platelet Factors' (LP), isolated after 24 hours incubation of the platelet aggregates. Chemotaxis was expressed as the distance travelled by NC through nitrocellulose filters. NC isolated from M3, the tumour line having the stronger metastatic potential, showed a significant chemotactic response towards LP factors, whereas NC from the M2 line exhibiting the lower metastatic behaviour, showed a chemotactic response towards EP factors. Both tumour cell lines lacked motion capability towards the well known chemoattractant peptide N-f-Met-Leu-Phe-Phe as well as to serum, plasma, collagen type I or culture medium. The different chemotactic response of both tumour lines when they were challenged by concentration gradients of factors released by early or late collagen-activated human platelets, confirm a relationship between platelet activity and metastatic capabilities and suggests that platelet chemoattractants might play a role in the metastatic dissemination of these mammary gland adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8217786

  6. Characterization and reactivity of broiler chicken sera to selected recombinant Campylobacter jejuni chemotactic proteins.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Hiett, Kelli L; Line, John E; Seal, Bruce S

    2014-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod bacterium, is the leading causative agent of human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Consumption and handling of raw or undercooked poultry are regarded as a major source for human infection. Because bacterial chemotaxis guides microorganisms to colonization and invasion in the host cells, proteins involved in chemotactic processes can be novel targets for vaccine development. In this communication, we report amplification, cloning and expression of the C. jejuni chemotactic proteins in an Escherichia coli expression system. A total of 15 chemotactic protein genes were successfully expressed. These recombinant proteins were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing, SDS-PAGE analysis and immunoblot analysis of six-His and hemagglutinin tags. Twelve recombinant chemotactic proteins were further tested whether they were antigenic using sera from broiler chickens older than 4 weeks. The immunoblot results show that each chicken serum reacted to a variety of the recombinant proteins, but all sera reacted to the Cjj0473 gene product (annotated as a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein), suggesting that anti-Campylobacter antibodies may be prevalent in the poultry population. These antibody screening results provide a rationale for further evaluation of the Cjj0473 protein as a potential vaccine for broilers to improve human food safety.

  7. Morphology and phylogeny of a new wall-less freshwater volvocalean flagellate, Hapalochloris nozakii gen. et sp. nov. (Volvocales, Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Nakada, Takashi; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-10-21

    New strains of a wall-less unicellular volvocalean flagellate were isolated from a freshwater environment in Japan. Observations of the alga, described here as Hapalochloris nozakii Nakada, gen. et sp. nov., were made using light, fluorescence, and electron microscopy. Each vegetative cell had two flagella, four contractile vacuoles, and a spirally furrowed cup-shaped chloroplast with an axial pyrenoid, and mitochondria located in the furrows. Based on the morphology, H. nozakii was distinguished from other known wall-less volvocalean flagellates. Under electron microscopy, fibrous material, instead of a cell wall and dense cortical microtubules, was observed outside and inside the cell membrane, respectively. Based on the phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA gene sequences, H. nozakii was found to be closely related to Asterococcus, Oogamochlamys, Rhysamphichloris, and "Dunaliella" lateralis and was separated from other known wall-less flagellate volvocaleans, indicating independent secondary loss of the cell wall in H. nozakii. In the combined 18S rRNA and chloroplast gene tree, H. nozakii was sister to Lobochlamys.

  8. Enhanced Retention of Chemotactic Bacteria in a Pore Network with Residual NAPL Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants are difficult to eliminate from natural aquifers due, in part, to the heterogeneous structure of the soil matrix. Residual NAPL ganglia remain trapped in regions where the hydraulic conductivity is relatively low. Bioremediation processes depend on adequate mixing of microbial populations and the groundwater contaminants that they degrade. The ability of bacteria to sense a chemical gradient and swim preferentially toward locations of higher concentration, known as chemotaxis, can enhance the mixing of bacteria with contaminant sources that may not be readily accessible by advection and dispersion alone. The impact of chemotaxis on bacterial abundance within a low conductivity NAPL-contaminated region of a well-characterized porous matrix was investigated. A microfluidic device was designed to mimic heterogeneous features of a contaminated groundwater system. NAPL ganglia (toluene) were trapped within a fine pore network, and bacteria were injected into the system through a highly conductive adjacent channel. Chemotactic bacteria (P. putida F1) migrated preferentially towards and accumulated in the vicinity of NAPL contaminant sources. The accumulation of chemotactic bacteria was 15% greater in comparison to a nonchemotactic mutant (P. putida F1 CheA). Bacteria in the microfluidic device were subjected to different flow velocities from 0.25 to 5 m/d encompassing the range of typical groundwater flow rates. Chemotactic bacteria exhibited greater accumulation near the intersection between the macrochannel and the porous network at a flow velocity of 0.5 m/d than both the nonchemotactic mutant control and the chemotactic bacteria at a higher flow velocity of 5 m/d. Breakthrough curves observed at the outlet provided indirect evidence that chemotactic bacteria were retained within the contaminated low permeable region for a longer time than the nonchemotactic bacteria at a flow velocity of 0.25 m/d. This retention was

  9. Presence of factors chemotactic for granulocytes in hypereosinophilic syndrome sera: relation with alterations in eosinophil migration.

    PubMed Central

    Gosset, P; Prin, L; Capron, M; Auriault, C; Tonnel, A B; Capron, A

    1986-01-01

    Recent work has underlined a structural and metabolic heterogeneity amongst blood eosinophils in various hypereosinophilic diseases. Little is known about the factors responsible for this variability. We have identified granulocyte chemotactic factors, termed GCFs in the sera of five patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Sera from normal controls or from 20 patients with blood hypereosinophilia of various causes, but with little or no hypodense blood eosinophils, did not demonstrate any chemotactic activity. Two distinct GCFs were characterized, either by gel filtration or isoelectric focusing (molecular weights of 600 kD and 240 kD; pIs of approximately 5 and 7). These fractions are sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and to heating to 100 degrees C but not to 56 degrees C. The activity of GCFs has been tested towards neutrophils and eosinophils. The fractions of 240 kD and pI 7 appear more selective for the eosinophil lineage. Checkerboard analysis shows that such fractions are primarily chemotactic. In addition, hypodense eosinophils appear defective in random motility and chemotaxis towards chemotactic agents which are effective on normodense eosinophils. Moreover, preincubation of normodense eosinophils with HES sera rendered these cells unresponsive to very efficient chemotactic agents such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4) (decrease in migration of 91%; P less than 10(-3), formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanyl (Fmlp) (decrease of 95%; P less than 10(-2)), HES sera (decrease of 91 to 93%). These findings suggest a process of deactivation of blood eosinophils with the possible retention within the circulation of activated hypodense eosinophils in HES. PMID:3780047

  10. Complement (C5)-derived chemotactic activity accounts for accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, J D; Hartiala, K T; Goldstein, I M; Sande, M A

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to identify the chemoattractant for polymorphonuclear leukocytes that appears in the cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits with experimental pneumococcal meningitis. Meningitis was induced in anesthetized New Zealand white rabbits by injecting 10(4) cells of stationary-phase Streptococcus pneumoniae type III intracisternally. Before bacteria were injected, cerebrospinal fluid contained neither polymorphonuclear leukocytes nor chemotactic activity. Significant chemotactic activity for rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes was detected 12 h after inoculation with bacteria and was maximal after 18 to 20 h. Chemotactic activity appeared in cerebrospinal fluid while concentrations of pneumococci and total protein were increasing but before there was any accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chemotactic activity in cerebrospinal fluid was heat stable (56 degrees C for 30 min), eluted from Sephadex G-75 with a profile identical to that of the chemotactic activity in zymosan-activated rabbit serum, and was inhibited by treatment with antibodies to native human C5. In addition, preincubation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes with partially purified rabbit C5a selectively inhibited their subsequent chemotactic responses to cerebrospinal fluid. These data indicate that complement (C5)-derived chemotactic activity appears in cerebrospinal fluid during the course of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rabbits and suggest that this activity accounts for the accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes observed in this infection. PMID:6480117

  11. Minimally modified low density lipoprotein induces monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in human endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, S.D.; Berliner, J.A.; Valente, A.J.; Territo, M.C.; Navab, M.; Parhami, F.; Gerrity, R.; Schwartz, C.J.; Fogelman, A.M.

    1990-07-01

    After exposure to low density lipoprotein (LDL) that had been minimally modified by oxidation (MM-LDL), human endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) cultured separately or together produced 2- to 3-fold more monocyte chemotactic activity than did control cells or cells exposed to freshly isolated LDL. This increase in monocyte chemotactic activity was paralleled by increases in mRNA levels for a monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) that is constitutively produced by the human glioma U-105MG cell line. Antibody that had been prepared against cultured baboon smooth muscle cell chemotactic factor (anti-SMCF) did not inhibit monocyte migration induced by the potent bacterial chemotactic factor f-Met-Leu-Phe. However, anti-SMCF completely inhibited the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the media of U-105MG cells, EC, and SMC before and after exposure to MM-LDL. Moreover, monocyte migration into the subendothelial space of a coculture of EC and SMC that had been exposed to MM-LDL was completely inhibited by anti-SMCF. Anti-SMCF specifically immunoprecipitated 10-kDa and 12.5-kDa proteins from EC. Incorporation of (35S)methionine into the immunoprecipitated proteins paralleled the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the medium of MM-LDL stimulated EC and the levels of MCP-1 mRNA found in the EC. We conclude that SMCF is in fact MCP-1 and MCP-1 is induced by MM-LDL.

  12. Identification criteria of the rare multi-flagellate Lophomonas blattarum: comparison of different staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Alam-Eldin, Yosra Hussein; Abdulaziz, Amany Mamdouh

    2015-09-01

    Bronchopulmonary lophomoniasis (BPL) is an emerging disease of potential importance. BPL is presented by non-specific clinical picture and is usually accompanied by immunosuppression. Culture of Lophomonas blattarum is difficult and its molecular diagnosis has not yet been developed. Therefore, microscopic examination of respiratory samples, e.g., bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or sputum, is the mainstay of BPL diagnosis. Creola bodies and ciliocytophthoria are two forms of bronchial cells which occur in chest diseases with non-specific clinical picture like that of BPL. Both forms could be misrecognized as multi-flagellates because of their motile cilia in the wet mounts and due to shape variability of L. blattarum in stained smears. The aim of the study is to compare different staining techniques for visualizing L. blattarum to improve the recognition and diagnosis of BPL, to distinguish respiratory epithelial cells from L. blattarum and to decide which stain is recommended in suspected cases of BPL. BAL samples from patients which contain L. blattarum, creola bodies, and ciliocytophthoria were collected then wet mounts were examined. The BAL samples were also stained by Papanicolaou (PAP), Giemsa, hematoxylin and eosin (H & E), trichrome, Gram, and Diff-Quik (DQ) stains. The different staining techniques were compared regarding the stain quality. In wet mounts, the ciliary movement was coordinate and synchronous while the flagellar movement was wavy and leaded to active swimming of L. blattarum. In stained slides, bronchial cells were characterized by the presence of basal nucleus and the terminal bar from which the cilia arise. Trichrome was the best stain in demonstration of cellular details of L. blattarum. H & E, PAP, and Giemsa stains showed good quality of stains. Gram and DQ stains showed only pale hues of L. blattarum. We recommended adding Wheatley's trichrome staining to the differential diagnosis workup of cases of non-specific chest infections

  13. Live-cell super-resolution imaging of intrinsically fast moving flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glogger, M.; Stichler, S.; Subota, I.; Bertlein, S.; Spindler, M.-C.; Teßmar, J.; Groll, J.; Engstler, M.; Fenz, S. F.

    2017-02-01

    Recent developments in super-resolution microscopy make it possible to resolve structures in biological cells at a spatial resolution of a few nm and observe dynamical processes with a temporal resolution of ms to μs. However, the optimal structural resolution requires repeated illumination cycles and is thus limited to chemically fixed cells. For live cell applications substantial improvement over classical Abbe-limited imaging can already be obtained in adherent or slow moving cells. Nonetheless, a large group of cells are fast moving and thus could not yet be addressed with live cell super-resolution microscopy. These include flagellate pathogens like African trypanosomes, the causative agents of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in livestock. Here, we present an embedding method based on a in situ forming cytocompatible UV-crosslinked hydrogel. The fast cross-linking hydrogel immobilizes trypanosomes efficiently to allow microscopy on the nanoscale. We characterized both the trypanosomes and the hydrogel with respect to their autofluorescence properties and found them suitable for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy (SMFM). As a proof of principle, SMFM was applied to super-resolve a structure inside the living trypanosome. We present an image of a flagellar axoneme component recorded by using the intrinsic blinking behavior of eYFP. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J Phys D. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Susanne Fenz was selected by the Editorial Board of J Phys D as an Emerging Talent/Leader.

  14. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, A.; Terrado, R.; Thaler, M.; Comeau, A.; Medrinal, E.; Lovejoy, C.

    2013-06-01

    The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL) in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8-20 μm cell diameter), mostly phagotrophic protists in the upper pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer, where light and nutrients are both available. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL from different water masses within the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada), targeting the surface, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer (SCM) and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1) to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly suggested that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate-driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  15. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, A.; Terrado, R.; Thaler, M.; Comeau, A. M.; Medrinal, E.; Lovejoy, C.

    2013-02-01

    The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL) in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8-20 μm cell diameter), mostly phagotrophic protists in the pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) layer. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL across a wide region, and down the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada), targeting the surface, the SCM and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1) to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly implied that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  16. Isolation and characterization of flagellates from rodents and canids in Masinga, Machakos District, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Githure, John I.; Anjili, Christopher O.; Ngumbi, Philip M.; Mwanyumba, Panuel M.; Lugalia, Reuben; Koech, Davy K.; Kinoti, George K.

    1995-11-01

    A total of 728 animals comprising of 633 rodents and 95 canids were examined for leishmanial parasites. Flagellates were isolated from 67 out of 111 (60.4%) Acomys subspinosus (spiny mouse), 12 out of 143 (8.4% ) Mastomys natalensis (multimammate rat), 2 out of 50 (4.0%) Lemniscomys striatus (striped mouse), 2 out of 6 (33.3%) Herpestes sanguineus (slender mongoose), 1 of 1 Helogale parvula (dwarf mongoose) and 1 out of 84 Canis familiaris (domestic dog). All isolates were characterized by Isoenzyme analysis using nine enzymes, namely, malate dehydrogenase (MDH), phosphoglucomutase (PGM), glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD), nucleoside hydrolase (NH), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), malic enzyme (ME), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (GPGD) and mannose phosphate isomerase (MPI). Enzyme profiles of these isolates were compared with those of five WHO Leishmania reference strains and five well characterized rodent trypanosomes of the subgenus Herpetosoma. The profiles of the isolates were found to be different from those of the Leishmania and Trypanosoma reference strains but the parasites were morphologically similar to rodent trypanosomes. These results suggest that Leishmania parasites were not among the isolates. The enzymes profiles of the three mongoose isolates were identical but differed from profiles of isolates from rodents and dog. This is the first time in Kenya that a high prevalence of nonpathogenic trypanosomes is reported in rodents and canids. From the epidemiological point of view, these trypanosomes must be differentiated from the pathogenic species of trypanosomes and Leishmania that infect man and other animals. The results of this study suggest that rodents do not seem to play a role as reservoirs of Leishmania parasites in Masinga Location, Kenya.

  17. The chemotactic properties of porcine seminal components toward neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rozeboom, K J; Troedsson, M H; Rocha, G R; Crabo, B G

    2001-04-01

    Our objectives were to investigate the mechanisms of postbreeding inflammation in swine by examining the chemotactic properties of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes (PMN) and of various populations of spermatozoa and seminal plasma. Epididymal spermatozoa from two boars obtained under sterile conditions, washed ejaculated spermatozoa from two boars, and pooled seminal plasma from eight boars of known fertility were examined for chemotaxis to PMN. The chemotaxis of blood-derived PMN in response to sperm and seminal plasma was evaluated and expressed as a percentage of a positive control (lipopolysaccharide-activated blood plasma). The mean chemotactic effect of washed sperm alone (4.4+/-0.04) and of epididymal sperm alone (3.4+/-0.06) was not different from that of the negative controls (3.1+/-0.05) of McCoy's medium with 10% heat-inactivated fetal calf serum. A marked chemotactic effect was detected when washed ejaculated and epididymal sperm were incubated with blood plasma, compared with blood plasma without spermatozoa (P < 0.001). Washed sperm in blood plasma (86.2+/-5.6) and epididymal sperm in blood plasma (83.9+/-7.7) were different from blood plasma alone (11.2+/-1.5), but no differences were detected between the two populations of sperm. This effect, however, was not completely inhibited by heat inactivation of the blood plasma. The chemotactic response of washed ejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa incubated in lipopolysaccharide-treated, heat-inactivated blood plasma were greater than that of the negative control (P < 0.05). Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocyte migration toward seminal plasma was similar to the negative control (4.0+/-0.04 vs 3.1+/-0.05). It seems that porcine epididymal sperm and ejaculated sperm activate chemotactic components in porcine blood plasma and heat-inactivated blood plasma, suggesting that, at least partially, a heat-stable (noncomplement) blood plasma component may be involved in sperm-induced PMN

  18. Chemotactic movement in sperm of the oogamous brown algae, Saccharina japonica and Fucus distichus.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Nana; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2017-01-01

    In oogamous species of brown algae such as Saccharina japonica and Fucus distichus, the sperm possess an unusual long posterior flagellum, which oscillates actively and produces a propulsive force during swimming. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed the effect of chemotactic responses on sperm swimming and flagellar waveforms by high-speed video recordings. We found that the thigmotactic response to the chemo-attractant was not enhanced during chemotactic swimming and that the swimming velocity of sperm did not decrease. As concentration of the chemo-attractant decreased, the sperm performed drastic U-turn movements, which was caused by a rapid and large bend of the posterior flagellum. Unilateral bending of the posterior flagellum when sensing a decrease in the concentration of the chemo-attractant may be a common response in male gametes during fertilization of brown algae both oogamous and isogamous species.

  19. Characterization of Chemotactic Responses and Flagella of Hyphomicrobium Strain W1-1B

    PubMed Central

    Tuhela, Laura; Robinson, Jayne B.; Tuovinen, Olli H.

    1998-01-01

    Motile swarmer cells of Hyphomicrobium strain W1-1B displayed positive chemotactic responses toward methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine but did not display significant chemotactic responses towards methanol and arginine. Electron micrographs of negatively stained intact flagellar filaments indicated a novel striated surface pattern. The flagella were composed of two proteins of 39 and 41 kDa. Neither protein was a glycoprotein as determined by Schiff’s staining and by enzyme immunoassay. Protein fingerprints visualized from silver-stained polyacrylamide gels and Western blots of protease-digested samples indicated that the two proteins were similar but not identical. Monoclonal antibodies prepared to the complex flagella of Rhizobium meliloti cross-reacted with the striated flagella of Hyphomicrobium strain W1-1B; however, these antibodies did not cross-react with smooth-surface flagella. These results suggest that complex and striated flagella possess homologous epitope regions. PMID:9603896

  20. Chemotactic sensing towards ambient and secreted attractant drives collective behaviour of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Curk, Tine; Marenduzzo, Davide; Dobnikar, Jure

    2013-01-01

    We simulate the dynamics of a suspension of bacterial swimmers, which chemotactically sense gradients in either ambient or self-secreted attractants (e.g. nutrient or aspartate respectively), or in both. Unlike previous mean field models based on a set of continuum partial differential equations, our model resolves single swimmers and therefore incorporates stochasticity and effects due to fluctuations in the bacterial density field. The algorithm we use is simple enough that we can follow the evolution of colonies of up to over a million bacteria for timescales relevant to pattern formation for E. coli growing in semisolid medium such as agar, or in confined geometries. Our results confirm previous mean field results that the patterns observed experimentally can be reproduced with a model incorporating chemoattractant secretion, chemotaxis (towards gradients in the chemoattractant field), and bacterial reproduction. They also suggest that further experiments with bacterial strains chemotactically moving up both nutrient and secreted attractant field may yield yet more dynamical patterns.

  1. Dynamic chemotactic response of fibroblasts to local stimulation using EGF-immobilized microbeads.

    PubMed

    Aratsu, Fumihiro; Harada, Ichiro; Yoshimura, Soichiro; Cho, Chong-Su; Akaike, Toshihiro; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi

    2014-03-01

    Directional cellular migrations as a chemotactic response to spatially inhomogeneous growth factor stimulation play an important role in establishing physiological mechanisms and pathological events in cells. We developed epidermal growth factor (EGF)-immobilized microbeads by photoreaction and evaluated its local stimulatory effects on the dynamic chemotactic motility of fibroblasts. The local stimulation resulted in global activation of ERK 1/2 and directionality of cellular migration. The cellular migration by stimulation using 3-μm diameter EGF-immobilized microbeads persisted for a longer time, were involved a wider field and their number were further increased with stimulation. This effective technique allows cellular migration and biochemical analyses that will help elucidate the mechanisms involved in signal transduction by spatially inhomogeneous stimulation of the growth factor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A common soil flagellate (Cercomonas sp.) grows slowly when feeding on the bacterium Rhodococcus fascians in isolation, but does not discriminate against it in a mixed culture with Sphingopyxis witflariensis.

    PubMed

    Lekfeldt, Jonas Duus Stevens; Rønn, Regin

    2008-07-01

    Flagellates are very important predators on bacteria in soil. Because of their high growth rates, flagellate populations respond rapidly to changes in bacterial numbers. Previous results indicate that actinobacteria are generally less suitable than proteobacteria as food for flagellates. In this study, we investigated the growth of the flagellate Cercomonas sp. (ATCC 50334) on each of the two bacteria Sphingopyxis witflariensis (Alphaproteobacteria) and Rhodococcus fascians (actinobacteria) separately and in combination. The growth rate of the flagellate was lower and the lag phase was longer when fed with R. fascians than when fed with S. witflariensis. This supports our initial hypothesis that the actinobacterium is less suitable as food than the alphaproteobacterium. However, after longer periods of growth the peak abundance of flagellates was higher on R. fascians, indicating that the food quality of bacterial prey depends on the time perspective of the flagellate-bacterial interaction. There was no evidence that the flagellates selected against the actinobacterium when feeding in mixed cultures of the two bacteria. Experiments where flagellates were fed with washed bacterial cells or with bacteria growing with different substrate concentrations suggested that the low food quality of R. fascians is related both to the intrinsic cell properties and to the extracellular metabolites.

  3. Flagellate infections of Brazilian sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae): isolation in vitro and biochemical identification of Endotrypanum and Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Arias, J R; Miles, M A; Naiff, R D; Povoa, M M; de Freitas, R A; Biancardi, C B; Castellon, E G

    1985-11-01

    Flagellate infections were found in 1,063 of 18,895 sand flies collected in the states of Amazonas, Pará, Rondonia and Acre, Brazil. Infection rates were 13.4% (species group Shannoni); 7.5% (subgenus Nyssomyia); 6.7% (subgenus Lutzomyia series Cruciata); 0.5% (genus Psychodopygus) and 3.1% for other sand flies (various subgenera). Leishmania braziliensis guyanensis and L. mexicana amazonensis were isolated, respectively, from the known vectors, Lutzomyia umbratilis and L. flaviscutellata. Single stocks of L. braziliensis-like and L. mexicana-like organisms were isolated, respectively, from L. whitmani and L. yuilli. Thirty-eight flagellate stocks, isolated by direct culture from sand flies were characterized in detail by morphology in culture, behavior in hamsters and mice and by enzyme profiles. Sixteen stocks from Lutzomyia sp. (Shannoni group) were identified as Endotrypanum schaudinni; 8 stocks from Lutzomyia sp. (Shannoni group) were identified as Endotrypanum sp.; 7 stocks from Psychodopygus ayrozai and P. paraensis were identified as Leishmania sp. previously isolated from the armadillo, Dasypus novemcinctus; 2 stocks of Trypanosoma rangeli were isolated from recently fed Lutzomyia sp. (Shannoni group) sand flies; the remaining 5 stocks from L. umbratilis and L. yuilli could not be identified. Observations suggested that Shannoni group sand flies were the natural vectors of Endotrypanum. Leishmania sp. infections in the man-biting flies P. ayrozai and P. paraensis were restricted to the midgut and associated with recent bloodmeals. Unidentified flagellates in L. umbratilis and L. yuilli were distributed throughout the digestive tract with no trace of bloodmeals.

  4. EST analysis of the scaly green flagellate Mesostigma viride (Streptophyta): Implications for the evolution of green plants (Viridiplantae)

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Andreas; Glöckner, Gernot; Felder, Marius; Melkonian, Michael; Becker, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    Background The Viridiplantae (land plants and green algae) consist of two monophyletic lineages, the Chlorophyta and the Streptophyta. The Streptophyta include all embryophytes and a small but diverse group of freshwater algae traditionally known as the Charophyceae (e.g. Charales, Coleochaete and the Zygnematales). The only flagellate currently included in the Streptophyta is Mesostigma viride Lauterborn. To gain insight into the genome evolution in streptophytes, we have sequenced 10,395 ESTs from Mesostigma representing 3,300 independent contigs and compared the ESTs of Mesostigma with available plant genomes (Arabidopsis, Oryza, Chlamydomonas), with ESTs from the bryophyte Physcomitrella, the genome of the rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon, the ESTs from the rhodophyte Porphyra, and the genome of the diatom Thalassiosira. Results The number of expressed genes shared by Mesostigma with the embryophytes (90.3 % of the expressed genes showing similarity to known proteins) is higher than with Chlamydomonas (76.1 %). In general, cytosolic metabolic pathways, and proteins involved in vesicular transport, transcription, regulation, DNA-structure and replication, cell cycle control, and RNA-metabolism are more conserved between Mesostigma and the embryophytes than between Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas. However, plastidic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways, cytoskeletal proteins and proteins involved in protein folding are more conserved between Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas than between Mesostigma and the embryophytes. Conclusion Our EST-analysis of Mesostigma supports the notion that this organism should be a suitable unicellular model for the last flagellate common ancestor of the streptophytes. Mesostigma shares more genes with the embryophytes than with the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, although both organisms are flagellate unicells. Thus, it seems likely that several major physiological changes (e.g. in the regulation of photosynthesis and photorespiration

  5. LPP3 mediates self-generation of chemotactic LPA gradients by melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Susanto, Olivia; Koh, Yvette W H; Morrice, Nick; Tumanov, Sergey; Thomason, Peter A; Nielson, Matthew; Tweedy, Luke; Muinonen-Martin, Andrew J; Kamphorst, Jurre J; Mackay, Gillian M; Insall, Robert H

    2017-09-04

    Melanoma cells steer out of tumours using self-generated lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradients. The cells break down LPA, which is present at high levels around the tumours, creating a dynamic gradient that is low in the tumour and high outside. They then also migrate up this gradient, creating a complex and evolving outward chemotactic stimulus. Here we introduce a new assay for self-generated chemotaxis, and show that raising LPA levels causes a delay in migration rather than loss of chemotactic efficiency. Knockdown of the lipid phosphatase LPP3 - but not its homologues LPP1 or LPP2 - diminishes the cell's ability to break down LPA. This is specific for chemotactically active LPAs, such as the 18:1 and 20:4 species. Inhibition of autotaxin-mediated LPA production does not diminish outward chemotaxis, but loss of LPP3-mediated LPA breakdown blocks it. Similarly, in both 2D and 3D invasion assays, knockdown of LPP3 diminishes melanoma cells' ability to invade. Our results demonstrate that LPP3 is the key enzyme in melanoma cells' breakdown of LPA, and confirm the importance of attractant breakdown in LPA-mediated cell steering. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Chemotactic effect of mono- and disaccharides on the unicellular Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Szemes, Áfonya; Lajkó, Eszter; Láng, Orsolya; Kőhidai, László

    2015-04-30

    Chemotaxis is one of the most essential cell physiological responses, which was developed in parallel the molecular evolution of signal molecules. Previously good correlations were found between chemotactic moieties and physicochemical properties (SEA, solubility, pKa) of peptide type ligands in Tetrahymena model. However, references are rather weak in eukaryotic chemotaxis about significance of simple carbohydrates. In the present work our goal is (i) to investigate the chemotactic effect of 10 mono- and disaccharides in the eukaryotic Tetrahymena pyriformis; (ii) to describe effective ligands with physicochemical parameters; (iii) to test whether sugars are acting via induction of metabolic pathways. Our results are: (i) the tested sugars can trigger both significant attractant (D-glucose, D-mannose) and significant repellent (D-glucosamine, D-fructose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-arabinose) effects, while some of the sugars (maltose, lactose, sucrose, D-galactose) had no effect. (ii) Correlations were described between the chemotactic effectiveness of the ligands and their physicochemical characters (TPSA, XLogP), which are supposed to influence the internalization of the sugars. (iii) All ligands proved to have low selection potential, which refers to a 'short-term' receptor moiety or influencing specific metabolic pathways. (iv) Starvation elicited modified, strong chemoattractive responsiveness towards glucose; however, it was independent of concentration while 1 h insulin treatment resulted in an increased and concentration dependent chemotaxis induced by glucose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MACROPHAGE MIGRATION INHIBITORY FACTOR REGULATES NEUTROPHIL CHEMOTACTIC RESPONSES IN INFLAMMATORY ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leilani L.; Fan, Huapeng; Hall, Pam; Ngo, Devi; Mackay, Charles R.; Fingerle-Rowson, Gunter; Bucala, Richard; Hickey, Michael J.; Morand, Eric F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) facilitates multiple aspects of inflammatory arthritis, the pathogenesis of which is significantly contributed to by neutrophils. The effects of MIF on neutrophil recruitment are unknown. We investigated the contribution of MIF to the regulation of neutrophil chemotactic responses. Methods K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was induced in wild-type (WT), MIF -/-, and MCP1 (CCL2)-deficient mice, and in WT mice treated with anti-KC (CXCL1) mAb. In vivo leukocyte trafficking was examined using intravital microscopy, and in vitro neutrophil function was examined using migration chambers and MAP kinase activation. Results K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was markedly attenuated in MIF-/- mice, with reductions in clinical and histological severity as well as synovial expression of KC and IL-1. Arthritis was also reduced by anti-KC antibody treatment, but not in MCP-1-deficient mice. In vivo neutrophil recruitment responses to KC were reduced in MIF-/- mice. Similarly, MIF-/-neutrophils exhibited reduced in vitro chemotactic responses to KC, despite unaltered chemokine receptor expression. Reduced chemotactic responses in MIF-/- neutrophils were associated with reduced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. Conclusion These data suggest MIF promotes neutrophil trafficking in inflammatory arthritis via facilitation of chemokine-induced migratory responses and MAP kinase activation. Therapeutic MIF inhibition could limit synovial neutrophil recruitment. PMID:21452319

  8. Chemotactic activity of Helicobacter pylori sonicate for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1992-01-01

    The immunopathology of Helicobacter pylori associated active chronic gastritis, which is characterised by predominance of polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration, is largely unknown. To evaluate the role of bacterial components as inflammatory mediators ultracentrifuged sonicated preparations were made of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The crude sonicates were shown to exhibit chemotactic activity for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood monocytes in a concentration dependent fashion. The potency was comparable with previously described bacterial derived cytotaxins. The cytotaxin(s) was non-dialysable and completely destroyed by proteinase. Heat treatment did not decrease the chemotactic activity, but in sonicate subjected to 100 degrees C for 15 minutes all activity disappeared after dialysis suggesting the breakdown of a larger protein to small fragments that are still biological active. By ammonium sulphate precipitation at increasing concentrations the cytotaxin(s) was selectively found in 10% ammonium sulphate saturation, and by further molecular gel separation the chemotactic activity was found in the molecular size range from 25 to 35 kDa. The demonstration of a polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte cytotaxin from Helicobacter pylori sonicate may help in understanding the mucosal immune response in gastric inflammatory diseases. PMID:1624151

  9. Involvement of Ras and Ral in Chemotactic Migration of Skeletal Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jotaro; Yamazaki, Yuji; Guang, Li; Kaziro, Yoshito; Koide, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    In skeletal myoblasts, Ras has been considered to be a strong inhibitor of myogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that Ras is involved also in the chemotactic response of skeletal myoblasts. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Ras inhibited chemotaxis of C2C12 myoblasts in response to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), key regulators of limb muscle development and skeletal muscle regeneration. A dominant-negative Ral also decreased chemotactic migration by these growth factors, while inhibitors for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) showed no effect. Activation of the Ras-Ral pathway by expression of an activated mutant of either Ras, the guanine-nucleotide dissociation stimulator for Ral, or Ral resulted in increased motility of myoblasts. The ability of Ral to stimulate motility was reduced by introduction of a mutation which prevents binding to Ral-binding protein 1 or phospholipase D. These results suggest that the Ras-Ral pathway is essential for the migration of myoblasts. Furthermore, we found that Ras and Ral are activated in C2C12 cells by bFGF, HGF and IGF-1 and that the Ral activation is regulated by the Ras- and the intracellular Ca2+-mediated pathways. Taken together, our data indicate that Ras and Ral regulate the chemotactic migration of skeletal muscle progenitors. PMID:10848592

  10. Automated Chemotactic Sorting and Single-cell Cultivation of Microbes using Droplet Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Libing; Chen, Dong-Wei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Du, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    We report a microfluidic device for automated sorting and cultivation of chemotactic microbes from pure cultures or mixtures. The device consists of two parts: in the first part, a concentration gradient of the chemoeffector was built across the channel for inducing chemotaxis of motile cells; in the second part, chemotactic cells from the sample were separated, and mixed with culture media to form nanoliter droplets for encapsulation, cultivation, enumeration, and recovery of single cells. Chemotactic responses were assessed by imaging and statistical analysis of droplets based on Poisson distribution. An automated procedure was developed for rapid enumeration of droplets with cell growth, following with scale-up cultivation on agar plates. The performance of the device was evaluated by the chemotaxis assays of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RP437 and E. coli RP1616. Moreover, enrichment and isolation of non-labelled Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 from its 1:10 mixture with E. coli RP437 was demonstrated. The enrichment factor reached 36.7 for CNB-1, based on its distinctive chemotaxis toward 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. We believe that this device can be widely used in chemotaxis studies without necessarily relying on fluorescent labelling, and isolation of functional microbial species from various environments. PMID:27074762

  11. Chemotactic selection with insulin, di-iodotyrosine and histamine alters the phagocytotic responsiveness of Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Schiess, N; Csaba, G; Kohidai, L

    2001-04-01

    Chemotactic selection is a method by which populations of cells exposed to ligands can be isolated and subsequently cultivated. We used Tetrahymena pyriformis GL cultures selected by chemotactic selection to insulin (10 nM), histamine (0.1 nM) and di-iodotyrosine (T2, 10 nM) to study the phagocytotic capacity under the induction of selector hormones. Our results show a long-lasting link between chemotactically selected cultures and phagocytotic activity. Cells selected to histamine produced the highest phagocytotic activity upon a second exposure to the selector hormone. T2 selection was also strongly effective, however, the phagocytosis stimulation was not specific to the hormone given later. Insulin selected sub-populations had different phagocytotic responses to the control substance itself, whereas histamine selected sub-populations seem to be heterogeneous in the phagocytotic response to histamine. For insulin, the increased endocytotic or metabolic activity was demonstrated by the lack of non-phagocytotic cells. These experiments call attention to the evolutionary role of selection in the later developing receptor-hormone relationship.

  12. Automated Chemotactic Sorting and Single-cell Cultivation of Microbes using Droplet Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Libing; Chen, Dong-Wei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Du, Wenbin

    2016-04-01

    We report a microfluidic device for automated sorting and cultivation of chemotactic microbes from pure cultures or mixtures. The device consists of two parts: in the first part, a concentration gradient of the chemoeffector was built across the channel for inducing chemotaxis of motile cells; in the second part, chemotactic cells from the sample were separated, and mixed with culture media to form nanoliter droplets for encapsulation, cultivation, enumeration, and recovery of single cells. Chemotactic responses were assessed by imaging and statistical analysis of droplets based on Poisson distribution. An automated procedure was developed for rapid enumeration of droplets with cell growth, following with scale-up cultivation on agar plates. The performance of the device was evaluated by the chemotaxis assays of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RP437 and E. coli RP1616. Moreover, enrichment and isolation of non-labelled Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 from its 1:10 mixture with E. coli RP437 was demonstrated. The enrichment factor reached 36.7 for CNB-1, based on its distinctive chemotaxis toward 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. We believe that this device can be widely used in chemotaxis studies without necessarily relying on fluorescent labelling, and isolation of functional microbial species from various environments.

  13. Automated Chemotactic Sorting and Single-cell Cultivation of Microbes using Droplet Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Libing; Chen, Dong-Wei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Du, Wenbin

    2016-04-14

    We report a microfluidic device for automated sorting and cultivation of chemotactic microbes from pure cultures or mixtures. The device consists of two parts: in the first part, a concentration gradient of the chemoeffector was built across the channel for inducing chemotaxis of motile cells; in the second part, chemotactic cells from the sample were separated, and mixed with culture media to form nanoliter droplets for encapsulation, cultivation, enumeration, and recovery of single cells. Chemotactic responses were assessed by imaging and statistical analysis of droplets based on Poisson distribution. An automated procedure was developed for rapid enumeration of droplets with cell growth, following with scale-up cultivation on agar plates. The performance of the device was evaluated by the chemotaxis assays of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RP437 and E. coli RP1616. Moreover, enrichment and isolation of non-labelled Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 from its 1:10 mixture with E. coli RP437 was demonstrated. The enrichment factor reached 36.7 for CNB-1, based on its distinctive chemotaxis toward 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. We believe that this device can be widely used in chemotaxis studies without necessarily relying on fluorescent labelling, and isolation of functional microbial species from various environments.

  14. Notes on protozoa in agricultural soil with emphasis on heterotrophic flagellates and naked amoebae and their ecology.

    PubMed

    Ekelund, F; Rønn, R

    1994-12-01

    Heterotrophic flagellates and naked amoebae are usually very numerous in agricultural soils; with numbers in the magnitude of 10,000 to 100,000 (active+encysted) cells per gram of soil. In 'hotspots' influenced by living roots or by dead organic material, the number may occasionally be as high as several millions per gram of soil. An exact enumeration of these organisms is virtually impossible. As they most often adhere closely to the soil particles, direct counting will underestimate numbers since the organisms will be masked. The method usually applied for enumeration of these organisms, the 'most probable number (MPN) method', is based on the ability of the organisms to grow on particular culture media. This method will in many cases underestimate the total protozoan number (active+encysted). It is uncertain how many of the heterotrophic flagellates and naked amoebae are actively moving and how many are encysted at a particular time; the 'HCl-method' which has usually been used to discriminate between active and encysted has proven to be highly unreliable. Despite the methodological difficulties many investigations of these organisms indicate that they play an important role in agricultural soils as bacterial consumers, and to a minor extent as consumers of fungi. Because of their small size and their flexible body they are able to graze bacteria in small pores in the soil in which larger organisms are precluded from coming. Key factors restricting the number and activity of heterotrophic flagellates and naked amoebae in soils seem to be water potential and soil structure and texture. In micro-cosm experiments, small heterotrophic flagellates and naked amoebae regulate the size and composition of the bacterial community. Bacterial activity seems to be stimulated by these organisms in most cases as well as the mineralization of carbon and nitrogen and possibly other mineral nutrients. In the rhizosphere of living plants the activity of protozoa has proven to

  15. Clinical and pathological observations on natural infections of cryptosporidiosis and flagellate protozoa in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius).

    PubMed

    Taylor, M A; Geach, M R; Cooley, W A

    1999-12-11

    A group of adult leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) which had been losing weight for several months were found to be infected with Cryptosporidium species. Histological and electron microscopical investigations on the intestines of five of the lizards revealed the presence of large numbers of the developmental stages of Cryptosporidium species attached to the mucosal surface of the lower intestine, and large numbers of flagellate protozoa, suspected to be predominantly Trichomonas species, in the gut lumen. The clinical signs were attributed to the presence of one or both types of parasites.

  16. Swimming Motility Mediates the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Induced by Flagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Sil, Payel; Chassaing, Benoit; Yoo, Dae-goon; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; McCarter, Linda L.; Rada, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe infections often characterized by robust neutrophilic infiltration. Neutrophils provide the first line of defense against P. aeruginosa. Aside from their defense conferred by phagocytic activity, neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to immobilize bacteria. Although NET formation is an important antimicrobial process, the details of its mechanism are largely unknown. The identity of the main components of P. aeruginosa responsible for triggering NET formation is unclear. In this study, our focus was to identify the main bacterial factors mediating NET formation and to gain insight into the underlying mechanism. We found that P. aeruginosa in its exponential growth phase promoted strong NET formation in human neutrophils while its NET-inducing ability dramatically decreased at later stages of bacterial growth. We identified the flagellum as the primary component of P. aeruginosa responsible for inducing NET extrusion as flagellum-deficient bacteria remained seriously impaired in triggering NET formation. Purified P. aeruginosa flagellin, the monomeric component of the flagellum, does not stimulate NET formation in human neutrophils. P. aeruginosa-induced NET formation is independent of the flagellum-sensing receptors TLR5 and NLRC4 in both human and mouse neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that flagellar motility, not flagellum binding to neutrophils per se, mediates NET release induced by flagellated bacteria. Immotile, flagellar motor-deficient bacterial strains producing paralyzed flagella did not induce NET formation. Forced contact between immotile P. aeruginosa and neutrophils restored their NET-inducing ability. Both the motAB and motCD genetic loci encoding flagellar motor genes contribute to maximal NET release; however the motCD genes play a more important role. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa and superoxide production by neutrophils were also largely dependent upon

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi alkaline 2-DE: Optimization and application to comparative proteome analysis of flagellate life stages

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Adriana D; Charneau, Sébastien; Paba, Jaime; Guércio, Rafael AP; Teixeira, Antonio RL; Santana, Jaime M; Sousa, Marcelo V; Ricart, Carlos AO

    2008-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, a flagellate protozoan, is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a chronic illness that causes irreversible damage to heart and digestive tract in humans. Previous 2-DE analyses of T. cruzi proteome have not focused on basic proteins, possibly because of inherent difficulties for optimizing 2-DE in the alkaline pH range. However, T. cruzi wide pH range 2-DE gels have shown few visible spots in the alkaline region, indicating that the parasite either did not have an appreciable amount of alkaline proteins or that these proteins were underrepresented in the 2-DE gels. Results Different IEF conditions using 6–11 pH gradient strips were tested for separation of T. cruzi alkaline proteins. The optimized methodology described here was performed using anodic "paper bridge" sample loading supplemented by increased concentration of DTT and Triton X-100 on Multiphor II (GE Healthcare) equipment and an electrode pad embedded in DTT- containing solution near the cathode in order to avoid depletion of reducing agent during IEF. Landmark proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting allowing the production of an epimastigote 2-DE map. Most identified proteins corresponded to metabolic enzymes, especially those related to amino acid metabolism. The optimized 2-DE protocol was applied in combination with the "two-in-one gel" method to verify the relative expression of the identified proteins between samples from epimastigote and trypomastigote life stages. Conclusion High resolution 2-DE gels of T. cruzi life forms were achieved using the optimized methodology and a partial epimastigote alkaline 2-DE map was built. Among 700 protein spots detected, 422 were alkaline with a pI above 7.0. The "two-in-one gel" method simplified the comparative analysis between T. cruzi life stages since it minimized variations in spot migration and silver-stained spot volumes. The comparative data were in agreement with biological traits of T. cruzi life

  18. Diversity of cultured photosynthetic flagellates in the North East Pacific and Arctic Oceans in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzano, S.; Gourvil, P.; Siano, R.; Chanoine, M.; Marie, D.; Lessard, S.; Sarno, D.; Vaulot, D.

    2012-06-01

    During the MALINA cruise (summer 2009) an extensive effort was undertaken to isolate phytoplankton strains from the North East (NE) Pacific Ocean, the Bering Strait, and the Beaufort Sea. Strains were isolated by flow cytometry sorting (FCS) and pipetting before or after phytoplankton enrichment of seawater samples. Strains were isolated both onboard and back in the laboratory and cultured at 4 °C under light/dark conditions. Overall, we isolated and characterised by light microscopy and 18S rRNA gene sequencing 104 strains of photosynthetic flagellates which grouped into 21 genotypes (defined by 99.5% 18S rRNA gene sequence similarity) mainly affiliated to Chlorophyta and Heterokontophyta. The taxon most frequently isolated was an Arctic ecotype of the green algal genus Micromonas (Arctic Micromonas) which was almost the only phytoplankter recovered within picoplankton (≤ 2 μm) size range. Strains of Arctic Micromonas as well as three unidentified strains related to the same genus were identified in further details by sequencing the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA operon. The MALINA Micromonas strains share identical 18S rRNA and ITS sequences suggesting high genetic homogeneity within Arctic Micromonas. The unidentified strains form a genotype likely belonging to a new genus within the family Mamiellaceae to which Micromonas belongs. Other green algae genotypes from the genera Nephroselmis, Chlamydomonas, Pyramimonas were also isolated whereas Heterokontophyta included Pelagophyceae, Dictyochophyceae and Chrysophyceae. Dictyochophyceae included Pedinellales which could not be identified to the genus level whereas Chrysophyceae comprised Dinobryon faculiferum. Moreover, we isolated Rhodomonas sp. as well as a few Haptophyta and dinoflagellates. We identified the dinoflagellate Woloszynskia cincta by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and 28S rRNA gene sequencing. Our morphological analyses show that this species possess the diagnostic

  19. Diversity of cultured photosynthetic flagellates in the northeast Pacific and Arctic Oceans in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzano, S.; Gourvil, P.; Siano, R.; Chanoine, M.; Marie, D.; Lessard, S.; Sarno, D.; Vaulot, D.

    2012-11-01

    During the MALINA cruise (summer 2009), an extensive effort was undertaken to isolate phytoplankton strains from the northeast (NE) Pacific Ocean, the Bering Strait, the Chukchi Sea, and the Beaufort Sea. In order to characterise the main photosynthetic microorganisms occurring in the Arctic during the summer season, strains were isolated by flow cytometry sorting (FCS) and single cell pipetting before or after phytoplankton enrichment of seawater samples. Strains were isolated both onboard and back in the laboratory and cultured at 4 °C under light/dark conditions. Overall, we isolated and characterised by light microscopy and 18 S rRNA gene sequencing 104 strains of photosynthetic flagellates which grouped into 21 genotypes (defined by 99.5% 18 S rRNA gene sequence similarity), mainly affiliated to Chlorophyta and Heterokontophyta. The taxon most frequently isolated was an Arctic ecotype of the green algal genus Micromonas (Arctic Micromonas), which was nearly the only phytoplankter recovered within the picoplankton (< 2 μm) size range. Strains of Arctic Micromonas as well as other strains from the same class (Mamiellophyceae) were identified in further detail by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA operon. The MALINA Micromonas strains share identical 18 S rRNA and ITS sequences suggesting high genetic homogeneity within Arctic Micromonas. Three other Mamiellophyceae strains likely belong to a new genus. Other green algae from the genera Nephroselmis, Chlamydomonas, and Pyramimonas were also isolated, whereas Heterokontophyta included some unidentified Pelagophyceae, Dictyochophyceae (Pedinellales), and Chrysophyceae (Dinobryon faculiferum). Moreover, we isolated some Cryptophyceae (Rhodomonas sp.) as well as a few Prymnesiophyceae and dinoflagellates. We identified the dinoflagellate Woloszynskia cincta by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 28 S rRNA gene sequencing. Our morphological analyses show that this species possess

  20. RANTES and Chemotactic Activity in Synovial Fluids From Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Stanczyk, Joanna; Kowalski, Marek L.; Grzegorczyk, Janina; Szkudlinska, Barbara; Jarzebska, Marzanna; Marciniak, Marek; Synder, Marek

    2005-01-01

    A massive accumulation of inflammatory cells in synovial tissues is a major pathological feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Neutrophiles dominate synovial fluid while rheumatoid synovium is infiltrated with mononuclear cells. Mechanisms regulating influx of particular subpopulations of leukocytes into articular cavity and synovium compartment are not completely defined. An increasing amount of data supports a crucial role of a C-C chemokine RANTES in the RA pathogenesis. Our objective is to evaluate chemotactic activity for neutrophils (NCA), lymphocytes (LCA), and monocytes (MoCA) in SFs obtained from patients with RA and osteoarthritis (OA). We also aimed to characterise the relation between chemotactic activity, RANTES, and percentage distribution of leukocytes in SF. SFs from 11 patients with RA and 6 with OA were included in the study. Modified microchamber Boyden method was employed to assess chemotactic activity. Cytological and biochemical analysis of SF was performed. RANTES was measured with ELISA. Rheumatoid SFs were rich in cells with predominance of neutrophiles while osteoarthritic fluids were lymphocytic. RA SFs were also characterised by increased lactoferrin level. Both NCA and LCA were higher in SF from patients with RA (62 ± 12 and 24 ± 6 cells/HPF, resp) as compared to patients with OA (23 ± 6; P < .05 and 6 ± 2 cells/HPF; P < 0.05). The chemoattractive effect of RA SF was more pronounced on neutrophiles than on lymphocytes. RA SF expressed high RANTES levels (145 ± 36 pg/mL), while OA SF was characterised by only trace amount of this chemokine (2 ± 1 pg/mL). We found positive correlation of RANTES with chemotactic activity for mononuclear cells (LCA+MoCA; R = 0.61; P < .05). Surprisingly, RANTES correlated also positively with neutrophiles number (R = 0.77; P < 0.001). Rheumatoid SF possesses strong chemotactic potency for leukocytes. RANTES is overexpressed in RA SF and is a potential mediator influencing intensity and composition

  1. In Vivo Crevicular Leukocyte Response to a Chemotactic Challenge: Inhibition by Experimental Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Lorne M.; Nicoll, Gregg A.; Iacono, Vincent J.; Ramamurthy, Nungavaram S.

    1982-01-01

    Diabetes in rats inhibits the migration of neutrophils into the healing gingival crevice, an effect associated with impaired in vitro neutrophil chemotactic activity. We recently described the in vivo response of human and rat crevicular neutrophils to a chemotactic challenge and used this assay in the present study on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Optimal concentrations of two chemotactic agents, casein (0.2 μl, 2 mg/ml) or N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (0.2 μl, 10−4 M), were placed into the gingival crevices of control and diabetic rats (time zero) after the resting neutrophil count was measured. After a 15-min delay, the neutrophil counts and gingival crevicular fluid flow were assessed every 5 min for another 0.5 h. The control rats (n = 14) showed an increase in neutrophil counts which reached maximum levels 30 min after the N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine challenge (“peak” neutrophil response) and decreased dramatically 5 min later. Diabetes of 4 days (n = 4), 14 days (n = 8), and 20 days (n = 5) duration reduced the peak neutrophil response 45, 66, and 71%, respectively. Casein produced the same response as N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine in control rats. Uncontrolled diabetes of 20 days duration reduced the peak neutrophil response to casein by 83%; diabetics administered insulin on a daily basis showed a reduction of only 34%. The pattern of change in gingival crevicular fluid flow in response to chemoattractants paralleled the neutrophil response. The chemotactic activity of peritoneal neutrophils was assessed in vitro with the agarose gel technique and was found to be correlated (r = 0.84; P < 0.01) with the in vivo chemotactic response in the same rats. If the same in vivo defect is observed in humans with diabetes (or with other systemic diseases associated with leukocyte dysfunction), this test could be useful diagnostically to rapidly assess neutrophil chemotaxis in lieu of in vitro assays and to identify patients who

  2. Predation impact of ciliated and flagellated protozoa during a summer bloom of brown sulfur bacteria in a meromictic coastal lake.

