Science.gov

Sample records for peritumoral lymphovascular invasion

  1. Hormone Use is Associated with Lymphovascular Invasion in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Loof-Johanson, Margaretha; Brudin, Lars; Sundquist, Marie; Rudebeck, Carl Edvard

    2016-01-01

    Risk of developing breast cancer increases with short breastfeeding and the use of hormones. The prognosis of breast cancer is better if the tumours are hormone receptor positive. Since breast feeding affects estrogen and progesterone receptors, we wanted to investigate how such reproductive factors as breastfeeding and the use of hormones interact with known prognostic markers and specific tumour characteristics in women with breast cancer. A total of 250 women treated for breast cancer from a larger cohort completed a questionnaire on breastfeeding, number and age at births and use of hormones. A logistic regression analysis was made to search for connections between known prognostic markers on the one hand (type of cancer, grade, tumor size, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, lymphovascular invasion and DNA-ploidy) and reproductive data, breastfeeding, and hormone use on the other. Hormone use, but not breastfeeding, was significantly associated, also on multivariate analysis, with the prognostic variable lymphovascular invasion, connected to a worse prognosis. No other hormone use or breast feeding correlations with prognostic variables were found.

  2. Prognostic significance of peritumoral vascular invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, R.; Penman, H. G.; Thornton-Jones, H.; Neville, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective study of 232 patients with primary invasive breast cancer (UICC Stages I, II and III) and histologically confirmed axillary node status was carried out to assess the prognostic significance of several readily available clinical and pathological characteristics. In addition to the recognised utility of tumour size and axillary lymph node status, the presence or absence of cohesive clumps of malignant cells in peritumoral vascular spaces (both lymphatic and blood vessels) was found to be prognostically important. PMID:6498073

  3. Lymphovascular space invasion in robotic surgery for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mark R; Richmond, Abby M; Cheng, Georgina; Davidson, Susan; Spillman, Monique A; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Post, Miriam D; Guntupalli, Saketh R

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has become a standard treatment for endometrial cancer and offers significant benefits over abdominal approaches. There are discrepant data regarding lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) and positive peritoneal cytology with the use of a uterine manipulator, with previous small-scale studies demonstrating an increased incidence of these prognostically important events. We sought to determine if there was a higher incidence of LVSI in patients who underwent robot-assisted surgery for endometrial cancer. We performed a single-institution review of medical records for patients who underwent open abdominal or robot-assisted hysterectomy for endometrial cancer over a 24-month period. The following data were abstracted: age, tumor grade and stage, size, depth of invasion, LVSI, and peritoneal cytology. For patients with LVSI, slides were reviewed by 2 pathologists for confirmation of LVSI. Of 104 patients identified, LVSI was reported in 39 (37.5%) and positive peritoneal cytology in 6 (4.8%). Rates of peritoneal cytology were not significantly different between the 2 groups (odds ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-3.17; P=.50). LVSI was reported in significantly fewer robot-assisted hysterectomies than open procedures (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.92; P=.03). In subgroup analyses restricted to early-stage disease (stage≤II), there was no significant difference in LVSI between open and robot-assisted hysterectomies (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.22-1.85; P=.43). In this retrospective study, we found that use of a uterine manipulator in robot-assisted surgery did not increase the incidence of LVSI.

  4. High lymphatic vessel density and presence of lymphovascular invasion both predict poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song; Zhang, Dong; Gong, Mingfu; Wen, Li; Liao, Cuiwei; Zou, Liguang

    2017-05-17

    Lymphatic vessel density and lymphovascular invasion are commonly assessed to identify the clinicopathological outcomes in breast cancer. However, the prognostic values of them on patients' survival are still uncertain. Databases of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched from inception up to 30 June 2016. The hazard ratio with its 95% confidence interval was used to determine the prognostic effects of lymphatic vessel density and lymphovascular invasion on disease-free survival and overall survival in breast cancer. Nineteen studies, involving 4215 participants, were included in this study. With the combination of the results of lymphatic vessel density, the pooled hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were 2.02 (1.69-2.40) for disease-free survival and 2.88 (2.07-4.01) for overall survival, respectively. For lymphovascular invasion study, the pooled hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were 1.81 (1.57-2.08) for disease-free survival and 1.64 (1.43-1.87) for overall survival, respectively. In addition, 29.56% (827/2798) of participants presented with lymphovascular invasion in total. Our study demonstrates that lymphatic vessel density and lymphovascular invasion can predict poor prognosis in breast cancer. Standardized assessments of lymphatic vessel density and lymphovascular invasion are needed.

  5. Obesity and Lymphovascular Invasion in Women with Uterine Endometrioid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Mona; Burmeister, Charlotte; Zhang, Ziying; Munkarah, Adnan; Elshaikh, Mohamed A

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is classically linked to type I endometrial cancer (EC). Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is a well-known adverse prognostic factor in EC. In other disease sites, it has been reported that obesity and LVI are strongly associated. The objective of the present study was to investigate the association between obesity and LVI in women with EC. For this Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved study, we reviewed our prospectively-maintained uterine cancer database of 1,950 patients with EC International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages I-IV who underwent hysterectomy from 1/1988 through 12/2011. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to investigate the relationships between obesity, as measured by body mass index (BMI) at the time of hysterectomy and tumor features including LVI. A total of 1,341 patients with uterine endometrioid carcinoma were identified. All patients underwent hysterectomy, and salpingoophrectomy with or without lymph node dissection. The median BMI for study patients was 34.3 (range=15.7-71.3) kg/m(2). 46.8% of the patients were morbidly obese. 625 patients (46.7%) were <60 years at diagnosis with a median BMI of 36.31 (range=19.7-69.8) kg/m(2) while the median BMI for women 61 years or older was 32.2 (15.7-71.3) kg/m(2) (p=0.002). In univariate analyses, high BMI was not significantly associated with LVI. In multivariate analyses, higher BMI was independently associated with younger age at diagnosis (odd ratio (OR)=0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.96-9.97) and the presence of lower tumor FIGO grade (OR=0.98, 95% CI=0.97-0.99). Increased BMI was significantly associated with lower tumor grade and younger patient age at diagnosis. Increased body mass index was not associated with LVI. The higher prevalence of obesity in young women with EC is alarming. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of genes and pathways related to lymphovascular invasion in breast cancer patients: A bioinformatics analysis of gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Klahan, Sukhontip; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Tu, Shih-Hsin; Chou, Wan-Hsuan; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Ho, Thien-Fiew; Liu, Chih-Yi; Yih, Shih-Ying; Lu, Hsing Fang; Chen, Sean Chun-Chang; Huang, Chi-Cheng; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2017-06-01

    Surgery is the most effective treatment for breast cancer patients. However, some patients developed recurrence and distant metastasis after surgery. Adjuvant therapy is considered for high-risk patients depending on several prognostic markers, and lymphovascular invasion has become one of such prognostic markers that help physicians to identify the risk for distant metastasis and recurrence. However, the mechanism of lymphovascular invasion in breast cancer remains unknown. This study aims to unveil the genes and pathways that may involve in lymphovascular invasion in breast cancer. In total, 108 breast cancer samples were collected during surgery and microarray analysis was performed. Significance analysis of the microarrays and limma package for R were used to examine differentially expressed genes between lymphovascular invasion-positive and lymphovascular invasion-negative cases. Network and pathway analyses were mapped using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. In total, 86 differentially expressed genes, including 37 downregulated genes and 49 upregulated genes were identified in lymphovascular invasion-positive patients. Among these genes, TNFSF11, IL6ST, and EPAS1 play important roles in cytokine-receptor interaction, which is the most enriched pathway related to lymphovascular invasion. Moreover, the results also suggested that an imbalance between extracellular matrix components and tumor micro-environment could induce lymphovascular invasion. Our study evaluated the underlying mechanisms of lymphovascular invasion, which may further help to assess the risk of breast cancer progression and identify potential targets of adjuvant treatment.

  7. Are microscopic satellites in melanoma indicative of lymphovascular invasion? A preliminary case study.

    PubMed

    Kaley, J; Patterson, J W; Chokoeva, A A; Lotti, T; Wollina, U; Tchernev, G

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic satellites (microsatellites) in primary melanoma are defined as one or more discontinuous nests of neoplastic melanocytes measuring more than 0.05 mm in diameter that are clearly separated by normal dermis (i.e., no fibrosis or inflammation) from the main invasive component of the melanoma by a distance of at least 0.3 mm. Long considered an adverse prognostic variable, there has been debate about whether these satellites in fact represent lymphovascular invasion. In this preliminary study, 6 cases of primary cutaneous melanoma containing microsatellites were stained immunohistochemically for endothelial cells, using the markers CD31 and D2-40 (podoplanin, a marker of lymphatic endothelium). In none of the cases was positive staining found to surround the tumor deposits. In one case that also showed independent lymphovascular and perineural invasion, a small CD31 positive vessel within the microsatellite was found to contain tumor cells. The possible significance of these findings is discussed.

  8. Breast Carcinomatous Tumoral Emboli Can Result From Encircling Lymphovasculogenesis Rather Than Lymphovascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mahooti, Sepi; Porter, Kyle; Alpaugh, Mary L.; Ye, Yin; Xiao, Yi; Jones, Susie; Tellez, Joseph D.; Barsky, Sanford H.

    2010-01-01

    The canonical view of the origin of tumor lymphovascular emboli is that they usually originate from lymphovascular invasion as part of a multistep metastatic process. Recent experimental evidence has suggested that metastasis can occur earlier than previously thought and we found evidence that tumor emboli formation can result from the short-circuiting step of encircling lymphovasculogenesis. Experimentally, we used a xenograft of human inflammatory breast cancer (MARY-X), a model that exhibited florid tumor emboli, to generate tumoral spheroids in vitro. In observational studies, we chose human breast carcinoma cases where there appeared to be a possible transition of in situ carcinoma to lymphovascular emboli without intervening stromal invasion. These cases were studied by morphometry as well as IHC with tumor proliferation (Ki-67) and adhesion (E-cadherin) markers, myoepithelial (p63), as well as endothelial (podoplanin [D2-40], CD31, VEGFR-3, Prox-1) markers. Unlabelled spheroids coinjected with either GFP or RFP-human myoepithelial cells or murine embryonal fibroblasts (MEFs) gave rise to tumors which exhibited GFP/RFP immunoreactivity within the cells lining the emboli-containing lymphovascular channels. In vitro studies demonstrated that the tumoral spheroids induced endothelial differentiation of cocultured myoepithelial cells and MEFs, measured by real time PCR and immunofluorescence. In humans, the in situ clusters exhibited similar proliferation, E-cadherin immunoreactivity and size as the tumor emboli (p =.5), suggesting the possibility that the latter originated from the former. The in situ clusters exhibited a loss (50%-100%) of p63 myoepithelial immunoreactivity but not E-cadherin epithelial immunoreactivity. The tumor emboli were mainly present within lymphatic channels whose dual p63/CD31, p63/D2-40 and p63/VEGFR-3 and overall weak patterns of D2-40/CD31/VEGFR-3 immunoreactivities suggested that they represented immature and newly created

  9. Breast carcinomatous tumoral emboli can result from encircling lymphovasculogenesis rather than lymphovascular invasion.

    PubMed

    Mahooti, Sepi; Porter, Kyle; Alpaugh, Mary L; Ye, Yin; Xiao, Yi; Jones, Susie; Tellez, Joseph D; Barsky, Sanford H

    2010-06-01

    The canonical view of the origin of tumor lymphovascular emboli is that they usually originate from lymphovascular invasion as part of a multistep metastatic process. Recent experimental evidence has suggested that metastasis can occur earlier than previously thought and we found evidence that tumor emboli formation can result from the short-circuiting step of encircling lymphovasculogenesis. Experimentally, we used a xenograft of human inflammatory breast cancer (MARY-X), a model that exhibited florid tumor emboli, to generate tumoral spheroids in vitro. In observational studies, we chose human breast carcinoma cases where there appeared to be a possible transition of in situ carcinoma to lymphovascular emboli without intervening stromal invasion. These cases were studied by morphometry as well as IHC with tumor proliferation (Ki-67) and adhesion (E-cadherin) markers, myoepithelial (p63), as well as endothelial (podoplanin [D2-40], CD31, VEGFR-3, Prox-1) markers. Unlabelled spheroids coinjected with either GFP or RFP-human myoepithelial cells or murine embryonal fibroblasts (MEFs) gave rise to tumors which exhibited GFP/RFP immunoreactivity within the cells lining the emboli-containing lymphovascular channels. In vitro studies demonstrated that the tumoral spheroids induced endothelial differentiation of cocultured myoepithelial cells and MEFs, measured by real time PCR and immunofluorescence. In humans, the in situ clusters exhibited similar proliferation, E-cadherin immunoreactivity and size as the tumor emboli (p =.5), suggesting the possibility that the latter originated from the former. The in situclusters exhibited a loss (50%-100%) of p63 myoepithelial immunoreactivity but not E-cadherin epithelial immunoreactivity. The tumor emboli were mainly present within lymphatic channels whose dual p63/CD31, p63/D2-40 and p63/VEGFR-3 and overall weak patterns of D2-40/CD31/VEGFR-3 immunoreactivities suggested that they represented immature and newly created

  10. Risk Factors of Submucosal or Lymphovascular Invasion in Early Gastric Cancer <2 cm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yu Yi; Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Su Bum; Nam, Hyeong Seok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although prediction of submucosal (SM) or lymphovascular (LV) invasion is important before endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer (EGC), it can only be confirmed following endoscopic resection. After endoscopic resection, patients with SM or LV invasion may require additional surgery due to high risk of lymph node metastasis. We conducted a retrospective study to identify risk factors for SM or LV invasion before endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of EGC. Between January 2009 and May 2014, we reviewed the data of patients with EGC who met the absolute indications for ESD before procedure: well and/or moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas, tumors ≤ 2 cm in length and absence of ulcer or ulcer-scar. During study period, a total of 308 lesions in 297 patients were included. SM or LV invasion was detected in 34 lesions (34/308, 11.0%). Multivariate analysis revealed that a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (odds ratio [OR] 4.157, P = 0.000) and location of the stomach (the upper and middle third; OR 3.100, P = 0.008) were significant risk factors for SM or LV invasion. Careful consideration of endoscopic treatment decision might be necessary for the patients with a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma and EGC located on the upper and middle third of the stomach. PMID:27258528

  11. Relationship between lymphovascular invasion and clinicopathological features of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Atakan; Celik, Mehmet; Bulbul, Buket Yilmaz; Can, Nuray; Tastekin, Ebru; Ayturk, Semra; Ustun, Funda; Guldiken, Sibel; Sut, Necdet

    2017-01-01

    Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is an important prognostic factor in various solid tumors, however, data on the association between LVI and thyroid carcinomas are limited. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between LVI and clinicopathological features of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Six hundred seventy-eight patients diagnosed with PTC between 2012 and 2015 were included into the study. Patients were classified based on the presence or absence of LVI. Gender, age, ultrasonography (US), tumor size and multifocality, BRAFV600E mutation, perineural and capsular invasion, extrathyroid extension (ETE), nodal metastasis, and recurrences were evaluated, and risk analysis was performed for each parameter. The number of patients with LVI [LVI (+)] was 63, while the number of patients without LVI [LVI (-)] was 615. The female/male ratio was 564/114. LVI was present in 18.4% of male patients and in 7.4 % of female patients. In the age group between 17-25 years LVI was detected in 6/13 patients, and this result was statistically significant compared to other age groups (p = 0.004). Suspicious lymph nodes upon US, perineural or capsular invasion, ETE, tumor size, and nodal metastasis were significantly more frequent in LVI (+) group (p < 0.001). The frequency of BRAFV600E mutation was also significantly higher in LVI (+) group (p < 0.001). Overall, the presence of LVI was associated with gender, tumor size, age, lymph node metastasis, pathological lymph nodes, perineural and capsular invasion, ETE, and BRAFV600E mutation. These results suggest that in PTC patients undergoing thyroidectomy, the presence of LVI should be considered as an indicator of aggressive clinicopathological features and those patients should be followed up carefully for recurrences and metastasis. PMID:28284178

  12. Endometrial Cancer: Combined MR Volumetry and Diffusion-weighted Imaging for Assessment of Myometrial and Lymphovascular Invasion and Tumor Grade.

    PubMed

    Nougaret, Stephanie; Reinhold, Caroline; Alsharif, Shaza S; Addley, Helen; Arceneau, Jocelyne; Molinari, Nicolas; Guiu, Boris; Sala, Evis

    2015-09-01

    To investigate magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry of endometrial tumors and its association with deep myometrial invasion, tumor grade, and lymphovascular invasion and to assess the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histographic analysis of the whole tumor volume for prediction of tumor grade and lymphovascular invasion. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study; patient consent was not required. Between May 2010 and May 2012, 70 women (mean age, 64 years; range, 24-91 years) with endometrial cancer underwent preoperative MR imaging, including axial oblique and sagittal T2-weighted, dynamic contrast material-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted imaging. Volumetry of the tumor and uterus was performed during the six sequences, with manual tracing of each section, and the tumor volume ratio (TVR) was calculated. ADC histograms were generated from pixel ADCs from the whole tumor volume. The threshold of TVR associated with myometrial invasion was assessed by using receiver operating characteristic curves. An independent sample Mann Whitney U test was used to compare differences in ADCs, skewness, and kurtosis between tumor grade and the presence of lymphovascular invasion. No significant difference in tumor volume and TVR was found among the six MR imaging sequences (P = .95 and .86, respectively). A TVR greater than or equal to 25% allowed prediction of deep myometrial invasion with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 93% (area under the curve, 0.96; 95% confidence interval: 0.86, 0.99) at axial oblique diffusion-weighted imaging. A TVR of greater than or equal to 25% was associated with grade 3 tumors (P = .0007) and with lymphovascular invasion (P < .0001). There was no significant difference in the ADCs between grades 1 and 2 tumors (P > .05). The minimum, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th percentile ADCs were significantly lower in grade 3 tumors than in grades 1 and 2 tumors (P < .02). The combination of whole tumor volume and ADC

  13. Endometrial Cancer: Combined MR Volumetry and Diffusion-weighted Imaging for Assessment of Myometrial and Lymphovascular Invasion and Tumor Grade

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, Caroline; Alsharif, Shaza S.; Addley, Helen; Arceneau, Jocelyne; Molinari, Nicolas; Guiu, Boris; Sala, Evis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry of endometrial tumors and its association with deep myometrial invasion, tumor grade, and lymphovascular invasion and to assess the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histographic analysis of the whole tumor volume for prediction of tumor grade and lymphovascular invasion. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this retrospective study; patient consent was not required. Between May 2010 and May 2012, 70 women (mean age, 64 years; range, 24–91 years) with endometrial cancer underwent preoperative MR imaging, including axial oblique and sagittal T2-weighted, dynamic contrast material–enhanced, and diffusion-weighted imaging. Volumetry of the tumor and uterus was performed during the six sequences, with manual tracing of each section, and the tumor volume ratio (TVR) was calculated. ADC histograms were generated from pixel ADCs from the whole tumor volume. The threshold of TVR associated with myometrial invasion was assessed by using receiver operating characteristic curves. An independent sample Mann Whitney U test was used to compare differences in ADCs, skewness, and kurtosis between tumor grade and the presence of lymphovascular invasion. Results No significant difference in tumor volume and TVR was found among the six MR imaging sequences (P = .95 and .86, respectively). A TVR greater than or equal to 25% allowed prediction of deep myometrial invasion with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 93% (area under the curve, 0.96; 95% confidence interval: 0.86, 0.99) at axial oblique diffusion-weighted imaging. A TVR of greater than or equal to 25% was associated with grade 3 tumors (P = .0007) and with lymphovascular invasion (P < .0001). There was no significant difference in the ADCs between grades 1 and 2 tumors (P > .05). The minimum, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th percentile ADCs were significantly lower in grade 3 tumors than in grades 1 and 2 tumors (P < .02

  14. Lymphovascular space invasion portends poor prognosis in low-risk endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Ricardo; Burzawa, Jennifer K.; Tsunoda, Audrey T.; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Frumovitz, Michael; Westin, Shannon N.; Munsell, Mark F.; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prognostic significance of lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer is not established. We sought to determine if LVSI status in patients with early-stage low-risk endometrial cancer correlates with recurrence and survival. Methods The records of all women who underwent hysterectomy for primary treatment of endometrial cancer from January 2006 through January 2011 at one academic institution were reviewed. Patients with grade 1 or 2 endometrioid histology, myometrial invasion less than 50%, and disease confined to the uterus (clinical FIGO stage IA) were analyzed. Fisher’s exact test and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test were applied to compare patients with and without LVSI. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Two hundred forty patients met the inclusion criteria. Forty (16.7%) had LVSI. Ninety-one patients (37.9%) underwent lymphadenectomy. Median tumor size was 30 mm in patients with and 26 mm in patients without LVSI (p=0.150). Thirty patients (12.5%) received adjuvant therapy. Site of recurrence did not differ between patients with and without LVSI. Patients with LVSI were more likely to have myometrial invasion (p<0.001), postoperative pathologic grade 2 disease (p<0.001), to undergo lymphadenectomy (p=0.049) and receive adjuvant therapy (p<0.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence of recurrence was 3.8% in the no-LVSI group and 14.2% in the LVSI group (p=0.053). The presence of LVSI was significantly associated with worse RFS (p=0.002) and OS (p=0.013). Conclusion Patients with low-risk endometrial cancer and LVSI have worse RFS and OS despite being more likely to undergo lymphadenectomy and adjuvant therapy. PMID:26067863

  15. Extent of lymphovascular space invasion may predict lymph node metastasis in uterine serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yushen; Pollom, Erqi L; Nwachukwu, Chika; Seiger, Kira; von Eyben, Rie; Folkins, Ann K; Kidd, Elizabeth A

    2017-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that extent of lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) predicts for risk of lymph node metastasis in endometrioid uterine cancers. However, this correlation remains unknown in the setting of uterine serous carcinoma (USC). We sought to examine the association between extent of LVSI and other histopathologic characteristics with risk of nodal metastasis for women with USC. Pathological data from all cases of uterine serous carcinoma between July 1998 to July 2015 at our institution were reviewed. Descriptive, univariate, and multivariate logistic regression analysis of selected pathologic features were performed. 88 patients with USC underwent total abdominal or laparoscopic hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and selective lymphadenectomy. Surgical staging revealed the following FIGO stage distributions: I (41%), II (8%), III (32%), IV (19%). LVSI was present in 44 (50%) patients. 36 patients (41%) had LN metastases with median number of total nodes removed of 17 (range, 1-49). On univariate analysis, depth of myometrial invasion, LVSI, tumor size, and cervical stromal involvement were significantly associated with nodal involvement. In a multivariate model, LVSI (OR 6.25, 95% CI 2.2-18.0, p<0.01) and cervical stromal involvement (OR 3.33, 95% CI 1.10-10.0, p=0.03) were the only factors that remained significant. Among patients with LVSI-positive disease, extensive LVSI was associated with increased risk of nodal involvement compared to focal LVSI (90% vs 29%, p=0.04). Presence and extent of LVSI, and cervical stromal invasion are important predictors for lymph node metastasis in uterine serous carcinoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA copy number aberrations associated with lymphovascular invasion in upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Taku; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Miyachika, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Satoshi; Chochi, Yasuyo; Nakao, Motonao; Nagao, Kazuhiro; Hara, Takahiko; Sakano, Shigeru; Furuya, Tomoko; Oga, Atsunori; Kawauchi, Shigeto; Sasaki, Kohsuke; Matsuyama, Hideyasu

    2012-06-01

    Recent studies have reported that lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is a predictor of patient prognosis in upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUTUC). DNA copy number aberrations (DCNAs) identified by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) had not previously been examined in UUTUC. We therefore examined DCNAs in UUTUC and compared them with DCNAs in LVI. We applied aCGH technology using DNA chips spotted with 4,030 BAC clones to 32 UUTUC patients. Frequent copy number gains were detected on chromosomal regions 8p23.1 and 20q13.12, whereas frequent copy number losses were detected on chromosomal regions 13q21.1, 17p13.1, 6q16.3, and 17p11.2. DCNAs occurred more frequently in tumors with LVI than in those without it (P = 0.0002), and this parameter was more closely associated with LVI than with the tumor grade or pT stage. Disease-specific survival rate was higher in tumors without LVI than in those with it (P = 0.0120); however, tumor grade and stage were not significant prognostic factors of patient outcome. These data support our hypothesis that tumors with LVI have more genetic alterations in terms of total numbers of DCNAs than those without, and provide proof that aggressive adjuvant therapy should be considered for UUTUC patients with LVI.

  17. Median Survival Time of Endometrial Cancer Patients with Lymphovascular Invasion at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Asyikeen, Wan Adnan Wan Nor; Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Jalil, Nur Asyilla Che; Zin, Anani Aila Mat; Othman, Nor Hayati

    2016-11-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecologic malignancy among females worldwide. The purpose of this study was to determine the median survival time of endometrial cancer patients at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). A list of 121 endometrial cancer cases registered at Hospital USM between 2000 until 2011 was retrospectively reviewed. The survival time of the endometrial cancer patients was estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Log-rank tests were performed to compare the survival of the patients based on socio-demographics and clinical presentation. Only 108 patients, 87.0%, were included who were of Malay ethnicity. Previous history included menopause in 67.6% of patients and diabetes mellitus in 39.8% of patients; additionally, 63.4% of patients were nulliparous. Tumour staging was as follows: 24.5% stage I, 10.8% stage II, 26.5% stage III and 38.2% stage IV. The overall median survival time of the endometrial cancer patients was 70.20 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 51.79, 88.61). The significant factors were age, the presence of lymphovascular invasion and treatment received. The overall survival of endometrial cancer was low. A prospective study needs to be carried out to discover more effective and accurate tests for the early detection of endometrial cancer.

  18. Median Survival Time of Endometrial Cancer Patients with Lymphovascular Invasion at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Asyikeen, Wan Adnan Wan Nor; Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Jalil, Nur Asyilla Che; Zin, Anani Aila Mat; Othman, Nor Hayati

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecologic malignancy among females worldwide. The purpose of this study was to determine the median survival time of endometrial cancer patients at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). Methods A list of 121 endometrial cancer cases registered at Hospital USM between 2000 until 2011 was retrospectively reviewed. The survival time of the endometrial cancer patients was estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Log-rank tests were performed to compare the survival of the patients based on socio-demographics and clinical presentation. Results Only 108 patients, 87.0%, were included who were of Malay ethnicity. Previous history included menopause in 67.6% of patients and diabetes mellitus in 39.8% of patients; additionally, 63.4% of patients were nulliparous. Tumour staging was as follows: 24.5% stage I, 10.8% stage II, 26.5% stage III and 38.2% stage IV. The overall median survival time of the endometrial cancer patients was 70.20 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 51.79, 88.61). The significant factors were age, the presence of lymphovascular invasion and treatment received. Conclusion The overall survival of endometrial cancer was low. A prospective study needs to be carried out to discover more effective and accurate tests for the early detection of endometrial cancer. PMID:28090178

  19. The prognostic significance of lymphovascular space invasion in laparoscopic versus abdominal hysterectomy for endometrioid endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Dewdney, S B; Jiao, Z; Roma, A A; Gao, F; Rimel, B J; Thaker, P H; Powell, M A; Massad, L S; Mutch, D G; Zighelboim, I

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that uterine manipulators can induce lymphovascular space involvement (LVSI) by endometrial cancer in laparoscopic hysterectomy specimens. The prognostic significance of this phenomenon known as "vascular pseudo invasion" remains elusive. The authors conducted a retrospective, single institution study of patients who underwent initial surgery for grade 1 and grade 2 endometrioid endometrial cancers with LVSI. Cases were stratified by surgical approach (laparoscopy vs laparotomy). Clinicopathologic and procedure characteristics as well as outcome data were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method. A total of 104 cases (20 laparoscopic, 84 laparotomy) were analyzed. Mean age (65 vs 64 years, respectively), stage distribution, mean number of lymph nodes sampled (18 vs 21, respectively) and use of adjuvant therapy was similar for both groups (p > 0.05). Mean body mass index (BMI) was 30 vs 35 kg/m2, respectively (p = 0.002). Mean follow up was 24 months (range 0.1-102). Univariate analysis demonstrated that LVSI in the laparoscopic setting was associated with worse DFS (p = 0.002). After adjusting for grade the risk of recurrence remained higher for laparoscopic cases (HR: 15.7, 95% CI 1.7-140.0, p = 0.014). Adjusted risk of recurrence associated with LVSI is higher in cases approached laparoscopically arguing against the concept of "vascular pseudo invasion" associated with the use of uterine manipulators and balloons. LVSI should be regarded as a serious risk factor and taken into account for triage to adjuvant therapies, even in laparoscopically treated early-stage endometrial cancer.

  20. Combining lymphovascular invasion with reactive stromal grade predicts prostate cancer mortality.

    PubMed

    Saeter, Thorstein; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Waaler, Gudmund; Servoll, Einar; Nesland, Jahn M; Axcrona, Karol; Axcrona, Ulrika

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that lymphovascular invasion (LVI) has a weak and variable effect on prognosis. It is uncertain whether LVI, determined by diagnostic prostate biopsy, predicts prostate cancer death. Data from experimental studies have indicated that carcinoma-associated fibroblasts in the reactive stroma could promote LVI and progression to metastasis. Thus, combining LVI with reactive stromal grade may identify prostate cancer patients at high risk of an unfavorable outcome. The purpose of the present study was to examine if LVI, determined by diagnostic biopsy, alone and in combination with reactive stromal grade could predict prostate cancer death. This population-based study included 283 patients with prostate cancer diagnosed by needle biopsy in Aust-Agder County (Norway) from 1991 to 1999. Clinical data were obtained by medical charts review. Two uropathologists evaluated LVI and reactive stromal grade. The endpoint was prostate cancer death. Patients with LVI had marginally higher risk of prostate cancer death compared to patients without LVI (hazard ratio: 1.8, P-value = 0.04). LVI had a stronger effect on prostate cancer death risk when a high reactive stromal grade was present (hazard ratio: 16.0, P-value <0.001). Therefore, patients with concomitant LVI and high reactive stromal grade were at particularly high risk for prostate cancer death. Evaluating LVI together with reactive stromal grade on diagnostic biopsies could be used to identify patients at high risk of death from prostate cancer. Prostate 76:1088-1094, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Non-small cell lung cancer: Whole-lesion histogram analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient for assessment of tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Naoko; Doai, Mariko; Usuda, Katsuo; Uramoto, Hidetaka

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Investigating the diagnostic accuracy of histogram analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for determining non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor grades, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. Materials and methods We studied 60 surgically diagnosed NSCLC patients. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in the axial plane using a navigator-triggered single-shot, echo-planar imaging sequence with prospective acquisition correction. The ADC maps were generated, and we placed a volume-of-interest on the tumor to construct the whole-lesion histogram. Using the histogram, we calculated the mean, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles of ADC, skewness, and kurtosis. Histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. We performed a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to assess the diagnostic performance of histogram parameters for distinguishing different pathologic features. Results The ADC mean, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles showed significant differences among the tumor grades. The ADC mean, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were significant histogram parameters between high- and low-grade tumors. The ROC analysis between high- and low-grade tumors showed that the 95th percentile ADC achieved the highest area under curve (AUC) at 0.74. Lymphovascular invasion was associated with the ADC mean, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles, skewness, and kurtosis. Kurtosis achieved the highest AUC at 0.809. Pleural invasion was only associated with skewness, with the AUC of 0.648. Conclusions ADC histogram analyses on the basis of the entire tumor volume are able to stratify NSCLCs' tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion. PMID:28207858

  2. Non-small cell lung cancer: Whole-lesion histogram analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient for assessment of tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naoko; Doai, Mariko; Usuda, Katsuo; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Tonami, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the diagnostic accuracy of histogram analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for determining non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor grades, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. We studied 60 surgically diagnosed NSCLC patients. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in the axial plane using a navigator-triggered single-shot, echo-planar imaging sequence with prospective acquisition correction. The ADC maps were generated, and we placed a volume-of-interest on the tumor to construct the whole-lesion histogram. Using the histogram, we calculated the mean, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles of ADC, skewness, and kurtosis. Histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. We performed a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to assess the diagnostic performance of histogram parameters for distinguishing different pathologic features. The ADC mean, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles showed significant differences among the tumor grades. The ADC mean, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were significant histogram parameters between high- and low-grade tumors. The ROC analysis between high- and low-grade tumors showed that the 95th percentile ADC achieved the highest area under curve (AUC) at 0.74. Lymphovascular invasion was associated with the ADC mean, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles, skewness, and kurtosis. Kurtosis achieved the highest AUC at 0.809. Pleural invasion was only associated with skewness, with the AUC of 0.648. ADC histogram analyses on the basis of the entire tumor volume are able to stratify NSCLCs' tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion.

  3. Impact of depth and extent of lymphovascular space invasion on lymph node metastasis and recurrence patterns in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Koji; Garcia-Sayre, Jocelyn; Medeiros, Fabiola; Casabar, Jennifer K; Machida, Hiroko; Moeini, Aida; Roman, Lynda D

    2015-11-01

    To determine the significance of depth and extent of lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) on lymph node metastasis and recurrence in endometrial cancer. A case-control study was conducted to examine LVSI-positive (n = 70) and LVSI-negative (n = 641) stage I-III endometrial cancer cases that underwent hysterectomy-based surgical staging. The risk of lymph node metastasis and distant recurrence was estimated based on LVSI patterns. In multivariate analysis, deep (>50% invasion), and extensive (≥7 foci/slide) LVSI patterns had a significantly increased risk of lymph node metastasis (incidence 57.6% and 72.7%, odds ratio 33.8 and 49.9, respectively, P < 0.001) as compared to other traditional uterine factors (>50% myometrial tumor invasion, cervical stromal invasion, and adnexal involvement: incidence range 30.4-37.9%, odds ratio range 3.80-7.03). Deep and extensive of LVSI patterns were both significantly correlated to distant recurrence (P < 0.001). Among women who received postoperative chemotherapy, deep and extensive LVSI patterns did not have increased risks for distant recurrence compared to no LVSI (P = 0.47 and 0.32, respectively). Among women who received postoperative radiotherapy, the depth of LVSI was significantly associated with recurrence outside the radiated field (P = 0.02). Depth and extent of LVSI are important predictors for lymph node metastasis and distant recurrence in endometrial cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Esophageal adenocarcinoma and obesity: peritumoral adipose tissue plays a role in lymph node invasion.

    PubMed

    Trevellin, Elisabetta; Scarpa, Marco; Carraro, Amedeo; Lunardi, Francesca; Kotsafti, Andromachi; Porzionato, Andrea; Saadeh, Luca; Cagol, Matteo; Alfieri, Rita; Tedeschi, Umberto; Calabrese, Fiorella; Castoro, Carlo; Vettor, Roberto

    2015-05-10

    Obesity is associated with cancer risk in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Adipose tissue directly stimulates tumor progression independently from body mass index (BMI), but the mechanisms are not fully understood. We studied the morphological, histological and molecular characteristics of peritumoral and distal adipose tissue of 60 patients with EAC, to investigate whether depot-specific differences affect tumor behavior. We observed that increased adipocyte size (a hallmark of obesity) was directly associated with leptin expression, angiogenesis (CD31) and lymphangiogenesis (podoplanin); however, these parameters were associated with nodal metastasis only in peritumoral but not distal adipose tissue of patients. We treated OE33 cells with conditioned media (CM) collected from cultured biopsies of adipose tissue and we observed increased mRNA levels of leptin and adiponectin receptors, as well as two key regulator genes of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT): alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and E-cadherin. This effect was greater in cells treated with CM from peritumoral adipose tissue of patients with nodal metastasis and was partially blunted by a leptin antagonist. Therefore, peritumoral adipose tissue may exert a direct effect on the progression of EAC by secreting depot-specific paracrine factors, and leptin is a key player in this crosstalk.

  5. Lymph node metastasis and pattern of recurrence in clinically early stage endometrial cancer with positive lymphovascular space invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Amelia; Nutter, Benjamin; Michener, Chad; Rose, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the rate, predictors of lymph node metastasis (LNM) and pattern of recurrence in clinically early stage endometrial cancer (EC) with positive lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI). Methods Women with clinically early stage EC and positive LVSI 2005 to 2012 were identified. Kaplan-Meier curves and logistic regression models were used. Results One hundred forty-eight women were identified. Of them, 25.7% had LNM (21.7% pelvic LNM, 18.5% para-aortic LNM). Among patients with LNM who had both pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy, isolated pelvic, para-aortic and both LNM were noted in 51.4%, 17.1%, and 31.4% respectively. Age and depth of myometrial invasion were significant predictors of LNM in LVSI positive EC. Node positive patients had high recurrence rate (47% vs. 11.8%, p<0.05) especially distant (60.9% vs. 7.9%, p<0.001) and para-aortic (13.2% vs. 1.8%, p=0.017) recurrences compared to node negative EC. LNM was associated with lower progression-free survival (p=0.002) but not overall survival (p=0.73). Conclusion EC with positive LVSI is associated with high risk of LNM. LNM is associated with high recurrence rate especially distant and para-aortic recurrences. Adjuvant treatments should target prevention of recurrences in these areas. PMID:25686395

  6. Preoperative CA125 and fibrinogen in patients with endometrial cancer: a risk model for predicting lymphovascular space invasion

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to build a model to predict the risk of lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) in women with endometrial cancer (EC). Methods From December 2010 to June 2013, 211 patients with EC undergoing surgery at Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital were enrolled in this retrospective study. Those patients were divided into a positive LVSI group and a negative LVSI group. The clinical and pathological characteristics were compared between the two groups; logistic regression was used to explore risk factors associated with LVSI occurrence. The threshold values of significant factors were calculated to build a risk model and predict LVSI. Results There were 190 patients who were negative for LVSI and 21 patients were positive for LVSI out of 211 patients with EC. It was found that tumor grade, depth of myometrial invasion, number of pelvic lymph nodes, and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (p<0.05) were associated with LVSI occurrence. However, cervical involvement and age (p>0.05) were not associated with LVSI. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves revealed that the threshold values of the following factors were correlated with positive LVSI: 28.1 U/mL of CA19-9, 21.2 U/mL of CA125, 2.58 mg/dL of fibrinogen (Fn), 1.84 U/mL of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and (6.35×109)/L of white blood cell (WBC). Logistic regression analysis indicated that CA125 ≥21.2 (p=0.032) and Fn ≥2.58 mg/dL (p=0.014) were significantly associated with LVSI. Conclusion Positive LVSI could be predicted by CA125 ≥21.2 U/mL and Fn ≥2.58 mg/dL in women with EC. It could help gynecologists better adapt surgical staging and adjuvant therapies. PMID:27894164

  7. Factors affecting tumor recurrence after curative surgery for NSCLC: impacts of lymphovascular invasion on early tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chanyeong; Jang, Seung Hun; Lee, Jae Woong

    2014-01-01

    Background Although surgery is potentially curative treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the risk of postoperative disease recurrence is still high. This study was conducted to assess the factors associated with postoperative tumor recurrence in patients who underwent curative surgery for NSCLC. Methods One hundred seventy-one patients who underwent curative surgery for NSCLC were included in this study. Clinicopathological factors of histologic type, pathologic TNM stage, T stage, N stage, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), perineural invasion (PNI), surgical procedure, adjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy were investigated. Gender, age, and clinicopathologic factors were included in univariate and multivariate analyses using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model, respectively. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to investigate the significance of differences in recurrence-free interval (RFI) according to clinicopathological factors. Results Median RFI was 20 months. Univariate and multivariate analyses for overall recurrence identified T stage, N stage, and LVI as significant factors (P=0.045, 0.044, and <0.001, respectively). Pathologic stage (P=0.005) was the only factor that was significantly associated with locoregional recurrence. T stage (P=0.040) and LVI (P<0.001) were significantly associated with distant recurrence. The difference in 2-year freedom from recurrence between LVI positive and negative groups was significant (14.9% vs. 44.6%, P<0.001). LVI was the only factor that was significantly associated with a shortened mean RFI (P<0.001). Conclusions LVI had a significant effect on both overall and distant recurrence rates as well as on early tumor recurrence after curative surgery for NSCLC. PMID:25364519

  8. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Evans, Andrew J; Delahunt, Brett; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David F; van der Kwast, Theo H; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars L; Humphrey, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a disease), bladder neck invasion, lymphovascular invasion and the definition of pT4 were coordinated by working group 3. It was agreed that prostate cancer can be categorized as pT3a in the absence of adipose tissue involvement when cancer bulges beyond the contour of the gland or beyond the condensed smooth muscle of the prostate at posterior and posterolateral sites. Extraprostatic extension can also be identified anteriorly. It was agreed that the location of extraprostatic extension should be reported. Although there was consensus that the amount of extraprostatic extension should be quantitated, there was no agreement as to which method of quantitation should be employed. There was overwhelming consensus that microscopic urinary bladder neck invasion by carcinoma should be reported as stage pT3a and that lymphovascular invasion by carcinoma should be reported. It is recommended that these elements are considered in the development of practice guidelines and in the daily practice of urological surgical pathology.

  9. Does Lymphovascular Invasion Predict Regional Nodal Failure in Breast Cancer Patients With Zero to Three Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy? Implications for Regional Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Boutrus, Rimoun; Abi-Raad, Rita; Niemierko, Andrzej; Brachtel, Elena F.; Rizk, Levi; Kelada, Alexandra; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between lymphovascular invasion (LVI) and regional nodal failure (RNF) in breast cancer patients with zero to three positive nodes treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 1,257 breast cancer patients with zero to three positive lymph nodes were reviewed. All patients were treated with BCT at Massachusetts General Hospital from 1980 to December 2003. Lymphovascular invasion was diagnosed by hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and in some cases supported by immunohistochemical stains. Regional nodal failure was defined as recurrence in the ipsilateral supraclavicular, axillary, or internal mammary lymph nodes. Regional nodal failure was diagnosed by clinical and/or radiologic examination. Results: The median follow-up was 8 years (range, 0.1-21 years). Lymphovascular invasion was present in 211 patients (17%). In univariate analysis, patients with LVI had a higher rate of RNF (3.32% vs. 1.15%; p = 0.02). In multivariate analysis, only tumor size, grade, and local failure were significant predictors of RNF (p = 0.049, 0.013, and 0.0001, respectively), whereas LVI did not show a significant relationship with RNF (hazard ratio = 2.07; 95% CI, 0.8-5.5; p = 0.143). The presence of LVI in the T2/3 population did not increase the risk of RNF over that for those with no LVI (p = 0.15). In addition, patients with Grade 3 tumors and positive LVI did not have a higher risk of RNF than those without LVI (p = 0.96). Conclusion: These results suggest that LVI can not be used as a sole indicator for regional nodal irradiation in breast cancer patients with zero to three positive lymph nodes treated with BCT.

  10. High expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 is predictive of lymphovascular invasion and poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cong, Zhuangzhuang; Wu, Haiwei; Guo, Zhong; Qin, Tao; Xu, Yang; Jing, Hua; Wang, Yanqing; Shen, Yi

    2017-06-01

    C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 have been shown to play oncogenic role individually. This study aimed to determine the combinatorial role of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 in lung adenocarcinoma. Expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 was detected in resected tumor samples from 185 patients with lung adenocarcinoma at stage I-IIIa by immunohistochemistry. Correlations of their immunoscores with clinicopathological characteristics and disease-specific survival were retrospectively investigated. A three-dimensional capillary-like sprouting model was established to assess the effects of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 on angiogenesis in vitro. The results revealed that expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 was elevated in lung adenocarcinoma tissues. The high co-expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 was significantly correlated with tumor size, tumor status, nodal status, tumor stage, and lymphovascular invasion, as well as decreased disease-specific survival. Multivariate analysis showed that lymphovascular invasion (hazard ratio: 0.205, 95% confidence interval: 0.086-0.491, p < 0.0001) and co-expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 (hazard ratio: 0.293, 95% confidence interval: 0.168-0.510, p < 0.0001) were independent indicators of poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, Notch1 enhanced the effects of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 to promote angiogenesis by regulating Flt1 and Flt4 in vitro. In conclusion, co-expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 is associated with tumor progression and lymphovascular invasion and is an independent indicator of poor survival in lung adenocarcinoma. In lung adenocarcinoma patients with high C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 and Notch1 expression, simultaneous inhibition of both factors might be an effective treatment strategy.

  11. Relationship between high density of peritumoral lymphatic vessels and biological behavior of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    En-Lin, Song; Wei-Wei, Yu; Xiao-Liang, Xiong; Juan, Xu

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis in cervical squamous carcinoma. Eighty cases of invasive cervical squamous cancer were selected as objects of our study. Double immunohistochemical staining with antibodies against lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 and Ki-67 was used to label the lymphatic vessels and mark the proliferative lymphatic vessels in cervical squamous cancer. The peritumoral lymphatic vessel density and intratumoral lymphatic vessel density was assessed. The lymphatic vessels proliferation index was evaluated by calculating Ki-67 proliferation index (PI) to reflect the lymphangiogenesis of cervical squamous cancer. Then the correlation between lymphangiogenesis and clinicopathologic features of cervical squamous cancer was analyzed. The LVD of cervical cancer (15.23 ± 3.6) was clearly higher than that of the adjacent normal cervical subepithelial tissues (9.9 ± 2.5, P < 0.001). The peritumoral lymphatic vessel density of cervical cancer (18.75 ± 4.3) was significantly higher than the intratumoral lymphatic vessel density of cervical cancer (11.71 ± 4.9, P < 0.001). Lymphatic PI (LPI) of cervical cancer (0.258 ± 0.07) was higher than that of the adjacent normal cervical subepithelial tissues (0.068 ± 0.08, P < 0.001). The peritumoral lymphatic vessel PI of cervical cancer (0.324 ± 0.06) was notably higher than the intratumoral lymphatic vessel PI of cervical cancer (0.232 ± 0.06, P < 0.001). Peritumoral lymphatic vessel density and peritumoral lymphatic vessel were clearly associated with the lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively) and lymphovascular space invasion (P = 0.024 and P = 0.01, respectively). The high density of peritumoral lymphatic vessels is a potential predictor of more aggressive phenotype of cervical squamous cancer.

  12. Peritumoral fibrosis in basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma mimicking perineural invasion: potential pitfall in Mohs micrographic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hassanein, Ashraf M; Proper, Steven A; Depcik-Smith, Natalie D; Flowers, Franklin P

    2005-09-01

    Perineural invasion (PI) in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is linked to an aggressive course. We describe a histologic mimic for PI that we termed peritumoral fibrosis (PF). To describe the morphologic changes associated with PF and to determine the incidence of PF and PI in Mohs frozen sections of BCC and SCC. All cases of BCC and SCC that were treated by Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) at the Skin and Cancer Center, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, and the Center for Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Tampa, Florida, during the period from January 1, 2003, to August 1, 2004, were reviewed for the presence of PI and PF. The latter was defined as the presence of concentric layers of fibrous tissue that either surround and/or were surrounded by tumor formations mimicking perineural or intraneural invasion. Seven hundred six cases of BCC and 264 cases of SCC were surveyed. Eleven cases (10 BCC and 1 SCC) with equivocal areas were destained, and immunohistochemical staining with S-100 protein was performed, proving actual PI in all of these cases. Available original hematoxylin-eosin biopsy slides were correlated with the MMS frozen sections. PF was noticed in 4.5% of SCCs and 5.8% of BCCs. The incidence of unequivocal PI was noted to be 2.6% in SCC and 2.1% in BCC. We describe a specific pattern of fibrosis noted in BCC and SCC that we called PF. It shows concentric layers of fibrous tissue surrounding and/or surrounded by tumor formations and resembles carcinomatous perineural and/or intraneural invasion. Moreover, PF was found to be a sensitive marker for PI. Mohs micrographic surgeons should be aware of this phenomenon to avoid triggering unnecessary steps in managing these cases, such as irradiation.