    PubMed

    Saccà, Alessandro; Borrego, Carles M; Renda, Rossella; Triadó-Margarit, Xavier; Bruni, Vivia; Guglielmo, Letterio

    2009-10-01

    Anaerobic phagotrophic protozoa may play an important role in the carbon flux of chemically stratified environments, especially when phototrophic sulfur bacteria account for a high proportion of the primary production. To test this assumption, we investigated the vertical and temporal distribution of microbial heterotrophs and of autotrophic picoplankton throughout the water column of the meromictic coastal lake Faro (Sicily, Italy), in the summer of 2004, coinciding with a bloom of brown-colored green sulfur bacteria. We also assessed the grazing impact of ciliated and flagellated protozoa within the sulfur bacteria plate using a modification of the fluorescently labeled bacteria uptake approach, attempting to minimize the biases intrinsic to the technique and to preserve the in situ anoxic conditions. Significant correlations were observed between ciliate biomass and bacteriochlorophyll e concentration, and between heterotrophic nanoflagellate biomass and chlorophyll a concentration in the water column. The major predators of anaerobic picoplankton were pleuronematine ciliates and cryptomonad flagellates, with clearances of 26.6 and 9.5 nL per cell h(-1), respectively, and a cumulative impact on the picoplankton gross growth rate ranging between 36% and 72%. We concluded that protozoan grazing channels a large proportion of anaerobic picoplankton production to higher trophic levels without restraining photosynthetic bacteria productivity.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of coordinate changes in flagellar mRNAs during differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amoebae into flagellates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Walsh, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The nuclear run-on technique was used to measure the rate of transcription of flagellar genes during the differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amebae into flagellates. Synthesis of mRNAs for the axonemal proteins ..cap alpha..- and BETA-tubulin and flagellar calmodulin, as well as a coordinately regulated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA that codes for an unidentified protein, showed transient increases averaging 22-fold. The rate of synthesis of two poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs common to ameobae and flagellates was low until the transcription of the flagellar genes began to decline, at which time synthesis of the RNAs found in ameobae increased 3- to 10-fold. The observed changes in the rate of transcription can account quantitatively for the 20-fold increase in flagellar mRNA concentration during the differentiation. The data for the flagellar calmodulin gene demonstrate transcriptional regulation for a nontubulin axonemal protein. The data also demonstrate at least two programs of transcriptional regulation during the differentiation and raise the intriguing possibility that some significant fraction of the nearly 200 different proteins of the flagellar axoneme is transcriptionally regulated during the 1 h it takes N. gruberi amebae to form visible flagella.

  4. Flagellated algae protein evolution suggests the prevalence of lineage-specific rules governing evolutionary rates of eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Yan; Liao, Ben-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the general rules governing the rate of protein evolution is fundamental to evolutionary biology. However, attempts to address this issue in yeasts and mammals have revealed considerable differences in the relative importance of determinants for protein evolutionary rates. This phenomenon was previously explained by the fact that yeasts and mammals are different in many cellular and genomic properties. Flagellated algae species have several cellular and genomic characteristics that are intermediate between yeasts and mammals. Using partial correlation analyses on the evolution of 6,921 orthologous proteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri, we examined factors influencing evolutionary rates of proteins in flagellated algae. Previous studies have shown that mRNA abundance and gene compactness are strong determinants for protein evolutionary rates in yeasts and mammals, respectively. We show that both factors also influence algae protein evolution with mRNA abundance having a larger impact than gene compactness on the rates of algae protein evolution. More importantly, among all the factors examined, coding sequence (CDS) length has the strongest (positive) correlation with protein evolutionary rates. This correlation between CDS length and the rates of protein evolution is not due to alignment-related issues or domain density. These results suggest no simple and universal rules governing protein evolutionary rates across different eukaryotic lineages. Instead, gene properties influence the rate of protein evolution in a lineage-specific manner.

  5. The dependence of the swimming efficiency of multi-flagellated bacteria on the geometric arrangement of flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, Nobuhiko; Larson, Ronald

    2010-11-01

    Multi-flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, often have flagella attached at random locations to the cell body. To study the effect of the number of flagella and the geometric arrangement of them to the swimming efficiency, we develop a simulation method using a bead-spring model to account for the hydrodynamic and the mechanical interactions between multiple flagella and the cell body. First, a modeled bacterium is constructed using beads, which represent the hydrodynamic drag centers of the geometric elements of the bacterium. This modeled bacterium swims by rotating the flagella with constant torques at the bases of them. We have found that for modeled bacteria with two flagella, the swimming speed varies by 30% depending on the position of the base of the flagellum along the cell body, which affects the tightness of the bundling. We have also found that overly rigid flagella can slow migration by inhibiting flagellar bundling, since bundling requires some adjustment in flagellar shape to compensate for helical phase miss-match produced by irregular flagellar positioning. In general, by changing the geometric arrangement and the number of flagella, our simulation enables us to determine the optimal designing of a flagellated micro-swimmer.

  6. The pathogenic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri: environmental isolations, competitors, ecologic interactions, and the flagellate-empty habitat hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J L

    1983-05-01

    From several surveys of environmental sites, the virulent human pathogen, Naegleria fowleri, was isolated from a pond in Georgia, a sewage treatment plant in Missouri, and from the Potomac and Anacostia rivers near and in Washington, D.C. Widely scattered, sparse populations seemed only a potential threat to human health at the time of sampling. The data support an estimate that the sites sampled contain 10,000 typical, low temperature, bactivorous amoebae for each heat tolerant amoeba able to grow at 45 degrees C. Heat tolerant competitors were much more common than N. fowleri. Naegleria lovaniensis, which is heat tolerant but nonpathogenic, was isolated from and downstream from an open air thermal pollution temperature gradient. Hot piles of composting sewage sludge yielded no amoeboflagellates, many heat tolerant (45-49 degrees C) amoebae, and one thermophilic (52 degrees C) Acanthamoeba. Features of the methods used include two-stage incubation to increase isolation of sparse organisms and distinction of N. fowleri from almost all other amoebae on agar plates. The flagellate-empty habitat hypothesis postulates a general model in which human intervention and/or natural events remove usual competitors and the ability to transform to a motile flagellate confers an advantage in recolonizing.

  7. Combined influence of quartz dust, ozone and NO2 on chemotactic mobility, release of chemotactic factors and other cytokines by macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Polzer, G; Lind, I; Mosbach, M; Schmidt, A; Seidel, A

    1994-06-01

    In this study the single as well as combined effects of quartz, ozone and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on some immunofunctions of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) were investigated. After incubation with 10 micrograms/ml of particles the chemotactic response of BAM is increased nonspecifically, whereas after incubation with 100 micrograms/ml of quartz chemotaxis is specifically decreased. In addition, quartz induces tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and chemokines to be released dependent on the concentration. Ozone by itself is also a very potent inducer of the release of chemokines and TNF-alpha, but in combination with ozone, quartz has not more than an additive effect. NO2 alone suppresses drastically the release of TNF-alpha. The results show that quartz, ozone and NO2 alter some immunofunctions of BAM and that by combining toxic particles such as quartz with these gases, additive but not synergistic effects might be expected.

  8. Chemotactic activity of cotyledons for mononuclear leukocytes related to occurrence of retained placenta in dexamethasone induced parturition in cattle.

    PubMed

    Benedictus, L; Jorritsma, R; Knijn, H M; Vos, P L A M; Koets, A P

    2011-09-15

    Induction of parturition with glucocorticosteroids in cattle is used for research purposes, in diseased or injured pregnant cows, and as a management tool to time parturition. A negative side effect of induction of parturition with glucocorticosteroids is the high incidence of retained placenta that occurs after these calvings. Reaction of the maternal immune system against the 'foreign' foetal membranes contributes to the breakdown of the foetal-maternal attachment. Several studies indicate that failure of this immune assisted detachment increases the occurrence of retained placenta. We hypothesized that retained placenta occurring after induction of parturition with glucocorticosteroids is caused by failure of immune assisted detachment of the foetal membranes. The chemotactic activity of cotyledons for mononuclear leukocytes was used as a parameter to see whether immune assisted detachment of the foetal membranes had occurred. Cotyledons were collected from spontaneously calving non-retained placenta cows and from dexamethasone induced non-retained placenta and retained placenta cows. The study showed that the chemotactic activity of cotyledons for mononuclear leukocytes was lower (P < 0.001) in cotyledons obtained from retained placenta cows in which parturition was induced with dexamethasone compared to the chemotactic activity of cotyledons obtained from spontaneously calving non-retained placenta cows, whereas the chemotactic activity of cotyledons obtained from induced non-retained placenta cows was not lower (P = 0.10) than the chemotactic activity of cotyledons obtained from spontaneously calving non-retained placenta cows. We concluded that induction of parturition with dexamethasone causes a failure of immune assisted detachment of the foetal membranes and the accompanying release of chemotactic factors. As a result, the chemotactic activity of cotyledons for mononuclear leukocytes is lower in induced retained placenta cows than in cotyledons from non

  9. Identification of a chemoreceptor for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates: differential chemotactic response towards receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lacal, Jesús; Alfonso, Carlos; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Rebecca E; Morel, Bertrand; Conejero-Lara, Francisco; Rivas, Germán; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L; Krell, Tino

    2010-07-23

    We report the identification of McpS as the specific chemoreceptor for 6 tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and butyrate in Pseudomonas putida. The analysis of the bacterial mutant deficient in mcpS and complementation assays demonstrate that McpS is the only chemoreceptor of TCA cycle intermediates in the strain under study. TCA cycle intermediates are abundantly present in root exudates, and taxis toward these compounds is proposed to facilitate the access to carbon sources. McpS has an unusually large ligand-binding domain (LBD) that is un-annotated in InterPro and is predicted to contain 6 helices. The ligand profile of McpS was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry of purified recombinant LBD (McpS-LBD). McpS recognizes TCA cycle intermediates but does not bind very close structural homologues and derivatives like maleate, aspartate, or tricarballylate. This implies that functional similarity of ligands, such as being part of the same pathway, and not structural similarity is the primary element, which has driven the evolution of receptor specificity. The magnitude of chemotactic responses toward these 7 chemoattractants, as determined by qualitative and quantitative chemotaxis assays, differed largely. Ligands that cause a strong chemotactic response (malate, succinate, and fumarate) were found by differential scanning calorimetry to increase significantly the midpoint of protein unfolding (T(m)) and unfolding enthalpy (DeltaH) of McpS-LBD. Equilibrium sedimentation studies show that malate, the chemoattractant that causes the strongest chemotactic response, stabilizes the dimeric state of McpS-LBD. In this respect clear parallels exist to the Tar receptor and other eukaryotic receptors, which are discussed.

  10. Effect of intravascular neutrophil chemotactic factors on blood neutrophil and platelet kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Issekutz, A.C.; Ripley, M.

    1986-02-01

    Intravenous infusion of an analogue (f-met-leu-phe (FMLP)) of a bacterial-derived polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) chemotactic factor, or of the complement-derived chemotactic stimulus, zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP, containing C5ades Arg) into rabbits induces acute PMNL margination in the pulmonary vasculature. The pulmonary PMNL sequestration is accompanied by thrombocytopenia. Because of the role platelets and PMNLs play in hemostasis and defense against infection, we studied the fate of these blood elements following sequestration induced by chemotactic factors. By employing 111In-labelled platelets and external radioisotope scanning, platelets were found to sequester in the pulmonary vasculature during FMLP infusion. Simultaneous 51Cr PMNL and 111In-platelet studies showed that following sequestration, PMNLs returned to the circulation and disappeared with a normal half-life (T1/2) whereas the T1/2 of the platelets was markedly shortened (T1/2 of control = 49 +/- 3.0 hr; FMLP or ZAP infused T1/2 = 27 +/- 2.7 hr). Infusion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) induced PMN and platelet sequestration with similar abnormalities in platelet kinetics. Studies with 51Cr- and 14C-serotonin-labelled platelets showed that platelets did not release serotonin during FMLP, ZAP, or low dose PAF-induced sequestration. In contrast to platelet survival, platelet size, platelet aggregation responses, and platelet glycoproteins were not affected by transient sequestration. These results indicate that during PMNL margination induced by relatively pure PMNL stimuli such as FMLP, platelets may reversibly marginate and subsequently be cleared at an accelerated rate. The reason for accelerated platelet clearance is not a result of circulating platelet aggregates or detectable proteolytic modification of membrane glycoproteins.

  11. On the role of 25-hydroxycholesterol synthesis by glioblastoma cell lines. Implications for chemotactic monocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Eibinger, Gerald; Fauler, Günter; Bernhart, Eva; Frank, Sasa; Hammer, Astrid; Wintersperger, Andrea; Eder, Hans; Heinemann, Akos; Mischel, Paul S; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2013-07-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor and is invariably fatal to affected patients. Oxysterols belong to a class of bioactive lipids that are implicated in neurological disease and are associated with various types of cancer. Here, we investigated expression and transcriptional regulation of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) in human U87MG and GM133 glioblastoma cell lines. We demonstrate that in both cell lines transcription and translation of CH25H are increased in response to TNFα and IL1β. In parallel, both cell lines upregulate 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-OHC) synthesis and secretion to levels comparable to bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages under inflammatory conditions. To determine whether 25-OHC acts as chemoattractant for tumor-associated macrophages, the human THP-1 monoblastic leukemia cell line was treated with varying amounts of the oxysterol. Experiments revealed that 25-OHC and lipid extracts isolated from GM133-conditioned medium (containing 7-fold higher 25-OHC concentrations than U87MG medium) induce chemotactic migration of THP-1 cells. Of note, 25-OHC also induced the migration of primary human peripheral blood monocytes. In response to exogenously added 25-OHC, THP-1 cells reorganized intermediate filament-associated vimentin to more cortical and polarized structures. Chemotactic migration of monocytes in response to 25-OHC was pertussis toxin-sensitive, indicating the involvement of G protein-coupled receptors. Using RNA interference we demonstrated that G protein-coupled receptor 183 (EBI2) contributes to 25-OHC-mediated chemotactic migration of THP-1 cells. These in vitro data indicate that GBM-derived and secreted 25-OHC may be involved in the recruitment of immune-competent cells to a tumor via EBI2.

  12. In vitro analysis of chemotactic leukocyte migration in 3D environments.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Michael; Lämmermann, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration on two-dimensional (2D) substrates follows entirely different rules than cell migration in three-dimensional (3D) environments. This is especially relevant for leukocytes that are able to migrate in the absence of adhesion receptors within the confined geometry of artificial 3D extracellular matrix scaffolds and within the interstitial space in vivo. Here, we describe in detail a simple and economical protocol to visualize dendritic cell migration in 3D collagen scaffolds along chemotactic gradients. This method can be adapted to other cell types and may serve as a physiologically relevant paradigm for the directed locomotion of most amoeboid cells.

  13. Macrolactone Nuiapolide, Isolated from a Hawaiian Marine Cyanobacterium, Exhibits Anti-Chemotactic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shogo; Williams, Howard; Cagle, Davey; Karanovich, Kristopher; Horgen, F. David; Smith, Roger; Watanabe, Coran M. H.

    2015-01-01

    A new bioactive macrolactone, nuiapolide (1) was identified from a marine cyanobacterium collected off the coast of Niihau, near Lehua Rock. The natural product exhibits anti-chemotactic activity at concentrations as low as 1.3 μM against Jurkat cells, cancerous T lymphocytes, and induces a G2/M phase cell cycle shift. Structural characterization of the natural product revealed the compound to be a 40-membered macrolactone with nine hydroxyl functional groups and a rare tert-butyl carbinol residue. PMID:26473885

  14. Epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78: a novel chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A E; Kunkel, S L; Harlow, L A; Mazarakis, D D; Haines, G K; Burdick, M D; Pope, R M; Walz, A; Strieter, R M

    1994-01-01

    We and others have shown that cells obtained from inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients produce interleukin-8, a potent chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils (PMNs). However, IL-8 accounted for only 40% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in these synovial fluids. Currently, we have examined the production of the novel PMN chemotactic cytokine, epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78 (ENA-78), using peripheral blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue from 70 arthritic patients. RA ENA-78 levels were greater in RA synovial fluid (239 +/- 63 ng/ml) compared with synovial fluid from other forms of arthritis (130 +/- 118 ng/ml) or osteoarthritis (2.6 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). RA peripheral blood ENA-78 levels (70 +/- 26 ng/ml) were greater than normal peripheral blood levels (0.12 +/- 0.04 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). Anti-ENA-78 antibodies neutralized 42 +/- 9% (mean +/- SE) of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in RA synovial fluids. Isolated RA synovial tissue fibroblasts in vitro constitutively produced significant levels of ENA-78, and this production was further augmented when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). In addition RA and osteoarthritis synovial tissue fibroblasts as well as RA synovial tissue macrophages were found to constitutively produce ENA-78. RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells spontaneously produced ENA-78, which was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Immunohistochemical localization of ENA-78 from the synovial tissue of patients with arthritis or normal subjects showed that the predominant cellular source of this chemokine was synovial lining cells, followed by macrophages, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Synovial tissue macrophages and fibroblasts were more ENA-78 immunopositive in RA than in normal synovial tissue (P < 0.05). These results, which are the first demonstration of ENA-78 in a human disease state, suggest that ENA-78 may play an important role in the recruitment of PMNs

  15. A survey of flagellate diversity at four deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Eastern Pacific Ocean using structural and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Atkins, M S; Teske, A P; Anderson, O R

    2000-01-01

    Eighteen strains of flagellated protists representing nine species were isolated and cultured from four deep-sea hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge (2,200 m), Guaymas Basin (2,000 m), 21 degrees N (2,550 m) and 9 degrees N (2,000 m). Light and electron microscopy were used to identify flagellates to genus and, when possible, species. The small subunit ribosomal RNA genes of each vent species and related strains from shallow-waters and the American Type Culture Collection were sequenced then used for comparative analysis with database sequences to place taxa in an rDNA tree. The hydrothermal vent flagellates belonged to six different taxonomic orders: the Ancyromonadida, Bicosoecida, Cercomonadida, Choanoflagellida, Chrysomonadida, and Kinetoplastida. Comparative analysis of vent isolate and database sequences resolved systematic placement of some well-known species with previously uncertain taxonomic affinities, such as Ancyromonas sigmoides, Caecitellus parvulus, and Massisteria marina. Many of these vent isolates are ubiquitous members of marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, suggesting a global distribution of these flagellate species.

  16. Interventional procedure based on nanorobots propelled and steered by flagellated magnetotactic bacteria for direct targeting of tumors in the human body.

    PubMed

    Martel, Sylvain; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste

    2008-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria used as bio-actuators may prove to be efficient propulsion mechanisms for future hybrid medical nanorobots when operating in the microvasculature. Here, we briefly describe a medical interventional procedure where flagellated bacteria and more specifically MC-1 Magnetotactic Bacteria (MTB) can be used to propel and steer micro-devices and nanorobots under computer control to reach remote locations in the human body. In particular, we show through experimental results the potential of using MTB-tagged robots to deliver therapeutic agents to tumors even the ones located in deep regions of the human body. We also show that such bacterial nanorobots can be tracked inside the human body for enhanced targeting under computer guidance using MRI as imaging modality. MTB can not only be guided and controlled directly towards a specific target, but we also show experimentally that these flagellated bacterial nanorobots can be propelled and steered in vivo deeply through the interstitial region of a tumor. The targeting efficacy is increased when combined with larger ferromagnetic micro-carriers being propelled by magnetic gradients generated by a MRI platform to carry and release nanorobots propelled by a single flagellated bacterium near the arteriocapillar entry. Based on the experimental data obtained and the experience gathered during several experiments conducted in vivo with this new approach, a general medical interventional procedure is briefly described here in a biomedical engineering context.

  17. Flagellated Magnetotactic Bacteria as Controlled MRI-trackable Propulsion and Steering Systems for Medical Nanorobots Operating in the Human Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Sylvain; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Lu, Zhao; Pouponneau, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Although nanorobots may play critical roles for many applications in the human body such as targeting tumoral lesions for therapeutic purposes, miniaturization of the power source with an effective onboard controllable propulsion and steering system have prevented the implementation of such mobile robots. Here, we show that the flagellated nanomotors combined with the nanometer-sized magnetosomes of a single Magnetotactic Bacterium (MTB) can be used as an effective integrated propulsion and steering system for devices such as nanorobots designed for targeting locations only accessible through the smallest capillaries in humans while being visible for tracking and monitoring purposes using modern medical imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Through directional and magnetic field intensities, the displacement speeds, directions, and behaviors of swarms of these bacterial actuators can be controlled from an external computer. PMID:19890435

  18. Flagellated Magnetotactic Bacteria as Controlled MRI-trackable Propulsion and Steering Systems for Medical Nanorobots Operating in the Human Microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Martel, Sylvain; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Lu, Zhao; Pouponneau, Pierre

    2009-04-01

    Although nanorobots may play critical roles for many applications in the human body such as targeting tumoral lesions for therapeutic purposes, miniaturization of the power source with an effective onboard controllable propulsion and steering system have prevented the implementation of such mobile robots. Here, we show that the flagellated nanomotors combined with the nanometer-sized magnetosomes of a single Magnetotactic Bacterium (MTB) can be used as an effective integrated propulsion and steering system for devices such as nanorobots designed for targeting locations only accessible through the smallest capillaries in humans while being visible for tracking and monitoring purposes using modern medical imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Through directional and magnetic field intensities, the displacement speeds, directions, and behaviors of swarms of these bacterial actuators can be controlled from an external computer.

  19. Overexpresssion of a Legionella pneumophila homologue of the E. coli regulator csrA affects cell size, flagellation, and pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Fettes, P S; Forsbach-Birk, V; Lynch, D; Marre, R

    2001-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an inhabitant of the aquatic environment and the causative agent of a bacterial pneumonia. We identified the presence of an L. pneumophila homologue of csrA of E. coli and rsmA of Erwinia carotovora, genes which regulate gene expression by destabilising mRNA and which have been shown to relate to environmental fitness and pathogenicity. The Legionella csrA was able to complement a csrA-negative mutant of E. coli. Overproduction of csrA in L. pneumophila lead to a reduction of flagellation and pigmentation and an increase in bacterial cell size. csrA overproduction was associated with a reduction of fliA and flaA transcripts. This suggests that similar to E. coli and Erwinia, L. pneumophila csrA is a regulator of gene expression and may contribute to the capability of the pathogen to rapidly adapt to changing environments.

  20. Distinct CCR7 glycosylation pattern shapes receptor signaling and endocytosis to modulate chemotactic responses.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Mark A; Kindinger, Ilona; Laufer, Julia M; Späte, Anne-Katrin; Bucher, Delia; Vanes, Sarah L; Krueger, Wolfgang A; Wittmann, Valentin; Legler, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 and their common cognate chemokine receptor CCR7 orchestrate immune cell trafficking by eliciting distinct signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that human CCR7 is N-glycosylated on 2 specific residues in the N terminus and the third extracellular loop. Conceptually, CCR7 glycosylation adds steric hindrance to the receptor N terminus and extracellular loop 3, acting as a "swinging door" to regulate receptor sensitivity and cell migration. We found that freshly isolated human B cells, as well as expanded T cells, but not naïve T cells, express highly sialylated CCR7. Moreover, we identified that human dendritic cells imprint T cell migration toward CCR7 ligands by secreting enzymes that deglycosylate CCR7, thereby boosting CCR7 signaling on T cells, permitting enhanced T cell locomotion, while simultaneously decreasing receptor endocytosis. In addition, dendritic cells proteolytically convert immobilized CCL21 to a soluble form that is more potent in triggering chemotactic movement and does not desensitize the receptor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that soluble CCL21 functionally resembles neither the CCL19 nor the CCL21 phenotype but acts as a chemokine with unique features. Thus, we advance the concept of dendritic cell-dependent generation of micromilieus and lymph node conditioning by demonstrating a novel layer of CCR7 regulation through CCR7 sialylation. In summary, we demonstrate that leukocyte subsets express distinct patterns of CCR7 sialylation that contribute to receptor signaling and fine-tuning chemotactic responses.

  1. Association of calprotectin with leukocyte chemotactic and inflammatory mediators following acute aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Arun; Slusher, Aaron L; Zourdos, Michael C; Whitehurst, Michael; Fico, Brandon G; Huang, Chun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether acute aerobic exercise-mediated calprotectin in plasma would be associated with monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in healthy individuals. Eleven healthy participants, aged 18 to 30 years, were recruited to perform a 30-min bout of aerobic exercise at 75% maximal oxygen uptake. Acute aerobic exercise elicited a significant elevation across time in plasma calprotectin, MCP-1, MPO, and IL-6. Body mass index (BMI) was positively correlated with calprotectin area-under-the-curve with "respect to increase" (AUCi) and IL-6 AUCi. Furthermore, calprotectin AUCi was positively correlated with IL-6 AUCi and MPO AUCi, even after controlling for BMI. Although MPO AUCi was positively correlated with IL-6 AUCi, this relationship no longer existed after controlling for BMI. These results suggest that acute aerobic exercise could mediate innate immune response associated with calprotectin and its related leukocyte chemotactic and inflammatory mediators, especially in individuals with elevated BMI.

  2. Analysis of the bimodal chemiluminescence pattern stimulated in human neutrophils by chemotactic factors.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, J G; Van Epps, D E

    1983-01-01

    Chemotactic factors, which are important in attracting neutrophils to inflammatory sites, have also been shown to stimulate oxidative metabolism, resulting in increased chemiluminescence and release of superoxide anion (O2-). We observed a unique bimodal chemiluminescence pattern upon stimulation with either the complement-derived factor C5a or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. A sharp peak of activity occurred within 1 to 2 min, and a second more extended peak was seen between 3 and 6 min. Enhancement of both peaks occurred when the cells were pretreated with cytochalasin B. Expression of both peaks was found to be related to cell density, and expression of the second peak was not dependent upon extracellular metabolites released during the first peak. Cells preincubated in luminol and then thoroughly washed responded with only a single peak coincident with the second peak. Together these findings indicate that the first peak is extracellular in origin, whereas the second peak is cell associated. Studies with scavengers of oxygen intermediates and inhibitors of myeloperoxidase for the oxidation of luminol, which may occur in part through the formation of HOCl as well as through a non-HOCl-mediated mechanism. Evidence for a non-HOCl-mediated mechanism comes from experiments in which luminol, myeloperoxidase, and O2- generated by xanthine-xanthine oxidase produce luminescence in the absence of chloride ion. These studies provide further insight into the sequence of events which occur during the stimulation of neutrophils with chemotactic factors and the nature of neutrophil chemiluminescence. PMID:6309658

  3. Modeling of chemotactic steering of bacteria-based microrobot using a population-scale approach.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunghoon; Choi, Young Jin; Zheng, Shaohui; Han, Jiwon; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-09-01

    The bacteria-based microrobot (Bacteriobot) is one of the most effective vehicles for drug delivery systems. The bacteriobot consists of a microbead containing therapeutic drugs and bacteria as a sensor and an actuator that can target and guide the bacteriobot to its destination. Many researchers are developing bacteria-based microrobots and establishing the model. In spite of these efforts, a motility model for bacteriobots steered by chemotaxis remains elusive. Because bacterial movement is random and should be described using a stochastic model, bacterial response to the chemo-attractant is difficult to anticipate. In this research, we used a population-scale approach to overcome the main obstacle to the stochastic motion of single bacterium. Also known as Keller-Segel's equation in chemotaxis research, the population-scale approach is not new. It is a well-designed model derived from transport theory and adaptable to any chemotaxis experiment. In addition, we have considered the self-propelled Brownian motion of the bacteriobot in order to represent its stochastic properties. From this perspective, we have proposed a new numerical modelling method combining chemotaxis and Brownian motion to create a bacteriobot model steered by chemotaxis. To obtain modeling parameters, we executed motility analyses of microbeads and bacteriobots without chemotactic steering as well as chemotactic steering analysis of the bacteriobots. The resulting proposed model shows sound agreement with experimental data with a confidence level <0.01.

  4. Multi-phasic bi-directional chemotactic responses of the growth cone

    PubMed Central

    Naoki, Honda; Nishiyama, Makoto; Togashi, Kazunobu; Igarashi, Yasunobu; Hong, Kyonsoo; Ishii, Shin

    2016-01-01

    The nerve growth cone is bi-directionally attracted and repelled by the same cue molecules depending on the situations, while other non-neural chemotactic cells usually show uni-directional attraction or repulsion toward their specific cue molecules. However, how the growth cone differs from other non-neural cells remains unclear. Toward this question, we developed a theory for describing chemotactic response based on a mathematical model of intracellular signaling of activator and inhibitor. Our theory was first able to clarify the conditions of attraction and repulsion, which are determined by balance between activator and inhibitor, and the conditions of uni- and bi-directional responses, which are determined by dose-response profiles of activator and inhibitor to the guidance cue. With biologically realistic sigmoidal dose-responses, our model predicted tri-phasic turning response depending on intracellular Ca2+ level, which was then experimentally confirmed by growth cone turning assays and Ca2+ imaging. Furthermore, we took a reverse-engineering analysis to identify balanced regulation between CaMKII (activator) and PP1 (inhibitor) and then the model performance was validated by reproducing turning assays with inhibitions of CaMKII and PP1. Thus, our study implies that the balance between activator and inhibitor underlies the multi-phasic bi-directional turning response of the growth cone. PMID:27808115

  5. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Alan K.; Baldor, Linda C.; Hogan, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement. PMID:16176981

  6. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-04

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  7. Leukocytes in chemotactic-fragment-induced lung inflammation. Vascular emigration and alveolar surface migration.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J. O.

    1980-01-01

    Lung inflammation was induced in rabbits by intratracheal injections of chemotactic fragments obtained from zymosan-activated serum (CF-ZAS), and the route of vascular emigration and alveolar surface interaction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and monocytes migrating into the lung was characterized by transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron-microscopic examination. Leukocytes migrated from capillaries and venules into the alveolar wall interstitium by adherence to the vascular endothelium and migration through the endothelial intracellular junction to attain a position between a reapposed endothelial cell junction and the vascular basement membrane. The cells then migrated into the interstitium through a narrow opening in the basement membrane. Leukocyte entrance into the alveolar space from the interstitium appeared to occur through small openings in the epithelial basement membrane at or near the Type I epithelial intercellular junction. Once in the alveolus, PMNs and macrophages demonstrated surface adherence and spreading along with evidence of migration, pseudopod extension, interalveolar pore transit, and retraction fiber formation. This study indicates the leukocyte influx into the alveolus in acute chemotactic-factor-induced inflammation is via a continuum of migrational activity, beginning at the pulmonary capillary endothelial surface and persisting on the alveolar epithelial surface. Images Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 16 Figure 9 PMID:7435538

  8. Syndecan-4 regulates the bFGF-induced chemotactic migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wu, Han; Xie, Jun; Li, Guannan; Gu, Rong; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-10-01

    Chemotactic migration of endothelial cells (ECs) guided by extracellular attractants is essential for blood vessel formation. Synd4 is a ubiquitous heparin sulfate proteoglycan receptor on the cell surface that has been identified to promote angiogenesis during tissue repair. Here, the role synd4 played in chemotactic migration of ECs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with Lenti-synd4-RNAi or Lenti-null. Cell migration was observed in a 2D-chemotaxis slide with a stable gradient of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for 18 h using time-lapse microscopy. Synd4 knockdown HUVECs showed reduced mobility compared with the control. In animal studies, Matrigel premixed with bFGF was used to induce the migration of ECs. The cells migrated less distance from the skin in the Matrigel plugs of synd4 null mice compared with the control mice. Then recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene (Ad-synd4) or null (Ad-null) were constructed to enhance the synd4 expression of migratory cells in Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice. Migratory cells with synd4 overexpression did not invade further in the Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice, but showed a high ability to proliferate.

  9. Collective Chemotactic Cell Movement; a Key Mechanism of Development and Morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijer, Cornelis

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the molecular mechanisms by which cells produce and detect chemotactic signals and translate this information in directed movement up or down chemical gradients in the social amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum, and during gastrulation in the chick embryo. Investigation of Dictyostelium mutants with changes in cAMP cell-cell signalling dynamics and chemotaxis, show how cellular heterogeneity in signalling dynamics and polarised activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton drive aggregation, cell sorting, slug formation and migration. Chemotactic cell movement also plays a critical role during gastrulation in the chick embryo a model for amniote development. We suggest that epiblast cell movement during the formation of the primitive streak as well as the movement of the mesoderm cells after their ingression through the streak is controlled by a combination of attractive and repulsive guidance cues. We use computer models explore signalling and cell movement interact to give rise to emergent phenomena at the tissue and organism level such as pattern formation and morphogenesis.

  10. A supplemented soft agar chemotaxis assay demonstrates the Helicobacter pylori chemotactic response to zinc and nickel

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Lisa; Andermann, Tessa M.

    2013-01-01

    Directed motility, or chemotaxis, is required for Helicobacter pylori to establish infection in the stomach, although the full repertoire of this bacterium’s chemotactic responses is not yet known. Here we report that H. pylori responds to zinc as an attractant and nickel as a repellent. To reach this conclusion, we employed both a temporal chemotaxis assay based on bacterial reversals and a supplemented soft agar spatial assay. We refined the temporal assay using a previously described chemorepellent, acid, and found that H. pylori requires rich media with serum to maintain optimal swimming motility. Surprisingly, we found that some strains respond to acid as an attractant, and that the TlpC chemoreceptor correlated with whether acid was sensed as an attractant or repellent. Using this same assay, we detected weak repellent responses to nickel and copper, and a varied response to zinc. We thus developed an alternative spatial chemotactic assay called the supplemented soft agar assay, which utilizes soft agar medium supplemented with the test compound. With Escherichia coli, the attractant serine slowed overall bacterial migration, while the repellent nickel increased the speed of overall migration. In H. pylori we detected slowed migration with doubled tryptone media, as well as zinc, consistent with an attractant response. In contrast, nickel increased migration, consistent with repulsion. PMID:23139399

  11. Computational modeling of chemotactic signaling and aggregation of microglia around implantation site during deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silchenko, A. N.; Tass, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    It is well established that prolonged electrical stimulation of brain tissue causes massive release of ATP in the extracellular space. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A and A2A adenosine receptors. The size of the sheath around the electrode formed by the microglial cells is an important criterion for the optimization of the parameters of electrical current delivered to brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards the implanted electrode during deep brain stimulation. We present a computational model describing formation of a stable aggregate around the implantation site due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP together with a mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The model was built in accordance with the classical Keller-Segel approach and includes an equation for the cells' density as well as equations describing the hydrolysis of extracellular ATP via successive reaction steps ATP →ADP →AMP →adenosine. The results of our modeling allowed us to reveal the dependence of the width of the encapsulating layer around the electrode on the amount of ATP released due to permanent electrical stimulation. The dependences of the aggregates' size on the parameter governing the nonlinearity of interaction between extracellular adenosine and adenosine receptors are also analyzed.

  12. Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Victoria, G. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-02-01

    The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

  13. Modeling of chemotactic steering of bacteria-based microrobot using a population-scale approach

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sunghoon; Choi, Young Jin; Zheng, Shaohui; Han, Jiwon; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria-based microrobot (Bacteriobot) is one of the most effective vehicles for drug delivery systems. The bacteriobot consists of a microbead containing therapeutic drugs and bacteria as a sensor and an actuator that can target and guide the bacteriobot to its destination. Many researchers are developing bacteria-based microrobots and establishing the model. In spite of these efforts, a motility model for bacteriobots steered by chemotaxis remains elusive. Because bacterial movement is random and should be described using a stochastic model, bacterial response to the chemo-attractant is difficult to anticipate. In this research, we used a population-scale approach to overcome the main obstacle to the stochastic motion of single bacterium. Also known as Keller-Segel's equation in chemotaxis research, the population-scale approach is not new. It is a well-designed model derived from transport theory and adaptable to any chemotaxis experiment. In addition, we have considered the self-propelled Brownian motion of the bacteriobot in order to represent its stochastic properties. From this perspective, we have proposed a new numerical modelling method combining chemotaxis and Brownian motion to create a bacteriobot model steered by chemotaxis. To obtain modeling parameters, we executed motility analyses of microbeads and bacteriobots without chemotactic steering as well as chemotactic steering analysis of the bacteriobots. The resulting proposed model shows sound agreement with experimental data with a confidence level <0.01. PMID:26487902

  14. Misbalanced CXCL12 and CCL5 Chemotactic Signals in Vitiligo Onset and Progression.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Ahmed F; Kemp, Daria Marley; El-Domyati, Moetaz; El-Din, Wael Hosam; Lee, Jason B; Uitto, Jouni; Igoucheva, Olga; Alexeev, Vitali

    2017-05-01

    Generalized nonsegmental vitiligo is often associated with the activation of melanocyte-specific autoimmunity. Because chemokines play an important role in the maintenance of immune responses, we examined chemotactic signatures in cultured vitiligo melanocytes and skin samples of early (≤2 months) and advanced (≥6 months) vitiligo. Analysis showed that melanocytes in early lesions have altered expression of several chemotaxis-associated molecules, including elevated secretion of CXCL12 and CCL5. Higher levels of these chemokines coincided with prominent infiltration of the skin with antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T cells. Most of the intralesional APCs expressed the CD86 maturation marker and co-localized with T cells, particularly in early vitiligo lesions. These observations were confirmed by in vivo animal studies showing preferential recruitment of APCs and T cells to CXCL12- and CCL5-expressing transplanted melanocytes, immunotargeting of the chemokine-positive cells, continuous loss of the pigment-producing cells from the epidermis, and development of vitiligo-like lesions. Taken together, our studies show that melanocyte-derived CXCL12 and CCL5 support APC and T-cell recruitment, antigen acquisition, and T-cell activation in early vitiligo and reinforce the role of melanocyte-derived CXCL12 and CCL5 in activation of melanocyte-specific immunity and suggest inhibition of these chemotactic axes as a strategy for vitiligo stabilization. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An unusual protein kinase phosphorylates the chemotactic receptor of Dictystelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.; Klein, C. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors report the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the chemotactic receptor of Dictyostelium discoideum in partially purified plasma membranes. The protein kinase responsible for receptor phosphorylation is associated with this fraction and preferentially phosphorylates the ligand-occupied form of the receptor. 8-Azido({sup 32}P)cAMP labeling of the cell surface has shown that the cAMP receptor exists in two forms. A 45-kDa protein is predominant on unstimulated cells. cAMP stimulation results in an increased receptor phosphorylation such that the receptor migrates on NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE as a 47-kDa protein. Phosphorylation of the chemotactic receptor is not detected in membrane preparations unless cAMP is added to the incubation mixture. Only under those conditions is the phosphorylated 47-kDa form observed. The requirement for cAMP reflects the fact that the kinase involved preferentially uses the ligand-occupied receptor as a substrate. In vitro phosphorylation of the receptor does not involve tyrosine residues. The enzyme does not appear to be a cAMP- or cGMP-dependent protein kinase nor is it sensitive to guanine nucleotides, Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin, Ca{sup 2+}/phospholipid, or EGTA. Similarities with the {beta}-adrenergic receptor protein kinase are discussed.

  16. Multi-phasic bi-directional chemotactic responses of the growth cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoki, Honda; Nishiyama, Makoto; Togashi, Kazunobu; Igarashi, Yasunobu; Hong, Kyonsoo; Ishii, Shin

    2016-11-01

    The nerve growth cone is bi-directionally attracted and repelled by the same cue molecules depending on the situations, while other non-neural chemotactic cells usually show uni-directional attraction or repulsion toward their specific cue molecules. However, how the growth cone differs from other non-neural cells remains unclear. Toward this question, we developed a theory for describing chemotactic response based on a mathematical model of intracellular signaling of activator and inhibitor. Our theory was first able to clarify the conditions of attraction and repulsion, which are determined by balance between activator and inhibitor, and the conditions of uni- and bi-directional responses, which are determined by dose-response profiles of activator and inhibitor to the guidance cue. With biologically realistic sigmoidal dose-responses, our model predicted tri-phasic turning response depending on intracellular Ca2+ level, which was then experimentally confirmed by growth cone turning assays and Ca2+ imaging. Furthermore, we took a reverse-engineering analysis to identify balanced regulation between CaMKII (activator) and PP1 (inhibitor) and then the model performance was validated by reproducing turning assays with inhibitions of CaMKII and PP1. Thus, our study implies that the balance between activator and inhibitor underlies the multi-phasic bi-directional turning response of the growth cone.

  17. Plasma monocyte chemotactic protein-1 remains elevated after minimally invasive colorectal cancer resection.

    PubMed

    Shantha Kumara, H M C; Myers, Elizabeth A; Herath, Sonali Ac; Jang, Joon Ho; Njoh, Linda; Yan, Xiaohong; Kirchoff, Daniel; Cekic, Vesna; Luchtefeld, Martin; Whelan, Richard L

    2014-10-15

    To investigate plasma Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 levels preoperatively in colorectal cancer (CRC) and benign patients and postoperatively after CRC resection. A plasma bank was screened for minimally invasive colorectal cancer resection (MICR) for CRC and benign disease (BEN) patients for whom preoperative, early postoperative, and 1 or more late postoperative samples (postoperative day 7-27) were available. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) levels (pg/mL) were determined via enzyme linked immuno-absorbent assay. One hundred and two CRC and 86 BEN patients were studied. The CRC patient's median preoperative MCP-1 level (283.1, CI: 256.0, 294.3) was higher than the BEN group level (227.5, CI: 200.2, 245.2; P = 0.0004). Vs CRC preoperative levels, elevated MCP-1 plasma levels were found on postoperative day 1 (446.3, CI: 418.0, 520.1), postoperative day 3 (342.7, CI: 320.4, 377.4), postoperative day 7-13 (326.5, CI: 299.4, 354.1), postoperative day 14-20 (361.6, CI: 287.8, 407.9), and postoperative day 21-27 (318.1, CI: 287.2, 371.6; P < 0.001 for all). Preoperative MCP-1 levels were higher in CRC patients (vs BEN). After MICR for CRC, MCP-1 levels were elevated for 1 mo and may promote angiogenesis, cancer recurrence and metastasis.

  18. Targeting the chemotactic function of CD147 reduces collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Damsker, Jesse M; Okwumabua, Ifeanyi; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Arora, Kamalpreet; Bukrinsky, Michael I; Constant, Stephanie L

    2009-01-01

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on a wide variety of cell types, including all leucocytes. While CD147 is best known as a potent inducer of matrix metalloproteinases, it can also function as a regulator of leucocyte migration through its cell surface interaction with chemotactic extracellular cyclophilins. A potential role for CD147-cyclophilin interactions during inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is suggested from several studies. For example, CD147 expression is increased on reactive leucocytes in the synovial fluid and tissues of patients with arthritis. In addition, the synovial fluid of patients with RA contains high levels of extracellular cyclophilin A. In the current studies we investigated the contribution of the chemotactic function of CD147-cyclophilin interactions to joint inflammation using the mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis. Our data demonstrate that proinflammatory leucocytes, specifically neutrophils, monocytes and activated CD4(+) T cells, lose their ability to migrate in response to cyclophilin A in vitro when treated with anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody can reduce the development of collagen-induced arthritis in mice by >75%. Such findings suggest that CD147-cyclophilin interactions might contribute to the pathogenesis of RA by promoting the recruitment of leucocytes into joint tissues.

  19. Targeting the chemotactic function of CD147 reduces collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Damsker, Jesse M; Okwumabua, Ifeanyi; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Arora, Kamalpreet; Bukrinsky, Michael I; Constant, Stephanie L

    2009-01-01

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on a wide variety of cell types, including all leucocytes. While CD147 is best known as a potent inducer of matrix metalloproteinases, it can also function as a regulator of leucocyte migration through its cell surface interaction with chemotactic extracellular cyclophilins. A potential role for CD147–cyclophilin interactions during inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is suggested from several studies. For example, CD147 expression is increased on reactive leucocytes in the synovial fluid and tissues of patients with arthritis. In addition, the synovial fluid of patients with RA contains high levels of extracellular cyclophilin A. In the current studies we investigated the contribution of the chemotactic function of CD147–cyclophilin interactions to joint inflammation using the mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis. Our data demonstrate that proinflammatory leucocytes, specifically neutrophils, monocytes and activated CD4+ T cells, lose their ability to migrate in response to cyclophilin A in vitro when treated with anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody can reduce the development of collagen-induced arthritis in mice by > 75%. Such findings suggest that CD147–cyclophilin interactions might contribute to the pathogenesis of RA by promoting the recruitment of leucocytes into joint tissues. PMID:18557953

  20. Dynamic relocalization of NHERF1 mediates chemotactic migration of ovarian cancer cells toward lysophosphatidic acid stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yong-Seok; Heo, Kyun; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Jang, Jin-Hyeok; Bae, Sun Sik; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Yun Hee; Song, Minseok; Kim, Sang Ryong; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, In-Hoo; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2017-01-01

    NHERF1/EBP50 (Na+/H+ exchanger regulating factor 1; Ezrin-binding phosphoprotein of 50 kDa) organizes stable protein complexes beneath the apical membrane of polar epithelial cells. By contrast, in cancer cells without any fixed polarity, NHERF1 often localizes in the cytoplasm. The regulation of cytoplasmic NHERF1 and its role in cancer progression remain unclear. In this study, we found that, upon lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) stimulation, cytoplasmic NHERF1 rapidly translocated to the plasma membrane, and subsequently to cortical protrusion structures, of ovarian cancer cells. This movement depended on direct binding of NHERF1 to C-terminally phosphorylated ERM proteins (cpERMs). Moreover, NHERF1 depletion downregulated cpERMs and further impaired cpERM-dependent remodeling of the cell cortex, suggesting reciprocal regulation between these proteins. The LPA-induced protein complex was highly enriched in migratory pseudopodia, whose formation was impaired by overexpression of NHERF1 truncation mutants. Consistent with this, NHERF1 depletion in various types of cancer cells abolished chemotactic cell migration toward a LPA gradient. Taken together, our findings suggest that the high dynamics of cytosolic NHERF1 provide cancer cells with a means of controlling chemotactic migration. This capacity is likely to be essential for ovarian cancer progression in tumor microenvironments containing LPA. PMID:28684865

  1. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha. A novel chemotactic cytokine for macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A E; Kunkel, S L; Harlow, L A; Mazarakis, D D; Haines, G K; Burdick, M D; Pope, R M; Strieter, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that human macrophages (m phi s) play an important role in the elaboration of chemotactic cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (Koch, A. E., S. L. Kunkel, J. C. Burrows, H. L. Evanoff, G. K. Haines, R. M. Pope, and R. M. Strieter. 1991. J. Immunol. 147:2187; Koch, A. E., S. L. Kunkel, L. A. Harlow, B. Johnson, H. L. Evanoff, G. K. Haines, M. D. Burdick, R. M. Pope, and R. M. Strieter. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 90:772; Koch, A. E., P. J. Polverini, S. L. Kunkel, L. A. Harlow, L. A. DiPietro, V. M. Elner, S. G. Elner, and R. M. Strieter. 1992. Science (Wash. DC). 258:1798). Recently, m phi inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1 alpha), a cytokine with chemotactic activity for m phi s and neutrophils (PMNs), has been described. We have examined the production of MIP-1 alpha using sera, synovial fluid (SF), and synovial tissue (ST) from 63 arthritic patients. MIP-1 alpha was higher in RA SF (mean, 29 +/- 8 ng/ml [SE]) compared with other forms of arthritis (2.8 +/- 1.7), or osteoarthritis (0.7 +/- 0.4; P < 0.05). RA SF MIP-1 alpha was greater than that found in either RA or normal peripheral blood (PB) (P < 0.05). Anti-MIP-1 alpha neutralized 36 +/- 3% (mean +/- SE) of the chemotactic activity for m phi s, but not PMNs, found in RA SFs. RA SF and PB mononuclear cells produced antigenic MIP-1 alpha. Mononuclear cell MIP-1 alpha production was augmented with phytohemagglutinin or LPS. Isolated RA ST fibroblast production of antigenic MIP-1 alpha was augmented upon incubation of cells with LPS, and to a lesser extent with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Isolated RA ST m phi s expressed constitutive MIP-1 alpha mRNA and antigenic MIP-1 alpha. Using ST immunohistochemistry, MIP-1 alpha+ cells from RA compared with normal were predominantly m phi s and lining cells (P < 0.05). These results suggest that MIP-1 alpha plays a role in the selective recruitment of m phi s in synovial inflammation associated with RA. Images PMID:8132778

  2. Expression of adhesion molecules and chemotactic cytokines in cultured human mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jonjić, N; Peri, G; Bernasconi, S; Sciacca, F L; Colotta, F; Pelicci, P; Lanfrancone, L; Mantovani, A

    1992-10-01

    The mesothelium is a flat epithelial lining of serous cavities that could gate the traffic of molecules and cells between the circulation and these body compartments. The present study was designed to elucidate the capacity of mesothelial cells to express adhesion molecules and chemoattractant cytokines, two fundamental mechanisms of regulation of leukocyte recruitment. Cultured human mesothelial cells express appreciable levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and these were increased by in vitro exposure to tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or TNF and IFN-gamma. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) was a less consistent stimulus for adhesion molecule expression in vitro. Unlike endothelial cells, used as a reference cell population, resting or stimulated mesothelial cells did not express E-selectin and ICAM-2, as assessed by flow cytometry. Analysis of VCAM-1 mRNA by reverse transcriptase and polymerase chain reaction using appropriate primers revealed that mesothelial cells expressed both the seven- and the six-Ig domain transcripts, with predominance of the longer species. Monocytes bound appreciably to "resting" and, to a greater extent, to stimulated mesothelial cells. Monocytes exposed to IFN-gamma and lipopolysaccharide, used as prototypic activation signals, showed increased capacity to bind mesothelial cells. Anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody significantly inhibited binding of monocytes to mesothelial cells, and this blocking effect was amplified by anti-very late antigen 4. Mesothelial cells were able to express the chemotactic cytokines IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 at the mRNA and protein levels. These results indicate that mesothelial cells can express a set of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) overlapping with, but distinct from, that expressed in vascular endothelium (ICAM-1, ICAM-2, VCAM-1, E-selectin), and that these are functionally relevant for interacting with

  3. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525].

  4. A 'chemotactic dipole' mechanism for large-scale vortex motion during primitive streak formation in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Sandersius, S A; Chuai, M; Weijer, C J; Newman, T J

    2011-08-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves significant coordinated cell movement lateral to the streak, in addition to the posterior-anterior movement of cells in the streak proper. Cells lateral to the streak are observed to undergo 'polonaise movements', i.e. two large counter-rotating vortices, reminiscent of eddies in a fluid. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for these movement patterns which relies on chemotactic signals emitted by a dipolar configuration of cells in the posterior region of the epiblast. The 'chemotactic dipole' consists of adjacent regions of cells emitting chemo-attractants and chemo-repellents. We motivate this idea using a mathematical analogy between chemotaxis and electrostatics, and test this idea using large-scale computer simulations. We implement active cell response to both neighboring mechanical interactions and chemotactic gradients using the Subcellular Element Model. Simulations show the emergence of large-scale vortices of cell movement. The length and time scales of vortex formation are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We also provide quantitative estimates for the robustness of the chemotaxis dipole mechanism, which indicate that the mechanism has an error tolerance of about 10% to variation in chemotactic parameters, assuming that only 1% of the cell population is involved in emitting signals. This tolerance increases for larger populations of cells emitting signals.

  5. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Lee, Ha Young; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Koo, JaeHyung; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525] PMID:27502013

  6. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency reduces spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice fed a high-fat diet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Obesity is a risk factor for cancer. Adipose tissue produces pro-inflammatory adipokines that contribute obesity-related malignant progression. This study investigated the effects of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) deficiency on pulmonary metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male C57...

  7. Total chemical synthesis and chemotactic activity of human S100A12 (EN-RAGE).

    PubMed

    Miranda, L P; Tao, T; Jones, A; Chernushevich, I; Standing, K G; Geczy, C L; Alewood, P F

    2001-01-12

    Human S100A12 (extracellular newly identified RAGE (receptor for advanced glycosylation end products)-binding protein), a new member of the S100 family of EF-hand calcium-binding proteins, was chemically synthesised using highly optimised 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate/tert-butoxycarbonyl in situ neutralisation solid-phase chemistry. Circular dichroism studies indicated that CaCl(2) decreased the helical content by 27% whereas helicity was marginally increased by ZnCl(2). The propensity of S100A12 to dimerise was examined by electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry which clearly demonstrated the prevalence of the non-covalent homodimer (20890 Da). Importantly, synthetic human S100A12 in the nanomolar range was chemotactic for neutrophils and macrophages in vitro.

  8. A continuum analysis of the chemotactic signal seen by Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Dallon, J C; Othmer, H G

    1998-10-21

    We developed a mathematical model of cell-to-cell-signalling in Dictyostelium discoideum that predicts the cAMP signal seen by individual cells in early aggregation. The model employs two cells on a plane and is designed to predict the space-time characteristics of both the extracellular cAMP signal seen by one cell when a nearby cell relays, and the intracellular cAMP response produced by the stimulus in the receiving cell. The effect of membrane bound phosphodiesterase is studied and it is shown that cells can orient effectively even in its absence. Our results give a detailed picture of how the spatio-temporal characteristics of the extracellular signal can be transduced into a time- and space-dependent intracellular gradient, and they suggest a plausible mechanism for orientation in a natural chemotactic wave.

  9. Biodegradation of naphthalene and anthracene by chemo-tactically active rhizobacteria of populus deltoides

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Sandeep; Pandey, Piyush; Sood, Anchal; Sharma, Shivesh; Bisht, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Several naphthalene and anthracene degrading bacteria were isolated from rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, which were growing in non-contaminated soil. Among these, four isolates, i.e. Kurthia sp., Micrococcus varians, Deinococcus radiodurans and Bacillus circulans utilized chrysene, benzene, toluene and xylene, in addition to anthracene and naphthalene. Kurthia sp and B. circulans showed positive chemotactic response for naphthalene and anthracene. The mean growth rate constant (K) of isolates were found to increase with successive increase in substrate concentration (0.5 to 1.0 mg/50ml). B. circulans SBA12 and Kurthia SBA4 degraded 87.5% and 86.6% of anthracene while, Kurthia sp. SBA4, B. circulans SBA12, and M. varians SBA8 degraded 85.3 %, 95.8 % and 86.8 % of naphthalene respectively after 6 days of incubation as determined by HPLC analysis. PMID:24031572

  10. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Basheer, Haneen A.; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D.; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC–19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC–19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  11. PTEN functions to 'prioritize' chemotactic cues and prevent 'distraction' in migrating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Heit, Bryan; Robbins, Stephen M; Downey, Charlene M; Guan, Zhiwen; Colarusso, Pina; Miller, B Joan; Jirik, Frank R; Kubes, Paul

    2008-07-01

    Neutrophils encounter and 'prioritize' many chemoattractants in their pursuit of bacteria. Here we tested the possibility that the phosphatase PTEN is responsible for the prioritization of chemoattractants. Neutrophils induced chemotaxis by two separate pathways, the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) pathway, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, with the p38 pathway dominating over the PI(3)K pathway. Pten(-/-) neutrophils could not prioritize chemoattractants and were 'distracted' by chemokines when moving toward bacterial chemoattractants. In opposing gradients, PTEN became distributed throughout the cell circumference, which inhibited all PI(3)K activity, thus permitting 'preferential' migration toward bacterial products via phospholipase A(2) and p38. Such prioritization was defective in Pten(-/-) neutrophils, which resulted in defective bacterial clearance in vivo. Our data identify a PTEN-dependent mechanism in neutrophils to prioritize, 'triage' and integrate responses to multiple chemotactic cues.

  12. Transverse Chemotactic Migration of Bacteria from High to Low Permeability Regions in a Dual Permeability Porous Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Low permeability regions sandwiched between high permeability regions such as clay lenses are difficult to treat using conventional treatment methods. Trace concentrations of contaminants such as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) remain trapped in these regions and over the time diffuse out into surrounding water thereby acting as a long term source of groundwater contamination. Bacterial chemotaxis (directed migration toward a contaminant source), may be helpful in enhancing bioremediation of such contaminated sites. This study is focused on simulating a two-dimensional dual-permeability groundwater contamination scenario using microfluidic devices and evaluating transverse chemotactic migration of bacteria from high to low permeability regions. A novel bi-layer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device was fabricated using photolithography and soft lithography techniques to simulate contamination of a dual- permeability region due to leakage from an underground storage tank into a low permeability region. This device consists of a porous channel through which a bacterial suspension (Escherchia Coli HCB33) is flown and another channel for injecting contaminant/chemo-attractant (DL-aspertic acid) into the porous channel. The pore arrangement in the porous channel contains a 2-D low permeability region surrounded by high permeability regions on both sides. Experiments were performed under chemotactic and non-chemotactic (replacing attractant with buffer solution in the non porous channel) conditions. Images were captured in transverse pore throats at cross-sections 4.9, 9.8, and 19.6 mm downstream from the attractant injection point and bacteria were enumerated in the middle of each pore throat. Bacterial chemotaxis was quantified in terms of the change in relative bacterial counts in each pore throat at cross-sections 9.8 and 19.6 mm with respect to counts at the cross-section at 4.9 mm. Under non-chemotactic conditions, relative bacterial count was observed

  13. Chemotactic response of frozen-thawed bovine spermatozoa towards follicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Gil, P I; Guidobaldi, H A; Teves, M E; Uñates, D R; Sanchez, R; Giojalas, L C

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether cattle spermatozoa respond by chemotaxis to follicular fluid (FF). The experimental conditions were defined to maintain a frozen-thawed sperm population with great motility and capacitation, and lesser sperm agglutination. Several sperm preparation conditions were studied: sperm separation from the seminal plasma by Sephadex column or migration-sedimentation, incubation under capacitating conditions in the presence or absence of a superficial layer of mineral oil, and different pH of the culture medium. The percentage of motile and agglutinated spermatozoa was determined in plate dishes under inverted phase contrast microscope. The percentage of capacitated spermatozoa was calculated as the difference between the percentages of acrosome reacted spermatozoa with and without lysophosphatidylcholine stimulation. The most ideal experimental conditions to evaluate chemotaxis in frozen-thawed cattle spermatozoa were: to separate the cells from the seminal plasma by migration-sedimentation and to incubate them under oil, in culture medium at pH 7.2, for less than 2h. The chemotaxis assays were conducted with spermatozoa treated as mentioned above which were confronted to several dilutions of FF (1:10(3), 1:10(4), 1:10(5), 1:10(6)) in a chemotaxis chamber by videomicroscopy and computer image analysis. A subpopulation of capacitated spermatozoa ( approximately 10%) that responded chemotactically to a concentration gradient generated by FF (1:10(4) to 1:10(5)) was observed. Since cryopreserved spermatozoa are regularly used to artificially inseminate the cows, the sperm chemotactic response towards FF would be potentially used to diagnose the bull sperm sample or to select the spermatozoa in the most functional state.

  14. Macrophage procoagulant-inducing factor. In vivo properties and chemotactic activity for phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J; Geczy, C L

    1988-09-15

    Murine macrophage procoagulant-inducing factor (MPIF) is a lymphokine with chemical properties distinct from a number of well-characterized cytokines. MPIF induces procoagulant activity on the surface of macrophages and thus may play a central role in the expression of cell-mediated immunity. Highly enriched MPIF-alpha and -beta, separated by virtue of their basic isoelectric point and affinity for heparin, induced local induration and fibrin deposition and cellular infiltration similar to that observed in delayed type hypersensitivity reactions, when injected intradermally. Margination with of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) along the endothelium as well as increased PMN infiltration was evident after 4 h. In contrast to other inflammatory mediators (e.g., C5a, IL-1) reactivity was sustained, with greater numbers of mononuclear cells apparent 24 h after skin testing. Changes in the dermis were evident 4 h after MPIF injection with increased numbers of cells near areas where spaces in the collagen bundles had formed. Dermal thickening was evident after 24 h and collagen fiber structure was disrupted. Extravascular fibrinogen/fibrin was most prominent 24 h after testing. LPS, which induces macrophage procoagulant activity in vitro, did not induce the histopathologic changes evident with MPIF. MPIF was chemotactic for PMN and macrophages in vitro. Chemotactic activity was heat-labile and not due to C5a. Migration was dependent on a concentration gradient, as determined by checkerboard analysis, indicating that MPIF promoted chemotaxis rather than chemokinesis. Experiments reported here suggest that MPIF is an important mediator of fibrin deposition and cellular infiltration characteristic of cell-mediated immune response.

  15. Malarial pigment hemozoin impairs chemotactic motility and transendothelial migration of monocytes via 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Skorokhod, Oleksii A; Barrera, Valentina; Heller, Regine; Carta, Franco; Turrini, Franco; Arese, Paolo; Schwarzer, Evelin

    2014-10-01

    Natural hemozoin, nHZ, is avidly phagocytosed in vivo and in vitro by human monocytes. The persistence of the undigested β-hematin core of nHZ in the phagocyte lysosome for long periods of time modifies several cellular immune functions. Here we show that nHZ phagocytosis by human primary monocytes severely impaired their chemotactic motility toward MCP-1, TNF, and FMLP, by approximately 80% each, and their diapedesis across a confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cell layer toward MCP-1 by 45±5%. No inhibition was observed with latex-fed or unfed monocytes. Microscopic inspection revealed polarization defects in nHZ-fed monocytes due to irregular actin polymerization. Phagocytosed nHZ catalyzes the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and generation of the highly reactive derivative 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Similar to nHZ phagocytosis, the exposure of monocytes to in vivo-compatible 4-HNE concentrations inhibited cell motility in both the presence and the absence of chemotactic stimuli, suggesting severe impairment of cytoskeleton dynamics. Consequently, 4-HNE conjugates with the cytoskeleton proteins β-actin and coronin-1A were immunochemically identified in nHZ-fed monocytes and mass spectrometrically localized in domains of protein-protein interactions involved in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell motility. The molecular and functional modifications of actin and coronin by nHZ/4-HNE may also explain impaired phagocytosis, another motility-dependent process previously described in nHZ-fed monocytes. Further studies will show whether impaired monocyte motility may contribute to the immunodepression and the frequent occurrence of secondary infections observed in malaria patients.

  16. Modulating Influence of Chemotactic Factor-Induced Cell Adhesiveness on Granulocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Jorg; Dahinden, Clemens

    1979-01-01

    The importance of adhesion in regulating locomotion and accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) has remained vague. We found that the chemotaxis of human PMN resuspended in heat-inactivated plasma was maximal toward 1-10 nM N-formyl-met-leu-phe (f-Met-Leu-Phe), but fell below random motility toward ≥ 100 nM. This impressive decrease of motility was paralleled by increased cell adherence on Petri dishes being minimal at 1 nM and maximal at >10 nM f-Met-Leu-Phe (6±1 and 37±2% [SE] adherent cells, respectively). Checked by phase-contrast microscopy, cells under stimulated adhesion lost the typical bipolar shape of moving PMN and became immobilized and highly flattened. PMN, preexposed to 250 nM f-Met-Leu-Phe and tested after washing, retained increased adhesiveness and showed extremely low random and chemotactic motility. In contrast, preexposure to 1 nM f-Met-Leu-Phe had no effect on chemotaxis. Supporting the concept that immobilizing hyperadhesiveness does not correspond to a general functional hyporesponsiveness of PMN, no depression of the initial ingestion rate was observed in the presence of 250 nM f-Met-Leu-Phe. Moreover, a close correlation was found between the induction of PMN adhesiveness and the stimulation of the hexose monophosphate pathway activity as well as of lysomal enzyme release (r ≥ 0.98). Thus, “chemotactic deactivation” and “high-dose inhibition of chemotaxis” by N-formyl peptides is the consequence of increased cell adhesiveness. This phenomenon provides a mechanism for cell trapping at the inflammatory site. Conversely, if operative in circulating blood, e.g., in septicemia, it may impair PMN emigration to such sites. Images PMID:447862

  17. Toluene-Degrading Bacteria Are Chemotactic towards the Environmental Pollutants Benzene, Toluene, and Trichloroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Parales, Rebecca E.; Ditty, Jayna L.; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2000-01-01

    The bioremediation of polluted groundwater and toxic waste sites requires that bacteria come into close physical contact with pollutants. This can be accomplished by chemotaxis. Five motile strains of bacteria that use five different pathways to degrade toluene were tested for their ability to detect and swim towards this pollutant. Three of the five strains (Pseudomonas putida F1, Ralstonia pickettii PKO1, and Burkholderia cepacia G4) were attracted to toluene. In each case, the response was dependent on induction by growth with toluene. Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and P. putida PaW15 did not show a convincing response. The chemotactic responses of P. putida F1 to a variety of toxic aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated aliphatic compounds were examined. Compounds that are growth substrates for P. putida F1, including benzene and ethylbenzene, were chemoattractants. P. putida F1 was also attracted to trichloroethylene (TCE), which is not a growth substrate but is dechlorinated and detoxified by P. putida F1. Mutant strains of P. putida F1 that do not oxidize toluene were attracted to toluene, indicating that toluene itself and not a metabolite was the compound detected. The two-component response regulator pair TodS and TodT, which control expression of the toluene degradation genes in P. putida F1, were required for the response. This demonstration that soil bacteria can sense and swim towards the toxic compounds toluene, benzene, TCE, and related chemicals suggests that the introduction of chemotactic bacteria into selected polluted sites may accelerate bioremediation processes. PMID:10966434

  18. Plasma monocyte chemotactic protein-1 remains elevated after minimally invasive colorectal cancer resection

    PubMed Central

    Kumara, HMC Shantha; Myers, Elizabeth A; Herath, Sonali AC; Jang, Joon Ho; Njoh, Linda; Yan, Xiaohong; Kirchoff, Daniel; Cekic, Vesna; Luchtefeld, Martin; Whelan, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate plasma Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 levels preoperatively in colorectal cancer (CRC) and benign patients and postoperatively after CRC resection. METHODS: A plasma bank was screened for minimally invasive colorectal cancer resection (MICR) for CRC and benign disease (BEN) patients for whom preoperative, early postoperative, and 1 or more late postoperative samples (postoperative day 7-27) were available. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) levels (pg/mL) were determined via enzyme linked immuno-absorbent assay. RESULTS: One hundred and two CRC and 86 BEN patients were studied. The CRC patient’s median preoperative MCP-1 level (283.1, CI: 256.0, 294.3) was higher than the BEN group level (227.5, CI: 200.2, 245.2; P = 0.0004). Vs CRC preoperative levels, elevated MCP-1 plasma levels were found on postoperative day 1 (446.3, CI: 418.0, 520.1), postoperative day 3 (342.7, CI: 320.4, 377.4), postoperative day 7-13 (326.5, CI: 299.4, 354.1), postoperative day 14-20 (361.6, CI: 287.8, 407.9), and postoperative day 21-27 (318.1, CI: 287.2, 371.6; P < 0.001 for all). CONCLUSION: Preoperative MCP-1 levels were higher in CRC patients (vs BEN). After MICR for CRC, MCP-1 levels were elevated for 1 mo and may promote angiogenesis, cancer recurrence and metastasis. PMID:25320658

  19. Chemotactic effect of odorants and tastants on the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Láng, Júlia; Rákász, Virág; Magyar, Anna; Pállinger, Éva; Kohidai, László

    2011-12-01

    Naturally occurring aroma compounds are able to elicit physiological and migratory responses such as chemotaxis even at nano to femtomolar concentrations in organisms at different levels of phylogeny. Despite the amazing chemical variety of these substances the apparatus by which they can be detected i.e. the chemosensory receptors and the signaling pathways seem to be rather uniform and evolutionary well-conserved. The intracellular signaling process is supposed to be mediated by either cAMP or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The present work aimed to investigate the chemotactic behavior of 11 odorants that occur naturally in foods and are also used by the industry as additives, on the eukaryotic ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Intracellular signaling pathways that might be activated by these compounds were also investigated. Activation of the phospholipase C (PLC) was measured by FACS and the stimulation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinases (IP3K) was measured using two specific inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002. The strongest chemoattractant character was observed for isoamyl acetate (10(⁻6) M), propyl isobutyrate (10(⁻8) M), isobutyl propionate (10(⁻6) M). The strongest repellent action was exerted by benzyl acetate (10(⁻8) M), furfuryl thioacetate (10(⁻12) M). Our results suggest that Tetrahymena responds in a very sensitive way to slight changes in the molecular structure. According to our study, tracer amounts of solvents do not contribute significantly to the chemotactic profile of the respective odorants. No significant activation of PLC or PI3K could be observed following stimulation with attractant odorants which implies that some other pathways may be involved, hence further investigation is needed.

  20. Imaging focal sites of bacterial infection in rats with indium-111-labeled chemotactic peptide analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Pike, M.C.; Kroon, D.; Fucello, A.J.; Rexinger, D.; ten Kate, C.; Wilkinson, R.; Rubin, R.H.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Four DTPA-derivatized chemotactic peptide analogs: ForNleLFNleYK-DTPA (P1), ForMLFNH(CH2)6NH-DTPA (P2), ForNleLFK(NH2)-DTPA (P3), and ForNleLFK-DTPA (P4), were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro bioactivity and receptor binding. The peptides were radiolabeled with 111In by transchelation and their biodistribution determined in rats at 5, 30, 60 and 120 min after injection. Localization at sites of infection was determined by scintillation camera imaging in animals with deep-thigh infection due to Escherichia coli. Images were recorded from 5 min to 2 hr after injection. All peptides maintained biologic activity (EC50 for O2-production by human PMN's: 3-150 nM) and the ability to bind to the oligopeptide chemoattractant receptor on human PMN's (EC50 for binding: 7.5-50 nM); biologic activity and receptor binding were highly correlated (r = 0.99). For all the peptides, blood clearance was rapid (half-lives: 21.5, 33.1, 31.6, and 28.7 min for P1, P2, P3, and P4, respectively). Biodistributions of the individual peptides were similar with low levels of accumulation in the heart, lung, liver, spleen, and gastrointestinal tract. In the kidney, P1 had much greater accumulation than other organs. All peptides yielded high quality images of the infection sites within 1 hr of injection. This study demonstrates that 111In-labeled chemotactic peptide analogs were effective agents for the external imaging of focal sites of infection.

  1. Chemotactic chemokines are important in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Darkoh, Charles; Comer, Latoya; Zewdie, Getie; Harold, Stephen; Snyder, Ned; Dupont, Herbert L

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequently diagnosed disorders, affecting about 20% of the general population in Western countries. This syndrome poses an enormous socio-economic burden, impairs the quality of life substantially, and increases healthcare costs. IBS can be classified as either idiopathic (ID-IBS) with unknown etiology or post-infectious (PI-IBS), which develops after a bout of acute diarrhea or gastroenteritis. Little is known about the immunopathogenesis of these two forms of IBS. We evaluated various biomarkers in clinical samples of ID-IBS and PI-IBS patients with the goal to test the hypothesis that the immunologic presentations of these forms of IBS are similar, despite their apparent different etiologic origins. Sera and stool samples from PI-IBS, ID-IBS, and healthy volunteers were analyzed for relative amounts of 36 different biomarkers using the Proteome Profiler Human Cytokine Array Panel A Kit and quantitative ELISA. Our results demonstrated significantly high levels of chemotactic chemokines monocytes chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2) [p-value  = 0.003], macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (CCL4) [p-value  = 0.010], and CXCL16 (p-value 0.001) in the sera and stools of both ID-IBS and PI-IBS patients. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α) were significantly higher in IBS patients. Anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-4, and IL-13) were variable except IL-10, which was significantly higher in the healthy volunteers than the IBS patients. Remarkably, the amounts and expression pattern of these biomarkers were not significantly different between ID-IBS and PI-IBS. Thus, ID-IBS and PI-IBS present similar immunologic and clinical phenotypes, in spite of their different etiologic origins.

  2. Diabetes mellitus: polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) filtration parameters and PMN membrane fluidity after chemotactic activation.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, R; Montana, M; Canino, B; Ventimiglia, G; Catania, A; Caimi, G

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine leukocyte rheology at baseline and after chemotactic activation in type I and type II diabetics. In 19 normal subjects, 21 type I diabetics, and 16 type II diabetics at baseline and after in vitro chemotactic activation (prolonged for 5 and 15 minutes) with two stimulating agents (4-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA] and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine [fMLP]), we evaluated polymorphonuclear (PMN) filtration parameters (using a St. George filtrometer [Carri-Med, Dorking, UK] and considering the initial relative flow rate [IRFR] and the concentration of clogging particles [CP]) and PMN membrane fluidity (obtained by marking PMNs with the fluorescent probe 1-(4-[trimethylamino]phenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH). At baseline, there was a difference between normals and type I and II diabetics for PMN membrane fluidity only. After activation in normals and diabetics of both types, a significant variation was present in PMN filtration parameters (IRFR and CP) at both 5 and 15 minutes. In normals, no variation was present in PMN membrane fluidity after activation with PMA or fMLP. After PMN activation, only in type I diabetics was a significant decrease in PMN membrane fluidity present at both 5 and 15 minutes. After PMN activation with either PMA or fMLP in comparison to basal values, only the mean variation (delta%) of the IRFR was significantly different between normals, type I diabetics, and type II diabetics at both 5 and 15 minutes. From the data obtained, it is evident that after activation, the PMN filtration pattern shows a specific behavior in diabetics of both types, while PMN membrane fluidity changes only in type I diabetics. The latter finding may be the basis of a metabolic pattern present in PMNs of this type, revealed after in vitro activation.

  3. A rapid phenol toxicity test based on photosynthesis and movement of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter.

    PubMed

    Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Kim, Youn-Jung; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Mi-Sung; Park, Areum; Park, Jihae; Shin, Woongghi; Han, Taejun

    2014-10-01

    Phenol, a monosubstituted aromatic hydrocarbon with various commercial uses, is a major organic constituent in industrial wastewaters. The ecotoxic action of phenol for aquatic environment is well known. In this study, rapid phenol toxicity tests (1h) were developed based on chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence and the movement parameters of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter. Phenol significantly reduced the maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) of photosystem II (PS II) and the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (rETRmax) with median effective concentration (EC50) values of 8.94 and 4.67 mM, respectively. Phenol reduced the motility and triggered change in the swimming velocity of the test organism. Among the parameters tested, velocity was the most sensitive biomarker with an EC50 of 3.17 mM. The EC50 values for Fv/Fm, motility, and velocity appear to overlap the permitted levels of phenol. In conclusion, the photosynthesis and movement of E. agilis can be fast and sensitive risk assessment parameters for the evaluation of phenol toxicity in municipal and industrial effluents.

  4. Biogeography of Heterotrophic Flagellate Populations Indicates the Presence of Generalist and Specialist Taxa in the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrophic marine flagellates (HF) are ubiquitous in the world's oceans and represented in nearly all branches of the domain Eukaryota. However, the factors determining distributions of major taxonomic groups are poorly known. The Arctic Ocean is a good model environment for examining the distribution of functionally similar but phylogenetically diverse HF because the physical oceanography and annual ice cycles result in distinct environments that could select for microbial communities or favor specific taxa. We reanalyzed new and previously published high-throughput sequencing data from multiple studies in the Arctic Ocean to identify broad patterns in the distribution of individual taxa. HF accounted for fewer than 2% to over one-half of the reads from the water column and for up to 60% of reads from ice, which was dominated by Cryothecomonas. In the water column, many HF phylotypes belonging to Telonemia and Picozoa, uncultured marine stramenopiles (MAST), and choanoflagellates were geographically widely distributed. However, for two groups in particular, Telonemia and Cryothecomonas, some species level taxa showed more restricted distributions. For example, several phylotypes of Telonemia favored open waters with lower nutrients such as the Canada Basin and offshore of the Mackenzie Shelf. In summary, we found that while some Arctic HF were successful over a range of conditions, others could be specialists that occur under particular conditions. We conclude that tracking species level diversity in HF not only is feasible but also provides a potential tool for understanding the responses of marine microbial ecosystems to rapidly changing ice regimes. PMID:25595764

  5. The Role of Glycerol and Inorganic Ions in Osmoregulatory Responses of the Euryhaline Flagellate Chlamydomonas pulsatilla Wollenweber 1

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Hellebust, Johan A.

    1986-01-01

    The green euryhaline flagellate Chlamydomonas pulsatilla Wollenweber, isolated from a coastal marine environment, was grown exponentially over the salinity range of 10 to 200% artificial seawater (ASW). The cellular volume and aqueous space of the alga, measured by [14C] mannitol and 3H2O tracer analyses of centrifuged cell pellets, ranged between 2.3 and 3.1 picoliters and between 1.5 and 2.1 picoliters, respectively. The nonaqueous space determined in those analyses (28-35%) was consistent with the cell composition of the alga. The glycerol content of the alga increased almost linearly with increasing salinity; its contribution to intracellular osmolality at 200% ASW was about 57%. The contribution of amino acids and soluble carbohydrates to the cell osmotic balance was small. Intracellular ion concentrations determined by analyzing centrifuged cell pellets of known [14C]mannitol space by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and by neutron activation analyses of washed cells were similar. At 10% ASW, potassium and magnesium were the major cations, and chloride and phosphate were the major anions. The sodium and chloride content of the alga increased with increasing salinity; at 200% ASW the intracellular concentration of both sodium and chloride was about 400 millimolar. The intracellular osmolality (πint) matched closely the external osmolality (πext) over the entire salinity range except at 10% ASW where πint exceeded πext by 120 to 270 milliosmoles per kilogram H2O. PMID:16665042

  6. Growth-related gene product {alpha}: A chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.E.; Pope, R.M. |; Shah, M.R.; Hosaka, S.

    1995-10-01

    Leukocyte recruitment is critical in the inflammation seen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To determine whether the chemokine growth-related gene product {alpha} (gro{alpha}) plays a role in this process, we examined synovial tissue (ST), synovial fluid (SF), and plasma samples from 102 patients with arthritis. RA SF contained more antigenic gro{alpha} (mean 5.3 {+-} 1.9 ng/ml) than did SFs from either osteoarthritis (OA) or other forms of arthritis (mean 0.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). RA plasma contained more gro{alpha} (mean 4.3 {+-} 1.8 ng/ml) than normal plasma (mean 0.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). RA ST fibroblasts (1.2 x 10{sup 5}/cells/ml RPMI 1640/24 h) produced antigenic gro{alpha} (mean 0.2 {+-} 0.1 ng/ml), and this production was increased significantly upon incubation with TNF-{alpha} (mean 1.3 {+-} 0.3 ng/ml) or IL-1{beta} (mean 2.3 {+-} 0.6 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). Cells from RA SF also produced gro{alpha}: neutrophils (PMNs) (10{sup 7} cells/ml/24 h) produced 3.7 {+-} 0.7 ng/ml. RA SF mononuclear cells produced gro{alpha}, particularly upon incubation with LPS or PHA. Immunoreactive ST gro{alpha} was found in greater numbers of RA compared with either OA or normal lining cells, as well as in RA compared with OA subsynovial macrophages (p < 0.05). IL-8 accounted for a mean of 36% of the RA SF chemotactic activity for PMNs, while epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide-78 accounted for 34%, and gro{alpha} for 28%, of this activity. Combined neutralization of all three chemokines in RA SFs resulted in a mean decrease of 50% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs present in the RA SFs. These results indicate that gro{alpha} plays an important role in the ingress of PMNs into the RA joint. 54 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Binding of formyl peptides to Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells and the chemotactic response of these cells.

    PubMed

    Rayner, D C; Orr, F W; Shiu, R P

    1985-05-01

    N-Formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) induces chemotaxis in leukocytes, the response being mediated by peptide binding to a receptor on the plasma membrane. In tumor cells, this peptide has been reported to induce cellular swelling and chemotaxis in vitro and to enhance the localization of circulating tumor cells in vivo. In the Boyden chamber, we evaluated the migratory responses of Walker carcinosarcoma 256 cells to varying concentrations of fMLP. Sigmoidal dose-response curves were obtained with the dose of chemotactic factor that elicits a half-maximal chemotactic response of 5.0 +/- 2.5 X 10(-8) M. Checkerboard analysis indicated that these responses were dependent upon a concentration gradient of fMLP with increases in migration of circa 2 to 2.5 times that of random movement. To examine the binding of fMLP, the tumor cells were incubated with 5 X 10(-9) M fML-[3H]P in Hanks' balanced salt solution. Specific binding (0.5 to 1% of total radioligand, to whole cells inhibited by 5 X 10(-6) M fMLP) approached equilibrium after 4 to 6 h at 4 degrees C and after 6 to 10 h at 22 degrees C. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated heterogeneous binding of the peptide by tumor cells and also showed its intracellular localization. In homogenates of Walker cells prepared in 0.1 M Tris HCl, pH 7.4, with 10 mM MgCl2 and bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml), specific binding of approximately 0.5% of total fML-[3H]P reached equilibrium after 60 min at 4 degrees C. In whole cells and homogenates, binding was reversible by addition of unlabeled fMLP. In whole cells, displacement curves demonstrated a Kd of 1.9 +/- 0.1 X 10(-7) M, whereas in homogenates there was a background of low affinity (Kd greater than 10(-5) M) nonsaturable binding, but also a high-affinity component with Kd of 4.9 +/- 1.8 X 10(-8) M. Both chemotaxis and binding were inhibited by the oligopeptide, N-carbobenzoxy-L-phenylalanyl-L-methionine, which is a competitive inhibitor of formyl peptide

  8. Intestinal Dendritic Cells Are Altered in Number, Maturity and Chemotactic Ability in Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Min; Liu, DY

    2016-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is defined as rapid acute liver injury, often complicated with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). The precise onset of FHF with SBP is still unknown, but it is thought that SBP closely correlates with a weakened intestinal barrier. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in forming the intestinal immune barrier, therefore the number, maturity and chemotactic ability of intestinal DCs were studied in FHF. Mouse intestinal and spleen DCs were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and surface markers of DCs, namely CD11c, CD74, CD83 and CD86, were identified using flow cytometry. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the distribution and expression of CC-chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) and CC-chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9), as well as their ligands-CC-chemokine ligand 21 (CCL21) and CC-chemokine ligand 25 (CCL25). Real-time PCR was used to detect CCR7 and CCR9 mRNA, along with their ligands-CCL21 and CCL25 mRNA. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the markers CD74, CD83 and CD86 of CD11c+DCs were lower in the D-galactosamine (D-GalN) group and were significantly decreased in the FHF group, while there were no significant changes in the expression of these markers in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group. Immunohistochemistry results showed that staining for CCR7 and CCR9, as well as their ligands CCL21 and CCL25, was significantly weaker in the D-GalN and FHF groups compared with the normal saline (NS) group or the LPS group; the FHF group even showed completely unstained parts. Protein expression of CCR7 and CCR9, as well as their ligands- CCL21 and CCL25, was also lower in the D-GalN group and decreased even more significantly in the FHF group. At the gene level, CCR7 and CCR9, along with CCL21 and CCL25 mRNA expression, was lower in the D-GalN group and significantly decreased in the FHF group compared to the NS and LPS groups, consisting with the protein expression. Our study indicated that

  9. Abnormal neutrophil chemotactic activity in children with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA): the role of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Beigelman, Avraham; Levy, Jacov; Hadad, Nurit; Pinsk, Vered; Haim, Alon; Fruchtman, Yariv; Levy, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    A 1926-ins-T mutation in the TrkA gene encoding the tyrosine kinase receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF) was previously documented in patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA). These patients suffer from skin lacerations which often evolve into deep tissue infections. Abnormality in neutrophil functions may explain this high rate of severe infections. In this study we show that chemotaxis was significantly (P<0.001) suppressed in patients' neutrophils, compared to healthy controls. Although NGF alone did not exert a chemotactic effect, its presence enhanced both migration toward fMLP and phosphorylation of MAP kinases (ERK and JNK) in neutrophils from healthy controls, but not in neutrophils from CIPA patients. The significantly impaired chemotactic activity of neutrophils from a CIPA patient, which has been attributed to the molecular defect in the TrkA receptor, may contribute to the high rate of infection.

  10. RecA Protein Plays a Role in the Chemotactic Response and Chemoreceptor Clustering of Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Mayola, Albert; Irazoki, Oihane; Martínez, Ignacio A.; Petrov, Dmitri; Menolascina, Filippo; Stocker, Roman; Reyes-Darias, José A.; Krell, Tino; Barbé, Jordi; Campoy, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The RecA protein is the main bacterial recombinase and the activator of the SOS system. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium, RecA is also essential for swarming, a flagellar-driven surface translocation mechanism widespread among bacteria. In this work, the direct interaction between RecA and the CheW coupling protein was confirmed, and the motility and chemotactic phenotype of a S. Typhimurium ΔrecA mutant was characterized through microfluidics, optical trapping, and quantitative capillary assays. The results demonstrate the tight association of RecA with the chemotaxis pathway and also its involvement in polar chemoreceptor cluster formation. RecA is therefore necessary for standard flagellar rotation switching, implying its essential role not only in swarming motility but also in the normal chemotactic response of S. Typhimurium. PMID:25147953

  11. Decreased numbers of chemotactic factor receptors in chronic neutropenia with defective chemotaxis: spontaneous recovery from the neutrophil abnormalities during early childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, K.; Yamazaki, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Akabane, T.

    1987-05-01

    Childhood chronic neutropenia with decreased numbers of chemotactic factor receptors as well as defective chemotaxis was first demonstrated in an 8-month-old girl. Chemotactic factor receptors on neutrophils were assayed using tritiated N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (/sup 3/H-FMLP). The patient's neutrophils had decreased numbers of the receptors: numbers of the receptors were 20,000 (less than 3 SD) as compared with those of control cells of 52,000 +/- 6000 (mean +/- SD) (n = 10). The neutropenia disappeared spontaneously by 28 months of age parallel with the improvement of chemotaxis and increase in numbers of chemotactic factor receptors. These results demonstrate a transient decrease of neutrophil chemotactic factor receptors as one of the pathophysiological bases of a transient defect of neutrophil chemotaxis in this disorder.

  12. High genetic diversity and fine-scale spatial structure in the marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae) uncovered by microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Chris D; Montagnes, David J S; Martin, Laura E; Watts, Phillip C

    2010-12-23

    Free-living marine protists are often assumed to be broadly distributed and genetically homogeneous on large spatial scales. However, an increasing application of highly polymorphic genetic markers (e.g., microsatellites) has provided evidence for high genetic diversity and population structuring on small spatial scales in many free-living protists. Here we characterise a panel of new microsatellite markers for the common marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina. Nine microsatellite loci were used to assess genotypic diversity at two spatial scales by genotyping 200 isolates of O. marina from 6 broad geographic regions around Great Britain and Ireland; in one region, a single 2 km shore line was sampled intensively to assess fine-scale genetic diversity. Microsatellite loci resolved between 1-6 and 7-23 distinct alleles per region in the least and most variable loci respectively, with corresponding variation in expected heterozygosities (H(e)) of 0.00-0.30 and 0.81-0.93. Across the dataset, genotypic diversity was high with 183 genotypes detected from 200 isolates. Bayesian analysis of population structure supported two model populations. One population was distributed across all sampled regions; the other was confined to the intensively sampled shore, and thus two distinct populations co-occurred at this site. Whilst model-based analysis inferred a single UK-wide population, pairwise regional F(ST) values indicated weak to moderate population sub-division (0.01-0.12), but no clear correlation between spatial and genetic distance was evident. Data presented in this study highlight extensive genetic diversity for O. marina; however, it remains a substantial challenge to uncover the mechanisms that drive genetic diversity in free-living microorganisms.

  13. Biogeography of heterotrophic flagellate populations indicates the presence of generalist and specialist taxa in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Mary; Lovejoy, Connie

    2015-03-01

    Heterotrophic marine flagellates (HF) are ubiquitous in the world's oceans and represented in nearly all branches of the domain Eukaryota. However, the factors determining distributions of major taxonomic groups are poorly known. The Arctic Ocean is a good model environment for examining the distribution of functionally similar but phylogenetically diverse HF because the physical oceanography and annual ice cycles result in distinct environments that could select for microbial communities or favor specific taxa. We reanalyzed new and previously published high-throughput sequencing data from multiple studies in the Arctic Ocean to identify broad patterns in the distribution of individual taxa. HF accounted for fewer than 2% to over one-half of the reads from the water column and for up to 60% of reads from ice, which was dominated by Cryothecomonas. In the water column, many HF phylotypes belonging to Telonemia and Picozoa, uncultured marine stramenopiles (MAST), and choanoflagellates were geographically widely distributed. However, for two groups in particular, Telonemia and Cryothecomonas, some species level taxa showed more restricted distributions. For example, several phylotypes of Telonemia favored open waters with lower nutrients such as the Canada Basin and offshore of the Mackenzie Shelf. In summary, we found that while some Arctic HF were successful over a range of conditions, others could be specialists that occur under particular conditions. We conclude that tracking species level diversity in HF not only is feasible but also provides a potential tool for understanding the responses of marine microbial ecosystems to rapidly changing ice regimes. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. High Genetic Diversity and Fine-Scale Spatial Structure in the Marine Flagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae) Uncovered by Microsatellite Loci

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Chris D.; Montagnes, David J. S.; Martin, Laura E.; Watts, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    Free-living marine protists are often assumed to be broadly distributed and genetically homogeneous on large spatial scales. However, an increasing application of highly polymorphic genetic markers (e.g., microsatellites) has provided evidence for high genetic diversity and population structuring on small spatial scales in many free-living protists. Here we characterise a panel of new microsatellite markers for the common marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina. Nine microsatellite loci were used to assess genotypic diversity at two spatial scales by genotyping 200 isolates of O. marina from 6 broad geographic regions around Great Britain and Ireland; in one region, a single 2 km shore line was sampled intensively to assess fine-scale genetic diversity. Microsatellite loci resolved between 1–6 and 7–23 distinct alleles per region in the least and most variable loci respectively, with corresponding variation in expected heterozygosities (He) of 0.00–0.30 and 0.81–0.93. Across the dataset, genotypic diversity was high with 183 genotypes detected from 200 isolates. Bayesian analysis of population structure supported two model populations. One population was distributed across all sampled regions; the other was confined to the intensively sampled shore, and thus two distinct populations co-occurred at this site. Whilst model-based analysis inferred a single UK-wide population, pairwise regional FST values indicated weak to moderate population sub-division (0.01–0.12), but no clear correlation between spatial and genetic distance was evident. Data presented in this study highlight extensive genetic diversity for O. marina; however, it remains a substantial challenge to uncover the mechanisms that drive genetic diversity in free-living microorganisms. PMID:21203414

  15. Prey-Specific Growth Responses of Freshwater Flagellate Communities Induced by Morphologically Distinct Bacteria from the Genus Limnohabitans

    PubMed Central

    Grujčić, Vesna; Kasalický, Vojtěch

    2015-01-01

    Because their large growth potential is counterbalanced with grazing by heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF), bacteria of the genus Limnohabitans, which are common in many freshwater habitats, represent a valuable model for examining bacterial carbon flow to the grazer food chain. We conducted experiments with natural HNF communities taken from two distinct habitats, the meso-eutrophic Římov Reservoir and the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Cep (South Bohemia). HNF communities from each habitat at distinct seasonal phases, a late April algal bloom and a late May clear water phase, were each fed 3 Limnohabitans strains of differing cell sizes. Water samples were prefiltered (5 μm) to release natural HNF communities from zooplankton control and then amended with the Limnohabitans strains L. planktonicus II-D5 (medium sized, rod shaped), Limnohabitans sp. strain T6-5 (thin, long, curved rod), and Limnohabitans sp. strain 2KL-3 (large solenoid). Using temporal sampling and prey treatment, we determined HNF growth parameters such as doubling time, growth efficiency, and length of lag phase prior starting to exponential growth. All three Limnohabitans strains supported HNF growth but in significant prey-, site-, and season-dependent fashions. For instance, addition of the moderately large T6-5 strain yielded very rapid HNF growth with a short lag phase. In contrast, the curved morphology and larger cell size of strain 2KL-3 made this prey somewhat protected against grazing by smaller HNF, resulting in slower HNF growth and longer lag phases. These trends were particularly pronounced during the late May clear-water phase, which was dominated by smaller HNF cells. This may indicate a longer “adaptation time” for the flagellate communities toward the large prey size offered. PMID:25979896

  16. Gravitaxis in the flagellate Euglena gracilis--results from NiZeMi, clinostat and sounding rocket flights.

    PubMed

    Häder, D P

    1994-05-01

    Many motile microorganisms including flagellates such as the green Euglena gracilis move up and down within the water column and use a number of external clues for their orientation, the most important of which may be light and gravity. The cells use positive phototaxis and negative gravitaxis to move closer to the surface of the water column which for energetic reasons is vital for their survival. However, most phytoplankton organisms cannot tolerate the bright irradiance of unfiltered solar radiation at the surface which also bleaches the photosynthetic pigments, disables the photosynthetic apparatus and impairs phototaxis, gravitaxis and motility in Euglena. Thus, it is not surprising that at higher irradiances negative phototaxis operates antagonistically to the responses described above to guide the cells into deeper water where they are protected from excessive radiation. Phototaxis and gravitaxis are not independent from one another: in a vertically positioned cuvette negative gravitaxis can be "titrated" by light impinging from above and is compensated at about 30 W m-2. While the photoreceptor for phototaxis has been identified in Euglena gracilis biochemically and spectroscopically, the gravireceptor is not yet known. Young cultures of Euglena gracilis show a positive gravitaxis, the ecological signficance of which is not yet understood while older cultures show negative gravitaxis. One hypothesis concerning the nature of graviperception is based on a passive physical process such as an asymmetric distribution of the mass within the cell. However, the observation that short term UV irradiation decreases the precision of negative gravitaxis rather indicates the involvement of an active physiological gravireceptor. Furthermore, some heavy metal ions have been found to change the direction of movement from positive to negative gravitaxis in young cells.

  17. Prey-Specific Growth Responses of Freshwater Flagellate Communities Induced by Morphologically Distinct Bacteria from the Genus Limnohabitans.

    PubMed

    Grujčić, Vesna; Kasalický, Vojtěch; Šimek, Karel

    2015-08-01

    Because their large growth potential is counterbalanced with grazing by heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF), bacteria of the genus Limnohabitans, which are common in many freshwater habitats, represent a valuable model for examining bacterial carbon flow to the grazer food chain. We conducted experiments with natural HNF communities taken from two distinct habitats, the meso-eutrophic Římov Reservoir and the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Cep (South Bohemia). HNF communities from each habitat at distinct seasonal phases, a late April algal bloom and a late May clear water phase, were each fed 3 Limnohabitans strains of differing cell sizes. Water samples were prefiltered (5 μm) to release natural HNF communities from zooplankton control and then amended with the Limnohabitans strains L. planktonicus II-D5 (medium sized, rod shaped), Limnohabitans sp. strain T6-5 (thin, long, curved rod), and Limnohabitans sp. strain 2KL-3 (large solenoid). Using temporal sampling and prey treatment, we determined HNF growth parameters such as doubling time, growth efficiency, and length of lag phase prior starting to exponential growth. All three Limnohabitans strains supported HNF growth but in significant prey-, site-, and season-dependent fashions. For instance, addition of the moderately large T6-5 strain yielded very rapid HNF growth with a short lag phase. In contrast, the curved morphology and larger cell size of strain 2KL-3 made this prey somewhat protected against grazing by smaller HNF, resulting in slower HNF growth and longer lag phases. These trends were particularly pronounced during the late May clear-water phase, which was dominated by smaller HNF cells. This may indicate a longer "adaptation time" for the flagellate communities toward the large prey size offered. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Developmental changes in chemotactic response and choice of two attractants, sodium acetate and diacetyl, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Endo, Seiko; Iwamoto, Rie; Takahashi, Hayato; Ichinose, Mitsuyuki

    2007-08-01

    The chemotactic behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to chemical attractants, water-soluble sodium acetate and odorant diacetyl, was investigated using nematodes at various developmental stages to examine the effects of postembryonic development on chemotactic response and spontaneous locomotion. The chemotactic responses to attractants increased as development progressed, and the largest responses to either 1.0 M sodium acetate or 0.1% diacetyl were seen at the young adult (YA) or day adult (A1) stage, respectively. Responses to the chemicals declined thereafter in-line with increasing age. The chemotaxis indices for attractants correlated with activity of spontaneous locomotion (p<0.01), suggesting that a change in spontaneous locomotion is one of the factors involved with the change in chemotactic responses during development. We also investigated the effect of aging on attractant choice by the simultaneous presentation of 0.6 M sodium acetate and 0.1% diacetyl. In the presence of both attractants, the fraction of larval animals at the sodium acetate location was greater than that at the diacetyl location (p<0.05). The fractions of YA animals that gathered at either location were almost identical, whereas the fraction of adult animals at the diacetyl location was greater than that at the sodium acetate location (p<0.05). The patterns of attractant choice of the long-lived daf-2 mutants and short lifespan mev-1 mutants showed the same tendency as those of wild type nematodes in the presence of both attractants. These results suggest that a change in the neuronal mechanisms controlling attractant choice and preference occurs during developmental progression.

  19. Preliminary studies on the chemotactic potential of dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) leucocytes using the bipolar shape formation assay.

    PubMed

    Hunt, T C; Rowley, A F

    1986-06-01

    The bipolar shape formation assay, previously used to determine the chemotactic potential of various factors for mammalian leucocytes, was tested in the present study with granulocytes of the lesser spotted dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula. Bipolar shape formation was found to be a temperature dependent process with maximal formation observed at 30 degrees C. Addition of the formyl peptide, N-formyl-methionyl-phenylalanine failed to induce any bipolar forms at all temperatures and concentrations tested.

  20. Recombinant gamma interferon causes neutrophil migration mediated by the release of a macrophage neutrophil chemotactic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, R. A.; Cunha, F. Q.; Ferreira, S. H.

    1990-01-01

    A dose-dependent neutrophil migration was observed following the injection of purified (Hu IFN-gamma) or recombinant (rIFN-gamma) human gamma interferon into rat peritoneal cavities. This finding contrasts with their inability to cause chemotaxis in vitro in the Boyden chamber. Neutrophil migration into peritoneal cavities and subcutaneous air pouches induced by both preparations of interferon was abolished by pretreatment of the animals with dexamethasone. IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration was enhanced when the macrophage population of the peritoneal cavities was increased by previous injection of thioglycollate and reduced by peritoneal lavage. Macrophage monolayers pretreated either with rIFN-gamma or with lipopolysaccharide from E. coli release into the supernatant a factor that stimulates neutrophil recruitment in animals treated with dexamethasone. Dexamethasone blocked this release but did not affect the neutrophil recruitment induced by this factor. These results suggest that IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration in vivo may be mediated by the release from resident macrophages of a neutrophil chemotactic factor and that dexamethasone blockade of neutrophil recruitment by IFN-gamma is due to inhibition of the release of this factor. PMID:2119790

  1. A Worldwide Competition to Compare the Speed and Chemotactic Accuracy of Neutrophil-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elisabeth; Hamza, Bashar; Bae, Albert; Martel, Joseph; Kataria, Rama; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kortholt, Arjan; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Charras, Guillaume; Janetopoulos, Christopher; Irimia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is the ability to migrate towards the source of chemical gradients. It underlies the ability of neutrophils and other immune cells to hone in on their targets and defend against invading pathogens. Given the importance of neutrophil migration to health and disease, it is crucial to understand the basic mechanisms controlling chemotaxis so that strategies can be developed to modulate cell migration in clinical settings. Because of the complexity of human genetics, Dictyostelium and HL60 cells have long served as models system for studying chemotaxis. Since many of our current insights into chemotaxis have been gained from these two model systems, we decided to compare them side by side in a set of winner-take-all races, the Dicty World Races. These worldwide competitions challenge researchers to genetically engineer and pharmacologically enhance the model systems to compete in microfluidic racecourses. These races bring together technological innovations in genetic engineering and precision measurement of cell motility. Fourteen teams participated in the inaugural Dicty World Race 2014 and contributed cell lines, which they tuned for enhanced speed and chemotactic accuracy. The race enabled large-scale analyses of chemotaxis in complex environments and revealed an intriguing balance of speed and accuracy of the model cell lines. The successes of the first race validated the concept of using fun-spirited competition to gain insights into the complex mechanisms controlling chemotaxis, while the challenges of the first race will guide further technological development and planning of future events. PMID:27332963

  2. Investigations into the design principles in the chemotactic behavior of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jung, Sung Hoon; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Inspired by the recent studies on the analysis of biased random walk behavior of Escherichia coli[Passino, K.M., 2002. Biomimicry of bacterial foraging for distributed optimization and control. IEEE Control Syst. Mag. 22 (3), 52-67; Passino, K.M., 2005. Biomimicry for Optimization, Control and Automation. Springer-Verlag, pp. 768-798; Liu, Y., Passino, K.M., 2002. Biomimicry of social foraging bacteria for distributed optimization: models, principles, and emergent behaviors. J. Optim. Theory Appl. 115 (3), 603-628], we have developed a model describing the motile behavior of E. coli by specifying some simple rules on the chemotaxis. Based on this model, we have analyzed the role of some key parameters involved in the chemotactic behavior to unravel the underlying design principles. By investigating the target tracking capability of E. coli in a maze through computer simulations, we found that E. coli clusters can be controlled as target trackers in a complex micro-scale-environment. In addition, we have explored the dynamical characteristics of this target tracking mechanism through perturbation of parameters under noisy environments. It turns out that the E. coli chemotaxis mechanism might be designed such that it is sensitive enough to efficiently track the target and also robust enough to overcome environmental noises.