  13. Peritumoral stromal remodeling, pattern of invasion and expression of c-met/HGF in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri, FIGO stages III and IV.

    PubMed

    Horn, L-C; Hommel, N; Roschlau, U; Bilek, K; Hentschel, B; Einenkel, J

    2012-07-01

    Different patterns of invasion (PIs) have prognostic impact in several types of cancer and are associated with different grades of peritumoral stromal remodeling, characterized by the desmoplastic stromal response (DSR). One key regulator influencing cellular motility and peritumoral stromal response is c-met/HGF. This study evaluates the association between different PI, peritumoral DSR and its correlation to the expression of c-met/HGF in squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix (CX). 131 advanced stage CX (FIGO III/IV) were re-evaluated histologically regarding PI, using a two-level scoring system. The tumor grows in solid cords/trabeculae in finger-like PI and in very small groups or single cells in spray-like PI. DSR was categorized as none/weak and moderate/strong. The tumors were stained with antibodies against c-met and HGF. The staining of >30% of tumor cells was defined as overexpression. The PI was correlated to the prognostic outcome, different categories of DSR and expression status of c-met and HGF. 66.4% of the tumors showed a finger-like, and 33.6% a spray-like PI. The spray-like PI showed a reduced two-year overall survival when compared to the finger-like PI (14.0% vs. 29.1%, respectively; p=0.012), and was associated with moderate/strong DSR. The majority of the tumors showed overexpression of c-met (85.4%) and HGF (74.8%). There was no correlation between the expression status of c-met/HGF and the FIGO stage, peritumoral DSR or the prognostic outcome. Spray-like PI is of prognostic impact in cervical carcinoma FIGO III/IV and is associated with strong peritumoral stromal remodeling. There is no prognostic impact of the immunohistochemical expression of c-met/HGF in advanced stage cervical carcinomas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prognostic role of lymphatic vessel density and lymphovascular invasion in chemotherapy-naive and chemotherapy-treated patients with invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niemiec, Joanna A; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Mucha-Małecka, Anna; Wysocki, Wojciech M; Biesaga, Beata; Ziobro, Marek; Cedrych, Ida; Grela-Wojewoda, Aleksandra; Domagała-Haduch, Małgorzata; Wysocka, Joanna; Ryś, Janusz; Sas-Korczyńska, Beata

    2017-01-01

    It is assumed that the spread of breast cancer cells via the lymphatic system might be influenced by inflammatory reactions and/or the application of chemotherapy or molecularly targeted therapy. Therefore, we analysed survival according to lymphatic vessel density (LVD), lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (both assessed using podoplanin as immunohistochemical marker of lymphatic endothelium) and well-established clinico-pathological features in a group of 358 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer: 139 chemotherapy-naïve (pT1-2/pN0/M0) and 219 treated with chemotherapy (pT1-4/pN1-3/M0). Univariate analysis revealed that high LVD was related to unfavourable disease-free survival (DFS) in pN0/chemotherapy/trastuzumab-naïve patients (P = 0.028). Conversely, in pN+/chemotherapy-treated individuals high LVD was related to favourable DFS (P = 0.019). LVI was a significant indicator of survival (P = 0.005) only in pN0/chemotherapy/trastuzumab-naïve patients. The following parameters were significant independent adverse prognostic factors for DFS: (i) in pN0/chemotherapy/trastuzumab-naïve patients: high LVD (LVD > 7 vessels/mm2; RR = 2.7, P = 0.039), LVI (RR = 3.3, P = 0.046) and high tumor grade (G3 vs. G1 + G2; RR = 2.6, P = 0.030); (ii) in pN+/chemotherapy/trastuzumab-treated patients: low LVD (RR = 1.8, P = 0.042), the number of involved lymph nodes (pN3 vs. pN1-2; RR = 2.3, P = 0.012) and the breast cancer subtype (expression of steroid receptors together with HER2 immunonegativity and high proliferation index vs. other breast cancer immunophenotypes; RR = 3.0, P < 0.001). High LVD may identify high progression risk in pN0/chemotherapy/trastuzumab-naïve patients, and low progression risk in pN+/chemotherapy-treated patients. This phenomenon might be explained by potential involvement of lymphangiogenesis in two processes related to cancer eradication: a chemotherapy-stimulated activity of the immune system against cancer cells, or increased tumour drainage

  15. Prognostic Implication of Lymphovascular Invasion Detected by Double Immunostaining for D2-40 and MITF1 in Primary Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Laurence; Tetzlaff, Michael; Fox, Patricia; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; Curry, Jonathan; Ivan, Doina; Torres Cabala, Carlos A; Prieto, Victor G; Aung, Phyu P

    2016-07-01

    Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is associated with adverse outcomes in primary cutaneous melanoma (PCM). Detection of LVI by hematoxylin and eosin staining alone is 0%-6%, but targeting lymphovascular structures increases the detection rate. To examine the prognostic significance of LVI detected by immunostaining for D2-40 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor 1 (MITF1) in PCM. The authors retrospectively analyzed 120 PCM samples. We compared the LVI detection rates of immunostaining for D2-40 only (22%), double staining for D2-40 and MITF1 (38%), and hematoxylin and eosin, and examined the association of LVI with clinicopathologic variables and clinical outcomes. Immunolabeling with both methods significantly increased the LVI detection rate. Double staining for D2-40 and MITF1 as well as D2-40-detected LVI was significantly associated with increased Breslow thickness, number of mitoses, and sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis. D2-40-detected LVI was also associated with ulceration. Although the difference was not significant, double staining for D2-40 and MITF1 allowed for easier detection of LVI than D2-40 alone. This study was conducted in a tertiary referral institution; therefore, a referral bias cannot be excluded. Immunolabeling increased detection of LVI in PCM. Because LVI is a positive predictive marker for SLN metastasis, the authors propose using anti-D2-40 and anti-MITF1 in the evaluation of LVI in patients with PCM with a certain risk of SLN metastasis.

  16. Does the type of surgery for early-stage endometrial cancer affect the rate of reported lymphovascular space invasion in final pathology specimens?

    PubMed

    Momeni, Mazdak; Kolev, Valentin; Cardenas-Goicoechea, Joel; Getrajdman, Joelle; Fishman, David; Chuang, Linus; Kalir, Tamara; Rahaman, Jamal; Zakashansky, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH), which usually involves the use of an intrauterine manipulator for optimal surgical control, has been shown to be as effective and safe as conventional total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) for the staging of endometrial carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of an intrauterine manipulator was associated with an increase in the pathologic reporting of lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI), which is an important determinant in choosing adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that intracavitary manipulation and an increase of the intrauterine pressure could cause pseudolymphovascular invasion. We performed a retrospective chart review of endometrial cancer patients treated at our institution from January 1996 through January 2006. Records were reviewed for patient's age, preoperative diagnosis, procedure type, final surgical staging, and final pathology report. Using the 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging, we included all patients having stage IA or IB endometrioid-type endometrial cancer who had undergone either a TAH or LAVH with or without pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used to measure the association between risk of positive lymphovascular invasion and surgical groups. Of 568 women identified as having endometrioid-type endometrial cancer, 486 (85.6%) met criteria for stage IA-IB endometrioid histology, grade 1, 2, or 3. LVSI was reported in 553/568 cases, with LVSI positivity in 16.9% (n = 96/568). The mean ages of the LAVH and TAH groups were significantly different (59.4 vs 62.4 years, respectively, P = .0050). Also, mean estimated blood loss and uterine weight significantly varied between TAH and LAVH groups (P = .0001 and .008, respectively). For stage IA, 17/220 (7.7%) who had been treated with LAVH had positive LVSI compared with 20/199 (10.1%) of patients receiving TAH (P = .73). For stage IB, 11

  17. Prognostic significance of lymphovascular space invasion and nodal involvement in intermediate- and high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated with curative intent using surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Kailash; Khaw, Pearly; Bernshaw, David; Mileshkin, Linda; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) and nodal status provide adequate prognostic information in comparison with the entire set of traditional prognostic factors in intermediate- and high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated and staged with primary surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. Three hundred twenty-four previously untreated high-intermediate- and high-risk endometrial cancer patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage I to IIIC; endometrioid, serous, or clear cell histology; diagnosed between November 1995 and December 2006; who presented to Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre for adjuvant radiotherapy were included in these analyses. All traditionally recognized prognostic factors and newly created 4 pairs of combination of LVSI and nodal status were studied with respect to survival and patterns of failure. The median follow-up time was 4.8 years. Five-year failure-free survival for all patients according to FIGO stage I, II, and III were 87.4%, 89.0%, and 62.4 %, respectively. In multivariable analysis for relapse, positive LVSI had a hazard ratio of 4.9 (P = 0.000), which increased to 8.8 (P = 0.004) in the presence of positive nodes. For overall survival, only LVSI was significant, with a hazard ratio of 3.02 (P = 0.003). In particular, in the presence of LVSI and nodes, histological type, grade, and myometrial invasion were not significant prognosticators for relapse or overall survival. This model enables the separation of good prognosis patients even among poorly differentiated endometrioid, serous, and clear cell carcinoma patients and can be used in simplifying the staging of endometrial cancer and for selecting patients for high-risk endometrial cancer studies.

  18. Lymphovascular space invasion and tumor differentiation are predictors for postoperative recurrence in patients with pathological stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Yi; Huang, Tsai-Wang; Tsai, Wen-Chiuan; Lin, Li-Fan; Cheng, Jian-Bo; Lee, Shih-Chun; Chang, Hung

    2014-08-01

    We investigated factors predicting postoperative recurrence in patients with pathological Stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All patients with clinical Stage I NSCLC who underwent surgical resection at Tri-Service General Hospital in Taiwan between January 2002 and June 2006 were reviewed retrospectively. All study patients underwent standard staging workups. We reviewed the records of 261 patients with an average follow-up of 93 months; we then included 179 patients with pathological Stage I. Two hundred sixty-one patients with clinical Stage I NSCLC were eligible. There were no significant differences in sex, tumor histopathology, location, and age between the two groups (recurrence and nonrecurrence), except for tumor differentiation (p = 0.002), survival rate (p < 0.001), lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI; p = 0.007), advanced pathology stage (p = 0.022), maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax; p = 0.027), tumor size (p < 0.011), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels (p = 0.013). Overall survival was significantly related to postoperative recurrence (p < 0.001) in patients with pathological Stage I, in whom recurrences developed in 11.17%. Only 179 patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC, including 20 patients with postoperative recurrences, were selected. Tumor differentiation (odds ratio 3.581, p = 0.058) and LVSI (odds ratio 5.374, p = 0.020) were independent factors predicting recurrence. Tumor differentiation and LVSI were predictors of postoperative relapse for patients with pathological stage I NSCLC. Risk factors of postoperative recurrence in patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC may enable us to optimize the patient selection for postoperative adjuvant therapies to prevent possibly occult micrometastases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Association of Estrogen Receptor Alpha and Interleukin 6 Polymorphisms with Lymphovascular Invasion, Extranodal Extension, and Lower Disease-Free Survival in Thai Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Sa-Nguanraksa, Doonyapat; Suntiparpluacha, Monthira; Kulprom, Anchalee; Kummalue, Tanawan; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai; Avirutnan, Panissadee; O-Charoenrat, Pornchai

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent type of cancer diagnosed among women worldwide and also in Thailand. Estrogen and estrogen receptors exert important roles in its genesis and progression. Several cytokines have been reported to be involved in the microenvironment that promotes distant metastasis via modulation of immune and inflammatory responses to tumor cells. Estrogen receptor genetic polymorphisms and several cytokines have been reported to be associated with breast cancer susceptibility and aggressiveness. To investigate roles of genetic polymorphisms in estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) and interleukin 6 (IL6), breast cancer patients and control subjects were recruited from the Division of Head, Neck and Breast Surgery (Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand). Polymorphisms in ESR1 (rs3798577) and IL6 (rs1800795 and rs1800797) were evaluated by real-time PCR in 391 breast cancer patients and 79 healthy controls. Associations between genetic polymorphisms and clinicopathological data were determined. There was no association between genetic polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility. However the ESR1 rs3798577 CT genotype was associated with presence of lymphovascular invasion (OR=2.07, 95%CI 1.20-3.56, p=0.009) when compared to the TT genotype. IL6 rs1800795 CC genotype was associated with presence of extranodal extension (OR= 2.30, 95%CI 1.23-4.31, p=0.009) when compared to the GG genotype. Survival analysis showed that IL6 rs1800797 AG or AA genotypes were associated with lower disease-free survival. These findings indicate that polymorphisms in ESR1 and IL6 contribute to aggressiveness of breast cancer and may be used to identify high risk patients.

  20. Lymphovascular space invasion and lack of downstaging after neoadjuvant chemotherapy are strong predictors of adverse outcome in young women with locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Shariq S; Ivanovich, Jennifer; DeWees, Todd A; Ochoa, Laura; Mullen, Daniel F; Thomas, Maria; Margenthaler, Julie A; Cyr, Amy; Naughton, Michael; Sanati, Souzan; Eberlein, Timothy J; Gillanders, William E; Aft, Rebecca L; Zoberi, Jacqueline E; Zoberi, Imran

    2016-02-01

    Younger age diagnosis of breast cancer is a predictor of adverse outcome. Here, we evaluate prognostic factors in young women with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). We present a retrospective review of 104 patients younger than 40 years with LABC treated with surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy from 2003 to 2014. Patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors important for overall survival (OS), local/regional recurrence (LRR), distant metastasis (DM), and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were evaluated. Mean age at diagnosis was 34 years (23-39 years) with a median follow-up of 47 months (8-138 months). Breast-conserving surgery was performed in 27%. Axillary lymph node dissection was performed in 85%. Sixty percent of patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 19% achieving pathologic complete response (pCR), and 61% downstaged. Lymph node positivity was present in 91% and lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) in 35%. Thirty-two percent of patients had triple negative tumors (TN, ER-/PR-/HER2 nonamplified). Four-year OS and RFS was 84% and 71%, respectively. Factors associated with worse OS on multivariate analysis include TN status, LVSI, and number of positive lymph nodes. LVSI was also associated with DM and LRR, as well as worse RFS. Downstaging was associated with improved 4 year RFS in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (74% vs. 38%, P = 0.002). With high risks of recurrence and inferior OS compared to older women, breast cancer in young women can be difficult to treat. Among additional factors, presence of LVSI and lack of downstaging portends a particularly worse prognosis. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Can lymphovascular invasion replace the prognostic value of lymph node involvement in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma after radical nephroureterectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Eun Sang; Ha, Yun-Sok; Lee, Jun Nyung; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Bup Wan; Byun, Seok-Soo; Choi, Young Deuk; Kang, Ho Won; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Kwon, Tae Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate whether lymphovascular invasion (LVI) can replace lymph node (LN) involvement as a prognostic marker in patients who do not undergo lymph node dissection (LND) during surgery in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Methods: A total of 505 patients who underwent radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) were recruited from four academic centres and divided into four groups: node negative (N0, Group 1); node positive (N+, Group 2); no LND without LVI (NxLVI−, Group 3); and no LND with LVI (NxLVI+, Group 4). Results: Patients in Group 2 had larger tumours, a higher incidence of left-sided involvement, more aggressive T stage and grade, and a higher positive surgical margin rate than patients in other groups. Pathological features (T stage and grade) were poorer in Group 4 than in Groups 1 and 3. Compared to other groups, Group 2 had the worst prognostic outcomes regarding locoregional/distant metastasis-free survival (MFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). LVI and LN status in Group 4 was not associated with MFS in multivariate analysis. Among Nx diseases, LVI was not an independent predictor of MFS or CCS. The small number of cases in Groups 2 and 4 is a major limitation of this study. Conclusions: Clinical outcomes according to LVI did not correlate with those outcomes predicted by LN involvement in patients with UTUC. Therefore, LVI may not be used as a substitute for nodal status in patients who do not undergo LND at the time of surgery. PMID:28255413

  2. AB180. Impact of lymphovascular invasion on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Nan; Hu, Hailong; Wu, Changli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection Methods This retrospective study was performed with 155 patients with newly diagnosed pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder who were treated with transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) at our institution from January 2006 to January 2010. The presence or absence of LVI was examined according to our pathologists. Chi-square was performed to identify the correlations between LVI and other clinical and pathological features. Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the recurrence-free survival (RFS) and progression-free survival (PFS) curves and difference was determined by the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictive factors through a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results LVI was detected in a total of 34 patients (21.9%).While LVI was associated with high grade tumors (P<0.001) and intravesical therapy (P=0.009). Correlations with age (P=0.227), gender (P=0.376), tumor size (P=0.969), tumor multiplicity (P=0.196), carcinoma in situ (CIS) (P=0.321) and smoking (P=0.438) were not statistically significant. There was a statistically significant tendency towards higher recurrence rate and shorter RFS time in LVI-positive patients. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in progression rate between the two groups. Moreover, multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that LVI, tumor size and smoking were independent prognostic predictors of recurrence. The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) were 2.042 (1.113–3.746, P=0.021), 1.817 (1.014–3.256, P=0.045) and 2.079 (1.172–3.687, P=0.012) respectively. Conclusions The presence of LVI in TURBT specimens is significantly associated with higher recurrence rate and shorter RFS time in patients with newly

  3. Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.S.; Chen, C.M.; Liu, M.C.; Jian, J.M.; Horng, C.F.; Liu, M.J.; Yu, B.L.; Lee, M.Y.; Chi, C.W.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

  4. Quantitative MRI for analysis of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Warntjes, J. B. Marcel; Smedby, Örjan; Lundberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Damage to the blood-brain barrier with subsequent contrast enhancement is a hallmark of glioblastoma. Non-enhancing tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema is, however, not usually visible on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. New quantitative techniques using relaxometry offer additional information about tissue properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate longitudinal relaxation R1, transverse relaxation R2, and proton density in the peritumoral edema in a group of patients with malignant glioma before surgery to assess whether relaxometry can detect changes not visible on conventional images. Methods In a prospective study, 24 patients with suspected malignant glioma were examined before surgery. A standard MRI protocol was used with the addition of a quantitative MR method (MAGIC), which measured R1, R2, and proton density. The diagnosis of malignant glioma was confirmed after biopsy/surgery. In 19 patients synthetic MR images were then created from the MAGIC scan, and ROIs were placed in the peritumoral edema to obtain the quantitative values. Dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion was used to obtain cerebral blood volume (rCBV) data of the peritumoral edema. Voxel-based statistical analysis was performed using a mixed linear model. Results R1, R2, and rCBV decrease with increasing distance from the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor. There is a significant increase in R1 gradient after contrast agent injection (P < .0001). There is a heterogeneous pattern of relaxation values in the peritumoral edema adjacent to the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor. Conclusion Quantitative analysis with relaxometry of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas detects tissue changes not visualized on conventional MR images. The finding of decreasing R1 and R2 means shorter relaxation times closer to the tumor, which could reflect tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema. However, these findings need to be validated in the future. PMID

  5. Peritumoral eosinophils predict recurrence in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Harbaum, Lars; Pollheimer, Marion J; Kornprat, Peter; Lindtner, Richard A; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Langner, Cord

    2015-03-01

    In colorectal cancer, the presence and extent of eosinophil granulocyte infiltration may render important prognostic information. However, it remains unclear whether an increasing number of eosinophils might simply be linked to the overall inflammatory cell reaction or represent a self-contained, antitumoral mechanism that needs to be documented and promoted therapeutically. Peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were retrospectively assessed in 381 primary colorectal cancers from randomly selected patients. Tumors were diagnosed in American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) stage I in 21%, stage II in 32%, stage III in 33%, and stage IV in 14%. Presence and extent of eosinophils was related to various histopathological parameters as well as patients' outcome. Overall, peri- and intratumoral eosinophils were observed in 86 and 75% cancer specimens. The peritumoral eosinophil count correlated strongly with the intratumoral eosinophil count (R=0.69; P<0.001) and with the intensity of the overall inflammatory cell reaction (R=0.318; P<0.001). Both increasing peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were significantly associated with lower T and N classification, better tumor differentiation, absence of vascular invasion, as well as improved progression-free and cancer-specific survival. However, only peritumoral eosinophils, but not intratumoral, were an independent prognosticator of favorable progression-free (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.98; P=0.04) and cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio 0.7; 95% confidence interval 0.52-0.93; P=0.01)-independent of the intensity of overall inflammatory cell reaction. This was also found for patients with AJCC/UICC stage II disease, wherein the presence of peritumoral eosinophils was significantly associated with favorable outcome. In conclusion, the number of peritumoral eosinophils had a significant favorable impact on prognosis of colorectal cancer patients

  6. Adverse prognostic value of peritumoral vascular invasion: is it abrogated by adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy? Results from two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials of chemoendocrine adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viale, G.; Giobbie-Hurder, A.; Gusterson, B. A.; Maiorano, E.; Mastropasqua, M. G.; Sonzogni, A.; Mallon, E.; Colleoni, M.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Regan, M. M.; Brown, R. W.; Golouh, R.; Crivellari, D.; Karlsson, P.; Öhlschlegel, C.; Gelber, R. D.; Goldhirsch, A.; Coates, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Peritumoral vascular invasion (PVI) may assist in assigning optimal adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early breast cancer. Patients and methods: Patients participated in two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials testing chemoendocrine adjuvant therapies in premenopausal (trial VIII) or postmenopausal (trial IX) node-negative breast cancer. PVI was assessed by institutional pathologists and/or central review on hematoxylin–eosin-stained slides in 99% of patients (analysis cohort 2754 patients, median follow-up >9 years). Results: PVI, present in 23% of the tumors, was associated with higher grade tumors and larger tumor size (trial IX only). Presence of PVI increased locoregional and distant recurrence and was significantly associated with poorer disease-free survival. The adverse prognostic impact of PVI in trial VIII was limited to premenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive tumors randomized to therapies not containing goserelin, and conversely the beneficial effect of goserelin was limited to patients whose tumors showed PVI. In trial IX, all patients received tamoxifen: the adverse prognostic impact of PVI was limited to patients with receptor-negative tumors regardless of chemotherapy. Conclusion: Adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy appears to abrogate the adverse impact of PVI in node-negative disease, while PVI may identify patients who will benefit particularly from adjuvant therapy. PMID:19633051

  7. Peritumoral EpCAM Is an Independent Prognostic Marker after Curative Resection of HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Xiu-Mei; Chen, George G.

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the tumor microenvironment has a profound influence on tumor initiation and progression, opening a new avenue for studying tumor biology. Nonetheless, the prognostic values of the peritumoral expression of EpCAM and CD13 remain to be elucidated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, the expression of EpCAM and CD13 was assessed by immunohistochemistry in peritumoral liver hepatocytes from 106 hepatitis B virus- (HBV-) related HCC patients who had undergone curative hepatectomy. The peritumoral EpCAM-positive group had a significantly worse overall survival (OS) (p = 0.003) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) (p = 0.022) compared to the negative group. Peritumoral CD13-positive patients were also associated with poor OS (p = 0.038), while not significantly associated with RFS. The adjusted multivariate COX proportional hazard regression analysis suggested that only the positive expression of peritumoral EpCAM precisely predicted poor OS. Being peritumoral EpCAM positive was also significantly associated with a larger tumor size, liver cirrhosis, and more frequent vascular invasion; however, no statistically significant association was observed between CD13 and any clinicopathological features. Taken together, peritumoral EpCAM and CD13 expression was associated with a poor prognosis, but EpCAM may be a better prognostic marker than CD13 in HBV-related HCC patients. In the future, peritumoral EpCAM could be a good target for adjuvant therapy after curative hepatectomy. PMID:28572700

  8. Microvascular invasion of testicular nonseminomatous germ cell tumors: implications of separate evaluation of lymphatic and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Heinzelbecker, Julia; Gross-Weege, Matthias; Weiss, Christel; Hörner, Christian; Trunk, Marcus J; Erben, Philipp; Haecker, Axel; Bolenz, Christian

    2014-08-01

    We separately evaluated the lymphatic and blood vascular systems to assess the diagnostic accuracy of microvascular invasion and identify predictive markers for occult metastasis of testicular nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. Tissue samples of 86 patients treated for testicular nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (stage 1 in 48 and stage greater than 1 in 38) were stained using the lymphatic endothelial cell specific marker LYVE-1 and the blood vessel endothelial cell marker von Willebrand factor. We assessed lymph vessel density in LYVE-1 stained sections and blood vessel density in von Willebrand factor stained sections. Lymphovascular invasion in LYVE-1 stained sections and blood vascular invasion in von Willebrand factor stained sections were documented. Parameters were correlated with standard clinicopathological data. Blood vessel density in von Willebrand factor sections was significantly greater than lymphatic vessel density in LYVE-1 sections (p<0.001). Peritumor and nontumor lymphatic vessel density in LYVE-1 sections was associated with metastasis at diagnosis (OR 1.277/U, p=0.020 and OR 1.113/U, p=0.095). Lymphovascular invasion in LYVE-1 sections was significantly associated with metastasis (OR=4.517, p=0.002) but blood vascular invasion in von Willebrand factor sections was only slightly significant (OR 2.261, p=0.071). Only lymphovascular invasion in LYVE-1 stained sections was significantly associated with metastasis in a multiple logistic regression model. Microvascular invasion in hematoxylin and eosin stained sections was not associated with metastasis but microvascular invasion evaluated in LYVE-1 and von Willebrand factor stained sections was associated with metastasis (OR 3.506, p=0.016). Lymphovascular invasion in LYVE-1 stained sections was the most important predictive parameter for metastasis at diagnosis, suggesting greater relevance of the lymphatic system in metastatic dissemination of testicular nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. Vascular

  9. Imaging the intratumoral-peritumoral extracellular pH gradient of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; Rao, Jyotsna U.; De Feyter, Henk M.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Juchem, Christoph; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors have acidic extracellular pH (pHe) but near neutral intracellular pH (pHi). Because acidic pHe milieu is conducive to tumor growth and builds resistance to therapy, simultaneous mapping of pHe inside and outside the tumor (i.e., intratumoral-peritumoral pHe gradient) fulfills an important need in cancer imaging. We used Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS), which utilizes shifts of nonexchangeable protons from macrocyclic chelates (e.g., 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrakis(methylene phosphonate) or DOTP8−) complexed with paramagnetic thulium (Tm3+) ion, to generate in vivo pHe maps in rat brains bearing 9L and RG2 tumors. Upon TmDOTP5− infusion, MRI identified the tumor boundary by enhanced water transverse relaxation and BIRDS allowed imaging of intratumoral-peritumoral pHe gradients. The pHe measured by BIRDS was compared with pHi measured with 31P-MRS. In normal tissue pHe was similar to pHi, but inside the tumor pHe was lower than pHi. While the intratumoral pHe was acidic for both tumor types, peritumoral pHe varied with tumor type. The intratumoral-peritumoral pHe gradient was much larger for 9L than RG2 tumors, because in RG2 tumors acidic pHe was found in distal peritumoral regions. Increased presence of Ki-67 positive cells beyond the RG2 tumor border suggested that RG2 was more invasive than 9L tumor. These results indicate that extensive acidic pHe beyond the tumor boundary correlates with tumor cell invasion. In summary, BIRDS has sensitivity to map in vivo intratumoral-peritumoral pHe gradient, thereby creating preclinical applications in monitoring cancer therapeutic responses (e.g., with pHe-altering drugs). PMID:26752688

  10. The lymphovascular embolus of inflammatory breast cancer expresses a stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi; Ye, Yin; Yearsley, Kurtis; Jones, Susie; Barsky, Sanford H

    2008-08-01

    Inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) is a particularly lethal form of breast cancer characterized by exaggerated lymphovascular invasion, which is a phenotype recapitulated in our human xenograft MARY-X. MARY-X generated spheroids in vitro that resemble the embryonal blastocyst. Because of the resemblance of the spheroids to the embryonal blastocyst and their resistance to traditional chemotherapy/radiotherapy, we hypothesized that the spheroids expressed a stem cell-like phenotype. MARY-X spheroids expressed embryonal stem cell markers including stellar, rex-1, nestin, H19, and potent transcriptional factors, oct-4, nanog, and sox-2, which are associated with stem cell self-renewal and developmental potential. Most importantly, MARY-X spheroids expressed a cancer stem cell profile characterized by CD44(+)/CD24(-/low), ALDH1, and most uniquely, CD133. A significant percentage of single cells of MARY-X exhibited distinct proliferative and morphogenic potencies in vitro. As few as 100 cells derived from single-cell clonogenic expansion were tumorigenic with recapitulation of the IBC phenotype. Prototype stem cell signaling pathways such as notch3 were active in MARY-X. The stem cell phenotype exhibited by MARY-X also was exhibited by the lymphovascular emboli of human IBC cases independent of their molecular subtype. This stem cell-like phenotype may contribute to the aggressive nature of IBC but also may lend itself to selective targeting.

  11. Impact of peritumoral and intratumoral budding in esophageal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Thies, Svenja; Guldener, Lars; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Zlobec, Inti; Koelzer, Viktor H; Lugli, Alessandro; Kröll, Dino; Seiler, Christian A; Feith, Marcus; Langer, Rupert

    2016-06-01

    Tumor budding has prognostic significance in many carcinomas and is defined as the presence of detached isolated single cells or small cell clusters up to 5 cells at the invasion front (peritumoral budding [PTB]) or within the tumor (intratumoral budding [ITB]). For esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs), there are currently only few data about the impact of this morphological feature. We investigated tumor budding in a large collective of 200 primarily resected EACs. Pancytokeratin staining was demonstrated to be superior to hematoxylin and eosin staining for the detection of buds with substantial to excellent interobserver agreement and used for subsequent analysis. PTB and ITB were scored across 10 high-power fields (HPFs). The median count of tumor buds was 130/10 HPFs for PTB (range, 2-593) and 80/10 HPFs for ITB (range, 1-656). PTB and ITB correlated significantly with each other (r = 0.9; P < .001). High PTB and ITB rates were seen in more advanced tumor categories (P < .001 each); tumors with lymph node metastases (P < .001/P = .002); and lymphatic, vascular, and perineural invasion and higher tumor grading (P < .001 each). Survival analysis showed an association with worse survival for high-grade ITB (P = .029) but not PTB (P = .385). However, in multivariate analysis, lymph node and resection status, but not ITB, were independent prognostic parameters. In conclusion, PTB and ITB can be observed in EAC to various degrees. High-grade budding is associated with aggressive tumor phenotype. Assessment of tumor budding, especially ITB, may provide additional prognostic information about tumor behavior and may be useful in specific cases for risk stratification of EAC patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in peri-tumor tissues and pelvic lymph nodes as potential molecular marker of micrometastasis in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Marianna; Annunziata, Clorinda; Liguori, Giuseppina; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Greggi, Stefano; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2016-01-01

    The association between high risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) and cervical cancer has been firmly established. HPV genome is present in nearly all cases of cervical cancer and detection of viral DNA could therefore be used as a surrogate marker of micrometastasis in peri-tumor tissues and lymph nodes. We analyzed primary cervical carcinomas, peri-tumor biopsies and pelvic lymph nodes in 20 women with invasive cancer (FIGO stage I-II) who underwent radical pelvic surgery and lymphadenectomy. HPV DNA was searched by broad spectrum PCR in 142 DNA samples extracted from paraffin embedded tissues. Viral genotypes were identified by direct sequencing analysis. HPV DNA sequences were identified in all available primary cervical tumors (n = 15). The most common genotype was HPV16 (60 %), followed by HPV18 (20 %), HPV35 (7 %), HPV45 (7 %) and HPV66 (7 %). Seven out of 20 (35 %) women had metastatic spread in peri-tumor tissues and/or lymph nodes, as determined by histology. HPV DNA was detected in all histological positive samples as well as in 16 and 25 % of histological negative peri-tumor tissues and lymph nodes, respectively. Three out of 20 (15 %) women without histological evidence of metastatic spread had HPV-positive lymph nodes. HPV genotype was found always concordant between primary tumor and metastatic lesions. The remaining 10 women (50 %) were histology and HPV-negative in all peri-tumor biopsies and lymph nodes analyzed. Evaluation of HPV DNA in peri-tumor tissues as well as pelvic lymph nodes could be a sensitive marker to identify micrometastasis or isolated tumor cells and to monitor the risk of disease recurrence in women with cervical cancer.

  13. Relationship of Sialyl-Lewisx/a Underexpression and E-Cadherin Overexpression in the Lymphovascular Embolus of Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alpaugh, Mary L.; Tomlinson, James S.; Ye, Yin; Barsky, Sanford H.

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) is characterized by florid tumor emboli within lymphovascular spaces called lymphovascular invasion. These emboli have a unique microscopic appearance of compact clumps of tumor cells retracted away from the surrounding endothelial cell layer. Using a human SCID model of IBC (MARY-X), we, in previous studies, demonstrated that the tumor cell embolus (IBC spheroid) forms on the basis of an intact and overexpressed E-cadherin/α,β-catenin axis that mediates tumor cell-tumor cell adhesion. In the present study we examine the mechanism behind the apparent lack of binding of the tumor embolus to the surrounding endothelium. We find that this lack of tumor cell binding is because of markedly decreased sialyl-Lewisx/a (sLex/a) carbohydrate ligand-binding epitopes on its overexpressed MUC1 and other surface molecules that bind endothelial E-selectin. Decreased sLex/a is because of decreased α3/4-fucosyltransferase activity in MARY-X. The decreased sLex/a fail to confer electrostatic repulsions between tumor cells, which further contributes to the compactness of the MARY-X spheroid by allowing the E-cadherin homodimeric interactions to go unopposed. MARY-X spheroids were retrovirally transfected with FucT-III cDNA, significantly raising their levels of fucosyltransferase activity and surface sLex/a. In parallel experiments, enzymatic transfers with a milk α1,3-fucosyltransferase and an α2,3-sialyltransferase (ST3GalIV) were performed on the MARY-X spheroids and increased surface sLex/a. The addition of sLex/a by either manipulation caused disadherence of the MARY-X spheroids and the disruption of the E-cadherin homodimers mediating cell adhesion. Our findings support the cooperative relationship of sLex/a underexpression and E-cadherin overexpression in the genesis of the lymphovascular embolus of IBC. PMID:12163386

  14. Lymphovascular space involvement is the sole independent predictor of lymph node metastasis in clinical early stage endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaizoglu, Ferdi; Yuce, Kunter; Salman, Mehmet Coskun; Basaran, Derman; Calis, Pinar; Ozgul, Nejat; Usubutun, Alp

    2013-12-01

    To determine clinicopathological risk factors associated with lymph node metastasis in endometrial cancer (EC). Clinicopathological data of patients who underwent comprehensive surgical staging for clinical early stage EC between 2001 and 2010 at Hacettepe University Hospital was retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and sixty-one patients were included. There were 26 patients (10.0%) with lymph node metastasis. Of these, 14 (5.4%) had pelvic lymph node metastasis, 8 (3.1%) had both pelvic and paraaortic lymph node metastasis, and 4 (1.5%) had isolated paraaortic metastasis. Univariate analysis revealed tumor size >2 cm, type II cancer, grade III histology, cervical stromal invasion, deep myometrial invasion, positive peritoneal cytology, adnexal involvement, serosal involvement, and presence of lymphovascular space involvement (LVSI) as significant clinicopathological factors associated with retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis. For paraaortic metastasis either isolated or with pelvic lymph node metastasis, significant factors were grade III disease, cervical stromal invasion, deep myometrial invasion, positive peritoneal cytology, adnexal involvement, serosal involvement, pelvic lymph node metastasis, and presence of LVSI. The only factor associated with isolated paraaortic lymph node metastasis was LVSI. Multivariate analysis revealed LVSI as the only independent factor for both retroperitoneal and paraaortic lymph node metastasis (odds ratio 14.9; 95% confidence interval 3.8-59.0; p < 0.001, and odds ratio 20.9; 95% confidence interval 1.9-69.9; p = 0.013, respectively). Lymphovascular space involvement is the sole predictor of lymph node metastasis in EC. Therefore, LVSI status should be requested from the pathologist during frozen examination whenever possible to consider when a decision to perform or omit lymphadenectomy is made.

  15. Does a uterine manipulator affect cervical cancer pathology or identification of lymphovascular space involvement?

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Joseph A; Tran, Tien Anh N; Ahmad, Sarfraz; James, Jeffrey A; Brudie, Lorna A; Pernicone, Peter J; Radi, Michael J; Holloway, Robert W

    2012-10-01

    Uterine manipulators are a useful adjunct for robotic-assisted radical hysterectomy (RARH), but some surgeons avoid their use for fear of altering pathology or interpretation of lymphovascular space involvement (LVSI). We retrospectively compared clinico-pathological data and tumor pathology from patients with cervical cancer operated by laparotomy vs. RARH. Charts from cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy from January-1997 to June-2010 were reviewed for tumor histology, grade, FIGO stage, lymph node status, LVSI, depth of invasion, and tumor size. A ConMed V-Care® uterine manipulator was used in all robotic cases. H&E stained slides from 20 robotic and 24 open stage IB1 cases with LVSI reported in the original pathology were re-reviewed by a blinded pathologist for analysis of tissue artifacts and LVSI. Two-hundred-thirty-six cases (185 open, 51 robotic) with stages IA2, IB1 and IB2 cervical cancer were reviewed. No significant differences in histology (squamous cell carcinoma, 65% vs. 51%; p=0.1), IB1 lesion size (≤2 cm, 62% vs. 61%, p>0.1), LVSI (34% vs. 39%, p>0.1), and depth of stromal invasion (p>0.1) was found between open and robotic groups. Histologic examination of all IB1 cervical carcinomas revealed a higher degree of surface disruption [45% (9/20) vs. 12.6% (3/24), p=0.038] and artifactual "parametrial carryover" [65% (13/20) vs. 29% (7/24), p=0.037] in robotic vs. open groups, respectively, but no significant differences in the rate of LVSI. RARH cases that utilized a uterine manipulator did not show any clinico-pathological differences in depth of invasion, LVSI, or parametrial involvement compared to open cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain tumors and epilepsy: pathophysiology of peritumoral changes.

    PubMed

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Fric-Shamji, Elana C; Benoit, Brien G

    2009-07-01

    Epilepsy commonly develops among patients with brain tumors, frequently even as the presenting symptom, and such patients consequently experience substantial morbidity from both the seizures and the underlying disease. At clinical presentation, these seizures are most commonly focal with secondary generalization and conventional medical management is often met with less efficacy. The molecular pathophysiology of these seizures is being elucidated with findings that both the tumoral and peritumoral microenvironments may exhibit epileptogenic phenotypes owing to disordered neuronal connectivity and regulation, impaired glial cell function, and the presence of altered vascular supply and permeability. Neoplastic tissue can itself be the initiation site of seizure activity, particularly for tumors arising from neuronal cell lines, such as gangliogliomas or dysembryoblastic neuroepithelial tumors. Conversely, a growing intracranial lesion can both structurally and functionally alter the surrounding brain tissue with edema, vascular insufficiency, inflammation, and release of metabolically active molecules, hence also promoting seizure activity. The involved mechanisms are certain to be multifactorial and depend on specific tumor histology, integrity of the blood brain barrier, and characteristics of the peritumoral environment. Understanding these changes that underlie tumor-related epilepsy may have roles in both optimal medical management for the seizure symptom and optimal surgical objective and management of the underlying disease.

  17. Peritumoral epilepsy: Relating form and function for surgical success

    PubMed Central

    Cowie, Christopher J.A.; Cunningham, Mark O.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are a prominent symptom in patients with both primary and secondary brain tumors. Medical management of seizure control in this patient group is problematic as the mechanisms linking tumorigenesis and epileptogenesis are poorly understood. It is possible that several mechanisms contribute to tumor-associated epileptic zone formation. In this review, we discuss key candidates that may be implicated in peritumoral epileptogenesis and, in so doing, hope to highlight areas for future research. Furthermore, we summarize the current role of antiepileptic medications in this type of epilepsy and examine the changes in surgical practice which may lead to improved seizure rates after tumor surgery. Lastly, we speculate on possible future preoperative and intraoperative considerations for improving seizure control after tumor resection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “NEWroscience 2013”. PMID:24894847

  18. High density of peritumoral lymphatic vessels is a potential prognostic marker of endometrial carcinoma: a clinical immunohistochemical method study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Liu, Zi; Gao, Fei; Meng, Xiao-yu

    2010-04-08

    The lymphatic system is a major route for cancer cell dissemination and also a potential target for antitumor therapy. To investigate whether increased lymphatic vessel density (LVD) is a prognostic factor for nodal metastasis and survival, we studied peritumoral LVD (P-LVD) and intratumoral LVD (I-LVD) in samples from 102 patients with endometrial carcinoma; Endometrial carcinoma tissues were analyzed for lymphatic vessels by immunohistochemical staining with an antibody against LYVE-1. Univariate analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier life-table curves to estimate survival, and was compared using the log rank test. Prognostic models used multivariate Cox regression analysis for multivariate analyses of survival; Our study showed that P-LVD, but not I-LVD, was significantly correlated with lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI), lymph node metastasis, tumor stage, and CD44 expression in endometrial carcinoma. Moreover, P-LVD was an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival and overall survival of endometrial carcinoma; P-LVD may serve as a prognostic factor for endometrial carcinoma. The peritumoral lymphatics might play an important role in lymphatic vessel metastasis.

  19. The role of ELK3 to regulate peritumoral lymphangiogenesis and VEGF-C production in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nuri; Park, Ji-In; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Dong Ryul; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2017-03-18

    Tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis, a major conduit for cancer cell dissemination from the primary tumor site to lymph nodes and beyond, eventually leads to metastasis in cancer patients. Given the recent evidence revealing that the suppression of ELK3 inhibits the metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer cells, we aimed to study the underlying mechanism of impaired metastasis in ELK3-suppressed MDA-MB-231 cells (ELK3 KD) with regard to lymphangiogenesis. We found that the secretome of ELK3 KD cells inhibited tube formation, whereas it promoted the migration and invasion of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in vitro. In vivo analysis revealed that peritumoral lymphatic vessels were not developed around the xenografted tumors of ELK3 KD. We further revealed that the suppression of NF-κB signaling in ELK3 KD was the primary cause of the reduced VEGFC expression. Taken together, we suggest that ELK3 is an upstream regulator of the NF-κB signaling pathway, the inhibition of which leads to the suppression of peritumoral lymphatic vessel development, possibly due to a low VEGFC expression.

  20. Hyaluronan in Peritumoral Stroma and Malignant Cells Associates with Breast Cancer Spreading and Predicts Survival

    PubMed Central

    Auvinen, Päivi; Tammi, Raija; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Tammi, Markku; Ågren, Ulla; Johansson, Risto; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Eskelinen, Matti; Kosma, Veli-Matti

    2000-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an extracellular matrix polysaccharide that promotes cell migration through its cell surface receptors and by effecting changes in the physical environment. HA expression is frequently increased in malignant tumors, whereas its association with the invasive potential and patient outcome in breast cancer has not been reported. The localization and signal intensity of HA was analyzed in 143 paraffin-embedded tumor samples of human breast carcinoma using a biotinylated HA-specific probe. In the immediate peritumoral stroma, HA signal was moderately or strongly increased in 39% and 56% of the cases, respectively. Normal ductal epithelium showed no HA, whereas in 57% of the tumors at least some of the carcinoma cells were HA positive. The intensity of the stromal HA signal and the presence of cell-associated HA were both significantly related to poor differentiation of the tumors, axillary lymph node positivity, and short overall survival of the patients. In Cox’s multivariate analysis, both the intensity of stromal HA signal alone and that combined with the HA positivity in tumor cells were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. These results suggest that HA is directly involved in the spreading of breast cancer and may offer a potential target for new therapies. PMID:10666382

  1. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Eric L. . E-mail: echang@mdanderson.org; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r {sup 2} 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm{sup 3}, the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm{sup 3}, using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema.

  2. Characterizing the peritumoral brain zone in glioblastoma: a multidisciplinary analysis.

    PubMed

    Lemée, Jean-Michel; Clavreul, Anne; Aubry, Marc; Com, Emmanuelle; de Tayrac, Marie; Eliat, Pierre-Antoine; Henry, Cécile; Rousseau, Audrey; Mosser, Jean; Menei, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is the most frequent and aggressive type of primary brain tumor. Recurrences are mostly located at the margin of the resection cavity in the peritumoral brain zone (PBZ). Although it is widely believed that infiltrative tumor cells in this zone are responsible for GB recurrence, few studies have examined this zone. In this study, we analyzed PBZ left after surgery with a variety of techniques including radiology, histopathology, flow cytometry, genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and primary cell cultures. The resulting PBZ profiles were compared with those of the GB tumor zone and normal brain samples to identify characteristics specific to the PBZ. We found that tumor cell infiltration detected by standard histological analysis was present in almost one third of PBZ taken from an area that was considered normal both on standard MRI and by the neurosurgeon under an operating microscope. The panel of techniques used in this study show that the PBZ, similar to the tumor zone itself, is characterized by substantial inter-patient heterogeneity, which makes it difficult to identify representative markers. Nevertheless, we identified specific alterations in the PBZ such as the presence of selected tumor clones and stromal cells with tumorigenic and angiogenic properties. The study of GB-PBZ is a growing field of interest and this region needs to be characterized further. This will facilitate the development of new, targeted therapies for patients with GB and the development of approaches to refine the per-operative evaluation of the PBZ to optimize the surgical resection of the tumor.

  3. Peri-tumoral leakage during intra-tumoral convection-enhanced delivery has implications for efficacy of peri-tumoral infusion before removal of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoliang; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamura, Taigen; Zhang, Rong; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    In cases of malignant brain tumors, infiltrating tumor cells that exist at the tumor-surrounding brain tissue always escape from cytoreductive surgery and, protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB), survive the adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, eventually leading to tumor recurrence. Local interstitial delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a promising strategy to target these cells. During our effort to develop effective drug delivery methods by intra-tumoral infusion of chemotherapeutic agents, we found consistent pattern of leakage from the tumor. Here we describe our findings and propose promising strategy to cover the brain tissue surrounding the tumor with therapeutic agents by means of convection-enhanced delivery. First, the intracranial tumor isograft model was used to define patterns of leakage from tumor mass after intra-tumoral infusion of the chemotherapeutic agents. Liposomal doxorubicin, although first distributed inside the tumor, distributed diffusely into the surrounding normal brain once the leakage happen. Trypan blue dye was used to evaluate the distribution pattern of peri-tumoral infusions. When infused intra- or peri-tumorally, infusates distributed robustly into the tumor border. Subsequently, volume of distributions with different infusion scheduling; including intra-tumoral infusion, peri-tumoral infusion after tumor resection, peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal with or without systemic infusion of steroids, were compared with Evans-blue dye. Peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal resulted in maximum volume of distribution. Prior use of steroids further increased the volume of distribution. Local interstitial drug delivery targeting tumor surrounding brain tissue before tumor removal should be more effective when targeting the invading cells.

  4. High expression levels of egfl7 correlate with low endothelial cell activation in peritumoral vessels of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pannier, Diane; Philippin-Lauridant, Géraldine; Baranzelli, Marie-Christine; Bertin, Delphine; Bogart, Emilie; Delprat, Victor; Villain, Gaëlle; Mattot, Virginie; Bonneterre, Jacques; Soncin, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels participate in the immune response against cancer cells and we previously used pre-clinical models to demonstrate that egfl7 (VE-statin) promotes tumor cell evasion from the immune system by repressing endothelial cell activation, preventing immune cells from entering the tumor mass. In the present study, the expression levels of egfl7 and that of ICAM-1 as a marker of endothelium activation, were evaluated in peritumoral vessels of human breast cancer samples. Breast cancer samples (174 invasive and 30 in situ) from 204 patients treated in 2005 were immunostained for CD31, ICAM-1 and stained for egfl7 using in situ hybridization. The expression levels of ICAM-1 and egfl7 were assessed in peritumoral areas using semi-quantitative scales. There was a strong and significant inverse correlation between the expression of ICAM-1 and that of egfl7 in CD31+ blood vessels. When the ICAM-1 score increased, the egfl7 score reduced significantly (P=0.004), and vice-versa (Cuzick's test for trend across ordered groups). In order to determine which gene influenced the other gene between egfl7 and ICAM-1, the expression levels of either gene were modulated in endothelial cells. Egfl7 regulated ICAM-1 expression while ICAM-1 had no effects on egfl7 expression in the same conditions. Altogether, these results provide further results that egfl7 serves a regulatory role in endothelial cell activation in relation to immune infiltration and that it is a potential therapeutic target to consider for improving anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:27446447

  5. Taurine concentration in human gliomas and meningiomas: tumoral, peritumoral, and extratumoral tissue.

    PubMed

    Cubillos, Suzana; Obregón, Francisco; Vargas, María Fernanda; Salazar, Luis Antonio; Lima, Lucimey

    2006-01-01

    Taurine concentrations were determined in gliomas from 16 patients and in meningiomas from 15 patients. After imaging analysis and clinical evaluation to consider the level of functional deterioration by the scale of Karnosky, tissue was obtained by surgery. Tumoral, peritumoral and extratumoral samples were taken and analyzed by HPLC with fluorescence detector. The concentration of taurine (nmol/mg protein) was higher in tumoral and peritumoral tissues than in the extratumoral samples for gliomas. In the case of meningiomas, the taurine concentration was higher in tumoral than in peritumoral and extratumoral samples. These modifications might be due to specific functions of this amino acid, being either protective or involved in the proliferation of cells. The differential distribution in the two types of tumors could be related to the malignancy of them, which is higher in gliomas than in meningiomas.

  6. Prevalence and outcomes of peritumor fat involvement following partial nephrectomy for radiologic T1 renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Mohamed; Elfaramawi, Mohamed; Jadhav, Supria; Davis, Rodney; Saafan, Ahmed; Sher, Annashia

    2015-01-01

    Context: Partial nephrectomy is becoming the standard of care in management of small renal tumors and excision of the peritumor fat is recommended for accurate staging. During the surgery, the overlying fat may be excised for accurate visualization of margins or maybe inadvertently left behind when performing a partial nephrectomy in an obese patient. We investigated the prevalence of fat involvement in these patients. Aims: The aim was to document the prevalence of peritumor fat involvement discovered after partial nephrectomy performed for radiologic T1 renal cancer. Settings and Design: Between 2005 and 2011, 107 partial nephrectomy procedures were performed for radiologic T1 disease. Statistical Analysis: All analyses were performed using SAS 9.2. Subjects and Methods: Patients were classified as: Group A (n = 88 patients), patients with stage T1a (tumor size ≤4 cm) and Group B (n = 24 patients) patients with stage T1b (tumor size 4-7 cm). Results: The overall prevalence of peritumor fat involvement was 1.86% (n = 2). The two patients had tumor ≤4 cm in size of the papillary subtype and were followed for 61 and 57 months, respectively. Both were living and without recurrence. Patient demographics and tumor characteristics did not differ between the two groups except, Fuhrman Grades 3 and 4 were statistically more prevalent in Group B (<0.01). Tumor grade, clear cell type cancer and stage T1b did not correlate with peritumor fat involvement in the study population. Conclusions: Our study revealed a low prevalence of peritumor fat involvement in radiologic pT1 renal cancer; however, peritumor fat removal is still recommended. PMID:26692661

  7. Intestinal and peri-tumoral lymphatic endothelial cells are resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Hoon Ki; Morisada, Tohru; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Oike, Yuichi; Lee, Jayhun; Sung, Eon Ki; Chung, Jae Hoon; Suda, Toshio; Koh, Gou Young . E-mail: gykoh@kaist.ac.kr

    2006-06-30

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment, but it is unable to completely block cancer metastasis. The lymphatic vasculature serves as the primary route for metastatic spread, but little is known about how lymphatic endothelial cells respond to radiation. Here, we show that lymphatic endothelial cells in the small intestine and peri-tumor areas are highly resistant to radiation injury, while blood vessel endothelial cells in the small intestine are relatively sensitive. Our results suggest the need for alternative therapeutic modalities that can block lymphatic endothelial cell survival, and thus disrupt the integrity of lymphatic vessels in peri-tumor areas.

  8. Intratumoral and peritumoral lymphatic vessel density both correlate with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Song; Yi, Shanhong; Zhang, Dong; Gong, Mingfu; Cai, Yuanqing; Zou, Liguang

    2017-01-01

    The status of lymph node involvement is an important prognostic factor for breast cancer. However, the presence of intratumoral lymphatic vessels in primary tumor lesions and the relationship between lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and lymph node metastasis (LNM) have not been firmly established. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis study to investigate these issues. According to the pre-established inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 studies, involving 1029 breast cancer patients, were included in this study. Using immunohistochemical staining, intratumoral lymphatic vessels were detected in 40.07% of breast cancer patients (240/599), and peritumoral lymphatics were detected in 77.09% (397/515). All studies demonstrated that peritumoral LVD was higher than intratumoral LVD, with a pooled standard mean difference and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 1.75 (1.28 to 2.21). Both intratumoral LVD and peritumoral LVD positively correlated with LNM, with correlation coefficients of 0.14 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.23) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.49), respectively. In summary, our study reports the overall detection rate of intratumoral lymphatics and demonstrates the associations between intratumoral LVD, peritumoral LVD, and LNM in breast cancer. Additionally, controlled studies with a larger number of subjects are needed to establish these relationships. PMID:28067327

  9. Aberrant ganglioside composition in glioblastoma multiforme and peritumoral tissue: A mass spectrometry characterization.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Dragana; Rožman, Marko; Sajko, Tomislav; Vukelić, Željka

    2017-06-01

    Tumor cells are characterized by aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycoconjugates. Gangliosides are sialylated glycosphingolipids highly abundant in neural tissue and considered as tumor markers and therapeutic targets. In this study, a detailed characterization of native ganglioside mixtures from glioblastoma multiforme, corresponding peritumoral tissue and healthy human brain was performed using mass spectrometry and high performance thin layer chromatography in order to elucidate their roles as tumor-associated antigens. Distinctive changes in ganglioside expression were determined in glioblastoma compared to healthy brain tissue showing 5 times lower total ganglioside content and higher abundance of simple gangliosides. Glioblastoma gangliosides were characterized by highly diverse ceramide composition with fatty acyl chains varying from 16 to 24 carbon atoms, while in normal and peritumoral tissue mostly C18 chains were found. The most abundant ganglioside in glioblastoma was GD3 (d18:1/18:0), followed by GD3 (d18:1/24:0) that was exclusively detected in glioblastoma tissue. Peritumoral tissue expressed higher abundance of GD3- and nLM1/GM1-species while lower GT1-species vs. normal brain. O-Ac-GD1, known as neurostatin, was detected in normal and peritumoral tissue, but not in glioblastoma. O-Ac-GD3 species were found exclusively in glioblastoma; MS structural characterization of the isomeric form possessing the O-acetylation at the inner sialic acid residue confirmed our previous finding that this isomer is glioma-associated. This, to our knowledge, the most detailed characterization of ganglioside composition in glioblastoma and peritumoral tissue, especially addressing the ceramide variability and O-acetylation of tumor-associated gangliosides, could contribute to recognition of new molecular targets for glioblastoma treatment and sub-classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Mol

  10. Analysis of angiogenesis related factors in glioblastoma, peritumoral tissue and their derived cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessio, Alessio; Proietti, Gabriella; Lama, Gina; Biamonte, Filippo; Lauriola, Libero; Moscato, Umberto; Vescovi, Angelo; Mangiola, Annunziato; Angelucci, Cristiana; Sica, Gigliola

    2016-01-01

    The formation of new blood vessels represents a crucial event under both physiological and pathological circumstances. In this study, we evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and/or Western blotting and/or quantitative real time-PCR the expression of HIF1α, HIF2α, VEGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 in surgical glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and peritumoral tissue samples obtained from 50 patients as well as in cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from GBM (GCSCs) and peritumoral tissue (PCSCs) of 5 patients. We also investigated the contribution of both GCSCs and PCSCs on the behavior of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of angiogenesis markers in both GBM and peritumoral tissue. In addition, in vitro tube formation assay indicated that both GCSCs and PCSCs stimulate EC proliferation as well as tube-like vessel formation. An increased migration aptitude was mainly observed when ECs were cultured in the presence of GCSCs rather than in the presence of PCSCs. These findings suggest that relevant neoangiogenetic events may occur in GBM. In particular, VEGF/VEGFR co-expression in PCSCs leads to hypothesize the involvement of an autocrine signaling. Moreover, our results suggest that both GCSCs and PCSCs own the skill of activating the “angiogenic switch” and the capability of modulating EC behavior, indicating that both cell types are either responsive to angiogenic stimuli or able to trigger angiogenic response. Together with our previous findings, this study adds a further piece to the challenging puzzle of the characterization of peritumoral tissue and of the definition of its real role in GBM pathophysiology. PMID:27705944

  11. Analysis of angiogenesis related factors in glioblastoma, peritumoral tissue and their derived cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Alessio; Proietti, Gabriella; Lama, Gina; Biamonte, Filippo; Lauriola, Libero; Moscato, Umberto; Vescovi, Angelo; Mangiola, Annunziato; Angelucci, Cristiana; Sica, Gigliola

    2016-11-29

    The formation of new blood vessels represents a crucial event under both physiological and pathological circumstances. In this study, we evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and/or Western blotting and/or quantitative real time-PCR the expression of HIF1α, HIF2α, VEGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 in surgical glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and peritumoral tissue samples obtained from 50 patients as well as in cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from GBM (GCSCs) and peritumoral tissue (PCSCs) of 5 patients. We also investigated the contribution of both GCSCs and PCSCs on the behavior of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of angiogenesis markers in both GBM and peritumoral tissue. In addition, in vitro tube formation assay indicated that both GCSCs and PCSCs stimulate EC proliferation as well as tube-like vessel formation. An increased migration aptitude was mainly observed when ECs were cultured in the presence of GCSCs rather than in the presence of PCSCs. These findings suggest that relevant neoangiogenetic events may occur in GBM. In particular, VEGF/VEGFR co-expression in PCSCs leads to hypothesize the involvement of an autocrine signaling. Moreover, our results suggest that both GCSCs and PCSCs own the skill of activating the "angiogenic switch" and the capability of modulating EC behavior, indicating that both cell types are either responsive to angiogenic stimuli or able to trigger angiogenic response. Together with our previous findings, this study adds a further piece to the challenging puzzle of the characterization of peritumoral tissue and of the definition of its real role in GBM pathophysiology.

  12. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in peritumoral tissues can cause glioma-associated seizures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Ruofei, Liang; Jiewen, Luo; Shu, Jiang; Qing, Mao

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic seizures, the most common symptom accompanying glioma, are closely associated with tumor growth and patient quality of life. However, the association between glioma and glioma-related epilepsy is poorly understood. In fact, findings related to the location of epileptogenicity have been inconsistent in previous studies. We investigated seizure foci in patients with glioma and the corresponding association between glioma-related epilepsy and the tumoral and peritumoral microenvironment. Clinical characteristics, extracellular electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and western blots were conducted on 12 patients with glioma; nine patients had histories of preoperative seizures while three did not. Samples from included patients were used to identify seizure foci and mTOR pathway status. Electrophysiological recordings were conducted on 36 samples (tumor, peritumoral, and normal brain tissues) from 12 patients. Interictal-like discharges (ILDs) were observed in seven of nine peritumoral tissues obtained from patients with glioma that had experienced perioperative seizures. No ILDs were observed in any other sample groups. Western blots and immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway proteins (mTOR and S6k) suggested that the mTOR pathway was activated in peritumoral tissues of patients with seizure history, but inactivated in patients without seizure history. Our results suggest that mTOR pathway expression in peritumoral tissues is associated with tumor-related seizures, thus providing a potential target for therapeutics aimed at simultaneously controlling gliomas and seizures.

  13. Pattern analysis of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MR imaging demonstrates peritumoral tissue heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Hamed; Macyszyn, Luke; Da, Xiao; Wolf, Ronald L; Bilello, Michel; Verma, Ragini; O'Rourke, Donald M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-11-01

    To augment the analysis of dynamic susceptibility contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images to uncover unique tissue characteristics that could potentially facilitate treatment planning through a better understanding of the peritumoral region in patients with glioblastoma. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this study, with waiver of informed consent for retrospective review of medical records. Dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MR imaging data were obtained for 79 patients, and principal component analysis was applied to the perfusion signal intensity. The first six principal components were sufficient to characterize more than 99% of variance in the temporal dynamics of blood perfusion in all regions of interest. The principal components were subsequently used in conjunction with a support vector machine classifier to create a map of heterogeneity within the peritumoral region, and the variance of this map served as the heterogeneity score. The calculated principal components allowed near-perfect separability of tissue that was likely highly infiltrated with tumor and tissue that was unlikely infiltrated with tumor. The heterogeneity map created by using the principal components showed a clear relationship between voxels judged by the support vector machine to be highly infiltrated and subsequent recurrence. The results demonstrated a significant correlation (r = 0.46, P < .0001) between the heterogeneity score and patient survival. The hazard ratio was 2.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.4, 3.6; P < .01) between patients with high and low heterogeneity scores on the basis of the median heterogeneity score. Analysis of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MR imaging data by using principal component analysis can help identify imaging variables that can be subsequently used to evaluate the peritumoral region in glioblastoma. These variables are potentially indicative of tumor infiltration and may become useful tools in

  14. Failed First Craniotomy and Tumor Removal of Parasagittal Meningioma with Severe Peritumoral Brain Edema

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Youngbo

    2016-01-01

    Parasagittal meningioma often presents as peritumoral brain edema (PTBE). The risk of edema increases when the tumor occludes the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Although PTBE may be expected based on the patient’s symptoms or radiologic findings, extensive brain swelling and extracranial herniation during elective surgery are rare. Herniation during surgery could lead to irreversible neurological damage and even brain rupture. We report a case of a failed routine craniotomy for a parasagittal meningioma with complete occlusion of the posterior third of the SSS in a 30-year-old male patient. The patient developed extensive brain swelling and extracranial herniation during surgery. PMID:27867923

  15. Peritumoral apparent diffusion coefficient as a metric of response in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Andre, J B; Lu, S; Spearman, K; Raval, S N

    2008-06-03

    Bevacizumab and irinotecan have shown promising results in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), which traditionally carries a poor prognosis after first-line therapies have been exhausted. Retrospectively documenting the short-term effects of this chemotherapeutic regimen on recurrent GBM, as evidenced by comparative magnetic resonance images obtained two weeks prior to, and one-month following initiation of treatment, we hypothesize that peritumoral apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values will decrease on post-treatment scans. Brain MR data were collected from August 2005 to December 2006, in which post-contrast T1-weighted images demonstrated measurable enhancement or GBM tumor mass. Pre- and post-treatment MR images for ten consecutive patients were collected, each having failed temozolomide and radiation therapy. Pre- and post-treatment recurrent GBM bulk tumor and peritumoral T2 signal abnormality were measured in three dimensions. Diffusion of peritumoral T2 signal abnormality was evaluated on pre- and post-treatment ADC. All patients witnessed a significant decrease in tumor bulk ranging from 15.3% to 96.7% with a mean reduction of 48.2%, having received an average of two cycles of chemotherapy. FLAIR images demonstrated a mean volumetric reduction in peritumoral T2 signal abnormality of 44.3%. ADC measurements demonstrated an average reduction in peritumoral ADC of 20.6%, which was statistically significant (p-value < .005). Recurrent GBM tumor bulk demonstrated a 48.2% mean reduction, with corresponding decrease in peritumoral ADC values of 20.6%, suggesting that ADC may represent a valuable metric in the evaluation of the chemotherapeutic response of recurrent GBM, when treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan.

  16. Diagnostic value of peritumoral minimum apparent diffusion coefficient for differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme from solitary metastatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Ja; terBrugge, Karel; Mikulis, David; Choi, Dae Seob; Bae, Jong Myon; Lee, Seon Kyu; Moon, Soon Young

    2011-01-01

    In glioblastoma multiforme, the peritumoral region may be infiltrated with malignant cells in addition to vasogenic edema, whereas in a metastatic deposit, the peritumoral areas comprise predominantly vasogenic edema. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can be used to differentiate glioblastoma from solitary metastasis on the basis of cellularity levels in the enhancing tumor and in the peritumoral region. Seventy-three patients underwent conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) before undergoing treatment. The minimum ADC was measured in the enhancing tumor, peritumoral region, and contralateral normal white matter. To determine whether there was a statistical difference between metastasis and glioblastoma, we analyzed patient age and sex, minimum ADC value, and ADC ratio of the two groups. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the cutoff value of the minimum ADC that had the best combination of sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing between glioblastoma and metastasis. The mean minimum ADC values and mean ADC ratios in the peritumoral regions of glioblastomas were significantly higher than those in metastases. However, the mean minimum ADC values and mean ADC ratios in enhancing tumors showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups. According to ROC curve analysis, a cutoff value of 1.302 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s for the minimum peritumoral ADC value generated the best combination of sensitivity (82.9%) and specificity (78.9%) for distinguishing between glioblastoma and metastasis. Although the characteristics of solitary metastasis and glioblastoma multiforme may be similar on conventional MRI, DWI can offer diagnostic information to distinguish between the tumors.

  17. Comparison of myometrial invasion and tumor free distance from uterine serosa in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozbilen, Ozlem; Sakarya, Derya Kilic; Bezircioglu, Incim; Kasap, Burcu; Yetimalar, Hakan; Yigit, Seyran

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether the tumor free distance (the distance between the uterine serosa and the tumor at its deepest point) is useful in surgical staging and in predicting prognosis. Data from patients who underwent complete surgical staging for endometrial cancer between January 2006 and June 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. All demographic findings, surgical stages, histological type and grade, myometrial invasion, lymphovascular space invasion as well as abdominal cytology, cervical, adnexal, and omental involvement, and lymph node metastasis were recorded. The relations between myometrial invasion and tumor free distance from uterine serosa with prognostic factors were investigated. Seventy patients were included in the study. Sixty-four (91.5%) had endometrioid type cancers and forty-four (62.9%) were grade 1. The deepest myometrial invasion was less than 1/2 in 42 patients (60%). In 18 patients (25.8%) lymphovascular invasion was noted. Eight (11.4%) were found to have cervical involvement, five (7.1%) had adnexal involvement and in 4 cases (5.7%) the peritoneal washings included malignant cells. Four patients had pelvic and one para-aortic node metastasis. We recognized that an invasion of more than 1/2 was correlated significantly with lymphovascular space involvement, histological grade, positive abdominal washing cytology, nodal and cervical involvement, but not with adnexal involvement. Tumor-free myometrial thickness was negative and statistically significant correlated with surgical stage, histological grade, lymphovascular space involvement, positive abdominal washing cytology, cervical and adnexal involvement. The importance of tumor- free myometrial thickness in determinating the lymphovascular space invasion was found to be highest in terms of sensitivity and specificity when crossing the ROC curve at 11 millimeters. Depth of myometrial invasion is more valuable for predicting lymph node metastasis than tumor-free myometrial thickness

  18. Progressive peritumoral edema defining the optic fibers and resulting in reversible visual loss.

    PubMed

    Baggenstos, Martin; Chew, Emily; Butman, John A; Oldfield, Edward H; Lonser, Russell R

    2008-08-01

    Hemangioblastomas are frequently associated with peritumoral edema caused by extravasation of plasma ultrafiltrate through permeable neoplastic vessels. The authors report the clinical and imaging findings in a 62-year-old man with von Hippel-Lindau disease who presented with rapid (within 24 hours) loss of color vision and nearcomplete loss of left eye vision (acuity too poor to test). Serial MR imaging demonstrated a stable vascular tumor in the medioinferior aspect of the left optic nerve, associated with progressive edema extending from the nerve through to the bilateral optic radiations. Complete resection of the lesion was performed via an extended transsphenoidal approach, and histological examination confirmed the lesion was a hemangioblastoma. Postoperatively, the patient recovered color vision and had improvement in visual acuity (20/320). Serial imaging in this unique case captured the progressive extravasation of peritumoral edema that tracked and defined the parallel white matter tracts of first- and second-order neurons of the optic system, causing vision loss. Tumor resection led to resolution of the edema and improvement in visual function.

  19. Quantitative analysis of peri-tumor tissue elasticity based on shear-wave elastography for breast tumor classification.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yang; Zeng, Jie; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Rongqin; Zheng, Hairong

    2013-01-01

    For shear-wave elastography (SWE) images, the most common site of tumor-associated stiffness is generally in the surrounding stroma rather than the tumor itself. The aim of this study is to assess the value of the peri-tumor tissue elasticity in the classification of breast tumors. SWE images of 106 breast tumors (65 benign, 41 malignant) were collected from 82 consecutive patients. By applying the image processing method, 5 elastographic features of the peri-tumor area (elasticity modulus mean, maximum, standard deviation, hardness degree and elasticity ratio) were computed to represent peri-tumor tissue elasticity. B-mode Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) were used for comparing the diagnostic performances between the grayscale US and color SWE images. Histopathologic results were used as the reference standard. The t-test, point biserial correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed for statistical analysis. As a result, the Az values (area under ROC curve) were 0.92, 0.95, 0.94, 0.91, and 0.98 for the classifiers using the five elastographic features respectively, and 0.91 for BI-RADS assessment. The results showed that the peri-tumor tissue elasticity could provide valuable information for breast tumor classification.

  20. Melanoma-Derived BRAF(V600E) Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B

    2016-06-21

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell's phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAF(V600E) melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAF(V600E) protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAF(V600E) with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAF(V600E) mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAF(V600E) mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAF(WT) melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome.

  1. Melanoma-Derived BRAFV600E Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V.; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell’s phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAFV600E melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAFV600E protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAFV600E with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAFV600E mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAFV600E mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAFWT melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome. PMID:27338362

  2. Assessment and Treatment of Peritumoral Cortical Veins in Parasagittal Meningiomas with Application of 3-Dimensional Imaging Fusion Model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tengkun; Gu, Jianjun; Huang, Yinxing; Wei, Liangfeng; Gao, Jinxi; Wang, Shousen

    2017-08-01

    Operation of cortical veins is the keystone of parasagittal meningioma (PSM) resection. Little is known about pathologic changes of the veins and proper treatment. We built 3-dimensional (3D) image fusion models by neuronavigation to analyze the features of peritumoral cortical veins for PSMs and explore intraoperative treatment options. We performed a prospective study of 42 consecutive surgically treated PSM patients who underwent preoperative evaluation of peritumoral cortical veins using a 3D venous-tumor fusion model established by a neuronavigation system. We categorized cortical veins into 3 types: single-end anastomosis (type a), tumor-to-end anastomosis (type b), and end-to-end anastomosis (type c). We present surgical strategies to operate these veins. Preoperative evaluation demonstrated 39 patients with peritumoral cortical veins. The 3D models show 100% of the veins (95 in total), which were confirmed intraoperation. The postoperative complication rates after vein injury were 60% (type a), 16.7% (type c), and 0% (type b). Ten patients (23.8%) had residual tumor because of venous protection (equal to Simpson grade III). After correlation analysis, type b and c cortical veins were positively correlated with tumor volume. The anastomoses of cortical veins may provide compensation for venous transaction. There may be a time-evolution relationship between different cortical veins (type a to c to b). Treatment of cortical veins should follow the following principles: single-end veins must be protected, tumor-to-end veins should be transacted directly, and end-to-end veins could be cut selectivity based on the degree of occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus. Detailed preoperative assessment of peritumoral cortical veins is critical for proper treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Altered peritumoral microRNA expression predicts head and neck cancer patients with a high risk of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ganci, Federica; Sacconi, Andrea; Manciocco, Valentina; Covello, Renato; Benevolo, Maria; Rollo, Francesca; Strano, Sabrina; Valsoni, Sara; Bicciato, Silvio; Spriano, Giuseppe; Muti, Paola; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Blandino, Giovanni

    2017-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is typically characterized by a high incidence of local recurrences. It has been extensively shown that mucosa from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients carries both genetic and gene expression alterations, which are mostly attributable to major etiologic agents of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We previously identified a signature of microRNAs (miRNAs) whose high expression in tumors is predictive of recurrence. Here, we investigated whether the deregulation of miRNA expression in the tumor-surrounding mucosa is correlated to disease recurrence. Specifically, comparing the miRNA expression in matched tumoral, peritumoral, and normal tissues collected from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients, we identified 35 miRNAs that are deregulated in both tumoral and peritumoral tissues as compared with normal matched samples. Four of these composed a miRNA signature that predicts head and neck squamous cell carcinoma local recurrence independently from prognostic clinical variables. The predictive power of the miRNA signature increased when using the expression levels derived from both the peritumoral and the tumoral tissues. The expression signal of the miRNAs composing the predictive signature correlated with the transcriptional levels of genes mostly associated with proliferation. Our results show that expression of miRNAs in tumor-surrounding mucosa may strongly contribute to the identification of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients at high risk of local recurrence.

  4. Impact of Including Peritumoral Edema in Radiotherapy Target Volume on Patterns of Failure in Glioblastoma following Temozolomide-based Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seo Hee; Kim, Jun Won; Chang, Jee Suk; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Se Hoon; Chang, Jong Hee; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the impact of including peritumoral edema in radiotherapy volumes on recurrence patterns among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with standard chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 167 patients with histologically confirmed GBM who received temozolomide (TMZ)-based CRT between May 2006 and November 2012. The study cohort was divided into edema (+) (n = 130) and edema (−) (n = 37) groups, according to whether the entire peritumoral edema was included. At a median follow-up of 20 months (range, 2–99 months), 118 patients (71%) experienced progression/recurrence (infield: 69%; marginal: 26%; outfield: 16%; CSF seeding: 12%). The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 20 months and 15 months, respectively. The marginal failure rate was significantly greater in the edema (−) group (37% vs. 22%, p = 0.050). Among 33 patients who had a favorable prognosis (total resection and MGMT-methylation), the difference in the marginal failure rates was increased (40% vs. 14%, p = 0.138). Meanwhile, treatment of edema did not significantly increase the incidence of pseudoprogression/radiation necrosis (edema (−) 49% vs. (+) 37%, p = 0.253). Inclusion of peritumoral edema in the radiotherapy volume can reduce marginal failures following TMZ-based CRT without increasing pseudoprogression/radiation necrosis. PMID:28176884

  5. The effect of bumetanide on photodynamic therapy-induced peri-tumor edema of C6 glioma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Cong, Damin; Shen, Dawei; Gao, Xin; Chen, Lei; Hu, Shaoshan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bumetanide on peri-tumor edema caused by photodynamic therapy (PDT) of intraparenchymal C6 glioma xenografts. Seven days after inoculation with C6 cells, rats with MRI-confirmed glioma received hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-mediated PDT, injection of bumetanide or a combination of the two treatments. After treatment, tumor volume, tumor weight, brain water content, microvessel density, expression of NKCC-1, Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), and animal survival time were examined. In the PDT group, tumor growth was significantly inhibited and survival prolonged. Bumetanide enhanced the efficacy of PDT and reduced PDT-induced peri-tumor edema in the combined PDT + bumetanide treatment group where NKCC-1 expression in response to PDT was significantly suppressed. ZO-1 expression was significantly suppressed in the PDT-only group. This suppression was not observed in the combined PDT + bumetanide treatment group. PDT, in combination with bumetanide was seen to significantly inhibit the growth of C6 glioma, relieve peri-tumor edema caused by PDT alone and prolong survival. These results suggest that PDT, in combination with bumetanide, may be a useful and promising strategy in the treatment of human glioma. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. In vivo distribution of 5-Fluorouracil after peritumoral implantation using a biodegradable micro-device in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Na; Zhou, Mingyao; Lu, Wen

    2013-09-01

    A novel implantable micro-device was used for delivery of 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu), which was often used in the treatment of various human malignancies. The biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) was used as material. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency of delivery of 5-Fu to the tumor via this delivery system. The distribution characters of the 5-Fu in tumor, plasma, peritumoral tissue, liver and kidney were compared after peritumoral implantation of micro-device and intraperitoneal injection of solution. After administration of micro-device, the 5-Fu was absorbed into the tumor on Day 1, and Cmax (4.14 μg/g) was reached on Day 6. The half life for the elimination was 4.48 d and the AUC was 46.78 μg × d/g. Similar pharmacokinetic behaviors were observed in plasma, peritumoral tissue, kidney and liver, while the Cmax and the AUC of plasma and these tissues were lower than those of tumor. When administered the solution, 5-Fu was rapidly absorbed into plasma, liver, kidney, spleen and tumor, and rapidly cleared from these tissues after 2 or 4 h. And the AUC in tumor of 5-Fu solution was significantly lower than that of the micro-device. These results indicated that 5-Fu loaded biodegradable micro-device offered a relatively high concentration and long-term delivery of the drug to the tumor site.

  7. Glucocorticoids in the management of peritumoral brain edema: a review of molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Murayi, Roger; Chittiboina, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Peritumoral brain edema (PTBE) is mediated by blood-brain barrier breakdown. PTBE results from interstitial vasogenic brain edema due to vascular endothelial growth factor and other inflammatory products of brain tumors. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the mainstay for treatment of PTBE despite significant systemic side effects. GCs are thought to affect multiple cell types in the edematous brain. Here, we review preclinical studies of GC effects on edematous brain and review mechanisms underlying GC action on tumor cells, endothelial cells, and astrocytes. GCs may reduce tumor cell viability and suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in tumor cells. Modulation of expression and distribution of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5, and ZO-1 in endothelial cells likely plays a central role in GC action on endothelial cells. GCs may also have an effect on astrocyte angiopoietin production and limited effect on astrocyte aquaporin. A better understanding of these molecular mechanisms may lead to the development of novel therapeutics for management of PTBE with a better side effect profile. PMID:27613642

  8. Intratumoral heterogeneity in glioblastoma: don't forget the peritumoral brain zone

    PubMed Central

    Lemée, Jean-Michel; Clavreul, Anne; Menei, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is the most frequent and aggressive primary tumor of the central nervous system. Prognosis remains poor despite ongoing progress. In cases where the gadolinium-enhanced portion of the GB is completely resected, 90% of recurrences occur at the margin of surgical resection in the macroscopically normal peritumoral brain zone (PBZ). Intratumoral heterogeneity in GB is currently a hot topic in neuro-oncology, and the GB PBZ may be involved in this phenomenon. Indeed, this region, which possesses specific properties, has been less studied than the core of the GB tumor. The high rate of local recurrence in the PBZ and the limited success of targeted therapies against GB demonstrate the need for a better understanding of the PBZ. We present here a review of the literature on the GB PBZ, focusing on its radiological, cellular, and molecular characteristics. We discuss how intraoperative analysis of the PBZ is important for the optimization of surgical resection and the development of targeted therapies against GB. PMID:26203067

  9. Primary invasive extramammary Paget disease on penoscrotum: a clinicopathological analysis of 41 cases.

    PubMed

    Shu, Bo; Shen, Xu-Xia; Chen, Peng; Fang, Xin-Zhi; Guo, Yong-Lian; Kong, Yun-Yi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features and prognostic factors for invasive extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) on penoscrotum, we described the clinical presentations, histopathology, and follow-up courses of 41 cases. The age of the patients ranged from 42 to 84 years. All the patients were treated with wide surgical excision, and 14 were confirmed to have lymph node metastasis. During follow-up, 18 patients (43.9%) developed local or distant recurrence, and 13 patients (31.7%) died of the disease. Histologically, glandular formation with true lumina within the epidermis was found in 29 cases, and signet ring cells were seen in 11 cases. In invasive components, nodular/micronodular growth pattern, glandular formation, and strands/solid sheets existed in 95.1% (39/41), 43.9% (18/41), and 24.4% (10/41) of the cases, respectively. More than half of the cases had at least 2 different types of invasive growth pattern. CK7 was diffusely positive in all cases, whereas CK20 was focally positive in 8 cases. GCDFP-15 was expressed to a variable degree in 24 cases. Presence of strands/solid sheets, lymphovascular invasion, and perineural invasion in invasive EMPD were found to be correlated with higher lymph node metastatic rate. Univariate analysis revealed that patients with one of the following prognostic factors: delay in diagnosis more than 7.5 years, depth of invasion more than 1 mm, invasive pattern of strands/solid sheets, marked inflammation, lymphovascular invasion, and lymph node metastasis at diagnosis, had significantly shorter cancer-specific survival. We concluded that invasive EMPD is a rare malignant skin neoplasm with morphological diversity. Invasive pattern of strands/solid sheets is significantly associated with both lymph node metastasis and worse prognosis. Delay in diagnosis, depth of invasion, marked inflammation, lymphovascular invasion, and regional lymph node status are important prognostic factors.

  10. Influence of large peritumoral vessels on outcome of radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Lu, David S K; Raman, Steven S; Limanond, Piyaporn; Aziz, Donya; Economou, James; Busuttil, Ronald; Sayre, James

    2003-10-01

    The effect of large vessels (>/=3 mm) contiguous to hepatic tumors was evaluated with respect to clinical tumor recurrence rates after radiofrequency (RF) ablation. The first 105 malignant liver tumors treated by RF ablation therapy at our institution with pathologic analysis or a minimum of 6 months of clinical follow-up were reviewed. The original pretreatment imaging studies were reviewed by a radiologist who was blinded to the cases, and, based on lesion contiguity to vessels of at least 3 mm, the lesions were categorized as perivascular or nonperivascular. Treatment outcomes with respect to local tumor recurrence between these two groups were then compared. Logistic regression analysis was performed to take into account other variables and to determine whether this categorization was an independent predictor of treatment outcome. There were 74 nonperivascular tumors and 31 perivascular tumors. Mean tumor size was 2.4 cm and mean follow-up was 11.3 months. Residual or locally recurrent tumors were documented in 20 of 105 cases (19%). In the nonperivascular group, five of 74 (7%) had either incompletely treated tumor (manifested within 6 months) or local recurrence beyond 6 months. In the perivascular group, 15 of 31 (48%) had incompletely treated or locally recurrent tumor (P <.001). Subanalysis of lesion size (61 tumors 4 cm), tumor type (40 hepatocellular carcinomas, 48 colorectal metastases, and 17 other metastases), access (53 intraoperative, 52 percutaneous), and RF device (45 Radiotherapeutics electrodes, 18 Rita electrodes, and 42 Radionics electrodes) showed similar results. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that presence or absence of a large peritumoral vessel is an independent, and the dominant, predictor of treatment outcome. The presence of vessels at least 3 mm in size contiguous to hepatic tumors is a strong independent predictor of incomplete tumor destruction by RF ablation. Modified

  11. Polydopamine-based surface modification for the development of peritumorally activatable nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gullotti, Emily; Park, Joonyoung; Yeo, Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To create a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs), where a drug-encapsulating NP core is covered with polyethylene glycol (PEG) in a normal condition but exposes a cell-interactive TAT-modified surface in an environment rich in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Methods PLGA NPs were modified with TAT peptide (PLGA-pDA-TAT NPs) or dual-modified with TAT peptide and a conjugate of PEG and MMP-substrate peptide (Peritumorally activatable NPs, PANPs) via dopamine polymerization. Cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled NPs was observed with or without a pre-treatment of MMP-2 by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. NPs loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) were tested against SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells to evaluate the contribution of surface modification to cellular delivery of PTX. Results While the size and morphology did not significantly change due to the modification, NPs modified with dopamine polymerization were recognized by their dark color. Moreover, TAT-containing NPs (PLGA-pDA-TAT NPs and PANPs) showed changes in surface charge, indicative of effective conjugation of TAT peptide on the surface. PLGA-pDA-TAT NPs and MMP-2-pre-treated PANPs showed relatively good cellular uptake as compared to PLGA NPs, MMP-2-non-treated PANPs, and NPs with non-cleavable PEG. After 3 hour treatment with cells, PTX loaded in cell-interactive NPs showed greater toxicity than that in non-interactive ones as the former could enter cells during the incubation period. However, due to the initial burst drug release, the difference was not as clear as microscopic observation. Conclusions PEGylated polymeric NPs that exposed cell-interactive surface in response to MMP-2 were successfully created by dual modification of PLGA NPs using dopamine polymerization. PMID:23609560

  12. Recovery of White Matter Tracts in Regions of Peritumoral FLAIR Hyperintensity using Restriction Spectrum Imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Carrie R.; White, Nathan S.; Farid, Nikdokht; Lai, Grace; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Hagler, Donald J.; Kesari, Santosh; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.; Dale, Anders M.

    2014-01-01

    Background DTI is being increasingly used for visualizing critical white matter tracts adjacent to brain tumors prior to neurosurgical resection. However, brain tumors, particularly high-grade gliomas, are typically surrounded by regions of FLAIR hyperintensity (FLAIR-HI) that include edema, which increase isotropic diffusion, degrading the ability of standard DTI to uncover orientation estimates within these regions. Purpose We introduce a new technique, RSI, which overcomes this limitation by removing the spherical, fast diffusion component introduced by edema, providing better analysis of white matter architecture. Methods Ten patients with high-grade gliomas surrounded by FLAIR-HI that at least partially resolved on follow-up imaging were included. All patients underwent RSI and DTI at baseline (FLAIR-HI present) and at follow-up (FLAIR-HI partially resolved). FA values obtained with RSI and DTI were compared within regions of FLAIR-HI and NAWM at both time points. Results RSI showed higher FA in regions of FLAIR-HI and NAWM relative to DTI, reflecting RSIs ability to specifically measure the slow, restricted volume fraction in regions of edema and NAWM. Furthermore, a method by time interaction revealed that FA estimates increased when the FLAIR-HI resolved using standard DTI, but remained stable with RSI. Tractography performed within the region of FLAIR-HI revealed the superior ability of RSI to track fibers through severe edema relative to standard DTI. Conclusion RSI improves the quantification and visualization of white matter tracts in regions of peritumoral FLAIR-HI associated with edema relative to standard DTI, and may provide a valuable tool for neurosurgical planning. PMID:23275591

  13. Significance of Primary Tumor Location and Histology for Brain Metastasis Development and Peritumoral Brain Edema in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fábián, Katalin; Gyulai, Márton; Furák, József; Várallyay, Péter; Jäckel, Márta; Bogos, Krisztina; Döme, Balázs; Pápay, Judit; Tímár, József; Szállási, Zoltán; Moldvay, Judit

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis of lung cancer adversely affects overall survival (OS) and quality of life, while peritumoral brain edema is responsible for life-threatening complications. We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological and cerebral radiological data of 575 consecutive lung cancer patients with brain metastases. In adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, peritumoral brain edema was more pronounced than in small-cell lung cancer (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). There was a positive correlation between the size of metastasis and the thickness of peritumoral brain edema (p < 0.001). It was thicker in supratentorial tumors (p = 0.019), in younger patients (≤50 years) (p = 0.042), and in females (p = 0.016). The time to development of brain metastasis was shorter in central than in peripheral lung cancer (5.3 vs. 9.0 months, p = 0.035). Early brain metastasis was characteristic for adenocarcinomas. A total of 135 patients had brain only metastases (N0 disease) characterized by peripheral lung cancer predominance (p < 0.001) and a longer time to development of brain metastasis (9.2 vs. 4.4 months, p < 0.001). OS was longer in the brain only subgroup than in patients with N1-3 diseases (p < 0.001). The clinicopathological characteristics of lung cancer are related to the development and radiographic features of brain metastases. Our results might be helpful in selecting patients who might benefit from prophylactic cranial irradiation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Segmentation of peritumoral oedema offers a valuable radiological feature of cerebral metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chengcheng; Yang, Zixiao; Yao, Zhengwei; Yin, Bo; Pan, Jiawei; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Hua, Wei; Mao, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Peritumoral oedema (PTO) is commonly observed on MRI in malignant brain tumours including brain metastasis (bMET) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This study aimed to differentiate bMET from GBM by comparing the volume ratio of PTO to tumour lesion (Rvol). 56 patients with solitary bMET or GBM were enrolled, and MRI was analyzed by a semi-automatic methodology based on MATLAB (Mathworks, Natick, MA). The PTO volume (Voedema) was segmented for quantification using T2 fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery images, while the tumour volume was quantified with enhanced T1 images. The quantitative volume of the tumour, PTO and the ratio of PTO to tumour were interpreted using SPSS(®) (IBM Corp., New York, NY; formerly SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) by considering different locations and pathologies. The tumour volumes of supratentorial GBM, supratentorial bMET (supra-bMET) and infratentorial bMET were 32.22 ± 21.9, 18.45 ± 17.28 and 11.40 ± 5.63 ml, respectively. The corresponding Voedema were 44.08 ± 25.84, 73.20 ± 40.35 and 23.74 ± 7.78 ml, respectively. The Voedema difference between supratentorial and infratentorial lesions is significant (p-value = 0.002). Supra-bMET has a smaller tumour volume (p-value = 0.032), but a larger PTO (p-value = 0.007). The ratio of Voedema to the tumour volume in bMET is statistically higher than that in GBM (p-value = 0.015). The cut-off ratio for identifying bMET from GBM is 3.9, with a specificity and sensitivity of 90.0% and 68.8%, respectively. Segmentation is an efficient method to quantify irregular PTO. bMET possesses more extensive oedema with smaller tumour volume than does GBM. The Rvol is a valuable index to distinguish bMET from GBM. This study presents a new method for the quantitation of PTO to differentiate bMET from GBM.

  15. Segmentation of peritumoral oedema offers a valuable radiological feature of cerebral metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengcheng; Yang, Zixiao; Yao, Zhengwei; Yin, Bo; Pan, Jiawei; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Mao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Peritumoral oedema (PTO) is commonly observed on MRI in malignant brain tumours including brain metastasis (bMET) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This study aimed to differentiate bMET from GBM by comparing the volume ratio of PTO to tumour lesion (Rvol). Methods: 56 patients with solitary bMET or GBM were enrolled, and MRI was analyzed by a semi-automatic methodology based on MATLAB (Mathworks, Natick, MA). The PTO volume (Voedema) was segmented for quantification using T2 fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery images, while the tumour volume was quantified with enhanced T1 images. The quantitative volume of the tumour, PTO and the ratio of PTO to tumour were interpreted using SPSS® (IBM Corp., New York, NY; formerly SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) by considering different locations and pathologies. Results: The tumour volumes of supratentorial GBM, supratentorial bMET (supra-bMET) and infratentorial bMET were 32.22 ± 21.9, 18.45 ± 17.28 and 11.40 ± 5.63 ml, respectively. The corresponding Voedema were 44.08 ± 25.84, 73.20 ± 40.35 and 23.74 ± 7.78 ml, respectively. The Voedema difference between supratentorial and infratentorial lesions is significant (p-value = 0.002). Supra-bMET has a smaller tumour volume (p-value = 0.032), but a larger PTO (p-value = 0.007). The ratio of Voedema to the tumour volume in bMET is statistically higher than that in GBM (p-value = 0.015). The cut-off ratio for identifying bMET from GBM is 3.9, with a specificity and sensitivity of 90.0% and 68.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Segmentation is an efficient method to quantify irregular PTO. bMET possesses more extensive oedema with smaller tumour volume than does GBM. The Rvol is a valuable index to distinguish bMET from GBM. Advances in knowledge: This study presents a new method for the quantitation of PTO to differentiate bMET from GBM. PMID:27119727

  16. Peritumoral interstitial double-nuclide double-compound lymphoscintigraphy (PIDDL) in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Munz, D.L.; Jung, H.

    1985-05-01

    PIDDL is a new two-phase lymphoscintigraphic approach developed by MUNZ et al. for identification of lymph node drainage groups of primary tumors followed by direct visualization of metastases in the nodes. The present study was done to test the diagnostic usefulness of PIDDL in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. 58 patients of either sex, aged 31-86 years, were examined prior to surgery. In the first phase of PIDDL, lymph node groups draining the primary lesions were identified after peritumoral interstitial injection of 1.52.0 mCi Tc-99m antimony trisulfide colloid or Tc-99m human serum albumin microcolloid. In the second phase, metastases located in the draining lymph nodes were visualized following peritumoral interstitial injection of 200-300 ..mu..Ci Ga-67 citrate. Ga-67 accumulated in 71% of lymph node drainage groups identified. No GA-67 uptake was observed in lymph nodes other than those identified by the radiocolloid. Based on the radiocolloid lymphoscintigraphic data, selective lymph node dissection was performed in 41 of the patients examined. The study concludes that PIDDL offers a promising approach for the noninvasive assessment of lymph node metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

  17. [Propositions for the selection and the delineation of peritumoral microscopic disease volumes in oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers (lymph nodes excluded)].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Henrot, P; Alfonsi, M; Bardet, E; Bensadoun, R J; Dolivet, G; Favrel, V; Gallocher, O; Giraud, P; Graff, P; Guerif, S; Lagarde, P; Lartigau, E; Marchesi, V; Pommier, P; Rives, M; Tortochaux, J; Toussaint, B; Verrelle, P; Bourhis, J; Calais, G

    2005-06-01

    This article reviews the concept of selectivity in peritumoral microscopic disease to be included in the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) for elective treatment for oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, using the local tumoral spread. The objective of the present article is to present a procedure for the delineation of the target volumes, required for an appropriate application of 3-DCRT and IMRT for head and neck cancers. These propositions are for the delineation of microscopic peritumoral target volumes when external beam irradiation is required. CTVs are illustrated on CT sections.