  3. Ca2+ spikes in the flagellum control chemotactic behavior of sperm

    PubMed Central

    Böhmer, Martin; Van, Qui; Weyand, Ingo; Hagen, Volker; Beyermann, Michael; Matsumoto, Midori; Hoshi, Motonori; Hildebrand, Eilo; Kaupp, Ulrich Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    The events that occur during chemotaxis of sperm are only partly known. As an essential step toward determining the underlying mechanism, we have recorded Ca2+ dynamics in swimming sperm of marine invertebrates. Stimulation of the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata by the chemoattractant or by intracellular cGMP evokes Ca2+ spikes in the flagellum. A Ca2+ spike elicits a turn in the trajectory followed by a period of straight swimming (‘turn-and-run'). The train of Ca2+ spikes gives rise to repetitive loop-like movements. When sperm swim in a concentration gradient of the attractant, the Ca2+ spikes and the stimulus function are synchronized, suggesting that precise timing of Ca2+ spikes controls navigation. We identified the peptide asterosap as a chemotactic factor of the starfish Asterias amurensis. The Ca2+ spikes and swimming behavior of sperm from starfish and sea urchin are similar, implying that the signaling pathway of chemotaxis has been conserved for almost 500 million years. PMID:16001082

  4. Directional memory arises from long-lived cytoskeletal asymmetries in polarized chemotactic cells.

    PubMed

    Prentice-Mott, Harrison V; Meroz, Yasmine; Carlson, Andreas; Levine, Michael A; Davidson, Michael W; Irimia, Daniel; Charras, Guillaume T; Mahadevan, L; Shah, Jagesh V

    2016-02-02

    Chemotaxis, the directional migration of cells in a chemical gradient, is robust to fluctuations associated with low chemical concentrations and dynamically changing gradients as well as high saturating chemical concentrations. Although a number of reports have identified cellular behavior consistent with a directional memory that could account for behavior in these complex environments, the quantitative and molecular details of such a memory process remain unknown. Using microfluidics to confine cellular motion to a 1D channel and control chemoattractant exposure, we observed directional memory in chemotactic neutrophil-like cells. We modeled this directional memory as a long-lived intracellular asymmetry that decays slower than observed membrane phospholipid signaling. Measurements of intracellular dynamics revealed that moesin at the cell rear is a long-lived element that when inhibited, results in a reduction of memory. Inhibition of ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase), downstream of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), stabilized moesin and directional memory while depolymerization of microtubules (MTs) disoriented moesin deposition and also reduced directional memory. Our study reveals that long-lived polarized cytoskeletal structures, specifically moesin, actomyosin, and MTs, provide a directional memory in neutrophil-like cells even as they respond on short time scales to external chemical cues.

  5. Squid-Derived Chitin Oligosaccharides Are a Chemotactic Signal during Colonization by Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Amy L.; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A. C.; DeLoney-Marino, Cindy R.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is noted as the second most abundant biopolymer in nature. Chitin serves many functions for marine bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae (“vibrios”), in some instances providing a physical attachment site, inducing natural genetic competence, and serving as an attractant for chemotaxis. The marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the specific symbiont in the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The bacterium provides the squid with luminescence that the animal uses in an antipredatory defense, while the squid supports the symbiont's nutritional requirements. V. fischeri cells are harvested from seawater during each host generation, and V. fischeri is the only species that can complete this process in nature. Furthermore, chitin is located in squid hemocytes and plays a nutritional role in the symbiosis. We demonstrate here that chitin oligosaccharides produced by the squid host serve as a chemotactic signal for colonizing bacteria. V. fischeri uses the gradient of host chitin to enter the squid light organ duct and colonize the animal. We provide evidence that chitin serves a novel function in an animal-bacterial mutualism, as an animal-produced bacterium-attracting synomone. PMID:22522684

  6. A chemotactic gradient sequestered on endothelial heparan sulfate induces directional intraluminal crawling of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Massena, Sara; Christoffersson, Gustaf; Hjertström, Elina; Zcharia, Eyal; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ausmees, Nora; Rolny, Charlotte; Li, Jin-Ping; Phillipson, Mia

    2010-09-16

    During infection, chemokines sequestered on endothelium induce recruitment of circulating leukocytes into the tissue where they chemotax along chemokine gradients toward the afflicted site. The aim of this in vivo study was to determine whether a chemokine gradient was formed intravascularly and influenced intraluminal neutrophil crawling and transmigration. A chemokine gradient was induced by placing a macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2)-containing (CXCL2) gel on the cremaster muscle of anesthetized wild-type mice or heparanase-overexpressing transgenic mice (hpa-tg) with truncated heparan sulfate (HS) side chains. Neutrophil-endothelial interactions were visualized by intravital microscopy and chemokine gradients detected by confocal microscopy. Localized extravascular chemokine release (MIP-2 gel) induced directed neutrophil crawling along a chemotactic gradient immobilized on the endothelium and accelerated their recruitment into the target tissue compared with homogeneous extravascular chemokine concentration (MIP-2 superfusion). Endothelial chemokine sequestration occurred exclusively in venules and was HS-dependent, and neutrophils in hpa-tg mice exhibited random crawling. Despite similar numbers of adherent neutrophils in hpa-tg and wild-type mice, the altered crawling in hpa-tg mice was translated into decreased number of emigrated neutrophils and ultimately decreased the ability to clear bacterial infections. In conclusion, an intravascular chemokine gradient sequestered by endothelial HS effectively directs crawling leukocytes toward transmigration loci close to the infection site.

  7. Motility and chemotactic response of Pseudomonas fluorescens toward chemoattractants present in the exudate of Macrophomina phaseolina.

    PubMed

    Singh, T; Arora, D K

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains (LAM1-hydrophilic) and (LAM2-hydrophobic) showed positive chemotaxis towards attractants (sugars, amino acids, polyols and organic acids) present in the exudate of Macrophomina phaseolina (a soil-borne plant pathogenic fungus). The varied response of motility traits such as speed, rate of change in direction (RCDI) and net to gross displacement ratio (NGDR) was observed for different chemoattractants. Swimming speed of the strains was highest in 10-fold diluted exudate or 100-1000 microM strength of different attractants, but further dilutions significantly decreased the swimming speed (P = 0.05). Chemotactic response of P fluorescens was positively correlated with swimming speed (P = 0.05; r = 0.76). Relative to control, the RCDI values decreased 1.5-fold in amino acids or sugars, and 1.2-fold in polyols or organic acids. With increase in swimming speed, the NGDR of both strains also increased, but the RCDI decreased. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic strains did not show significant differences in their motility traits. The results demonstrate that M. phaseolina exudate contains chemical attractants that serve as signal for flagellar motility of P. fluorescens. Motile P fluorescens strains thus may consume fungal exudate as nutrients, and thus spores could offer a niche for these bacteria in soil.

  8. Chemotactic synthetic vesicles: Design and applications in blood-brain barrier crossing

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Adrian; Contini, Claudia; Cecchin, Denis; Nyberg, Sophie; Ruiz-Perez, Lorena; Gaitzsch, Jens; Fullstone, Gavin; Tian, Xiaohe; Azizi, Juzaili; Preston, Jane; Volpe, Giorgio; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, scientists have created artificial microscopic and nanoscopic self-propelling particles, often referred to as nano- or microswimmers, capable of mimicking biological locomotion and taxis. This active diffusion enables the engineering of complex operations that so far have not been possible at the micro- and nanoscale. One of the most promising tasks is the ability to engineer nanocarriers that can autonomously navigate within tissues and organs, accessing nearly every site of the human body guided by endogenous chemical gradients. We report a fully synthetic, organic, nanoscopic system that exhibits attractive chemotaxis driven by enzymatic conversion of glucose. We achieve this by encapsulating glucose oxidase alone or in combination with catalase into nanoscopic and biocompatible asymmetric polymer vesicles (known as polymersomes). We show that these vesicles self-propel in response to an external gradient of glucose by inducing a slip velocity on their surface, which makes them move in an extremely sensitive way toward higher-concentration regions. We finally demonstrate that the chemotactic behavior of these nanoswimmers, in combination with LRP-1 (low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 1) targeting, enables a fourfold increase in penetration to the brain compared to nonchemotactic systems. PMID:28782037

  9. Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) is a common form of renal amyloidosis among Egyptians

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christopher P; Ismail, Wesam; Kurtin, Paul J; Vrana, Julie A; Dasari, Surendra; Nasr, Samih H

    2016-01-01

    Large case series of renal amyloidosis subtypes have recently been published in the United States and Europe showing AL amyloidosis to be the predominant subtype in this part of the world. However, the most common subtypes of renal amyloidosis throughout the rest of the world are unknown. We present here the first large case series detailing the subtypes of renal amyloidosis among Egyptians. In this population, AA amyloidosis was the most common type of amyloidosis on renal biopsy at 48%. The newly described leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) was the second most common type and represented nearly one-third of renal amyloid cases at 31%. AL accounted for only 20% of cases. The pathologic findings in ALECT2 cases were similar to those previously described in other case series. Thus ALECT2, which was initially thought to affect mainly Hispanics in the United States, appears to represent an important and likely underrecognized etiology of chronic kidney disease among Egyptians and probably in other ethnic groups around the world. PMID:26867784

  10. The actin cytoskeleton of chemotactic amoebae operates close to the onset of oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westendorf, Christian; Negrete, Jose, Jr.; Bae, Albert; Sandmann, Rabea; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2013-03-01

    We report evidence that the actin machinery of chemotactic Dictyostelium cells operates close to an oscillatory instability. The averaged F-actin response of many cells to a short-time pulse of cAMP is reminiscent of a damped oscillation. At the single-cell level, however, the response dynamics ranged from short, strongly damped responses to slowly decaying, weakly damped oscillations. Furthermore, in a small subpopulation, we observed self-sustained oscillations in the cortical F-actin concentration. We systematically exposed a large number of cells to periodic pulse trains. The results indicate a resonance peak at periodic inputs of around 20 s. We propose a delayed feedback model that explains our experimental findings based on a time-delay in the actin regulatory network. To quantitatively test the model, we performed stimulation experiments with cells that express GFP-tagged fusion proteins of Coronin and Aip1. These served as markers of the F-actin disassembly process and thus allow us to estimate the delay time. Based on this independent estimate, our model predicts an intrinsic period of 20 s, which agrees with the resonance observed experimentally. Financial support by the Max-Planck Society and the DFG (SFB 937).

  11. Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) is a common form of renal amyloidosis among Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christopher P; Ismail, Wesam; Kurtin, Paul J; Vrana, Julie A; Dasari, Surendra; Nasr, Samih H

    2016-04-01

    Large case series of renal amyloidosis subtypes have recently been published in the United States and Europe showing AL amyloidosis to be the predominant subtype in this part of the world. However, the most common subtypes of renal amyloidosis throughout the rest of the world are unknown. We present here the first large case series detailing the subtypes of renal amyloidosis among Egyptians. In this population, AA amyloidosis was the most common type of amyloidosis on renal biopsy at 48%. The newly described leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) was the second most common type and represented nearly one-third of renal amyloid cases at 31%. AL accounted for only 20% of cases. The pathologic findings in ALECT2 cases were similar to those previously described in other case series. Thus ALECT2, which was initially thought to affect mainly Hispanics in the United States, appears to represent an important and likely underrecognized etiology of chronic kidney disease among Egyptians and probably in other ethnic groups around the world.

  12. Emerging morphologies in round bacterial colonies: comparing volumetric versus chemotactic expansion.

    PubMed

    Giverso, Chiara; Verani, Marco; Ciarletta, Pasquale

    2016-06-01

    Biological experiments performed on living bacterial colonies have demonstrated the microbial capability to develop finger-like shapes and highly irregular contours, even starting from an homogeneous inoculum. In this work, we study from the continuum mechanics viewpoint the emergence of such branched morphologies in an initially circular colony expanding on the top of a Petri dish coated with agar. The bacterial colony expansion, based on either a source term, representing volumetric mitotic processes, or a nonconvective mass flux, describing chemotactic expansion, is modeled at the continuum scale. We demonstrate that the front of the colony is always linearly unstable, having similar dispersion curves to the ones characterizing branching instabilities. We also perform finite element simulations, which not only prove the emergence of branching, but also highlight dramatic differences between the two mechanisms of colony expansion in the nonlinear regime. Furthermore, the proposed combination of analytical and numerical analysis allowed studying the influence of different model parameters on the selection of specific patterns. A very good agreement has been found between the resulting simulations and the typical structures observed in biological assays. Finally, this work provides a new interpretation of the emergence of branched patterns in living aggregates, depicted as the results of a complex interplay among chemical, mechanical and size effects.

  13. Theoretical results for chemotactic response and drift of E. coli in a weak attractant gradient.

    PubMed

    Reneaux, Melissa; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2010-09-07

    The bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli) moves in its natural environment in a series of straight runs, interrupted by tumbles which cause change of direction. It performs chemotaxis towards chemo-attractants by extending the duration of runs in the direction of the source. When there is a spatial gradient in the attractant concentration, this bias produces a drift velocity directed towards its source, whereas in a uniform concentration, E. coli adapts, almost perfectly in case of methyl aspartate. Recently, microfluidic experiments have measured the drift velocity of E. coli in precisely controlled attractant gradients, but no general theoretical expression for the same exists. With this motivation, we study an analytically soluble model here, based on the Barkai-Leibler model, originally introduced to explain the perfect adaptation. Rigorous mathematical expressions are obtained for the chemotactic response function and the drift velocity in the limit of weak gradients and under the assumption of completely random tumbles. The theoretical predictions compare favorably with experimental results, especially at high concentrations. We further show that the signal transduction network weakens the dependence of the drift on concentration, thus enhancing the range of sensitivity.

  14. Chemotactic systems in the presence of conflicts: A new functional inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolansky, G.

    2016-11-01

    The evolution of a chemotactic system involving a population of cells attracted to self-produced chemicals is described by the Keller-Segel system. In dimension 2, this system demonstrates a balance between the spreading effect of diffusion and the concentration due to self-attraction. As a result, there exists a critical "mass" (i.e. total cell's population) above which the solution of this system collapses in a finite time, while below this critical mass there is global existence in time. In particular, subcritical mass leads under certain additional conditions to the existence of steady states, corresponding to the solution of an elliptic Liouville equation. The existence of this critical mass is related to a functional inequality known as the Moser-Trudinger inequality. An extension of the Keller-Segel model to several cells populations was considered before in the literature. Here we review some of these results and, in particular, consider the case of conflict between two populations, that is, when population one attracts population two, while, at the same time, population two repels population one. This assumption leads to a new functional inequality which generalizes the Moser-Trudinger inequality. As an application of this inequality we derive sufficient conditions for the existence of steady states corresponding to solutions of an elliptic Liouville system.

  15. Moving Forward Moving Backward: Directional Sorting of Chemotactic Cells due to Size and Adhesion Differences

    PubMed Central

    Käfer, Jos; Hogeweg, Paulien; Marée, Athanasius F. M

    2006-01-01

    Differential movement of individual cells within tissues is an important yet poorly understood process in biological development. Here we present a computational study of cell sorting caused by a combination of cell adhesion and chemotaxis, where we assume that all cells respond equally to the chemotactic signal. To capture in our model mesoscopic properties of biological cells, such as their size and deformability, we use the Cellular Potts Model, a multiscale, cell-based Monte Carlo model. We demonstrate a rich array of cell-sorting phenomena, which depend on a combination of mescoscopic cell properties and tissue level constraints. Under the conditions studied, cell sorting is a fast process, which scales linearly with tissue size. We demonstrate the occurrence of “absolute negative mobility”, which means that cells may move in the direction opposite to the applied force (here chemotaxis). Moreover, during the sorting, cells may even reverse the direction of motion. Another interesting phenomenon is “minority sorting”, where the direction of movement does not depend on cell type, but on the frequency of the cell type in the tissue. A special case is the cAMP-wave-driven chemotaxis of Dictyostelium cells, which generates pressure waves that guide the sorting. The mechanisms we describe can easily be overlooked in studies of differential cell movement, hence certain experimental observations may be misinterpreted. PMID:16789822

  16. Optimizing the restored chemotactic behavior of anticancer agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium VNP20009.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Katherine M; Suh, Seungbeum; Behkam, Bahareh; Scharf, Birgit E

    2017-06-10

    Bacteria, including strains of Salmonella, have been researched and applied as therapeutic cancer agents for centuries. Salmonella are particularly of interest due to their facultative anaerobic nature, facilitating colonization of differentially oxygenated tumor regions. Additionally, Salmonella can be manipulated with relative ease, resulting in the ability to attenuate the pathogen or engineer vectors for drug delivery. It was recently discovered that the anti-cancer Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain VNP20009 is lacking in chemotactic ability, due to a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in cheY. Replacing the mutated copy of cheY with the wild-type sequence restored chemotaxis to 70% of the parental strain. We aimed to investigate further if chemotaxis of VNP20009 can be optimized. By restoring the gene msbB in VNP20009 cheY(+), which confers attenuation by lipid A modification, we observed a 9% increase in swimming speed, 13% increase in swim plate performance, 19% increase in microfluidic device partitioning towards the attractant at the optimum concentration gradient, and mitigation of a non-motile cell subpopulation. We conclude that chemotaxis can be enhanced further but at the cost of changing one defining characteristic of VNP20009. A less compromised strain might be needed to employ for investigating bacterial chemotaxis in tumor interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of placental monocyte chemotactic and activating factor during pregnancy and chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Shimoya, K; Matsuzaki, N; Sawai, K; Saji, F; Murata, Y; Yasumoto, K; Su, S; Mukaida, N; Matsushima, K

    1998-04-01

    A number of placental cytokines participate in the feto-maternal defence mechanism. Monocyte chemotactic and activating factor (MCAF) is one of these chemokines. We investigated the pattern of placental MCAF production, the localization of MCAF-producing cells in the placenta, and alterations in its expression in chorioamnionitis. The amounts of MCAF protein produced by the placenta increased during pregnancy irrespective of the presence of uterine contraction. MCAF mRNA was expressed at equivalent levels in the first and second trimester placenta, but at higher levels in the third trimester placenta. Chorioamnionitis in the third trimester placenta induced a 10-fold increase in MCAF protein production and a 3-fold increase in MCAF mRNA level. Immunohistochemical analysis of the placenta revealed the MCAF-producing cells to be trophoblasts. Stimulation of placental cells with lipopolysaccharide augmented MCAF production. These results indicate unique transcriptional and developmental regulation of MCAF mRNA and protein production during pregnancy and chorioamnionitis. Placental MCAF may be involved in the feto-maternal defence mechanism by activating feto-placental and maternal monocytes in chorioamnionitis.

  18. Neutrophil chemotactic factor release and neutrophil alveolitis in asbestos-exposed individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.A.; Rose, A.H.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W.

    1988-09-01

    Alveolar neutrophil accumulation occurs in asbestosis. To evaluate a possible role for release of neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF) in the pathogenesis of asbestosis, spontaneous NCF release from alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in eight individuals with asbestosis, 13 asbestos-exposed individuals without asbestosis, and five control subjects has been studied. Alveolar macrophages were incubated in medium (four hours; 37 degrees C), and neutrophil responses to the supernatants were assayed in a microchemotaxis chamber. Alveolar macrophages from subjects with asbestosis released more NCF (97 +/- 19 neutrophils per high-power field (N/HPF)) than controls (3 +/- 1 N/HPF; p less than 0.01). Alveolar macrophages from individuals with asbestos exposure and increased BAL neutrophil proportions (n = 7) released more NCF (93 +/- 24 N/HPF) than individuals with asbestos exposure and normal BAL neutrophil proportions (n = 6; 11 +/- 6 N/HPF; p less than 0.02). The results show that spontaneous NCF release occurs in asbestosis and that NCF release is associated with neutrophil alveolitis in asbestos-exposed individuals without asbestosis, suggesting a pathogenic role for NCF in mediating this neutrophil alveolitis. The results of the study also suggest that the presence of crackles is a better predictor of the presence of neutrophil alveolitis than is an abnormal chest x-ray film.

  19. Neutrophil chemotactic factor (IL-8) gene expression by cytokine-treated retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, V. M.; Strieter, R. M.; Elner, S. G.; Baggiolini, M.; Lindley, I.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The neural-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) underlies the sensory retina and is central to both retinal homeostasis and many common retinal diseases. Retinal pigment epithelium cells are actively phagocytic and share several features with macrophages that have recently been shown to produce a neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF), also known as interleukin-8, after cytokine stimulation. Because RPE cell responses to cytokines are largely unknown, human RPE cell NCF production was monitored after interleukin-1-beta (IL-1 beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or lipopolysaccharide stimulation. RPE NCF mRNA expression and RPE production of biologically active NCF was time and concentration dependent. Maximal NCF mRNA expression occurred at 20 ng/ml for IL-1 beta. Messenger RNA expression in RPE cells and biologically active NCF in RPE cell supernatants were found 1 hour after stimulation and were maintained for 24 hours. These findings demonstrate that cytokine-stimulated RPE cells may evoke or augment neutrophil-mediated inflammation by synthesizing NCF, a cytokine that may be important in ocular disease mechanisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:2183623

  20. A microfluidic imaging chamber for the direct observation of chemotactic transmigration

    PubMed Central

    Breckenridge, Mark T.; Egelhoff, Thomas T.; Baskaran, Harihara

    2010-01-01

    To study the roles of nonmuscle myosin II (NM-II) during invasive cell migration, microfluidic migration chambers have been designed and fabricated using photo- and soft-lithography microfabrication techniques. The chamber consists of two channels separated by a vertical barrier with multiple bays of pores with widths varying from 6 µm to 16 µm, and lengths varying from 25µm to 50µm. The cells are plated in the channel on one side of the barrier while a chemoattractant is flowed through the channel on the other side of the barrier. In these chambers, cells can be observed with transmitted light or fluorescence optics while they chemotax through various sized pores that impose differential mechanical resistance to transmigration. As an initial test of this device, we compared breast-cancer cell chemotactic transmigration through different pore sizes with and without inhibition of NM-II. Two distinct rates were observed as cells attempted to pull their nucleus through the smaller pores, and the faster nuclear transit mode was critically dependent on NM-II motor activity. The ability to monitor cells as they chemotax through pores of different dimensions within a single experimental system provides novel information on how pore size affects cell morphology and migration rate, providing a dramatic improvement of imaging potential relative to other in vitro transmigration systems such as Boyden chambers. PMID:20309736

  1. Anti-coreceptor therapy drives selective T cell egress by suppressing inflammation-dependent chemotactic cues

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aaron J.; Clark, Matthew; Gojanovich, Gregory; Manzoor, Fatima; Miller, Keith; Kline, Douglas E.; Morillon, Y. Maurice; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There continues to be a need for immunotherapies to treat type 1 diabetes in the clinic. We previously reported that nondepleting anti-CD4 and -CD8 Ab treatment effectively reverses diabetes in new-onset NOD mice. A key feature of the induction of remission is the egress of the majority of islet-resident T cells. How this occurs is undefined. Herein, the effects of coreceptor therapy on islet T cell retention were investigated. Bivalent Ab binding to CD4 and CD8 blocked TCR signaling and T cell cytokine production, while indirectly downregulating islet chemokine expression. These processes were required for T cell retention, as ectopic IFN-γ or CXCL10 inhibited Ab-mediated T cell purging. Importantly, treatment of humanized mice with nondepleting anti–human CD4 and CD8 Ab similarly reduced tissue-infiltrating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings demonstrate that Ab binding of CD4 and CD8 interrupts a feed-forward circuit by suppressing T cell–produced cytokines needed for expression of chemotactic cues, leading to rapid T cell egress from the islets. Coreceptor therapy therefore offers a robust approach to suppress T cell–mediated pathology by purging T cells in an inflammation-dependent manner. PMID:27777971

  2. NLRP3 inflammasome induces chemotactic immune cell migration to the CNS in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Makoto; Williams, Kristi L.; Gunn, Michael D.; Shinohara, Mari L.

    2012-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of three kinds of proteins, NLRP3, ASC, and pro-caspase-1, and plays a role in sensing pathogens and danger signals in the innate immune system. The NLRP3 inflammasome is thought to be involved in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism by which the NLRP3 inflammasome induces EAE is not clear. In this study, we found that the NLRP3 inflammasome played a critical role in inducing T-helper cell migration into the CNS. To gain migratory ability, CD4+ T cells need to be primed by NLRP3 inflammasome-sufficient antigen-presenting cells to up-regulate chemotaxis-related proteins, such as osteopontin, CCR2, and CXCR6. In the presence of the NLRP3 inflammasome, dendritic cells and macrophages also induce chemotactic ability and up-regulate chemotaxis-related proteins, such as α4β1 integrin, CCL7, CCL8, and CXCL16. On the other hand, reduced Th17 cell population size in immunized Nlrp3−/− and Asc−/− mice is not a determinative factor for their resistance to EAE. As currently applied in clinical interventions of MS, targeting immune cell migration molecules may be an effective approach in treating MS accompanied by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. PMID:22699511

  3. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Regulates Voltage-Gated K+ Channels and Macrophage Transmigration

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, Howard E.; Ding, Shengyuan; Gong, Nan; Liu, Jianuo; Ramirez, Servio H.; Persidsky, Yuri; Mosley, R. Lee; Wang, Tong; Volsky, David J.; Xiong, Huangui

    2009-01-01

    Progressive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and virus-induced neuroinflammatory responses effectuates monocyte-macrophage transmigration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A key factor in mediating these events is monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Upregulated glial-derived MCP-1 in HIV-1 infected brain tissues generates a gradient for monocyte recruitment into the nervous system. We posit that the inter-relationships between MCP-1, voltage gated ion channels, cell shape and volume, and cell mobility underlie monocyte transmigration across the BBB. In this regard, MCP-1 serves both as a chemoattractant and an inducer of monocyte-macrophage ion flux affecting cell shape and mobility. To address this hypothesis, MCP-1 treated bone marrow derived macrophages (BMM) were analyzed for gene and protein expression, electrophysiology, and capacity to migrate across a laboratory constructed BBB. MCP-1 enhanced K+ channel gene (KCNA3) and channel protein expression. Electrophysiological studies revealed that MCP-1 increased outward K+ currents in a dose dependent manner. In vitro studies demonstrated that MCP-1 increased BMM migration across an artificial BBB and the MCP-1-induced BMM migration was blocked by tetraethylammonium, a voltage-gated K+ channel blocker. Together these data demonstrated that MCP-1 affects macrophage migratory movement through regulation of voltage-gated K+ channels and as such, provides a novel therapeutic strategy for neuroAIDS PMID:19034671

  4. Chemotactic synthetic vesicles: Design and applications in blood-brain barrier crossing.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Adrian; Contini, Claudia; Cecchin, Denis; Nyberg, Sophie; Ruiz-Perez, Lorena; Gaitzsch, Jens; Fullstone, Gavin; Tian, Xiaohe; Azizi, Juzaili; Preston, Jane; Volpe, Giorgio; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, scientists have created artificial microscopic and nanoscopic self-propelling particles, often referred to as nano- or microswimmers, capable of mimicking biological locomotion and taxis. This active diffusion enables the engineering of complex operations that so far have not been possible at the micro- and nanoscale. One of the most promising tasks is the ability to engineer nanocarriers that can autonomously navigate within tissues and organs, accessing nearly every site of the human body guided by endogenous chemical gradients. We report a fully synthetic, organic, nanoscopic system that exhibits attractive chemotaxis driven by enzymatic conversion of glucose. We achieve this by encapsulating glucose oxidase alone or in combination with catalase into nanoscopic and biocompatible asymmetric polymer vesicles (known as polymersomes). We show that these vesicles self-propel in response to an external gradient of glucose by inducing a slip velocity on their surface, which makes them move in an extremely sensitive way toward higher-concentration regions. We finally demonstrate that the chemotactic behavior of these nanoswimmers, in combination with LRP-1 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1) targeting, enables a fourfold increase in penetration to the brain compared to nonchemotactic systems.

  5. Transient receptor potential canonical channels are essential for chemotactic migration of human malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bomben, Valerie C; Turner, Kathryn L; Barclay, Tia-Tabitha C; Sontheimer, Harald

    2011-07-01

    The majority of malignant primary brain tumors are gliomas, derived from glial cells. Grade IV gliomas, Glioblastoma multiforme, are extremely invasive and the clinical prognosis for patients is dismal. Gliomas utilize a number of proteins and pathways to infiltrate the brain parenchyma including ion channels and calcium signaling pathways. In this study, we investigated the localization and functional relevance of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels in glioma migration. We show that gliomas are attracted in a chemotactic manner to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Stimulation with EGF results in TRPC1 channel localization to the leading edge of migrating D54MG glioma cells. Additionally, TRPC1 channels co-localize with the lipid raft proteins, caveolin-1 and β-cholera toxin, and biochemical assays show TRPC1 in the caveolar raft fraction of the membrane. Chemotaxis toward EGF was lost when TRPC channels were pharmacologically inhibited or by shRNA knockdown of TRPC1 channels, yet without affecting unstimulated cell motility. Moreover, lipid raft integrity was required for gliomas chemotaxis. Disruption of lipid rafts not only impaired chemotaxis but also impaired TRPC currents in whole cell recordings and decreased store-operated calcium entry as revealed by ratiomeric calcium imaging. These data indicated that TRPC1 channel association with lipid rafts is essential for glioma chemotaxis in response to stimuli, such as EGF.

  6. Marangoni-driven chemotaxis, chemotactic collapse, and the Keller-Segel equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael; Masoud, Hassan

    2013-11-01

    Almost by definition, chemotaxis involves the biased motion of motile particles along gradients of a chemical concentration field. Perhaps the most famous model for collective chemotaxis in mathematical biology is the Keller-Segel model, conceived to describe collective aggregation of slime mold colonies in response to an intrinsically produced, and diffusing, chemo-attractant. Heavily studied, particularly in 2D where the system is ``super-critical'', it has been proved that the KS model can develop finite-time singularities - so-called chemotactic collapse - of delta-function type. Here, we study the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D interface above a 3D fluid. These particles are chemically active and produce a diffusing field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. Remarkably, we show that this system involving 3D diffusion and fluid dynamics, exactly yields the 2D Keller-Segel model for the surface-flow of active particles. We discuss the consequences of collapse on the 3D fluid dynamics, and generalizations of the fluid-dynamical model.

  7. Enhancement of Chemotactic Cell Aggregation by Haptotactic Cell-To-Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Tae-goo; Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-01-01

    The crawling of biological cell is a complex phenomenon involving various biochemical and mechanical processes. Some of these processes are intrinsic to individual cells, while others pertain to cell-to-cell interactions and to their responses to extrinsically imposed cues. Here, we report an interesting aggregation dynamics of mathematical model cells, when they perform chemotaxis in response to an externally imposed global chemical gradient while they influence each other through a haptotaxis-mediated social interaction, which confers intriguing trail patterns. In the absence of the cell-to-cell interaction, the equilibrium population density profile fits well to that of a simple Keller-Segal population dynamic model, in which a chemotactic current density J→chemo∼∇p competes with a normal diffusive current density J→diff∼∇ρ, where p and ρ refer to the concentration of chemoattractant and population density, respectively. We find that the cell-to-cell interaction confers a far more compact aggregation resulting in a much higher peak equilibrium cell density. The mathematical model system is applicable to many biological systems such as swarming microglia and neutrophils or accumulating ants towards a localized food source. PMID:27128310

  8. Microcystins Alter Chemotactic Behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans by Selectively Targeting the AWA Sensory Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Caroline E.; Lein, Pamela J.; Puschner, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms expose humans and animals to microcystins (MCs) through contaminated drinking water. While hepatotoxicity following acute exposure to MCs is well documented, neurotoxicity after sub-lethal exposure is poorly understood. We developed a novel statistical approach using a generalized linear model and the quasibinomial family to analyze neurotoxic effects in adult Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to MC-LR or MC-LF for 24 h. Selective effects of toxin exposure on AWA versus AWC sensory neuron function were determined using a chemotaxis assay. With a non-monotonic response MCs altered AWA but not AWC function, and MC-LF was more potent than MC-LR. To probe a potential role for protein phosphatases (PPs) in MC neurotoxicity, we evaluated the chemotactic response in worms exposed to the PP1 inhibitor tautomycin or the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid for 24 h. Okadaic acid impaired both AWA and AWC function, while tautomycin had no effect on function of either neuronal cell type at the concentrations tested. These findings suggest that MCs alter the AWA neuron at concentrations that do not cause AWC toxicity via mechanisms other than PP inhibition. PMID:24918360

  9. Squid-derived chitin oligosaccharides are a chemotactic signal during colonization by Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Mark J; Schaefer, Amy L; Brennan, Caitlin A; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Deloney-Marino, Cindy R; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-07-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is noted as the second most abundant biopolymer in nature. Chitin serves many functions for marine bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae ("vibrios"), in some instances providing a physical attachment site, inducing natural genetic competence, and serving as an attractant for chemotaxis. The marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the specific symbiont in the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The bacterium provides the squid with luminescence that the animal uses in an antipredatory defense, while the squid supports the symbiont's nutritional requirements. V. fischeri cells are harvested from seawater during each host generation, and V. fischeri is the only species that can complete this process in nature. Furthermore, chitin is located in squid hemocytes and plays a nutritional role in the symbiosis. We demonstrate here that chitin oligosaccharides produced by the squid host serve as a chemotactic signal for colonizing bacteria. V. fischeri uses the gradient of host chitin to enter the squid light organ duct and colonize the animal. We provide evidence that chitin serves a novel function in an animal-bacterial mutualism, as an animal-produced bacterium-attracting synomone.

  10. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and other inflammatory parameters in Bernese Mountain dogs with disseminated histiocytic sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Nikolic Nielsen, Lise; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between cancer and the immune system, and the production of cytokines by the tumour itself have been associated with altered levels of cytokines in human cancer patients. Bernese Mountain dogs with disseminated histiocytic sarcoma (DHS) show vague and non-specific clinical signs. Although histiocytes can secrete cytokines in response to inflammatory stimuli, serum cytokine concentrations in dogs with DHS have not previously been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunological state of untreated Bernese Mountain dogs with DHS by assessing multiple serum cytokines and to correlate these with other inflammatory markers. As a prospective case control study, 17 Bernese Mountain dogs with DHS were included along with 18 healthy controls (12 Bernese Mountain dogs and 6 dogs of various breeds). Blood samples were examined for fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count, monocyte count and the following cytokines: interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, tumour necrosis factor and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1. Significant differences were observed in Bernese Mountain dogs with DHS compared to healthy control dogs for fibrinogen (P=0.002), CRP (P=0.02) and MCP-1 (P=0.004). Other important pro-inflammatory cytokines were not significantly increased in dogs with DHS and none of the measured cytokines were correlated to either WBC, monocyte count, CRP or fibrinogen concentration. The implications of this increased MCP-1 blood levels in Bernese Mountain dogs with DHS warrant further investigations.

  11. Inferring the Chemotactic Strategy of P. putida and E. coli Using Modified Kramers-Moyal Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Hintsche, Marius; Beta, Carsten; Stark, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Many bacteria perform a run-and-tumble random walk to explore their surrounding and to perform chemotaxis. In this article we present a novel method to infer the relevant parameters of bacterial motion from experimental trajectories including the tumbling events. We introduce a stochastic model for the orientation angle, where a shot-noise process initiates tumbles, and analytically calculate conditional moments, reminiscent of Kramers-Moyal coefficients. Matching them with the moments calculated from experimental trajectories of the bacteria E. coli and Pseudomonas putida, we are able to infer their respective tumble rates, the rotational diffusion constants, and the distributions of tumble angles in good agreement with results from conventional tumble recognizers. We also define a novel tumble recognizer, which explicitly quantifies the error in recognizing tumbles. In the presence of a chemical gradient we condition the moments on the bacterial direction of motion and thereby explore the chemotaxis strategy. For both bacteria we recover and quantify the classical chemotactic strategy, where the tumble rate is smallest along the chemical gradient. In addition, for E. coli we detect some cells, which bias their mean tumble angle towards smaller values. Our findings are supported by a scaling analysis of appropriate ratios of conditional moments, which are directly calculated from experimental data. PMID:28114420

  12. Increased expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 during active hepatic fibrogenesis: correlation with monocyte infiltration.

    PubMed Central

    Marra, F.; DeFranco, R.; Grappone, C.; Milani, S.; Pastacaldi, S.; Pinzani, M.; Romanelli, R. G.; Laffi, G.; Gentilini, P.

    1998-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 is a chemoattractant and activator for circulating monocytes and T lymphocytes. We investigated MCP-1 protein and gene expression during chronic liver disease at different stages, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively. In normal liver, a modest expression of MCP-1 was confined to few peri-sinusoidal cells and to bile duct epithelial cells. During chronic hepatitis, MCP-1 immunostaining and gene expression were evident in the inflammatory infiltrate of the portal tract. In tissue from patients with active cirrhosis, MCP-1 expression was clearly up-regulated and was present in the portal tract, in the epithelial cells of regenerating bile ducts, and in the active septa surrounding regenerating nodules. A combination of in situ hybridization for MCP-1 and immunohistochemistry showed that activated stellate cells and monocyte/macrophages contribute to MCP-1 expression in vivo together with bile duct epithelial cells. Comparison of serial sections of liver biopsies from patients with various degrees of necro-inflammatory activity showed that infiltration of the portal tracts with monocytes/macrophages is directly correlated with the expression of MCP-1. These data expand previous in vitro studies showing that secretion of MCP-1 may contribute to the formation and maintenance of the inflammatory infiltrate observed during chronic liver disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9466568

  13. Gc-globulin (vitamin D-binding protein) enhances the neutrophil chemotactic activity of C5a and C5a des Arg.

    PubMed Central

    Kew, R R; Webster, R O

    1988-01-01

    Several serum proteins have been shown to be important in modulating leukocyte chemotaxis and inflammation. We investigated the possibility that the multifunctional serum protein Gc-globulin (vitamin D-binding protein) may also enhance the neutrophil chemotactic activity of complement-derived peptides. Purified Gc-globulin by itself did not induce chemotaxis of human neutrophils. However, as little as 0.01 nM Gc-globulin greatly enhanced the neutrophil chemotactic activity of C5a and its derivative, C5a des Arg over a wide concentration range. The effect was most pronounced at nonchemotactic doses of C5a (0.01 nM) and C5a des Arg (1 nM). Gc-globulin was unable to augment the neutrophil chemotactic activity of FMLP and leukotriene B4. This enhancing activity was not due to a nonspecific effect of anionic proteins since other purified serum proteins, of similar size and charge as Gc-globulin (alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, alpha 2 HS glycoprotein, alpha 2 histidine-rich glycoprotein), could not increase the chemotactic activity of C5a des Arg. Serum depleted of Gc-globulin by immunoaffinity chromatography totally lacked chemotactic enhancing activity for C5a des Arg. Gc-globulin-depleted serum activated with zymosan also had significantly less chemotactic activity than control- (sham-depleted) activated serum. Finally, radioiodinated C5a or C5a des Arg formed a 1:1 complex with purified Gc-globulin when analyzed by gel filtration chromatography. These results indicate that Gc-globulin is the major chemotactic enhancing factor in serum and may function as an up-regulator of the chemotactic activity of C5-derived peptides. PMID:3392213

  14. Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates chemotactic migration of L2071 mouse fibroblasts via pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Park, Kyoung Sun; Lee, Hyuck; Kim, Young Dae; Yun, Jeanho; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2007-04-30

    Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P) was found to stimulate an intracellular calcium increase via phospholipase C but not pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G-proteins in L2071 mouse fibroblasts. PhS1P also activated ERK and p38 kinase, and these activations by PhS1P were inhibited by PTX. Moreover, PhS1P stimulated the chemotactic migration of L2071 cells via PTX-sensitive Gi protein(s). In addition, the PhS1P-induced chemotactic migration of L2071 cells was also dramatically inhibited by LY294002 and SB203580 (inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and p38 kinase, respectively). L2071 cells are known to express four S1P receptors, i.e., S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, and S1P4, and pretreatment with an S1P1 and S1P3 antagonist (VPC 23019) did not affect on PhS1P-induced chemotaxis. This study demonstrates that PhS1P stimulates at least two different signaling cascades, one is a PTX-insensitive but phospholipase C dependent intracellular calcium increase, and the other is a PTX-sensitive chemotactic migration mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase and p38 kinase.

  15. [Chemotactic activity of neutrophils from atopic and non-atopic subjects--effect of sodium cromoglycate (DSCG)].

    PubMed

    Szkudlińska, B; Kowalski, M L; Grzegorczyk, J; Pierzchała, A

    1996-01-01

    It has been well documented, that sodium cromoglycate (DSCG) is capable in inhibiting activity of several inflammatory cells putatively involved in allergic and non-allergic asthmatic inflammation. The goal of this study was to compare the effect of DSCG on random locomotion and chemotaxis of neutrophils to several stimuli in atopic and non-atopic subjects. In 10 seasonal asthmatic (SA), and 10 healthy subjects (HS) chemotactic responses of neutrophils were examined using modified Boyden's microchamber (Neuroprobe) technique. Neutrophils isolated from both HS and SA demonstrated similar spontaneous migration and dose dependent chemotactic responses to FMLP (10(-12) - 10(-5M)), PAF (10(-7) - 10(-5M)) and ZAS (2.5% - 50%). DSCG in concentration range 10(-7) - 10(-9M) expressed a dose-dependent inhibition of both random migration and chemotactic responses to all stimuli tested, with maximal inhibition ranging from 58%-89% and 67%-75% for HS and SA, respectively. Our results confirm potent anti-inflammatory activity of DSCG in vitro, and demonstrate, that this activity is similar in atopic asthmatics, and in healthy subjects.

  16. Effects of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Metabolites on RANTES- and IL-5-Induced Eosinophil Chemotactic Activity in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Etsuro; Simpson, Keith L.; Grisham, Matthew B.; Koyama, Sekiya; Robbins, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Eosinophils and increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide, components of peroxynitrite, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic disorders including asthma. Peroxynitrite induced protein nitration may compromise enzyme and protein function. We hypothesized that peroxynitrite may modulate eosinophil migration by modulating chemotactic cytokines. To test this hypothesis, the eosinophil chemotactic responses of regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and interleukin (IL)-5 incubated with and without peroxynitrite were evaluated. Peroxynitrite-attenuated RANTES and IL-5 induced eosinophil chemotactic activity (ECA) in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05) but did not attenuate leukotriene B4 or complement-activated serum ECA. The reducing agents deferoxamine and dithiothreitol reversed the ECA inhibition by peroxynitrite, and exogenous L-tyrosine abrogated the inhibition by peroxynitrite. PAPA-NONOate, a NO donor, or superoxide generated by lumazine or xanthine and xanthine oxidase, did not show an inhibitory effect on ECA. The peroxynitrite generator, 3-morpholinosydnonimine, caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of ECA. Peroxynitrite reduced RANTES and IL-5 binding to eosinophils and resulted in nitrotyrosine formation. These findings are consistent with nitration of tyrosine by peroxynitrite with subsequent inhibition of RANTES and IL-5 binding to eosinophils and suggest that peroxynitrite may play a role in regulation of eosinophil chemotaxis. PMID:10433951

  17. Comamonas testosteroni uses a chemoreceptor for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to trigger chemotactic responses towards aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bin; Huang, Zhou; Fan, Zheng; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds has been frequently observed; however, knowledge of how bacteria sense aromatic compounds is limited. Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 is able to grow on a range of aromatic compounds. This study investigated the chemotactic responses of CNB-1 to 10 aromatic compounds. We constructed a chemoreceptor-free, non-chemotactic mutant, CNB-1Δ20, by disruption of all 19 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) and the atypical chemoreceptor in strain CNB-1. Individual complementation revealed that a putative MCP (tagged MCP2201) was involved in triggering chemotaxis towards all 10 aromatic compounds. The recombinant sensory domain of MCP2201 did not bind to 3- or 4-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate, catechol, benzoate, vanillate and gentisate, but bound oxaloacetate, citrate, cis-aconitate, isocitrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate and malate. The mutant CNB-1ΔpmdF that lost the ability to metabolize 4-hydroxybenzoate and protocatechuate also lost its chemotactic response to these compounds, suggesting that taxis towards aromatic compounds is metabolism-dependent. Based on the ligand profile, we proposed that MCP2201 triggers taxis towards aromatic compounds by sensing TCA cycle intermediates. Our hypothesis was further supported by the finding that introduction of the previously characterized pseudomonad chemoreceptor (McpS) for TCA cycle intermediates into CNB-1Δ20 likewise triggered chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds.

  18. Homing of hemopoietic precursor cells to the embryonic thymus: characterization of an invasive mechanism induced by chemotactic peptides

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    During embryonic development, T cell precursors migrate to the thymus, where immunocompetency is acquired. Our previous studies have shown that avian hemopoietic precursor cells are recruited to the thymus by chemotactic peptides secreted by thymic epithelial cells (Champion, S., B. A. Imhof, P. Savagner, and J. P. Thiery, 1986, Cell, 44:781-790). In this study, we have characterized the homing of these precursor cells to the thymus in vivo by electron and light microscopy. Hemopoietic precursors could be seen to extravasate from blood or lymphatic vessels, migrate in the mesenchyme, traverse the perithymic basement membrane, and finally intercalate into the thymic epithelium. Labeled hemopoietic precursors injected into the blood circulation also followed the same pathway. Migrating hemopoietic precursor cells were found to express the fibronectin receptor complex. In the presence of thymic chemotactic peptides, hemopoietic precursors traverse a human amniotic basement membrane. This invasive process was inhibited by antibodies to laminin or to fibronectin, two major glycoproteins of the amniotic membrane, by monovalent Fab' fragments of antibodies to the fibronectin receptor, and, finally by synthetic peptides that contain the cell-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser of fibronectin. These results indicate that hemopoietic precursors respond to thymic chemotactic peptides by invasive behavior. Direct interactions between basement membrane components and fibronectin receptors appear to be required for this developmentally regulated invasion process. PMID:3793754

  19. Activation of cellular chemotactic responses to chemokines coupled with oxidation of plasma membrane proteins by lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Héctor A; Mäki, Joni M; Kagan, Herbert M

    2011-07-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is a potent chemokine inducing the migration of varied cell types. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of cellular LOX activity by preincubation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), the irreversible inhibitor of LOX activity, resulted in the marked suppression of the chemotactic response and sensitivity of these cells toward LOX and toward PDGF-BB. Plasma membranes purified from VSMC not previously exposed to BAPN contained a group of oxidized plasma membrane proteins, including the PDGF receptor, PDGFR-β. The oxidation of this receptor and other membrane proteins was largely prevented in cells preincubated with BAPN. Addition of purified LOX to BAPN-free cells, which had been previously exposed to BAPN, restored the profile of oxidized proteins towards that of control cells. The high affinity and capacity for the binding of PDGF-BB by cells was significantly diminished when compared with cells in which oxidation by LOX was prevented by BAPN. The chemotactic responses of LOX knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts mirrored those obtained with VSMC treated with BAPN. These novel findings suggest that LOX activity is essential to generate optimal chemotactic sensitivity of cells to chemoattractants by oxidizing specific cell surface proteins, such as PDGFR-β.

  20. The HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain is cleaved by matriptase to produce a chemotactic peptide that acts through FPR2.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew P; Cole, Amy L; Eade, Colleen R; Chen, Li-Mei; Chai, Karl X; Cole, Alexander M

    2014-07-01

    Several aspects of HIV-1 virulence and pathogenesis are mediated by the envelope protein gp41. Additionally, peptides derived from the gp41 ectodomain have been shown to induce chemotaxis in monocytes and neutrophils. Whereas this chemotactic activity has been reported, it is not known how these peptides could be produced under biological conditions. The heptad repeat 1 (HR1) region of gp41 is exposed to the extracellular environment and could therefore be susceptible to proteolytic processing into smaller peptides. Matriptase is a serine protease expressed at the surface of most epithelia, including the prostate and mucosal surfaces. Here, we present evidence that matriptase efficiently cleaves the HR1 portion of gp41 into a 22-residue chemotactic peptide MAT-1, the sequence of which is highly conserved across HIV-1 clades. We found that MAT-1 induced migration of primary neutrophils and monocytes, the latter of which act as a cellular reservoir of HIV during early stage infection. We then used formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and FPR2 inhibitors, along with HEK 293 cells, to demonstrate that MAT-1 can induce chemotaxis specifically using FPR2, a receptor found on the surface of monocytes, macrophages and neutrophils. These findings are the first to identify a proteolytic cleavage product of gp41 with chemotactic activity and highlight a potential role for matriptase in HIV-1 transmission and infection at epithelial surfaces and within tissue reservoirs of HIV-1. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Plant-Adapted Escherichia coli Show Increased Lettuce Colonizing Ability, Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Dublan, Maria de los Angeles; Ortiz-Marquez, Juan Cesar Federico; Lett, Lina; Curatti, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is a widespread gut commensal and often a versatile pathogen of public health concern. E. coli are also frequently found in different environments and/or alternative secondary hosts, such as plant tissues. The lifestyle of E. coli in plants is poorly understood and has potential implications for food safety. Methods/Principal Findings This work shows that a human commensal strain of E. coli K12 readily colonizes lettuce seedlings and produces large microcolony-like cell aggregates in leaves, especially in young leaves, in proximity to the vascular tissue. Our observations strongly suggest that those cell aggregates arise from multiplication of single bacterial cells that reach those spots. We showed that E. coli isolated from colonized leaves progressively colonize lettuce seedlings to higher titers, suggesting a fast adaptation process. E. coli cells isolated from leaves presented a dramatic rise in tolerance to oxidative stress and became more chemotactic responsive towards lettuce leaf extracts. Mutant strains impaired in their chemotactic response were less efficient lettuce colonizers than the chemotactic isogenic strain. However, acclimation to oxidative stress and/or minimal medium alone failed to prime E. coli cells for enhanced lettuce colonization efficiency. Conclusion/Significance These findings help to understand the physiological adaptation during the alternative lifestyle of E. coli in/on plant tissues. PMID:25313845

  2. Plant-adapted Escherichia coli show increased lettuce colonizing ability, resistance to oxidative stress and chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    Dublan, Maria de los Angeles; Ortiz-Marquez, Juan Cesar Federico; Lett, Lina; Curatti, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a widespread gut commensal and often a versatile pathogen of public health concern. E. coli are also frequently found in different environments and/or alternative secondary hosts, such as plant tissues. The lifestyle of E. coli in plants is poorly understood and has potential implications for food safety. This work shows that a human commensal strain of E. coli K12 readily colonizes lettuce seedlings and produces large microcolony-like cell aggregates in leaves, especially in young leaves, in proximity to the vascular tissue. Our observations strongly suggest that those cell aggregates arise from multiplication of single bacterial cells that reach those spots. We showed that E. coli isolated from colonized leaves progressively colonize lettuce seedlings to higher titers, suggesting a fast adaptation process. E. coli cells isolated from leaves presented a dramatic rise in tolerance to oxidative stress and became more chemotactic responsive towards lettuce leaf extracts. Mutant strains impaired in their chemotactic response were less efficient lettuce colonizers than the chemotactic isogenic strain. However, acclimation to oxidative stress and/or minimal medium alone failed to prime E. coli cells for enhanced lettuce colonization efficiency. These findings help to understand the physiological adaptation during the alternative lifestyle of E. coli in/on plant tissues.