  18. Adipose microenvironment promotes triple negative breast cancer cell invasiveness and dissemination by producing CCL5

    PubMed Central

    D’Esposito, Vittoria; Liguoro, Domenico; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Collina, Francesca; Cantile, Monica; Spinelli, Rosa; Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Miele, Claudia; Valentino, Rossella; Campiglia, Pietro; De Laurentiis, Michelino; Di Bonito, Maurizio; Botti, Gerardo; Franco, Renato; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that adiposity is associated with raised cancer incidence, morbidity and mortality. In a subset of tumors, cancer cell growth and/or metastasis predominantly occur in adipocyte-rich microenvironment. Indeed, adipocytes represent the most abundant cell types surrounding breast cancer cells. We have studied the mechanisms by which peritumoral human adipose tissue contributes to Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) cell invasiveness and dissemination. Co-culture with human adipocytes enhanced MDA-MB231 cancer cell invasiveness. Adipocytes cultured in high glucose were 2-fold more active in promoting cell invasion and motility compared to those cultured in low glucose. This effect is induced, at least in part, by the CC-chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5). Indeed, CCL5 inhibition by specific peptides and antibodies reduced adipocyte-induced breast cancer cell migration and invasion. CCL5 immuno-detection in peritumoral adipose tissue of women with TNBC correlated with lymph node (p-value = 0.04) and distant metastases (p-value = 0.001). A positive trend was also observed between CCL5 expression and glycaemia. Finally, Kaplan-Meier curves showed a negative correlation between CCL5 staining in the peritumoral adipose tissue and overall survival of patients (p-value = 0.039). Thus, inhibition of CCL5 in adipose microenvironment may represent a novel approach for the therapy of highly malignant TNBC. PMID:27027351

  19. Nonenhancing peritumoral hyperintense lesion on diffusion-weighted imaging in glioblastoma: a novel diagnostic and specific prognostic indicator.

    PubMed

    Kolakshyapati, Manish; Adhikari, Rupendra B; Karlowee, Vega; Takayasu, Takeshi; Nosaka, Ryo; Amatya, Vishwa J; Takeshima, Yukio; Akiyama, Yuji; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru; Yamasaki, Fumiyuki

    2017-03-31

    OBJECTIVE Glioblastoma differentials include intracranial tumors, like malignant lymphomas and metastatic brain tumors with indiscernible radiological characteristics. The purpose of this study was to identify a distinct radiological feature for the preoperative differentiation of glioblastoma from its differentials, which include malignant lymphomas and metastatic brain tumors. METHODS Preoperative MR images, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) studies (b = 1000 and 4000 sec/mm(2)), obtained in patients with newly diagnosed malignant tumor, were analyzed retrospectively after receiving approval from the institutional review board. Sixty-four patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma, 32 patients with malignant lymphoma, and 46 patients with brain metastases were included. The presence of a nonenhancing peritumoral DWI high lesion (NePDHL, i.e., hyperintense lesion in a nonenhancing peritumoral area on DWI) was confirmed in both DWI sequences. Gray matter lesions were excluded. Lesions were termed "definite" if present within 3 cm of the hyperintense tumor border with a signal intensity ratio ≥ 30% when compared with the contralateral normal white matter in both sequences. Discriminant analysis between the histological diagnosis and the presence of Definite-NePDHL was performed, as well as Kaplan-Meier survival analysis incorporating the existence of Definite-NePDHL. RESULTS In 25% of glioblastoma patients, Definite-NePDHL was present, while it was conspicuously absent in patients with malignant lymphoma and metastatic brain tumors. The specificity and positive predictive value were 100%. In the glioblastoma subset, a higher preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale score (p = 0.0028), high recursive partitioning analysis class (p = 0.0006), and total surgical removal (p = 0.0012) were associated with better median overall survival. Patients with Definite-NePDHL had significantly early local (p = 0.0467) and distant/dissemination recurrence (p < 0

  20. Morphometric analysis of peritumoral lymph nodes in patients operated on for uterine cancer, locally treated with a thymic extract.

    PubMed

    Corradi, G; Cappellari, A; Pomari, R; Cappello, F

    1989-01-01

    By means of a morphometric analysis, the authors have evaluated the structure and dimensions of the lymph node functional areas (cortical, medullary, paracortical, histiocytosis of the sinuses, germinal centres) in regional nodes of women with carcinoma of the uterus in the 1st and 2nd stages. Twenty patients were treated 8 days before surgery with a dose of 1.5 mg kg-1 body weight of thymic hormone directly into the uterine portio. Ten patients, on the other hand, were injected with physiological saline solution. The quantitative and qualitative results show that in peritumoral lymph nodes of women treated with thymostimolin there is a marked increase, statistically significant (P less than 0.001), of the paracortical zone and of the number of germinal centres.

  1. Quantitative MRI study of the permeability of peritumoral brain edema in lung cancer patients with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Ming-Liang; Li, Yue-Hua

    2017-08-15

    To use Ktrans to evaluate the aggressiveness and vascular permeability of peritumoral edema in cases of lung cancer brain metastases. A total of 68 lung cancer patients with 92 metastatic brain lesions were enrolled (20 metastatic lesions only in the gray matter - group 1; and 72 metastatic lesions located in the gray and white matter junction - group 2). All patients underwent MRI examination, which involved a dual angle (2° and 15°) enhanced T1W-VIBE (volume interpolated breath-hold examination) sequence to calculate the T1 parameter map. We used the enhanced T1-3D sequence to measure the tumor volume. The vascular permeability coefficient (Ktrans) was calculated using the single-compartment Tofts model, motion registration, and quick input mode. We examined the correlations of Ktrans with the edema index (EI), Ktrans with the tumor volume, and Ktrans with the histological expression of MMP-9 or VEGF in the original lung tumor using Pearson's' correlation analysis. Ktrans and EI were highly correlated in group 2 (r=0.66687; P<0.001) and not correlated in group 1 (r=0.33096; P=0.15405). Ktrans was also moderately related to the positive expression of MMP-9 (r=0.50912; P<0.001) and VEGF (r=0.36995; P=0.00138) There is statistical correlation between Ktrans and EI for group 2, and no statistical correlation between Ktrans and EI for group 1. The Ktrans of the peritumoral brain edema may be used to indicate the aggressiveness and vascular permeability of brain metastases in patients with lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Intravoxel distribution of DWI decay rates reveals C6 glioma invasion in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kevin M; Hyde, James S; Rand, Scott D; Bennett, Raoqiong; Krouwer, Hendrikus G J; Rebro, Kelly J; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2004-11-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the intravoxel distribution of water diffusion rates, as measured with a stretched-exponential model of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), is a marker of brain tumor invasion. Eight rats underwent intracerebral inoculation of C6 glioma cells. In three rats, cells were labeled with a fluorescent dye for microscopy. One rat was inoculated with a saline solution, and five more rats were imaged without inoculation as controls. Five healthy uninoculated rats were also imaged. DWI was performed 14-15 days after inoculation, with diffusion-weighting factor b = 500 to 6500 sec/mm2, and the resulting signal attenuation was fitted with the stretched-exponential model. The heterogeneity index values were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the peritumor ROI than in normal gray matter and significantly higher than in normal white matter. The distributed diffusion coefficient values were significantly lower than in normal white matter or normal gray matter. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the presence of tumors in the peritumor region that could be histologically distinguished from the main tumor mass. There was no change in proton density or T2-weighted images in the peritumor region, making vasogenic edema unlikely as a source of contrast. It is therefore thought that the heterogeneity parameter alpha is a marker of brain tumor invasion. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. The effect of the amount of peritumoral adipose tissue in the detection of additional tumors with digital breast tomosynthesis and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    García-Barquín, Paula; Páramo, María; Elizalde, Arlette; Pina, Luis; Etxano, Jon; Fernandez-Montero, Alejandro; Caballeros, Meylin

    2017-06-01

    Background Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and ultrasound (US) can detect additional cancers after negative mammography. However, not all cancers are visible by both techniques. Purpose To study the role of the amount of peritumoral fat in the detection of additional cancers with DBT or US. Material and Methods One reader retrospectively reviewed 142 breast cancers in 109 women who underwent mammography, DBT, US, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two readers in consensus evaluated the additional cancers detected by US, DBT, or MRI, and classified them into four groups according to the amount of peritumoral adipose tissue: group I, >75% of peritumoral fat; group II, 50-74%; group III, 25-49%, and group IV, 0-24%. The detection of additional cancers by US and DBT with respect to the other imaging techniques was evaluated. Results Seventy-eight cancers were detected by mammography and the remaining 64 cancers were detected by DBT, US, or MRI. US and DBT detected 46 (71.8%) and 25 (39.06%) additional tumors, respectively. Statistical significance was only found in group IV ( P < 0.01). Conclusion US detected more tumors than DBT in lesions surrounded by a small amount of fat. No significant differences were found between US and DBT in the detection of additional cancers in the other groups.

  4. CD34(low) and SMA(high) represent stromal signature in uterine cervical cancer and are markers for peritumoral stromal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Horn, Lars-Christian; Schreiter, Carolin; Canzler, Anika; Leonhardt, Karoline; Einenkel, Jens; Hentschel, Bettina

    2013-12-01

    Peritumoral desmoplastic stromal reaction (DSR) with myofibroblastic phenotype may be of prognostic impact in uterine cervical carcinoma. The present study evaluates the immunostaining (CD34 and smooth muscle actin; SMA) of 97 squamous cell cancers. Staining was scored as low/negative (<5% stroma positive), moderate (patchy/focal expression, 5%-50%), or high (diffuse expression throughout peritumoral stroma, >50%) and DSR as negative/weak and moderate/strong. The staining results were correlated to patient survival. Of the cases, 78.3% showed a decreased of CD34 (<5% stromal positivity) and 71.9% an increased SMA staining with more than 50% SMA positive stromal cells. Tumors representing moderate/strong DSR showed a significant decreased CD34 (P=.001) and an increased but not statistically significant SMA staining (P=0.345). Cases with low CD34 and high SMA staining showed reduced 5-year overall survival when compared to cases with high CD34 and low SMA positivity (59.9 vs 81.0%; P=0.025 and 64.6 vs 81.1%; P=0.243). Peritumoral stromal response in cervical carcinoma is immunohistochemically characterized by CD34(low)/SMA(high) and associated reduced overall survival. © 2013.

  5. [Invasive micropapillary carcinoma of gallbladder: a clinicopathologic study].

    PubMed

    Yao, J G; Yin, M X; Wang, C H; Liu, Y

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To study the clinicopathologic features of invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) of the gallbladder. Methods: Among 160 resected cases of gallbladder adenocarcinomas, the clinical and histological features of gallbladder adenocarcinomas with invasive micropapillary components (IMPC≥5%) were studied. Results: The detection rate of IPMC among gallbladder adenocarcinomas was 19.4% (31/160). Among these 31 cases, the patients' age ranged from 42 to 84 years (mean 64.8 years). The male-to-female ratio was 1∶4.Histologically, 19 cases were characterized by small papillary tufts lacking central fibrovascular cores, lying freely within the clefts of fibrous tissue, resembling IMPC of the breast; in five cases, the micropapillary tufts floated within cystic spaces lined by tumor cells, resembling IMPC of the lung; in four cases, slender, delicate filiform processes on the tumor surface with classic IMPC in the depth of gallbladder was observed; and in three cases mixed features were seen. Small cluster invasion (SCI) was seen adjacent to the IMPC. The lymph node metastatic rate, the lymphovascular invasion rate, and the SCI detection rate were significantly higher in the IMPC group (P=0.000). The IMPC detection rate was related to poorer histological differentiation and increased T stage (P=0.012, C=0.67; P=0.011, C=0.68). The two-year survival rate of IMPC (4/18) was significantly lower than usual gallbladder carcinoma (54.8%, 23/42). Conclusions: Compared to conventional adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder, IMPC has a more advanced tumor status and is prone to lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis, which thus leads to short-term survival. Moreover, SCI may play an important role in the invasion of the IMPC of the gallbladder.

  6. Shear-wave elastography of invasive breast cancer: correlation between quantitative mean elasticity value and immunohistochemical profile.

    PubMed

    Youk, Ji Hyun; Gweon, Hye Mi; Son, Eun Ju; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Jeong, Joon

    2013-02-01

    To compare the mean elasticity value, as measured by shear-wave elastography (SWE), with immunohistochemical profile of invasive breast cancer. This was an institutional review board-approved retrospective study, with a waiver of informed consent. A total of 166 invasive breast cancers in 152 women undergoing preoperative SWE and surgery were included. Quantitative mean elasticity values in kPa were measured for each lesion by using SWE. Medical records were reviewed to determine palpability, invasive size, lymphovascular invasion, histologic grade, and axillary lymph node status. Based on the immunohistochemical profiles, tumor subtypes were categorized as triple-negative (TN), luminal A and B, or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-enriched cancer. The mean elasticity value was correlated with clinicopathological features using univariate regression models and multivariate linear regression analysis. Palpability (P < 0.0001), larger size (P = 0.013), lymphovascular invasion (P < 0.0001), higher histologic grade (P < 0.0001), and lymph node involvement (P = 0.018) were significantly associated with the mean elasticity value. For the immunohistochemical profiles and tumor subtypes, the estrogen receptor (P = 0.015), progesterone receptor (P = 0.002), Ki-67 (P = 0.009), and the TN (P = 0.009) tumor subtype were correlated with the mean elasticity value. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the following variables were significantly associated with the mean elasticity value: palpable abnormality, histologic grade, and lymphovascular invasion. No immunohistochemical profile of the cancers was independently correlated with the mean elasticity value. For invasive breast cancers, clinicopathological features of poor prognosis showed higher mean elasticity values than those of good prognosis. However, the immunohistochemical profile showed no independent association with the mean elasticity value.

  7. Inhibition of NF-kappa B pathway leads to deregulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and neural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Alice; Majumder, Kaustav; Giri, Bhuwan; Dauer, Patricia; Dudeja, Vikas; Roy, Sabita; Banerjee, Sulagna; Saluja, Ashok K

    2016-12-01

    NF-κB has an essential role in the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer and specifically mediates the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasiveness. In this study, we demonstrate the importance of activated NF-κB signaling in EMT induction, lymphovascular metastasis, and neural invasion. Modulation of NF-κB activity was accomplished through the specific NF-κB inhibitor (BAY 11-7085), triptolide, and Minnelide treatment, as well as overexpression of IKBα repressor and IKK activator plasmids. In the classical lymphovascular metastatic cascade, inhibition of NF-κB decreased the expression of several EMT transcription factors (SNAI1, SNAI2, and ZEB1) and mesenchymal markers (VIM and CDH2) and decreased in vitro invasion, which was rescued by IKK activation. This was further demonstrated in vivo via BAY 11-7085 treatment in a orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer. In vivo NF-κB inhibition decreased tumor volume; decreased tumor EMT gene expression, while restoring cell-cell junctions; and decreasing overall metastasis. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of active NF-κB signaling in neural invasion. Triptolide treatment inhibits Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) mediated, neural-tumor co-culture in vitro invasion, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neural outgrowth through a disruption in tumor-neural cross talk. In vivo, Minnelide treatment decreased neurotrophin expression, nerve density, and sciatic nerve invasion. Taken together, this study demonstrates the importance of NF-κB signaling in the progression of pancreatic cancer through the modulation of EMT induction, lymphovascular invasion, and neural invasion.

  8. Minimally invasive and open gallbladder cancer resections: 30- vs 90-day mortality.

    PubMed

    Goussous, Naeem; Hosseini, Motahar; Sill, Anne M; Cunningham, Steven C

    2017-08-15

    Minimally invasive surgery is increasingly used for gallbladder cancer resection. Postoperative mortality at 30 days is low, but 90-day mortality is underreported. Using National Cancer Database (1998-2012), all resection patients were included. Thirty- and 90-day mortality rates were compared. A total of 36 067 patients were identified, 19 139 (53%) of whom underwent resection. Median age was 71 years and 70.7% were female. Ninety-day mortality following surgical resection was 2.3-fold higher than 30-mortality (17.1% vs 7.4%). There was a statistically significant increase in 30- and 90-day mortality with poorly differentiated tumors, presence of lymphovascular invasion, tumor stage, incomplete surgical resection and low-volume centers (P<0.001 for all). Even for the 1885 patients who underwent minimally invasive resection between 2010 and 2012, the 90-day mortality was 2.8-fold higher than the 30-day mortality (12.0% vs 4.3%). Ninety-day mortality following gallbladder cancer resection is significantly higher than 30-day mortality. Postoperative mortality is associated with tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, tumor stage, type and completeness of surgical resection as well as type and volume of facility. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Concomitant Radiochemotherapy on Invasion Potential of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hutóczki, Gábor; Bognár, László; Tóth, Judit; Scholtz, Beáta; Zahuczky, Gábor; Hanzély, Zoltán; Csősz, Éva; Reményi-Puskár, Judit; Kalló, Gergő; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Klekner, Almos

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults with inevitable recurrence after oncotherapy. The insufficient effect of "gold standard" temozolomide-based concomitant radiochemotherapy may be due to the inability to prevent tumor cell invasion. Peritumoral infiltration depends mainly on the interaction between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and cell membrane receptors. Changes in invasive behaviour after oncotherapy can be evaluated at the molecular level by determining the RNA expression and protein levels of the invasion-related ECM components. The expression of nineteen ECM molecules was determined at both RNA and protein levels in thirty-one GBM samples. Fifteen GBM samples originated from the first surgical procedure on patients before oncotherapy, and sixteen GBM samples were collected at the second surgery due to local recurrence after concomitant chemoirradiation. RNA expressions were measured with qRT-PCR, and protein levels were determined by quantitative analysis of Western blots. Only MMP-9 RNA transcript level was reduced (p < 0.05) whereas at protein level, eight molecules showed changes concordant with RNA expression with significant decrease in brevican only. The results suggest that concomitant radiochemotherapy does not have sufficient impact on the expression of invasion-related ECM components of glioblastoma, oncotherapy does not significantly affect its invasive behavior. To avoid the spread of tumors into the brain parenchyma, supplementation of antiproliferative treatment with anti-invasive agents may be worth consideration in oncotherapy for glioblastoma.

  10. Intraoperative Localisation of Impalpable Breast Lesions Utilising the ROLLIS Technique Following Peritumoral 99mTc-colloid Sentinel Node Lymphoscintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hung, Te-Jui; Burrage, John; Bourke, Anita; Taylor, Donna

    2017-08-24

    Ultrasound or stereotactic guided hook-wire localisation has been the standard-of-care for the pre-surgical localisation of impalpable breast lesions, which account for approximately a third of all breast cancer. Radioguided occult lesion localisation using I-125 seeds (ROLLIS) is a relatively new technique for guiding surgical excision of impalpable breast lesions, and is a promising alternative to the traditional hook-wire method. When combined with Tc-99m labelled colloid for sentinel node mapping in clinically indicated cases, there has been uncertainty regarding whether the downscatter of Tc-99m into the I-125 energy spectrum could adversely affect the intra-operative detection of the I-125 seed, especially pertaining to a peritumoral injection. To evaluate the percentage contribution of downscattered activity from Tc-99m into the I-125 energy spectrum in simulated intra-operative resections of an I-125 seed following different sentinel node injection techniques. Two scenarios were simulated using breast phantoms with lean chicken breast. The first scenario, with a 2cm distance between the Tc-99m injection site and the I-125 seed, simulated a periareolar ipsiquadrant injection with the subdermal or intradermal technique. The second scenario simulated a peritumoral injection technique with the Tc-99m bolus and an I-125 seed at the same site. Count rates were acquired with a hand-held gamma probe, and the percentage contribution of downscattered Tc-99m gamma photons to the I-125 energy window was calculated. In scenarios one and two, downscattered Tc-99m activity contributed 0.5% and 33% respectively to the detected count rate in the I-125 energy window. In both scenarios, the I-125 seed was successfully localised and removed using the gamma probe. There is no significant contribution of downscattered activity associated with a peritumoral injection of Tc-99m to adversely affect the accurate intra-operative localisation of an I- 125 seed. Copyright© Bentham

  11. Investigating Invasives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightbody, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Invasive species, commonly known as "invasives," are nonnative plants, animals, and microbes that completely take over and change an established ecosystem. The consequences of invasives' spread are significant. In fact, many of the species that appear on the Endangered Species list are threatened by invasives. Therefore, the topic of invasive…

  12. Investigating Invasives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightbody, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Invasive species, commonly known as "invasives," are nonnative plants, animals, and microbes that completely take over and change an established ecosystem. The consequences of invasives' spread are significant. In fact, many of the species that appear on the Endangered Species list are threatened by invasives. Therefore, the topic of invasive…

  13. Nestin depletion induces melanoma matrix metalloproteinases and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Wei; Zhan, Qian; Lezcano, Cecilia; Frank, Markus H.; Huang, John; Larson, Allison; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Wan, Marilyn T.; Lin, Ping-I; Ma, Jie; Kleffel, Sonja; Schatton, Tobias; Lian, Christine G.; Murphy, George F.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key biological mediators of processes as diverse as wound healing, embryogenesis, and cancer progression. Although MMPs may be induced through multiple signaling pathways, the precise mechanisms for their regulation in cancer are incompletely understood. Because cytoskeletal changes are known to accompany MMP expression, we sought to examine the potential role of the poorly understood cytoskeletal protein, nestin, in modulating melanoma MMPs. Nestin knockdown (KD) upregulated expression of specific MMPs and MMP-dependent invasion both through extracellular matrix barriers in vitro and in peritumoral connective tissue of xenografts in vivo. Development of 3-dimensionsal melanospheres that in vitro partially recapitulate non-invasive tumorigenic melanoma growth was inhibited by nestin KD, although ECM invasion by aberrant melanospheres that did form was enhanced. Mechanistically, nestin KD-dependent melanoma invasion was associated with intracellular redistribution of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK) and increased melanoma cell responsiveness to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), both implicated in pathways of melanoma invasion. The results suggest that the heretofore poorly understood intermediate filament, nestin, may serve as a novel mediator of MMPs critical to melanoma virulence. PMID:25365206

  14. Invasive Candidiasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Invasive candidiasis is an infection caused by a yeast (a type of fungus) called Candida . Unlike Candida ... mouth and throat (also called “thrush”) or vaginal “yeast infections,” invasive candidiasis is a serious infection that ...

  15. Invasive Species

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Invasive species have significantly changed the Great Lakes ecosystem. An invasive species is a plant or animal that is not native to an ecosystem, and whose introduction is likely to cause economic, human health, or environmental damage.

  16. Invasion front-specific expression and prognostic significance of microRNA in colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, Christoph; Klupp, Fee; Brand, Karsten; Lasitschka, Felix; Diederichs, Sven; Kirchberg, Johanna; Rahbari, Nuh; Dutta, Shamik; Bork, Ulrich; Fritzmann, Johannes; Reissfelder, Christoph; Koch, Moritz; Weitz, Juergen

    2011-10-01

    The tumor edge of colorectal cancer and its adjacent peritumoral tissue is characterized by an invasion front-specific expression of genes that contribute to angiogenesis or epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Dysregulation of these genes has a strong impact on the invasion behavior of tumor cells. However, the invasion front-specific expression of microRNA (miRNA) still remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate miRNA expression patterns at the invasion front of colorectal liver metastases. Laser microdissection of colorectal liver metastases was performed to obtain separate tissue compartments from the tumor center, tumor invasion front, liver invasion front and pure liver parenchyma. Microarray expression analysis revealed 23 miRNA downregulated in samples from the tumor invasion front with respect to the same miRNA in the liver, the liver invasion front or the tumor center. By comparing samples from the liver invasion front with samples from pure liver parenchyma, the tumor invasion front and the tumor center, 13 miRNA were downregulated. By quantitative RT-PCR, we validated the liver invasion front-specific downregulation of miR-19b, miR-194, let-7b and miR-1275 and the tumor invasion front-specific downregulation of miR-143, miR- 145, let-7b and miR-638. Univariate analysis demonstrated that enhanced expression of miR-19b and miR-194 at the liver invasion front, and decreased expression of let-7 at the tumor invasion front, is an adverse prognostic marker of tumor recurrence and overall survival. In conclusion, the present study suggests that invasion front-specific downregulation of miRNA in colorectal liver metastases plays a pivotal role in tumor progression.

  17. Prognostic significance of lymphatic, vascular and perineural invasion for bladder cancer patients treated by radical cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Muppa, Prasuna; Gupta, Sounak; Frank, Igor; Boorjian, Stephen A; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Thompson, R Houston; Thapa, Prabin; Tarrell, Robert F; Herrera Hernandez, Loren P; Jimenez, Rafael E; Cheville, John C

    2017-04-01

    In radical cystectomy specimens with bladder cancer, lymphatic and vascular invasion are often reported as 'angiolymphatic' or 'lymphovascular' invasion, terms that combine the findings of tumour within simple endothelial-lined lymphatic spaces and tumour within muscle-lined blood vessels. It is unclear if these patterns of invasion have different prognostic significance. In addition, there are conflicting data regarding the significance of lymphatic, vascular and perineural invasion in patients with bladder cancer. Herein, we studied 1504 patients treated by radical cystectomy for bladder cancer at our institution and followed for a mean of 10.6 years. Cases were re-reviewed by a urological pathologist for lymphatic invasion defined as tumour within a non-muscle-lined endothelial-lined lymphatic space, vascular invasion defined as tumour in a muscle-lined blood vessel, and perineural invasion defined as tumour within the perineural sheath. Associations of clinical and pathological features with bladder cancer death were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression models and summarised with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis showed that lymphatic and vascular invasion but not perineural invasion were significantly associated with cancer specific survival (p<0.0001 and p=0.02, respectively). There was a significant association of lymphatic and vascular invasion but not perineural invasion with involved regional lymph nodes (p<0.0001 and p=0.004, respectively). In patients with metastasis to regional lymph nodes, lymphatic invasion remained significantly associated with outcome (p=0.02). The frequency of lymphatic and vascular invasion varied amongst histological subtypes of bladder cancer. Vascular and lymphatic invasion should be clearly defined and reported for radical cystectomy specimens containing bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Pathologists of

  18. Agreement Among RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists in Contouring Suspicious Peritumoral Edema for Preoperative Radiation Therapy of Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Bahig, Houda; Roberge, David; Bosch, Walter; Levin, William; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Freeman, Carolyn; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Indelicato, Danny J.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Hitchcock, Ying; Kirsch, David G.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Wolfson, Aaron; and others

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Peritumoral edema may harbor sarcoma cells. The extent of suspicious edema (SE) included in the treatment volume is subject to clinical judgment, balancing the risk of missing tumor cells with excess toxicity. Our goal was to determine variability in SE delineation by sarcoma radiation oncologists (RO). Methods and Materials: Twelve expert ROs were provided with T1 gadolinium and T2-weighted MR images of 10 patients with high-grade extremity soft-tissue sarcoma. Gross tumor volume, clinical target volume (CTV)3cm (3 cm longitudinal and 1.5 cm radial margin), and CTV2cm (2 cm longitudinal and 1 cm radial margin) were contoured by a single observer. Suspicious peritumoral edema, defined as abnormal signal on T2 images, was independently delineated by all 12 ROs. Contouring agreement was analyzed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: The mean volumes of GTV, CTV2cm, and CTV3cm were, respectively, 130 cm{sup 3} (7-413 cm{sup 3}), 280 cm{sup 3} and 360 cm{sup 3}. The mean consensus volume computed using the STAPLE algorithm at 95% confidence interval was 188 cm{sup 3} (24-565 cm{sup 3}) with a substantial overall agreement corrected for chance (mean kappa = 0.71; range: 0.32-0.87). The minimum, maximum, and mean volume of SE (excluding the GTV) were 4, 182, and 58 cm{sup 3} (representing a median of 29% of the GTV volume). The median volume of SE not included in the CTV2cm and in the CTV3cm was 5 and 0.3 cm{sup 3}, respectively. There were 3 large tumors with >30 cm{sup 3} of SE not included in the CTV3cm volume. Conclusion: Despite the fact that SE would empirically seem to be a more subjective volume, a substantial or near-perfect interobserver agreement was observed in SE delineation in most cases with high-grade soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremity. A median of 97% of the consensus SE is within the CTV2cm (99.8% within the CTV3cm). In a minority of cases, however, significant

  19. Usefulness of dilated blood vessels in the tumor periphery for assessing the invasion depth of small-sized depressed colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Rintaro; Matsuda, Tomoki; Hamamoto, Hidetaka; Yamaoka, Hajime; Nakahori, Masato; Chonan, Akimichi

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between dilated blood vessels in the tumor periphery and the tumor invasion depth is unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to clarify the relationship between dilated blood vessels and the invasion depth of small-sized (<30 mm) colorectal cancer (CRC), and its implications on endoscopic treatment.We performed a single-arm observational study of the diagnostic accuracy of the existence of dilated vessels in the tumor periphery of CRC lesions as an indicator of submucosal deep (SM-d, ≥1000 μm) carcinomas. Lesions were classified into two groups based on the existence of dilated vessels by two experienced endoscopists. The clinicopathological features, invasion depth, and lymphovascular invasion/poorly differentiated clusters were analyzed in all resected specimens.Four hundred and two consecutive small-sized CRC lesions were included. The dilated vessels were observed in 96/402 (24%) lesions, and most of them (93/96) were found in depressed lesions. In depressed lesions, the histopathological diagnosis of the dilated vessels group showed SM-d or deeper invasion in 84/93 (90%) cases, whereas 3/20 (15%) had SM-d invasion in the nondilated vessels group (P < 0.001). When the dilated vessels were used as an indicator of SM-d or deeper invasion in depressed lesions, the sensitivity was 95.6%, specificity was 66.7%, and accuracy was 90.2%. No correlation was observed between the existence of dilated vessels and the lesion site, lesion diameter, and lymphovascular invasion/poorly differentiated cluster.The existence of dilated blood vessels in the tumor periphery suggests SM-d or deeper invasion in depressed lesions.

  20. Vascular invasion in infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas can mimic pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia: a histopathologic study of 209 cases.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Mo; Goggins, Michael; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Schulick, Richard D; Edil, Barish H; Cameron, John L; Handra-Luca, Adriana; Herman, Joseph M; Hruban, Ralph H

    2012-02-01

    Although vascular invasion is a well-established indicator of poor prognosis for patients with infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (PDAC), the histopathologic characteristics of vascular invasion are not well described. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides from 209 surgically resected infiltrating PDACs were systematically evaluated for the presence or absence of microscopic vascular invasion. For the cases with vascular invasion, we further categorized the histologic pattern of invasion into conventional and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like (PanIN-like). In addition, several histopathologic factors in the surrounding blood vessels, including lymphocytic infiltration and luminal fibrosis, were carefully assessed. Data were compared with clinicopathologic variables, including patient survival. Microscopic vascular invasion was observed in 136 of the 209 PDACs (65.1%). Vascular invasion mimicking pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN-like invasion) was observed in 94 of the 136 cases (69.1%) with vascular invasion. Microscopic vascular invasion was associated with increased tumor size (P=0.04), higher pT classification (P=0.003), lymph node metastasis (P<0.0001), and perineural invasion (P=0.005). Vascular invasion was inversely correlated with neo-adjuvant therapy (P<0.0001). Examination of adjacent blood vessels revealed that peritumoral blood vessels with intimal lymphocytes (P=0.002), intimal (P=0.007) and medial (P=0.001) fibrosis, and cancer cells in vascular wall (P<0.0001) were all highly associated with the intraluminal vascular invasion. In univariate analysis, patients whose cancers had microscopic vascular invasion (median survival, 15.3 mo) had a significantly worse survival than did patients with carcinomas without vascular invasion (25.1 mo; P=0.01, log-rank test). Microscopic vascular invasion is a poor prognostic indicator and can histologically mimic PanIN.

  1. Extent of resection of peritumoral diffusion tensor imaging-detected abnormality as a predictor of survival in adult glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiun-Lin; van der Hoorn, Anouk; Larkin, Timothy J; Boonzaier, Natalie R; Matys, Tomasz; Price, Stephen J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to detect tumor invasion in glioblastoma patients and has been applied in surgical planning. However, the clinical value of the extent of resection based on DTI is unclear. Therefore, the correlation between the extent of resection of DTI abnormalities and patients' outcome was retrospectively reviewed. METHODS A review was conducted of 31 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma who underwent standard 5-aminolevulinic acid-aided surgery with the aim of maximal resection of the enhancing tumor component. All patients underwent presurgical MRI, including volumetric postcontrast T1-weighted imaging, DTI, and FLAIR. Postsurgical anatomical MR images were obtained within 72 hours of resection. The diffusion tensor was split into an isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) component. The extent of resection was measured for the abnormal area on the p, q, FLAIR, and postcontrast T1-weighted images. Data were analyzed in relation to patients' outcome using univariate and multivariate Cox regression models controlling for possible confounding factors including age, O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltrans-ferase methylation status, and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 mutation. RESULTS Complete resection of the enhanced tumor shown on the postcontrast T1-weighted images was achieved in 24 of 31 patients (77%). The mean extent of resection of the abnormal p, q, and FLAIR areas was 57%, 83%, and 59%, respectively. Increased resection of the abnormal p and q areas correlated positively with progression-free survival (p = 0.009 and p = 0.006, respectively). Additionally, a larger, residual, abnormal q volume predicted significantly shorter time to progression (p = 0.008). More extensive resection of the abnormal q and contrast-enhanced area improved overall survival (p = 0.041 and 0.050, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Longer progression-free survival and overall survival were seen in glioblastoma patients in whom more DTI

  2. Tumor Wide Horizontal Invasion Predicts Local Recurrence for Scrotal Extramammary Paget’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lujia; Feng, Chenchen; Zhou, Minwei; Zhou, Zhongwen; Ding, Guanxiong; Gao, Peng; Ding, Qiang; Wu, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Extramammary Paget’s disease (EMPD) is a rare malignancy, and little was known about its prognostic factors and optimal treatment. In the current study, we aimed to discuss clinical and pathological features of scrotal EMPD and determine the prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival and local recurrence. A total of 206 patients with scrotal EMPD lesions surgically treated at our institute were studied. All clinical and pathological data were reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining of TP53 and Ki67 was examined as well. At the last follow-up, 175 patients (84.95%) were alive. Twelve patients (5.83%) had died of the disease due to distant metastases. Fifteen patients (7.28%) developed local recurrences of scrotal EMPD. Ki67 expression was significantly elevated in patients with wide horizontal invasion (P = 0.003). In univariate analysis, high invasion level, presence of nodule, presence of lymphovascular invasion, adnexa invasion, lymph node metastasis and high p53 expression were significant factors for poor cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, high p53 expression was significantly correlated with poor cancer-specific survival. Wide horizontal invasion was independently correlated with local recurrence-free survival of scrotal EMPD. In conclusion, wide horizontal invasion is an independent risk factor for local recurrence-free survival in the patients with scrotal EMPD. PMID:28322288

  3. Kinetics of tumor size and peritumoral brain edema before, during, and after systemic therapy in recurrent WHO grade II or III meningioma.

    PubMed

    Furtner, Julia; Schöpf, Veronika; Seystahl, Katharina; Le Rhun, Emilie; Rudà, Roberta; Roelcke, Ulrich; Koeppen, Susanne; Berghoff, Anna Sophie; Marosi, Christine; Clement, Paul; Faedi, Marina; Watts, Colin; Wick, Wolfgang; Soffietti, Riccardo; Weller, Michael; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    The efficacy of systemic antineoplastic therapy on recurrent World Health Organization (WHO) grades II and III meningiomas is unclear. We performed a retrospective multicenter analysis of serial cranial MRI in patients with recurrent WHO II and III meningiomas treated with antineoplastic systemic therapies. Growth rates for tumor volume and diameter, as well as change rates for edema size, were calculated for all lesions. We identified a total of 34 patients (23 atypical, 11 anaplastic meningiomas) with a total of 57 meningioma lesions who had been treated at 6 European institutions. Systemic therapies included bevacizumab, cytotoxic chemotherapy, somatostatin analogues, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Overall, tumor growth rates decreased during systemic therapy by 51% for tumor diameter and 14% for tumor volume growth rates compared with the period before initiation of systemic therapy. The most pronounced decrease in meningioma growth rates during systemic therapy was evident in patients treated with bevacizumab, with a reduction of 80% in diameter and 59% in volume growth. Furthermore, a decrease in size of peritumoral edema after initiation of systemic therapy was exclusively observed in patients treated with bevacizumab (-107%). Our data indicate that systemic therapy may inhibit growth of recurrent WHO grades II and III meningiomas to some extent. In our small cohort, bevacizumab had the most pronounced inhibitory effect on tumor growth, as well as some anti-edematous activity. Prospective studies are needed to better define the role of medical therapies in this tumor type. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Quantitative Evaluation of Diffusion and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR in Tumor Parenchyma and Peritumoral Area for Distinction of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Zhi-yun; Luo, Bo-ning; Yang, Jian-yong; Chu, Jian-ping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantitatively evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of parameters from diffusion and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR which based on tumor parenchyma (TP) and peritumoral (PT) area in classification of brain tumors. Methods 45 patients (male: 23, female: 22; mean age: 46 y) were prospectively recruited and they underwent conventional, DCE-MR and DWI examination. With each tumor, 10–15 regions of interest (ROIs) were manually placed on TP and PT area. ADC and permeability parameters (Ktrans, Ve, Kep and iAUC) were calculated and their diagnostic efficiency was assessed. Results In TP, all permeability parameters and ADC value could significantly discriminate Low- from High grade gliomas (HGG) (p<0.001); among theses parameters, Ve demonstrated the highest diagnostic power (iAUC: 0.79, cut-off point: 0.15); the most sensitive and specific index for gliomas grading were Ktrans (84%) and Kep (89%). While, in PT area, only Ktrans could help in gliomas grading (P = 0.009, cut-off point: 0.03 min-1). Moreover, in TP, mean Ve and iAUC of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) and metastases were significantly higher than that in HGG (p<0.003). Further, in PT area, mean Ktrans (p≤0.004) could discriminate PCNSL from HGG and ADC (p≤0.003) could differentiate metastases with HGG. Conclusions Quantitative ADC and permeability parameters from Diffusion and DCE-MR in TP and PT area, especially DCE-MR, can aid in gliomas grading and brain tumors discrimination. Their combined application is strongly recommended in the differential diagnosis of these tumor entities. PMID:26384329

  5. Invasive Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Todd P; Pappas, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Invasive candidiasis is a collective term that refers to a group of infectious syndromes caused by a variety of species of Candida, 5 of which cause most cases. Candidemia is the most commonly recognized syndrome associated with invasive candidiasis. Certain conditions may influence the likelihood for one species versus another in a specific clinical scenario, and this can have important implications for selection of antifungal therapy and the duration of treatment. Molecular diagnostic technology plays an ever-increasing role as an adjunct to traditional culture-based diagnostics, offering significant potential toward improvement in patient care.

  6. Invasive micropapillary carcinoma: A distinct type of adenocarcinomas in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Guzińska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna; Niewiarowska, Katarzyna; Pryczynicz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) is a rare histological type of tumor, first described in invasive ductal breast cancer, than in malignancies in other organs such as lungs, urinary bladder, ovaries or salivary glands. Recent literature data shows that this histological lesion has also been found in cancers of the gastrointestinal system. The micropapillary components are clusters of neoplastic cells that closely adhere to each other and are located in distinct empty spaces. Moreover, clusters of neoplastic cells do not have a fibrous-vascular core. The IMPC cells show reverse polarity resulting in typical ‘’inside-out’’ structures that determines secretary properties, disturbs adhesion and conditions grade of malignancy in gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Invasive micropapillary carcinoma in this location is associated with metastases to local lymph nodes and lymphovascular invasion. IMPC can be a prognostic factor for patients with cancers of the stomach, pancreas and with colorectal cancer since it is related with disease-free and overall survival. The purpose of this review is to present the characterization of invasive micropapillary carcinoma in colon, rectum, stomach and others site of GI tract, and to determine the immunohistological indentification of IMPC in those localization. PMID:24782612

  7. Paget disease of the breast with invasion from nipple skin into the dermis: an unusual type of skin invasion not associated with an adverse outcome.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mary Ann; Dominici, Laura; Denison, Christine; Golshan, Mehra; Wiecorek, Tad; Lester, Susan C

    2013-01-01

    Paget disease is an uncommon skin manifestation of breast cancer, associated with either invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ in the underlying breast. In very rare cases, tumor cells within the epidermis invade through the basement membrane of the skin into the dermis. To identify a series of cases of Paget disease with direct dermal invasion and to investigate the clinicopathologic features and outcome. Cases were identified during a 6-year period from the files of 2 hospitals. The clinical histories, imaging studies, and pathology reports were reviewed. Seven patients were identified, 5 with microinvasion (<0.1 cm) and 2 with 0.2- or 0.3-cm invasive carcinomas in the dermis. No lymphovascular invasion was seen. Sentinel nodes were negative in 3 patients who underwent biopsy. Five patients were treated with breast conservation with radiation. Three patients were at high risk for breast cancer because of prior breast cancer, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, or radiation for Hodgkin disease. The latter 2 patients underwent bilateral mastectomies. Three patients received hormonal therapy and 1 oophorectomy. No patient received chemotherapy. At follow-ups ranging from 4 to 66 months (median, 20 months), there have been no recurrences. Patients with direct dermal invasion from Paget disease had a favorable outcome during the available follow-up period. This type of dermal involvement must be distinguished from locally advanced invasive carcinomas with skin invasion classified as T4b in the American Joint Cancer Commission staging system, as cancers with other types of skin invasion are associated with a poor prognosis.

  8. Peri-tumoral inflammatory cell infiltration in OSCC: a reliable marker of local recurrence and prognosis? An investigation using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Campisi, G; Calvino, F; Carinci, F; Matranga, D; Carella, M; Mazzotta, M; Rubini, C; Panzarella, V; Santarelli, A; Fedele, S; Lo Muzio, L

    2011-01-01

    The presence of inflammatory reaction in peri-tumoural connective tissue is generally considered as a defense mechanism against cancer, but inflammation tissue in malignant transformation and early steps of oncogenesis has been recently proven to play a supporting and aggravating role in some carcinomas. Aims of this retrospective study were to evaluate in OSCCs the independent association of peri-tumoral inflammatory infiltrate (PTI) with local recurrence (LR) or survival outcome, and to verify whether PTI can be considered a marker of prognosis. Data from 211 cases of OSCC, only surgically treated between 1990 and 2000, were collected and retrospectively analyzed for PTI and the event LR (5 yrs follow-up at least) by means of univariate-multivariate and neural networks analyses. Patients (mean age 65.3 ± 12.4 yrs, M/F = 2.98) showed presence of PTI in 68.2% (144/211): (+) in 27.0%, (++) in 25.6%, (+++) 15.6%; PTI was found reduced in 24.7% of cases and absent in 7.1%. In overall PTI+ve group (n=144), 66 were TNM Stage I, 33 Stage II, 45 Stage III, none Stage IV. LR (mean 6 ± 4 months) was present in 87/211 (41.2%) patients, of which 43/144 (29.8%) in OSCCs with PTI [23 (+), 13 (++) and 7 (+++)] vs. 44/67 (65.7%) in OSCC with PTI -/+ or PTI-ve ones. By univariate analysis, PTI+ve cases showed a significant lower risk to have LR (p <0.0001; OR= 0.2297; CI= 0.1277:0.4134) vs PTI -/+ or -ve ones, especially among cases with higher PTI value (+++) (OR= 0.1718; CI= 0.0749:0.3939). Multivariate analyses (Logit model and neural networks) confirmed the same datum: presence of PTI was an independent predictive variable accounting for a better tumoural outcome without LR (Logit and neural networks values: OR' 0.226; CI= 0.113:0.454; ROC Area = 0.66, respectively). In terms of prognostic significance, elevated PTI was found to have an independent association with the poorest overall survival rate (P = 0.056). Our findings strongly suggest the importance to investigate

  9. Tumor Grade versus Expression of Invasion-Related Molecules in Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Virga, József; Bognár, László; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Zahuczky, Gábor; Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő; Tóth, Judit; Hutóczki, Gábor; Reményi-Puskár, Judit; Steiner, László; Klekner, Almos

    2017-02-04

    Peritumoral infiltration is characteristic of astrocytomas even in low-grade tumors. Tumor cells migrate to neighbouring tissue and cause recurrence. The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a role in tumor invasion; expression levels of its components' have been linked to tumor invasion. This study determines the mRNA and protein expression of 20 invasion-related ECM components by examining non-tumor brain; grade I-II-III astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples. Expression levels were measured by QRT-PCR and mass-spectroscopy. The connection between the expression pattern and tumor grade is statistically analyzed. During the analysis of data, key molecules (brevican, cadherin-12, fibronectin and integrin-β1) correlating the most with tumor grade were selected. While the mRNA level of brevican, ErbB2, fibronectin, integrin-β1 and versican discriminates low-grade from high-grade gliomas, of proteins RHAMM, integrin-α1 and MMP2 seems important. The expression pattern was found to be distinctive for tumor grade, as statistical classifiers are capable of identifying an unknown sample's grade using them. Furthermore, normal brain and glioma expression patterns, along with low-grade astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples, differ the most. Determining the invasion-related molecules' expression profile provides extra information regarding the tumor's clinical behavior. Additionally, identifying molecules playing a key role in glioma invasion could uncover potential therapeutic targets in the future.

  10. Prognostic Value of Microvessel Density in Tumor and Peritumoral Area as Evaluated by CD31 Protein Expression and Argyrophilic Nucleolar Organizer Region Count in Endothelial Cells in Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Avdalyan, Ashot; Bobrov, Igor; Klimachev, Vladimir; Lazarev, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of microvessel density (MVD) in uterine leiomyosarcoma (LMS) and peritumoral area (PA) as evaluated by CD31 expression and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR) count in endothelial cells. Tissue specimens from 66 patients with uterine LMS were examined. There were no significant differences in the mean MVD between tumor itself and the PA (P = 0.9); moreover, the MVD in the PA often exceeded that in the tumor. No correlation or significant differences were also found in the MVD between different grades of malignancy of LMS (r = 0.1; P = 0.07). The number of AgNORs in tumor endothelial cells was significantly higher in tumor vessels than in the peritumoral area (P < 0.005) and increased with the tumor grade. Analysis of the prognostic value of MVD in uterine LMS and PA showed that the density of tumor vessels was not an independent criterion, while the MVD in the PA affected 10-year survival to a significantly greater extent (χ 2 = 27.5; P = 0.0003). The number of AgNORs also had an important effect on survival of LMS patients: when the threshold of 11.6 granules was exceeded, prognosis was significantly more unfavorable than that prior to exceeding the threshold. PMID:22910809

  11. Current therapeutic strategies for invasive and metastatic bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Mathew, Jacob; Tan, Winston W

    2011-01-01

    Background Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe, the United States, and Northern African countries. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is an aggressive epithelial tumor, with a high rate of early systemic dissemination. Superficial, noninvasive bladder cancer can most often be cured; a good proportion of invasive cases can also be cured by a combined modality approach of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Recurrences are common and mostly manifest as metastatic disease. Those with distant metastatic disease can sometime achieve partial or complete remission with combination chemotherapy. Recent developments Better understanding of the biology of the disease has led to the incorporation of molecular and genetic features along with factors such as tumor grade, lympho-vascular invasion, and aberrant histology, thereby allowing identification of ‘favorable’ and ‘unfavorable’ cancers which helps a more accurate informed and objective selection of patients who would benefit from neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Gene expression profiling has been used to find molecular signature patterns that can potentially be predictive of drug sensitivity and metastasis. Understanding the molecular pathways of invasive bladder cancer has led to clinical investigation of several targeted therapeutics such as anti-angiogenics, mTOR inhibitors, and anti-EGFR agents. Conclusion With improvements in the understanding of the biology of bladder cancer, clinical trials studying novel and targeted agents alone or in combination with chemotherapy have increased the armamentarium for the treatment of bladder cancer. Although the novel biomarkers and gene expression profiles have been shown to provide important predictive and prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation. PMID:21792316

  12. Invasive forest species

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Illman

    2006-01-01

    Nonnative organisms that cause a major change to native ecosystems-once called foreign species, biological invasions, alien invasives, exotics, or biohazards–are now generally referred to as invasive species or invasives. invasive species of insects, fungi, plants, fish, and other organisms present a rising threat to natural forest ecosystems worldwide. Invasive...