  3. Effect of vasoactive peptides in Tetrahymena: chemotactic activities of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP).

    PubMed

    Kőhidai, László; Tóth, Katalin; Samotik, Paul; Ranganathan, Kiran; Láng, Orsolya; Tóth, Miklós; Ruskoaho, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AMD), proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were studied for chemotaxis, chemotactic selection and G-actin/F-actin transition in Tetrahymena. The aim of the experiments was to study the effects of two different peptides encoded by the same gene compared to a peptide related to one of the two, but encoded by a different gene, at a low level of phylogeny. The positive, chemotactic effect of ADM and the strong negative, chemorepellent effect of PAMP suggest that in Tetrahymena, the two peptides elicit their chemotactic effects via different signalling mechanisms. The complexity of swimming behaviour modulated by the three peptides underlines that chemotaxis, chemokinesis and some characteristics of migratory behaviour (velocity, tortuosity) are working as a sub-population level complex functional unit. Chemotactic responsiveness to ADM and CGRP is short-term, in contrast to PAMP, which as a chemorepellent ligand, has the ability to select sub-populations with negative chemotactic responsiveness. The different effects of ADM and PAMP on the polymerization of actin networks show that the microtubular structure of cilia is more essential to chemotactic response than are transitions of the actin network. The results draw attention to the characteristic effects of vasoactive peptides at this low level of phylogeny.

  4. Caffeine, dibutyryl cyclic-AMP and heparin affect the chemotactic and phagocytotic activities of neutrophils for boar sperm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, J-C; Yamaguchi, S; Kondo, Y; Funahashi, H

    2011-04-15

    The objective was to examine the effects of caffeine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, and heparin on the chemotaxis and/or phagocytosis of PMNs for porcine sperm. The chemotactic activity of PMNs, determined in a blind well chamber, increased (P < 0.05) when fresh serum was added to the medium (control containing BSA, 1109.5 cells/mm(2) vs serum, 1226.3 cells/mm(2)), regardless of the presence of sperm (control, 1121.1 cells/mm(2) vs serum, 1245.8 cells/mm(2)), whereas heat-inactivated serum did not affect activity (without sperm, 1099.4 cells/mm(2) and with sperm, 1132.6 cells/mm(2)). Regardless of live and dead sperm and of the origin of PMNs (boars vs sows), the phagocytotic activity of PMNs, as determined by co-culture of PMNs with sperm for 60 min, increased (P < 0.05) in the presence of fresh serum containing active complement (46.7 and 43.0%, respectively), but stimulation was decreased (P < 0.05) when 1 mM or higher concentrations of caffeine was added to the medium (from 40.7 to 20.8-31.6%). The origin of PMNs (sows vs boars) did not significantly affect phagocytotic activity. The percentage of PMNs that phagocytized polystyrene latex beads decreased when 2 mM caffeine was added to the medium containing porcine serum (from 43.7 to 21.5%). Serum-stimulated chemotactic activity of PMNs (1089.9 cells/mm(2)) was also reduced (P < 0.05) with 2 mM caffeine (942.5 cells/mm(2)). Furthermore, dibutyryl cAMP at ≥ 0.1 mM or heparin at ≥ 100 μg/mL decreased phagocytotic activity, in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Supplementation of PMNs with heparin at 100 or 500 μg/mL decreased (P < 0.05) chemotactic activity in the presence of serum (from 1137.1 cells/mm(2) to 1008.8-1026.3 cells/mm(2)). We inferred that opsonization in the presence of active complement stimulated phagocytotic and chemotactic activities of PMNs, whereas supplementation with caffeine and dibutyryl cAMP (which could be associated with the intracellular cAMP level of PMNs) or adding heparin

  5. Chemotactic Migration of T Cells towards Dendritic Cells Promotes the Detection of Rare Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Vroomans, Renske M. A.; Marée, Athanasius F. M.; de Boer, Rob J.; Beltman, Joost B.

    2012-01-01

    In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs) has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data. PMID:23166480

  6. Chemotactic migration of T cells towards dendritic cells promotes the detection of rare antigens.

    PubMed

    Vroomans, Renske M A; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2012-01-01

    In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs) has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data.

  7. Binding characteristics of radioiodinated crystal - induced chemotactic factor to human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Spilberg, I.; Mehta, J.

    1984-12-01

    The binding of radiolabeled crystal-induced chemotactic factor (CCF) to human neutrophils is characterized. Binding of /sup 125/I-CCF to the cells was higher at 4/sup 0/C than at 24/sup 0/ or 37/sup 0/C and was found to be independent of Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration. The binding showed a pH optimum of 6.0. Tosylamido phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone at 100 ..mu..mol/L concentration inhibited 20% of /sup 125/I-CCF binding, but phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride at 200 ..mu..mol/L had no effect. Approximately 50% of the cell-associated /sup 125/I-CCF was released after treatment with proteases. The nonspecific uptake by the cells, as measured by the uptake of /sup 3/H-sucrose and /sup 14/C-inulin in the presence of CCF, was negligible. After the steady-state binding of /sup 125/I-CCF to the cells, approx. 15% of the cell-associated radioactivity at 4/sup 0/C and 40% to 50% at 24/sup 0/ and 37/sup 0/C was released into the medium after 60 minutes of incubation in medium alone. Dissociation of the radioactive material was not affected by the presence of tosylamido phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone or phenanthroline in the media. The dissociated material was determined to be degraded /sup 125/I-CCF, suggesting that degradation of /sup 125/I-CCF occurs after binding to its specific receptor on the human neutrophil. 22 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Enterohepatic circulation of bacterial chemotactic peptide in rats with experimental colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, C.H.; Butt, T.J.; Ferry, D.M.; Hunter, J.; Chadwick, V.S.; Broom, M.F.

    1988-04-01

    The association of hepatobiliary disorders with colonic inflammation is well recognized. Although the pathophysiology is obscure, increased permeation of toxic bacterial products across the inflamed gut to the portal circulation might be one mechanism. Potentially toxic metabolites include N-formylated chemotactic peptides that are produced by several species of intestinal bacteria and can be detected in colonic fluid in vivo. To investigate the metabolic fate of one of these low molecular weight proinflammatory peptides, N-formyl L-methionine L-leucine /sup 125/I-L-tyrosine was introduced into colon loops of healthy rats (n = 10) and rats with experimental colitis (n = 15) induced by rectal instillation of 15% (vol/vol) acetic acid. Gut, liver, and blood radioactivity were monitored by external gamma-counting and radioactivity in bile was measured by biliary catheter drainage into a well counter. Bile was processed by high-performance liquid chromatography to determine the amount of intact, bioactive peptide excreted over 3 h. After colonic instillation of 1 nmol of peptide, the mean (+/- SEM) biliary excretion of intact peptide was 6.4 +/- 2.0 pmol in normal rats and 49.0 +/- 20 pmol in rats with colitis (p less than 0.01). An enterohepatic circulation of synthetic N-formyl L-methionine L-leucine L-tyrosine has been demonstrated in the rat. Experimental colitis was associated with an eightfold increase in biliary excretion of this proinflammatory bacterial peptide. Proinflammatory bacterial peptides synthesized by colonic bacteria could be important in the pathophysiology of colon inflammation and its frequently associated hepatobiliary complications.

  9. Cytokines secreted by macrophages isolated from tumor microenvironment of inflammatory breast cancer patients possess chemotactic properties.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mona M; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A; Nouh, Mohamed A; Schneider, Robert J; Sloane, Bonnie F; El-Shinawi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature describing the role of macrophages in breast cancer, the role of macrophages in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is unclear. The aim of present study was to isolate and characterize tumor associated macrophages of IBC and non-IBC patients and define their role in IBC. Tumor infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (CD14+ and CD68+) were measured by immunohistochemistry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Blood drained from axillary vein tributaries was collected during breast cancer surgery and the percentage of CD14+ in the total isolated leukocytes was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. CD14+ cells were separated from total leukocytes by immuno-magnetic beads technique and were cultured overnight. Media conditioned by CD14+ were collected and subjected to cytokine profiling using cytokine antibody array. Wound healing and invasion assays were used to test whether cytokines highly secreted by tumor drained macrophages induce motility and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that macrophages highly infiltrate into carcinoma tissues of IBC patients. In addition blood collected from axillary tributaries of IBC patients is highly enriched with CD14+ cells as compared to blood collected from non-IBC patients. Cytokine profiling of CD14+ cells isolated from IBC patients revealed a significant increase in secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CC-chemokine ligand 2; interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 as compared to CD14+ cells isolated from non-IBC patients. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 significantly increased motility and invasion of IBC cells in vitro. In conclusion, macrophages isolated from the tumor microenvironment of IBC patients secrete chemotactic cytokines that may augment dissemination and metastasis of IBC carcinoma cells.

  10. C1-Inhibitor Decreases the Release of Vasculitis-Like Chemotactic Endothelial Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Mossberg, Maria; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Kahn, Robin; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Tati, Ramesh; Heijl, Caroline; Segelmark, Mårten; Leeb-Lundberg, L M Fredrik; Karpman, Diana

    2017-08-01

    The kinin system is activated during vasculitis and may contribute to chronic inflammation. C1-inhibitor is the main inhibitor of the kinin system. In this study, we investigated the presence of the kinin B1 receptor on endothelial microvesicles and its contribution to the inflammatory process. Compared with controls (n=15), patients with acute vasculitis (n=12) had markedly higher levels of circulating endothelial microvesicles, identified by flow cytometry analysis, and significantly more microvesicles that were positive for the kinin B1 receptor (P<0.001). Compared with microvesicles from wild-type cells, B1 receptor-positive microvesicles derived from transfected human embryonic kidney cells induced a significant neutrophil chemotactic effect, and a B1 receptor antagonist blocked this effect. Likewise, patient plasma induced neutrophil chemotaxis, an effect decreased by reduction of microvesicle levels and by blocking the B1 receptor. We used a perfusion system to study the effect of patient plasma (n=6) and control plasma (n=6) on the release of microvesicles from glomerular endothelial cells. Patient samples induced the release of significantly more B1 receptor-positive endothelial microvesicles than control samples, an effect abrogated by reduction of the microvesicles in the perfused samples. Perfusion of C1-inhibitor-depleted plasma over glomerular endothelial cells promoted excessive release of B1 receptor-positive endothelial microvesicles compared with normal plasma, an effect significantly decreased by addition of C1-inhibitor or B1 receptor-antagonist. Thus, B1 receptor-positive endothelial microvesicles may contribute to chronic inflammation by inducing neutrophil chemotaxis, and the reduction of these microvesicles by C1-inhibitor should be explored as a potential treatment for neutrophil-induced inflammation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  11. Sonic hedgehog is a chemotactic neural crest cell guide that is perturbed by ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Ezequiel J; Fernández-Zapico, Martín E; Battiato, Natalia L; Rovasio, Roberto A

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to understand the involvement of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) morphogen in the oriented distribution of neural crest cells (NCCs) toward the optic vesicle and to look for potential disorders of this guiding mechanism after ethanol exposure. In vitro directional analysis showed the chemotactic response of NCCs up Shh gradients and to notochord co-cultures (Shh source) or to their conditioned medium, a response inhibited by anti-Shh antibody, receptor inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Smo morpholino (MO). Expression of the Ptch-Smo receptor complex on in vitro NCCs was also shown. In whole embryos, the expression of Shh mRNA and protein was seen in the ocular region, and of Ptch, Smo and Gli/Sufu system on cephalic NCCs. Anti-Smo MO or Ptch-mutated plasmid (Ptch1(Δloop2)) impaired cephalic NCC migration/distribution, with fewer cells invading the optic region and with higher cell density at the homolateral mesencephalic level. Beads embedded with cyclopamine (Smo-blocking) or Shh (ectopic signal) supported the role of Shh as an in vivo guide molecule for cephalic NCCs. Ethanol exposure perturbed in vitro and in vivo NCC migration. Early stage embryos treated with ethanol, in a model reproducing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, showed later disruptions of craniofacial development associated with abnormal in situ expression of Shh morphogen. The results show the Shh/Ptch/Smo-dependent migration of NCCs toward the optic vesicle, with the support of specific inactivation with genetic and pharmacological tools. They also help to understand mechanisms of accurate distribution of embryonic cells and of their perturbation by a commonly consumed teratogen, and demonstrate, in addition to its other known developmental functions, a new biological activity of cellular guidance for Shh.

  12. Exercise-induced release of histamine and neutrophil chemotactic factor in atopic asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H; Brown, M J; Nagy, L; Causon, R; Walport, M J; Kay, A B

    1982-08-01

    Concentrations of plasma histamine and serum neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF) were measured in seven atopic asthmatics who developed exercise-induced asthma (EIA) after a treadmill task. The results were compared with those obtained after inhalation of specific antigen or methacholine. Plasma histamine concentrations were measured with a novel double-isotope radiometric assay, and NCF was identified by its elution in the void volume fractions of Sephadex G-200 and as a single peak of activity at approximately 0.20 molar NaCl after anion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephacel (pH 7.8). After exercise or antigen challenge, the time courses of appearance of both mediators were virtually identical and accompanied the increase in airways obstruction. There was a statistically significant correlation between the concentrations of histamine or NCF and the magnitude of airflow obstruction after exercise and antigen challenge. This suggested that there may be a direct association between mediator release and EIA or antigen-induced bronchoconstriction. In contrast, there were no significant elevations in circulating histamine and NCF after inhalation of methacholine, at concentrations giving a fall in FEV1 comparable to that induced by exercise or antigen. The prior administration of cromolyn to three asthmatics inhibited both their EIA and the release of histamine and NCF. When four asthmatics were exercised for periods of 1, 3, and 6 min, the release of NCF and fall in peak expiratory flow rate were directly related to the duration of the exercise. The rise of NCF activity in subjects with EIA was fivefold greater than that observed in asthmatics who did not experience airways obstruction when subjected to the same exercise task. These results provide further evidence that mediators of hypersensitivity are released during EIA.

  13. Synergic production of neutrophil chemotactic activity by colonic epithelial cells and eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Dent, Gordon; Loweth, Sam C; Hasan, Anwar Matar; Leslie, Fiona M

    2014-10-01

    The presence of eosinophils in the lumen and mucosa of the intestine is characteristic of both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). There is evidence of eosinophil activation in the intestine during acute inflammatory episodes of these diseases; these episodes are also characterized by an influx of neutrophils, which have the potential to cause extensive tissue damage. We undertook a study to determine whether eosinophils in contact with colonic epithelial cells produce factors that may attract neutrophils in response to immunological stimulation. Neutrophil chemotactic activity (NCA) and concentrations of three neutrophil-attracting CXC chemokines - CXCL1 (Groα), CXCL5 (Ena78) and CXCL8 (IL8) - were measured in supernatants of T84 colonic epithelial cells and blood eosinophils or eosinophil-like myeloid leukaemia cells (AML14.3D10), alone or in combination. Cells were stimulated with serum-opsonized zymosan (OZ) particles. NCA (P<0.005) and CXCL5 levels (P<0.05) in the supernatants of OZ-stimulated epithelial/eosinophil co-cultures were significantly higher than in the supernatants of either cell type alone. Release of CXCL1 (P<0.05) and CXCL8 (P<0.01) from OZ-stimulated co-culture supernatants was significantly higher than from OZ-stimulated eosinophils but not higher than from OZ-stimulated epithelial cells. Eosinophils and colonic epithelial cells exhibit synergy in production of neutrophil chemoattractants in response to immunological stimulation. This may represent a mechanism for exaggerated recruitment of neutrophils to the intestine in response to acute infection in conditions that are characterized by the presence of eosinophils in the bowel.

  14. Characterization of a receptor for human monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8

    SciTech Connect

    Grob, P.M.; David, E.; Warren, T.C.; DeLeon, R.P.; Farina, P.R.; Homon, C.A. )

    1990-05-15

    Monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8 (MDNCF/IL-8) is an 8,000-dalton protein produced by monocytes which exhibits activity as a chemoattractant for neutrophils with maximal activity achieved at a concentration of 50 ng/ml. This polypeptide has been iodinated by chloramine-T methodology (350 Ci/mM), and specific receptors for MDNCF/IL-8 have been detected on human neutrophils, U937 cells, THP-1 cells, and dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells. The binding of MDNCF/IL-8 to human neutrophils is not inhibited by interleukin-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin, or epidermal growth factor. In addition, chemoattractants such as C5a, fMet-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, and platelet-activating factor fail to inhibit binding, suggesting that MDNCF/IL-8 utilizes a unique receptor. The receptor for MDNCF/IL-8 is apparently glycosylated since ligand binding is inhibited by the presence of wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin with a binding specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and neuraminic acid. Steady state binding experiments indicate Kd values of 4 and 0.5 nM and receptor numbers of 75,000 and 7,400 for human neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 cells, respectively. 125I-MDNCF/IL-8 bound to human neutrophils is rapidly internalized and subsequently released from cells as trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity. Affinity labeling experiments suggest that the human neutrophil MDNCF/IL-8 receptor exhibits a mass of approximately 58,000 daltons.

  15. Phospholipase D catalyzes phospholipid metabolism in chemotactic peptide-stimulated HL-60 granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, J.K.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Billah, M.M.

    1988-09-05

    There exists circumstantial evidence for activation of phospholipase D (PLD) in intact cells. However, because of the complexity of phospholipid remodeling processes, it is essential to distinguish PLD clearly from other phospholipases and phospholipid remodeling enzymes. Therefore, to establish unequivocally PLD activity in dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 granulocytes, to demonstrate the relative contribution of PLD to phospholipid turnover, and to validate the hypothesis that the formation of phosphatidylethanol is an expression of PLD-catalyzed transphosphatidylation, we have developed methodologies to label HL-60 granulocytes in 1-O-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-PC) with 32P without labeling cellular ATP. These methodologies involve (a) synthesis of alkyl-lysoPC containing 32P by a combination of enzymatic and chemical procedures and (b) incubation of HL-60 granulocytes with this alkyl-(32P) lysoPC which enters the cell and becomes acylated into membrane-associated alkyl-(32P)PC. Upon stimulation of these 32P-labeled cells with the chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP), alkyl-(32P)phosphatidic acid (alkyl-(32P)PA) is formed rapidly. Because, under these conditions, cellular ATP has not been labeled with 32P, alkyl-(32P)PA must be formed via PLD-catalyzed hydrolysis of alkyl-(32P)PC at the terminal phosphodiester bond. This result conclusively demonstrates fMLP-induced activation of PLD in HL-60 granulocytes. These 32P-labeled HL-60 granulocytes have also been stimulated in the presence of ethanol to produce alkyl-(32P)phosphatidylethanol (alkyl-(32P)PEt). Formation of alkyl-(32P)PEt parallels that of alkyl-(32P)PA with respect to time course, fMLP concentration, inhibition by a specific fMLP antagonist (t-butoxycarbonyl-Met-Leu-Phe), and Ca2+ concentration.

  16. Mytilus galloprovincialis Myticin C: A Chemotactic Molecule with Antiviral Activity and Immunoregulatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Alejandro; Dios, Sonia; Martínez-López, Alicia; Figueras, Antonio; Estepa, Amparo; Novoa, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the myticin class C (Myt C) is the most abundantly expressed gene in cDNA and suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries after immune stimulation of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. However, to date, the expression pattern, the antimicrobial activities and the immunomodulatory properties of the Myt C peptide have not been determined. In contrast, it is known that Myt C mRNA presents an unusual and high level of polymorphism of unidentified biological significance. Therefore, to provide a better understanding of the features of this interesting molecule, we have investigated its function using four different cloned and expressed variants of Myt C cDNA and polyclonal anti-Myt C sera. The in vivo results suggest that this AMP, mainly present in hemocytes, could be acting as an immune system modulator molecule because its overexpression was able to alter the expression of mussel immune-related genes (as the antimicrobial peptides Myticin B and Mytilin B, the C1q domain-containing protein MgC1q, and lysozyme). Moreover, the in vitro results indicate that Myt C peptides have antimicrobial and chemotactic properties. Their recombinant expression in a fish cell line conferred protection against two different fish viruses (enveloped and non-enveloped). Cell extracts from Myt C expressing fish cells were also able to attract hemocytes. All together, these results suggest that Myt C should be considered not only as an AMP but also as the first chemokine/cytokine-like molecule identified in bivalves and one of the few examples in all of the invertebrates. PMID:21858010

  17. Modulation of signalling in neutrophils activated by a chemotactic peptide: calcium regulates diacyl glycerol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Korchak, H.M.; Vosshall, L.B.; Lundquist, K.F.

    1987-05-01

    Neutrophils activated by ligands such as the chemotactic peptide f-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) generate superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) and release specific and azurophil granule contents. The signalling for this response is thought to involve both elevated cytosolic Ca and protein kinase C activity. Receptor-occupation triggers a phospholipase C to cleave phosphatidyl inositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) yielding inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate, (IP/sub 3/), a trigger for intracellular Ca release, and diacyl glycerol (DG), which together with Ca activates protein kinase C. The DG can be metabolized to phosphatidic acid (PA). FMLP triggered a rapid increase in cytosolic Ca (fura-2). Loading cells with MAPTAM, and intracellular Ca buffer, suppressed this Ca transient in FMLP activated cells and inhibited O/sub 2//sup -/ generation to 12.5% of control, beta-glucuronidase release to 40.3% of control and lysozyme release to 55.1% of control. FMLP triggered a prompt decrease in PIP/sub 2/ in cells pre-labelled with /sup 32/P or /sup 3/H-inositol and an increase in PA and release of /sup 3/H-IP/sub 3/. A rapid increase in /sup 14/C-DG levels was also observed in /sup 14/C-glycerol pre-loaded cells activated by FMLP. Suppression of the Ca transient by buffering with MAPTAM inhibited elevation of /sup 14/C-DG. Breakdown of PIP/sub 2/ was not inhibited and elevation of /sup 32/P-PA was enhanced in MAPTAM loaded cells. Conversely, 200nM ionomycin which elevated cytosolic Ca to an equivalent level to 10/sup -7/M FMLP, triggered a rise in /sup 14/C-DG but not in PA.

  18. Mytilus galloprovincialis myticin C: a chemotactic molecule with antiviral activity and immunoregulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Pablo; Falcó, Alberto; Romero, Alejandro; Dios, Sonia; Martínez-López, Alicia; Figueras, Antonio; Estepa, Amparo; Novoa, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the myticin class C (Myt C) is the most abundantly expressed gene in cDNA and suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries after immune stimulation of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. However, to date, the expression pattern, the antimicrobial activities and the immunomodulatory properties of the Myt C peptide have not been determined. In contrast, it is known that Myt C mRNA presents an unusual and high level of polymorphism of unidentified biological significance. Therefore, to provide a better understanding of the features of this interesting molecule, we have investigated its function using four different cloned and expressed variants of Myt C cDNA and polyclonal anti-Myt C sera. The in vivo results suggest that this AMP, mainly present in hemocytes, could be acting as an immune system modulator molecule because its overexpression was able to alter the expression of mussel immune-related genes (as the antimicrobial peptides Myticin B and Mytilin B, the C1q domain-containing protein MgC1q, and lysozyme). Moreover, the in vitro results indicate that Myt C peptides have antimicrobial and chemotactic properties. Their recombinant expression in a fish cell line conferred protection against two different fish viruses (enveloped and non-enveloped). Cell extracts from Myt C expressing fish cells were also able to attract hemocytes. All together, these results suggest that Myt C should be considered not only as an AMP but also as the first chemokine/cytokine-like molecule identified in bivalves and one of the few examples in all of the invertebrates.

  19. A novel biologic activity of thrombin: stimulation of monocyte chemotactic protein production

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Thrombin is a serine protease that is released at sites of vascular injury and exerts a variety of biologic effects on different cell types. Thrombin is postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases including atherosclerosis, since it activates vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Thrombin mediates these effects through a specific receptor that is upregulated in vascular cells in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis and glomerulosclerosis are characterized by the presence of monocyte-macrophages in the lesions. Monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1) is believed to be an important mediator of monocyte recruitment to the tissue and can be induced in a broad variety of cells including mesangial cells. We studied the effect of thrombin on MCP-1 production and gene expression in well- characterized human mesangial cells, vascular pericytes that play a central role in fibrosis of the glomerular microvascular bed. alpha thrombin stimulates MCP-1 production and gene expression in mesangial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Experiments with diisopropylfluorophosphate thrombin and gamma thrombin demonstrate that this thrombin effect requires both receptor binding as well as catalytic activity, features consistent with the known properties of the recently characterized and cloned thrombin receptor. Moreover, a human thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP1-7) also stimulates MCP-1 production. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that mesangial cells express an mRNA transcript that hybridizes with labeled human thrombin receptor cDNA. These data describe a novel biologic activity of thrombin and suggest an additional mechanism by which this coagulation factor may participate in the progression of glomerulosclerosis, and by analogy, atherosclerosis. PMID:8163952

  20. Proteolytic cleavage of the urokinase receptor substitutes for the agonist-induced chemotactic effect.

    PubMed Central

    Resnati, M; Guttinger, M; Valcamonica, S; Sidenius, N; Blasi, F; Fazioli, F

    1996-01-01

    Physiological concentrations of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) stimulated a chemotactic response in human monocytic THP-1 through binding to the urokinase receptor (uPAR). The effect did not require the protease moiety of uPA, as stimulation was achieved also with the N-terminal fragment (ATF), while the 33 kDa low molecular weight uPA was ineffective. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed association of uPAR with intracellular kinase(s), as demonstrated by in vitro kinase assays. Use of specific antibodies identified p56/p59hck as a kinase associated with uPAR in THP-1 cell extracts. Upon addition of ATF, p56/p59hck activity was stimulated within 2 min and returned to normal after 30 min. Since uPAR lacks an intracellular domain capable of interacting with intracellular kinase, activation of p56/p59hck must require a transmembrane adaptor. Evidence for this was strongly supported by the finding that a soluble form of uPAR (suPAR) was capable of inducing chemotaxis not only in THP-1 cells but also in cells lacking endogenous uPAR (IC50, 5 pM). However, activity of suPAR require chymotrypsin cleavage between the N-terminal domain D1 and D2 + D3. Chymotrypsin-cleaved suPAR also induced activation of p56/p59hck in THP-1 cells, with a time course comparable with ATF. Our data show that uPA-induced signal transduction takes place via uPAR, involves activation of intracellular tyrosine kinase(s) and requires an as yet undefined adaptor capable of connecting the extracellular ligand binding uPAR to intracellular transducer(s). Images PMID:8612581

  1. Coccidioides Endospores and Spherules Draw Strong Chemotactic, Adhesive, and Phagocytic Responses by Individual Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Thompson III, George R.; Hastey, Christine J.; Hodge, Gregory C.; Lunetta, Jennine M.; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Heinrich, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioides spp. are dimorphic pathogenic fungi whose parasitic forms cause coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever) in mammalian hosts. We use an innovative interdisciplinary approach to analyze one-on-one encounters between human neutrophils and two forms of Coccidioides posadasii. To examine the mechanisms by which the innate immune system coordinates different stages of the host response to fungal pathogens, we dissect the immune-cell response into chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Our single-cell technique reveals a surprisingly strong response by initially quiescent neutrophils to close encounters with C. posadasii, both from a distance (by complement-mediated chemotaxis) as well as upon contact (by serum-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis). This response closely resembles neutrophil interactions with Candida albicans and zymosan particles, and is significantly stronger than the neutrophil responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Rhizopus oryzae under identical conditions. The vigorous in vitro neutrophil response suggests that C. posadasii evades in vivo recognition by neutrophils through suppression of long-range mobilization and recruitment of the immune cells. This observation elucidates an important paradigm of the recognition of microbes, i.e., that intact immunotaxis comprises an intricate spatiotemporal hierarchy of distinct chemotactic processes. Moreover, in contrast to earlier reports, human neutrophils exhibit vigorous chemotaxis toward, and frustrated phagocytosis of, the large spherules of C. posadasii under physiological-like conditions. Finally, neutrophils from healthy donors and patients with chronic coccidioidomycosis display subtle differences in their responses to antibody-coated beads, even though the patient cells appear to interact normally with C. posadasii endospores. PMID:26070210

  2. Cytokines secreted by macrophages isolated from tumor microenvironment of inflammatory breast cancer patients possess chemotactic properties

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mona M.; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A.; Nouh, Mohamed A.; Schneider, Robert J.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; El-Shinawi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature describing the role of macrophages in breast cancer, the role of macrophages in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is unclear. The aim of present study was to isolate and characterize tumor associated macrophages of IBC and non-IBC patients and define their role in IBC. Tumor infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (CD14+ and CD68+) were measured by immunohistochem-istry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Blood drained from axillary vein tributaries was collected during breast cancer surgery and the percentage of CD14+ in the total isolated leukocytes was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. CD14+ cells were separated from total leukocytes by immuno-magnetic beads technique and were cultured overnight. Media conditioned by CD14+ were collected and subjected to cytokine profiling using cytokine antibody array. Wound healing and invasion assays were used to test whether cytokines highly secreted by tumor drained macrophages induce motility and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that macrophages highly infiltrate into carcinoma tissues of IBC patients. In addition blood collected from axillary tributaries of IBC patients is highly enriched with CD14+ cells as compared to blood collected from non-IBC patients. Cytokine profiling of CD14+ cells isolated from IBC patients revealed a significant increase in secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α; monocyte chemoat-tractant protein-1/CC-chemokine ligand 2; interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 as compared to CD14+ cells isolated from non-IBC patients. Tumor necrosis factor-a, interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 significantly increased motility and invasion of IBC cells in vitro. In conclusion, macrophages isolated from the tumor microenvironment of IBC patients secrete chemotactic cytokines that may augment dissemination and metastasis of IBC carcinoma cells. PMID:24291763

  3. Functional characterization of ferret CCL20 and CCR6 and identification of chemotactic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shulin; Klamar, Cynthia R; Fallert Junecko, Beth A; Craigo, Jodi; Fuller, Deborah H; Reinhart, Todd A

    2013-03-01

    CCL20 is currently the only known chemokine ligand for the receptor CCR6, and is a mucosal chemokine involved in normal and pathological immune responses. Although nucleotide sequence data are available for ccl20 and ccr6 sequences from multiple species, the ferret ccl20 and ccr6 sequences have not been determined. To increase our understanding of immune function in ferret models of infection and vaccination, we have used RT-PCR to obtain the ferret ccl20 and ccr6 cDNA sequences and functionally characterize the encoded proteins. The open reading frames of both genes were highly conserved across species and mostly closely related to canine sequences. For functional analyses, single cell clones expressing ferret CCR6 were generated, a ferret CCL20/mouse IgG(2a) fusion protein (fCCL20-mIgG(2a)) was produced, and fCCL20 was chemically synthesized. Cell clones expressing ferret CCR6 responded chemotactically to fCCL20-mIgG2a fusion protein and synthetic ferret CCL20. Chemotaxis inhibition studies identified the polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate and the murine γ-herpesvirus 68 M3 protein as inhibitors of fCCL20. Surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that EGCG bound directly to fCCL20. These results provide molecular characterization of previously unreported ferret immune gene sequences and for the first time identify a broad-spectrum small molecule inhibitor of CCL20 and reveal CCL20 as a target for the herpesviral M3 protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Generic modeling of chemotactic based self-wiring of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Segev, R; Ben-Jacob, E

    2000-03-01

    The proper functioning of the nervous system depends critically on the intricate network of synaptic connections that are generated during the system development. During the network formation, the growth cones migrate through the embryonic environment to their targets using chemical communication. A major obstacle in the elucidation of fundamental principles underlying this self-wiring is the complexity of the system being analyzed. Hence much effort is devoted to in vitro experiments of simpler (two-dimensional) 2D model systems. In these experiments neurons are placed on Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) surfaces, so it is easier to monitor their self-wiring. We developed a model to reproduce the salient features of the 2D systems, inspired by the study of the growth of bacterial colonies and the aggregation of amoebae. We represent the neurons (each composed of cell's soma, neurites and growth cones) by active elements that capture the generic features of the real neurons. The model also incorporates stationary units representing the cells' soma and communicating walkers representing the growth cones. The stationary units send neurites one at a time, and respond to chemical signaling. The walkers migrate in response to chemotaxis substances emitted by the soma and communicate with each other and with the soma by means of chemotactic "feedback". The interplay between the chemo-repulsive and chemo-attractive responses is determined by the dynamics of the walker's internal energy which is controlled by the soma. These features enable the neurons to perform the complex task of self-wiring. We present numerical experiments of the model to demonstrate its ability to form fine structures in simple networks of few neurons. Our results raise two fundamental issues: (1) one needs to develop characterization methods (beyond number of connections per neuron) to distinguish the various possible networks; (2) what are the relations between the network organization and its computational

  5. Chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism as adaptive strategies during citrus canker induction by Xanthomonas citri.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leandro Marcio; Facincani, Agda Paula; Ferreira, Cristiano Barbalho; Ferreira, Rafael Marine; Ferro, Maria Inês Tiraboshi; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Ferro, Jesus Aparecido; Soares, Márcia Regina

    2015-03-01

    The genome of Xanthomonas citri subsp. Citri strain 306 pathotype A (Xac) was completely sequenced more than 10 years; to date, few studies involving functional genomics Xac and its host compatible have been developed, specially related to adaptive events that allow the survival of Xac within the plant. Proteomic analysis of Xac showed that the processes of chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism are key adaptive strategies during the interaction of a pathogenic bacterium with its plant host. The results also indicate the importance of a group of proteins that may not be directly related to the classical virulence factors, but that are likely fundamental to the success of the initial stages of the infection, such as methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (Mcp) and phosphate specific transport (Pst). Furthermore, the analysis of the mutant of the gene pstB which codifies to an ABC phosphate transporter subunit revealed a complete absence of citrus canker symptoms when inoculated in compatible hosts. We also conducted an in silico analysis which established the possible network of genes regulated by two-component systems PhoPQ and PhoBR (related to phosphate metabolism), and possible transcriptional factor binding site (TFBS) motifs of regulatory proteins PhoB and PhoP, detaching high degree of conservation of PhoB TFBS in 84 genes of Xac genome. This is the first time that chemotaxis signal transduction and phosphate metabolism were therefore indicated to be fundamental to the process of colonization of plant tissue during the induction of disease associated with Xanthomonas genus bacteria.

  6. Persistent Flagellate Hyperpigmentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-28

    Education student and y.our department has told you they cannot fund your publication, the 59th Clinical Research Division may pay for your basic ...SGS R&D; Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP): Defense Medical Research & Development Program (DMRDP); NIH; Congressionally Directed...statement for research involving humans: "The voluntary, fully informed consent of the subjects used in this research was obtained as required by 32 CFR

  7. Elastohydrodynamics of flagellated microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojin; Ardekani, Arezoo

    2016-11-01

    The swimming motion of many microorganisms and cells are achieved by the waving deformation of their cilia and flagella. The typical structure of flagella and cilia contains nine doublets of parallel microtubules in a cylindrical arrangement surrounding one pair of microtubules in the center. The dynein molecular motors internally drive the sliding motion between the neighboring microtubules and cause the bending motion of the flagella and cilia and drive the microorganism swimming motion. In this work, we develop a numerical model for a microorganism swimming by an internally self-driven filament. Our numerical method captures the interaction between the elasticity of the flagellum and the surround fluid. The no-slip boundary conditions are satisfied by an iterative distributed Lagrangian multiplier method. We also investigate the effects of the non-Newtonian fluid rheology on the motion of an elastic flagellum near a wall.

  8. In vitro effect of essential oils from Cinnamomum aromaticum, Citrus limon and Allium sativum on two intestinal flagellates of poultry, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum and Histomonas meleagridis.

    PubMed

    Zenner, L; Callait, M P; Granier, C; Chauve, C

    2003-06-01

    Essential oils may be effective preventive or curative treatments against several flagelated poultry parasites and may become primordial either to organic farms, or as more drugs are bannished. The anti-flagellate activity of essential oils obtained from fresh leaves of Cinnamomum aromaticum, Citrus limon pericarps and Allium sativum bulbs was investigated in vitro on Tetratrichomonas gallinarum and Histomonas meleagridis. On T. gallinarum, the minimal lethal concentration (MLC) at 24 hours was 0.25 microliter/ml for C. aromaticum oil, and 0.125 microliter/ml for C. limon and A. sativum oils. On H. meleagridis, MLC was 0.5 microliter/ml for C. aromaticum oil and 1 microliter/ml for C. limon and A. sativum oils at 24 and 48 hours. Moreover, no synergistic effects were evidenced in vitro. The essential oil constituents, based on their GC retention times have been also identified. The major component is trans-cinnamaldehyde (79%) for C. aromaticum; limonene for C. limon (71%) and diallyl tri- and disulfide (79%) for A. sativum. Even if concentration and protocol adaptations are required for successful in vivo treatments, it appears that these oils may be useful as chemotherapeutic agents against several poultry parasites.

  9. Enhanced production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A. E.; Kunkel, S. L.; Pearce, W. H.; Shah, M. R.; Parikh, D.; Evanoff, H. L.; Haines, G. K.; Burdick, M. D.; Strieter, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory leukocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of human atherosclerotic disease, from early atherogenesis to the late stages of atherosclerosis, such as aneurysm formation. We have shown previously that human abdominal aortic aneurysms are characterized by the presence of numerous chronic inflammatory cells throughout the vessel wall (Am J Pathol 1990, 137: 1199-1213). The signals that attract lymphocytes and monocytes into the aortic wall in aneurysmal disease remain to be precisely defined. We have studied the production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by aortic tissues obtained from 47 subjects. We compared the antigenic production of these cytokines by explants of: 1) human abdominal aneurysmal tissue, 2) occlusive (atherosclerotic) aortas, and 3) normal aortas. IL-8, which is chemotactic for neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells was liberated in greater quantities by abdominal aortic aneurysms than by occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, macrophages, and to a lesser degree endothelial cells, were found to be positive for the expression of antigenic IL-8. Similarly, MCP-1, a potent chemotactic cytokine for monocytes/macrophages, was released by explants from abdominal aortic aneurysms in greater quantities than by explants from occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, the predominant MCP-1 antigen-positive cells were macrophages and to a lesser extent smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate that human abdominal aortic aneurysms produce IL-8 and MCP-1, both of which may serve to recruit additional inflammatory cells into the abdominal aortic wall, hence perpetuating the inflammatory reaction that may result in the pathology of vessel wall destruction and aortic aneurysm formation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8494046

  10. Chemotactic recruitment of adult neural progenitor cells into multifunctional hydrogels providing sustained SDF-1α release and compatible structural support.

    PubMed

    Lim, Teck Chuan; Rokkappanavar, Swetha; Toh, Wei Seong; Wang, Li-Shan; Kurisawa, Motoichi; Spector, Myron

    2013-03-01

    Without chemotactic cues and structural support, cavitary brain lesions typically fail to recruit endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Toward resolving this, we engineered multifunctional biomaterials comprising injectable gelatin-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (Gtn-HPA) hydrogels and dextran sulfate/chitosan polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (PCNs) that delivered stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α). Over 7 d of interface with in vitro tissue simulant containing adult rat hippocampal NPCs (aNPCs) and their neuronal progeny, Gtn-HPA/SDF-1α-PCN hydrogels promoted chemotactic recruitment to enhance infiltration of aNPCs by 3- to 45-fold relative to hydrogels that lacked SDF-1α or vehicles to sustain SDF-1α release. When cross-linked with 0.85-0.95 mM HO, Gtn-HPA/SDF-1α-PCN hydrogels provided optimally permissive structural support for migration of aNPCs. Specific matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors revealed that 42, 30, and 55% of cell migration into Gtn-HPA/SDF-1α-PCN hydrogels involved MMP-2, 3, and 9, respectively, demonstrating the hydrogels to be compatible toward homing endogenous NPCs, given their expression of similar MMPs. Interestingly, PCNs utilized FGF-2 found in situ to induce chemokinesis, potentiate SDF-1α chemotactic recruitment, and increase proliferation of recruited cells, which collectively orchestrated a higher number of migrated aNPCs. Overall, Gtn-HPA/SDF-1α-PCN hydrogels prove to be promising biomaterials for injection into cavitary brain lesions to recruit endogenous NPCs and enhance neural tissue repair/regeneration.

  11. Plasma Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Is Associated With Acute Kidney Injury and Death After Cardiac Operations.

    PubMed

    Moledina, Dennis G; Isguven, Selin; McArthur, Eric; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Garg, Amit X; Shlipak, Michael; Whitlock, Richard; Kavsak, Peter A; Coca, Steven G; Parikh, Chirag R

    2017-08-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1; chemokine C-C ligand-2 [CCL-2]) is upregulated in ischemia-reperfusion injury and is a promising biomarker of inflammation in cardiac operations. We measured preoperative and postoperative plasma MCP-1 levels in adults undergoing cardiac operations to evaluate the association of perioperative MCP-1 levels with acute kidney injury (AKI) and death in Translational Research Investigating Biomarker Endpoints in AKI (TRIBE-AKI), a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort. Of the 972 participants in the study, AKI developed in 329 (34%), and severe AKI developed in 45 (5%). During a median follow-up of 2.9 years (interquartile range, 2.2 to 3.5 years), 119 participants (12%) died. MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in those who developed AKI and died than in those without AKI and death. Participants with a preoperative MCP-1 level in the highest tertile (>196 pg/mL) had an increased AKI risk than those in the lowest tertile (<147 pg/mL; odds ratio [OR], 1.43l; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 2.05). The association appeared similar but was not significant for the severe AKI outcome (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 0.62 to 3.54). Compared with participants with preoperative MCP-1 level in the lowest tertile, those in the highest tertile had higher adjusted risk of death (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.40 to 2.38). Similarly, participants in the highest tertile had a higher adjusted risk of death (hazard ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.09-3.49) than those with a postoperative MCP-1 level in the lowest tertile. Higher plasma MCP-1 is associated with increased AKI and risk of death after cardiac operations. MCP-1 could be used as a biomarker to identify high-risk patients for potential AKI prevention strategies in the setting of cardiac operations. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Eosinophil chemotactic lymphokine produced by spleen cells of Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice. III. Isolation and characterization of two distinctive eosinophil chemotactic lymphokines directed against different maturation stages of eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Owhashi, M; Nawa, Y

    1987-01-01

    Two distinctive types of eosinophil chemotactic lymphokines (ECF-L) directed against eosinophils obtained from bone marrow (BM-Eo) or from peritoneal cavity (PEC-Eo) were isolated from the media conditioned by spleen cells from mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum by a combination of anion-exchange chromatography on DE52, affinity chromatography on Procion Red agarose, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecular weight of ECF-L directed against BM-Eo was 10,000 and that against PEC-Eo was 46,000 by SDS-PAGE analysis. After isolation, selectivity of the two distinct ECF-L was examined using BM-Eo, PEC-Eo and circulating Eo. ECF-L directed against BM-Eo could attract only BM-Eo, whereas that directed against PEC-Eo could attract not only PEC-Eo but also circulating Eo. Synthetic ECF-A was chemotactic against both BM- and circulating-Eo but not against PEC-Eo. When BM-Eo were cultured with ECF-L selective to PEC-Eo, they became reactive to ECF-L selective to PEC-Eo, whereas ECF-L selective to BM-Eo did not have such effect. These results suggest that ECF-L selective to PEC-Eo is not simply a chemoattractant but also is important in eosinophil differentiation.

  13. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ Potentiates Cell Chemotactism, Polarization, and Migration▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nguan Soon; Icre, Guillaume; Montagner, Alexandra; Heggeler, Béatrice Bordier-ten; Wahli, Walter; Michalik, Liliane

    2007-01-01

    After an injury, keratinocytes acquire the plasticity necessary for the reepithelialization of the wound. Here, we identify a novel pathway by which a nuclear hormone receptor, until now better known for its metabolic functions, potentiates cell migration. We show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) enhances two phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathways, namely, the Akt and the Rho-GTPase pathways. This PPARβ/δ activity amplifies the response of keratinocytes to a chemotactic signal, promotes integrin recycling and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and thereby favors cell migration. Using three-dimensional wound reconstructions, we demonstrate that these defects have a strong impact on in vivo skin healing, since PPARβ/δ−/− mice show an unexpected and rare epithelialization phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that nuclear hormone receptors not only regulate intercellular communication at the organism level but also participate in cell responses to a chemotactic signal. The implications of our findings may be far-reaching, considering that the mechanisms described here are important in many physiological and pathological situations. PMID:17682064

  14. Enzymatic digestion of the milk protein beta-casein releases potent chemotactic peptide(s) for monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Haruki; Yonezawa, Kumiko; Tohno, Masanori; Shimosato, Takeshi; Kawai, Yasushi; Saito, Tadao; Wang, Ji Ming

    2007-09-01

    Proteins in the milk release biologically active peptides upon enzymatic digestion. In the present study, we report the identification of novel monocyte/macrophage chemotactic peptides derived from enzymatically digested bovine beta-casein, a casein family member that is a major constituent of milk. Beta-casein fragments generated by actinase E showed potent chemotactic activity for human and mouse monocytes/macrophages, but not neutrophils, T lymphocytes or dendritic cells. The fragment-induced migration of human monocytes was inhibited by pertussis toxin and was not desensitized by a variety of known chemoattractants, suggesting that the digests activate a unique G protein-coupled receptor(s). The digests were further fractionated and purified to yield 3 small peptides. One peptide Q1 designated as "beta-casochemotide-1" with the amino acid sequence of YPVEP (f114-118 of beta-casein) induced high levels of macrophage chemotaxis. It also promoted calcium mobilization in macrophages, another indication of cell activation. Our study suggests that biologically active peptides released by actinase-digested milk beta-casein may promote innate host immune responses by inducing macrophage migration and activation.

  15. Btk-dependent Rac activation and actin rearrangement following FcepsilonRI aggregation promotes enhanced chemotactic responses of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Hye Sun; Rådinger, Madeleine; Brown, Jared M; Ali, Khaled; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Beaven, Michael A; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2010-08-01

    Mast cells infiltrate the sites of inflammation associated with chronic atopic disease and during helminth and bacterial infection. This process requires receptor-mediated cell chemotaxis across a concentration gradient of their chemotactic ligands. In vivo, mast cells are likely to be exposed to several such agents, which can cooperate in a synergistic manner to regulate mast cell homing. Here, we report that chemotaxis of mouse bone-marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) in response to the chemoattractants stem-cell factor (SCF) and prostaglandin (PG)E(2), is substantially enhanced following antigen-dependent ligation of the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI). These responses were associated with enhanced activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and downstream activation of the tyrosine protein kinase Btk, with subsequent enhanced phospholipase (PL)Cγ-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization, Rac activation and F-actin rearrangement. Antigen-induced chemotaxis, and the ability of antigen to amplify responses mediated by SCF, adenosine and PGE(2) were suppressed following inhibition of PI3K, and were impaired in BMMCs derived from Btk(-/-) mice. There were corresponding decreases in the PLCγ-mediated Ca(2+) signal, Rac activation and F-actin rearrangement, which, as they are essential for BMMC chemotaxis, accounts for the impaired migration of Btk-deficient cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that, by regulating signaling pathways that control F-actin rearrangement, Btk is crucial for the ability of antigen to amplify mast-cell chemotactic responses.

  16. Generation of a complement-derived chemotactic factor for tumor cells in experimentally induced peritoneal exudates and its effect on the local metastasis of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, F. W.; Mokashi, S.; Delikatny, J.

    1982-01-01

    A chemotactic factor for tumor cells was found in inflammatory exudate fluids induced by giving intraperitoneal injections of glycogen to Sprague-Dawley rats. The quantity of chemotactic activity and the period of time during which it could be detected correlated with the inflammatory reaction, measured by the cellular composition of the exudates and their content of protein and lysosomal enzymes. In gel filtration the chemotactic factor behaved mainly as a molecule having a molecular weight of approximately 6000 daltons. Its biologic activity was blocked by antiserums directed against C5 but not by antiserums against C3 or C4. In these two respects, the factor generated in vivo has the same properties as a previously described chemotactic factor that can be generated in vitro by proteolysis of purified C5 or C5a. Chemotactic activity was not detected in the glycogen-induced peritoneal exudates of rats depleted of serum complement by cobra venom factor. Intravenously injected Walker tumor cells arrested and formed metastases in the mesenteries of rats with peritonitis in greater numbers than in normal controls, animals depleted of complement during the experimental period, or animals given intraperitoneal injections of the vasopermeability agent, histamine. The growth of tumor cells in vitro was not promoted by peritoneal exudate fluids, nor was the number of metastases on vivo greater than in negative controls, in animals in which peritonitis was induced 24 hours after the intravenous injection of tumor cells. It is argued that chemotactic mechanisms can contribute to the formation of metastases at sites of tissue injury. PMID:7091299

  17. The effects of oral consumption of selenium nanoparticles on chemotactic and respiratory burst activities of neutrophils in comparison with sodium selenite in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kojouri, Gholam Ali; Sadeghian, Sirous; Mohebbi, Abdonnaser; Mokhber Dezfouli, Mohammad Reza

    2012-05-01

    The present study was designed to compare the effects of nano-selenium and of sodium selenite on the chemotactic and respiratory burst activities of neutrophils in sheep. Fifteen sheep were randomly divided into three groups. Groups 1 and 2 received selenium nanoparticles (1 mg/kg) or sodium selenite (1 mg/kg) orally, respectively, for ten consecutive days, and the third group was considered as the control. To determine the chemotactic and respiratory burst activities of the neutrophils, the leading front assay and the NBT test were used on heparinized blood samples that were collected at different intervals (days 0, 10th, 20th, and 30th). The results obtained showed that the chemotactic activities in groups 1 and 2 increased significantly on the 10th, 20th, and 30th day, compared to day 0, and on the 20th day in comparison with the 10th day, while in group 2, there was a significant decrease on the 30th day compared to the 20th day. The chemotactic activities in group 1 were significantly higher than in group 2 on the 10th day and in the control group on the 10th, 20th, and 30th day, but the chemotactic activities in group 2 were significantly higher than those in the control group only on the 20th day. On the 30th day into the experiment, the respiratory bursts in groups 1 and 2 were significantly stronger in comparison with those at day 0. Overall, nano-selenium increased the chemotactic and respiratory burst activities more significantly than sodium selenite, which is suggestive of a stronger stimulatory effect of the Se nanoparticles on intracellular activities.

  18. Cryptic chemotactic activity of fibronectin for human monocytes resides in the 120-kDa fibroblastic cell-binding fragment.

    PubMed

    Clark, R A; Wikner, N E; Doherty, D E; Norris, D A

    1988-08-25

    Monocytes and lymphocytes form a second wave of infiltrating blood leukocytes in areas of tissue injury. The mechanisms for monocyte accumulation at these sites are not completely understood. Recently, however, fragments from extracellular matrix proteins including collagen, elastin, and fibronectin have been shown to induce monocyte chemotaxis. In this report we demonstrate that chemotactic activity for human monocytes is expressed when a 120-kDa fragment containing the RGDS cell-binding peptide is released from intact fibronectin or from larger fibronectin fragments. Monocytes, either from mononuclear cell Ficoll-Hypaque preparations (10-20% monocytes, 89-90% lymphocytes) or from elutriation preparations (95% monocytes, 5% lymphocytes), but not lymphocytes, migrated toward 120-kDa fragment preparations (10(-7) M) in blind-end chambers when the cells were separated from the chemoattractant by a 5-micron pore polycarbonate filter either alone or overlying a 0.45-micron pore nitrocellulose filter. Neutrophils migrated toward zymosan-activated serum but not toward 10(-5)-10(-8) M concentrations of the 120-kDa fragment. Intact fibronectin had no chemotactic activity for human monocytes. Fibronectin was isolated from citrated human plasma by sequential gelatin-Sepharose affinity and DEAE ion-exchange chromatography in the presence of buffers containing 1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride to prevent fragmentation. Controlled enzymatic digestion with thermolysin cleaved fibronectin into 30 kDa fibrin, 45 kDa collagen, and 150/160-kDa cell and heparin domains. Upon prolonged digestion, purified 150/160-kDa fragments were cleaved into 120-kDa cell and 30/40-kDa heparin-binding fragments. Even though the intact fibronectin molecule, the 150/160-kDa fragments, and the 120-kDa fragment, have cell binding activity for Chinese hamster ovary fibroblasts, only the 120-kDa fragment expressed chemotactic activity for human monocytes. Thus, the 120-kDa fibroblastic cell

  19. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 attenuates and high-fat diet exacerbates bone loss in mice with pulmonary metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bone can be adversely affected by obesity and cancer-associated complications including wasting. The objective of this study was to determine whether a high-fat diet and a deficiency in monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) altered bone structural defects found in male C57BL/6 mice with Lewis lung...

  20. Multiscale dynamics of biological cells with chemotactic interactions: from a discrete stochastic model to a continuous description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Mark; Chen, Nan; Glimm, Tilmann; Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2006-01-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) has been used for simulating various biological phenomena such as differential adhesion, fruiting body formation of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, angiogenesis, cancer invasion, chondrogenesis in embryonic vertebrate limbs, and many others. In this paper, we derive continuous limit of discrete one dimensional CPM with the chemotactic interactions between cells in the form of a Fokker-Planck equation for the evolution of the cell probability density function. This equation is then reduced to the classical macroscopic Keller-Segel model. In particular, all coefficients of the Keller-Segel model are obtained from parameters of the CPM. Theoretical results are verified numerically by comparing Monte Carlo simulations for the CPM with numerics for the Keller-Segel model.

  1. Prevalence and organ distribution of leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) among decedents in New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christopher P.; Beggs, Marjorie L.; Wilson, Jon D.; Lathrop, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 (LECT2) amyloidosis is one of the most recently described types of amyloidosis. Since its description, it has been found to be one the most common types of amyloidosis in large series of amyloid cases involving the kidney and liver in the United States, where it primarily affects patients of Hispanic ethnicity. We sought to investigate the prevalence of this disease among Hispanic adult decedents who had an autopsy performed at the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator and determine the organ distribution of amyloid deposition. LECT2 amyloid deposits were identified within the kidney in 3.1% of Hispanic decedents. It was consistently deposited in the liver, spleen, adrenals, and lungs but did not involve the myocardium or brain. LECT2 amyloidosis is likely not rare among Hispanics in the Southwest United States and could represent an important but under-recognized etiology of chronic kidney disease in this population. PMID:26912093

  2. Prevalence and organ distribution of leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) among decedents in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christopher P; Beggs, Marjorie L; Wilson, Jon D; Lathrop, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 (LECT2) amyloidosis is one of the most recently described types of amyloidosis. Since its description, it has been found to be one the most common types of amyloidosis in large series of amyloid cases involving the kidney and liver in the United States, where it primarily affects patients of Hispanic ethnicity. We sought to investigate the prevalence of this disease among Hispanic adult decedents who had an autopsy performed at the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator and determine the organ distribution of amyloid deposition. LECT2 amyloid deposits were identified within the kidney in 3.1% of Hispanic decedents. It was consistently deposited in the liver, spleen, adrenals, and lungs but did not involve the myocardium or brain. LECT2 amyloidosis is likely not rare among Hispanics in the Southwest United States and could represent an important but under-recognized etiology of chronic kidney disease in this population.

  3. Chemotactic Activity of Cyclophilin A in the Skin Mucus of Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and Its Active Site for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Dawar, Farman Ullah; Tu, Jiagang; Xiong, Yang; Lan, Jiangfeng; Dong, Xing Xing; Liu, Xiaoling; Khattak, Muhammad Nasir Khan; Mei, Jie; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Fish skin mucus is a dynamic barrier for invading pathogens with a variety of anti-microbial enzymes, including cyclophilin A (CypA), a multi-functional protein with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Beside various other immunological functions, CypA induces leucocytes migration in vitro in teleost. In the current study, we have discovered several novel immune-relevant proteins in yellow catfish skin mucus by mass spectrometry (MS). The CypA present among them was further detected by Western blot. Moreover, the CypA present in the skin mucus displayed strong chemotactic activity for yellow catfish leucocytes. Interestingly, asparagine (like arginine in mammals) at position 69 was the critical site in yellow catfish CypA involved in leucocyte attraction. These novel efforts do not only highlight the enzymatic texture of skin mucus, but signify CypA to be targeted for anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:27589721

  4. Optimality in Bacterial Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, Nikita; Lebiedz, Dirk; Sourjik, Victor

    2010-03-01

    One of the central questions of systems biology is the role of microscopic parameters of a single cell in the behavior of population. Multiscale models address this problem, allowing us to understand population behavior from single-cell molecular components and reactions. In this work a multiscale (hybrid) model is presented, which describes chemotactic Escherichia coli bacterium by combination of mathematical models and time-scale separation of key reactions. The bacterial behavior is described with high accuracy according to the available experimental data. The model shows several new aspects of chemotactic optimality in terms of adaptation rate, gradient steepness and type of medium (liquid or porous). Also, it predicts existence of an additional mechanism of gradient navigation in E. coli. Based on the available experiments, the model suggests that tumbles are anisotropic, i.e. the angle of reorientation during a tumble depends on the swimming direction along the gradient. This result demonstrates a new level of optimization in E. coli chemotaxis, which is likely to be used by some other peritrichously flagellated bacteria, and indicates yet another level of evolutionary optimization in bacterial chemotaxis.

  5. Evidence for a novel chemotactic C1q domain-containing factor in the leech nerve cord.

    PubMed

    Tahtouh, Muriel; Croq, Françoise; Vizioli, Jacopo; Sautiere, Pierre-Eric; Van Camp, Christelle; Salzet, Michel; Daha, Mohamed R; Pestel, Joël; Lefebvre, Christophe

    2009-02-01

    In vertebrates, central nervous system (CNS) protection is dependent on many immune cells including microglial cells. Indeed, activated microglial cells are involved in neuroinflammation mechanisms by interacting with numerous immune factors. Unlike vertebrates, some lophotrochozoan invertebrates can fully repair their CNS following injury. In the medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis, the recruitment of microglial cells at the lesion site is essential for sprouting of injured axons. Interestingly, a new molecule homologous to vertebrate C1q was characterized in leech, named HmC1q (for H. medicinalis) and detected in neurons and glial cells. In chemotaxis assays, leech microglial cells were demonstrated to respond to human C1q. The chemotactic activity was reduced when microglia was preincubated with signaling pathway inhibitors (Pertussis Toxin or wortmannin) or anti-human gC1qR antibody suggesting the involvement of gC1qR in C1q-mediated migration in leech. Assays using cells preincubated with NO chelator (cPTIO) showed that C1q-mediated migration was associated to NO production. Of interest, by using anti-HmC1q antibodies, HmC1q released in the culture medium was shown to exhibit a similar chemotactic effect on microglial cells as human C1q. In summary, we have identified, for the first time, a molecule homologous to mammalian C1q in leech CNS. Its chemoattractant activity on microglia highlights a new investigation field leading to better understand leech CNS repair mechanisms.

  6. Role of Interleukin-17A on the Chemotactic Responses to CCL7 in a Murine Allergic Rhinitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Lian; Han, Doo Hee; Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Chul Hee; Rhee, Chae-Seo

    2017-01-01

    Background The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-17A is associated with eosinophil infiltration into the nasal mucosa in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis. Chemotaxis of eosinophils is mediated primarily through C-C chemokine receptor type 3 (CCR3). However, the mechanism underlying the IL-17A-mediated enhancement of eosinophil recruitment via chemoattractants/chemokines remains unknown. Objectives In this study, we assessed the contribution of IL-17A to eosinophil-related inflammation via the CCL7/CCR3 pathway in experimental allergic rhinitis. Methods IL-17A knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally and challenged intranasally with OVA to induce allergic rhinitis. Various parameters of the allergic response were evaluated, and mRNA and protein levels of CCL7 and CCR3 in nasal tissue and serum were compared between the two groups. The chemotactic response to CCL7 with or without IL-17A in bone marrow-derived eosinophils (bmEos) from BALB/c mice was measured. Results In the allergic rhinitis model, IL-17A deficiency significantly decreased nasal symptoms, serum IgE levels, and eosinophil recruitment to the nasal mucosa. CCL7 and CCR3 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in the nasal mucosa of IL-17A KO mice compared with the WT mice. BmEos showed a significantly increased chemotactic response to -low concentration of CCL7 in the presence of IL-17A compared with its absence. Conclusion The suppression of nasal inflammation due of IL-17A deficiency in allergic rhinitis is partly responsible for the regulation of CCL7 secretion and eosinophil infiltration, which may be regulated via the CCL7/CCR3 pathway. PMID:28046055

  7. Agent-Based Model of Human Alveoli Predicts Chemotactic Signaling by Epithelial Cells during Early Aspergillus fumigatus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pollmächer, Johannes; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most important human fungal pathogens, causing life-threatening diseases. Since humans inhale hundreds to thousands of fungal conidia every day, the lower respiratory tract is the primary site of infection. Current interaction networks of the innate immune response attribute fungal recognition and detection to alveolar macrophages, which are thought to be the first cells to get in contact with the fungus. At present, these networks are derived from in vitro or in situ assays, as the peculiar physiology of the human lung makes in vivo experiments, including imaging on the cell-level, hard to realize. We implemented a spatio-temporal agent-based model of a human alveolus in order to perform in silico experiments of a virtual infection scenario, for an alveolus infected with A. fumigatus under physiological conditions. The virtual analog captures the three-dimensional alveolar morphology consisting of the two major alveolar epithelial cell types and the pores of Kohn as well as the dynamic process of respiration. To the best of our knowledge this is the first agent-based model of a dynamic human alveolus in the presence of respiration. A key readout of our simulations is the first-passage-time of alveolar macrophages, which is the period of time that elapses until the first physical macrophage-conidium contact is established. We tested for random and chemotactic migration modes of alveolar macrophages and varied their corresponding parameter sets. The resulting first-passage-time distributions imply that randomly migrating macrophages fail to find the conidium before the start of germination, whereas guidance by chemotactic signals derived from the alveolar epithelial cell associated with the fungus enables a secure and successful discovery of the pathogen in time. PMID:25360787

  8. Carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels support central nervous system-derived tumor-cell chemotactic migration: comparison with conventional extracellular matrix macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tanya; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar; Varma, Devika; Nicoll, Steven B; Vazquez, Maribel

    2014-09-01

    The local microenvironment plays an important role in maintaining the dynamics of the extracellular matrix and the cell-extracellular matrix relationship. The extracellular matrix is a complex network of macromolecules with distinct mechanical and biochemical characteristics. Disruptions in extracellular matrix homeostasis are associated with the onset of cancer. The extracellular matrix becomes highly disorganized, and the cell-matrix relationship changes, resulting in altered cell-signaling processes and metastasis. Medulloblastoma is one of the most common malignant pediatric brain tumors in the United States. In order to gain a better understanding of the interplay between cell-extracellular matrix interactions and cell-migratory responses in tumors, eight different matrix macromolecule formulations were investigated using a medulloblastoma-derived cell line: poly-D-lysine, matrigel, laminin, collagen 1, fibronectin, a 10% blend of laminin-collagen 1, a 20% blend of laminin-collagen 1, and a cellulose-derived hydrogel, carboxymethylcellulose. Over time, the average changes in cell morphology were quantified in 2D and 3D, as was migration in the presence and absence of the chemoattractant, epidermal growth factor. Data revealed that carboxymethylcellulose allowed for a cell-extracellular matrix relationship typically believed to be present in tumors, with cells exhibiting a rounded, amoeboid morphology consistent with chemotactic migration, while the other matrices promoted an elongated cell shape as well as both haptotactic and chemotactic motile processes. Therefore, carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels may serve as effective platforms for investigating central nervous system-derived tumor-cell migration in response to soluble factors. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. A novel trypanoplasm-like flagellate Jarrellia atramenti n. g., n. sp. (Kinetoplastida: Bodonidae) and ciliates from the blowhole of a stranded pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps (Physeteridae): morphology, life cycle and potential pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Poynton, S L; Whitaker, B R; Heinrich, A B

    2001-04-10

    The successful 6 mo rehabilitation of a stranded juvenile pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps afforded the opportunity to study the poorly known protozoan fauna of the upper respiratory tract of cetaceans. Mucus samples were collected by holding either a petri dish or glass slides over the blowhole for 3 to 5 exhalations; preparations were examined as wet mounts, and then stained with Wrights-Giemsa or Gram stain. Blood smears were stained with Wrights-Giemsa. Unidentified spindle-shaped and unidentified broad ciliates, reported from the blowhole of the pygmy sperm whale for the first time, were seen only initially, while yeast-like organisms and bacteria were seen intermittently. Epithelial cells and white blood cells were often present in the blowhole mucus, but red blood cells were never seen. A novel trypanoplasm-like bodonid kinetoplastid biflagellate (Order Kinetoplastida) was commonly encountered in the blowhole mucus, but never in the blood. Both mature flagellates and those undergoing longitudinal binary fission were present. The elongate flagellate had a long whiplash anterior flagellum; the recurrent flagellum was attached along at least two-thirds of the body length, forming a prominent undulating membrane, and the trailing portion was short. The kinetoplast was irregularly fragmented. The flagellates were either free-swimming, or attached to host material via the free portion of the posterior flagellum. The prominent undulating membrane was characteristic of Trypanoplasma, while the fragmented kinetoplast was characteristic of some species of Cryptobia. For the novel bodonid kinetoplastid, with its unique combination of morphological features (prominent undulating membrane and fragmented kinetoplast), we propose the creation of a new genus Jarrellia. We believe this to be the first published description of a flagellate from a marine mammal, and among the first reports of a trypanoplasm-like flagellate from a warm-blooded host. We expect that a diversity

  10. Cofactor Regulation of C5a Chemotactic Activity in Physiological Fluids. Requirement for the Vitamin D Binding Protein, Thrombospondin-1 and its Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Glenda; Zhang, Jianhua; Habiel, David M.; Ge, Lingyin; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Kew, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    Factors in physiological fluids that regulate the chemotactic activity of complement activation peptides C5a and C5a des Arg are not well understood. The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) has been shown to significantly enhance chemotaxis to C5a/C5a des Arg. More recently, platelet-derived thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) has been shown to facilitate the augmentation of C5a-induced chemotaxis by DBP. The objective of this study was to better characterize these chemotactic cofactors and investigate the role that cell surface TSP-1 receptors CD36 and CD47 may play in this process. The chemotactic activity in C-activated normal serum, citrated plasma, DBP-depleted serum or C5 depleted serum was determined for both normal human neutrophils and U937 cell line transfected with the C5a receptor (U937-C5aR). In addition, levels of C5a des Arg, DBP and TSP-1 in these fluids were measured by RIA or ELISA. Results show that there is a clear hierarchy with C5a being the essential primary signal (DBP or TSP-1 will not function in the absence of C5a), DBP the necessary cofactor and TSP-1 a dependent tertiary factor, since it cannot function to enhance chemotaxis to C5a without DBP. Measurement of the C5a-induced intracellular calcium flux confirmed the same hierarchy observed with chemotaxis. Moreover, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) demonstrated that C5a-dependent chemotactic activity is significantly decreased after anti-DBP treatment. Finally, results show that TSP-1 utilizes cell surface receptors CD36 and CD47 to augment chemotaxis, but DBP does not bind to TSP-1, CD36 or CD47. The results clearly demonstrate that C5a/C5a des Arg needs both DBP and TSP-1 for maximal chemotactic activity and suggest that the regulation of C5a chemotactic activity in physiological fluids is more complex than previously thought. PMID:22014686

  11. Crystal and molecular structure of two geometrically restricted chemotactic tripeptides, analogues of formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Michel, A G; Lajoie, G; Hassani, C A

    1990-12-01

    The crystal structures of HCO-Met-Leu-Phe-OC(CH3)3, (CH25H39N3O5S), fMLP-OtBu, and HCO-Met psi [CSNH]-Leu-Phe-OCH3, (C22H33N3O4S2), fMS LP-OMe, have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and their conformational properties investigated by molecular mechanics energy calculations. Crystals of fMLP-OtBu are monoclinic, space group P2(1), a = 12.027(4), b = 9.492(3), c = 12.660(4) A, beta = 101.99(3) degrees, Z = 2; those of fMS LP-OMe are orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), a = 7.130(1), b = 12.097(2), c = 31.060(5) A, Z = 4. The first compounds fMLP-OtBu is the t-butyl ester of the tripeptide fMLP that represents one of the most potent compounds in inducing the lysozyme release from human neutrophils that reflects the chemotactic activity. From the crystal structure, it is shown that the orientation of the phenylalanine side chain is largely affected by the presence of the bulky group. fMSLP-OMe was shown to be inactive after thionation of the methionine residue in the original tripeptide. Nevertheless, the crystal structure does not reveal any influence of the presence of the thionated peptidic bond on the backbone conformation. The X-ray results have been used to generate parameters for empirical energy calculations. Subsequently, a strategy based on random generation of conformations followed by energy-minimization was applied to investigate the conformational space of thiopeptides, in comparison with normal peptides. From molecular free energy calculations, it is shown that the main influence of the introduction of a thioamide bond on the molecular structure is to prevent the existence of C7(eq) conformations involving the thiomethionine residue. Consequently, a larger number of conformers are found to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving the formyl group, reducing its availability to interact with the receptor. For the first time, the theoretical prediction of the existence of C7eq conformations for fMLP is made. The resulting

  12. Coprophilic amoebae and flagellates, including Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, characterise a divergent and diverse rhizarian radiation and contribute to a large diversity of faecal-associated protists.

    PubMed

    Bass, David; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Brown, Matthew W; Pearce, Rebecca A; Tice, Alexander K; Jousset, Alexandre; Geisen, Stefan; Hartikainen, Hanna

    2016-05-01

    A wide diversity of organisms utilize faecal habitats as a rich nutrient source or a mechanism to traverse through animal hosts. We sequenced the 18S rRNA genes of the coprophilic, fruiting body-forming amoeba Guttulinopsis vulgaris and its non-fruiting relatives Rosculus 'ithacus' CCAP 1571/3, R. terrestris n. sp. and R. elongata n. sp. and demonstrate that they are related to the coprophilic flagellate Helkesimastix in a strongly supported, but highly divergent 18S sister clade. PCR primers specific to both clades were used to generate 18S amplicons from a range of environmental and faecal DNA samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the cloned sequences demonstrated a high diversity of uncharacterised sequence types within this clade, likely representing previously described members of the genera Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, as well as so-far unobserved organisms. Further, an Illumina MiSeq sequenced set of 18S V4-region amplicons generated from faecal DNAs using universal eukaryote primers showed that core-cercozoan assemblages in faecal samples are as diverse as those found in more conventionally examined habitats. These results reveal many novel lineages, some of which appear to occur preferentially in faecal material, in particular cercomonads and glissomonads. More broadly, we show that faecal habitats are likely untapped reservoirs of microbial eukaryotic diversity.

  13. Using optical tweezers to examine the chemotactic force to a single inflammatory cell--eosinophil stimulated by chemoattractants prepared from Toxocara Canis larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Po-Chen; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Ke-Min; Jen, Lin-Ni; Liu, Cheng-tzu; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Granulocytes are a group of white blood cells belonging to the innate immune system in human and in murine in which eosinophils play an important role in worm infection-induced inflammation. The migration of these cells is well characterized and has been separated into four steps: rolling, adhesion, transendothelial migration, and chemotaxis, however, the physical characteristics of the chemotactic force to eosinophils from worm component remain largely unknown. Note that optical tweezers are featured in the manipulation of a single cell and the measurement of biological forces. Therefore, we propose to use optical tweezers to examine the chemotactic force to a eosinophil from a T. canis lavae preparation in terms of distance during the migration of eosinophil.

  14. Renal leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 (LECT2) amyloidosis in First Nations people in Northern British Columbia, Canada: a report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Holly L; DeMarco, Mari L; Magil, Alex B; Taylor, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 (LECT2) amyloidosis is a recently identified type of amyloidosis that may represent an underdiagnosed cause of chronic kidney disease. LECT2 amyloidosis typically is reported as being renal limited and, in the United States, more prevalent in Hispanic patients. We add to the epidemiologic data of this condition by describing 4 First Nations people from Northern British Columbia, Canada, who presented with slowly progressive chronic kidney disease that was found to be due to LECT2 amyloidosis.

  15. Chemotactic activity of gestational tissues through late pregnancy, term labor, and RU486-induced preterm labor in Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Tong, Wing-Chiu; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia; Tanaka, Satomi; Hajar, Omar; Olson, David M; Taggart, Michael J; Mitchell, Bryan F

    2015-04-01

    Is increased leukocyte chemotactic activity (CA) from gestational tissues necessary for term or preterm labor in guinea pigs? Tissue extracts were prepared from pregnant guinea pig decidua-myometrium, cervix, fetal membranes (amniochorion), and placenta during early third trimester (n = 8), term not in labor (TNL, n = 5), and term spontaneous labor (TL, n = 6), RU486-induced preterm labor (PTL, n = 6), or controls (cPTL, n = 5). Leukocyte CA was assessed using a modified Boyden chamber assay. Extract chemokine and maternal progesterone concentrations were quantified by enzyme immunoassay. Only the extracts from amniochorion demonstrated increased CA through late gestation and labor. In contrast, CA was decreased in extracts from amniochorion and cervix from animals after RU486-induced PTL. Maternal progesterone concentrations remained high in all groups. Leukocyte CA of intrauterine tissues is increased in term spontaneous labor. However, RU486-induced preterm labor occurs in the absence of increased CA. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Reproductive Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Inhibition of chemiluminescence and chemotactic activity of phagocytes in vitro by the extracts of selected medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Jantan, Ibrahim; Harun, Nurul Hikmah; Septama, Abdi Wira; Murad, Shahnaz; Mesaik, M A

    2011-04-01

    The methanol extracts of 20 selected medicinal plants were investigated for their effects on the respiratory burst of human whole blood, isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and isolated mice macrophages using a luminol/lucigenin-based chemiluminescence assay. We also tested the effect of the extracts on chemotactic migration of PMNs using the Boyden chamber technique. The extracts of Curcuma domestica L., Phyllanthus amarus Schum & Thonn and C. xanthorrhiza Roxb. were the samples producing the strongest oxidative burst of PMNs with luminol-based chemiluminescence, with IC(50) values ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 μg/ml. For macrophage cells, the extracts which showed strong suppressive activity for luminol-based chemiluminescence were C. xanthorrhiza and Garcinia mangostana L. Among the extracts studied, C. mangga Valton & Vazsjip, Piper nigrum L. and Labisia pumila var. alata showed strong inhibitory activity on lucigenin-amplified oxidative burst of PMNs, with IC(50) values ranging from 0.9 to 1.5 μg/ml. The extracts of Zingiber officinale Rosc., Alpinia galangal (L.) Willd and Averrhoa bilimbi Linn showed strong inhibition on the chemotaxic migration of cells, with IC(50) values comparable to that of ibuprofen (1.5 μg/ml). The results suggest that some of these plants were able to modulate the innate immune response of phagocytes at different steps, emphasizing their potential as a source of new immunomodulatory agents.

  17. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency attenuates and high-fat diet exacerbates bone loss in mice with Lewis lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Nielsen, Forrest H; Sundaram, Sneha; Cao, Jay

    2017-04-04

    Bone loss occurs in obesity and cancer-associated complications including wasting. This study determined whether a high-fat diet and a deficiency in monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) altered bone structural defects in male C57BL/6 mice with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) metastases in lungs. Compared to non-tumor-bearing mice, LLC reduced bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number, trabecular thickness and bone mineral density and increased trabecular separation in femurs. Similar changes occurred in vertebrae. The high-fat diet compared to the AIN93G diet exacerbated LLC-induced detrimental structural changes; the exacerbation was greater in femurs than in vertebrae. Mice deficient in MCP-1 compared to wild-type mice exhibited increases in bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number and decreases in trabecular separation in both femurs and vertebrae, and increases in trabecular thickness and bone mineral density and a decrease in structure model index in vertebrae. Lewis lung carcinoma significantly decreased osteocalcin but increased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP 5b) in plasma. In LLC-bearing mice, the high-fat diet increased and MCP-1 deficiency decreased plasma TRAP 5b; neither the high-fat diet nor MCP-1 deficiency resulted in significant changes in plasma concentration of osteocalcin. In conclusion, pulmonary metastasis of LLC is accompanied by detrimental bone structural changes; MCP-1 deficiency attenuates and high-fat diet exacerbates the metastasis-associated bone wasting.

  18. Stromal-derived factor-1α/CXCL12-CXCR4 chemotactic pathway promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinhong; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Xin; Duan, Wanxing; Lei, Jianjun; Zong, Liang; Li, Xuqi; Sheng, Liang; Ma, Jiguang; Han, Liang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lun; Guo, Kun; Ma, Zhenhua; Wu, Zheng; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong

    2015-03-10

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is considered as an alternative route for the metastatic spread of pancreatic cancer cells; however, the molecular changes leading to PNI are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis plays a pivotal role in the neurotropism of pancreatic cancer cells to local peripheral nerves. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that CXCR4 elevation correlated with PNI in 78 pancreatic cancer samples. Both in vitro and in vivo PNI models were applied to investigate the function of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in PNI progression and pathogenesis. The results showed that the activation of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis significantly increased pancreatic cancer cells invasion and promoted the outgrowth of the dorsal root ganglia. CXCL12 derived from the peripheral nerves stimulated the invasion and chemotactic migration of CXCR4-positive cancer cells in a paracrine manner, eventually leading to PNI. In vivo analyses revealed that the abrogation of the activated signaling inhibited tumor growth and invasion of the sciatic nerve toward the spinal cord. These data indicate that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis may be a novel therapeutic target to prevent the perineural dissemination of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Bacterial swimming, swarming and chemotactic response to heavy metal presence: which could be the influence on wastewater biotreatment efficiency?

    PubMed

    Barrionuevo, Matías R; Vullo, Diana L

    2012-09-01

    Fixed-bed reactors are usually designed for wastewater biotreatments, where the biofilm establishment and maintenance play the most important roles. Biofilm development strictly relies on different types of bacterial motility: swimming, swarming, and chemotaxis, which can be altered by the microenvironment conditions. The aim of this work is to do an integrated study on the effects of Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Cr(VI) on swimming, swarming and chemotaxis of Pseudomonas veronii 2E, Delftia acidovorans AR and Ralstonia taiwanensis M2 to improve biofilm development and maintenance for metal loaded wastewater biotreatment in fixed-bed bioreactors. Swimming, swarming and chemotactic response evaluation experiments were carried out at different metal concentrations. P. veronii 2E motility was not affected by metal presence, being this strain optimal for fixed-bed reactors. D. acidovorans AR swarming was inhibited by Cd and Zn. Although R. taiwanensis M2 showed high resistance to Cu, Cd, Cr and Zn, motility was definitively altered, so further studies on R. taiwanensis M2 resistance mechanisms would be particularly interesting.

  20. Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor based on orderly oriented conductive wires for the detection of human monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in serum.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuliang; He, Junlin; Xia, Chunyong; Gao, Liuliu; Yu, Chao

    2015-08-15

    For the first time, a simple, ultrasensitive and label-free electrochemical monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) immunosensor based on orderly oriented conductive wires has been developed. A conductive wire, which is similar to an electron-conducting tunnel, was designed with Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) joined to Au@Pt core-shell microspheres via a cysteamine (CA) crosslinker. To enhance the sensitivity of the immunosensor, Au nanoparticles were electrodeposited onto the gold electrode, and CA was self-assembled via strong Au-S covalent bonds, providing an appropriate surface and promoting electron transfer. Next, Au@Pt core-shell microspheres with large surface area were grafted onto the modified electrode to immobilize more MCP-1 antibodies. MCP-1 is an initiating factor and biomarker of atherosclerotic diseases. Under optimal experimental conditions, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) current changes were used to detect MCP-1 with a broad linear range of 0.09-360 pg mL(-1) and a low detection limit of 0.03 pg mL(-1) (S/N=3). The proposed immunosensor exhibited good selectivity, reproducibility and reusability. When applied to spiked serum samples, the data for the developed immunosensor were in agreement with an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, suggesting that the electrochemical immunosensor would be suitable for practical detection.

  1. Endogenous humoral autoreactive immune responses to apoptotic cells: Effects on phagocytic uptake, chemotactic migration and antigenic spread.

    PubMed

    Das, Joy; Arora, Pooja; Gracias, Donald; Praveen, Alagangula; Raj, Beena P J; Martin, Elishba; Pal, Rahul

    2008-12-01

    Enhanced cell death and deficient clearance of cellular debris are thought to contribute to increased self-antigen exposure in systemic autoimmune disease. To investigate the characteristics of early humoral autoimmune responses, six monoclonal antibodies were generated from two autoimmune prone strains of mice. All antibodies specifically bound the surface of late-stage apoptotic cells. Similar antibody reactivities were present in the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. While IgM antibodies significantly reduced the phagocytic uptake of apoptotic thymocytes, IgG antibodies enhanced uptake. Poly-reactivity was demonstrated in the recognition of ribonucleoproteins and lipids. An antibody reactive towards lysophosphatidylcholine reversed lysophosphatidylcholine-mediated inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-alpha production and adversely affected the transmigration of phagocytes towards an apoptotic stimulus. In several instances, CDR were characterized by the accumulation of somatic mutations. Anti-idiotypic antibodies generated upon immunization bound distinct cellular moieties and self-antigens. Poly-specific, apoptotic cell-reactive autoantibodies can therefore directly impact upon the course of disease by influencing phagocytic uptake of apoptotic cells, by inducing a pro-inflammatory environment through neutralization of bioactive lipids, by blinding phagocytes to the presence of dying cells through the negation of lipidic chemotactic signals, and by mediating diversification of the humoral autoimmune response via the idiotypic network.

  2. A new SPH scheme to model transport of chemotactic bacteria in porous media at the continuum scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avesani, Diego; Bellin, Alberto; Dumbser, Michael; Chiogna, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    As recently shown chemotaxis, i.e. the movement of microorganisms toward or away from the concentration gradient of a chemical species, could have a fundamental role in the transport of bacteria through saturated porous media. Chemotactic bacteria could enhance bioremediation by directing their own motions to residual contaminants in less conductive zones of aquifers. The aim of the present work is to develop a proper numerical scheme to define and to quantify the magnitude and the role of chemotaxis in the complex groundwater system framework. We present a new class of meshless Lagrangian particle methods based on the Smooth Particle Hydrodinamics (SPH) formulation of Vila & Ben Moussa, combined with a new Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) reconstruction technique on moving point clouds in multiple space dimensions. The purpose of this new scheme is to fully exploit the advantages of SPH among traditional meshbased and meshfree schemes and to overcome its problems for modeling chemotaxis in porous media. We test the new scheme against analytical reference solutions and we show, under the assumption of complete mixing at the Darcy scale, that chemotaxis may significantly affect the quantification of field-scale bacterial distribution, therefore influencing reactive mixing and degradation of contaminants.

  3. Plasma Levels of Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Are Associated with Clinical Features and Angiogenesis in Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Valković, Toni; Babarović, Emina; Lučin, Ksenija; Štifter, Sanja; Aralica, Merica; Seili-Bekafigo, Irena; Duletić-Načinović, Antica; Jonjić, Nives

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to determine the plasma levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and possible associations with angiogenesis and the main clinical features of untreated patients with multiple myeloma (MM). ELISA was used to determine plasma MCP-1 levels in 45 newly diagnosed MM patients and 24 healthy controls. The blood vessels were highlighted by immunohistochemical staining, and computer-assisted image analysis was used for more objective and accurate determination of two parameters of angiogenesis: microvessel density (MVD) and total vascular area (TVA). The plasma levels of MCP-1 were compared to these parameters and the presence of anemia, renal dysfunction, and bone lesions. A significant positive correlation was found between plasma MCP-1 concentrations and TVA (p = 0.02). The MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in MM patients with evident bone lesions (p = 0.01), renal dysfunction (p = 0.02), or anemia (p = 0.04). Therefore, our preliminary results found a positive association between plasma MCP-1 levels, angiogenesis (expressed as TVA), and clinical features in patients with MM. However, additional prospective studies with a respectable number of patients should be performed to authenticate these results and establish MCP-1 as a possible target of active treatment. PMID:26925413

  4. Resveratrol inhibits foam cell formation via NADPH oxidase 1-mediated reactive oxygen species and monocyte chemotactic protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae-Weon; Baek, Kheewoong; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Lee, Jae-Jin; Ryu, Sang-Ho; Chin, Byung-Rho

    2009-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound in red wine that has anti-oxidant and cardioprotective effects in animal models. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) play key roles in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. We studied LPS-mediated foam cell formation and the effect of resveratrol. Resveratrol pretreatment strongly suppressed LPS-induced foam cell formation. To determine if resveratrol affected the expression of genes that control ROS generation in macrophages, NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) was measured. Resveratrol treatment of macrophages inhibited LPS-induced Nox1 expression as well as ROS generation, and also suppressed LPS-induced MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. We investigated the upstream targets of Nox1 and MCP-1 expression and found that Akt-forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxO3a) is an important signaling pathway that regulates both genes. These inhibitory effects of resveratrol on Nox1 expression and MCP-1 production may target to the Akt and FoxO3a signaling pathways. PMID:19293636

  5. A lipid chemotactic factor from anaerobic coryneform bacteria including Corynebacterium parvum with activity for macrophages and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R J; McInroy, R J; Wilkinson, P C; White, R G

    1976-01-01

    A lipid with chemoattractant (chemotactic) activity for mouse and guinea-pig macrophages and for human blood monocytes is released by anaerobic coryneform bacteria (including Corynebacterium parvum). The active lipid is associated with fibrillar structures which lie on the outside of the bacterial cell and are released spontaneously during growth. The lipid can also be extracted easily by a number of methods. The fibrils are loosely associated with a capsule-like structure composed largely of polysaccharide. Purification of the active lipid was achieved by chloroform-methanol extraction of the whole organisms yielding a chloroform-soluble fraction attracting mononuclear phagocytes at concentrations around 10 microgram/ml. The infra-red spectrum of this material showed lipid but no peptide or sugar. Thin-layer chromatography yielded twelve spots of which three had chemoattractant properties. The most active of these gave staining reactions consistent with the presence of phospholipid, the other two probably contained free fatty acids and triglycerides. Thin-layer electrophoresis also yielded an active phosphorus-containing spot. Saturated fatty acids of chain lengths found in the anaerobic coryne forms had weak monocyte-attractant activity. As the active material was progressively purified, its activity as a monocyte attractant weakened. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1027716

  6. A “Trimer of Dimers”—Based Model for the Chemotactic Signal Transduction Network in Bacterial Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xiangrong

    2013-01-01

    The network that controls chemotaxis in Escherichia coli is one of the most completely characterized signal transduction systems to date. Receptor clustering accounts for characteristics such as high sensitivity, precise adaptation over a wide dynamic range of ligand concentrations, and robustness to variations in the amounts of intracellular proteins. To gain insights into the structure-function relationship of receptor clusters and understand the mechanism behind the high-performance signaling, we develop and analyze a model for a single trimer of dimers. This new model extends an earlier model (Spiro et al. in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 94:7263–7268, 1997) to incorporate the recent experimental findings that the core structure of receptor clusters is the trimer of receptor dimers. We show that the model can reproduce most of the experimentally-observed behaviors, including excitation, adaptation, high sensitivity, and robustness to parameter variations. In addition, the model makes a number of new predictions as to how the adaptation time varies with the expression level of various proteins involved in signal transduction. Our results provide a more mechanistically-based description of the structure-function relationship for the signaling system, and show the key role of the interaction among dimer members of the trimer in the chemotactic response of cells. PMID:22864951

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Promotes Assembly of the p130Cas Interactome to Drive Endothelial Chemotactic Signaling and Angiogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ian M.; Kennedy, Susan A.; Paliashvili, Ketevan; Santra, Tapesh; Yamaji, Maiko; Lovering, Ruth C.; Britton, Gary; Frankel, Paul; Kolch, Walter; Zachary, Ian C.

    2017-01-01

    p130Cas is a polyvalent adapter protein essential for cardiovascular development, and with a key role in cell movement. In order to identify the pathways by which p130Cas exerts its biological functions in endothelial cells we mapped the p130Cas interactome and its dynamic changes in response to VEGF using high-resolution mass spectrometry and reconstruction of protein interaction (PPI) networks with the aid of multiple PPI databases. VEGF enriched the p130Cas interactome in proteins involved in actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell movement, including actin-binding proteins, small GTPases and regulators or binders of GTPases. Detailed studies showed that p130Cas association of the GTPase-binding scaffold protein, IQGAP1, plays a key role in VEGF chemotactic signaling, endothelial polarization, VEGF-induced cell migration, and endothelial tube formation. These findings indicate a cardinal role for assembly of the p130Cas interactome in mediating the cell migratory response to VEGF in angiogenesis, and provide a basis for further studies of p130Cas in cell movement. PMID:28007913

  8. Growth Factors: Production of Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 (MCP-1/JE) by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: Effect on the Migration and Proliferation of Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y. X.; Talati, B. R.; Janakiraman, N.; Chapman, R. A.; Gautam, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant chemotactic cytokines (chemokines) have been shown to modulate in vitro proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Whether bone marrow stromal cells produce chemokines and the physiological role they may have in the regulation of hematopoiesis has largely remained unexamined. We have examined the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/JE) in bone marrow stromal cells and its effect on the migration and proliferation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells. Freshly derived murine bone marrow stromal cells were found to secrete abundant amounts of MCP-1/JE, which was further increased upon stimulation of stromal cells with pro-inflammatory agents LPS, IL1-alpha, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha. Although culture supernatant conditioned by stromal cells exhibited chemotactic activity toward hematopoietic progenitor cells, the chemotactic activity was not due to MCP-1/JE. Furthermore, rMCP-1/JE also failed to induce migration of progenitor cells. MCP-1/JE, however, caused 20 to 30% increase in the clonal expansion of progenitor cells. Thus, although MCP-1/JE does not chemoattract hematopoietic progenitor cells it may have a role in their proliferation and clonal expansion.

  9. Detection of the chemotactic factor for canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear cells in the culture supernatant of Cos7 cells transfected with canine interleukin-8 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, A; Matsumoto, Y; Furusawa, S; Yoshihara, K; Matsumoto, Y; Onodera, T; Hirota, Y

    1995-08-01

    Chemotactic activities in the culture supernatants of Cos7 cells transfected with a cloned canine IL-8 cDNA (pcIL-8SR alpha 14) were evaluated by using mononuclear cells (MNC) and polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) from the peripheral blood of dogs. The culture supernatants of Cos7 cells were collected 66 hr after the transfection of pcIL-8SR alpha 14 (Cos7/cIL-8). Chemotactic activities in the culture supernatants for MNC and PMN were determined as migration distances in Millipore membrane filters in a modified Boyden's chamber method. Peroxidase staining for MNC was effective not only for cells in cytospun smears but also for cells migrated in the filters. PMN in cytospun smears were well stained by peroxidase staining, whereas migrated PMN in the filters were stained weakly. Chemotactic activities in the culture supernatant of Cos7/cIL-8 cells for both MNC and PMN were significantly higher than those of control Cos7 cells. In addition, the culture supernatant of Cos7/cIL-8 cells was chemotactic for peroxidase negative nonadherent MNC (lymphocytes), but not for peroxidase positive adherent MNC (monocytes). This Cos7/cIL-8 supernatant also showed chemotactic activities for neutrophils in a dose dependent manner. These results suggest that the culture supernatant of Cos7/cIL-8 is chemotactic for lymphocytes as well as for neutrophils.

  10. Boar seminal plasma or hen's egg yolk decrease the in-vitro chemotactic and phagocytotic activities of neutrophils when co-incubated with boar or bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Li, J-C; Yamaguchi, S; Funahashi, H

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of boar seminal plasma and hen's egg yolk on chemotaxis and phagocytosis of porcine and bovine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in vitro. Chemotactic activity of PMNs was determined following culture for 90 min in a blind well chamber. Phagocytosis was assayed after co-culture of PMNs with sperm for 60 min. In the presence of ≥5% boar seminal plasma, chemotactic activity of PMNs was reduced (P<0.05) in both pigs (from 1126.1 to 934.2-1009.1 cells/mm2) and in cows (from 1067.1 to 768.9-800.0 cells/mm2). Furthermore, ≥5% boar seminal plasma reduced (P<0.05) leukocyte phagocytosis in pigs (26.2-32.1%) and cows (27.2-30.0%) compared to controls (41.7 and 42.1%, respectively). Although 20% hen's egg yolk increased (P<0.05) chemotactic activity of PMNs in pigs (from 790.4 to 1006.1 cells/mm2) and cows (from 789.9 to 953.5 cells/mm2), egg yolk increased (P<0.05) phagocytotic activity of porcine PMNs (from 24.3 to 33.8%), but not the activity of bovine PMNs (15.1 vs 15.8% in controls). Boar seminal plasma and caffeine reduced (P<0.05) the egg yolk-induced increase in chemotaxis in both species (from 988.6 to 795.2 or 813.2 cells/mm2 in pigs and from 953.5 to 779.4 or 833.8 cells/mm2 in cows), and phagocytotic activities of PMN (from 33.8% to 15.2 or 13.3%) only in pigs (but not in cows; 11.2-15.1%). In conclusion, hen's egg yolk increased chemotactic activity of PMNs in both pigs and cows, whereas egg yolk increased only phagocytosis of PMNs in pigs, but not in cows. Even in the presence of egg yolk, boar seminal plasma and caffeine significantly reduced chemotactic activity of PMNs in pigs and cows, and phagocytotic activity of porcine PMNs.

  11. Sputum chemotactic activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: effect of α1–antitrypsin deficiency and the role of leukotriene B4 and interleukin 8

    PubMed Central

    Woolhouse, I; Bayley, D; Stockley, R

    2002-01-01

    Background: Neutrophil recruitment to the airway is thought to be an important component of continuing inflammation and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly in the presence of severe α1–antitrypsin (α1–AT) deficiency. However, the chemoattractant nature of secretions from these patients has yet to be clarified. Methods: The chemotactic activity of spontaneous sputum from patients with stable COPD, with (n=11) and without (n=11) α1–AT deficiency (PiZ), was assessed using the under-agarose assay. The contribution of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) to the chemotactic activity was examined using an LTB4 receptor antagonist (BIIL 315 ZW) and an IL-8 monoclonal antibody, respectively. Results: Sputum neutrophil chemotactic activity (expressed as % n-formylmethionyl leucylphenylalanine (fMLP) control) was significantly higher in patients with α1–AT deficiency (mean (SE) 63.4 (8.9)% v 36.7 (5.5)%; mean difference 26.7% (95% CI 4.9 to 48.4), p<0.05). The mean (SE) contribution of both LTB4 and IL-8 (expressed as % fMLP control) was also significantly higher in α1–AT deficient patients than in patients with COPD with normal levels of α1–AT (LTB4: 31.9 (6.3)% v 18.0 (3.7)%; mean difference 13.9% (95% CI –1.4 to 29.1), p<0.05; IL-8: 24.1 (5.2)% v 8.1 (1.2)%; mean difference 15.9% (95% CI 4.7 to 27.2), p<0.05). When all the subjects were considered together the mean (SE) contribution of LTB4 (expressed as % total chemotactic activity) was significantly higher than IL-8 (46.8 (3.5)% v 30.8 (4.6)%; mean difference 16.0% (95% CI 2.9 to 29.2), p<0.05). This difference was not significantly influenced by α1–AT phenotype (p=0.606). Conclusions: These results suggest that the bronchial secretions of COPD patients with α1–AT deficiency have increased neutrophil chemotactic activity. This relates to the increased levels of IL-8 and, in particular LTB4, which accounted most of the sputum chemotactic activity in

  12. Molecular analysis of the graviperception signal transduction in the flagellate Euglena gracilis: Involvement of a transient receptor potential-like channel and a calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, Donat-Peter; Richter, Peter R.; Schuster, Martin; Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Euglena gracilis, a unicellular, photosynthetic flagellate is a model system for environmentally controlled behavior responses. The organism shows pronounced negative gravitaxis. This movement is based on physiological mechanisms, which in the past had been only indirectly assessed. It was shown that mechano-sensitive calcium channels are involved in the gravitaxis response. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family function as mechano-sensitive channels in several different cell types. We have sequenced part of a TRP gene in Euglena and applied RNA interference (RNAi) to confirm that these channels are involved in graviperception. It was found that RNAi against the putative TRP channel abolished gravitaxis. The genes of three calmodulins were sequences in Euglena, one of which was previously known in its protein structure (cal 1). The other two were unknown (cal 2 and cal 3). Cal 2 has been analyzed in detail. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of cal 1 and cal 2 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to see whether this blockage impairs gravitaxis. RNAi of cal 1 leads to a long-term loss of free swimming in the cells (while euglenoid movement persists). It induced pronounced cell form aberrations and the division of cells was hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Thus cal 1 does not seem to be involved in gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of cal 2 has no pronounced influence on motility and cell form but leads to a complete loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days showing that this calmodulin is an element in the signal transduction chain. The data are discussed in the context of the current model of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis.

  13. Mitochondrial group II introns in the raphidophycean flagellate Chattonella spp. suggest a diatom-to-Chattonella lateral group II intron transfer.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Masuda, Isao; Demura, Mikihide; Oyama, Kenichi; Yoshimatsu, Sadaaki; Kawachi, Masanobu; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2009-08-01

    In the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene of four raphidophycean flagellates Chattonella antiqua, C. marina, C. ovata, and C. minima we found two group II introns described here as Chattonella cox1-i1 and Chattonella cox1-i2 encoding an open reading frame (ORF) comprised of three domains: reverse transcriptase (RT), RNA maturase (Ma) and zinc finger (H-N-H) endonuclease domains. The secondary structures show both Chattonella cox1-i1 and Chattonella cox1-i2 belong to group IIA1, albeit the former possesses a group IIB-like secondary structural character in the epsilon' region of arm I. Our phylogenetic analysis inferred from RT domain sequences of the intronic ORF, comparison of the insertion sites, and the secondary structures of the introns suggests that Chattonella cox1-i1 likely shares an evolutionary origin with the group II introns inserted in cox1 genes of five phylogenetically diverged eukaryotes. In contrast, Chattonella cox1-i2 was suggested to bear a close evolutionary affinity to the group II introns found in diatom cox1 genes. The RT domain-based phylogeny shows a tree topology in which Chattonella cox1-i2 is nested in the diatom sequences suggesting that a diatom-to-Chattonella intron transfer has taken place. Finally, we found no intron in cox1 genes from deeper-branching raphidophyceans. Based on parsimonious discussion, Chattonella cox1-i1 and Chattonella cox1-i2 have invaded into the cox1 gene of an ancestral Chattonella cell after diverging from C. subsalsa.

  14. The alternative sigma factor sigma28 of Legionella pneumophila restores flagellation and motility to an Escherichia coli fliA mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Heuner, K; Hacker, J; Brand, B C

    1997-01-01

    Gene expression in Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires' disease, can be controlled by alternative forms of RNA polymerase programmed by distinct sigma factors. To understand the regulation of L. pneumophila flagellin expression, we cloned the sigma factor (FliA) of RNA polymerase responsible for the transcription of the flagellin gene, flaA. FliA is a member of the sigma28 class of alternative sigma factors identified in several bacterial genera. The gene fliA has been isolated from an expression library of L. pneumophila isolate Corby in Escherichia coli K-12. This library was transformed into a fliA mutant of E. coli K-12 containing a plasmid carrying the L. pneumophila-specific flaA promoter fused to the reporter gene luxAB. Screening the obtained transformants for luciferase activity, we isolated the major part of the fliA gene on a 1.64-kb fragment. This fragment was sequenced and used for reverse PCR in order to recover the complete fliA gene. The resulting 1.03-kb fragment was shown to contain the entire fliA gene. L. pneumophila FliA has 55 and 43% amino acid identity with the homologous sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli. Furthermore, the L. pneumophila fliA gene was able to restore the flagellation and the motility defect of an E. coli fliA mutant. This result suggests that the L. pneumophila sigma28 protein can bind to the E. coli core RNA polymerase to direct transcription initiation from the flaA-specific promoter. PMID:8981975

  15. Instabilities in the Swimming of Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Emily; Lauga, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Peritrichously flagellated bacteria, such as E. coli and B. subtillis, have flagella randomly distributed over their body. These flagella rotate to generate a pushing force that causes the cell to swim body first. For changes in direction these flagella return to their randomly distributed state where the flagella point in many different directions. The main observed state of swimming peritrichously flagellated bacteria however is one where all their flagella gathered or bundled at one end of the body. In this work we address this problem from the point of view of fluid-structure interactions and show theoretically and numerically how the conformation of flagella depends on the mechanics of the cell.