  13. Evaluation of the association between perineural invasion and clinical and histopathological features of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, You-Sheng; Yao, De-Sheng; Long, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) has been investigated as a new prognostic factor in a number of carcinomas. However, studies on PNI in cervical cancer are limited, and inconsistent conclusions have been reported by different groups. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between perineural invasion (PNI) and clinical and histopathological features of cervical cancer, and to evaluate the clinical significance of PNI of cervical cancer. Retrospective review identified 206 patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy between December 2012 and August 2014. The association between PNI and clinical and histopathological features of cervical cancer and post-operative radiotherapy was evaluated based on univariate and multivariate analyses. PNI of cervical cancer was identified in 33 of 206 (16%) cervical cancer patients. Univariate analysis demonstrated that PNI was associated with clinical stage, tumor grade, tumor size, depth of invasion, lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI), and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), but not associated with age and histopathological types (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis suggests that LVSI and lymph node metastasis were associated with PNI of cervical cancer (P<0.05). In addition, post-operative radiotherapy was significantly more recommended for patients with PNI than those without PNI (P<0.001). In conclusion, PNI of cervical cancer is associated with LVSI and lymph node metastasis and can be used as an index for the determination of post-operative radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients.

  14. The Pattern of Myometrial Invasion As a Predictor of Lymph Node Metastasis or Extrauterine Disease in Low Grade Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Euscher, Elizabeth; Fox, Patricia; Bassett, Roland; Al-Ghawi, Hayma; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Barbuto, Denise; Djordjevic, Bojana; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth; Kim, Insun; Hong, Sun Rang; Montiel, Delia; Moschiano, Elizabeth; Roma, Andres; Silva, Elvio; Malpica, Anais

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of lymph node metastases (LN+) or extrauterine disease (ED) in low grade (FIGO grades 1 or 2) endometrioid carcinoma (LGEC) in a multi institutional setting. For LGEC with and without LNM or ED, each of the 9 participating institutions evaluated patients age, tumor size, myometrial invasion (MI), FIGO grade, % solid component, the presence or absence of papillary architecture, microcystic elongated and fragmented glands (MELF) and single cell/cell cluster invasion (SCI), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), lower uterine segment (LUS) and cervical stromal (CX) involvement and numbers of pelvic (PLN) and para-aortic (PALN) LNs sampled.302 cases were reviewed: LN+ or ED +, 96; LN-/ED-, 208. Patients' ages ranged from 23-91 yrs (median 61). Table 1 summarizes the histopathologic variables that were noted for the LN+ or ED+ group: tumor size ≥2cm, 93/96 (97%), MI >50%, 54/96 (56%), MELF, 67/96 (70%), SCI, 33/96 (34%), LVI, 79/96 (82%), >20% solid, 65/96 (68%), papillary architecture present, 68/96 (72%), LUS involved, 64/96 (67%) and CX involved, 31/96 (32%). For the LN-/ED- group, the results were as follows: tumor size ≥2cm, 152/208 (73%), MI >50%, 56/208 (27%), MELF, 79/208 (38%), single cell invasion, 19/208 (9%) , LVI, 56/208 (27%), >20% solid, 160/208 (77%), papillary architecture present, 122/208 (59%), LUS involved, 77/208 (37%), CX involved, 31/208 (15%). There was no evidence of a difference in the number of pelvic or para-aortic LNs sampled between groups (p=0.9 and 0.1, respectively). Following multivariate analysis, depth of myometrial invasion, cervical stromal involvement, lymphovascular space invasion, and the single cell pattern of invasion emerged as significant predictors of advanced stage disease. Although univariate analysis pointed to LUS involvement, MELF pattern of invasion, and papillary architecture as possible predictors of advanced stage disease, these were not shown to be significant by

  15. What is the impact of cervical invasion on lymph node metastasis in patients with stage IIIC endometrial cancer?

    PubMed

    Turan, Taner; Hızlı, Deniz; Yılmaz, Saynur Sarici; Gundogdu, Burcu; Boran, Nurettin; Tulunay, Gokhan; Ozfuttu, Ahmet; Faruk Kose, M

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the presence of cervical invasion has altered the site of lymph node (LN) metastasis in stage IIIC endometrial cancer (EC) patients. Fourty-six patients who had systematic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy surgery for EC and staged as IIIC were included in the study. Patients with cervical invasion were defined as Group A and patients without cervical invasion were defined as Group B. The groups were compared according to surgical-pathologic characteristics. Chi-square and Annova table test were used to examine the effect of cervical invasion on LN metastasis. The mean age of patients was 59 years (range 38-81) and tumor size was 47 mm (range 10-80). Twenty-three patients had cervical involvement (Group A) and 23 had no cervical metastasis (Group B). Groups were not different with regard to cell type, grade, depth of myometrial invasion, tumor size, adnexal involvement, peritoneal metastasis and lymphovascular space invasion. Among 46 patients obturator LN was the most involved site of LN metastasis, however, when there is cervical metastasis external iliac LN was found to be the most involved LN site. Patients without cervical invasion had 21.7% of external iliac LN metastasis while patients with cervical invasion had 60.9% of external iliac LN metastasis. Also, cervical invasion has increased the risk of pelvic LN and obturator LN involvement from 82.6 to 95.7% and 39.1 to 52.2%, respectively. Cervical invasion may have an effect on lymphatic spread and change the site of metastatic LNs. Large prospective studies are needed to clarify the alteration of LN metastasis in cervix invaded EC patients.

  16. Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nancy L.; Lin, Chi-Iou; Du, Jinyan; Whang, Edward E.; Ito, Hiromichi; Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinome profiling is a novel technique for identifying activated kinases in human cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Src activity is increased in invasive thyroid cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Src activity decreased proliferation and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further investigation of Src targeted therapies in thyroid cancer is warranted. -- Abstract: Background: Novel therapies are needed for the treatment of invasive thyroid cancers. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases plays an important role in thyroid oncogenesis. Because current targeted therapies are biased toward a small subset of tyrosine kinases, we conducted a study to reveal novel therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer using a bead-based, high-throughput system. Methods: Thyroid tumors and matched normal tissues were harvested from twenty-six patients in the operating room. Protein lysates were analyzed using the Luminex immunosandwich, a bead-based kinase phosphorylation assay. Data was analyzed using GenePattern 3.0 software and clustered according to histology, demographic factors, and tumor status regarding capsular invasion, size, lymphovascular invasion, and extrathyroidal extension. Survival and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of Src inhibition in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. Results: Tyrosine kinome profiling demonstrated upregulation of nine tyrosine kinases in tumors relative to matched normal thyroid tissue: EGFR, PTK6, BTK, HCK, ABL1, TNK1, GRB2, ERK, and SRC. Supervised clustering of well-differentiated tumors by histology, gender, age, or size did not reveal significant differences in tyrosine kinase activity. However, supervised clustering by the presence of invasive disease showed increased Src activity in invasive tumors relative to non-invasive tumors (60% v. 0%, p < 0.05). In vitro, we found that Src inhibition in PTC cells decreased cell invasion and proliferation

  17. Estimation of the pathological invasive size of pulmonary adenocarcinoma using high-resolution computed tomography of the chest: A consideration based on lung and mediastinal window settings.

    PubMed

    Sakakura, Noriaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Sakao, Yukinori

    2016-05-01

    Since the proposal of the new classification of pulmonary adenocarcinoma (PADC), the size of pathological invasion has become more important. We aimed to determine whether high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) could be used to preoperatively evaluate PADC invasive size. We investigated 360 complete resected cT1a-1b-2aN0 PADCs. We examined the correlation of pathological invasive size with three HRCT parameters [whole tumor dimension in the lung window (LD), consolidation dimension in the lung window (CD), and tumor dimension in the mediastinal window (MD)]. HRCT prediction of an invasive size of ≤5 mm was determined using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Pathological invasive size correlated well with both CD (r(2)=0.710) and MD (r(2)=0.743) comparably, and moderately with LD (r(2)=0.514). CD and MD tended to be slightly larger and smaller, respectively, than the actual invasive size. Invasive size roughly approximated to MD+3mm, and an invasive size of ≤5 mm was best predicted by MD, followed by CD. MD of ≤2 mm and 0mm predicted an invasive size of ≤5 mm with 64.1% and 47.4% sensitivity and 96.5% and 98.9% specificity, respectively. Lymphovascular invasion was best predicted by MD followed by CD. Pleural invasion and lymph node metastasis was predicted well by both MD and CD. Preoperative estimation of the invasive size of PADC and evaluation of other parameters of invasiveness were possible using MD. This approach using HRCT may play a complementary role in more thorough clinical staging of PADC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Local CYP17A1 and CYP19A1 Expression Levels as Prognostic Factors in Postmenopausal Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer Cases.

    PubMed

    Tüzüner, Mete Bora; Öztürk, Tülin; Eronat, Allison Pınar; Seyhan, Fatih; Kısakesen, Halil İbrahim; Calay, Zerrin; İlvan, Şennur; Turna, Hande; Yılmaz-Aydoğan, Hülya; Bermek, Hakan; Öztürk, Oğuz

    2016-12-01

    There is growing attention focused on local estrogen production in the breast tissue and its possible role in breast cancer initiation and progression. Understanding the underlying mechanisms for estrogen synthesis and the microenvironment consisting of tumor and its surrounding adipose tissue might open new avenues in breast cancer prevention, prognosis and treatment. In order to obtain insight, we compared peritumoral and tumor tissue expressions of CYP17A1 and CYP19A1 genes, which play an important role in estrogen biosynthesis. The paired tissue samples of 20 postmenopausal ER(+)/PR(+) patients diagnosed with invasive ductal breast cancer were studied. In addition, 12 breast tissue samples obtained from premenopausal women without a history of breast cancer were also investigated as representative of normal conditions. Peritumoral adipose tissues expressed CYP19A1 approximately threefold higher than tumor itself (p = 0.001). A nonsignificant trend toward low expression of CYP17A1 was observed in peritumoral compared to tumor tissue (p = 0.687). Clinicopathological parameters and patient characteristics which are accepted as risk factors for breast cancer were also associated with individual and combined expressions of CYP17A1 and CYP19A1. This study offers that evaluation of CYP17A1 and CYP19A1 local expression levels might be useful for deciding on personalized treatment approaches and more accurate diagnosis, when evaluated together with several clinicopathological and disease risk factors. Considering the key role of these CYPs in estrogen synthesis, determining their expression levels may be useful as a postdiagnostic marker and for choosing the right treatment method in addition to the conventional approach.

  19. Lysine-specific demethylase-1 contributes to malignant behavior by regulation of invasive activity and metabolic shift in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosumi, Keisuke; Baba, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Harada, Kazuto; Nakamura, Kenichi; Kurashige, Junji; Hiyoshi, Yukiharu; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Iwagami, Shiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoya; Oki, Eiji; Watanabe, Masayuki; Hino, Shinjiro; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-15

    Lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) removes the methyl groups from mono- and di-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3. Previous studies have linked LSD1 to malignancy in several human tumors, and LSD1 is considered to epigenetically regulate the energy metabolism genes in adipocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma. This study investigates the function of LSD1 in the invasive activity and the metabolism of esophageal cancer cells. We investigated whether LSD1 immunohistochemical expression levels are related to clinical and pathological features, including the maximum standard uptake value in fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography assay. The influence of LSD1 on cell proliferation, invasion and glucose uptake was evaluated in vitro by using specific small interfering RNA for LSD1, and an LSD1 inhibitor. We also evaluated two major energy pathways (glycolytic pathway and mitochondrial respiration) by measuring the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) with an extracellular flux analyzer. High LSD1 immunohistochemical expression was significantly associated with high tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion, poor prognosis, and high maximum standard uptake value in esophageal cancer patients. In the in vitro analysis, LSD1 knockdown significantly suppressed the invasive activity and glucose uptake of cancerous cells, reduced their ECAR and increased their OCR and OCR/ECAR. LSD1 may contribute to malignant behavior by regulating the invasive activity and metabolism, activating the glycolytic pathway and inhibiting the mitochondrial respiration of esophageal cancer cells. The results support LSD1 as a potential therapeutic target. © 2015 UICC.

  20. Thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRa) tissue expression in ductal invasive breast cancer: A study combining quantitative immunohistochemistry with digital slide image analysis.

    PubMed

    Charalampoudis, P; Agrogiannis, G; Kontzoglou, K; Kouraklis, G; Sotiropoulos, G C

    2017-08-01

    In breast cancer, hormonal receptors hold promise for developing novel targeted therapies. The thyroid exerts its actions via the thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta. The clinical significance of the expression of thyroid hormone receptors in breast cancer is unclear. We studied thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRa) expression in 82 samples from 41 women with ductal invasive breast cancer and no thyroid disease. We performed quantitative immunohistochemistry with digital image analysis and correlated TRa expression with clinicopathological parameters. TRa was expressed in both normal breast epithelium and breast cancer, but expression in breast cancer was significantly lower. TRa was expressed significantly less in larger and grade III tumors. Conversely, breast cancers with lymphovascular invasion showed increased TRa expression compared to cancers without lymphovascular invasion. TRa expression was not significantly different between node-positive and node-negative breast cancers, or among different hormonal profiles and intrinsic subtypes. This is the first-in-human study to combine quantitative immunohistochemistry with image analysis to study TRa expression in women with ductal invasive breast cancer and no clinical or biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction. We confirm that TRa is expressed in both normal and malignant breast epithelium and suggest that TRa expression is downregulated during breast carcinogenesis. Larger and higher grade breast cancers demonstrate partial loss in TRa expression. Alterations in TRa expression take place even in the absence of clinical or biochemical thyroid disease. The underlying mechanism of these findings and their potential significance in survival and relapse mandate further research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  1. Consensus and conflict in invasive micropapillary carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Li; Zhang, Huina; Zhang, Xinhai Bob; Lonser, Roland; Thompson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) is an aggressive histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma that has been gaining increased attention over the past twenty years. It is important to recognize IMPC due to its strong association with early lymphovascular invasion (LVI), high risk of lymph node metastasis, perineural invasion and poor prognosis. Controversies regarding IMPC include differentiating from retraction artifact and mimics, clinical significance of proportion of micropapillary component (MC), pathogenesis, biologic nature of the entity and consequently terminology, etc. We herein present a case of rectal IMPC arising from a tubulovillous adenoma. Since HER2 over-expression has been reported in IMPC of the breast and the bladder but never in the colorectum, given the availability of HER2 targeted therapy, HER2 protein expression in our case is examined by immunohistochemical study which shows weak incomplete membrane staining in less than 5% of cells. Literature is reviewed with emphasis on colorectal IMPC as well as aforementioned controversial topics. In summary, more study is needed to resolve the conflicts and build consensus on IMPC. PMID:27034813

  2. Comparison of invasive micropapillary and triple negative invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-liang; Ding, Ang

    2015-12-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) of the breast and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) are both aggressive subtypes, but little information is available on their comparison. Retrospective analysis of 95 IMPC and 200 TNBC-IDC (invasive ductal carcinoma) was conducted to compare the clinicopathologic characteristics and survivals. For IMPC, pN was the independent prognostic factor of local-regional recurrence free survival (LRRFS) (P = 0.045) and metastasis free survival (MFS) (P = 0.048), but not of overall survival (OS) (P = 0.165). For TNBC, pT and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were both independent prognostic factors of MFS (pT: P = 0.006, LVI: P = 0.010) and OS (pT: P = 0.006, LVI: P = 0.001), but not for LRRFS (pT: P = 0.060, LVI: P = 0.503). IMPC exhibited more aggressive features than TNBC, including larger tumor size, a greater proportion of nodal involvement, and an increased incidence of LVI. After a median follow-up duration of 61 months, 5y-LRRFS rate was lower in IMPC than in TNBC, in entire cohort (71.4 ± 4.8% vs. 89.8 ± 2.2%, P < 0.001) and in node positive cases (64.2 ± 5.9% vs. 81.7 ± 4.4%, P = 0.048). A tendency of lower 5y-MFS rate was observed in TNBC compared with in IMPC, in node positive cases (63.8 ± 5.5% vs. 74.8 ± 5.5%, P = 0.053) and in node negative cases (80.1 ± 3.6% vs. 96.2 ± 3.8%, P = 0.052), but it did not reach significance. 5y-OS was similar between IMPC and TNBC (81.9 ± 4.7% vs. 79.8 ± 3.1%, P = 0.475). IMPC is featured with high rate of lymph node involvement which is strongly associated with high rate of LRR. TNBC is featured with high rate of early distant metastasis without increase of nodal metastases. The survival is still relatively poor even in node negative cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Esophagectomy - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy; Robotic esophagectomy; Removal of the esophagus - minimally invasive; Achalasia - esophagectomy; Barrett esophagus - esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - laparoscopic; Cancer of the ...

  4. PAP/REG3A favors perineural invasion in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and serves as a prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Nigri, Jérémy; Gironella, Meritxell; Bressy, Christian; Vila-Navarro, Elena; Roques, Julie; Lac, Sophie; Bontemps, Caroline; Kozaczyk, Coraline; Cros, Jérôme; Pietrasz, Daniel; Maréchal, Raphaël; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Iovanna, Juan; Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Folch-Puy, Emma; Tomasini, Richard

    2017-06-27

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a fatal and insidious malignant disease for which clinicians' tools are restricted by the current limits in knowledge of how tumor and stromal cells act during the disease. Among PDA hallmarks, neural remodeling (NR) and perineural invasion (PNI) drastically influence quality of life and patient survival. Indeed, NR and PNI are associated with neuropathic pain and metastasis, respectively, both of which impact clinicians' decisions and therapeutic options. The aim of this study was to determine the impact and clinical relevance of the peritumoral microenvironment, through pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP/REG3A) expression, on PNI in pancreatic cancer. First, we demonstrated that, in PDA, PAP/REG3A is produced by inflamed acinar cells from the peritumoral microenvironment and then enhances the migratory and invasive abilities of cancer cells. More specifically, using perineural ex vivo assays we revealed that PAP/REG3A favors PNI through activation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in cancer cells. Finally, we analyzed the level of PAP/REG3A in blood from healthy donors or patients with PDA from three independent cohorts. Patients with high levels of PAP/REG3A had overall shorter survival as well as poor surgical outcomes with reduced disease-free survival. Our study provides a rationale for using the PAP/REG3A level as a biomarker to improve pancreatic cancer prognosis. It also suggests that therapeutic targeting of PAP/REG3A activity in PDA could limit tumor cell aggressiveness and PNI.

  5. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  6. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Triggers Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invasiveness via α3β1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Giannelli, Gianluigi; Fransvea, Emilia; Marinosci, Felice; Bergamini, Carlo; Colucci, Silvia; Schiraldi, Oronzo; Antonaci, Salvatore

    2002-01-01

    Metastasis occurrence in the course of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) severely affects prognosis and survival. We have shown that HCC invasive cells express α3β1-integrin whereas noninvasive cells do not. Here we show that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulates α3-integrin expression at a transcriptional level in noninvasive HCC cells, causing transformation into a motile and invasive phenotype. Such activities are inhibited by neutralizing anti-α3- but not anti-α6-integrin monoclonal antibodies. HCC invasive cells secrete abundant levels of active TGF-β1 in comparison with noninvasive cells, but in the latter, addition of active matrix metalloproteinases-2 increases the concentration of active TGF-β1. In this way, the cells express α3-integrin at a transcriptional level and acquire motility on Ln-5. By contrast, an anti-TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody reduces α3-integrin expression and the invasive ability of HCC invading cells. In HCC patients, TGF-β1 serum concentrations and α3-integrin expression are strongly correlated. The integrin, absent in normal and peritumoral liver parenchyma, is abundantly expressed in HCC primary and metastatic tissue. In particular, patients with metastasis show higher levels of TGF-β1 serum concentrations and stronger expression of TGF-β1 and α3-integrin in HCC tissues. In conclusion, TGF-β1 may play an important role in HCC invasiveness by stimulating α3-integrin expression, and could therefore be an important target for new therapies. PMID:12107103

  7. Invasion characteristics of oral tongue cancer: frequency of reporting and effect on survival in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Michael; Liu, Lihua; Ward, Kevin; Zhang, Juanjuan; Almon, Lyn; Su, Gan; Berglund, Lenard; Chen, Amy; Sinha, Uttam K; Young, John L

    2009-09-01

    The 2000 College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines recommend that a characterization of carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, including tongue cancer, should include depth of invasion (DI) and the presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) or perineural invasion (PNI). This study included patients who were diagnosed with cancer of the oral tongue, who underwent tumor resection, and who were reported to either the Metropolitan Atlanta and Rural Georgia Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry or the Los Angeles SEER registry. The authors assessed the completeness of pathology reporting with respect to the documentation of PNI or LVI and DI. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine factors that influenced reporting while taking into consideration clustering of observations within the hospitals. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted to examine the impact of tumor invasion characteristics on mortality while controlling for other prognostic factors. DI reporting increased from 13% between 1997 and 1999 to 23% between 2000 and 2004 after the CAP issued its recommendations; whereas mode of invasion (the presence of LVI and/or PNI) reporting for the same period increased from 13% to 38%. The observed increase in reporting was most pronounced in the first 2 years (2000 and 2001) and appeared to decline again afterward. Tumor invasion >3 mm in depth and the presence of PNI were among the strongest predictors of survival in multivariate analyses. The current results indicated the importance of reporting tumor invasion characteristics for patients diagnosed with cancer of the oral tongue. The findings also underscore the need for continuous monitoring of adherence to the CAP protocol.

  8. S100A4 drives non-small cell lung cancer invasion, associates with poor prognosis, and is effectively targeted by the FDA-approved anti-helminthic agent niclosamide.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Rachel L; Carpenter, Brittany L; West, Dava S; Knifley, Teresa; Liu, Lili; Wang, Chi; Weiss, Heidi L; Gal, Tamas S; Durbin, Eric B; Arnold, Susanne M; O'Connor, Kathleen L; Chen, Min

    2016-06-07

    S100A4 (metastasin-1), a metastasis-associated protein and marker of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition, contributes to several hallmarks of cancer and has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancer. However, the impacts of S100A4 signaling in lung cancer progression and its potential use as a target for therapy in lung cancer have not been properly explored. Using established lung cancer cell lines, we demonstrate that S100A4 knockdown reduces cell proliferation, invasion and three-dimensional invasive growth, while overexpression of S100A4 increases invasive potential. In patient-derived tissues, S100A4 is preferentially elevated in lung adenocarcinoma. This elevation is associated with lymphovascular invasion and decreased overall survival. In addition, depletion of S100A4 by shRNA inhibits NF-κB activity and decreases TNFα-induced MMP9 expression. Furthermore, inhibition of the NF-κB/MMP9 axis decreases lung carcinoma invasive potential. Niclosamide, a reported inhibitor of S100A4, blocks expression and function of S100A4 with a reduction in proliferation, invasion and NF-κB-mediated MMP9 expression. Collectively, this study highlights the importance of the S100A4/NF-κB/MMP9 axis in lung cancer invasion and provides a rationale for targeting S100A4 to combat lung cancer.

  9. S100A4 drives non-small cell lung cancer invasion, associates with poor prognosis, and is effectively targeted by the FDA-approved anti-helminthic agent niclosamide

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rachel L.; Carpenter, Brittany L.; West, Dava S.; Knifley, Teresa; Liu, Lili; Wang, Chi; Weiss, Heidi L.; Gal, Tamas S.; Durbin, Eric B.; Arnold, Susanne M.; O'Connor, Kathleen L.; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    S100A4 (metastasin-1), a metastasis-associated protein and marker of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition, contributes to several hallmarks of cancer and has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancer. However, the impacts of S100A4 signaling in lung cancer progression and its potential use as a target for therapy in lung cancer have not been properly explored. Using established lung cancer cell lines, we demonstrate that S100A4 knockdown reduces cell proliferation, invasion and three-dimensional invasive growth, while overexpression of S100A4 increases invasive potential. In patient-derived tissues, S100A4 is preferentially elevated in lung adenocarcinoma. This elevation is associated with lymphovascular invasion and decreased overall survival. In addition, depletion of S100A4 by shRNA inhibits NF-κB activity and decreases TNFα-induced MMP9 expression. Furthermore, inhibition of the NF-κB/MMP9 axis decreases lung carcinoma invasive potential. Niclosamide, a reported inhibitor of S100A4, blocks expression and function of S100A4 with a reduction in proliferation, invasion and NF-κB-mediated MMP9 expression. Collectively, this study highlights the importance of the S100A4/NF-κB/MMP9 axis in lung cancer invasion and provides a rationale for targeting S100A4 to combat lung cancer. PMID:27127879

  10. Lack of Association between Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression and Clinically Relevant Molecular or Morphologic Tumor Characteristics at the Leading Edge of Invasive Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Wardelmann, Eva; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the western world, but tumor biology and clinical course show great interindividual variation. Molecular and morphologic tumor characteristics, such as KRAS/BRAF mutation status, mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression, tumor growth pattern, and tumor cell budding, have been shown to be of key therapeutic and/or prognostic relevance in CRC. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-anchored zinc-binding endopeptidase that is expressed at the leading edge of various invasive carcinomas and promotes tumor cell invasion through degradation of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between MT1-MMP expression and molecular tumor characteristics as well as morphologic features of tumor aggressiveness in a consecutive series of 79 CRC tissue samples. However, although MT1-MMP was expressed in 41/79 samples (52%), there was no significant association between MT1-MMP expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation status, MMR protein expression, presence of lymphovascular invasion, tumor growth pattern, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor cell budding in our sample cohort (P > 0.05). Thus, we conclude that although MT1-MMP may play a role in CRC invasion, it is not of key relevance to the current models of CRC invasion and aggressiveness. PMID:26106602

  11. Cryptic invasions: A review.

    PubMed

    Morais, Pedro; Reichard, Martin

    2017-06-22

    Cryptic invasions are defined as the introduction and spread of non-native lineages within the species' native range (intra-specific cryptic invasion) or the invasion of non-native species that goes unnoticed due to misidentification as a native or another invasive species (inter-specific cryptic invasion). While population-specific attributes are acknowledged to play a critical role in the success and impact of biological invasions in general, our knowledge of the causes and consequences of cryptic invasions is largely neglected. Cryptic invasions are inherently difficult to recognize and, despite being likely widespread, often go undetected. In this review, we analyse the sources, mechanisms, and consequences of cryptic invasions. Using a bibliometric survey, we first quantify the relative proportion of study questions, taxa, and geographic regions. We then highlight the value of comparative information from archived specimens in uncovering the occurrence and timing of cryptic invasions. We examine the mechanisms of cryptic invasions and emphasise the role of anthropogenic environmental changes on the arrival of cryptic invaders. We then discuss the role of interspecific biological interactions in the success of cryptic invasions and the role of hybridization between native and non-native lineages in cryptic invasions. We examine the competitive advantage of some invasive lineages in key physiological, ecological or sexually-selected traits. We argue that cryptic invasions, often undetected, may trigger subsequent rapid range expansions. We suggest that cryptic invasions are much more common than currently acknowledged. We highlight the role of coevolved associations (host-parasite, mutualism, herbivory), inherently population-specific, in the impacts of cryptic invasions on local communities. Finally, we outline a framework to manage intraspecific cryptic invasions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mammary adipocytes stimulate breast cancer invasion through metabolic remodeling of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan Yuan; Attané, Camille; Milhas, Delphine; Dirat, Béatrice; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Guerard, Adrien; Gilhodes, Julia; Lazar, Ikrame; Alet, Nathalie; Laurent, Victor; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Hervé, Caroline; Bost, Frédéric; Ren, Guo Sheng; Bono, Françoise; Escourrou, Ghislaine; Prentki, Marc; Nieto, Laurence; Valet, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    In breast cancer, a key feature of peritumoral adipocytes is their loss of lipid content observed both in vitro and in human tumors. The free fatty acids (FFAs), released by adipocytes after lipolysis induced by tumor secretions, are transferred and stored in tumor cells as triglycerides in lipid droplets. In tumor cell lines, we demonstrate that FFAs can be released over time from lipid droplets through an adipose triglyceride lipase–dependent (ATGL-dependent) lipolytic pathway. In vivo, ATGL is expressed in human tumors where its expression correlates with tumor aggressiveness and is upregulated by contact with adipocytes. The released FFAs are then used for fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO), an active process in cancer but not normal breast epithelial cells, and regulated by coculture with adipocytes. However, in cocultivated cells, FAO is uncoupled from ATP production, leading to AMPK/acetyl-CoA carboxylase activation, a circle that maintains this state of metabolic remodeling. The increased invasive capacities of tumor cells induced by coculture are completely abrogated by inhibition of the coupled ATGL-dependent lipolysis/FAO pathways. These results show a complex metabolic symbiosis between tumor-surrounding adipocytes and cancer cells that stimulate their invasiveness, highlighting ATGL as a potential therapeutic target to impede breast cancer progression. PMID:28239646

  13. The transcriptome and miRNome profiling of glioblastoma tissues and peritumoral regions highlights molecular pathways shared by tumors and surrounding areas and reveals differences between short-term and long-term survivors

    PubMed Central

    Fazi, Barbara; Felsani, Armando; Grassi, Luigi; Moles, Anna; D'Andrea, Daniel; Toschi, Nicola; Sicari, Daria; De Bonis, Pasquale; Anile, Carmelo; Guerrisi, Maria Giovanna; Luca, Emilia; Farace, Maria Giulia; Maira, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest primary brain tumor, driving patients to death within 15 months after diagnosis (short term survivors, ST), with the exception of a small fraction of patients (long term survivors, LT) surviving longer than 36 months. Here we present deep sequencing data showing that peritumoral (P) areas differ from healthy white matter, but share with their respective frankly tumoral (C) samples, a number of mRNAs and microRNAs representative of extracellular matrix remodeling, TGFβ and signaling, of the involvement of cell types different from tumor cells but contributing to tumor growth, such as microglia or reactive astrocytes. Moreover, we provide evidence about RNAs differentially expressed in ST vs LT samples, suggesting the contribution of TGF-β signaling in this distinction too. We also show that the edited form of miR-376c-3p is reduced in C vs P samples and in ST tumors compared to LT ones. As a whole, our study provides new insights into the still puzzling distinction between ST and LT tumors, and sheds new light onto that “grey” zone represented by the area surrounding the tumor, which we show to be characterized by the expression of several molecules shared with the proper tumor mass. PMID:26188123

  14. High density of peritumoral lymphatic vessels measured by D2-40/podoplanin and LYVE-1 expression in gastric cancer patients: an excellent prognostic indicator or a false friend?

    PubMed

    Rudno-Rudzinska, Julia; Kielan, Wojciech; Grzebieniak, Zygmunt; Dziegiel, Piotr; Donizy, Piotr; Mazur, Grzegorz; Knakiewicz, Monika; Frejlich, Ewelina; Halon, Agnieszka

    2013-10-01

    One of the most important prognostic indicators in gastric cancer is the presence of metastases in lymph nodes. Even now, little is known about lymphangiogenesis in neoplastic tissue, and little is also known about the transmission of a neoplastic cell from the tumor mass into a lymphatic vessel. This study examined the relationships between the density of lymphatic vessels (LVD) stained immunohistochemically with lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1) and D2-40 (podoplanin) antibodies, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C/D, selected clinical and pathomorphological factors, and the 5-year overall survival of gastric cancer patients. Statistical analysis showed no impact of increased intratumoral or peritumoral LVD on gastric cancer patient survival, irrespective of the protein used to stain lymphatic vessels. Analysis showed that the probability of overall survival was decreased in the cases with enhanced VEGF-D immunoreactivity (P = 0.0045). The study showed that the studied markers cannot be used to determine the required extent of the surgical procedure, as they have no statistically significant correlation with the degree of progression of the cancer, the stage of the disease assessed according to the TNM 5th classification of malignant tumors, clinicopathological features, and patient survival. VEGF-D is the only marker that can be regarded as an unfavorable prognostic indicator for patients with advanced gastric cancer.

  15. Comparison of Clinicopathological Features and Treatment Results between Invasive Lobular Carcinoma and Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Su; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Kim, Young Il; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won Ho

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) and to compare the clinicopathological features and treatment results after breast conserving surgery (BCS) followed by radiotherapy between ILC and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). A total of 1,071 patients who underwent BCS followed by radiotherapy were included in the study. Medical records and pathological reports were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence of ILC was 5.2% (n=56). Bilateral breast cancer, lower nuclear grade, and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer were more frequent in patients with ILC than in those with IDC. There were no cases of lymphovascular invasion or the basal-like subtype in patients with ILC. There were no statistically significant differences in patterns of failure or treatment outcomes between patients with ILC and those with IDC. The development of metachronous contralateral breast cancer was more frequent in patients with IDC (n=27). Only one patient with ILC developed contralateral breast cancer, with a case of ductal carcinoma in situ. The incidence of ILC was slightly higher in our study than in previous Korean studies, but was lower than the incidences reported in Western studies. The differences we observed in clinico pathological features between ILC and IDC were similar to those described elsewhere in the literature. Although there were no statistically significant differences, there was a trend toward better disease-specific survival and disease-free survival rates in patients with ILC than in those with IDC.

  16. National invasive species program

    Treesearch

    Anna Rinick; Hilda Diaz-Soltero

    2007-01-01

    The structure and function of the National Invasive Species Council was presented below. The names and contact information for the USDA Invasive Species coordinators as of February 2006 were presented on the next page.

  17. Attacking invasive grasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    In grasslands fire may play a role in the plant invasion process, both by creating disturbances that potentially favour non-native invasions and as a possible tool for controlling alien invasions. Havill et al. (Applied Vegetation Science, 18, 2015, this issue) determine how native and non-native species respond to different fire regimes as a first step in understanding the potential control of invasive grasses.

  18. Invasive species in agriculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agricultural production of food, feed, fiber or fuel is a local human activity with global ecological impacts, including the potential to foster invasions. Agriculture plays an unusual role in biological invasions, in that it is both a source of non-indigenous invasive species (NIS) and especially s...

  19. TRAIL Death Receptor-4 Expression Positively Correlates With the Tumor Grade in Breast Cancer Patients With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Korcum, Aylin F.; Pestereli, Elif; Erdogan, Gulgun; Karaveli, Seyda; Savas, Burhan; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih V.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not in normal cells, and a number of clinical trials have recently been initiated to test the safety and antitumoral potential of TRAIL in cancer patients. Four different receptors have been identified to interact with TRAIL: two are death-inducing receptors (TRAIL-R1 [DR4] and TRAIL-R2 [DR5]), whereas the other two (TRAIL-R3 [DcR1] and TRAIL-R4 [DcR2]) do not induce death upon ligation and are believed to counteract TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity. Because high levels of DcR2 expression have recently been correlated with carcinogenesis in the prostate and lung, this study investigated the importance of TRAIL and TRAIL receptor expression in breast cancer patients with invasive ductal carcinoma, taking various prognostic markers into consideration. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical analyses were performed on 90 breast cancer patients with invasive ductal carcinoma using TRAIL and TRAIL receptor-specific antibodies. Age, menopausal status, tumor size, lymph node status, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, extracapsular tumor extension, presence of an extensive intraductal component, multicentricity, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and CerbB2 expression levels were analyzed with respect to TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression patterns. Results: The highest TRAIL receptor expressed in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma was DR4. Although progesterone receptor-positive patients exhibited lower DR5 expression, CerbB2-positive tissues displayed higher levels of both DR5 and TRAIL expressions. Conclusions: DR4 expression positively correlates with the tumor grade in breast cancer patients with invasive ductal carcinoma.

  20. The Potential Role of Systemic Buffers in Reducing Intratumoral Extracellular pH and Acid-Mediated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ariosto S.; Yunes, Jose A.; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that the extracellular pH (pHe) in cancers is typically lower than that in normal tissue and that an acidic pHe promotes invasive tumor growth in primary and metastatic cancers. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that increased systemic concentrations of pH buffers reduce intratumoral and peritumoral acidosis and, as a result, inhibit malignant growth. Computer simulations are used to quantify the ability of systemic pH buffers to increase the acidic pHe of tumors in vivo and investigate the chemical specifications of an optimal buffer for such purpose. We show that increased serum concentrations of the sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) can be achieved by ingesting amounts that have been used in published clinical trials. Furthermore, we find that consequent reduction of tumor acid concentrations significantly reduces tumor growth and invasion without altering the pH of blood or normal tissues. The simulations also show that the critical parameter governing buffer effectiveness is its pKa. This indicates that NaHCO3, with a pKa of 6.1, is not an ideal intratumoral buffer and that greater intratumoral pHe changes could be obtained using a buffer with a pKa of ~7. The simulations support the hypothesis that systemic pH buffers can be used to increase the tumor pHe and inhibit tumor invasion. PMID:19276380

  1. The potential role of systemic buffers in reducing intratumoral extracellular pH and acid-mediated invasion.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ariosto S; Yunes, Jose A; Gillies, Robert J; Gatenby, Robert A

    2009-03-15

    A number of studies have shown that the extracellular pH (pHe) in cancers is typically lower than that in normal tissue and that an acidic pHe promotes invasive tumor growth in primary and metastatic cancers. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that increased systemic concentrations of pH buffers reduce intratumoral and peritumoral acidosis and, as a result, inhibit malignant growth. Computer simulations are used to quantify the ability of systemic pH buffers to increase the acidic pHe of tumors in vivo and investigate the chemical specifications of an optimal buffer for such purpose. We show that increased serum concentrations of the sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) can be achieved by ingesting amounts that have been used in published clinical trials. Furthermore, we find that consequent reduction of tumor acid concentrations significantly reduces tumor growth and invasion without altering the pH of blood or normal tissues. The simulations also show that the critical parameter governing buffer effectiveness is its pK(a). This indicates that NaHCO(3), with a pK(a) of 6.1, is not an ideal intratumoral buffer and that greater intratumoral pHe changes could be obtained using a buffer with a pK(a) of approximately 7. The simulations support the hypothesis that systemic pH buffers can be used to increase the tumor pHe and inhibit tumor invasion.

  2. A Mammaglobin-A Targeting Agent for Non-invasive Detection of Breast Cancer Metastasis in Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Tafreshi, NK; Enkemann, SA; Bui, MM; Lloyd, MC; Abrahams, D; Huynh, AS; Kim, J; Grobmyer, SR; Carter, WB; Vagner, J; Gillies, RJ; Morse, DL

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic axillary lymph node (ALN) status is an important prognostic factor for staging breast cancer. Currently, status is determined by histopathology following surgical excision of sentinel lymph node(s), which is an invasive, time consuming, costly and potentially morbid procedure. This work describes an imaging platform for the non-invasive assessment of ALN status, eliminating the need for operation in patients without nodal involvement. A targeted imaging probe (MamAb-680) was developed by conjugation of a mammaglobin-A specific monoclonal antibody to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. Using DNA and tissue microarray, mammaglobin-A was validated as a cell-surface target that is expressed in axillary lymph node positive patient samples but is not expressed in normal lymph nodes. In vivo selectivity was determined by intravenous injection of MamAb-680 into mice with mammaglobin-A positive and negative mammary fat pad (MFP) tumors; and by peritumoral MFP injection of the targeted imaging probe in mice with spontaneous ALN metastases. Fluorescence imaging showed that probe was only retained in positive tumors and metastases. As few as 1000 cells that endogenously express mammaglobin-A were detected in ALN indicating high sensitivity of this method. Hence, this approach has potential for translation into clinical use for the non-invasive staging of breast cancer. PMID:21169406

  3. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Resulting from Endometrial Carcinogenesis Enhances Tumor Invasion and Correlates with Poor Outcome of Endometrial Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Yen; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Yun; Huang, Ching-Ting; Tang, Yu-Chien; Huang, Hsien-Da; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the dysregulated genes involved in the tumorigenesis and progression of endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEC), and their possible mechanisms. Endometrial specimens including normal endometrial tissues, atypical endometrial hyperplasia, and EEC were analyzed. The expression profiles were compared using GeneChip Array. The gene expression levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR in the training and testing sets to correlate the clinico-pathological parameters of EEC. Immunoblotting, in vitro cell migration and invasion assays were performed in human endometrial cancer cell lines and their transfectants. In microarray analysis, seven dysregulated genes were identified. Only the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were higher in EEC with deep myometrial invasion, positive lympho-vascular space invasion, lymph node metastasis, and advanced stages. After multivariate analysis, uPA was the only independent poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival in the EEC patients (hazard ratio: 4.65, p = 0.03). uPA may enhance the migratory and invasive capabilities of endometrial tumor cells by the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and p38 molecules. uPA is a dysregulated gene involved in the tumorigenesis, bio-pathological features and outcomes of EEC. uPA may be a potential molecule and target for the detection and treatment of EEC. PMID:26033187

  4. Invasive Extramammary Paget Disease of the Vulva With Signet Ring Cell Morphology in a Patient With Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma of the Stomach: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Kyu-Rae

    2017-06-02

    This report describes a rare case of invasive extramammary Paget disease of the vulva with signet ring cell morphology in a 58-yr-old woman with a history of signet ring cell carcinoma of the stomach. This case was initially misinterpreted as a metastatic gastric carcinoma to the vulva because an initial small, superficial biopsy specimen showed infiltration of signet ring cells in the dermis without intraepidermal Paget cells. However, a surgically resected specimen showed concordant immunophenotypes in both intraepidermal Paget cells and intradermal signet ring cell components with immunoreactivity to cytokeratin (CK) 7, CEA, and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, and immunonegativity for CK20, MUC5AC, and MUC6. Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma showed immunoreactivity to CK7, CEA, MUC5AC, and MUC6, and immunonegativity for gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 and CK20. The diagnosis of primary invasive extramammary Paget disease of the vulva was also supported by a long interval after gastrectomy (7.5 yr), the solitary involvement of the vulva, and the absence of lymphovascular invasion. This case demonstrates that invasive extramammary Paget disease may have a signet ring cell morphology and immunohistochemical profile similar to those of gastric signet ring cell carcinoma, but the addition of gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 immunostain in the panel of markers is helpful in the differential diagnosis.

  5. Invasive micropapillary mucinous carcinoma of the breast is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangfang; Yang, Mu; Li, Zhenhua; Guo, Xiaojing; Lin, Yang; Lang, Ronggang; Shen, Beibei; Pringle, Gordon; Zhang, Xinmin; Fu, Li

    2015-06-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma of breast (IMpC) is a special type of breast cancer with frequent lymph node metastasis (LNM) and poor prognosis, while pure mucinous carcinoma of breast (PMC) is generally associated with infrequent LNM and better prognosis. A similar micropapillary epithelial growth pattern has been described in PMC that was named as invasive micropapillary mucinous carcinoma (IMpMC), but its prognostic significance is as yet not known. A retrospective review of 531 cases of PMC in 43,685 cases of breast cancer diagnosed over a 10-year period was conducted to assess the frequency of IMpMC and its prognostic implications. IMpMC was identified in 134 (25.2 %) of the 531 PMC cases. Compared to conventional PMC (cPMC), IMpMC was found more frequently in younger patients and in tumors with increased frequency of LNM and lymphovascular invasion, and higher HER2 expression. In stage-matched Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients with stage II-III IMpMC suffered a decreased overall survival and recurrence-free survival (RFS) than matched cPMC patients. Multivariate analysis confirmed the presence of IMpMC morphology was an independent unfavorable predictor for LNM and RFS of PMC. However, decreased LNM, lower nuclear grade, higher expression of ER and PR, less expression of HER2, and better prognosis were identified in IMpMC when compared with IMpC (n = 281). This is the first study to show the prognostic significance of IMpMC in a large cohort. IMpMC pursues a more aggressive clinical course than cPMC and should be managed differently; therefore, recognition of IMpMC and its accurate diagnosis are clinically important.

  6. COMPROMISED MARGINS FOLLOWING MASTECTOMY FOR STAGE I - III INVASIVE BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jennifer; Mushawah, Fatema Al; Taylor, Marie E.; Cyr, Amy E.; Gillanders, William E.; Aft, Rebecca L.; Eberlein, Timothy J.; Gao, Feng; Margenthaler, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated factors associated with positive margins following mastectomy and the impact on outcomes. Methods We identified 240 patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer who underwent mastectomy from 1999-2009. Data included patient and tumor characteristics, pathologic margin assessment, and outcomes. Margin positivity was defined as the presence of in situ or invasive malignancy present at any margin. Descriptive statistics were utilized for data summary and were compared using Chi-square. Results Of the 240 patients, 132 (55%) had a simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy and 108 (45%) had a modified radical mastectomy. Overall, 21 (9%) patients had positive margins, including 12 (57%) with one positive margin, 3 (14%) with two positive margins, and 6 (29%) with three or more positive margins. The most commonly affected margin was the deep margin (48% of patients). Eight (38%) of the 21 patients received adjuvant chest wall irradiation. There were no differences between patients who had a positive margin versus those who did not with respect to patient age, race, percentage of in situ component, tumor size, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, or immunostain profile (p>0.05 for all). None of the patients with positive margins experienced a local recurrence. Conclusions Positive margins following mastectomy occurred in nearly 10% of our patients. No specific patient or tumor characteristics predicted a risk for having a positive margin. Despite the finding that only approximately 40% of patients received adjuvant radiation in the setting of a positive margin, no local recurrences have been observed. PMID:22520579

  7. Compromised margins following mastectomy for stage I-III invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jennifer; Al Mushawah, Fatema; Taylor, Marie E; Cyr, Amy E; Gillanders, William E; Aft, Rebecca L; Eberlein, Timothy J; Gao, Feng; Margenthaler, Julie A

    2012-09-01

    We investigated factors associated with positive margins following mastectomy and the impact on outcomes. We identified 240 patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer who underwent mastectomy from 1999 to 2009. Data included patient and tumor characteristics, pathologic margin assessment, and outcomes. Margin positivity was defined as the presence of in situ or invasive malignancy at any margin. Descriptive statistics were used for data summary and were compared using χ(2). Of the 240 patients, 132 (55%) had a simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy and 108 (45%) had a modified radical mastectomy. Overall, 21 patients (9%) had positive margins, including 12 (57%) with one positive margin, 3 (14%) with two positive margins, and 6 (29%) with three or more positive margins. The most commonly affected margin was the deep margin (48% of patients). Eight of the 21 patients (38%) received adjuvant chest wall irradiation. There were no differences between patients who had a positive margin and those who did not with respect to patient age, race, percentage of in situ component, tumor size, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, or immunostain profile (P > 0.05 for all). None of the patients with positive margins experienced a local recurrence. Positive margins following mastectomy occurred in nearly 10% of our patients. No specific patient or tumor characteristics predicted a risk for having a positive margin. Despite the finding that only approximately 40% of patients received adjuvant radiation in the setting of a positive margin, no local recurrences have been observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Elastic staining-a rejuvenated method to reassess prognosis and serosal invasion in patients with pT3N0M0 gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lei, Guang; Yang, Haiyan; Hong, Ting; Zhou, Chunhua; Li, Jigang; Liu, Wenbin; Hu, Jun; Zeng, Liang; Chen, Gong; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Yongchang; Yang, Nong

    2017-07-01

    Prognosis of pT3N0M0 gastric cancer (GC) varies greatly, though the major factor conferring poor prognosis is unclear. Subserosal elastic lamina invasion (ELI+) is closely associated with poor outcomes in pT3 colorectal cancer, but related research on GC is unavailable. This study aimed to identify the influence of ELI+ on the prognosis of patients with pT3N0M0 GC and its relationship with serosal invasion using elastic staining. We retrospectively reviewed 94 and 28 patients with pT3N0M0 and pT4aN0M0 GC who underwent gastrectomy between 1994 and 2005. For the former, one section with invasion depth closest to the peritoneal surface and one corresponding paraffin block for each specimen were selected for conventional elastic staining to assess the relationship between ELI+ and patients' clinical characteristics and survival. pT3N0M0 GC specimens were divided into 3 groups based on staining results: ELI+ (N=51), non-invasion (N=31), and unidentified (N=12). ELI+ was closely related to recurrence and lymphovascular invasion. Five-year disease-free (DFS) (46%) and overall (OS) (36%) survival rates were significantly lower in the ELI+ than in the non-invasion or unidentified groups (P<.0001); no obvious difference was found between the ELI+ and pT4aN0M0 groups (P=.25). Multivariate analysis showed ELI+ and recurrence as independent prognostic factors for DFS in pT3 GC patients. In conclusion, elastic staining is an effective and highly feasible method for predicting prognosis and evaluating the serosal invasion depth of pT3 GC. pT3 GC accompanied with ELI+ is an obvious adverse prognostic factor and could be considered a treatment for pT4a GC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma: correlation with M2 macrophage differentiation and lymphatic invasion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Chin; Chen, Jui-Yu; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Yang, An-Hang

    2013-06-01

    The diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (DSV-PTC) is a unique variant of PTC that is characterized by extensive lymphovascular invasion of tumor cells in a background of lymphocytic thyroiditis. The lymphatic emboli contain tumor cells as well as macrophages, but the recruitment of these macrophages is not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the expression of Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3), the recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and lymphatic invasion in DSV-PTC. We retrospectively examined 14 cases of DSV-PTC using immunohistochemistry studies. The density of TAMs, lymphatic vessel density, lymphatic invasion, tumor emboli area, and DcR3 expression were assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher's exact test, unpaired t-test, and linear regression. The lymphatic tumor emboli contained a relatively higher density of TAMs than stroma and classical PTC (CPTC) areas. In addition, the number of lymphatic invasions and the size of the tumor emboli area were positively correlated with the number of M2 TAMs. A higher density of M2 TAMs was associated with older patients and larger tumor size. Moreover, DcR3 was expressed only in lymphatic tumor cells and squamous metaplastic tumor cells, but not in macrophages and CPTC. In addition, the preferential expression of DcR3 in tumors was associated with higher levels of M2 TAMs and lymphatic invasion. Despite the fact that the exact relationship between DcR3, M2 macrophages, and lymphatic invasion in DSV-PTC remains to be elucidated, our findings suggest that DcR3 expression in DSV-PTC tumor cells may promote the polarized macrophage differentiation toward the M2 phenotype. This phenomenon may further promote lymphatic invasion of DSV-PTC tumor cells.