  16. Abnormal mobility of neonatal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Relationship to impaired redistribution of surface adhesion sites by chemotactic factor or colchicine.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D C; Hughes, B J; Smith, C W

    1981-01-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of diminished, stimulated, and directed migration of neonatal (N) polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), chemotactic factor (CF) sensory and PMN effector functions were studied in healthy N and adult or maternal controls (C). N PMN demonstrated high affinity binding for N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-[3H]phenylalanine (fMLP), which was saturable between 40 and 100 nM as observed with C PMN. The kinetics of binding and the characteristics of dissociation of binding by N PMN were equivalent to control PMN. Both "threshold" and "peak" concentrations (1 and 10 nM, respectively) of fMLP effected comparable PMN chemiluminescence among neonates and controls. An equivalent threshold concentration (0.05 nM) of fMLP effected N and C PMN shape change in suspension, and a maximally effective concentration (5 nM) induced comparable bipolar configuration, although uropod formation was only 38 +/- 8% of N PMN, compared with 73 +/- 11% of C PMN (P less than 0.01). Striking abnormalities of N PMN adherence were identified: mean +/- SD base-line (unstimulated) N adherence values (39 +/- 8%) were equal to C (38 +/- 9%), but diminished increments in response to single CF stimuli were noted among N (fMLP: 42 +/- 7% (N), 70 +/- 11% (C); C5a: 41 +/- 6% (N), 68 +/- 6% (C); BCF: 41 +/- 6% (N), 63 +/- 9% (C), P less than 0.01 for each CF). On sequential exposure to increasing concentrations of CF N PMN failed to demonstrate expected decreased adherence values; sequential stimuli with fMLP (0.1 nM, 10 nM) or C5a (8 microgram protein/ml, 32 microgram protein/ml) effected mean +/- 1 SD values of 51 +/- 9% (N), 30 +/- 9% (C), and 34 +/- 10 (N), 48 +/- 14% (C), respectively. As demonstrated with a latex bead-binding technique, N PMN failed to redistribute adhesion sites to the cell's tail under the same experimental conditions; in 21 N samples studied, restricted unipolar binding occurred in 33 +/- 8% (fMLP) or 37 +/- 7% (C5a) of PMN in contrast to C values of 70% (f

  17. An investigation on the chemotactic responses of different entomopathogenic nematode strains to mechanically damaged maize root volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Laznik, Z; Trdan, S

    2013-07-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) respond to a variety of stimuli when foraging. In a laboratory investigation, we tested the chemotactic responses of 8 EPN strains (Steinernema and Heterorhabditis) to three mechanically damaged maize root compounds (linalool, α-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene). We hypothesized that the EPN directional response to the tested volatile compounds would vary among the species and volatile compound and may be related to foraging strategies. The nematodes with an intermediate foraging strategy (Steinernema feltiae) proved to be less active in their movement toward volatile compounds in a comparison with the ambushers (Steinernema carpocapsae) and cruisers (Steinernema kraussei and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora); β-caryophyllene was found to be the most attractive substance in our experiment. The results of our investigation showed that the cruisers were more attracted to β-caryophyllene than the ambushers and intermediates. The foraging strategy did not affect the movement of the IJs toward the other tested volatile compounds or the control. Our results suggest that the response to different volatile cues is more a strain-specific characteristic than a different host-searching strategy. Only S. carpocapsae strain B49 displayed an attraction to linalool, whereas S. kraussei showed a retarded reaction to β-caryophyllene and α-caryophyllene in our experiment. The EPN strains showed only a weak attraction to α-caryophyllene, suggesting that this volatile compound could not have an important role in the orientation of IJs to the damaged roots of maize plants. These results expand our knowledge of volatile compounds as the cues that may be used by EPNs for finding hosts or other aspects of navigation in the soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) Is Associated With Prostatic Growth Dysregulation and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kazutoshi; Ewing, Charles M.; Getzenberg, Robert H.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Isaacs, William B.; Pavlovich, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic inflammation is commonly observed in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate tissue often contains increased inflammatory infiltrates, including T cells and macrophages. Cytokines are not only key mediators of inflammation but may also play important roles in the initiation and progression of BPH. METHODS In order to determine what cytokines might be involved in prostatic enlargement, expressed prostatic secretions (EPS) from ex vivo prostates were analyzed by human cytokine antibody microarray and ELISA. Prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and prostate stromal cells (PrSC) were used for ELISA, proliferation, and Western blot assays. RESULTS Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) was one of the most elevated proteins in secretions from large prostate glands. PrSC were found to secrete MCP-1; Western blotting showed that both PrSC and PrEC express the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 which by RT-PCR was the CCR2b isoform. Proliferation assays showed that MCP-1 stimulates the proliferation of PrEC, but not PrSC, and that a specific MCP-1 antagonist (RS102895) suppressed this effect. Conditioned medium from PrSC stimulated the proliferation of PrEC as well, an effect completely inhibited by both RS102895 and a neutralizing anti-MCP-1 monoclonal antibody. The inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, interferon-γ, and IL-2 enhanced the secretion of MCP-1 from PrEC and PrSC. In addition, MCP-1 levels in EPS correlated with mRNA levels of the macrophage marker CD68 in the same secretions. CONCLUSIONS The cytokine MCP-1, of apparent prostatic stromal cell origin, may play an important role in prostatic enlargement and BPH, and is a candidate biomarker for these pathologic processes. PMID:19902472

  19. Cathepsin K cleavage of SDF-1α inhibits its chemotactic activity towards glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hira, Vashendriya V V; Verbovšek, Urška; Breznik, Barbara; Srdič, Matic; Novinec, Marko; Kakar, Hala; Wormer, Jill; der Swaan, Britt Van; Lenarčič, Brigita; Juliano, Luiz; Mehta, Shwetal; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Lah, Tamara T

    2017-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with poor patient survival that is at least partly caused by malignant and therapy-resistant glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs) that are protected in GSLC niches. Previously, we have shown that the chemo-attractant stromal-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), its C-X-C receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and the cysteine protease cathepsin K (CatK) are localized in GSLC niches in glioblastoma. Here, we investigated whether SDF-1α is a niche factor that through its interactions with CXCR4 and/or its second receptor CXCR7 on GSLCs facilitates their homing to niches. Furthermore, we aimed to prove that SDF-1α cleavage by CatK inactivates SDF-1α and inhibits the invasion of GSLCs. We performed mass spectrometric analysis of cleavage products of SDF-1α after proteolysis by CatK. We demonstrated that CatK cleaves SDF-1α at 3 sites in the N-terminus, which is the region of SDF-1α that binds to its receptors. Confocal imaging of human GBM tissue sections confirmed co-localization of SDF-1α and CatK in GSLC niches. In accordance, 2D and 3D invasion experiments using CXCR4/CXCR7-expressing GSLCs and GBM cells showed that SDF-1α had chemotactic activity whereas CatK cleavage products of SDF-1α did not. Besides, CXCR4 inhibitor plerixafor inhibited invasion of CXCR4/CXCR7-expressing GSLCs. In conclusion, CatK can cleave and inactivate SDF-1α. This implies that CatK activity facilitates migration of GSLCs out of niches. We propose that activation of CatK may be a promising strategy to prevent homing of GSLCs in niches and thus render these cells sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation.

  20. Resveratrol Inhibits Expression and Binding Activity of the Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Receptor, CCR2, on THP-1 Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, John P.; Morrow, David; Jin, Ying; von Offenberg Sweeney, Nicholas; Sitzmann, James V.; Cahill, Paul A.; Redmond, Eileen M.

    2007-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and its receptor, CCR2, play a key role in atherosclerosis. We determined the effect of the polyphenol, resveratrol, on CCR2 and the mechanisms involved. Resveratrol treatment inhibited 125I-MCP-1 binding to THP-1 cells; 31%, 56%, 84% decrease for 10, 50 and 100 µM resveratrol, in the absence of any effect on receptor affinity. The inhibitory effect of resveratrol on 125I-MCP-1 binding to THP-1 cells and on CCR2 protein expression determined by FACS analysis was attenuated by treatment with L-NAME (NOS inhibitor), PD98059 (MAPK inhibitor) and LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), whereas neither X/XO (reactive oxygen species generator) nor ICI182780 (estrogen receptor antagonist) had any effect. Concomitant with a decrease in CCR2 protein expression, resveratrol inhibited THP-1 CCR2 mRNA levels, in the absence of any effect on its stability; 26% and 45% inhibition at 10 and 50 µM resveratrol, respectively. This effect was not altered by co-treatment with L-NAME, PD98059 or ICI182780, but was potentiated by LY294002 and X/XO. Conclusions: Resveratrol inhibits monocyte CCR2 binding activity in an NO-, MAPK- and PI3K-dependent manner, whereas it inhibits CCR2 mRNA in an NO- and MAPK-independent, PI3K-dependent manner. These inhibitory effects of resveratrol on chemokine receptor binding and expression may contribute, in part, to its cardiovascular protective activity in vivo. PMID:17499741

  1. Osteopontin Undergoes Polymerization in Vivo and Gains Chemotactic Activity for Neutrophils Mediated by Integrin α9β1*

    PubMed Central

    Nishimichi, Norihisa; Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Chen, Chun; Matsuda, Haruo; Sheppard, Dean; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is an integrin-binding inflammatory cytokine that undergoes polymerization catalyzed by transglutaminase 2. We have previously reported that polymeric OPN (polyOPN), but not unpolymerized OPN (OPN*), attracts neutrophils in vitro by presenting an acquired binding site for integrin α9β1. Among many in vitro substrates for transglutaminase 2, only a few have evidence for in vivo polymerization and concomitant function. Although polyOPN has been identified in bone and aorta, the in vivo functional significance of polyOPN is unknown. To determine whether OPN polymerization contributes to neutrophil recruitment in vivo, we injected OPN* into the peritoneal space of mice. Polymeric OPN was detected by immunoblotting in the peritoneal wash of mice injected with OPN*, and both intraperitoneal and plasma OPN* levels were higher in mice injected with a polymerization-incompetent mutant, confirming that OPN* polymerizes in vivo. OPN* injection induced neutrophil accumulation, which was significantly less following injection of a mutant OPN that was incapable of polymerization. The importance of in vivo polymerization was further confirmed with cystamine, a transglutaminase inhibitor, which blocked the polymerization and attenuated OPN*-mediated neutrophil recruitment. The thrombin-cleaved N-terminal fragment of OPN, another ligand for α9β1, was not responsible for neutrophil accumulation because a thrombin cleavage-incompetent mutant recruited similar numbers of neutrophils as wild type OPN*. Neutrophil accumulation in response to both wild type and thrombin cleavage-incompetent OPN* was reduced in mice lacking the integrin α9 subunit in leukocytes, indicating that α9β1 is required for polymerization-induced recruitment. We have illustrated a physiological role of molecular polymerization by demonstrating acquired chemotactic properties for OPN. PMID:21321126

  2. Characteristics of attachment and growth of Thiobacillus caldus on sulphide minerals: a chemotactic response to sulphur minerals?

    PubMed

    Edwards, K J; Bond, P L; Banfield, J F

    2000-06-01

    To further our understanding of the ecological role of sulphur-oxidizing microorganisms in the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD), growth and attachment of the chemoautotrophic sulphur-oxidizing bacterium, Thiobacillus caldus, on the sulphide minerals pyrite, marcasite and arsenopyrite was studied. Growth curves were estimated based on total cells detected in the system (in suspension and attached to mineral surfaces). In general, higher cell numbers were detected on surfaces than in suspension. Fluorescent in situ hybridizations to cells on surfaces at mid-log growth confirmed that cells on surfaces were metabolically active. Total cell (both surface and solution phase) generation times on pyrite and marcasite (both FeS2) were calculated to be approximately equals 7 and 6 h respectively. When grown on pyrite (not marcasite), the number of T. caldus cells in the solution phase decreased, while the total number of cells (both surface and solution) increased. Additionally, marcasite supported about three times more total cells (approximately equals 3 x 10(9)) than pyrite (approximately equals 8 x 10(8)). This may be attributed to the dissolution rate of marcasite, which is twice that of pyrite. Epifluorescent and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyse the cell orientation on surfaces. Results of Fourier transform analysis of fluorescent images confirmed that attachment to all three sulphides occurred in an oriented manner. Results from high-resolution SEM imaging showed that cell orientation coincides with dissolution pit edges and secondary sulphur minerals that develop during dissolution. Preferential colonization of surfaces relative to solution and oriented cell attachment on these sulphide surfaces suggest that T. caldus may chemotactically select the optimal site for chemoautotrophic growth on sulphur (i.e. the mineral surface).

  3. Lattice-Boltzmann modeling of contaminant degradation by chemotactic bacteria: Exploring the formation and movement of bacterial bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wei; Hilpert, Markus

    2008-09-01

    We developed a three-dimensional Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) model to simulate the biodegradation of a dissolved substrate, toward which bacteria exhibit chemotaxis. The model was verified by comparing simulations to capillary assay experiments performed elsewhere. In these assays, a capillary containing an aqueous solution, with initially uniformly distributed dissolved naphthalene, was dipped into a reservoir containing Pseudomonas putida, a microorganism that exhibits chemotaxis to naphthalene. These experiments were also performed with additional glass beads present in the capillary and reservoir. The simulations show that a fraction of the bacteria separates from the reservoir to form a band that moves with constant speed into the capillary while metabolizing the naphthalene. We also used the LB model to explore band formation in a porous medium under groundwater flow conditions. If a bacterial slug is injected, two bacterial bands form; one moves upstream and the other moves downstream. The magnitudes of the two band velocities, as measured relative to the pore water velocity, are identical. Bacteria injected in excess are advected downstream in a fluid parcel containing no substrate. Our simulations suggest that the bioremediation of a contaminant plume in groundwater can potentially be enhanced by the injection of chemotactic bacteria. We also derived a correlation that predicts the number of bacteria in a band that separates from a semi-infinite bacterial slug in a domain containing substrate that is initially uniformly distributed. This correlation allows estimation of the optimal number of bacteria that needs to be added to a substrate-filled domain, such that the number of bacteria in the band is maximum while simultaneously avoiding the injection of excess bacteria that do not make it into the band.

  4. Differential neutrophil chemotactic response towards IL-8 and bacterial N-formyl peptides in term newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Stålhammar, Maria E.; Douhan Håkansson, Lena; Jonzon, Anders; Sindelar, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background A prerequisite for an effective innate immunity is the migrative ability of neutrophils to respond to inflammatory and infectious agents such as the intermediate interleukin (IL)-8 and the end-target formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) chemoattractants. The aim was to study the chemotactic capacity of neutrophils from newborn infants and adults in response to IL-8 and the bacterial peptide fMLP. Methods In the under-agarose cell migration assay, isolated leukocytes from healthy adults and from cord blood of healthy term newborn infants were studied with dose responses towards IL-8 and fMLP. The same number of leukocytes (1 × 105 cells), with the same distribution of neutrophils and monocytes, were analyzed in neonates and adults. Chemotaxis was distinguished from randomly migrating neutrophils, and the neutrophil pattern of migration, i.e. the migration distance and the number of migrating neutrophils per distance, was evaluated. Results In comparison to adults, fewer neutrophils from newborn infants migrated towards IL-8 and for a shorter distance (P < .01, respectively). The number of neutrophils migrating to different gradients of fMLP, the distance they migrated, and the correlation between the number and the distance were the same for neonates and adults. Random migration did not differ in any instance. Conclusion Chemotaxis of neutrophils from newborn infants was as co-ordinated as neutrophils from adults in response to fMLP, whereas the response to IL-8 was reduced. The differential response of neutrophils from neonates to intermediate and end-target chemoattractants could indicate a reduced infectious response. PMID:27690722

  5. CD147 and CD98 complex-mediated homotypic aggregation attenuates the CypA-induced chemotactic effect on Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Na; Zhang, Kui; Lv, Minghua; Miao, Jinlin; Chen, Zhinan; Zhu, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Homotypic cell aggregation plays important roles in physiological and pathological processes, including embryogenesis, immune responses, angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion and metastasis. CD147 has been implicated in most of these phenomena, and it was identified as a T cell activation-associated antigen due to its obvious up-regulation in activated T cells. However, the explicit function and mechanism of CD147 in T cells have not been fully elucidated. In this study, large and compact aggregates were observed in Jurkat T cells after treatment with the specific CD147 monoclonal antibody HAb18 or after the expression of CD147 was silenced by RNA interference, which indicated an inhibitory effect of CD147 in T cell homotypic aggregation. Knocking down CD147 expression resulted in a significant decrease in CD98, along with prominent cell aggregation, similar to that treated by CD98 and CD147 monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, decreased cell chemotactic activity was observed following CD147- and CD98-mediated cell aggregation, and increased aggregation was correlated with a decrease in the chemotactic ability of the Jurkat T cells, suggesting that CD147- and CD98-mediated homotypic cell aggregation plays a negative role in T cell chemotaxis. Our data also showed that p-ERK, p-ZAP70, p-CD3ζ and p-LCK were significantly decreased in the CD147- and CD98-knocked down Jurkat T cells, which suggested that decreased CD147- and/or CD98-induced homotypic T cell aggregation and aggregation-inhibited chemotaxis might be associated with these signaling pathways. A role for CD147 in cell aggregation and chemotaxis was further indicated in primary CD4(+) T cells. Similarly, low expression of CD147 in primary T cells induced prominent cell aggregation and this aggregation attenuated primary T cell chemotactic ability in response to CypA. Our results have demonstrated the correlation between homotypic cell aggregation and the chemotactic response of T cells to CypA, and these data

  6. [Culturing and characterization of human gingival mesenchymal stem cells and their chemotactic responses to stromal cell-derived factor-1].

    PubMed

    Du, Lingqian; Yang, Pishan; Ge, Shaohua

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the expression of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) receptor CXCR4 in human gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) and the migration potential of GMSCs stimulated with SDF-1. Human GMSCs were isolated by single-cell cloning method. Their cell surface markers were characterized by flow cytometry, and the rate of colony formation was evaluated. Differentiation assay was used to detect the differentiation potential of GMSCs. The expression of chemokine SDF-l receptor CXCR4 in GMSCs was detected by immunocytochemical staining. The chemotactic effect of SDF-1 on GMSCs was detected using a 24-multiwell Transwell cell culture chamber. The number of net migrated cells was counted in different microscope fields. Human GMSCs possessed high self-renewal potential and formed single-cell colonies cultured in vitro. GMSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cells-associated markers CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD166, and the expression of hemopoietic stem cell surface markers CD14, CD34, and CD45 was negative. GMSCs differentiated into osteoblasts and adipocytes under defined culture conditions. The colony forming unit-fibroblastic for GMSCs was 21.4%/±2.8%. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that GMSCs expressed chemokine SDF-1 receptor CXCR4. The number of GMSCs migrating at concentrations of 100 ng.mL-1 and 200 ng.mL-1 of SDF-l in the Transwell cell culture chamber was significantly higher than that of the negative control (189.3±4.4, 164.6±4.9 cells/field vs. 47.8±2.5 cells/field, P<0.01). Treatment with the CXCR4 neutralizing antibody, an antagonist for CXCR4, significantly reduced the migratory effect compared with the negative controls (29.0±2.4 cells/field vs. 47.8±2.5 cells/field, P<0.01). Human GMSCs express chemokine SDF-l receptor CXCR4. SDF-1 may participate in regulating chemotaxis of human GMSCs. Results suggest that the migration induced by SDF-1 is mediated by CXCR4.

  7. Adipocyte-derived monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) promotes prostate cancer progression through the induction of MMP-2 activity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yusuke; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Naohito; Hasumi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Yao, Masahiro; Uemura, Hiroji

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is known to be associated with prostate cancer development and progression, but the detailed mechanism is not clear. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is secreted from cancer cells, stromal cells, and adipocytes, and it is involved in prostate cancer progression. Here we investigated the biological role of MCP-1 secreted from adipocytes for prostate cancer cells. Human pre-adipocytes (HPAds) were cultured and differentiated to mature adipocytes. Conditioned medium (CM) from HPAd cells was obtained using phenol red-free RPMI1640 medium. We performed a cytokine membrane array analysis to detect cytokines in the CM. To characterize the physiological function of MCP-1 in the CM, we performed an MTT-assay, a wound-healing and invasion assay with anti-MCP-1 antibody using three prostate cancer cell lines: DU145, LNCaP, and PC-3. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 activities were evaluated by gelatin zymography. A qPCR and Western blotting were used to examine the mRNA and protein expression levels of MMP-2. The cytokine membrane array of the CM showed a strong signal of MCP-1compared to the control medium, and we thus focused our attention on MCP-1 in the CM. The CM up-regulated the cancer cell proliferation, and the neutralization by anti-MCP-1 antibody inhibited the proliferative effect of the prostate cancer cell lines. The CM greatly increased the invasive activity in the prostate cancer cell lines, and anti-MCP-1 antibody decreased the invasiveness. Gelatin zymography revealed that the CM markedly enhanced the enzymatic activity of MMP-2, and anti-MCP-1 antibody down-regulated its effect. MMP-2 mRNA expression was undetected and the MMP-2 protein level was unchanged between the control medium and CM in DU145 cells. MCP-1 from adipocytes enhances the growth and invasion activity of prostate cancer cells. The inhibition of MCP-1 derived from adipocytes might be an effective treatment for prostate cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. BIOCHEMICAL CYTOLOGY OF TRICHOMONAD FLAGELLATES

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Miklós

    1973-01-01

    To determine the localization of several enzymes in Tritrichomonas foetus, the axenic KV-1 strain was grown in Diamond's medium with bovine serum, homogenized in 0.25 M sucrose, and subjected to analytical differential and isopycnic centrifugation. The fractions were assayed for their enzymatic composition and examined electron microscopically. NADH and NADPH dehydrogenases, about 90% of the catalase, and two hydrolases, α-galactosidase and manganese-activated β-galactosidase I are in the nonsedimentable part of the cytoplasm. α-Glycerophosphate and malate dehydrogenases are associated with a large particle, whose equilibrium density in sucrose gradients is 1.24. This particle corresponds to that population of the paracostal and paraxostylar granules which, having a uniform granular matrix surrounded by a single membrane, resemble microbodies from other organisms. The small sedimentable portion of catalase (about 10% of the total activity) is not associated with these granules and equilibrates at density 1.22. The nature of the subcellular entity carrying catalase could not be ascertained. Hydrolases with a pH optimum around 6–6.5 (protease, β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, β-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, and cation-independent β-galactosidase II), as well as a large part of acid phosphatase, are associated with a population of large particles which equilibrate at densities from 1.15 to 1.20. The hydrolases in these granules lose their structure-bound latency easily after freezing and thawing. These particles correspond to another population of the paracostal and paraxostylar granules which have varied shape and inhomogeneous content with frequent myelin figures, indicating a digestive function. The rest of the phosphatase and most of the acid β-glucuronidase activity are in a smaller granule fraction with an equilibrium density around 1.18. The latency of these enzymes is quite resistant to freezing and thawing. This particle population consists of smaller, very often flattened vesicles and granules, many of which are clearly fragments of the prominent Golgi apparatus of the cell. PMID:4144506

  9. Critical chemotactic collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2010-04-01

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  10. Establishment of Azotobacter on plant roots: chemotactic response, development and analysis of root exudates of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhatia, Ranjana; Kukreja, K; Behl, Rishi Kumar; Dudeja, Surjit Singh; Narula, Neeru

    2007-10-01

    Biofertilizers contribute in N(2) fixation, P solubilization, phytohormone production and thus enhance plant growth. Beneficial plant-microbe interactions and the stability and effectiveness of biofertilizer depend upon the establishment of bacterial strains in the rhizosphere of the plant. This interaction depends upon many factors, one of them being plant exudates. Root exudates are composed of small organic molecules like carbonic acids, amino acids or sugars etc., which are released into the soil and bacteria can be attracted towards these exudates due to chemotaxis. The chemotactic behaviour of Azotobacter strains was studied using cotton (Desi HD 123 and American H 1098) and wheat (WH 711) seedlings and the root exudates of these two plants were chemically characterized. Analysis of the root exudates revealed the presence of sugars and simple polysaccharides (glucose), amino acids (glutamate, lysine) and organic acids (citric acid, succinic acid, maleic acid, malonic acid). Differences between cotton cultivars in root exudates were observed which influenced chemotactic response in Azotobacter. These results indicate colonization with rhizobacteria which implies that optimal symbionts, on the sides of both plant cultivar and bioinoculant bacteria can lead to better plant growth under cultivation conditions.

  11. Acute and subacute toxicity of chemotactic conjugates between monoclonal antibody and fMet-Leu-Phe in humans: a phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Obrist, R; Schmidli, J; Müller, R; Gallati, H; Obrecht, J P

    1991-01-01

    Conjugates of the chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP) to IgG retain chemotactic and antigen recognition function in vitro and enhance intra-tumour macrophage numbers in a guinea pig model. We report a study approved by the ethics committee on the acute toxicity of fMLP conjugates in ten consenting cancer patients with metastasizing melanoma and colon cancer. They were given increasing single doses (1-2500 micrograms) IgG-fMLP made with the anti-melanoma monoclonal antibody (mAb) 9.2.27. Clinical examinations and blood cell counts, urinalysis, electrolytes, and liver and kidney function tests before and after the infusion and weekly thereafter revealed no relevant toxicities. One patient had a herpes zooster exacerbation on day 1, which was judged to be coincidental. Peak post-infusion conjugate serum concentrations fell to unmeasurable levels within a few days. In no case was a human humoral anti-(mouse Ig) immune response detected.

  12. The carboxyl terminus of the chemokine receptor CCR3 contains distinct domains which regulate chemotactic signaling and receptor down-regulation in a ligand-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Sabroe, Ian; Jorritsma, Annelies; Stubbs, Victoria E L; Xanthou, Georgina; Jopling, Louise A; Ponath, Paul D; Williams, Timothy J; Murphy, Philip M; Pease, James E

    2005-04-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 regulates the chemotaxis of leukocytes implicated in allergic disease, such as eosinophils. Incubation of eosinophils with CCL11, CCL13 or CCL5 resulted in a rapid decrease of cell-surface CCR3 which was replicated using CCR3 transfectants. Progressive truncation of the CCR3 C terminus by 15 amino acids produced three constructs, Delta340, Delta325 and Delta310. Delta340 and Delta325 were able to bind CCL11 with affinities similar to wild-type CCR3. Delta340 transfectants exhibited enhanced migration and reduced receptor down-regulation in response to CCL11 and CCL13. Delta325 transfectants displayed chemotactic responses to CCL11 and CCL13 similar to wild-type CCR3, and had impaired down-regulation when stimulated with CCL13 but not CCL11. In contrast, neither the Delta325 nor Delta340 truncation affected chemotaxis or receptor down-regulation induced by CCL5. Delta310 transfectants bound CCL11 poorly and were biologically inactive. Inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI3-kinase antagonized eosinophil shape change responses and chemotaxis of transfectants to CCL11 and CCL13. In contrast, shape change but not chemotaxis was sensitive to inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase pathway suggesting differential regulation of the two responses. Thus, the CCR3 C terminus contains distinct domains responsible for the regulation of receptor desensitization and for coupling to chemotactic responses.

  13. UDP-Induced Phagocytosis and ATP-Stimulated Chemotactic Migration Are Impaired in STIM1(-/-) Microglia In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hye Min; Woon, Heo; Han, Jung Woo; Baba, Yoshihiro; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Joo Young

    2017-01-01

    STIM1 is the only currently known intracellular calcium sensor that functions as the calcium influx regulator controlling immune cell activation. STIM1 function in immune cell calcium signalling has been studied extensively; however, its role in microglia, innate immune cells in brain, has not been fully understood. Here, we report that STIM1(-/-) murine microglia lost store-operated calcium influx and displayed aberrant immunological functions. Microglial functions regulated by chronic and global [Ca(2+)]i changes were reduced significantly, including cytokine releases and opsonin-dependent phagocytosis. More dramatically, cellular functions governed by Ca(2+) regulation in local microdomains at the cell periphery, such as UDP-induced phagocytosis and ATP-stimulated chemotactic migration, were severely reduced in STIM1(-/-) microglia. Interestingly, UDP-induced Orai1 mobilization to the peripheral region was greatly attenuated in STIM1(-/-) microglia. Their chemotactic migration defect was reproduced in vivo in embryonic brain; the aggregated number of STIM1(-/-) microglia in LPS- (lipopolysaccharide-) injected lesions was much smaller than that in wild-type microglia. Furthermore, the neuron phagoptosis activities of activated microglia were significantly diminished in the STIM1(-/-) microglia. These in vitro and in vivo results suggest that STIM1-mediated store-operated calcium entry is important for the regulation of global [Ca(2+)]i changes which differentiates into active immune state of microglia, but it is more crucial for the regulation of local [Ca(2+)] microdomains which mediates the acute motility of murine microglia.

  14. Tracking Chemotactic Migration of a Genetically Engineered Bacterium in the Presence of Constructed Nutrient Gradients Within a Sandy Aquifer in Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Ford, R. M.; Metge, D. W.; Wang, M.; Toepfer, A. A.; McGowan, S. B.

    2008-05-01

    Due to our increasing dependence upon groundwater resources, there is a growing need to remediate shallow aquifers contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Often, trichloroethene (TCE) travels into zones of low permeability thereby making removal difficult by traditional pump-and-treat technologies. In addition, degradation of TCE by native microbial communities can result in buildup of highly toxic intermediates such as vinyl chloride. Bioaugmentation, involving addition of specialized bacterial consortia to an aquifer, can facilitate more complete degradation into harmless byproducts. Also, it is believed that chemotaxis, the ability of bacteria to swim towards higher concentrations of a chemical perceived as beneficial to survival, may expedite movement of introduced bacteria to where they are needed. However, there is no quantitative information about chemotaxis at the field scale and the evidence for bacterial chemotaxis during bioaugmentation has been largely anecdotal. In this study, the chemotactic migration of the bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri in a TCE-contaminated, sand- and-gravel aquifer in Cape Cod, Massachusetts was measured. P. stutzeri is known to denitrify as well as degrade a variety of aromatic and chlorinated solvents and is often advocated as a candidate for bioaugmentation. This bacterium was genetically engineered to be resistant to ampicillin and produce blue- fluorescing protein (BFP) in order to facilitate maintaining the bacteria in pure culture and later to track them in the environment. The study involved a natural-gradient injection and recovery test in which vertical gradients of an electron donor (acetate) and acceptor (nitrate) were created within the sandy aquifer sediments above an amendment of the genetically engineered P. stutzeri. The bacteria, nitrate, and acetate were allowed to be advected with the natural flow of groundwater past close-interval, multi-level samplers that were installed downgradient from the points of

  15. Bacterial Tethering Analysis Reveals a “Run-Reverse-Turn” Mechanism for Pseudomonas Species Motility

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chen; Wong, Chui Ching; Swarup, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a program that can accurately analyze the dynamic properties of tethered bacterial cells. The program works especially well with cells that tend to give rise to unstable rotations, such as polar-flagellated bacteria. The program has two novel components. The first dynamically adjusts the center of the cell's rotational trajectories. The second applies piecewise linear approximation to the accumulated rotation curve to reduce noise and separate the motion of bacteria into phases. Thus, it can separate counterclockwise (CCW) and clockwise (CW) rotations distinctly and measure rotational speed accurately. Using this program, we analyzed the properties of tethered Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida cells for the first time. We found that the Pseudomonas flagellar motor spends equal time in both CCW and CW phases and that it rotates with the same speed in both phases. In addition, we discovered that the cell body can remain stationary for short periods of time, leading to the existence of a third phase of the flagellar motor which we call “pause.” In addition, P. aeruginosa cells adopt longer run lengths, fewer pause frequencies, and shorter pause durations as part of their chemotactic response. We propose that one purpose of the pause phase is to allow the cells to turn at a large angle, where we show that pause durations in free-swimming cells positively correlate with turn angle sizes. Taken together, our results suggest a new “run-reverse-turn” paradigm for polar-flagellated Pseudomonas motility that is different from the “run-and-tumble” paradigm established for peritrichous Escherichia coli. PMID:23728820

  16. p63RhoGEF-mediated formation of a single polarized lamellipodium is required for chemotactic migration in breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Aya; Hiatari, Ryuichi; Tsuji, Takuji; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2013-03-18

    Short hairpin RNAs targeting 66 Rho-GEFs were screened for inhibition of chemotaxis. Six Rho-GEFs (p63RhoGEF, Trio, Duet, Net1, Frabin/Fgd4, and AAH33666) were found to be required for the serum-induced chemotactic migration of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells. Knockdown of p63RhoGEF suppressed serum-induced RhoA activation and chemotaxis and caused the aberrant formation of multiple lamellipodial protrusions after serum stimulation while control cells formed a single polarized lamellipodium. These results indicate that p63RhoGEF plays a crucial role in serum-induced chemotaxis by limiting lamellipodial protrusion to one direction via RhoA activation. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cloning, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of the periplasmic sensing domain of Pseudomonas fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA).

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Abu Iftiaf Md Salah; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-09-05

    Chemotaxis towards nutrients plays a crucial role in root colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens. The P. fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA) mediates movement towards amino acids present in root exudates. In this study, the periplasmic sensory domain of CtaA has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitating agent. A complete data set was collected to 1.9 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.2, b = 76.0, c = 113.3 Å. This is an important step towards elucidation of the structural basis of how CtaA recognizes its signal molecules and transduces the signal across the membrane.

  18. The strength of the chemotactic response to a CCR5 binding chemokine is determined by the level of cell surface CCR5 density.

    PubMed

    Desmetz, Caroline; Lin, Yea-Lih; Mettling, Clément; Portalès, Pierre; Rabesandratana, Herisoa; Clot, Jacques; Corbeau, Pierre

    2006-12-01

    We have shown that the intensity of expression of the C-C chemokine receptor CCR5 at the single CD4(+) cell level strongly determines the efficiency of its function as a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1. By analogy, we examined if the number of CCR5 molecules at the cell surface might determine its chemotactic response to CCR5 ligands. To test this hypothesis, we measured by flow cytometry the migration of primary human T cells towards the CCR5-binding chemokine CCL5 in vitro. First, we observed a dose-dependent blockage of this migration exerted by an anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody. Second, we sorted peripheral blood mononuclear cells into five subpopulations expressing various cell surface CCR5 densities, and observed a correlation between the intensity of migration towards CCL5 and the level of CCR5 expression on these subpopulations. Third, we transduced CCR5(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells with the CCR5 gene, and observed that the CCR5 over-expression induced an over-migration towards CCL5. Finally, we observed in healthy donors a correlation between the chemotactic response of peripheral blood CD8(+) T cell to CCL5 and their level of surface CCR5 expression. T-cell surface CCR5 density, which is constant over time for a given individual, but varies drastically among individuals, might therefore be an important personal determinant of T-cell migration in many biological situations where CCR5-binding chemokines play a role, such as graft rejection, T helper 1-mediated auto-immune diseases, and infectious diseases involving CCR5. Moreover, our data highlight the therapeutic potential of CCR5 antagonists in these situations.

  19. Characteristic Time Scales of Transport Processes for Chemotactic Bacteria in Groundwater: Analysis of Pore-scale to Field-scale Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Many processes contribute to the transport of microorganisms in groundwater environments. One process of interest is chemotaxis, whereby motile bacteria are able to detect and swim toward increasing concentrations of industrial hydrocarbons that they perceive as food sources. By enabling bacteria to migrate to the sources of pollutants that they degrade, chemotaxis has the potential to enhance bioremediation efforts, especially in less permeable zones where contamination may persist. To determine the field conditions under which chemotaxis might be exploited in a bioremediation scheme requires an understanding of the characteristic time scales in the system. We defined a dimensionless chemotaxis number that compares the time over which a bacterial population is exposed to a chemical gradient to the time required for a bacterial population to migrate a significant distance in response to a chemical gradient. The exposure time and the response time are dependent upon the experimental conditions and properties of the bacteria and chemical attractant. Experimental data was analyzed for a range of groundwater flow rates over a wide scope of experimental systems including a single-pore with NAPL source, a microfluidic channel with and without a porous matrix, a laboratory column, a bench-scale microcosm and a field-scale study. Chemical gradients were created transverse to the flow direction. Distributions of chemotactic and nonchemotactic bacteria were compared to determine the extent of migration due to chemotaxis. Under some conditions at higher flow rates, the effect of chemotaxis was diminished to the point of not being detected. The goal of the study was to determine a critical value for the dimensionless chemotaxis number (which is independent of scale) that can be used as a design criterion to ascertain a priori the conditions under which a chemotactic response will impact bacterial transport relative to other processes such as advection and dispersion.

  20. Chemotactic responses of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to a cyclic AMP concentration gradient: evidence to support a spatial mechanism for sensing cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Tani, T; Naitoh, Y

    1999-01-01

    The motile responses of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to a cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentration gradient were examined using a novel assay system. In this system, a cAMP concentration gradient was generated, while the overall cAMP concentration could be either increased or decreased in a chamber containing amoebae. The chemotactic responses of amoebae were examined immediately after they had been subjected to the cAMP concentration gradient. Amoebae moving in random directions in a reference solution ascended a cAMP concentration gradient after they had been exposed to the gradient irrespective of whether there was an increase or a decrease in the overall cAMP concentration. This strongly supports the idea that D. discoideum amoebae can sense a spatial cAMP gradient around them and that this causes their chemoaccumulation behavior. Ascending locomotion became less conspicuous when the amoebae were treated with a homogeneous cAMP solution for approximately 8 min before exposure to a cAMP gradient. This cAMP pretreatment reduced the sensitivity of the amoeba to a cAMP concentration gradient. The cAMP concentration gradient could be reversed in less than 30 s in this assay system, allowing the generation of a cAMP wave by accumulating amoebae to be mimicked. The ascending amoebae continued to move in the same direction for 1-2 min after the gradient had been reversed. This is consistent with the well-known observation that reversal of a cAMP concentration gradient experienced by the amoebae passing through a cAMP wave does not negate their chemotactic movement towards the accumulation center.

  1. UDP-Induced Phagocytosis and ATP-Stimulated Chemotactic Migration Are Impaired in STIM1−/− Microglia In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hye Min; Woon, Heo; Han, Jung Woo; Baba, Yoshihiro; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Lee, Min Goo

    2017-01-01

    STIM1 is the only currently known intracellular calcium sensor that functions as the calcium influx regulator controlling immune cell activation. STIM1 function in immune cell calcium signalling has been studied extensively; however, its role in microglia, innate immune cells in brain, has not been fully understood. Here, we report that STIM1−/− murine microglia lost store-operated calcium influx and displayed aberrant immunological functions. Microglial functions regulated by chronic and global [Ca2+]i changes were reduced significantly, including cytokine releases and opsonin-dependent phagocytosis. More dramatically, cellular functions governed by Ca2+ regulation in local microdomains at the cell periphery, such as UDP-induced phagocytosis and ATP-stimulated chemotactic migration, were severely reduced in STIM1−/− microglia. Interestingly, UDP-induced Orai1 mobilization to the peripheral region was greatly attenuated in STIM1−/− microglia. Their chemotactic migration defect was reproduced in vivo in embryonic brain; the aggregated number of STIM1−/− microglia in LPS- (lipopolysaccharide-) injected lesions was much smaller than that in wild-type microglia. Furthermore, the neuron phagoptosis activities of activated microglia were significantly diminished in the STIM1−/− microglia. These in vitro and in vivo results suggest that STIM1-mediated store-operated calcium entry is important for the regulation of global [Ca2+]i changes which differentiates into active immune state of microglia, but it is more crucial for the regulation of local [Ca2+] microdomains which mediates the acute motility of murine microglia. PMID:28293066

  2. A Dichotomy in Cortical Actin and Chemotactic Actin Activity between Human Memory and Naive T Cells Contributes to Their Differential Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weifeng; Guo, Jia; Yu, Dongyang; Vorster, Paul J.; Chen, WanJun; Wu, Yuntao

    2012-01-01

    Human memory and naive CD4 T cells can mainly be identified by the reciprocal expression of the CD45RO or CD45RA isoforms. In HIV-1 infection, blood CD45RO memory CD4 T cells are preferentially infected and serve as a major viral reservoir. The molecular mechanism dictating this differential susceptibility to HIV-1 remains largely obscure. Here, we report that the different susceptibility of memory and naive T cells to HIV is not determined by restriction factors such as Apobec3G or BST2. However, we observed a phenotypic distinction between human CD45RO and CD45RA resting CD4 T cells in their cortical actin density and actin dynamics. CD45RO CD4 T cells possess a higher cortical actin density and can be distinguished as CD45RO+Actinhigh. In contrast, CD45RA T cells are phenotypically CD45RA+Actinlow. In addition, the cortical actin in CD45RO memory CD4 T cells is more dynamic and can respond to low dosages of chemotactic induction by SDF-1, whereas that of naive cells cannot, despite a similar level of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 present on both cells. We further demonstrate that this difference in the cortical actin contributes to their differential susceptibility to HIV-1; resting memory but not naive T cells are highly responsive to HIV-mediated actin dynamics that promote higher levels of viral entry and early DNA synthesis in resting memory CD4 T cells. Furthermore, transient induction of actin dynamics in resting naive T cells rescues HIV latent infection following CD3/CD28 stimulation. These results suggest a key role of chemotactic actin activity in facilitating HIV-1 latent infection of these T cell subsets. PMID:22879601

  3. MiR-221 and miR-26b Regulate Chemotactic Migration of MSCs Toward HGF Through Activation of Akt and FAK.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Aisi; Kang, Naixin; He, Lihong; Li, Xianyang; Xu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2016-06-01

    The chemotactic migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is fundamental for their use in cell-based therapies, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate their directed migration. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in the regulation of a large variety of cellular processes. However, their roles in regulating the responses of MSCs to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) remain elusive. Here, we found that microRNA-221 (miR-221) and microRNA-26b (miR-26b) were upregulated in MSCs subjected to HGF. Overexpression of miR-221 or miR-26b enhanced MSC migration through activation of PI3K/Akt signaling. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) was identified as a potential target of miR-221 and miR-26b; overexpression of miR-221 or miR-26b decreased PTEN expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Overexpression of miR-221 or miR-26b in MSCs increased the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a downstream effector of PTEN, which regulates cell migration through assembly and distribution of focal adhesions (FAs), and more dot-like FAs were localized at the periphery of these cells. Altering miR-221 or miR-26b expression influenced the directed migration of MSCs toward HGF. Inhibition of miR-221 or miR-26b suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt and FAK and upregulated PTEN expression, which was partly restored by HGF treatment. Collectively, these results demonstrate that miR-221 and miR-26b participate in regulating the chemotactic response of MSCs toward HGF.

  4. Sphingosine-1-phosphate inhibits PDGF-induced chemotaxis of human arterial smooth muscle cells: spatial and temporal modulation of PDGF chemotactic signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Activation of the PDGF receptor on human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC) induces migration and proliferation via separable signal transduction pathways. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (Sph-1-P) can be formed following PDGF receptor activation and therefore may be implicated in PDGF-receptor signal transduction. Here we show that Sph-1-P does not significantly affect PDGF-induced DNA synthesis, proliferation, or activation of mitogenic signal transduction pathways, such as the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade and PI 3-kinase, in human arterial SMC. On the other hand, Sph-1-P strongly mimics PDGF receptor-induced chemotactic signal transduction favoring actin filament disassembly. Although Sph-1-P mimics PDGF, exogenously added Sph-1-P induces more prolonged and quantitatively greater PIP2 hydrolysis compared to PDGF-BB, a markedly stronger calcium mobilization and a subsequent increase in cyclic AMP levels and activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This excessive and prolonged signaling favors actin filament disassembly by Sph-1-P, and results in inhibition of actin nucleation, actin filament assembly and formation of focal adhesion sites. Sph-1-P-induced interference with the dynamics of PDGF-stimulated actin filament disassembly and assembly results in a marked inhibition of cell spreading, of extension of the leading lamellae toward PDGF, and of chemotaxis toward PDGF. The results suggest that spatial and temporal changes in phosphatidylinositol turnover, calcium mobilization and actin filament disassembly may be critical to PDGF-induced chemotaxis and suggest a possible role for endogenous Sph-1-P in the regulation of PDGF receptor chemotactic signal transduction. PMID:7790372

  5. The Major Leukocyte Chemotactic and Activating Factors in the Mouse Gut Lumen are not N-formylpeptide Receptor 1 (Fpr1) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ojode, Teresa; Schneider, Erich H.; Tiffany, H. Lee; Yung, Sunny; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Cultured bacteria release N-formylpeptides, which are potent chemoattractants for phagocytic leukocytes acting at G protein-coupled receptors FPR1 and FPR2. However, the distribution and immunologic activity of these molecules at mucosal surfaces, where large numbers of bacteria are separated from the immune system by epithelium, remain undefined. To investigate this for the gut, we tested leukocyte responses to cell-free gut luminal contents from C57Bl/6 mice fed a chow diet. Small and large intestine contents were able to compete with labeled N-formylpeptide for binding to FPR1, indicating the presence of FPR1 ligands in the gut lumen. Material from both small and large intestine induced robust calcium flux responses by primary FPR1+ leukocytes (mouse bone marrow cells and splenocytes, and human peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear cells), as well as chemotactic responses by both mouse bone marrow cells and human peripheral blood neutrophils. However, unlike defined N-formylpeptides, calcium flux responses induced by gut luminal contents were insensitive both to pertussis toxin treatment of leukocytes and to proteinase K digestion of the samples. Moreover, the gut samples were fully active on neutrophils from mice lacking Fpr1, and the kinetics of the calcium flux response differed markedly for neutrophils and PBMCs. The active factor(s) could be dialyzed using a 3.5 kD pore size membrane. Thus, mouse intestinal lumen contains small, potent and highly efficacious leukocyte chemotactic and activating factors that may be distinct for neutrophils and PBMCs and distinct from Fpr1 agonists. PMID:22722599

  6. Nucleus-encoded mRNAs for chloroplast proteins GapA, PetA, and PsbO are trans-spliced in the flagellate Euglena gracilis irrespective of light and plastid function.

    PubMed

    Mateášiková-Kováčová, Bianka; Vesteg, Matej; Drahovská, Hana; Záhonová, Kristína; Vacula, Rostislav; Krajčovič, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    Euglena gracilis is a fresh-water flagellate possessing secondary chloroplasts of green algal origin. In contrast with organisms possessing primary plastids, mRNA levels of nucleus-encoded genes for chloroplast proteins in E. gracilis depend on neither light nor plastid function. However, it remains unknown, if all these mRNAs are trans-spliced and possess spliced leader sequence at the 5'-end and if trans-splicing depends on light or functional plastids. This study revealed that polyadenylated mRNAs encoding the chloroplast proteins glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA), cytochrome f (PetA), and subunit O of photosystem II (PsbO) are trans-spliced irrespective of light or plastid function.

  7. [Effect of Jianpi Qinghua decoctions on interleukin-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in rats with focal segmental glomurular sclerosis nephropathy: role of the inflammatory signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaohong; He, Liqun

    2013-11-01

    To study the effect of Jianpi Qinghua decoctions in ameliorating kidney fibrosis in rats with focal segmental glomurular sclerosis (FSGS) nephropathy in light of blocking the functions of the inflammatory cells. Rat models of FSGS nephropathy were established by left nephrectomy and intravenous injection of adriamycin and treated with Jianpi Qinghua decoction. The renal expressions of interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and intercellular adhesion molecular-1 (ICAM-1) were detected. Treatment with Jianpi Qinghua decoction, Jianpi decoction, Qinghua decoction, and Niaoduqing particles all significantly lowered renal tubulointerstitial expressions of IL-6 in the model rats (P<0.01). Renal tubulointerstitial MCP-1 expressions were all lowered significantly in the rats by treatments with Jianpi Qinghua decoction, Jianpi decoction, QingHua decoctions, and Niaoduqing particles (P<0.01), and Jianpi Qinghua decoction produced a stronger effect than Niaoduqing particles (P<0.05). Jianpi Qinghua decoction, Jianpi decoction, Qinghua decoctions and and Niaoduqing particles all significantly decreased renal tubulointerstitial MCP-1 and ICAM-1 expressions (P<0.01), and Jianpi Qinghua and Qinghua decoctions both showed stronger effects than Niaoduqing particles (P<0.01). Jianpi Qinghua decoctions significantly suppressed the expressions of IL-6, MCP-1, and ICAM-1 and produced stronger effects than Niaoduqing particles on MCP-1 and ICAM-1 expressions. Jianpi Qinghua decoctions can ameliorate inflammatory injury and lower the levels of inflammatory factors in rats with FSGS nephropathy, the mechanism of which is associated with inhibiting IL-6 signaling pathway.

  8. Preparation of Engineered Salmonella Typhimurium-Driven Hyaluronic-Acid-Based Microbeads with Both Chemotactic and Biological Targeting Towards Breast Cancer Cells for Enhanced Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Uthaman, Saji; Zheng, Shaohui; Han, Jiwon; Choi, Young Jin; Cho, Sunghoon; Nguyen, Van Du; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Seung-Hwan; Min, Jung-Joon; Park, Sukho; Park, In-Kyu

    2016-01-21

    In this study, a new type of targeted bacteriobots is prepared and investigated as a therapeutic strategy against solid tumors. Maleimide-functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA) polymer is synthesized and cross-linked with four-arm-thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG-SH) to form HA microbeads with diameter of 8 μm through the Michael-type addition. Docetaxel (DTX)-loaded nanoparticles are encapsulated in HA-PEG microbeads and sustained in vitro drug-release pattern of the DTX from the HA-PEG microbeads is observed for up to 96 h. Dual-targeted bacteriobots are prepared using CD 44 receptor-targeted HA microbeads synthesized via microfluidics, followed by the attachment of the flagellar bacterium Salmonella typhimurium, which have been genetically engineered for tumor targeting, onto the surface of the HA microbeads by the specific interaction between streptavidin on the HA beads and biotin on the bacteria. After the attachment of bacteria, the bacteriobots show an average velocity of 0.72 μm s(-1) and high chemotactic migration velocity of 0.43 μm s(-1) towards 4T1 cells lysates. CD 44 receptor-specific cellular uptake is verified through flow cytometry analysis and confocal imaging, demonstrating enhanced intracellular uptake in CD 44 receptor positive tumor cells compared to normal cells. Therefore, the present study suggests that these bacteriobots have dual-tumor-targeting abilities displaying their potential for targeted anticancer therapy.