  10. [Invasive and minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Advanced hemodynamic monitoring is necessary for adequate management of high-risk patients or patients with derangement of circulation. Studies demonstrate a benefit of early goal directed therapy in unstable cardiopulmonary situations. In these days we have different possibilities of minimally invasive or invasive hemodynamic monitoring. Minimally invasive measurements like pulse conture analysis or pulse wave analysis being less accurate under some circumstances, however only an artery catheter is needed for cardiac output monitoring. Pulmonary artery, transpulmonary thermodilution and lithium dilution technology have acceptable accuracy in cardiac output measurement. For therapy of unstable circulation there are additionally parameters to obtain. The pulmonary artery catheter is the device with the largest rate of complications, used by a trained crew and with a correct indication, his use is unchained justified.

  11. Fatal submucosal invasive gastric adenosquamous carcinoma detected at surveillance after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Shirahige, Akinori; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Oda, Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Masau; Mori, Genki; Abe, Seiichiro; Nonaka, Satoru; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Sekine, Shigeki; Kushima, Ryoji; Saito, Yutaka; Fukagawa, Takeo; Katai, Hitoshi

    2015-04-14

    An 80-year-old man was under annual surveillance esophagogastroduodenoscopy after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC). Two years after the initial ESD, a 0-IIc type metachronous EGC lesion, 8 mm in size, without an ulcer scar, was found in the gastric antrum. The estimated tumor depth was up to the mucosa, and biopsy revealed well and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. ESD was performed for this lesion and en bloc resection with negative margins was achieved. Histopathological examination revealed an adenosquamous carcinoma 8 mm in size invading the deep submucosal layer (1600 μm), with lymphovascular invasion, consistent with the diagnosis of non-curative resection. Additional gastrectomy was recommended for this patient; however, two months after the ESD, preoperative computed tomography revealed multiple liver metastases, and the patient was considered as an unsuitable candidate for surgical resection. Systemic chemotherapy was therefore started; however, the patient died of gastric cancer 27 mo after the second ESD. Early gastric adenosquamous carcinoma localized to the mucosa and submucosa is extremely rare and its clinical behavior is not well known. The present report is very significant in that it underscores the distinct possibility of gastric adenosquamous carcinoma being very aggressive and fatal even when detected at an early cancer.

  12. Fatal submucosal invasive gastric adenosquamous carcinoma detected at surveillance after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Shirahige, Akinori; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Oda, Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Masau; Mori, Genki; Abe, Seiichiro; Nonaka, Satoru; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Sekine, Shigeki; Kushima, Ryoji; Saito, Yutaka; Fukagawa, Takeo; Katai, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was under annual surveillance esophagogastroduodenoscopy after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC). Two years after the initial ESD, a 0-IIc type metachronous EGC lesion, 8 mm in size, without an ulcer scar, was found in the gastric antrum. The estimated tumor depth was up to the mucosa, and biopsy revealed well and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. ESD was performed for this lesion and en bloc resection with negative margins was achieved. Histopathological examination revealed an adenosquamous carcinoma 8 mm in size invading the deep submucosal layer (1600 μm), with lymphovascular invasion, consistent with the diagnosis of non-curative resection. Additional gastrectomy was recommended for this patient; however, two months after the ESD, preoperative computed tomography revealed multiple liver metastases, and the patient was considered as an unsuitable candidate for surgical resection. Systemic chemotherapy was therefore started; however, the patient died of gastric cancer 27 mo after the second ESD. Early gastric adenosquamous carcinoma localized to the mucosa and submucosa is extremely rare and its clinical behavior is not well known. The present report is very significant in that it underscores the distinct possibility of gastric adenosquamous carcinoma being very aggressive and fatal even when detected at an early cancer. PMID:25892891

  13. TU-CD-BRB-07: Identification of Associations Between Radiologist-Annotated Imaging Features and Genomic Alterations in Breast Invasive Carcinoma, a TCGA Phenotype Research Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, A; Net, J; Brandt, K; Huang, E; Freymann, J; Kirby, J; Burnside, E; Morris, E; Sutton, E; Bonaccio, E; Giger, M; Jaffe, C; Ganott, M; Zuley, M; Le-Petross, H; Dogan, B; Whitman, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine associations between radiologist-annotated MRI features and genomic measurements in breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA) from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Methods: 98 TCGA patients with BRCA were assessed by a panel of radiologists (TCGA Breast Phenotype Research Group) based on a variety of mass and non-mass features according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Batch corrected gene expression data was obtained from the TCGA Data Portal. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to assess correlations between categorical image features and tumor-derived genomic features (such as gene pathway activity, copy number and mutation characteristics). Image-derived features were also correlated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) status. Multiple hypothesis correction was done using Benjamini-Hochberg FDR. Associations at an FDR of 0.1 were selected for interpretation. Results: ER status was associated with rim enhancement and peritumoral edema. PR status was associated with internal enhancement. Several components of the PI3K/Akt pathway were associated with rim enhancement as well as heterogeneity. In addition, several components of cell cycle regulation and cell division were associated with imaging characteristics.TP53 and GATA3 mutations were associated with lesion size. MRI features associated with TP53 mutation status were rim enhancement and peritumoral edema. Rim enhancement was associated with activity of RB1, PIK3R1, MAP3K1, AKT1,PI3K, and PIK3CA. Margin status was associated with HIF1A/ARNT, Ras/ GTP/PI3K, KRAS, and GADD45A. Axillary lymphadenopathy was associated with RB1 and BCL2L1. Peritumoral edema was associated with Aurora A/GADD45A, BCL2L1, CCNE1, and FOXA1. Heterogeneous internal nonmass enhancement was associated with EGFR, PI3K, AKT1, HF/MET, and EGFR/Erbb4/neuregulin 1. Diffuse nonmass enhancement was associated with HGF/MET/MUC20/SHIP

  14. Factors influencing plant invasiveness

    Treesearch

    Yvette Ortega; Dean Pearson

    2009-01-01

    Invasiveness of spotted knapweed and biological control agents. Dean and Yvette are examining the influence of drought on the invasiveness of spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa) and its susceptibility to herbivory by biological control agents. In collaboration with the University of Montana and Forest Health Protection, researchers have constructed 150...

  15. Identification of microRNAs associated with invasive and aggressive phenotype in cutaneous melanoma by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Babapoor, Sankhiros; Wu, Rong; Kozubek, James; Auidi, Donna; Grant-Kels, Jane M; Dadras, Soheil S

    2017-02-20

    A comprehensive repertoire of human microRNAs (miRNAs) that could be involved in early melanoma invasion into the dermis remains unknown. To this end, we sequenced small RNAs (18-30 nucleotides) isolated from an annotated series of invasive melanomas (average invasive depth, 2.0 mm), common melanocytic nevi, and matched normal skin (n=28). Our previously established bioinformatics pipeline identified 765 distinct mature known miRNAs and defined a set of top 40 list that clearly segregated melanomas into thin (0.75 mm) and thick (2.7 mm) groups. Among the top, miR-21-5p, let-7b-5p, let-7a-5p, miR-424-5p, miR-423-5p, miR-21-3p, miR-199b-5p, miR-182-5p, and miR-205-5p were differentially expressed between thin and thick melanomas. In a validation cohort (n=167), measured expression of miR-21-5p and miR-424-5p, not previously reported in melanoma, were significantly increased in invasive compared with in situ melanomas (P<0.0001). Increased miR-21-5p levels were significantly associated with invasive depth (P=0.038), tumor mitotic index (P=0.038), lymphovascular invasion (P=0.0036), and AJCC stage (P=0.038). In contrast, let-7b levels were significantly decreased in invasive and in situ melanomas compared with common and dysplastic nevi (P<0.0001). Decreased let-7b levels were significantly associated with invasive depth (P=0.011), Clark's level (P=0.013), ulceration (P=0.0043), and AJCC stage (P=0.011). These results define a distinct set of miRNAs associated with invasive and aggressive melanoma phenotype.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 20 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.5.

  16. High Expression of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Is Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Do, Sung-Im; Hyun, Keehoon; Park, Yong Lai; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Chae, Seoung Wan; Sohn, Jin Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we evaluated the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by performing immunohistochemical staining to determine whether they were reliable prognostic markers in patients with breast cancer. Methods Demographic and clinicopathological parameters of 214 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 80 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who were diagnosed and treated from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed. Tissue microarray was constructed and immunohistochemical staining was performed for each specimen. Results Univariate analyses showed that age at diagnosis, history of hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, skin and chest wall invasion, Paget disease, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor positivity, and triple-negative subtype were significantly associated with patient prognosis (p<0.005). Patients with DCIS showed higher PAI-1 expression than patients with IDC (82.5% and 36.2%, respectively; p=0.012). Lymph node metastasis was more frequent in patients with high uPA levels than in patients with low uPA levels (p=0.001). Conclusion Our results suggested that PAI-1 was involved in tumor progression in the early stages of breast cancer, such as DCIS. In addition, our results suggested that high uPA levels were associated with the lymph node metastasis of IDC. PMID:27382391

  17. Correlation between mammographic and sonographic findings and prognostic factors in patients with node-negative invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Kim, H H; Huh, M O; Kim, M J; Yi, A; Kim, H; Son, B H; Ahn, S H

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate sonographic and mammographic findings with prognostic factors in patients with node-negative invasive breast cancer. Sonographic and mammographic findings in 710 consecutive patients (age range 21-81 years; mean age 49 years) with 715 node-negative invasive breast cancers were retrospectively evaluated. Pathology reports relating to tumour size, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), extensive intraductal component (EIC), oestrogen receptor (ER) status and HER-2/neu status were reviewed and correlated with the imaging findings. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression analysis and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). On mammography, non-spiculated masses with calcifications were associated with all poor prognostic factors: high histological grade, positive LVI, EIC, HER-2/neu status and negative ER. Other lesions were associated with none of these poor prognostic factors. Hyperdense masses on mammography, the presence of mixed echogenicity, posterior enhancement, calcifications in-or-out of masses and diffusely increased vascularity on sonography were associated with high histological grade and negative ER. Associated calcifications on both mammograms and sonograms were correlated with EIC and HER-2/neu overexpression. The ICC value for the disease extent was 0.60 on mammography and 0.70 on sonography. Several sonographic and mammographic features can have a prognostic value in the subsequent treatment of patients with node-negative invasive breast cancer. Radiologists should pay more attention to masses that are associated with calcifications because on both mammography and sonography associated calcifications were predictors of positive EIC and HER-2/neu overexpression.

  18. MR imaging features associated with distant metastasis-free survival of patients with invasive breast cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung Eun; Shin, Sung Ui; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Ryu, Han Suk; Kim, Kwangsoo; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-04-01

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of primary breast cancers may have the potential to act as prognostic biomarkers by providing morphologic and kinetic features representing inter- or intra-tumor heterogeneity. Recent radiogenomic studies reveal that several radiologist-annotated image features are associated with genes or signal pathways involved in tumor progression, treatment resistance, and distant metastasis (DM). We investigate whether preoperative breast MR imaging features are associated with worse DM-free survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. Of the 3536 patients with primary breast cancers who underwent preoperative MR imaging between 2003 and 2009, 147 patients with DM were identified and one-to-one matched with control patients (n = 147) without DM according to clinical-pathologic variables. Three radiologists independently reviewed the MR images of 294 patients, and the association of DM-free survival with MR imaging and clinical-pathologic features was assessed using Cox proportional hazard models. Of MR imaging features, rim enhancement (hazard ratio [HR], 1.83 [95% confidence interval, CI 1.29, 2.51]; p = 0.001) and peritumoral edema (HR, 1.48 [95% CI 1.03, 2.11]; p = 0.032) were the significant features associated with worse DM-free survival. The significant MR imaging features, however, were different between breast cancer subtypes and stages. Preoperative breast MR imaging features of rim enhancement and peritumoral edema may be used as prognostic biomarkers that help predict DM risk in patients with breast cancer, thereby potentially enabling improved personalized treatment and monitoring strategies for individual patients.

  19. Non-invasive Detection of Breast Cancer Lymph Node Metastasis using Carbonic Anhydrases IX and XII Targeted Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tafreshi, Narges K.; Bui, Marilyn M.; Bishop, Kellsey; Lloyd, Mark C.; Enkemann, Steven A.; Lopez, Alexis S.; Abrahams, Dominique; Carter, Bradford W.; Vagner, Josef; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Gillies, Robert J.; Morse, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop targeted molecular imaging probes for the non-invasive detection of breast cancer lymph node metastasis. Methods Six cell surface or secreted markers were identified by expression profiling and from the literature as being highly expressed in breast cancer lymph node metastases. Two of these markers were cell surface carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CAIX and/or CAXII) and were validated for protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of patient tissue samples on a breast cancer tissue microarray containing 47 normal breast tissue samples, 42 ductal carcinoma in situ, 43 invasive ductal carcinomas without metastasis, 46 invasive ductal carcinomas with metastasis and 49 lymph node macrometastases of breast carcinoma. Targeted probes were developed by conjugation of CAIX and CAXII specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. Results Together, these two markers were expressed in 100% of the lymph node metastases surveyed. Selectivity of the imaging probes were confirmed by intravenous injection into nude mice bearing mammary fat pad tumors of marker expressing cells, and non-expressing cells or by pre-injection of unlabeled antibody. Imaging of LN metastases showed that peritumorally-injected probes detected nodes harboring metastatic tumor cells. As few as 1,000 cells were detected, as determined by implanting, under ultrasound guidance, a range in number of CAIX and CAXII expressing cells into the axillary LNs. Conclusion These imaging probes have potential for non-invasive staging of breast cancer in the clinic and elimination of unneeded surgery, which is costly and associated with morbidities. PMID:22016510

  20. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... invasive - discharge Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge Review Date 6/29/2015 Updated by: Jennifer Sobol, ... the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  1. Invasive Prenatal Testing

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, A.

    1988-01-01

    Invasive prenatal diagnosis is a major diagnostic tool which is used in modern obstetrical care. A synopsis of these techniques is provided to assist the family practitioner in providing this information to his patients. PMID:21253097

  2. Minimally invasive stomas.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Michael D; Al Haddad, Abdullah

    2008-02-01

    Traditionally, stoma creation and end stoma reversal have been performed via a laparotomy incision. However, in many situations, stoma construction may be safely performed in a minimally invasive nature. This may include a trephine, laparoscopic, or combined approach. Furthermore, Hartmann's colostomy reversal, a procedure traditionally associated with substantial morbidity, may also be performed laparoscopically. The authors briefly review patient selection, preparation, and indications, and focus primarily on surgical techniques and results of minimally invasive stoma creation and Hartmann's reversal.

  3. Minimally invasive lumbar foraminotomy.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel

    2013-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is a common problem. Nerve root compression can occur at different places along a nerve root's course including in the foramina. Minimal invasive approaches allow easier exposure of the lateral foramina and decompression of the nerve root in the foramina. This video demonstrates a minimally invasive approach to decompress the lumbar nerve root in the foramina with a lateral to medial decompression. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/jqa61HSpzIA.

  4. Parasites and marine invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torchin, M.E.; Lafferty, K.D.; Kuris, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduced marine species are a major environmental and economic problem. The rate of these biological invasions has substantially increased in recent years due to the globalization of the world's economies. The damage caused by invasive species is often a result of the higher densities and larger sizes they attain compared to where they are native. A prominent hypothesis explaining the success of introduced species is that they are relatively free of the effects of natural enemies. Most notably, they may encounter fewer parasites in their introduced range compared to their native range. Parasites are ubiquitous and pervasive in marine systems, yet their role in marine invasions is relatively unexplored. Although data on parasites of marine organisms exist, the extent to which parasites can mediate marine invasions, or the extent to which invasive parasites and pathogens are responsible for infecting or potentially decimating native marine species have not been examined. In this review, we present a theoretical framework to model invasion success and examine the evidence for a relationship between parasite presence and the success of introduced marine species. For this, we compare the prevalence and species richness of parasites in several introduced populations of marine species with populations where they are native. We also discuss the potential impacts of introduced marine parasites on native ecosystems.

  5. Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma with cervical lymph node metastasis: a preliminary study of 62 cases.

    PubMed

    Min, R; Siyi, L; Wenjun, Y; Ow, A; Lizheng, W; Minjun, D; Chenping, Z

    2012-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an infrequent malignant neoplasm that originates most commonly in the major and minor salivary glands of the head and neck region. This study provides new information on head and neck ACC with cervical lymph node metastasis. Of 616 patients who underwent primary tumour resection from 1995 to 2008 in the authors' hospital, 62 cases with cervical lymph node metastasis were analyzed. The general incidence of cervical lymph node metastasis in ACC was approximately 10%. The base of tongue, mobile tongue and mouth floor were the most frequent sites of lymph nodes metastasis, with incidences of 19.2%, 17.6% and 15.3%, respectively. Most cases occurred via a classic 'tunnel-style' metastasis and the level Ib and II regions were the most frequently involved. Primary site and lymphovascular invasion were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. High patient mortality was significantly correlated with lymph node positive cases. The tongue-mouth floor complex has a high propensity for cervical lymph node metastasis, which occurs through a classic 'tunnel-style' metastasis. Peritumoral lymphovascular invasion could be taken as strong predictor for lymph node metastasis, which ultimately leads to poor prognosis of ACC patient. Selective neck dissection should be considered in such cases. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A unified approach for quantifying invasibility and degree of invasion

    Treesearch

    Qinfeng Guo; Songlin Fei; Jeffrey S. Dukes; Christopher M. Oswalt; Basil V. Iannone III; Kevin M. Potter

    2015-01-01

    Habitat invasibility is a central focus of invasion biology, with implications for basic ecological patterns and processes and for effective invasion management. ‘‘Invasibility’’ is, however, one of the most elusive metrics and misused terms in ecology. Empirical studies and meta-analyses of invasibility have produced inconsistent and even conflicting results. This ...

  7. Regulatory T cells and their prognostic value in hepatopancreatobiliary tumours.

    PubMed

    Ozgur, Halil Hakan; Ercetin, Ayse Pinar; Eliyatkin, Nuket; Seren, Asli; Kupelioglu, Ali; Ortac, Ragip; Diniz, Gulden; Aktas, Safiye

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic values of Foxp3+ Treg cells, CD4+ Tcells and CD8+ T cells in cancer cases of gallbladder, pancreas and liver. This study included 20 patients with gallbladder cancer, 25 patients with pancreatic cancer and 8 patients with liver cancer. Foxp3, CD4 and CD8 were immunohistochemically evaluated and compared with histopathological and clinical prognostic parameters. Foxp3, CD4 and CD8 expression levels were significantly higher in peritumoral areas than in intratumoral areas in patients with gallbladder, pancreas, liver cancers (p<0,05). Positivity of Foxp3, CD4 and CD8 was correlated with advanced stage (p<0,05), poor differentiation, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, advanced age. Patients with high positivity of Foxp3 had a shorter disease free survival (p<0,05). Our results indicate that the ratio of Tregs/T helper cells (Foxp3+/CD4+) cells was higher in intratumoral area in hepatopancreatobiliary tumors. We conclude that intratumoral inlamatory cells might work for cancer cells, besides peritumoral cells work against cancer cells.

  8. Laparoscopic Versus Open Nephroureterectomy in Muscle-Invasive Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: Subanalysis of the Multi-Institutional National Database of the Japanese Urological Association.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Jun; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohyama, Chikara; Koie, Takuya; Hinotsu, Shiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Sakura, Mizuaki; Inokuchi, Junichi; Hara, Tomohiko

    2016-05-01

    Open nephroureterectomy (ONU) is the current standard for muscle-invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) in the European Association of Urology/Japanese Urological Association (JUA) guidelines. In this study, we compared the postsurgical survival of muscle-invasive UTUC patients treated with ONU or with laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (LNU), using the multi-institutional national database of the JUA. The 1509 patients with UTUC who were diagnosed at 348 Japanese institutions in 2005 were registered. We collected the clinical data of the patients in 2011. The muscle-invasive UTUC patients who underwent ONU or LNU were identified, and survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Overall, 749 pT2≥cNxM0 patients underwent a nephroureterectomy (ONU, n = 527 and LNU, n = 222). The overall survival and cause-specific survival rates were not significantly different between the ONU and LNU groups (p = 0.1263 and p = 0.0893, respectively). In addition, 459 of the 749 (61.3%) patients experienced disease recurrence (bladder recurrence, local recurrence, or distant metastasis), with no significant difference between the ONU and LNU groups. Even when patients were stratified by pT3/pT4 and/or pN+, overall survival was not significantly different between the ONU and LNU groups (p = 0.2876). The results of a univariate analysis showed that lymphovascular invasion was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival, but the surgical approaches were not found to be associated with overall survival. Our data suggest that there is no evidence that the oncologic outcome of LNU is inferior to that of ONU in muscle-invasive UTUC, when the appropriate patients are selected.

  9. The presence of extensive retraction clefts in invasive breast carcinomas correlates with lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis and predicts poor outcome: a prospective validation study of 2742 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Acs, Geza; Khakpour, Nazanin; Kiluk, John; Lee, Marie Catherine; Laronga, Christine

    2015-03-01

    We previously reported that the presence of extensive retraction clefts (RC) in breast cancers correlates with increasing tumor size and grade as well as lymphatic tumor spread and predicts poor outcome. This study is a prospective validation of our prior results. Consecutive cases of invasive breast carcinoma (n=2742) were reviewed to determine the diagnoses, including histologic type, grade, presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and extent of RC. No differences were found in the extent of RC between corresponding core needle biopsy and surgical samples. Extent of RC showed a significant correlation with tumor size, grade, LVI, and nodal metastasis in both core needle biopsy and surgical specimens. These associations remained significant in subset analyses of small (≤1 cm), node-negative and node-positive tumors. Extensive RC predicted poor recurrence-free (P<0.0001) and overall (P<0.0001) survival and remained significant in subset analyses of node-negative (P=0.0015 and 0.0021, respectively) and node-positive (P=0.0039 and 0.0214, respectively) cases. Carcinomas without LVI but extensive RC were associated with better outcome than carcinomas with LVI but worse than those without LVI and low RC. This prospective study confirms that the presence of extensive RC in invasive breast carcinomas correlates with aggressive tumor features and lymphatic tumor spread. Extensive RC appears to be an independent factor predictive of poor outcome in node-negative and node-positive disease. Our results support the hypothesis that RCs are the morphologic reflection of biological changes in tumor cells playing a role in lymphatic tumor spread and likely represent an early stage of LVI with similar clinical implications.

  10. Minimally invasive procedures

    PubMed Central

    Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Michail, Chandrinos; Lazaridis, George; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures, which include laparoscopic surgery, use state-of-the-art technology to reduce the damage to human tissue when performing surgery. Minimally invasive procedures require small “ports” from which the surgeon inserts thin tubes called trocars. Carbon dioxide gas may be used to inflate the area, creating a space between the internal organs and the skin. Then a miniature camera (usually a laparoscope or endoscope) is placed through one of the trocars so the surgical team can view the procedure as a magnified image on video monitors in the operating room. Specialized equipment is inserted through the trocars based on the type of surgery. There are some advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures that can be performed almost exclusively through a single point of entry—meaning only one small incision, like the “uniport” video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Not only do these procedures usually provide equivalent outcomes to traditional “open” surgery (which sometimes require a large incision), but minimally invasive procedures (using small incisions) may offer significant benefits as well: (I) faster recovery; (II) the patient remains for less days hospitalized; (III) less scarring and (IV) less pain. In our current mini review we will present the minimally invasive procedures for thoracic surgery. PMID:25861610

  11. The long non-coding RNA HOTAIR increases tumour growth and invasion in cervical cancer by targeting the Notch pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Wun; Park, Sun-Ae; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Cho, Nam Hoon; Song, Yong Sang; Kim, Young Tae

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), HOTAIR, is involved in cervical cancer pathogenesis. We examined serum HOTAIR expression levels in cervical cancer patients and determined the relationships between HOTAIR expression and several clinicopathological factors, including survival. We also examined the functional consequences of HOTAIR overexpression both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with control patients, HOTAIR expression was significantly greater in the serum of cervical cancer patients (P < 0.001). The results indicated that this increase was significantly associated with tumour size (P = 0.030), lymphovascular space invasion (P = 0.037), and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.043). Univariate analysis revealed that disease-free survival and overall survival times were significantly shorter in cervical cancer patients with high HOTAIR expression (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.27, 4.68 and P = 0.039, 0.031, respectively). Cell proliferation and invasion in vitro increased as a result of lentiviral-mediated HOTAIR overexpression in cervical cancer cell lines. HOTAIR knockdown inhibited these properties and increased apoptosis. In vivo xenograft experiments using the HOTAIR-overexpressing SiHa cell line revealed that HOTAIR was a strong inducer of tumour growth and modulated the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and Notch-Wnt signalling pathway-related genes. This result suggested that HOTAIR overexpression promoted cell proliferation and invasion. In conclusion, increased HOTAIR expression was associated with decreased patient survival times. HOTAIR may be a useful target for treatment of cervical cancer patients. PMID:27323817

  12. Invasive Bordetella holmesii infections.

    PubMed

    Fishbain, Joel T; Riederer, Kathleen; Sawaf, Hadi; Mody, Rupal

    2015-02-01

    Bordetella holmesii is a rare cause of invasive human disease. The fastidious and unusual nature of this organism makes routine isolation and identification challenging. We report two cases of B. holmesii bacteremia that were rapidly identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) when standard techniques failed to provide speciation. There are no current standards for susceptibility testing or treatment recommendations. The rare occurrence and challenges in identifying this pathogen led us to perform a comprehensive review of the epidemiology, clinical presentations, and treatment options for this potentially invasive pathogen.

  13. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  14. Over-invasion by functionally equivalent invasive species.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Sataruddin, Nurul S; Heard, Allison D

    2014-08-01

    Multiple invasive species have now established at most locations around the world, and the rate of new species invasions and records of new invasive species continue to grow. Multiple invasive species interact in complex and unpredictable ways, altering their invasion success and impacts on biodiversity. Incumbent invasive species can be replaced by functionally similar invading species through competitive processes; however the generalized circumstances leading to such competitive displacement have not been well investigated. The likelihood of competitive displacement is a function of the incumbent advantage of the resident invasive species and the propagule pressure of the colonizing invasive species. We modeled interactions between populations of two functionally similar invasive species and indicated the circumstances under which dominance can be through propagule pressure and incumbent advantage. Under certain circumstances, a normally subordinate species can be incumbent and reject a colonizing dominant species, or successfully colonize in competition with a dominant species during simultaneous invasion. Our theoretical results are supported by empirical studies of the invasion of islands by three invasive Rattus species. Competitive displacement is prominent in invasive rats and explains the replacement of R. exulans on islands subsequently invaded by European populations of R. rattus and R. norvegicus. These competition outcomes between invasive species can be found in a broad range of taxa and biomes, and are likely to become more common. Conservation management must consider that removing an incumbent invasive species may facilitate invasion by another invasive species. Under very restricted circumstances of dominant competitive ability but lesser impact, competitive displacement may provide a novel method of biological control.

  15. Invasion triangle: an organizational framework for species invasion

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Lora B; Leger, Elizabeth A; Nowak, Robert S

    2011-01-01

    Species invasion is a complex, multifactor process. To encapsulate this complexity into an intuitively appealing, simple, and straightforward manner, we present an organizational framework in the form of an invasion triangle. The invasion triangle is an adaptation of the disease triangle used by plant pathologists to help envision and evaluate interactions among a host, a pathogen, and an environment. Our modification of this framework for invasive species incorporates the major processes that result in invasion as the three sides of the triangle: (1) attributes of the potential invader; (2) biotic characteristics of a potentially invaded site; and (3) environmental conditions of the site. The invasion triangle also includes the impact of external influences on each side of the triangle, such as climate and land use change. This paper introduces the invasion triangle, discusses how accepted invasion hypotheses are integrated in this framework, describes how the invasion triangle can be used to focus research and management, and provides examples of application. The framework provided by the invasion triangle is easy to use by both researchers and managers and also applicable at any level of data intensity, from expert opinion to highly controlled experiments. The organizational framework provided by the invasion triangle is beneficial for understanding and predicting why species are invasive in specific environments, for identifying knowledge gaps, for facilitating communication, and for directing management in regard to invasive species. PMID:22393528

  16. Early Primary Invasion Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Katie V.; Villano, Christine P.

    2011-01-01

    "We really need to get the government involved," said one student, holding his graph up to USDA scientist Steve Seefeldt. Dr. Steve studies methods to control "invasive" plants, plants that have been introduced to an area by humans and have potential to spread rapidly and negatively affect ecosystems. The first grader and his…

  17. Exotic invasive plants

    Treesearch

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Barbara G. Phillips; Laura P. Moser

    2003-01-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are threatened by nonnative plant invasions that can cause undesirable, irreversible changes. They can displace native plants and animals, out-cross with native flora, alter nutrient cycling and other ecosystem functions, and even change an ecosystem's flammability (Walker and Smith 1997). After habitat loss, the spread of exotic species is...

  18. Early Primary Invasion Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Katie V.; Villano, Christine P.

    2011-01-01

    "We really need to get the government involved," said one student, holding his graph up to USDA scientist Steve Seefeldt. Dr. Steve studies methods to control "invasive" plants, plants that have been introduced to an area by humans and have potential to spread rapidly and negatively affect ecosystems. The first grader and his…

  19. Minimally invasive valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph

    2009-08-01

    Traditional cardiac valve replacement surgery is being rapidly supplanted by innovative, minimally invasive approaches toward the repair of these valves. Patients are experiencing benefits ranging from less bleeding and pain to faster recovery and greater satisfaction. These operations are proving to be safe, highly effective, and durable, and their use will likely continue to increase and become even more widely applicable.

  20. Mechanisms regulating glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Paw, Ivy; Carpenter, Richard C; Watabe, Kounosuke; Debinski, Waldemar; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2015-06-28

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive, deadliest, and most common brain malignancy in adults. Despite the advances made in surgical techniques, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival for GBM patients has remained at a mere 14 months. GBM poses several unique challenges to currently available treatments for the disease. For example, GBM cells have the propensity to aggressively infiltrate/invade into the normal brain tissues and along the vascular tracks, which prevents complete resection of all malignant cells and limits the effect of localized radiotherapy while sparing normal tissue. Although anti-angiogenic treatment exerts anti-edematic effect in GBM, unfortunately, tumors progress with acquired increased invasiveness. Therefore, it is an important task to gain a deeper understanding of the intrinsic and post-treatment invasive phenotypes of GBM in hopes that the gained knowledge would lead to novel GBM treatments that are more effective and less toxic. This review will give an overview of some of the signaling pathways that have been shown to positively and negatively regulate GBM invasion, including, the PI3K/Akt, Wnt, sonic hedgehog-GLI1, and microRNAs. The review will also discuss several approaches to cancer therapies potentially altering GBM invasiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Invasion percolation with memory

    SciTech Connect

    Kharabaf, H.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1997-06-01

    Motivated by the problem of finding the minimum threshold path (MTP) in a lattice of elements with random thresholds {tau}{sub i}, we propose a new class of invasion processes, in which the front advances by minimizing or maximizing the measure S{sub n}={summation}{sub i}{tau}{sub i}{sup n} for real n. This rule assigns long-time memory to the invasion process. If the rule minimizes S{sub n} (case of minimum penalty), the fronts are stable and connected to invasion percolation in a gradient [J. P. Hulin, E. Clement, C. Baudet, J. F. Gouyet, and M. Rosso, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 61}, 333 (1988)] but in a correlated lattice, with invasion percolation [D. Wilkinson and J. F. Willemsen, J. Phys. A {bold 16}, 3365 (1983)] recovered in the limit {vert_bar}n{vert_bar}={infinity}. For small n, the MTP is shown to be related to the optimal path of the directed polymer in random media (DPRM) problem [T. Halpin-Healy and Y.-C. Zhang, Phys. Rep. {bold 254}, 215 (1995)]. In the large n limit, however, it reduces to the backbone of a mixed site-bond percolation cluster. The algorithm allows for various properties of the MTP and the DPRM to be studied. In the unstable case (case of maximum gain), the front is a self-avoiding random walk. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Biogeography of plant invasions

    Treesearch

    Dean Pearson; Yvette Ortega

    2013-01-01

    The fact that most of our worst animal and weed pests come from other continents is no coincidence. Biological invasions are fundamentally a biogeographic phenomenon. That is to say, there is something rather significant about taking an organism from a specific evolutionary history and ecological context and casting it into an entirely new environment that can...

  3. Enrichment map profiling of the cancer invasion front suggests regulation of colorectal cancer progression by the bone morphogenetic protein antagonist, gremlin-1.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, George S; Berk, Aaron; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2013-08-01

    The cancer invasion front (CIF), a spatially-recognized area due to the frequent presence of peritumoral desmoplastic reaction, represents a cancer site where many hallmarks of cancer metastasis occur. It is now strongly suggested that the desmoplastic microenvironment holds crucial information for determining tumor development and progression. Despite extensive research on tumor-host cell interactions at CIFs, the exact paracrine molecular network that is hardwired into the proteome of the stromal and cancer subpopulations remains partially understood. Here, we interrogated the signaling pathways and the molecular functional signatures across the proteome of a desmoplastic coculture model system of colorectal cancer progression. We discovered a group of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists that coordinates major biological programs in CIFs, including cell proliferation, invasion, migration and differentiation processes. Using a mathematical model of cancer cell progression, coupled to in vitro cell migration assays, we demonstrated that the prominent BMP antagonist gremlin-1 (GREM1) may trigger motility of cancer cell cohorts. Our data collectively demonstrate that the desmoplastic CIFs deploy a microenvironmental signature, based on BMP antagonism, in order to regulate the motogenic fates of cancer cell cohorts invading the adjacent stroma. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  4. Invasion of the hybrids.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, M J

    2012-10-01

    Human activity and climate change are increasingly driving species, which were once separate together, leading to the potential for gene flow. Hybridization between diverged species brings together two genomes which have evolved to meet different adaptive requirements. The unique combination of these traits in a hybrid may be beneficial or maladaptive, but either way it results in increased phenotypic variation. A percentage of hybrid individuals may, therefore, find themselves able to exploit environmental niches which their progenitors cannot, leading to invasive hybrid swarms becoming established in new habitats. Previous research into hybrids, most famously that of Loren Rieseberg and co-workers (Rieseberg et al. 1999, 2003) in sunflowers, demonstrated that hybridization can give rise to transgressive segregation of adaptive traits, wherein the combination of favourable alleles from both parents in hybrids can enable them to outperform either. However, the question still remains as to how much of the competitive ability of hybrids is a direct result of admixture and how much is the result of selection after the fact. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, (Czypionka et al. 2012) describe their study of transcriptional changes resulting from hybridization in a fish hybrid termed invasive sculpins (Cottus). Using gene expression microarray assays, they compare gene expression in both wild and lab-reared invasive hybrids to the progenitor species and experimentally produced F(2) hybrids. They demonstrate that whilst hybridization alone does result in higher variance in gene expression (some of which is transgressive), many of the transgressive changes distinguishing the invasives appear to have come about subsequent to the initial natural hybridization event. They speculate that initial success of the hybrids in their new habitat is facilitated by hybridization, but that optimization of the invasive phenotype and removal of maladaptive traits rapidly reduces the

  5. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway enhances cancer cell invasion by upregulating the MMP expression and is associated with poor prognosis in upper urinary tract urothelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masaru; Mikami, Shuji; Kikuchi, Eiji; Kosaka, Takeo; Miyajima, Akira; Nakagawa, Ken; Mukai, Makio; Okada, Yasunori; Oya, Mototsugu

    2010-02-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the activation of the AhR pathway are involved in xenobiotic-induced toxicity and carcinogenesis. Although xenobiotics, such as cigarette smoke, contribute to the development of urothelial carcinoma (UC), the relationship between AhR and UC is unclear. In the present study, we investigated AhR expression in 209 patients with upper urinary tract UC. The nuclear expression of AhR was significantly associated with histological grade, pathological T stage, lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement. A multivariate Cox analysis revealed that nuclear AhR expression was a significant and independent predictor for disease-specific survival (hazard ratio = 2.469, P = 0.013). To determine whether the AhR pathway can be activated in the T24 UC cell line, we examined the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1, which are target genes of the AhR pathway, following exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ligand of AhR. TCDD treatment upregulated the expression levels of AhR, CYP1A1 and CYP1B1. TCDD enhanced T24 cell invasion associated with the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-9. Furthermore, targeting AhR messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in T24 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA) downregulated the mRNA expression of AhR, CYP1A1, CYP1B1, MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9; furthermore, the cells transfected with siRNA for AhR showed decreased invasion activity in comparison with the cells transfected with a non-targeting siRNA. Our results therefore suggest that AhR plays a role in the invasiveness of UC cells and can serve as a marker for the prognosis of upper urinary tract UC.

  6. Biogeography of Mediterranean Invasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, R. H.; di Castri, F.

    The Mediterranean basin, California, Chile, the western Cape of South Africa, and southern Australia share a Mediterranean climate characterized by cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers. These five regions have differing patterns of human settlement, but similarities in natural vegetation and some faunal assemblages. These likenesses are enhanced with time by an increasing level of biotic exchange among the regions. An initiative of a subcommittee of SCOPE (Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment), which realized that the integrity of many natural ecosystems is being threatened by the ingress of invasive species, this book uniquely documents the introduced floras and faunas, especially plants, buds, and mammals, in these five regions of Mediterranean climate, and aims to increase our understanding of the ecology of biological invasions. In doing so, it points a way to more effectively manage the biota of these regions.

  7. BRAF-Mutated Colorectal Cancer Exhibits Distinct Clinicopathological Features from Wild-Type BRAF-Expressing Cancer Independent of the Microsatellite Instability Status

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), the BRAF V600E mutation has been reported to be associated with several clinicopathological features and poor survival. However, the prognostic implications of BRAF V600E mutation and the associated clinicopathological characteristics in CRCs remain controversial. Therefore, we reviewed various clinicopathological features, including BRAF status, in 349 primary CRCs and analyzed the relationship between BRAF status and various clinicopathological factors, including overall survival. Similar to previous studies conducted in Eastern countries, the incidence of the BRAF V600E mutation in the current study was relatively low (5.7%). BRAF-mutated CRC exhibits distinct clinicopathological features from wild-type BRAF-expressing cancer independent of the microsatellite instability (MSI) status. This mutation was significantly associated with a proximal tumor location (P = 0.002); mucinous, signet ring cell, and serrated tumor components (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, and P = 0.008, respectively); lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.004); a peritumoral lymphoid reaction (P = 0.009); tumor budding (P = 0.046); and peritoneal seeding (P = 0.012). In conclusion, the incidence of the BRAF V600E mutation was relatively low in this study. BRAF-mutated CRCs exhibited some clinicopathological features which were also frequently observed in MSI-H CRCs, such as a proximal location; mucinous, signet ring cell, and serrated components; and marked peritumoral lymphoid reactions. PMID:27914130

  8. Pathologic and imunohistochemical characterization of tumoral inflammatory cell infiltrate in invasive penile squamous cell carcinomas: Fox-P3 expression is an independent predictor of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, José; Rodrigues, André Fellipe Freitas; Campos, Antonio Hugo J F M; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Zequi, Stênio Cássio; Guimarães, Gustavo Cardoso; da Fonseca, Francisco Paulo; Lopes, Ademar; Cubilla, Antonio; Soares, Fernando Augusto

    2015-04-01

    Penile carcinomas (PeCa) are relatively rare, but devastating neoplasms, more frequent among people of underprivileged socioeconomic status. There is mounting evidence that immune cells may trigger various mechanisms that enhance tumor growth and metastasis, but no data on the peritumoral inflammation is available for PeCa. The objectives of the present study are to evaluate the immunohistomorphology of tumoral inflammation in PeCa, and to correlate it with clinicopathological parameters, which could contribute to the prognostic evaluation. One hundred and twenty-two patients with the diagnosis of usual-type squamous cell penile carcinoma were included. Paraffin-embedded tissue was submitted to immunohistochemical evaluation of p16 protein, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD68, CD138, granzyme B, and Fox-P3. The Fisher's exact test was employed for comparison between histological variables and parameters, and the Kaplan-Meier method for the analysis of survival. Improved 5-year overall survival was significantly associated to age ≤60 years, stage I + II, tumor size T1 + T2, lymph node status N0, and absent perineural invasion. In a multivariate analysis age ≥60 years, presence of lymph node metastasis, urethral invasion, and high histologic grade retained a significantly more unfavorable outcome. Improved 5-year failure free survival was associated to stage of the disease I + II, lymph node status N0, absence of perineural, vascular, and urethral invasion, and Fox-P3 expression. In a multivariate analysis, presence of lymph node metastasis, perineural and vascular invasion, and of Fox-P3-positive lymphocytes together with low inflammatory infiltrate retained a significantly more unfavorable outcome. These results support the prognostic value of determining the levels of Fox-P3-positive lymphocytes by immunohistochemistry in PeCa, as this parameter adds value to the traditional clinicopathological features.

  9. [Emerging invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Alvez, F; Figueras, C; Roselló, E

    2010-07-01

    The frequency and diversity of invasive fungal infections has changed over the last 25 years. The emergence of less common, but medically important fungi has increased, and the children at risk has expanded, with the inclusion of medical conditions such as cancer, mainly haematological malignancy or stem cell transplant, immunosuppressive therapy, prolonged neutropenia, and T-cell immunodeficiency. Among mould infections, fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis (Dematiaceous fungi) have been increasingly reported in this group of patients. To successfully manage these challenging infections, it is imperative that paediatricians and sub-specialists remain aware of the optimal and timely diagnosis and therapeutic options. Unlike other common mycoses that cause human disease, there no simple antigen or serological tests available to detect these pathogens in tissue or blood. The outcome for these disseminate, and often refractory fungal infections in neutropenic patients and transplant recipients remains extremely poor, requiring early and aggressive therapy. Unfortunately there are no guidelines outlining the choices for optimal therapy in the treatment of paediatric invasive fungal infections do not exist, and on the other hand are limited paediatric data available comparing antifungal agents in children with proven, probable or suspected invasive fungal infection. The options for treatment rest mainly on some adult guidelines that comment on the treatment of these emerging and uncommon important fungi in children. Despite the sparse clinical trials available on treatment and its poor outcome, options for treatment of invasive fungal infections have increased with the advance of new antifungal agents, with improved tolerability and increased range of activity. The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis are discussed in this article.

  10. USGS invasive species solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Land managers must meet the invasive species challenge every day, starting with identification of problem species, then the collection of best practices for their control, and finally the implementation of a plan to remove the problem. At each step of the process, the availability of reliable information is essential to success. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a suite of resources for early detection and rapid response, along with data management and sharing.

  11. [Minimally invasive thymus surgery].

    PubMed

    Rückert, J C; Ismail, M; Swierzy, M; Braumann, C; Badakhshi, H; Rogalla, P; Meisel, A; Rückert, R I; Müller, J M

    2008-01-01

    There are absolute and relative indications for complete removal of the thymus gland. In the complex therapy of autoimmune-related myasthenia gravis, thymectomy plays a central role and is performed with relative indication. In case of thymoma with or without myasthenia, thymectomy is absolutely indicated. Thymus resection is further necessary for cases of hyperparathyroidism with ectopic intrathymic parathyroids or with certain forms of multiple endocrine neoplasia. The transcervical operation technique traditionally reflected the well-founded desire for minimal invasiveness for thymectomy. Due to the requirement of radicality however, most of these operations were performed using sternotomy. With the evolution of therapeutic thoracoscopy in thoracic surgery, several pure or extended minimally invasive operation techniques for thymectomy have been developed. At present uni- or bilateral, subxiphoid, and modified transcervical single or combination thoracoscopic techniques are in use. Recently a very precise new level of thoracoscopic operation technique was developed using robotic-assisted surgery. There are special advantages of this technique for thymectomy. An overview of the development and experiences with minimally invasive thymectomy is presented, including data from the largest series published so far.

  12. Risk stratification of metastatic recurrence in invasive upper urinary tract carcinoma after radical nephroureterectomy without lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Colin, Pierre; Ghoneim, Tarek P; Nison, Laurent; Seisen, Thomas; Lechevallier, Eric; Cathelineau, Xavier; Ouzzane, Adil; Zerbib, Marc; Long, Jean-Alexandre; Ruffion, Alain; Crouzet, Sébastien; Cussenot, Olivier; Audouin, Marie; Irani, Jacques; Gardic, Solène; Gres, Pascal; Audenet, François; Roumiguié, Mathieu; Valeri, Antoine; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2014-04-01

    To assess the risk factors of metastasis relapse in pT2-3 upper tract urothelial carcinomas (UTUCs) treated by radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) without lymphadenectomy (LN). A multicentric retrospective study was performed for pT2-3 pNx UTUCs treated by RNU between 1995 and 2010. The following criteria were retrieved: age, gender, American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status, surgical approach, preoperative hydronephrosis, stage, grade, tumor location, surgical margin, lymphovascular invasion (LVI) status and outcomes. Metastasis-free survival (MFS) was measured by Kaplan-Meier method with the log-rank test. Overall, 151 patients were included. The median follow-up was 18.5 months (IQR 9.5-37.9). The 2- and 5-year MFS were 69 % ± 4.5 and 54.1 % ± 5.8, respectively. In univariate analysis, ureteral location, pT3 stage, positive LVI status and positive surgical margin were significantly associated with worse MFS (p = 0.03; 0.02; 0.01 and 0.006, respectively). In the multivariate analysis of ureteral location and pT3 stage were independent prognostic factors (p = 0.03 and 0.03, respectively). Based on the results of the univariate analysis, we proposed a risk model predicting MFS, which classifies patients into 3 categories with different overall survival (p < 0.001). In view of our data, tumor location, T stage, LVI and surgical margin status are mandatory to predict survival in case of RN without LN. Contingent upon external validation, our risk model based on these variables could be useful to provide relevant information concerning metastasis relapse probability and necessity of close follow-up for these patients.

  13. Invasive mycoses: diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Despite the availability of newer antifungal drugs, outcomes for patients with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) continue to be poor, in large part due to delayed diagnosis and initiation of appropriate antifungal therapy. Standard histopathologic diagnostic techniques are often untenable in at-risk patients, and culture-based diagnostics typically are too insensitive or nonspecific, or provide results after too long a delay for optimal IFI management. Newer surrogate markers of IFIs with improved sensitivity and specificity are needed to enable earlier diagnosis and, ideally, to provide prognostic information and/or permit therapeutic monitoring. Surrogate assays should also be accessible and easy to implement in the hospital. Several nonculture-based assays of newer surrogates are making their way into the medical setting or are currently under investigation. These new or up-and-coming surrogates include antigens/antibodies (mannan and antimannan antibodies) or fungal metabolites (d-arabinitol) for detection of invasive candidiasis, the Aspergillus cell wall component galactomannan used to detect invasive aspergillosis, or the fungal cell wall component and panfungal marker β-glucan. In addition, progress continues with use of polymerase chain reaction- or other nucleic acid- or molecular-based assays for diagnosis of either specific or generic IFIs, although the various methods must be better standardized before any of these approaches can be more fully implemented into the medical setting. Investigators are also beginning to explore the possibility of combining newer surrogate markers with each other or with more standard diagnostic approaches to improve sensitivity, specificity, and capacity for earlier diagnosis, at a time when fungal burden is still relatively low and more responsive to antifungal therapy.

  14. Minimally invasive mediastinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Melfi, Franca M. A.; Mussi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the past, mediastinal surgery was associated with the necessity of a maximum exposure, which was accomplished through various approaches. In the early 1990s, many surgical fields, including thoracic surgery, observed the development of minimally invasive techniques. These included video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which confers clear advantages over an open approach, such as less trauma, short hospital stay, increased cosmetic results and preservation of lung function. However, VATS is associated with several disadvantages. For this reason, it is not routinely performed for resection of mediastinal mass lesions, especially those located in the anterior mediastinum, a tiny and remote space that contains vital structures at risk of injury. Robotic systems can overcome the limits of VATS, offering three-dimensional (3D) vision and wristed instrumentations, and are being increasingly used. With regards to thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG), unilateral and bilateral VATS approaches have demonstrated good long-term neurologic results with low complication rates. Nevertheless, some authors still advocate the necessity of maximum exposure, especially when considering the distribution of normal and ectopic thymic tissue. In recent studies, the robotic approach has shown to provide similar neurological outcomes when compared to transsternal and VATS approaches, and is associated with a low morbidity. Importantly, through a unilateral robotic technique, it is possible to dissect and remove at least the same amount of mediastinal fat tissue. Preliminary results on early-stage thymomatous disease indicated that minimally invasive approaches are safe and feasible, with a low rate of pleural recurrence, underlining the necessity of a “no-touch” technique. However, especially for thymomatous disease characterized by an indolent nature, further studies with long follow-up period are necessary in order to assess oncologic and neurologic results through minimally

  15. Minimally invasive parathyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, Salem I.; Gooi, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, bilateral cervical exploration for localization of all four parathyroid glands and removal of any that are grossly enlarged has been the standard surgical treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). With the advances in preoperative localization studies and greater public demand for less invasive procedures, novel targeted, minimally invasive techniques to the parathyroid glands have been described and practiced over the past 2 decades. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) can be done either through the standard Kocher incision, a smaller midline incision, with video assistance (purely endoscopic and video-assisted techniques), or through an ectopically placed, extracervical, incision. In current practice, once PHPT is diagnosed, preoperative evaluation using high-resolution radiographic imaging to localize the offending parathyroid gland is essential if MIP is to be considered. The imaging study results suggest where the surgeon should begin the focused procedure and serve as a road map to allow tailoring of an efficient, imaging-guided dissection while eliminating the unnecessary dissection of multiple glands or a bilateral exploration. Intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH) levels may be measured during the procedure, or a gamma probe used during radioguided parathyroidectomy, to ascertain that the correct gland has been excised and that no other hyperfunctional tissue is present. MIP has many advantages over the traditional bilateral, four-gland exploration. MIP can be performed using local anesthesia, requires less operative time, results in fewer complications, and offers an improved cosmetic result and greater patient satisfaction. Additional advantages of MIP are earlier hospital discharge and decreased overall associated costs. This article aims to address the considerations for accomplishing MIP, including the role of preoperative imaging studies, intraoperative adjuncts, and surgical techniques. PMID:26425454

  16. Bioterrorism and invasive species.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B B; Sun, B

    2010-08-01

    The risk of dispersing invasive species, especially human pathogens, through acts of bioterrorism, cannot be neglected. However, that risk appears quite low in comparison with the risk of dispersing animal pathogens that could dramatically burden the agricultural economy of food animal producing countries, such as Australia and countries in Europe and North and South America. Although it is not directly related to bioterrorism, the intentional release of non-native species, particularly undesired companion animals or wildlife, may also have a major economic impact on the environment and, possibly, on animal and human health, in the case of accidental release of zoonotic agents.

  17. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Alaric W.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971;47:1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  18. Invasive and minimally invasive surgical techniques for back pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, William; Carl, Allen; Lavelle, Elizabeth Demers

    2007-12-01

    This article summarizes current issues related to invasive and minimally invasive surgical techniques for back pain conditions. It describes pain generators and explains theories about how discs fail. The article discusses techniques for treating painful sciatica, painful motion segments, and spinal stenosis. Problems related to current imaging are also presented. The article concludes with a discussion about physical therapy.

  19. The interference of Notch1 target Hes1 affects cell growth, differentiation and invasiveness of glioblastoma stem cells through modulation of multiple oncogenic targets.

    PubMed

    Cenciarelli, Carlo; Marei, Hany E; Zonfrillo, Manuela; Casalbore, Patrizia; Felsani, Armando; Giannetti, Stefano; Trevisi, Gianluca; Althani, Asma; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2017-02-02

    The invasive and lethal nature of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) necessitates the continuous identification of molecular targets and search of efficacious therapies to inhibit GBM growth. The GBM resistance to chemotherapy and radiation it is attributed to the existence of a rare fraction of cancer stem cells (CSC) that we have identified within the tumor core and in peritumor tissue of GBM. Since Notch1 pathway is a potential therapeutic target in brain cancer, earlier we highlighted that pharmacological inhibition of Notch1 signalling by γ-secretase inhibitor-X (GSI-X), reduced cell growth of some c-CSC than to their respective p-CSC, but produced negligible effects on cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and cell invasion. In the current study, we assessed the effects of Hes1-targeted shRNA, a Notch1 gene target, specifically on GBM CSC refractory to GSI-X. Depletion of Hes1 protein induces major changes in cell morphology, cell growth rate and in the invasive ability of shHes1-CSC in response to growth factor EGF. shHes1-CSC show a decrease of the stemness marker Nestin concurrently to a marked increase of neuronal marker MAP2 compared to pLKO.1-CSC. Those effects correlated with repression of EGFR protein and modulation of Stat3 phosphorylation at Y705 and S727 residues. In the last decade Stat3 has gained attention as therapeutic target in cancer but there is not yet any approved Stat3-based glioma therapy. Herein, we report that exposure to a Stat3/5 inhibitor, induced apoptosis either in shHes1-CSC or control cells. Taken together, Hes1 seems to be a favorable target but not sufficient itself to target GBM efficaciously, therefore a possible pharmacological intervention should provide for the use of anti-Stat3/5 drugs either alone or in combination regimen.

  20. Metachronous adenoma on ileorectal anastomosis suture line and submucosal deep invasive cancer suspected of rapid growth in rectal remnant following long-term interval after curative surgery for advanced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Uraoka, Toshio; Horii, Joichiro; Goto, Osamu; Shimoda, Masayuki; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2013-05-01

    There is general agreement as to the value of postoperative surveillance and the effectiveness of colonoscopy in the early detection of metachronous colorectal lesions. In the present case, a 56-year-old woman with no family history of colon cancer underwent surveillance colonoscopy in which a metachronous flat adenoma was detected following an interval of 23 years after a colectomy and 20 years subsequent to treatment for uterine cancer. A second metachronous flat lesion histopathologically determined to be a submucosal (sm) deep invasive cancer with lymphovascular involvement was detected 12 months later. This second metachronous lesion was suspected of having developed rapidly in the rectal remnant accounting for its sm deep invasion. The findings of this case suggest colonoscopy surveillance guidelines proposed for individuals at high risk should be evaluated based on cancer history and an analysis of possible mismatch repair gene mutations. In addition, the first metachronous lesion was located directly on the suture line of the anastomosis. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was indicated despite severe fibrosis into the sm layer. This case also demonstrates the successful use of improved ESD instruments, sm injection agents and technique refinements in the treatment of a technically difficult lesion with a high risk of complications.

  1. Dietary Flexibility Aids Asian Earthworm Invasion in North American Forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    On a local scale, invasiveness of introduced species and invasibility of habitats together determine invasion success. A key issue in invasion ecology has been how to quantify the contribution of species invasiveness and habitat invasibility separately. Conventional approaches, s...

  2. Dietary Flexibility Aids Asian Earthworm Invasion in North American Forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    On a local scale, invasiveness of introduced species and invasibility of habitats together determine invasion success. A key issue in invasion ecology has been how to quantify the contribution of species invasiveness and habitat invasibility separately. Conventional approaches, s...

  3. Transanal Minimally Invasive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    deBeche-Adams, Teresa; Nassif, George

    2015-01-01

    Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was first described in 2010 as a crossover between single-incision laparoscopic surgery and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) to allow access to the proximal and mid-rectum for resection of benign and early-stage malignant rectal lesions. The TAMIS technique can also be used for noncurative intent surgery of more advanced lesions in patients who are not candidates for radical surgery. Proper workup and staging should be done before surgical decision-making. In addition to the TAMIS port, instrumentation and set up include readily available equipment found in most operating suites. TAMIS has proven its usefulness in a wide range of applications outside of local excision, including repair of rectourethral fistula, removal of rectal foreign body, control of rectal hemorrhage, and as an adjunct in total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer. TAMIS is an easily accessible, technically feasible, and cost-effective alternative to TEM. PMID:26491410

  4. Defining an invasive species.

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P P

    2010-04-01

    The definition of an invasive species will depend on the viewpoint of the observer, who in some cases may be responsible for introducing the species. History has taught us that humans are the species that has invaded the largest surface area of the planet. So, before going on to propose a few definitions, this article describes three different examples or types of example in which domestic animal species, wild animal species and microorganisms (for biological pest control) have been transported intentionally. By doing so, this paper uses a variety of situations to support the definitions. A contemporary argument would counter a strictly biogeographical definition with a more ecological definition. The two are probably complementary. In any case, these definitions should remain practical. The consequences of species movements vary. However, their health impacts should not be underestimated.

  5. Minimally invasive esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Herbella, Fernando A; Patti, Marco G

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal resection is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) might theoretically decrease this rate. We reviewed the current literature on MIE, with a focus on the available techniques, outcomes and comparison with open surgery. This review shows that the available literature on MIE is still crowded with heterogeneous studies with different techniques. There are no controlled and randomized trials, and the few retrospective comparative cohort studies are limited by small numbers of patients and biased by historical controls of open surgery. Based on the available literature, there is no evidence that MIE brings clear benefits compared to conventional esophagectomy. Increasing experience and the report of larger series might change this scenario. PMID:20698044

  6. Minimally invasive valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph; Seeburger, Joerg; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2007-01-01

    As alternatives to standard sternotomy, surgeons have developed innovative, minimally invasive approaches to conducting valve surgery. Through very small skin incisions and partial upper sternal division for aortic valve surgery and right minithoracotomy for mitral surgery, surgeons have become adept at performing complex valve procedures. Beyond cosmetic appeal, apparent benefits range from decreased pain and bleeding to improved respiratory function and recovery time. The large retrospective studies and few small prospective randomized studies are herein briefly summarized. The focus is then directed toward describing specific intraoperative technical details in current clinical use, covering anesthetic preparation, incision, mediastinal access, cardiovascular cannulation, valve exposure, and valve reconstruction. Finally, unique situations such as pulmonic valve surgery, reoperations, beating heart surgery, and robotics are discussed.

  7. [Invasive gastroenteritis, anything new?].

    PubMed

    Echeita Sarrionandia, M Aurora; León, Silvia Herrera; Baamonde, Cristina Simón

    2011-03-01

    Invasive gastroenteritis is characterized by fever and inflammatory diarrhea and can be caused by nontyphoideal Salmonella serotypes and Shigella spp.-enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), among other pathogens. This review describes emerging monophasic variants of Salmonella enterica serotype 1,4,[5],12:i:- and provides an evolutionary consideration of Shigella spp.-EIEC as a single pathotype. In 1997, a monophasic variant of S. enterica serotype 1,4,[5],12:i:-, phage-type U302, multidrug resistant (ACGSSuTSxT), lacking the fljBA operon, appeared in Spain constituting a "Spanish" clonal line. Subsequently, strains of S. 4[5],12:i:-, of different phage types with a new resistance genomic island (ASSuT) were detected in Italy, forming part of a European clonal line. Finally, an "American" clonal line with a deletion of fljBA different from the Spanish clonal line appeared. Therefore, probably by convergent evolution, different clonal lines of Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:-, which can carry resistance genes on chromosomes or plasmids, with Salmonella Typhimurium as ancestor, have emerged in the world. Although Shigella belongs to the E. coli species and despite the biological inconsistency involved, this genus has traditionally been considered to cause bacillary dysentery. The EIEC group shares virulence mechanisms and clinical manifestations with Shigella. Both lack some metabolic genes and harbor similar plasmids of invasion. Shigella spp. and EIEC evolved from independent clonal lines of E. coli, by horizontal acquisition of virulence factors, forming a single pathotype. IpaH gene detection is an alternative to attribute the corresponding pathogenic role to non-agglutinable strains that are biochemically compatible with Shigella spp.

  8. Integrated assessment of biological invasions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As the main annalists of the ecological and economic impacts of invasions on ecosystems around the world, ecologists should be able to provide information that can guide management practices. Managers often want to know about the potential for invasion of specific organisms in the sites under their ...

  9. Earthworm invasions in the tropics

    Treesearch

    Grizelle Gonzalez; Ching Yu Huang; Xiaoming Zou; Carlos Rodriguez

    2006-01-01

    The effects and implications of invasive species in belowground terrestrial ecosystems are not well known in comparison with aboveground terrestrial and marine environments. The study of earthworm invasions in the tropics is limited by a lack of taxonomic knowledge and the potential for loss of species in native habitats due to anthropogenic land use change. Alteration...

  10. Spread dynamics of invasive species.

    PubMed

    Arim, Matías; Abades, Sebastián R; Neill, Paula E; Lima, Mauricio; Marquet, Pablo A

    2006-01-10

    Species invasions are a principal component of global change, causing large losses in biodiversity as well as economic damage. Invasion theory attempts to understand and predict invasion success and patterns of spread. However, there is no consensus regarding which species or community attributes enhance invader success or explain spread dynamics. Experimental and theoretical studies suggest that regulation of spread dynamics is possible; however, the conditions for its existence have not yet been empirically demonstrated. If invasion spread is a regulated process, the structure that accounts for this regulation will be a main determinant of invasion dynamics. Here we explore the existence of regulation underlying changes in the rate of new site colonization. We employ concepts and analytical tools from the study of abundance dynamics and show that spread dynamics are, in fact, regulated processes and that the regulation structure is notably consistent among invasions occurring in widely different contexts. We base our conclusions on the analysis of the spread dynamics of 30 species invasions, including birds, amphibians, fish, invertebrates, plants, and a virus, all of which exhibited similar regulation structures. In contrast to current beliefs that species invasions are idiosyncratic phenomena, here we provide evidence that general patterns do indeed exist.

  11. Spread dynamics of invasive species

    PubMed Central

    Arim, Matías; Abades, Sebastián R.; Neill, Paula E.; Lima, Mauricio; Marquet, Pablo A.

    2006-01-01

    Species invasions are a principal component of global change, causing large losses in biodiversity as well as economic damage. Invasion theory attempts to understand and predict invasion success and patterns of spread. However, there is no consensus regarding which species or community attributes enhance invader success or explain spread dynamics. Experimental and theoretical studies suggest that regulation of spread dynamics is possible; however, the conditions for its existence have not yet been empirically demonstrated. If invasion spread is a regulated process, the structure that accounts for this regulation will be a main determinant of invasion dynamics. Here we explore the existence of regulation underlying changes in the rate of new site colonization. We employ concepts and analytical tools from the study of abundance dynamics and show that spread dynamics are, in fact, regulated processes and that the regulation structure is notably consistent among invasions occurring in widely different contexts. We base our conclusions on the analysis of the spread dynamics of 30 species invasions, including birds, amphibians, fish, invertebrates, plants, and a virus, all of which exhibited similar regulation structures. In contrast to current beliefs that species invasions are idiosyncratic phenomena, here we provide evidence that general patterns do indeed exist. PMID:16387862

  12. A three-tier classification system based on the depth of submucosal invasion and budding/sprouting can improve the treatment strategy for T1 colorectal cancer: a retrospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, Hiroshi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Ueno, Hideki; Nemoto, Tetsuo; Fujimori, Takahiro; Iwashita, Akinori; Ajioka, Yoichi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Ishiguro, Shingo; Shimoda, Tadakazu; Mochizuki, Hidetaka; Kato, Yo; Watanabe, Hidenobu; Koike, Morio; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2015-06-01

    More than 85% of patients with T1 colorectal cancer have no lymph node metastasis and can be cured by endoscopic resection. To avoid unnecessary surgery after complete endoscopic resection, accurate histologic methods for evaluating resected specimens are needed to discriminate those at high risk for lymph node metastasis. A retrospective multi-institutional, cross-sectional study of 806 T1 colorectal cancer patients was conducted. A budding/sprouting score was incorporated for predicting lymph node metastasis in addition to other parameters, including the depth of submucosal invasion, histologic grade, and lymphovascular invasion. Lymph node metastasis was detected in 97 patients. Independent predictors of lymph node metastasis by multivariate analysis were depth of submucosal invasion ≥1000 μm (odds ratio (95% confidence interval)=5.56 (2.14-19.10)) and high-grade budding/sprouting (3.14 (1.91-5.21)). Among lesions with a depth of submucosal invasion ≥1000 μm, lymph node metastasis was detected in 59 (29%) of 207 patients with high-grade budding/sprouting, and in 34 (9%) of 396 with low-grade budding/sprouting. Lymph node metastasis was detected in only 4 (2%) of 203 lesions with a depth of submucosal invasion <1000 μm. Of these four tumors, three invaded lymphatic and/or venous vessels. Thus, the risk for lymph node metastasis can be classified into three groups: high risk with a depth of submucosal invasion ≥1000 μm and high-grade budding/sprouting, intermediate-risk with a depth of submucosal invasion ≥1000 μm and low-grade budding/sprouting, and low-risk with a depth of submucosal invasion <1000 μm. These findings revealed that a depth of submucosal invasion ≥1000 μm and high-grade budding/sprouting are powerful predictive parameters for lymph node metastasis in T1 colorectal cancer. This three-tier risk classification system will facilitate the decision for additional major surgery for T1 colorectal cancer patients after

  13. 75 FR 29359 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    .../coastal environments in the world, with over 50 invasive species that threaten the Bay's vibrant economy... within invasive species efforts, ballast water related issues, and the development of state invasive...

  14. Surface vacuolar ATPase in ameloblastoma contributes to tumor invasion of the jaw bone.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Shohei; Morita, Hiromitsu; Matsubara, Ryota; Mitsuyasu, Takeshi; Imai, Yuko; Kajioka, Shunichi; Yoneda, Masahiro; Ito, Yushi; Hirofuji, Takao; Nakamura, Seiji; Hirata, Masato

    2016-03-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common benign odontogenic tumor in Japan. It is believed that it expands in the jaw bone through peritumoral activation of osteoclasts by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) released from the ameloblastoma, as in bone metastases of cancer cells. However, the clinical features of ameloblastoma, including its growth rate and patterns of invasion, are quite different from those of bone metastasis of cancer cells, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms are involved. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying the invasive expansion of ameloblastoma in the jaw bone. Expression levels of RANKL assessed by western blotting were markedly lower in ameloblastoma (AM-1) cells than in highly metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3) cells. Experiments coculturing mouse macrophages (RAW264.7) with AM-1 demonstrated low osteoclastogenic activity, as assessed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cell formation, probably because of low release of RANKL, whereas cocultures of RAW264.7 with HSC-3 cells exhibited very high osteoclastogenic activity. Thus, RANKL release from AM-1 appeared to be too low to generate osteoclasts. However, AM-1 cultured directly on calcium phosphate-coated plates formed resorption pits, and this was inhibited by application of bafilomycin A1. Furthermore, vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) and H+/Cl- exchange transporter 7 (CLC-7) were detected on the surface of AM-1 cells by plasma membrane biotinylation and immunofluorescence analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis of clinical samples of ameloblastoma also showed plasma membrane-localized V-ATPase and CLC-7 in the epithelium of plexiform, follicular and basal cell types. The demineralization activity of AM-1 was only 1.7% of osteoclasts demineralization activity, and the growth rate was 20% of human normal skin keratinocytes and HSC-3 cells. These results suggest that the

  15. Integrated assessment of biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Ines; Diez, Jeffrey M; Miller, Luke P; Olden, Julian D; Sorte, Cascade J B; Blumenthal, Dana M; Bradley, Bethany A; D'Antonio, Carla M; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Early, Regan I; Grosholz, Edwin D; Lawler, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    As the main witnesses of the ecological and economic impacts of invasions on ecosystems around the world, ecologists seek to provide the relevant science that informs managers about the potential for invasion of specific organisms in their region(s) of interest. Yet, the assorted literature that could inform such forecasts is rarely integrated to do so, and further, the diverse nature of the data available complicates synthesis and quantitative prediction. Here we present a set of analytical tools for synthesizing different levels of distributional and/or demographic data to produce meaningful assessments of invasion potential that can guide management at multiple phases of ongoing invasions, from dispersal to colonization to proliferation. We illustrate the utility of data-synthesis and data-model assimilation approaches with case studies of three well-known invasive species--a vine, a marine mussel, and a freshwater crayfish--under current and projected future climatic conditions. Results from the integrated assessments reflect the complexity of the invasion process and show that the most relevant climatic variables can have contrasting effects or operate at different intensities across habitat types. As a consequence, for two of the study species climate trends will increase the likelihood of invasion in some habitats and decrease it in others. Our results identified and quantified both bottlenecks and windows of opportunity for invasion, mainly related to the role of human uses of the landscape or to disruption of the flow of resources. The approach we describe has a high potential to enhance model realism, explanatory insight, and predictive capability, generating information that can inform management decisions and optimize phase-specific prevention and control efforts for a wide range of biological invasions.

  16. Chick heart invasion assay.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Marc E; Parmar, Virinder S; Depass, Anthony L; Stevens, Christian V; Vanhoecke, Barbara W; Mareel, Marc M

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are microecosystems in which a continuous cross talk between cancer cells and host cells decides on the invasive behavior of the tumor cell population as a whole (Mareel et al., Encyclopedia of cancer, San Diego, CA, Academic Press, 1997). Both compartments secrete activating and inhibitory factors that modulate activities such as cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction, cell-cell adhesion, remodeling of the ECM, and cell motility. For this reason, confrontations of cancer cells with a living normal host tissue in organ culture have been introduced by several groups: Wolff and Schneider in France (Wolff and Schneider, C R S Soc Biol (Paris) 151:1291-1292, 1957), Easty and Easty in the United Kingdom (Easty and Easty, Nature 199:1104-1105, 1963), and Schleich in Germany (Schleich et al., J Natl Cancer Inst 56:221-237, 1976). Embryonic chick heart fragments in organ culture maintain many histological features of their tissue of origin: They are composed of myocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, and their ECM contains fibronectin, laminin, and several collagen types. Moreover, the fragments remain contractile, and this activity allows the monitoring of their functional integrity during organ culture.

  17. Neonatal invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Stronati, M; Decembrino, L

    2006-12-01

    Over the last two decades, systemic fungal infections have emerged to play a primary role in hospital-acquired infections. C. albicans is involved in 75% of neonatal candidiasis; however, the incidence of infection from C. parapsilosis is also increasing significantly. The higher incidence observed in the high-risk group of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants is linked to their special physical characteristics and the diagnostic and therapeutic invasive procedures they undergo. Colonization is a relevant risk factor depending on the colonized site , the fungal species and the type of colonization. Serological tests have a low specificity and sensitivity; in many cases, they do not distinguish between colonization and infection. Blood culture, although the best diagnostic test for determining systemic infection, can result negative, even in cases of deep organ involvement. In addition, fungi grow more slowly than bacteria in cultures. So, the difficulty in diagnosing systemic candidiasis and its aspecific clinical features may make empirical therapy appropriate. Amphotericin B (AmB) alone or combined with 5-fluorocytosine remains the drug of choice. Fluconazole represents a valid alternative. Recently developed new formulations of amphotericin incapsulated in liposomes can avoid possible adverse effects. Prognosis depends on the specific micro-organism involved; mortality is higher in the presence of C. albicans. As prognosis is associated with high mortality, prevention measures to reduce risk factors are of critical importance.

  18. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery.

  19. Genital invasion or perigenital spread may pose a risk of marginal misses for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Julia; Lohr, Frank; Buergy, Daniel; Büsing, Karen; Trunk, Marcus J; Wenz, Frederik; Mai, Sabine

    2016-04-04

    While intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in anal cancer is feasible and improves high-dose conformality, the current RTOG/AGITG contouring atlas and planning guidelines lack specific instructions on how to proceed with external genitalia. Meanwhile, the RTOG-Protocol 0529 explicitly recommends genital sparing on the basis of specific genital dose constraints. Recent pattern-of-relapse studies based on conventional techniques suggest that marginal miss might be a potential consequence of genital sparing. Our goal is to outline the potential scope and increase the awareness for this clinical issue. We present and discuss four patients with perigenital spread in anal cancer in both early and advanced stages (three at time of first diagnosis and one in form of relapse). Genital/perigenital spread was observed once as direct genital infiltration and thrice in form of perigenital lymphatic spread. We review the available data regarding the potential consequences of genital sparing in anal cancer. Pattern-of-relapse studies in anal cancer after conventional radiotherapy and the current use of IMRT in anal cancer are equivocal but suggest that genital sparing may occasionally result in marginal miss. An obvious hypothesis suggested by our report is that perigenital lymphovascular invasion might be associated with manifest inguinal N+ disease. Local failure has low salvage rates in recent anal cancer treatment series. Perigenital spread may pose a risk of marginal misses in IMRT in anal cancer. To prevent marginal misses, meticulous pattern-of-relapse analyses of controlled IMRT-series are warranted. Until their publication, genital sparing should be applied with caution, PET/CT should be used when possible and meeting genital dose constraints should not be prioritized over CTV coverage, especially (but not only) in stage T3/4 and N+ disease.

  20. Cheatgrass invasion and wildlife habitat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The introduction and subsequent invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) has altered native plant communities and the wildlife species that depend on these communities. Cheatgrass has truncated secondary succession by outcompeting native plant species for limited resources, thus building persistent...

  1. Invasiveness, chimerism and genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shlomo, Rachel

    2017-09-26

    Adaptation for invasiveness should comprise the capability to exploit and prosper in a wide range of ecological conditions, and is therefore expected to be associated with a certain level of genetic diversity. Paradoxically, however, invasive populations are established by only a few founders, resulting in low genetic diversity. As a conceivable way of attaining high genetic diversity and high variance of gene expression even when a small number of founders is involved in invasiveness, I suggest here chimerism, a fusion between different individuals-a common phenomenon found in numerous phyla. The composite entity offers the chimeric organism genetic flexibility and higher inclusive fitness that depends on the joint genomic fitness of the original partners. The ability to form a chimeric entity is also applied to subsequent generations and, consequently, the level of genetic diversity does not decline over generations of population establishment following invasion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. [Non-invasive ventilation].

    PubMed

    Gallardo Romero, Jose Manuel; García, Teresa Gómez; Sancho Chust, José Norberto; González Martínez, Mónica

    2010-10-01

    The advent of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) has radically changed the management of acute and chronic respiratory failure. Over the last few years, the number of possible applications of NIMV has progressively increased, both in the hospital and extrahospital setting. NIMV is now used in all hospitals and resident physicians currently receive specific training -nonexistent until a few years ago- in this modality. It falls to all of us to push forward the clinical and scientific advances represented by the development of NIMV, by promoting the events that accompany better knowledge of the physiopathological bases of ventilation and of its continuous applications in daily clinical practice and by perfecting the elements required for the correct application of this technique. The present review aims to provide a broad overview of NIMV, from the most theoretical knowledge (the physiopathology of NIMV) to the most practical skills (recognition of patient-ventilator asynchrony). Through this progression from the complex to the most basic, or from the basics to the most complex, depending on the perspective taken, we aim to provide deeper knowledge of the concepts required to understand the technical functioning of the ventilator, describing its distinct modes and parameters and the abilities that must be developed for the correct indication, use and monitoring of the technique. We provide a final reflection on other forms of respiratory support that can be offered to patients with ventilatory failure. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Common Ground for Managing Invasive Annual Grasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasive annual grasses often reach their full biological potential in ecosystems of the western United States. This suggests that crucial ecosystem "checks and balances" are not functioning. In other words, invasion occurs because ecosystems have lost resistance to invasion, and invasive plants a...

  4. Invasive and non-invasive assessment of portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jonathan Chung-Fai; Loong, Thomson Chi-Wang; Pang, James; Wei, Jeremy Lok; Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun

    2017-03-30

    Portal hypertension is the central driver of complications in patients with chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis. The diagnosis of portal hypertension has important prognostic and clinical implications. In particular, screening for varices in patients with portal hypertension can effectively reduce the morbidity and mortality of variceal bleeding. In this article, we review the invasive and non-invasive methods to assess portal hypertension. Hepatic venous pressure gradient remains the gold standard to measure portal pressure but is invasive and seldom performed outside expert centers and research settings. In recent years, a number of non-invasive tests of fibrosis have shown good correlation with liver histology. They also show promise in identifying patients with portal hypertension and large varices. As a result, the latest Baveno VI consensus guidelines endorse the use of liver stiffness measurement by transient elastography and platelet count as initial assessment to select patients for varices screening. On the other hand, the performance of non-invasive tests in assessing the response to non-selective beta-blockers or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting is either suboptimal or unclear.

  5. Walker 256 tumour cells increase substance P immunoreactivity locally and modify the properties of the blood-brain barrier during extravasation and brain invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kate M; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Vink, Robert; Nimmo, Alan J; Ghabriel, Mounir N

    2013-01-01

    It is not yet known how tumour cells traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to form brain metastases. Substance P (SP) release is a key component of neurogenic inflammation which has been recently shown to increase the permeability of the BBB following CNS insults, making it a possible candidate as a mediator of tumour cell extravasation into the brain. This study investigated the properties of the BBB in the early stages of tumour cell invasion into the brain, and the possible involvement of SP. Male Wistar rats were injected with Walker 256 breast carcinoma cells via the internal carotid artery and euthanised at 1, 3, 6 and 9 days post tumour inoculation. Culture medium-injected animals served as controls at 1 and 9 days. Evidence of tumour cell extravasation across the BBB was first observed at 3 days post-inoculation, which corresponded with significantly increased albumin (p < 0.05) and SP immunoreactivity (p < 0.01) and significantly reduced endothelial barrier antigen labelling of microvessels when compared to culture medium control animals (p < 0.001). By day 9 after tumour cell inoculation, 100 % of animals developed large intracranial neoplasms that had significantly increased albumin in the peri-tumoral area (p < 0.001). The increased SP immunoreactivity and altered BBB properties at 3 days post-inoculation that coincided with early tumour invasion may be indicative of a mechanism for tumour cell extravasation into the brain. Thus, extravasation of tumour cells into the brain to form cerebral metastases may be a SP-mediated process.

  6. SOST Inhibits Prostate Cancer Invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Bryan D.; Hum, Nicholas R.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Kohlgruber, Ayano; Sebastian, Aimy; Collette, Nicole M.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Christiansen, Blaine A.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2015-11-06

    Inhibitors of Wnt signaling have been shown to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) metastasis; however the role of Sclerostin (Sost) has not yet been explored. Here we show that elevated Wnt signaling derived from Sost deficient osteoblasts promotes PC invasion, while rhSOST has an inhibitory effect. In contrast, rhDKK1 promotes PC elongation and filopodia formation, morphological changes characteristic of an invasive phenotype. Furthermore, rhDKK1 was found to activate canonical Wnt signaling in PC3 cells, suggesting that SOST and DKK1 have opposing roles on Wnt signaling in this context. Gene expression analysis of PC3 cells co-cultured with OBs exhibiting varying amounts of Wnt signaling identified CRIM1 as one of the transcripts upregulated under highly invasive conditions. We found CRIM1 overexpression to also promote cell-invasion. These findings suggest that bone-derived Wnt signaling may enhance PC tropism by promoting CRIM1 expression and facilitating cancer cell invasion and adhesion to bone. We concluded that SOST and DKK1 have opposing effects on PC3 cell invasion and that bone-derived Wnt signaling positively contributes to the invasive phenotypes of PC3 cells by activating CRIM1 expression and facilitating PC-OB physical interaction. As such, we investigated the effects of high concentrations of SOST in vivo. In conclusion, we found that PC3-cells overexpressing SOST injected via the tail vein in NSG mice did not readily metastasize, and those injected intrafemorally had significantly reduced osteolysis, suggesting that targeting the molecular bone environment may influence bone metastatic prognosis in clinical settings.

  7. SOST Inhibits Prostate Cancer Invasion

    DOE PAGES

    Hudson, Bryan D.; Hum, Nicholas R.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; ...

    2015-11-06

    Inhibitors of Wnt signaling have been shown to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) metastasis; however the role of Sclerostin (Sost) has not yet been explored. Here we show that elevated Wnt signaling derived from Sost deficient osteoblasts promotes PC invasion, while rhSOST has an inhibitory effect. In contrast, rhDKK1 promotes PC elongation and filopodia formation, morphological changes characteristic of an invasive phenotype. Furthermore, rhDKK1 was found to activate canonical Wnt signaling in PC3 cells, suggesting that SOST and DKK1 have opposing roles on Wnt signaling in this context. Gene expression analysis of PC3 cells co-cultured with OBs exhibiting varyingmore » amounts of Wnt signaling identified CRIM1 as one of the transcripts upregulated under highly invasive conditions. We found CRIM1 overexpression to also promote cell-invasion. These findings suggest that bone-derived Wnt signaling may enhance PC tropism by promoting CRIM1 expression and facilitating cancer cell invasion and adhesion to bone. We concluded that SOST and DKK1 have opposing effects on PC3 cell invasion and that bone-derived Wnt signaling positively contributes to the invasive phenotypes of PC3 cells by activating CRIM1 expression and facilitating PC-OB physical interaction. As such, we investigated the effects of high concentrations of SOST in vivo. In conclusion, we found that PC3-cells overexpressing SOST injected via the tail vein in NSG mice did not readily metastasize, and those injected intrafemorally had significantly reduced osteolysis, suggesting that targeting the molecular bone environment may influence bone metastatic prognosis in clinical settings.« less

  8. Management of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Brausi, M; Olaru, V

    2012-12-01

    Risk stratification is of paramount importance for the future treatment and follow-up of patients with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. Transurethral resection (TUR) is the gold standard for initial diagnosis and treatment of non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Muscle must be present in the pathological specimen in order to correctly stage the tumor. When muscle is not present, the tumor has to be staged as Tx. A second TUR done after two-six weeks of the first resection reduces the rate of tumor left behind and improves staging. Re-TUR in these patients should be considered a must. Since BCG is toxic, an attempt to reduce toxicity was made by reducing the dose. CUETO group showed that 1/3 dose BCG was as effective as full dose in intermediate risk patients but not in high risk. Another study that evaluated the efficacy of low dose BCG is the trial 30962 from EORTC. The results showed a difference of 10% in the five-years recurrence free survival only when 1/3 dose BCG for one year (54.5%) was compared to Full dose BCG for three years (64.2%) suggesting that 1/3 dose or one year full dose are suboptimal treatments. Immediate radical cystectomy should be considered for high grade, multiple T1 tumors, T1 tumors located at a site difficult to resect, residual T1 tumors after resection or high grade tumors with CIS and lymphovascular invasion. Cystoscopy and cytology must be performed at three months. In the case of negative findings, following cystoscopy and cytology assessments have to be repeated every three months for three years, and every six months thereafter until five years, and then annually. For the group of patients with initial BCG induction therapy failure that are unfit or refuse radical cystectomy or have a low or intermediate grade disease an additional course of l BCG is a choice. For patients who failed before completion of maintenance BCG, radical cystectomy has to be considered in presence of a high grade T1 or CIS. BCG

  9. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  10. Approximating spatially exclusive invasion processes.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joshua V; Binder, Benjamin J

    2014-05-01

    A number of biological processes, such as invasive plant species and cell migration, are composed of two key mechanisms: motility and reproduction. Due to the spatially exclusive interacting behavior of these processes a cellular automata (CA) model is specified to simulate a one-dimensional invasion process. Three (independence, Poisson, and 2D-Markov chain) approximations are considered that attempt to capture the average behavior of the CA. We show that our 2D-Markov chain approximation accurately predicts the state of the CA for a wide range of motility and reproduction rates.

  11. Recent Advances in Invasive Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, George J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes recent advances in invasive cardiology that enable the primary-care physician to offer his/her patient a wider range of effective treatments. Major developments in the investigation and management of the acute coronary syndromes, unstable angina and myocardial infarction, have revolutionized the care of patients with these conditions. The primary-care physician must be aware of the treatment modalities, the lines of referral, and strategies for management available in his/her clinical setting to allow prompt application of these modalities. A sampling of exciting advances in other areas of invasive cardiology are also described. PMID:21263906

  12. Bacterial invasion via lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Frank; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2005-05-01

    Accumulating reports document the use by pathogens of cholesterol-enriched lipid microdomains, often called lipid rafts, as cell surface platforms to interact, bind and possibly enter into host cells. The challenge is now to understand what could be the functional role of these domains during pathogen invasion. Are they hijacked as general clustering devices for cellular binding sites and/or do they have other roles? In particular, is their cell signalling capacity activated and used by pathogens? In reverse, could lipid rafts activate bacterial mechanisms required for invasion? These issues will be discussed after an introduction on the current view on lipid rafts.

  13. Biological Warfare in Invasive Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) is an invasive species in temperate forests throughout North America that has led to a decrease in species diversity and alterations in nutrient cycling. Garlic mustard produces an arsenal of secondary chemicals in the glucosinolate family that have strong biocid...

  14. Invasion Percolation and Global Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabási, Albert-László

    1996-05-01

    Invasion bond percolation (IBP) is mapped exactly into Prim's algorithm for finding the shortest spanning tree of a weighted random graph. Exploring this mapping, which is valid for arbitrary dimensions and lattices, we introduce a new IBP model that belongs to the same universality class as IBP and generates the minimal energy tree spanning the IBP cluster.

  15. Hybridization increases invasive knotweed success

    PubMed Central

    Parepa, Madalin; Fischer, Markus; Krebs, Christine; Bossdorf, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which rapid evolution can occur in exotic species. If hybrids show increased vigour, this could significantly contribute to invasion success. Here, we compared the success of the two invasive knotweeds, Fallopia japonica and F. sachalinensis, and their hybrid, F. × bohemica, in competing against experimental communities of native plants. Using plant material from multiple clones of each taxon collected across a latitudinal gradient in Central Europe, we found that knotweed hybrids performed significantly better in competition with a native community and that they more strongly reduced the growth of the native plants. One of the parental species, F. sachalinensis, regenerated significantly less well from rhizomes, and this difference disappeared if activated carbon was added to the substrate, which suggests allelopathic inhibition of F. sachalinensis regeneration by native plants. We found substantial within-taxon variation in competitive success in all knotweed taxa, but variation was generally greatest in the hybrid. Interestingly, there was also significant variation within the genetically uniform F. japonica, possibly reflecting epigenetic differences. Our study shows that invasive knotweed hybrids are indeed more competitive than their parents and that hybridization increased the invasiveness of the exotic knotweed complex. PMID:24665343

  16. Vaccines against invasive Salmonella disease

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A; Martin, Laura B; Micoli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Though primarily enteric pathogens, Salmonellae are responsible for a considerable yet under-appreciated global burden of invasive disease. In South and South-East Asia, this manifests as enteric fever caused by serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. In sub-Saharan Africa, a similar disease burden results from invasive nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The existing Ty21a live-attenuated and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines target S. Typhi and are not effective in young children where the burden of invasive Salmonella disease is highest. After years of lack of investment in new Salmonella vaccines, recent times have seen increased interest in the area led by emerging-market manufacturers, global health vaccine institutes and academic partners. New glycoconjugate vaccines against S. Typhi are becoming available with similar vaccines against other invasive serovars in development. With other new vaccines under investigation, including live-attenuated, protein-based and GMMA vaccines, now is an exciting time for the Salmonella vaccine field. PMID:24804797

  17. Advertising and Invasion of Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    The right of privacy as it relates to advertising and the use of a person's name or likeness is discussed in this paper. After an introduction that traces some of the history of invasion of privacy in court decisions, the paper examines cases involving issues such as public figures and newsworthy items, right of privacy waived, right of privacy…

  18. Managing acute invasive fungal sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Dwyhalo, Kristina M; Donald, Carrlene; Mendez, Anthony; Hoxworth, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acute invasive fungal sinusitis is the most aggressive form of fungal sinusitis and can be fatal, especially in patients who are immunosuppressed. Early diagnosis and intervention are crucial and potentially lifesaving, so primary care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion for this disease. Patients may need to be admitted to the hospital for IV antifungal therapy and surgical debridement.

  19. Evolutionary origins of invasive populations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Carol Eunmi; Gelembiuk, Gregory William

    2008-01-01

    What factors shape the evolution of invasive populations? Recent theoretical and empirical studies suggest that an evolutionary history of disturbance might be an important factor. This perspective presents hypotheses regarding the impact of disturbance on the evolution of invasive populations, based on a synthesis of the existing literature. Disturbance might select for life-history traits that are favorable for colonizing novel habitats, such as rapid population growth and persistence. Theoretical results suggest that disturbance in the form of fluctuating environments might select for organismal flexibility, or alternatively, the evolution of evolvability. Rapidly fluctuating environments might favor organismal flexibility, such as broad tolerance or plasticity. Alternatively, longer fluctuations or environmental stress might lead to the evolution of evolvability by acting on features of the mutation matrix. Once genetic variance is generated via mutations, temporally fluctuating selection across generations might promote the accumulation and maintenance of genetic variation. Deeper insights into how disturbance in native habitats affects evolutionary and physiological responses of populations would give us greater capacity to predict the populations that are most likely to tolerate or adapt to novel environments during habitat invasions. Moreover, we would gain fundamental insights into the evolutionary origins of invasive populations. PMID:25567726

  20. Locally invasive primary splenic angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hasiloglu, Zehra Isik; Metin, Duygu Yegul; Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Havan, Nuri

    2010-12-01

    Primary angiosarcoma of the spleen is a very rare vascular neoplasm, but it represents the most common non-hematolymphoid malignant tumor of the spleen. In this report, we present the case of a 48-year-old man with primary splenic angiosarcoma with local invasion to the left diaphragm and the radiological imaging findings for this cancer.

  1. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  2. What is minimally invasive dentistry?

    PubMed

    Ericson, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Minimally Invasive Dentistry is the application of "a systematic respect for the original tissue." This implies that the dental profession recognizes that an artifact is of less biological value than the original healthy tissue. Minimally invasive dentistry is a concept that can embrace all aspects of the profession. The common delineator is tissue preservation, preferably by preventing disease from occurring and intercepting its progress, but also removing and replacing with as little tissue loss as possible. It does not suggest that we make small fillings to restore incipient lesions or surgically remove impacted third molars without symptoms as routine procedures. The introduction of predictable adhesive technologies has led to a giant leap in interest in minimally invasive dentistry. The concept bridges the traditional gap between prevention and surgical procedures, which is just what dentistry needs today. The evidence-base for survival of restorations clearly indicates that restoring teeth is a temporary palliative measure that is doomed to fail if the disease that caused the condition is not addressed properly. Today, the means, motives and opportunities for minimally invasive dentistry are at hand, but incentives are definitely lacking. Patients and third parties seem to be convinced that the only things that count are replacements. Namely, they are prepared to pay for a filling but not for a procedure that can help avoid having one.