  9. Circulating histamine and neutrophil chemotactic activity during allergen-induced asthma: the effect of inhaled antihistamines and anti-allergic compounds.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D J; Moodley, I; Cundell, D R; Sheinman, B D; Smart, W; Davies, R J

    1985-07-01

    Plasma histamine and serum neutrophil chemotactic activity (S-NCA) were measured in ten atopic asthmatic patients on four separate occasions after allergen bronchial provocation testing (BPT). Single doses of inhaled sodium cromoglycate (SCG; 20 mg), clemastine (0.5 mg), ketotifen (0.5 mg) and isotonic saline (0.9% NaCl) placebo were administered 30 min before bronchial provocation testing in random order and double-blind. The airflow obstruction after BPT was monitored by measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). Plasma histamine was measured by the double-isotope radioenzymatic assay and S-NCA by a modified Boyden chamber technique. A highly significant decrease in FEV1 after BPT occurred on the placebo pre-treatment visit (P less than 0.001). Prior administration of inhaled SCG, clemastine and ketotifen significantly reduced the decrease in airflow obstruction seen after BPT when compared with placebo treatment (P less than 0.01, P less than 0.02, P less than 0.05 respectively). No significant alteration in plasma histamine was detected during allergen-induced airflow obstruction. Levels of S-NCA were significantly higher 5, 10 and 15 min after BPT when compared with the pre-challenge level (P less than 0.01, P less than 0.01, P less than 0.001 respectively). These levels were not significantly decreased when airflow obstruction was inhibited by the prior inhalation of SCG, clemastine or ketotifen.

  10. Role of chemotaxis in the association of motile bacteria with intestinal mucosa: chemotactic responses of Vibrio cholerae and description of motile nonchemotactic mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Freter, R; O'Brien, P C

    1981-01-01

    A motile, chemotactic, Ogawa strain of Vibrio cholerae was attracted by all 20 L-amino acids tested, in contrast to Escherichia coli AW 405, which did not react to several of these. The maximum number of vibrios entering a capillary was much lower when the capillary contained carbohydrates rather than amino acids, but the minimum effective concentrations of the carbohydrates and amino acids tested were of the same order of magnitude. L-Fucose, a sugar known to inhibit the adhesion of this vibrio strain to brush border membranes, had no attraction (taxin activity) for it. A pepsin digest of rabbit mucosal scrapings or tryptone attracted vibrios as strongly as the most active amino acids. Several nonchemotactic and one nonmotile mutant were selected from the parent vibrio. The nonchemotactic mutants were indistinguishable from the parent in their ability to attach in vitro to isolated intestinal brush border membranes, whereas the nonmotile mutant had lost this ability. Parent and nonchemotactic mutants had equal growth rates in stirred and still continuous flow cultures that were maintained in an anaerobic environment. PMID:7298183

  11. Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) inhibits IL-1- and TNF-α-dependent, but not chemotactic-factor-stimulated, neutrophil transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Issekutz, Andrew C; Rowter, Derek; Macmillan, Heather F

    2011-11-01

    High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has anti-inflammatory effects via incompletely understood mechanisms. By investigating whether IVIG might modulate neutrophil (PMN) recruitment, we observed that IVIG dose-dependently inhibited (by 30-50%) PMN transendothelial migration (TEM) across human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) stimulated with IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α or IL-1β+TNF-α. Inhibition required the presence of IVIG with the responding PMNs, was attributable to the F(ab)(2) portion and was unrelated to putative contaminants in IVIG. IVIG did not inhibit IL-1β- or TNF-α-induced increase of PMN adhesion to EC, nor did it affect C5a- or IL-8-induced PMN TEM across unstimulated EC. Effects of IVIG and F(ab)(2) fragments were not associated with PMN activation, assessed by CD62L shedding, CD11b upregulation or PMN shape. Thus, IVIG selectively inhibits PMN TEM across inflammatory-cytokine-stimulated - but not unstimulated - EC, perhaps contributing to therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammation with minimal impact on chemotactic-factor-induced PMN recruitment during acute infection.

  12. Chemotactic and enzyme-releasing activity of amphipathic proteins for neutrophils. A possible role for protease in chemotaxis on substratum-bound protein gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P C; Bradley, G R

    1981-01-01

    The purified amphipathic proteins, alpha s 1-casein, beta-casein, and alkali-denatured serum albumin were studied for chemotactic and enzyme-releasing effects on human neutrophil leucocytes. Evidence for chemotaxis both in fluid-phase gradients and on solid-phase gradients was obtained using visual assays. In fluid-phase gradients, neutrophils showed good orientation to gradient sources of these proteins at concentrations of 10(-4) to 10(-5) M. Solid-phase gradients of casein and of denatured albumin were prepared on glass coverslips, and the locomotion of neutrophils attached to these coverslips was filmed by time-lapse cinematography. Displacement of neutrophils towards the highest concentration of substratum-bound protein was observed, suggesting that neutrophils can show true chemotaxis on a solid-phase gradient. All three proteins induced enzyme release from neutrophils in the absence of cytochalasin B. Lysozyme release was equivalent to that released by stimulation with formyl methionyl peptide in the presence of cytochalasin B, but the proteins stimulated a smaller release of beta-glucuronidase than the peptide. The proteins stimulated release of neutrophil proteases which were able to digest both casein and denatured albumin extracellularly. It is suggested that this proteolytic activity may assist locomotion of neutrophils, especially on solid-phase protein gradients, by cleaving membrane-attached protein, thus both freeing cell-surface receptors and allowing the cell to detach itself from the substratum and continue movement. Images Figure 1 PMID:7016748

  13. Intelectin is required for IL-13-induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and -3 expression in lung epithelial cells and promotes allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Naibing; Kang, Guannan; Jin, Chang'E; Xu, Yongjian; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Erle, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, mucus overproduction, airway hyperreactivity, and peribronchial fibrosis. Intelectin has been shown to be increased in airway epithelium of asthmatics. However, the role of intelectin in the pathogenesis of asthma is unknown. Airway epithelial cells can secrete chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and -3 that play crucial roles in asthmatic airway inflammation. We hypothesized that intelectin plays a role in allergic airway inflammation by regulating chemokine expression. In a mouse allergic asthma model, we found that mRNA expression of intelectin-2 as well as MCP-1 and -3 in mouse lung was increased very early (within 2 h) after allergen challenge. Expression of intelectin protein was localized to mucous cells in airway epithelium. Treatment of MLE12 mouse lung epithelial cells with interleukin IL-13, a critical mediator of allergic airway disease, induced expression of intelectin-1 and -2 as well as MCP-1 and -3. When IL-13-induced intelectin-1 and -2 expression was inhibited by RNA interference, IL-13-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and MCP-1 and -3 production by MLE12 cells was inhibited. Furthermore, inhibition of intelectin expression by airway transfection with shRNA targeting intelectin-1 and -2 attenuated allergen-induced airway inflammation. We conclude that intelectin, a molecule expressed by airway epithelial cells and upregulated in asthma, is required for IL-13-induced MCP-1 and -3 production in mouse lung epithelial cells and contributes to allergic airway inflammation. PMID:19965981

  14. Intelectin is required for IL-13-induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and -3 expression in lung epithelial cells and promotes allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Naibing; Kang, Guannan; Jin, Chang'E; Xu, Yongjian; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Erle, David J; Zhen, Guohua

    2010-03-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, mucus overproduction, airway hyperreactivity, and peribronchial fibrosis. Intelectin has been shown to be increased in airway epithelium of asthmatics. However, the role of intelectin in the pathogenesis of asthma is unknown. Airway epithelial cells can secrete chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and -3 that play crucial roles in asthmatic airway inflammation. We hypothesized that intelectin plays a role in allergic airway inflammation by regulating chemokine expression. In a mouse allergic asthma model, we found that mRNA expression of intelectin-2 as well as MCP-1 and -3 in mouse lung was increased very early (within 2 h) after allergen challenge. Expression of intelectin protein was localized to mucous cells in airway epithelium. Treatment of MLE12 mouse lung epithelial cells with interleukin IL-13, a critical mediator of allergic airway disease, induced expression of intelectin-1 and -2 as well as MCP-1 and -3. When IL-13-induced intelectin-1 and -2 expression was inhibited by RNA interference, IL-13-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and MCP-1 and -3 production by MLE12 cells was inhibited. Furthermore, inhibition of intelectin expression by airway transfection with shRNA targeting intelectin-1 and -2 attenuated allergen-induced airway inflammation. We conclude that intelectin, a molecule expressed by airway epithelial cells and upregulated in asthma, is required for IL-13-induced MCP-1 and -3 production in mouse lung epithelial cells and contributes to allergic airway inflammation.

  15. Klotho Gene Deficiency Causes Salt-Sensitive Hypertension via Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1/CC Chemokine Receptor 2–Mediated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Chen, Kai; Lei, Han

    2015-01-01

    Klotho (KL) is a newly discovered aging suppressor gene. In mice, the KL gene extends the lifespan when overexpressed and shortens the lifespan when disrupted. This study investigated if KL deficiency affects BP and salt sensitivity using KL mutant heterozygous (+/−) mice and wild-type (WT) mice (9 weeks of age, 16 mice per group). Notably, systolic BP in KL(+/−) mice began to increase at the age of 15 weeks, reached a peak level at the age of 17 weeks, and remained elevated thereafter, whereas systolic BP remained consistent in WT mice. High salt (HS) intake further increased BP in KL(+/−) mice but did not affect BP in WT mice. Blockade of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2), involved in monocyte chemotaxis, by a specific CCR2 antagonist (INCB3284) abolished the HS-induced increase in BP in KL(+/−) mice. Furthermore, HS loading substantially increased the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and the infiltration of macrophages and T cells in kidneys in KL(+/−) mice, and treatment with INCB3284 abolished these effects. Treatment of KL(+/−) mice with INCB3284 also attenuated the increased renal expressions of serum glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1, thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter, and ATP synthase β along with the renal structural damage and functional impairment induced by HS loading. In conclusion, KL deficiency caused salt-sensitive hypertension and renal damage by CCR2-mediated inflammation. PMID:24904083

  16. Large induction of the chemotactic cytokine RANTES during cutaneous wound repair: a regulatory role for nitric oxide in keratinocyte-derived RANTES expression.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, S; Kämpfer, H; Wetzler, C; Stallmeyer, B; Pfeilschifter, J

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of NO on expressional regulation of the chemotactic cytokine RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) during tissue regeneration using an excisional wound-healing model in mice. Wound repair was characterized by a large and sustained induction of RANTES expression, and inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) during repair only slightly decreased RANTES expression levels. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed keratinocytes of the wound margins and the hyperproliferative epithelium to be the main RANTES-expressing cell type within the wound. Therefore we analysed the regulation of RANTES expression in vitro in cultured human keratinocytes of the cell line HaCaT. Here we demonstrate that NO very efficiently suppressed interleukin-1beta- and tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha-induced RANTES expression in keratinocytes. Furthermore, down-regulation of cytokine-induced RANTES mRNA in keratinocytes was dependent on endogenously produced NO, as inhibition of the co-induced iNOS by L-N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine increased cytokine-triggered RANTES expression in the cells. Moreover, we observed strongest RANTES-immunopositive labelling in epithelial areas which were characterized by a NO-mediated low cellularity. Thus our data implicate NO as a negative regulator of RANTES expression during wound repair in vivo, as decreased numbers of keratinocytes observed in the absence of wound-derived NO might compensate for the high levels of RANTES expression which are associated with normal repair. PMID:10727427

  17. Novel sulfated glucomannan-barium-alginate microcapsules in islet transplantation: significantly decreased the secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and improved the activity of islet in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zhang, L; Qi, Z; Guo, B; Zhong, L; Shen, B; Yan, Z; Zhang, J

    2009-12-01

    The sulfated glucomannan can be used to filter the heparin-binding properties of cytokines. In this study, novel sulfated glucomannan-barium-alginate (SGA) microcapsules were prepared to encapsulate islets with barium-alginate (ABa) and calcium alginate-poly-l-lysine (APA) microcapsules as controls. SD rat islets were purified as donor cells to Lewis rats that had been treated with streptozotocin. Intraperitoneal transplantation was performed with about 3000 islet equivalent (IEQ) rat. At week three after transplantation, the concentrations of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-1 beta, interferon (IFN)-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in intraperitoneal fluid were determined using ELISA. At week 8, the islet cell mass in the abdominal microcapsules was excised to test insulin release. The EB-FDA fluorescence staining method was used to observe the functional activity of the islet cells. Compared with ABa and APA microcapsules, SGA microcapsules showed significantly decreased MCP-1 secretion by beta-cells. Also, the concentrations of cytokines IL-1beta, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were decreased significantly. The activity of the transplanted islets was significantly improved in SGA microcapsules, which shielded against cytokines better than ABa or APA microcapsules and may serve as novel method.

  18. Distinct Renal Pathology and a Chemotactic Phenotype after Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Shiga Toxins in Non-Human Primate Models of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J.; Oh, Sun-Young; Cherla, Rama P.; Lee, Moo-Seung; Tesh, Vernon L.; Papin, James; Henderson, Joel; Kurosawa, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli cause approximately 1.5 million infections globally with 176,000 cases occurring in the United States annually from ingesting contaminated food, most frequently E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef or fresh produce. In severe cases, the painful prodromal hemorrhagic colitis is complicated by potentially lethal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), particularly in children. Bacterial Shiga-like toxins (Stx1, Stx2) are primarily responsible for HUS and the kidney and neurologic damage that ensue. Small animal models are hampered by the inability to reproduce HUS with thrombotic microangiopathy, hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney injury. Earlier, we showed that nonhuman primates (Papio) recapitulated clinical HUS after Stx challenge and that novel therapeutic intervention rescued the animals. Here, we present detailed light and electron microscopic pathology examination of the kidneys from these Stx studies. Stx1 challenge resulted in more severe glomerular endothelial injury, whereas the glomerular injury after Stx2 also included prominent mesangiolysis and an eosinophilic inflammatory infiltration. Both toxins induced glomerular platelet-rich thrombi, interstitial hemorrhage, and tubular injury. Analysis of kidney and other organs for inflammation biomarkers showed a striking chemotactic profile, with extremely high mRNA levels for IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α and elevated urine chemokines at 48 hours after challenge. These observations give unique insight into the pathologic consequences of each toxin in a near human setting and present potential pathways for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23402998

  19. The G2019S LRRK2 mutation increases myeloid cell chemotactic responses and enhances LRRK2 binding to actin-regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Moehle, Mark S; Daher, João Paulo Lima; Hull, Travis D; Boddu, Ravindra; Abdelmotilib, Hisham A; Mobley, James; Kannarkat, George T; Tansey, Malú G; West, Andrew B

    2015-08-01

    The Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene is genetically and biochemically linked to several diseases that involve innate immunity. LRRK2 protein is highly expressed in phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, most notably in myeloid cells capable of mounting potent pro-inflammatory responses. Knockdown of LRRK2 protein in these cells reduces pro-inflammatory responses. However, the effect of LRRK2 pathogenic mutations that cause Parkinson's disease on myeloid cell function is not clear but could provide insight into LRRK2-linked disease. Here, we find that rats expressing G2019S LRRK2 have exaggerated pro-inflammatory responses and subsequent neurodegeneration after lipopolysaccharide injections in the substantia nigra, with a marked increase in the recruitment of CD68 myeloid cells to the site of injection. While G2019S LRRK2 expression did not affect immunological homeostasis, myeloid cells expressing G2019S LRRK2 show enhanced chemotaxis both in vitro in two-chamber assays and in vivo in response to thioglycollate injections in the peritoneum. The G2019S mutation enhanced the association between LRRK2 and actin-regulatory proteins that control chemotaxis. The interaction between G2019S LRRK2 and actin-regulatory proteins can be blocked by LRRK2 kinase inhibitors, although we did not find evidence that LRRK2 phosphorylated these interacting proteins. These results suggest that the primary mechanism of G2019S LRRK2 with respect to myeloid cell function in disease may be related to exaggerated chemotactic responses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 plays a central role in the chemotactic response of mammalian neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, C.; Riquelme, T. T.; Vera, D.; Julio-Kalajzić, F.; Ehrenfeld, P.; Melvin, J. E.; Figueroa, C. D.; Sarmiento, J.; Flores, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim Neutrophils are the first cells to arrive at sites of injury. Nevertheless, many inflammatory diseases are characterized by an uncontrolled infiltration and action of these cells. Cell migration depends on volume changes that are governed by ion channel activity, but potassium channels in neutrophil have not been clearly identified. We aim to test whether KCa3.1 participates in neutrophil migration and other relevant functions of the cell. Methods Cytometer and confocal measurements to determine changes in cell volume were used. Cells isolated from human, mouse and horse were tested for KCa3.1-dependent chemotaxis. Chemokinetics, calcium handling and release of reactive oxygen species were measured to determine the role of KCa3.1 in those processes. A mouse model was used to test for neutrophil recruitment after acute lung injury in vivo. Results We show for the first time that KCa3.1 is expressed in mammalian neutrophils. When the channel is inhibited by a pharmacological blocker or by genetic silencing, it profoundly affects cell volume regulation, and chemotactic and chemokinetic properties of the cells. We also demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of KCa3.1 did not affect calcium entry or reactive oxygen species production in neutrophils. Using a mouse model of acute lung injury, we observed that Kca3.1−/− mice are significantly less effective at recruiting neutrophils into the site of inflammation. Conclusions These results demonstrate that KCa3.1 channels are key actors in the migration capacity of neutrophils, and its inhibition did not affect other relevant cellular functions. PMID:26138196

  1. The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 plays a central role in the chemotactic response of mammalian neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Henríquez, C; Riquelme, T T; Vera, D; Julio-Kalajzić, F; Ehrenfeld, P; Melvin, J E; Figueroa, C D; Sarmiento, J; Flores, C A

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first cells to arrive at sites of injury. Nevertheless, many inflammatory diseases are characterized by an uncontrolled infiltration and action of these cells. Cell migration depends on volume changes that are governed by ion channel activity, but potassium channels in neutrophil have not been clearly identified. We aim to test whether KCa3.1 participates in neutrophil migration and other relevant functions of the cell. Cytometer and confocal measurements to determine changes in cell volume were used. Cells isolated from human, mouse and horse were tested for KCa3.1-dependent chemotaxis. Chemokinetics, calcium handling and release of reactive oxygen species were measured to determine the role of KCa3.1 in those processes. A mouse model was used to test for neutrophil recruitment after acute lung injury in vivo. We show for the first time that KCa3.1 is expressed in mammalian neutrophils. When the channel is inhibited by a pharmacological blocker or by genetic silencing, it profoundly affects cell volume regulation, and chemotactic and chemokinetic properties of the cells. We also demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of KCa3.1 did not affect calcium entry or reactive oxygen species production in neutrophils. Using a mouse model of acute lung injury, we observed that Kca3.1(-/-) mice are significantly less effective at recruiting neutrophils into the site of inflammation. These results demonstrate that KCa3.1 channels are key actors in the migration capacity of neutrophils, and its inhibition did not affect other relevant cellular functions. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Identification of a fish specific chemokine CXCL_F2 in large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) reveals its primitive chemotactic function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shimin; Mu, Yinnan; Liu, Yingdi; Ao, Jingqun; Chen, Xinhua

    2016-12-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines regulating immune cell migration under both inflammatory and normal physiological conditions. Currently, a number of fish specific CXC chemokines, named as CXCL_F1-5, have been identified in several species. However, understanding of their functional characteristics is still limited. In this study, we identified a fish specific chemokine CXCL_F2 (LycCXCL_F2) from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). The open reading frame (ORF) of LycCXCL_F2 is 348 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 115 amino acids (aa). The deduced LycCXCL_F2 protein contains a 20-aa signal peptide and a 95-aa mature polypeptide. Phylogenetic analysis showed that LycCXCL_F2 fell into a major clade formed by CXCL_F2 sequences and was separated from CXCL_F1 and CXCL_F3-5 subgroups. LycCXCL_F2 mRNA transcript was constitutively expressed in various tissues, with the highest levels in spleen and head kidney. After stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccines, LycCXCL_F2 mRNA transcription was significantly increased in both spleen and head kidney. Moreover, recombinant LycCXCL_F2 protein exhibited obvious chemotaxis to monocytes, lymphocytes and eosnophils of PBLs isolated from large yellow croaker, but could not induce the respiratory burst of macrophages. These results indicate that this fish specific CXC chemokine LycCXCL_F2 possesses primitive chemotactic activity and may play a role in immune response in large yellow croaker.

  3. Dose-Response Analysis of Chemotactic Signaling Response in Salmonella typhimurium LT2 upon Exposure to Cysteine/Cystine Redox Pair.

    PubMed

    Rosier, Bob T; Lazova, Milena D

    2016-01-01

    The chemotaxis system enables motile bacteria to search for an optimum level of environmental factors. Salmonella typhimurium senses the amino acid cysteine as an attractant and its oxidized dimeric form, cystine, as a repellent. We investigated the dose-response dependence of changes in chemotactic signaling activity upon exposure to cysteine and cystine of S. typhimurium LT2 using in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. The dose-response curve of the attractant response to cysteine had a sigmoidal shape, typical for receptor-ligand interactions. However, in a knockout strain of the chemoreceptor genes tsr and tar, we detected a repellent response to cysteine solutions, scaling linearly with the logarithm of the cysteine concentration. Interestingly, the magnitude of the repellent response to cystine also showed linear dependence to the logarithm of the cystine concentration. This linear dependence was observed over more than four orders of magnitude, where detection started at nanomolar concentrations. Notably, low concentrations of another oxidized compound, benzoquinone, triggered similar responses. In contrast to S. typhimurium 14028, where no response to cystine was observed in a knockout strain of chemoreceptor genes mcpB and mcpC, here we showed that McpB/McpC-independent responses to cystine existed in the strain S. typhimurium LT2 even at nanomolar concentrations. Additionally, knocking out mcpB and mcpC did not affect the linear dose-response dependence, whereas enhanced responses were only observed to solutions that where not pH neutral (>100 μM cystine) in the case of McpC overexpression. We discuss that the linear dependence of the response on the logarithm of cystine concentrations could be a result of a McpB/C-independent redox-sensing pathway that exists in S. typhimurium LT2. We supported this hypothesis with experiments with defined cysteine/cystine mixed solutions, where a transition from repellent to attractant

  4. Characterization of synthetic human granulocyte chemotactic protein 2: usage of chemokine receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 and in vivo inflammatory properties.

    PubMed

    Wuyts, A; Van Osselaer, N; Haelens, A; Samson, I; Herdewijn, P; Ben-Baruch, A; Oppenheim, J J; Proost, P; Van Damme, J

    1997-03-04

    Human granulocyte chemotactic protein 2 (GCP-2) has originally been isolated from cytokine-stimulated osteosarcoma cells as a chemokine coproduced in minute amounts together with interleukin 8. Human GCP-2 (75 residues) was synthesized on a 0.25-mmol scale using Fmoc chemistry. After disulfide bridge formation and purification, monomeric GCP-2 was recovered as a 6-kDa protein; the pure synthetic protein showed a molecular mass of 8076 Da as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The exact amino acid sequence of synthetic GCP-2 was confirmed by Edman degradation. Synthetic GCP-2 was an equally active (minimal effective concentration of 1-3 nM) chemoattractant for neutrophilic granulocytes as was natural 75-residue GCP-2. At concentrations up to 30 nM, synthetic GCP-2 did not stimulate eosinophil, monocyte, or lymphocyte chemotaxis. GCP-2 induced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i in neutrophils, 1 nM being the minimal effective concentration. The GCP-2-induced [Ca2+]i increase was completely prevented by pertussis toxin. Prestimulation of neutrophils with equimolar concentrations of purified natural IL-8, GROalpha, GROgamma and ENA-78 abolished the [Ca2+]i increase in response to 1 nM GCP-2. Alternatively, the [Ca2+]i rise induced by these CXC chemokines was inhibited by pretreatment of neutrophils with GCP-2. GCP-2 stimulated [Ca2+]i increases in CXCR1- and CXCR2-transfected cells, demonstrating that GCP-2 binds to both IL-8 receptors. Intradermal injection of synthetic GCP-2 resulted in a dose-dependent neutrophil accumulation and plasma extravasation in rabbit skin. To provoke this skin reaction, GCP-2 (10 pmol/site) was nearly as effective as IL-8, indicating that it is an important complementary mediator of the inflammatory response.

  5. Roles of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and nuclear factor-κB in immune response to spinal tuberculosis in a New Zealand white rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, X.H.; Bai, Z.; Qiang, B.; Bu, F.H.; Zhao, N.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the roles of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in immune response to spinal tuberculosis in a New Zealand white rabbit model. Forty-eight New Zealand white rabbits were collected and divided into four groups: experimental group (n=30, spinal tuberculosis model was established), the sham group (n=15, sham operation was performed) and the blank group (n=3). The qRT-PCR assay and western blotting were applied to detect the mRNA and protein expressions of MCP-1 and NF-κB in peripheral blood. ELISA was used to measure serum levels of MCP-1, NF-κB, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10. Flow cytometry was adopted to assess the distributions of CD4+, CD8+ lymphocytes and CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3 lymphocyte subsets. Compared with the sham and blank groups, the mRNA and protein expressions of MCP-1 and NF-κB in the experimental group were significantly increased. The experimental group had lower serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ and higher serum level of IL-10 than the sham and blank groups. In comparison to the sham and blank groups, CD4+ T lymphocyte subsets percentage, CD4+/CD8+ ratio and CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs subsets accounting for CD4+ lymphocyte in the experimental group were lower, while percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte subsets was higher. Our study provided evidence that higher expression of MCP-1 and NF-κB may be associated with decreased immune function of spinal tuberculosis, which can provide a new treatment direction for spinal tuberculosis. PMID:28225889

  6. Helicobacter pylori Lipopolysaccharide Binds to CD14 and Stimulates Release of Interleukin-8, Epithelial Neutrophil-Activating Peptide 78, and Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 1 by Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Charles M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Keates, Sarah; Linevsky, Joanne K.; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori gastritis is characterized by leukocyte infiltration of the gastric mucosa. The aims of this study were to determine whether H. pylori-derived factors stimulate chemokine release from human monocytes and to ascertain whether H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may be responsible for this effect. Human peripheral blood monocytes were exposed to an H. pylori water extract (HPE) or to purified H. pylori LPS. Levels of the chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The contribution of H. pylori LPS to monocyte activation was determined by using the LPS antagonist Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RSLA) and a blocking monoclonal antibody to CD14 (60bca). HPE increased monocyte secretion of IL-8, ENA-78, and MCP-1. Heat treatment of HPE did not reduce its ability to activate monocytes. Purified H. pylori LPS also stimulated monocyte chemokine production but was 1,000-fold less potent than Salmonella minnesota lipid A. RSLA blocked H. pylori LPS-induced monocyte IL-8 release in a dose-dependent fashion (maximal inhibition 82%, P < 0.001). RSLA also inhibited HPE-induced IL-8 release (by 93%, P < 0.001). The anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody 60bca substantially inhibited IL-8 release from HPE-stimulated monocytes (by 88%, P < 0.01), whereas the nonblocking anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody did not. These experiments with potent and specific LPS inhibitors indicate that the main monocyte-stimulating factor in HPE is LPS. H. pylori LPS, acting through CD14, stimulates human monocytes to release the neutrophil-activating chemokines IL-8 and ENA-78 and the monocyte-activating chemokine MCP-1. Despite its low relative potency, H. pylori LPS may play an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori gastritis. PMID:9784544

  7. Roles of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and nuclear factor-κB in immune response to spinal tuberculosis in a New Zealand white rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Guo, X H; Bai, Z; Qiang, B; Bu, F H; Zhao, N

    2017-02-20

    This study aimed to explore the roles of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in immune response to spinal tuberculosis in a New Zealand white rabbit model. Forty-eight New Zealand white rabbits were collected and divided into four groups: experimental group (n=30, spinal tuberculosis model was established), the sham group (n=15, sham operation was performed) and the blank group (n=3). The qRT-PCR assay and western blotting were applied to detect the mRNA and protein expressions of MCP-1 and NF-κB in peripheral blood. ELISA was used to measure serum levels of MCP-1, NF-κB, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10. Flow cytometry was adopted to assess the distributions of CD4+, CD8+ lymphocytes and CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3 lymphocyte subsets. Compared with the sham and blank groups, the mRNA and protein expressions of MCP-1 and NF-κB in the experimental group were significantly increased. The experimental group had lower serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ and higher serum level of IL-10 than the sham and blank groups. In comparison to the sham and blank groups, CD4+ T lymphocyte subsets percentage, CD4+/CD8+ ratio and CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs subsets accounting for CD4+ lymphocyte in the experimental group were lower, while percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte subsets was higher. Our study provided evidence that higher expression of MCP-1 and NF-κB may be associated with decreased immune function of spinal tuberculosis, which can provide a new treatment direction for spinal tuberculosis.

  8. Urinary kidney injury molecule-1 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 are noninvasive biomarkers of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shinke, Haruka; Masuda, Satohiro; Togashi, Yousuke; Ikemi, Yasuaki; Ozawa, Aiko; Sato, Tomoko; Kim, Young Hak; Mishima, Michiaki; Ichimura, Takaharu; Bonventre, Joseph V; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious adverse effect of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, traditional markers of kidney function, such as serum creatinine, are suboptimal, because they are not sensitive measures of proximal tubular injury. We aimed to determine whether the new urinary biomarkers such as kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) could detect cisplatin-induced AKI in lung cancer patients in comparison with the conventional urinary proteins such as N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and β2-microglobulin. We measured KIM-1, MCP-1, NGAL, NAG, and β2-microglobulin concentrations in urine samples from 11 lung cancer patients, which were collected the day before cisplatin administration and on days 3, 7, and 14. Subsequently, we evaluated these biomarkers by comparing their concentrations in 30 AKI positive (+) and 12 AKI negative (-) samples and performing receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. The urinary levels normalized with urine creatinine of KIM-1 and MCP-1, but not NGAL, NAG, and β2-microglobulin in AKI (+) samples were significantly higher than those in AKI (-) samples. In addition, ROC curve analyses revealed that KIM-1 and MCP-1, but not NGAL, could detect AKI with high accuracy (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.858, 0.850, and 0.608, respectively). The combination of KIM-1 and MCP-1 outperformed either biomarker alone (AUC = 0.871). Urinary KIM-1 and MCP-1, either alone or in combination, may represent biomarkers of cisplatin-induced AKI in lung cancer patients.

  9. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1, RANTES and macrophage migration inhibitory factor levels in gingival crevicular fluid of metabolic syndrome patients with gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Gürkan, Ali; Eren, Gülnihal; Çetinkalp, Şevki; Akçay, Yasemin Delen; Emingil, Gülnur; Atilla, Gül

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein (RANTES) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in metabolic syndrome patients with gingivitis. Twenty metabolic syndrome patients with gingivitis (MSG), 20 MetS patients with clinically healthy periodontium (MSH), 20 systemically healthy subjects with gingivitis and 20 subjects who were both systemically and periodontally healthy were included. Periodontal and systemical parameters were recorded. GCF MCP-1, RANTES and MIF levels were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. MSG and MSH groups had elevated blood pressure, triglyceride, waist circumference and fasting glucose values in comparison to gingivitis and healthy groups (P<0.0001). Clinical periodontal parameters were higher in MSG and gingivitis groups when compared to those of the MSH and healthy groups (P<0.0001). MCP-1 and RANTES levels (ng/mg total protein) of MSG group were higher than those of the MSH groups (P=0.005, P=0.0001, respectively). Also gingivitis group had higher MCP-1, RANTES and MIF levels compared to the healthy group (P=0.011, P=0.0001, P=0.011 respectively). The RANTES level of MSG group was significantly higher than those of the gingivitis group (P=0.01), but MCP-1 and MIF levels were similar in the MSG and gingivitis groups (P>0.05). Elevated levels of GCF RANTES in MetS patients with gingivitis might associate with the presence of increased gingival inflammation by MetS. Low-grade systemic inflammation associated with MetS and adipose tissue-derived RANTES might lead to altered GCF RANTES levels in the presence of gingival inflammation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Expression and modulation of C5a receptor (CD88) on skin dendritic cells. Chemotactic effect of C5a on skin migratory dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, A; Larregina, A; Chuluyán, I; Kolkowski, E; Fainboim, L

    1996-01-01

    Although it is known that dendritic cells (DC) migrate in response to inflammatory stimuli. There is little information about the expression of receptors for chemotactic factors on DC. The present study has demonstrated by double immunostaining and flow cytometry of Langerhan's cell (LC)-enriched epidermal cell suspensions that a small subpopulation (5-6%) of epidermal resident DC (rLC) expresses receptors for C5a (C5aR). Epidermal rLC positive for C5aR show a round-shape morphology, were located next to the basement membrane and express HLA-DR molecules higher than C5aR negative rLC. These observations suggest that rLC would express C5aR as part of their process of maturation during tissue trafficking. To investigate whether epidermal LC up-regulate C5aR along their differentiation pathway. LC were differentiated in vitro after culture in epidermal cell suspensions supplemented with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). As a result, in vitro differentiated LC increased the expression of C5aR up to 69% of the DC population. In accordance with this observation, interdigitating DC of secondary lymphoid organs (lymph node and tonsil) also expressed (5aR. Migratory CD1a positive DC that spontaneously migrated out of dermal or split-skin organ explants were also positive for C5aR and were used for chemotaxis and chemokinesis assays in response to human recombinant C5a (rC5a). Optimum migration to rC5a was observed at 10(-8)M with a sigmoidal dose response curve. Checkboard analysis demonstrated that locomotion in response to rC5a was chemotaxis and not chemokinesis. Images Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8911150

  11. Thiol Oxidative Stress Induced by Metabolic Disorders Amplifies Macrophage Chemotactic Responses and Accelerates Atherogenesis and Kidney Injury in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Mu; Zhao, Qingwei; Lee, Chi Fung; Tannock, Lisa R.; Smart, Eric J.; LeBaron, Richard G.; Phelix, Clyde F.; Rangel, Yolanda; Asmis, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Background Strengthening the macrophage glutathione redox buffer reduces macrophage content and decreases the severity of atherosclerotic lesions in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR−/−) mice, but the underlying mechanisms were not clear. This study examined the effect of metabolic stress on the thiol redox state, chemotactic activity in vivo and the recruitment of macrophages into atherosclerotic lesions and kidneys of LDL-R−/− mice in response to mild, moderate and severe metabolic stress. Methods and Results Reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels in peritoneal macrophages isolated from mildly, moderately and severe metabolically-stressed LDL-R−/− mice were measured by HPLC, and the glutathione reduction potential (Eh) was calculated. Macrophage Eh correlated with the macrophage content in both atherosclerotic (r2=0.346, P=0.004) and renal lesions (r2=0.480, P=0.001) in these mice as well as the extent of both atherosclerosis (r2=0.414, P=0.001) and kidney injury (r2=0.480, P=0.001). Compared to LDL-R−/− mice exposed to mild metabolic stress, macrophage recruitment into MCP-1-loaded Matrigel plugs injected into LDL-R−/− mice increased 2.6–fold in moderately metabolically-stressed mice and 9.8–fold in severely metabolically-stressed mice. The macrophage Eh was a strong predictor of macrophage chemotaxis (r2=0.554, P<0.001). Conclusion Thiol oxidative stress enhances macrophage recruitment into vascular and renal lesions by increasing the responsiveness of macrophages to chemoattractants. This novel mechanism contributes at least in part to accelerated atherosclerosis and kidney injury associated with dyslipidemia and diabetes in mice. PMID:19592463

  12. Tick saliva inhibits the chemotactic function of MIP-1alpha and selectively impairs chemotaxis of immature dendritic cells by down-regulating cell-surface CCR5.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carlo José F; Cavassani, Karen A; Moré, Daniela D; Garlet, Gustavo P; Aliberti, Julio C; Silva, João S; Ferreira, Beatriz R

    2008-05-01

    Ticks are blood-feeding arthropods that secrete immunomodulatory molecules through their saliva to antagonize host inflammatory and immune responses. As dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in host immune responses, we studied the effects of Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick saliva on DC migration and function. Bone marrow-derived immature DCs pre-exposed to tick saliva showed reduced migration towards macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) chemokines in a Boyden microchamber assay. This inhibition was mediated by saliva which significantly reduced the percentage and the average cell-surface expression of CC chemokine receptor CCR5. In contrast, saliva did not alter migration of DCs towards MIP-3beta, not even if the cells were induced for maturation. Next, we evaluated the effect of tick saliva on the activity of chemokines related to DC migration and showed that tick saliva per se inhibits the chemotactic function of MIP-1alpha, while it did not affect RANTES, MIP-1beta and MIP-3beta. These data suggest that saliva possibly reduces immature DC migration, while mature DC chemotaxis remains unaffected. In support of this, we have analyzed the percentage of DCs on mice 48h after intradermal inoculation with saliva and found that the DC turnover in the skin was reduced compared with controls. Finally, to test the biological activity of the saliva-exposed DCs, we transferred DCs pre-cultured with saliva and loaded with the keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) antigen to mice and measured their capacity to induce specific T cell cytokines. Data showed that saliva reduced the synthesis of both T helper (Th)1 and Th2 cytokines, suggesting the induction of a non-polarised T cell response. These findings propose that the inhibition of DCs migratory ability and function may be a relevant mechanism used by ticks to subvert the immune response of the host.

  13. Adherence of neutrophils to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation by chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators and dependence upon the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family.

    PubMed Central

    Tonnesen, M G; Anderson, D C; Springer, T A; Knedler, A; Avdi, N; Henson, P M

    1989-01-01

    The process of neutrophil adhesion to and migration through the microvascular endothelium, an early event in the induction of the acute inflammatory response, has been attributed to the generation of extravascular chemoattractants. Although both chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators enhance neutrophil adherence in vitro and in vivo, the mechanism(s) involved in the interaction between circulating neutrophils and microvascular endothelial cells is still not completely understood. In a microtiter well adherence assay, the chemotactic peptides, FMLP and C5a, and the lipid mediators, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and platelet activating factor (PAF), enhanced human neutrophil adherence to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells as well as to human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner with a rapid time course. This stimulated adhesive interaction between neutrophils and cultured human endothelial cells was dependent on the expression of the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family on the neutrophil surface since neutrophils from patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency, lacking surface expression of the adhesive glycoproteins, exhibited markedly diminished adherence to human endothelial cells in response to stimulation with chemotactic factors compared to normal control neutrophils. All four mediators enhanced expression of the glycoprotein family on the surface of normal neutrophils as determined by flow cytofluorimetry using a monoclonal antibody (TS1/18) to the glycoprotein common beta subunit. In addition, TS1/18 inhibited up to 100% the adherence of normal neutrophils to endothelial cells stimulated by maximal concentrations of FMLP, C5a, LTB4, or PAF. Moreover, HL-60 cells, human promyelocytic leukemia cells, neither increased glycoprotein surface expression nor adherence in response to stimulation. Thus, peptide and lipid mediators of the acute inflammatory response appear to enhance adherence of circulating neutrophils to the

  14. Augmentation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and mRNA transcript in chronic inflammatory states induced by potassium permanganate (KMnO4) in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, P; Reale, M; Feliciani, C; Frydas, S; Trakatellis, M; Placido, F C; Cataldo, I; Di Gioacchino, M; Barbacane, R C

    1997-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is a proinflammatory cytokine that attracts and activates specific types of leucocytes. The purpose of this work was to analyse the generation of MCP-1 and mRNA transcript in a model of chronic inflammation using a granulomatous tissue induced by potassium permanganate (KMnO4; water soluble crystals). The data presented here shows that MCP-1 is generated in granuloma tissue and its level was strongly increased by i.p. injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and inhibited in rats treated with injections of dexamethasone, 18 hr before the animals were killed. In histological studies LPS and dexamethasone increased and decreased, respectively, the recruitment of mononuclear cells in the granuloma tissue compared with the control granulomas from phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated animals. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for mRNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. mRNA MCP-1 was significantly produced in the granuloma tissue of untreated animals, an effect increased by LPS and inhibited by dexamethasone, compared with the controls. Moreover, MCP-1 protein was found in the supernatant from homogenized granuloma tissues and the levels of MCP-1 were higher in the LPS-treated animals, while they were lower in the dexamethasone group, compared with the granulomas from the PBS-treated groups (control). The generation of MCP-1 was also found in minced granuloma tissue incubated for 18 hr (overnight) from treated (LPS or dexamethasone) and untreated (PBS) rats. When LPS was added in vitro for 18 hr to the controls and treated animals the production of MCP-1 was further increased except in the dexamethasone group (P > 0.05). Analysing blood serum from LPS, dexamethasone or PBS-treated rats, we found that MCP-1 was also present. The level was higher in the LPS group and lower in the dexamethasone group, compared with the control (PBS). In these studies we show for the first time that MCP-1 transcript and

  15. VEGF-A promotes IL-17A-producing γδ T cell accumulation in mouse skin and serves as a chemotactic factor for plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Ito, Taisuke; Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Detmar, Michael; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-05-01

    IL-17-producing CD4(+) T (Th17) cells and their cytokines, IL-17A and IL-22, are deeply involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis by stimulating epidermal keratinocytes to proliferate and to produce cytokines/chemokines and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), infiltrating in psoriatic lesions, are known to exacerbate the Th17-mediated pathogenesis of psoriasis. To address the initiative role of VEGF-A in the development of psoriasis and the pDC accumulation. Numerical changes and VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and VEGFR2 expressions were investigated in skin-infiltrating T cells and pDCs of K14-VEGF-A transgenic (Tg) and wild type (WT) mice. The chemotactic properties of VEGF-A for purified splenic pDCs were also evaluated by real-time chemotaxis assay. By flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, we observed that the number of dermal IL-17A(+) γδ T cells, but not CD4(+) T cells, was increased in VEGF-A Tg mice, suggesting that the main source of IL-17A was γδ T cells. Moreover, we identified pDCs as 440c(+) cells by immunohistochemistry and as PDCA-1(+)B220(+) cells by flow cytometry, and found that pDCs infiltrated at a higher frequency in VEGF-A Tg than WT mice. pDCs, but not γδ T cells, isolated from the skin expressed VEGFR1 and VEGFR2. Freshly isolated splenic pDCs expressed both receptors after 48-h cultivation. pDCs did not produce cytokines in response to VEGF-A, however, they had a strong velocity of chemotaxis toward VEGF-A at a comparable level to chemerin. These findings suggest that VEGF-A functions as not only a downstream enhancer but also an upstream initiator by chemoattracting pDCs in psoriatic lesions. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibitory effect of plant phenolics on fMLP-induced intracellular calcium rise and chemiluminescence of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and their chemotactic activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Piotr Jan; Zasowska-Nowak, Anna; Bialasiewicz, Piotr; de Graft-Johnson, Jeffrey; Nowak, Dariusz; Nowicki, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) produce oxidants, contributing to systemic oxidative stress. Diets rich in plant polyphenols seem to decrease the risk of oxidative stress-induced disorders including cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro effect of each of the 14 polyphenols on PMNs chemotaxis, intracellular calcium response, oxidants production. Blood samples and PMNs suspensions were obtained from 60 healthy non-smoking donors and incubated with a selected polyphenol (0.5-10 µM) or a control solvent. We assessed resting and fMLP-dependent changes of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in PMNs with the Fura-2AM method and measured fMLP-induced luminol enhanced whole blood chemiluminescence (fMLP-LBCL). Polyphenol chemoattractant activity for PMNs was tested with Boyden chambers. Polyphenols had no effect on resting [Ca(2+)]i. Unaffected by other compounds, fMLP-dependent increase of [Ca(2+)]i was inhibited by quercetin and catechol (5 µM) by 32 ± 14 and 12 ± 10% (p < 0.04), respectively. Seven of the 14 tested substances (5 µM) influenced fMLP-LBCL by decreasing it. Catechol, quercetin, and gallic acid acted most potently reducing fMLP-LBCL by 49 ± 5, 42 ± 15, and 28 ± 18% (p < 0.05), respectively. 3,4-Dihydroxyhydrocinnamic, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and catechin (5 µM) revealed distinct (p < 0.02) chemoattractant activity with a chemotactic index of 1.9 ± 0.8, 1.8 ± 0.7, 1.6 ± 0.6, 1.4 ± 0.2, respectively. Catechol, quercetin, and gallic acid at concentrations commensurate in human plasma strongly suppressed the oxidative response of PMNs. Regarding quercetin and catechol, this could result from an inhibition of [Ca(2+)]i response.

  17. Maze solving by chemotactic droplets.

    PubMed

    Lagzi, István; Soh, Siowling; Wesson, Paul J; Browne, Kevin P; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2010-02-03

    Droplets emitting surface-active chemicals exhibit chemotaxis toward low-pH regions. Such droplets are self-propelled and navigate through a complex maze to seek a source of acid placed at one of the maze's exits. In doing so, the droplets find the shortest path through the maze. Chemotaxis and maze solving are due to an interplay between acid/base chemistry and surface tension effects.

  18. Maze Solving by Chemotactic Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Soh, Siowling; Wesson, Paul J.; Browne, Kevin P.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-01-11

    Droplets emitting surface-active chemicals exhibit chemotaxis toward low-pH regions. Such droplets are self-propelled and navigate through a complex maze to seek a source of acid placed at one of the maze’s exits. In doing so, the droplets find the shortest path through the maze. Chemotaxis and maze solving are due to an interplay between acid/base chemistry and surface tension effects.

  19. The evolution and diversity of kinetoplastid flagellates.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Alastair G B; Stevens, Jamie R; Lukes, Julius

    2006-04-01

    Five years ago, little was known about kinetoplastid evolution. Recent improvements in the taxon sampling for nuclear rRNA genes and several protein markers have transformed this understanding. Parasitism evolved at least four times in kinetoplastids. Obligate parasitic trypanosomatids are a relatively 'derived' group within kinetoplastids; their closest relative is likely to be the free-living Bodo saltans, and the ancestral trypanosomatids were probably parasites of insects. Although subject to recent controversy, trypanosomes (genus Trypanosoma) probably constitute a monophyletic group. Several unusual features of trypanosomatid genomes (e.g. trans-splicing, mitochondrial RNA editing and intron poverty) are common in kinetoplastids and pre-date the adoption of parasitism. The framework of relationships is becoming robust enough for real comparative approaches to be used to understand kinetoplastid biology.

  20. A new monoclonal antibody (5D3-F7) which recognizes human monocyte-chemotactic protein-1 but not related chemokines. Development of a sandwich ELISA and in situ detection of producing cells.

    PubMed

    Peri, G; Milanese, C; Matteucci, C; Ruco, L; Zhou, D; Sozzani, S; Coletta, I; Mantovani, A

    1994-09-14

    Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally related cytokines involved in leukocyte recruitment in normal and neoplastic tissues. The availability of non-cross-reacting reagents specific for each member of the C-C and C-X-C family is important for careful characterization of their in vitro and in vivo production and relevance. Here we describe a novel, highly specific, mAb against monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). The 5D3-F7 mAb (IgG1,kappa) recognizes human recombinant and natural MCP-1 in ELISA, immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis. As a source of natural MCP-1 we used the 8387 human sarcoma line which produces spontaneously MCP-1 and responds to TNF with increased expression and release. The 5D3-F7 mAb inhibited the chemotactic activity of MCP-1 for monocytes. Using the 5D3-F7 mAb and a polyclonal rabbit anti-MCP-1 serum, a sandwich ELISA was developed. In both the direct and the sandwich ELISA, the 5D3-F7 mAb recognized human MCP-1, but not the closely related C-C chemokines MCP-1, MCP-2, MCP-3, MIP-1 alpha, and RANTES and the C-X-C chemokines IL-8, gro alpha and NAP-2. In culture supernatants the sensitivity of the sandwich ELISA was approximately equal to 30 pg/ml. The sandwich ELISA permitted detection of MCP-1 in resting or cytokine-stimulated endothelial, mesothelial and Kaposi's sarcoma cells. Preliminary immunohistochemical analysis revealed production of MCP-1 by macrophage-like cells at sites of inflammation. The 5D3-F7 mAb provides a novel, highly specific reagent with which to investigate the in vitro and in vivo production and role of MCP-1.

  1. Diversification and Phylogenetics of Mobilid Peritrichs (Ciliophora) with Description of Urceolaria parakorschelti sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Nicholas A T; Sabetrasekh, Mona; Lynn, Denis H

    2017-08-01

    Ciliates within the order Mobilida comprise a group of ectosymbionts that form ecologically and economically important symbioses with aquatic organisms. However, despite their significance, the factors driving mobilid diversification are poorly understood. To address this, we sought to examine the genetic diversity of two mobilid families, the trichodinids and urceolariids, over geographical areas and from different hosts. To this end we collected and provide morphological and molecular characterizations of three species of Trichodina: Trichodina domerguei and Trichodina tenuidens from three-spined sticklebacks, and Trichodina unionis from snails. We also sequenced the small subunit rRNA gene from Urceolaria korschelti collected from its type host at the type locality of Helgoland, Germany. The Trichodina from sticklebacks show intra-specific genetic variation that is not related to geographic distribution. Furthermore, we find evidence of fish to mollusc host transitions within the Trichodinidae and suggest that the most recent common ancestor of the Trichodina was a symbiont of vertebrates. Lastly we confirm that U. korschelti constitutes a cryptic species complex, which in turn justifies the description of Urceolaria parakorschelti sp. nov. These data suggest that not only host transitions, but allopatric and or genetically-driven sympatric speciation play a role in facilitating the diversification of mobilid ciliates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. How bacteria maintain location and number of flagella?

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Jan S; Thormann, Kai M; Bange, Gert

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria differ in number and location of their flagella that appear in regular patterns at the cell surface (flagellation pattern). Despite the plethora of bacterial species, only a handful of these patterns exist. The correct flagellation pattern is a prerequisite for motility, but also relates to biofilm formation and the pathogenicity of disease-causing flagellated bacteria. However, the mechanisms that maintain location and number of flagella are far from being understood. Here, we review our knowledge on mechanisms that enable bacteria to maintain their appropriate flagellation pattern. While some peritrichous flagellation patterns might occur by rather simple stochastic processes, other bacterial species appear to rely on landmark systems to define the designated flagellar position. Such landmarks are the Tip system of Caulobacter crescentus or the signal recognition particle (SRP)-GTPase FlhF and the MinD/ParA-type ATPase FlhG (synonyms: FleN, YlxH and MinD2). The latter two proteins constitute a regulatory circuit essential for diverse flagellation patterns in many Gram-positive and negative species. The interactome of FlhF/G (e.g. C-ring proteins FliM, FliN, FliY or the transcriptional regulator FleQ/FlrA) seems evolutionary adapted to meet the specific needs for a respective pattern. This variability highlights the importance of the correct flagellation pattern for motile species.

  3. Structural characterization of novel chemotactic and mastoparan peptides from the venom of the social wasp Agelaiapallipes pallipes by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.