  3. A proposal for a TNM staging system for extramammary Paget disease: Retrospective analysis of 301 patients with invasive primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Kuniaki; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Kiyohara, Yoshio; Kadono, Takafumi; Murata, Yozo; Uhara, Hisashi; Hatta, Naohito; Uchi, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Shigeto; Takenouchi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-09-01

    Although extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) usually appears as carcinoma in situ, it sometimes becomes invasive (iEMPD) and fatal. However, a TNM staging system for iEMPD has yet to be established. The aim of this study was to establish a TNM staging system for iEMPD. We retrospectively collected iEMPD patients treated at 12 institutes in Japan. Factors reported to be associated with survival such as distant metastasis, lymph node (LN) metastasis, and primary tumor status were evaluated using the log-rank test. We enrolled 301 iEMPD patients, of whom 114 had remote metastases (49 had both distant and LN metastasis; 2, distant metastasis only; and 63, LN metastasis only) and the remaining 187 patients had no remote metastasis. Distant metastasis (M1) showed worse survival (P<0.00001). In the analysis of the 250 patients without distant metastasis, LN metastasis also showed worse survival (P<0.00001). Among the patients with LN metastasis, 2 or more LN metastases (N2) showed worse survival than did single LN metastasis (N1, P=0.02). Lastly, in the analysis of the 187 patients without metastasis, tumor thickness of over 4mm or lymphovascular invasion showed worse survival (T2, P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively). Patients with neither of these features were defined as T1. From these results, we propose this TNM staging system: stage I, T1N0M0; stage II, T2N0M0; stage IIIa, anyTN1M0; stage IIIb, anyTN2M0; stage IV, anyTanyNM1. Other than stages II and IIIa, each stage had a statistically distinct survival curve. We propose a TNM staging system for EMPD using simple factors for classification that could provide important prognostic information in managing EMPD. However, accumulation of more patient data and further revision of the system are required. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A meta-analysis of trait differences between invasive and non-invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    van Kleunen, Mark; Weber, Ewald; Fischer, Markus

    2010-02-01

    A major aim in ecology is identifying determinants of invasiveness. We performed a meta-analysis of 117 field or experimental-garden studies that measured pair-wise trait differences of a total of 125 invasive and 196 non-invasive plant species in the invasive range of the invasive species. We tested whether invasiveness is associated with performance-related traits (physiology, leaf-area allocation, shoot allocation, growth rate, size and fitness), and whether such associations depend on type of study and on biogeographical or biological factors. Overall, invasive species had significantly higher values than non-invasive species for all six trait categories. More trait differences were significant for invasive vs. native comparisons than for invasive vs. non-invasive alien comparisons. Moreover, for comparisons between invasive species and native species that themselves are invasive elsewhere, no trait differences were significant. Differences in physiology and growth rate were larger in tropical regions than in temperate regions. Trait differences did not depend on whether the invasive alien species originates from Europe, nor did they depend on the test environment. We conclude that invasive alien species had higher values for those traits related to performance than non-invasive species. This suggests that it might become possible to predict future plant invasions from species traits.

  5. A functional trait perspective on plant invasion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Global environmental change affects exotic plant invasions, which profoundly impact native plant populations, communities and ecosystems. In this context, we review plant functional traits, including those that drive invader abundance (invasiveness), and impacts, as well as the integration of these...

  6. The progress of interdisciplinarity in invasion science.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Ana S; Kueffer, Christoph; Kull, Christian A; Richardson, David M; Schindler, Stefan; Muñoz-Pajares, A Jesús; Vicente, Joana R; Martins, João; Hui, Cang; Kühn, Ingolf; Honrado, João P

    2017-02-01

    Interdisciplinarity is needed to gain knowledge of the ecology of invasive species and invaded ecosystems, and of the human dimensions of biological invasions. We combine a quantitative literature review with a qualitative historical narrative to document the progress of interdisciplinarity in invasion science since 1950. Our review shows that 92.4% of interdisciplinary publications (out of 9192) focus on ecological questions, 4.4% on social ones, and 3.2% on social-ecological ones. The emergence of invasion science out of ecology might explain why interdisciplinarity has remained mostly within the natural sciences. Nevertheless, invasion science is attracting social-ecological collaborations to understand ecological challenges, and to develop novel approaches to address new ideas, concepts, and invasion-related questions between scholars and stakeholders. We discuss ways to reframe invasion science as a field centred on interlinked social-ecological dynamics to bring science, governance and society together in a common effort to deal with invasions.

  7. 75 FR 69698 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    .... The full ISAC will also consider a white paper entitled, Invasive Species and Climate Change, as drafted by the ISAC Task Team on Climate Change. DATES: Meeting of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee...

  8. Council Coordination of Federal Invasive Species Efforts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Chris Dionigi, Assistant Director, Domestic Policy National Invasive Species Council Coordination of Federal Invasive Species Efforts Report...REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CouncilCoordination of Federal Invasive Species Efforts 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...ADDRESS(ES) National Invasive Species Council (NISC) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS

  9. Invasive versus non-invasive diagnosis of renal bone disease.

    PubMed

    Fournier, A; Oprisiu, R; Said, S; Sechet, A; Ghazali, A; Marié, A; el Esper, I; Brazier, M; Achard, J M; Morinière, P

    1997-07-01

    At present, bone histomorphometry remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of the various types of renal bone disease. In the search for a non-invasive method of diagnosis, biochemical serum markers of bone remodelling, in addition to serum intact parathyroid hormone and aluminium determinations, have been proposed as the most reliable tools and are at present widely used in clinical practice. Their respective diagnostic values, as separate items and in combined analysis, are thoroughly discussed in the present review.

  10. Invasive species and climate change (Chapter 7)

    Treesearch

    Justin B. Runyon; Jack L. Butler; Megan M. Friggens; Susan E. Meyer; Sharlene E. Sing

    2012-01-01

    Invasive species present one of the greatest threats to the health and sustainability of ecosystems worldwide. Invasive plants, animals, and diseases are known to have significant negative effects on biological diversity and the ecological structure and functions of native ecosystems. Moreover, the economic cost imposed by invasive species is enormous—the damage...

  11. Cabergoline treatment in invasive giant prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically.

  12. 76 FR 30955 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive...

  13. 76 FR 68776 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-28743] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory..., notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 29 nonfederal invasive species experts and stakeholders from across the nation, the purpose of the...

  14. Plant community associations of the invasive thistles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to combat the growing problems associated with biological invasions, many researchers have focused on identifying which communities are most vulnerable to invasion by exotic species. Once established, invasive species can significantly change the composition of the communities that they inv...

  15. CONSERVATION PROGRAMS THAT PROMOTE INVASIVE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Invasive plant species are degrading the structure and function of ecosystems throughout the world. Although most state and federal conservation agencies in the U.S. attempt to reduce the impact of invasive species, some agency activities can contribute to the spread of invasive...

  16. Secondary invasion: The bane of weed management

    Treesearch

    Dean E. Pearson; Yvette K. Ortega; Justin B. Runyon; Jack L. Butler

    2016-01-01

    Exotic plant invasions present a global threat to natural ecosystems, yet the efficacy of management efforts in mitigating invader impacts remains unclear. A rapidly emerging problem is that of secondary invasion — an increase in abundance of non-target exotics following treatment of targeted invasive plants. Here, we present a global literature review and...

  17. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 5)

    Treesearch

    Dean Pearson; Yvette Ortega

    2011-01-01

    Welcome to the fifth issue of the Rocky Mountain Research Station's (RMRS) Invasive Species Science Update. The newsletter is produced by the RMRS Invasive Species Working Group (ISWG), which is a core group of scientists who volunteer to coordinate outreach of RMRS invasive species science to managers and the public. After publishing the past four newsletters, we...

  18. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 9)

    Treesearch

    Justin Runyon

    2017-01-01

    This newsletter is designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as to highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues. The newsletter is produced by the RMRS Invasive Species Working Group (ISWG), a core group of scientists who volunteer to disseminate RMRS invasive species...

  19. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 8)

    Treesearch

    Dean Pearson; Yvette Ortega; Jack Butler

    2015-01-01

    Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues. The newsletter is produced by the RMRS Invasive Species Working Group (ISWG), which is a core group of scientists who volunteer to coordinate...

  20. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 7)

    Treesearch

    Dean Pearson; Yvette Ortega; Jack Butler

    2014-01-01

    Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues. The newsletter is produced by the RMRS Invasive Species Working Group (ISWG), which is a core group of scientists who volunteer to coordinate...

  1. Do invasive plant species alter soil health?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasive species may alter soil characteristics or interact with the soil microbial community to yield a competitive advantage. Our objectives were to determine: if invasive plant species alter soil properties important to soil health; and the long-term effects of invasive plant species on soil pro...

  2. 78 FR 11899 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior... Invasive Species Advisory Committee. The document contained incorrect dates. This document corrects those.... Meeting of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (OPEN): Thursday, March 7, 2013 through Friday, March 8...

  3. CONSERVATION PROGRAMS THAT PROMOTE INVASIVE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Invasive plant species are degrading the structure and function of ecosystems throughout the world. Although most state and federal conservation agencies in the U.S. attempt to reduce the impact of invasive species, some agency activities can contribute to the spread of invasive...

  4. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 4)

    Treesearch

    Ned B. Klopfenstein; Brian W. Geils

    2010-01-01

    The fourth issue of Invasive Species Science Update has finally arrived. This newsletter has no set publication schedule, but our intent is to deliver invasive species information on a timely basis. The RMRS Invasive Species Working Group (ISWG) has been reorganized and recharged. General information on the ISWG is presented in a publication by Butler and others (2009...

  5. Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Surgery II

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, J. Alan; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Farivar, R. Saeid; Khan, Junaid H.; Hargrove, W. Clark; Moront, Michael G.; Ryan, William H.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Agnihotri, Arvind K.; Hummel, Brian W.; Fayers, Trevor M.; Grossi, Eugene A.; Guy, T. Sloane; Lehr, Eric J.; Mehall, John R.; Murphy, Douglas A.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Salemi, Arash; Segurola, Romualdo J.; Shemin, Richard J.; Smith, J. Michael; Smith, Robert L.; Weldner, Paul W.; Lewis, Clifton T. P.; Barnhart, Glenn R.; Goldman, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Techniques for minimally invasive mitral valve repair and replacement continue to evolve. This expert opinion, the second of a 3-part series, outlines current best practices for nonrobotic, minimally invasive mitral valve procedures, and for postoperative care after minimally invasive mitral valve surgery. PMID:27654406

  6. A subcontinental view of forest plant invasions

    Treesearch

    Christopher M. Oswalt; Songlin Fei; Qinfeng Guo; Basil V. Iannone III; Sonja N. Oswalt; Bryan C. Pijanowski; Kevin M. Potter

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, considerable attention has focused on small-scale studies of invasive plants and invaded systems. Unfortunately, small scale studies rarely provide comprehensive insight into the complexities of biological invasions at macroscales. Systematic and repeated monitoring of biological invasions at broad scales are rare. In this report, we...

  7. Invasive plants in 21st Century landscapes.

    Treesearch

    Valerie. Rapp

    2005-01-01

    A plant species is defined as invasive if it is nonnative to the ecosystem under consideration, and if it causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. Nonnative plant invasions are generally considered to have reached the Pacific Northwest in the mid-1800s with the arrival of European-American settlers. Invasive species such as...

  8. Invasive plant species in hardwood tree plantations

    Treesearch

    Rochelle R. Beasley; Paula M. Pijut

    2010-01-01

    Invasive plants are species that can grow and spread aggressively, mature quickly, and invade an ecosystem causing economic and environmental damage. Invasive plants usually invade disturbed areas, but can also colonize small areas quickly, and may spread and dominate large areas in a few short years. Invasive plant species displace native or desirable forest...

  9. Terrestrial animals as invasive species and as species at risk from invasions

    Treesearch

    Deborah M. Finch; Dean Pearson; Joseph Wunderle; Wayne Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Including terrestrial animal species in the invasive species strategy plan is an important step in invasive species management. Invasions by nonindigenous species threaten nearly 50 percent of imperiled native species in the United States and are the Nation's second leading cause of species endangerment. Invasion and conversion of native habitats by exotic species...

  10. Human mobility and epidemic invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria

    2010-03-01

    The current H1N1 influenza pandemic is just the latest example of how human mobility helps drive infectious diseases. Travel has grown explosively in the last decades, contributing to an emerging complex pattern of traffic flows that unfolds at different scales, shaping the spread of epidemics. Restrictions on people's mobility are thus investigated to design possible containment measures. By considering a theoretical framework in terms of reaction-diffusion processes, it is possible to study the invasion dynamics of epidemics in a metapopulation system with heterogeneous mobility patterns. The system is found to exhibit a global invasion threshold that sets the critical mobility rate below which the epidemic is contained. The results provide a general framework for the understanding of the numerical evidence from detailed data-driven simulations that show the limited benefit provided by travel flows reduction in slowing down or containing an emerging epidemic.

  11. Outcomes After Minimally Invasive Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Awais, Omar; Levy, Ryan M.; Keeley, Samuel; Shende, Manisha; Christie, Neil A.; Weksler, Benny; Landreneau, Rodney J.; Abbas, Ghulam; Schuchert, Matthew J.; Nason, Katie S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophagectomy is a complex operation and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In an attempt to lower morbidity, we have adopted a minimally invasive approach to esophagectomy. Objectives Our primary objective was to evaluate the outcomes of minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) in a large group of patients. Our secondary objective was to compare the modified McKeown minimally invasive approach (videothoracoscopic surgery, laparoscopy, neck anastomosis [MIE-neck]) with our current approach, a modified Ivor Lewis approach (laparoscopy, videothoracoscopic surgery, chest anastomosis [MIE-chest]). Methods We reviewed 1033 consecutive patients undergoing MIE. Elective operation was performed on 1011 patients; 22 patients with nonelective operations were excluded. Patients were stratified by surgical approach and perioperative outcomes analyzed. The primary endpoint studied was 30-day mortality. Results The MIE-neck was performed in 481 (48%) and MIE-Ivor Lewis in 530 (52%). Patients undergoing MIE-Ivor Lewis were operated in the current era. The median number of lymph nodes resected was 21. The operative mortality was 1.68%. Median length of stay (8 days) and ICU stay (2 days) were similar between the 2 approaches. Mortality rate was 0.9%, and recurrent nerve injury was less frequent in the Ivor Lewis MIE group (P < 0.001). Conclusions MIE in our center resulted in acceptable lymph node resection, postoperative outcomes, and low mortality using either an MIE-neck or an MIE-chest approach. The MIE Ivor Lewis approach was associated with reduced recurrent laryngeal nerve injury and mortality of 0.9% and is now our preferred approach. Minimally invasive esophagectomy can be performed safely, with good results in an experienced center. PMID:22668811

  12. Minimally invasive surgery. Future developments.

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The rapid development of minimally invasive surgery means that there will be fundamental changes in interventional treatment. Technological advances will allow new minimally invasive procedures to be developed. Application of robotics will allow some procedures to be done automatically, and coupling of slave robotic instruments with virtual reality images will allow surgeons to perform operations by remote control. Miniature motors and instruments designed by microengineering could be introduced into body cavities to perform operations that are currently impossible. New materials will allow changes in instrument construction, such as use of memory metals to make heat activated scissors or forceps. With the reduced trauma associated with minimally invasive surgery, fewer operations will require long hospital stays. Traditional surgical wards will become largely redundant, and hospitals will need to cope with increased through-put of patients. Operating theatres will have to be equipped with complex high technology equipment, and hospital staff will need to be trained to manage it. Conventional nursing care will be carried out more in the community. Many traditional specialties will be merged, and surgical training will need fundamental revision to ensure that surgeons are competent to carry out the new procedures. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:8312776

  13. Reversing invasion in bistable systems.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Ebraheem O; Davidson, Fordyce A; Dodds, Niall

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss a class of bistable reaction-diffusion systems used to model the competitive interaction of two species. The interactions are assumed to be of classic "Lotka-Volterra" type and we will consider a particular problem with relevance to applications in population dynamics: essentially, we study under what conditions the interplay of relative motility (diffusion) and competitive strength can cause waves of invasion to be halted and reversed. By establishing rigorous results concerning related degenerate and near-degenerate systems, we build a picture of the dependence of the wave speed on system parameters. Our results lead us to conjecture that this class of competition model has three "zones of response". In the central zone, varying the motility can slow, halt and reverse invasion. However, in the two outer zones, the direction of invasion is independent of the relative motility and is entirely determined by the relative competitive strengths. Furthermore, we conjecture that for a large class of competition models of the type studied here, the wave speed is an increasing function of the relative motility.

  14. Minimally invasive paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Emile; Kalfa, David

    2014-01-01

    The concept of minimally invasive surgery for congenital heart disease in paediatric patients is broad, and has the aim of reducing the trauma of the operation at each stage of management. Firstly, in the operating room using minimally invasive incisions, video-assisted thoracoscopic and robotically assisted surgery, hybrid procedures, image-guided intracardiac surgery, and minimally invasive cardiopulmonary bypass strategies. Secondly, in the intensive-care unit with neuroprotection and 'fast-tracking' strategies that involve early extubation, early hospital discharge, and less exposure to transfused blood products. Thirdly, during postoperative mid-term and long-term follow-up by providing the children and their families with adequate support after hospital discharge. Improvement of these strategies relies on the development of new devices, real-time multimodality imaging, aids to instrument navigation, miniaturized and specialized instrumentation, robotic technology, and computer-assisted modelling of flow dynamics and tissue mechanics. In addition, dedicated multidisciplinary co-ordinated teams involving congenital cardiac surgeons, perfusionists, intensivists, anaesthesiologists, cardiologists, nurses, psychologists, and counsellors are needed before, during, and after surgery to go beyond apparent technological and medical limitations with the goal to 'treat more while hurting less'.

  15. Biological invasions, ecological resilience and adaptive governance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffin, Brian C.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Angeler, David G.; Herrmann, Dustin L.; Stow, Craig A.; Nystrom, Magnus; Sendzimir, Jan; Hopton, Matthew E.; Kolasa, Jurek; Allen, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    In a world of increasing interconnections in global trade as well as rapid change in climate and land cover, the accelerating introduction and spread of invasive species is a critical concern due to associated negative social and ecological impacts, both real and perceived. Much of the societal response to invasive species to date has been associated with negative economic consequences of invasions. This response has shaped a war-like approach to addressing invasions, one with an agenda of eradications and intense ecological restoration efforts towards prior or more desirable ecological regimes. This trajectory often ignores the concept of ecological resilience and associated approaches of resilience-based governance. We argue that the relationship between ecological resilience and invasive species has been understudied to the detriment of attempts to govern invasions, and that most management actions fail, primarily because they do not incorporate adaptive, learning-based approaches. Invasive species can decrease resilience by reducing the biodiversity that underpins ecological functions and processes, making ecosystems more prone to regime shifts. However, invasions do not always result in a shift to an alternative regime; invasions can also increase resilience by introducing novelty, replacing lost ecological functions or adding redundancy that strengthens already existing structures and processes in an ecosystem. This paper examines the potential impacts of species invasions on the resilience of ecosystems and suggests that resilience-based approaches can inform policy by linking the governance of biological invasions to the negotiation of tradeoffs between ecosystem services.

  16. Biological invasions, ecological resilience and adaptive governance.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Brian C; Garmestani, Ahjond S; Angeler, David G; Herrmann, Dustin L; Stow, Craig A; Nyström, Magnus; Sendzimir, Jan; Hopton, Matthew E; Kolasa, Jurek; Allen, Craig R

    2016-12-01

    In a world of increasing interconnections in global trade as well as rapid change in climate and land cover, the accelerating introduction and spread of invasive species is a critical concern due to associated negative social and ecological impacts, both real and perceived. Much of the societal response to invasive species to date has been associated with negative economic consequences of invasions. This response has shaped a war-like approach to addressing invasions, one with an agenda of eradications and intense ecological restoration efforts towards prior or more desirable ecological regimes. This trajectory often ignores the concept of ecological resilience and associated approaches of resilience-based governance. We argue that the relationship between ecological resilience and invasive species has been understudied to the detriment of attempts to govern invasions, and that most management actions fail, primarily because they do not incorporate adaptive, learning-based approaches. Invasive species can decrease resilience by reducing the biodiversity that underpins ecological functions and processes, making ecosystems more prone to regime shifts. However, invasions do not always result in a shift to an alternative regime; invasions can also increase resilience by introducing novelty, replacing lost ecological functions or adding redundancy that strengthens already existing structures and processes in an ecosystem. This paper examines the potential impacts of species invasions on the resilience of ecosystems and suggests that resilience-based approaches can inform policy by linking the governance of biological invasions to the negotiation of tradeoffs between ecosystem services.

  17. Host cell invasion by medically important fungi.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Donald C; Filler, Scott G

    2014-11-03

    To infect the host and cause disease, many medically important fungi invade normally nonphagocytic host cells, such as endothelial cells and epithelial cells. Host cell invasion is a two-step process consisting of adherence followed by invasion. There are two general mechanisms of host cell invasion, induced endocytosis and active penetration. Furthermore, fungi can traverse epithelial or endothelial cell barriers either by proteolytic degradation of intercellular tight junctions or via a Trojan horse mechanism in which they are transported by leukocytes. Although these mechanisms of host cell invasion have been best studied using Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, it is probable that other invasive fungi also use one or more of these mechanisms to invade host cells. Identification of these invasion mechanisms holds promise to facilitate the development of new approaches to inhibit fungal invasion and thereby prevent disease. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  18. Invasive predators and global biodiversity loss.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Tim S; Glen, Alistair S; Nimmo, Dale G; Ritchie, Euan G; Dickman, Chris R

    2016-10-04

    Invasive species threaten biodiversity globally, and invasive mammalian predators are particularly damaging, having contributed to considerable species decline and extinction. We provide a global metaanalysis of these impacts and reveal their full extent. Invasive predators are implicated in 87 bird, 45 mammal, and 10 reptile species extinctions-58% of these groups' contemporary extinctions worldwide. These figures are likely underestimated because 23 critically endangered species that we assessed are classed as "possibly extinct." Invasive mammalian predators endanger a further 596 species at risk of extinction, with cats, rodents, dogs, and pigs threatening the most species overall. Species most at risk from predators have high evolutionary distinctiveness and inhabit insular environments. Invasive mammalian predators are therefore important drivers of irreversible loss of phylogenetic diversity worldwide. That most impacted species are insular indicates that management of invasive predators on islands should be a global conservation priority. Understanding and mitigating the impact of invasive mammalian predators is essential for reducing the rate of global biodiversity loss.

  19. Novel chemistry of invasive exotic plants

    PubMed Central

    Cappuccino, Naomi; Arnason, J.Thor

    2006-01-01

    Of the many exotic plants that have become naturalized in North America, only a small proportion are pests capable of invading and dominating intact natural communities. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the most invasive plants are phytochemically unique in their new habitats. A comparison of exotic plant species that are highly invasive in North America with exotics that are widespread, but non-invasive revealed that the invasive plants were more likely to have potent secondary compounds that have not been reported from North American native plants. On average, the compounds found in the invasive plants were reported from fewer species, fewer genera and fewer families than those from non-invasive plants. Many of the unique phytochemicals from invasive plants have been reported to have multiple activities, including antiherbivore, antifungal, antimicrobial and allelopathic (phytotoxic) effects, which may provide the plants with several advantages in their new environments. PMID:17148359

  20. Will climate change promote future invasions?

    PubMed

    Bellard, Celine; Thuiller, Wilfried; Leroy, Boris; Genovesi, Piero; Bakkenes, Michel; Courchamp, Franck

    2013-12-01

    Biological invasion is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to biodiversity. Using ensemble forecasts from species distribution models to project future suitable areas of the 100 of the world's worst invasive species defined by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, we show that both climate and land use changes will likely cause drastic species range shifts. Looking at potential spatial aggregation of invasive species, we identify three future hotspots of invasion in Europe, northeastern North America, and Oceania. We also emphasize that some regions could lose a significant number of invasive alien species, creating opportunities for ecosystem restoration. From the list of 100, scenarios of potential range distributions show a consistent shrinking for invasive amphibians and birds, while for aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates distributions are projected to substantially increase in most cases. Given the harmful impacts these invasive species currently have on ecosystems, these species will likely dramatically influence the future of biodiversity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A proposed unified framework for biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Tim M; Pyšek, Petr; Bacher, Sven; Carlton, James T; Duncan, Richard P; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Wilson, John R U; Richardson, David M

    2011-07-01

    There has been a dramatic growth in research on biological invasions over the past 20 years, but a mature understanding of the field has been hampered because invasion biologists concerned with different taxa and different environments have largely adopted different model frameworks for the invasion process, resulting in a confusing range of concepts, terms and definitions. In this review, we propose a unified framework for biological invasions that reconciles and integrates the key features of the most commonly used invasion frameworks into a single conceptual model that can be applied to all human-mediated invasions. The unified framework combines previous stage-based and barrier models, and provides a terminology and categorisation for populations at different points in the invasion process.

  2. Will climate change promote future invasions?

    PubMed Central

    Bellard, C.; Thuiller, W.; Leroy, B.; Genovesi, P.; Bakkenes, M.; Courchamp, F.

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasion is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to biodiversity. Using ensemble forecasts from species distribution models to project future suitable areas of the “100 of the world’s worst invasive species” defined by the IUCN, we show that both climate and land use changes will likely cause drastic species range shifts. Looking at potential spatial aggregation of invasive species, we identify three future hotspots of invasion in Europe, northeastern North America, and Oceania. We also emphasize that some regions could lose a significant number of invasive alien species, creating opportunities for ecosystem restoration. From the list of 100, scenarios of potential range distributions show a consistent shrinking for invasive amphibians and birds, while for aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates distributions are projected to substantially increase in most cases. Given the harmful impacts these invasive species currently have on ecosystems, these species will likely dramatically influence the future of biodiversity. PMID:23913552

  3. Host Cell Invasion by Medically Important Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Donald C.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    To infect the host and cause disease, many medically important fungi invade normally nonphagocytic host cells, such as endothelial cells and epithelial cells. Host cell invasion is a two-step process consisting of adherence followed by invasion. There are two general mechanisms of host cell invasion, induced endocytosis and active penetration. Furthermore, fungi can traverse epithelial or endothelial cell barriers either by proteolytic degradation of intercellular tight junctions or via a Trojan horse mechanism in which they are transported by leukocytes. Although these mechanisms of host cell invasion have been best studied using Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, it is probable that other invasive fungi also use one or more of these mechanisms to invade host cells. Identification of these invasion mechanisms holds promise to facilitate the development of new approaches to inhibit fungal invasion and thereby prevent disease. PMID:25367974

  4. Chick Heart Invasion Assay for Testing the Invasiveness of Cancer Cells and the Activity of Potentially Anti-invasive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Marc E; Roman, Bart I; Stevens, Christian V; Mus, Liselot M; Parmar, Virinder S; De Wever, Olivier; Mareel, Marc M

    2015-06-06

    The goal of the chick heart assay is to offer a relevant organ culture method to study tumor invasion in three dimensions. The assay can distinguish between invasive and non-invasive cells, and enables study of the effects of test compounds on tumor invasion. Cancer cells - either as aggregates or single cells - are confronted with fragments of embryonic chick heart. After organ culture in suspension for a few days or weeks the confronting cultures are fixed and embedded in paraffin for histological analysis. The three-dimensional interaction between the cancer cells and the normal tissue is then reconstructed from serial sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin or after immunohistochemical staining for epitopes in the heart tissue or the confronting cancer cells. The assay is consistent with the recent concept that cancer invasion is the result of molecular interactions between the cancer cells and their neighbouring stromal host elements (myofibroblasts, endothelial cells, extracellular matrix components, etc.). Here, this stromal environment is offered to the cancer cells as a living tissue fragment. Supporting aspects to the relevance of the assay are multiple. Invasion in the assay is in accordance with the criteria of cancer invasion: progressive occupation and replacement in time and space of the host tissue, and invasiveness and non-invasiveness in vivo of the confronting cells generally correlates with the outcome of the assay. Furthermore, the invasion pattern of cells in vivo, as defined by pathologists, is reflected in the histological images in the assay. Quantitative structure-activity relation (QSAR) analysis of the results obtained with numerous potentially anti-invasive organic congener compounds allowed the study of structure-activity relations for flavonoids and chalcones, and known anti-metastatic drugs used in the clinic (e.g., microtubule inhibitors) inhibit invasion in the assay as well. However, the assay does not take into account

  5. Peritumoral SPARC expression and patient outcome with resectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Tung; Chu, Yin-Yi; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Huang, Shih-Chiang; Chen, Ming Huang; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Chen, Yen-Yang; Ma, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Chen, Tsung-Wen; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) affects thousands worldwide with increasing incidence. SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) plays an important role in cellular matrix interactions, wound repair, and cellular migration, and has been reported to prevent malignancy from growth. SPARC undergoes epigenetic silencing in pancreatic malignancy, but is frequently expressed by stromal fibroblasts adjacent to infiltrating pancreatic adenocarcinomas. CCA is also a desmoplastic tumor, similar to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. SPARC’s clinical influence on clinicopathological characteristics of mass-forming (MF)-CCA still remains unclear. In this study, we evaluate the expression of SPARC in tumor and stromal tissue to clarity its relation with prognosis. Methods Seventy-eight MF-CCA patients who underwent hepatectomy with curative intent were enrolled for an immunohistochemical study of SPARC. The expression of immunostaining of SPARC was characterized for both tumor and stromal tissues. We conducted survival analysis with 16 clinicopathological variables. The overall survival (OS) was analyzed by Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Results Thirty-three men and 45 women with MF-CCA were studied. Within total 78 subjects, 12 (15.4%) were classified as tumor negative/stroma negative, 37 (47.4%) as tumor positive/stroma negative, four (5.1%) as tumor negative/stroma positive, and 25 (32.1%) as tumor positive/stroma positive. With a median follow-up of 13.6 months, the 5-year OS was 14.9%. Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that SPARC tumor positive and stromal negative immunostaining and curative hepatectomy predicted favorable OS in patients with MF-CCA after hepatectomy. Conclusion MF-CCA patients with SPARC tumor positive and stromal negative expression may have favorable OS rates after curative hepatectomy. PMID:26251613

  6. The Body Image Dissatisfaction and Psychological Symptoms among Invasive and Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Y. Yazdandoost, Rokhsareh; Hayatbini, Niki; Asgharnejad Farid, Ali Asghar; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Latifi, Noor Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elective aesthetic surgeries are increasing in the Iranian population with reasons linked to body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms. This study compared the body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms among invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery patients and a control group. METHODS Data from 90 participants (invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, minimally invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, and control group=30 Ss) were included. Subjects were assessed on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms to provide an evidence for a continuum of body image dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity in invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery clients. RESULTS Between the three groups of invasive, minimally invasive aesthetic surgeries and control on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms (anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity), there was a significant difference. CONCLUSION These findings have implications for pre-surgical assessment as well as psychological interventions rather than invasive medical interventions at first step. PMID:27579270

  7. The Body Image Dissatisfaction and Psychological Symptoms among Invasive and Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Y Yazdandoost, Rokhsareh; Hayatbini, Niki; Asgharnejad Farid, Ali Asghar; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Latifi, Noor Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    Elective aesthetic surgeries are increasing in the Iranian population with reasons linked to body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms. This study compared the body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms among invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery patients and a control group. Data from 90 participants (invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, minimally invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, and control group=30 Ss) were included. Subjects were assessed on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms to provide an evidence for a continuum of body image dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity in invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery clients. Between the three groups of invasive, minimally invasive aesthetic surgeries and control on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms (anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity), there was a significant difference. These findings have implications for pre-surgical assessment as well as psychological interventions rather than invasive medical interventions at first step.

  8. The population biology of fungal invasions.

    PubMed

    Gladieux, P; Feurtey, A; Hood, M E; Snirc, A; Clavel, J; Dutech, C; Roy, M; Giraud, T

    2015-05-01

    Fungal invasions are increasingly recognized as a significant component of global changes, threatening ecosystem health and damaging food production. Invasive fungi also provide excellent models to evaluate the generality of results based on other eukaryotes. We first consider here the reasons why fungal invasions have long been overlooked: they tend to be inconspicuous, and inappropriate methods have been used for species recognition. We then review the information available on the patterns and mechanisms of fungal invasions. We examine the biological features underlying invasion success of certain fungal species. We review population structure analyses, revealing native source populations and strengths of bottlenecks. We highlight the documented ecological and evolutionary changes in invaded regions, including adaptation to temperature, increased virulence, hybridization, shifts to clonality and association with novel hosts. We discuss how the huge census size of most fungi allows adaptation even in bottlenecked, clonal invaders. We also present new analyses of the invasion of the anther-smut pathogen on white campion in North America, as a case study illustrating how an accurate knowledge of species limits and phylogeography of fungal populations can be used to decipher the origin of invasions. This case study shows that successful invasions can occur even when life history traits are particularly unfavourable to long-distance dispersal and even with a strong bottleneck. We conclude that fungal invasions are valuable models to contribute to our view of biological invasions, in particular by providing insights into the traits as well as ecological and evolutionary processes allowing successful introductions.

  9. The complexity underlying invasiveness precludes the identification of invasive traits: A comparative study of invasive and non-invasive heterocarpic Atriplex congeners

    PubMed Central

    Doudová, Jana; Douda, Jan; Mandák, Bohumil

    2017-01-01

    Heterocarpy enables species to effectively spread under unfavourable conditions by producing two or more types of fruit differing in ecological characteristics. Although it is frequent in annuals occupying disturbed habitats that are vulnerable to invasion, there is still a lack of congeneric studies addressing the importance of heterocarpy for species invasion success. We compared two pairs of heterocarpic Atriplex species, each of them comprising one invasive and one non-invasive non-native congener. In two common garden experiments, we (i) simulated the influence of different levels of nutrients and population density on plants grown from different types of fruits and examined several traits that are generally positively associated with invasion success, and (ii) grew plants in a replacement series experiment to evaluate resource partitioning between them and to compare their competitive ability. We found that specific functional traits or competitiveness of species cannot explain the invasiveness of Atriplex species, indicating that species invasiveness involves more complex interactions of traits that are important only in certain ecological contexts, i.e. in specific environmental conditions and only some habitats. Interestingly, species trait differences related to invasion success were found between plants growing from the ecologically most contrasting fruit types. We suggest that fruit types differing in ecological behaviour may be essential in the process of invasion or in the general spreading of heterocarpic species, as they either the maximize population growth (type C fruit) or enhance the chance of survival of new populations (type A fruit). Congeners offer the best available methodical framework for comparing traits among phylogenetically closely related invasive and non-invasive species. However, as indicated by our results, this approach is unlikely to reveal invasive traits because of the complexity underlying invasiveness. PMID:28445514

  10. The Invasive Species Forecasting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnase, John; Most, Neal; Gill, Roger; Ma, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Invasive Species Forecasting System (ISFS) provides computational support for the generic work processes found in many regional-scale ecosystem modeling applications. Decision support tools built using ISFS allow a user to load point occurrence field sample data for a plant species of interest and quickly generate habitat suitability maps for geographic regions of management concern, such as a national park, monument, forest, or refuge. This type of decision product helps resource managers plan invasive species protection, monitoring, and control strategies for the lands they manage. Until now, scientists and resource managers have lacked the data-assembly and computing capabilities to produce these maps quickly and cost efficiently. ISFS focuses on regional-scale habitat suitability modeling for invasive terrestrial plants. ISFS s component architecture emphasizes simplicity and adaptability. Its core services can be easily adapted to produce model-based decision support tools tailored to particular parks, monuments, forests, refuges, and related management units. ISFS can be used to build standalone run-time tools that require no connection to the Internet, as well as fully Internet-based decision support applications. ISFS provides the core data structures, operating system interfaces, network interfaces, and inter-component constraints comprising the canonical workflow for habitat suitability modeling. The predictors, analysis methods, and geographic extents involved in any particular model run are elements of the user space and arbitrarily configurable by the user. ISFS provides small, lightweight, readily hardened core components of general utility. These components can be adapted to unanticipated uses, are tailorable, and require at most a loosely coupled, nonproprietary connection to the Web. Users can invoke capabilities from a command line; programmers can integrate ISFS's core components into more complex systems and services. Taken together, these

  11. Antarctic crabs: invasion or endurance?

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Huw J; Whittle, Rowan J; Roberts, Stephen J; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the "discovery" of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This "invasion hypothesis" suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40-15 million years ago and are only now returning as "warm" enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60 °S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0 °C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day "crab invasion". We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the "invasion hypothesis".

  12. Non-invasive neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, William J.; Sanguinetti, Joseph L.; Fini, Maria; Hool, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

  13. Minimally invasive therapy in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Schou, I

    1993-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is beginning to have impacts on health care in Denmark, although diffusion has been delayed compared to diffusion in other European countries. Now policy makers are beginning to appreciate the potential advantages in terms of closing hospitals and shifting treatment to the out-patient setting, and diffusion will probably go faster in the future. Denmark does not have a system for technology assessment, neither central nor regional, and there is no early warning mechanism to survey international developments. This implies lack of possibilities for the planning of diffusion, training, and criteria for treatment.

  14. Laboratory diagnosis of invasive mycoses.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Elizabeth M; Shea, Yvonne M; Witebsky, Frank G

    2003-03-01

    Rising numbers of immunocompromised patients have led to an ever-increasing population at risk of invasive fungal disease. Much has been achieved in the laboratory diagnosis of these infections, such as advances in blood culture systems, and the development of new biochemical, antigen detection assays, and molecular methodologies. More standardized susceptibility testing guidelines provide for better therapeutic interventions. In an era of economic cutbacks in health care, future challenges include the development of cost-effective and technically simplified systems, which provide early detection and identification of common and emerging fungal pathogens. It will, however, take some time to establish the clinical relevance of these new methodologies in different patient populations.

  15. Microrobots for minimally invasive medicine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bradley J; Kaliakatsos, Ioannis K; Abbott, Jake J

    2010-08-15

    Microrobots have the potential to revolutionize many aspects of medicine. These untethered, wirelessly controlled and powered devices will make existing therapeutic and diagnostic procedures less invasive and will enable new procedures never before possible. The aim of this review is threefold: first, to provide a comprehensive survey of the technological state of the art in medical microrobots; second, to explore the potential impact of medical microrobots and inspire future research in this field; and third, to provide a collection of valuable information and engineering tools for the design of medical microrobots.

  16. Biological invasions and the conservation of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Pascal, M; Le Guyader, H; Simberloff, D

    2010-08-01

    Consideration of definitions of 'biological invasion' and 'biodiversity' shows why invasions have recently generated great interest among conservationists. Many studies show that invasion numbers have increased drastically over the last five centuries, that this exponential increase is not levelling off, and that human activities are the only reason for the phenomenon. Many mechanisms are portrayed in an evolutionary framework and their consequences for biodiversity are described at three levels of life--gene, species and ecosystem. Examples from islands show that insular ecosystems are especially prone to damage from invasions; they also serve as 'laboratories' to elucidate the nature of invasion impacts. An important management approach--eradication--is discussed. Eradicating invaders not only aids understanding of their impacts on native species but also in understanding how ecosystems function. In fact, biological invasions can be seen as 'experiments', providing a rare opportunity to help answer certain fundamental scientific questions.

  17. [Interactions between invasive plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: a review].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan-fang; Guo, Shao-xia; Li, Min

    2011-09-01

    The invasion of invasive plants changes the biological community structure in their invaded lands, leading to the biodiversity loss. As an important component of soil microorganisms in terrestrial ecosystem, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can affect the growth performance of invasive plants. This kind of specific relations between AM fungi and invasive plants also implies that AM fungi can affect plant invasion. On the other hand, the invasion of invasive plants can affect the community structure and function of AM fungi. This paper summarized the species and harms of invasive plants in China, and discussed the relationships between AM fungi and invasive plants invasion, including the roles of AM fungi in the processes of invasive plants invasion, the effects of the invasion on AM fungi, and the interactive mechanisms between the invasion and AM fungi.

  18. [Iron and invasive fungal infection].

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Florencio; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential factor for both the growth and virulence of most of microorganisms. As a part of the innate (or nutritional) immune system, mammals have developed different mechanisms to store and transport this element in order to limit free iron bioavailability. To survive in this hostile environment, pathogenic fungi have specific uptake systems for host iron sources, one of the most important of which is based on the synthesis of siderophores-soluble, low-molecular-mass, high-affinity iron chelators. The increase in free iron that results from iron-overload conditions is a well-established risk factor for invasive fungal infection (IFI) such as mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Therefore, iron chelation may be an appealing therapeutic option for these infections. Nevertheless, deferoxamine -the first approved iron chelator- paradoxically increases the incidence of IFI, as it serves as a xeno-siderophore to Mucorales. On the contrary, the new oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) have shown to exert a deleterious effect on fungal growth both in vitro and in animal models. The present review focuses on the role of iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of IFI and summarises the preclinical data, as well as the limited clinical experience so far, in the use of new iron chelators as treatment for mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis.

  19. [Combination therapy for invasive aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel

    2011-03-01

    The frequency of invasive fungal infections, and specifically invasive aspergillosis, has increased in the last few decades. Despite the development of new antifungal agents, these infections are associated with high mortality, ranging from 40% to 80%, depending on the patient and the localization of the infection. To reduce these figures, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed, including combination therapy. Most of the available data on the efficacy of these combinations are from experimental models, in vitro data and retrospective observational studies or studies with a small number of patients that have included both patients in first-line treatment and those receiving rescue therapy; in addition there are many patients with possible forms of aspergillosis and few with demonstrated or probable forms. To date, there is no evidence that combination therapy has significantly higher efficacy than monotherapy; however, combination therapy could be indicated in severe forms of aspergillosis, or forms with central nervous involvement or extensive pulmonary involvement with respiratory insufficiency, etc. Among the combinations, the association of an echinocandin--the group that includes micafungin--with voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B seems to show synergy. These combinations are those most extensively studied in clinical trials and therefore, although the grade of evidence is low, are recommended by the various scientific societies.

  20. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kandalgaonkar, Shilpa D; Gharat, Leena A; Tupsakhare, Suyog D; Gabhane, Mahesh H

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption exhibiting no external signs. The resorptive condition is often detected by routine radiographic examination. The clinical features vary from a small defect at the gingival margin to a pink coronal discoloration of the tooth crown resulting in ultimate cavitation of the overlying enamel which is painless unless pulpal or periodontal infection supervenes. Radiographic features of lesions vary from well-delineated to irregularly bordered mottled radiolucencies, and these can be confused with dental caries. A characteristic radiopaque line generally separates the image of the lesion from that of the root canal, because the pulp remains protected by a thin layer of predentin until late in the process. Histopathologically, the lesions contain fibrovascular tissue with resorbing clastic cells adjacent to the dentin surface. More advanced lesions display fibro-osseous characteristics with deposition of ectopic bonelike calcifications both within the resorbing tissue and directly on the dentin surface. How to cite this article: Kandalgaonkar SD, Gharat LA, Tupsakhare SD, Gabhane MH. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):124-30 . PMID:24453457

  1. Non-Invasive Glucose Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakley, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    There are two little words, when taken together have great implications: ``What IF'' In the US alone, there are millions who are burdened with diabetes and who must maintain their glucose levels by taking blood samples and having it analyzed. Even though this procedure has improved over time, still it is very intrusive and is a burden to many that must live with it. What if it were not necessary? Although it is current practice to measure glucose levels invasively (using blood samples), it may be possible to measure glucose non-invasively. Although several companies around the world have invested millions of dollars to address this problem, none have been successful thus far. However, there are many methods that hold a potential and many approaches that have not yet been explored. We are working on a review of what has been approached thus far and are entertaining proposals for a combined interdisciplinary approach which combines expertise from bioengineering, physics, and biology. We hope to learn from the unsuccessful attempts of others whilst employing innovative new approaches to this problem.

  2. Cabergoline Treatment in Invasive Giant Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically. PMID:25002819

  3. Fire management and invasive plants- A handbook

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Matthew L.; Lusk, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Fire management can help maintain natural habitats, increase forage for wildlife, reduce fuel loads that might otherwise lead to catastrophic wildfire, and maintain natural succession. Today, there is an emerging challenge that fire managers need to be aware of: invasive plants. Fire management activities can create ideal opportunities for invasions by nonnative plants, potentially undermining the benefits of fire management actions. This manual provides practical guidelines that fire managers should consider with respect to invasive plants.

  4. Biological Invasions: A Challenge In Ecological Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnase, J. L.; Smith, J. A.; Stohlgren, T. J.; Graves, S.; Trees, C.; Rood, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The spread of invasive species is one of the most daunting environmental, economic, and human-health problems facing the United States and the World today. It is one of several grand challenge environmental problems being considered by NASA's Earth Science Vision for 2025. The invasive species problem is complex and presents many challenges. Developing an invasive species predictive capability could significantly advance the science and technology of ecological forecasting.

  5. [Invasive yeast infections in neutropenic patients].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts still play an important role in the morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients with haematological malignancies. Although the overall incidence of invasive candidiasis has decreased due to widespread use of antifungal prophylaxis, the incidence of non-Candida albicans Candida species is increasing compared with that of C.albicans, and mortality of invasive candidiasis continues to be high. In addition, there has been an increase in invasive infections caused by an array of uncommon yeasts, including species of the genus Malassezia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon and Saprochaete, characterised by their resistance to echinocandins and poor prognosis.

  6. Can biological invasions save Caribbean coral reefs?

    PubMed

    Bellwood, David Roy; Robert Goatley, Christopher Harry

    2017-01-09

    It is widely accepted that coral reefs are in decline globally, due to climate change as well as more direct human impacts such as poor water quality and overharvesting [1-3]. Biological invasions are also seen as a major threat [4-6]; however, they may not all be negative. An invasion of Red Sea rabbitfishes is disrupting Mediterranean ecosystems by removing macro-algae - meanwhile, in contrast, the Caribbean is suffering from excess macro-algal growth. We suggest that an invasion of the Caribbean by rabbitfishes may prove beneficial, and that the future of Caribbean coral reefs may depend upon a rabbitfish invasion.

  7. Invasive plants have broader physiological niches.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Steven I; Richardson, David M

    2014-07-22

    Invasive species cost the global economy billions of dollars each year, but ecologists have struggled to predict the risk of an introduced species naturalizing and invading. Although carefully designed experiments are needed to fully elucidate what makes some species invasive, much can be learned from unintentional experiments involving the introduction of species beyond their native ranges. Here, we assess invasion risk by linking a physiologically based species distribution model with data on the invasive success of 749 Australian acacia and eucalypt tree species that have, over more than a century, been introduced around the world. The model correctly predicts 92% of occurrences observed outside of Australia from an independent dataset. We found that invasiveness is positively associated with the projection of physiological niche volume in geographic space, thereby illustrating that species tolerant of a broader range of environmental conditions are more likely to be invasive. Species achieve this broader tolerance in different ways, meaning that the traits that define invasive success are context-specific. Hence, our study reconciles studies that have failed to identify the traits that define invasive success with the urgent and pragmatic need to predict invasive success.

  8. Modes of invasion during tumour dissemination.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Pahini; Orgaz, Jose L; Sanz-Moreno, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cell migration and invasion underlie metastatic dissemination, one of the major problems in cancer. Tumour cells exhibit a striking variety of invasion strategies. Importantly, cancer cells can switch between invasion modes in order to cope with challenging environments. This ability to switch migratory modes or plasticity highlights the challenges behind antimetastasis therapy design. In this Review, we present current knowledge on different tumour invasion strategies, the determinants controlling plasticity and arising therapeutic opportunities. We propose that targeting master regulators controlling plasticity is needed to hinder tumour dissemination and metastasis. © 2016 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Invasive plants have broader physiological niches

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Steven I.; Richardson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species cost the global economy billions of dollars each year, but ecologists have struggled to predict the risk of an introduced species naturalizing and invading. Although carefully designed experiments are needed to fully elucidate what makes some species invasive, much can be learned from unintentional experiments involving the introduction of species beyond their native ranges. Here, we assess invasion risk by linking a physiologically based species distribution model with data on the invasive success of 749 Australian acacia and eucalypt tree species that have, over more than a century, been introduced around the world. The model correctly predicts 92% of occurrences observed outside of Australia from an independent dataset. We found that invasiveness is positively associated with the projection of physiological niche volume in geographic space, thereby illustrating that species tolerant of a broader range of environmental conditions are more likely to be invasive. Species achieve this broader tolerance in different ways, meaning that the traits that define invasive success are context-specific. Hence, our study reconciles studies that have failed to identify the traits that define invasive success with the urgent and pragmatic need to predict invasive success. PMID:24989502

  10. Alabama invasive plant council: list of invasive plants by cultural use categories

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller; Nancy J. Loewenstein; Curtis J. Hansen

    2006-01-01

    Shortly after formation of the Alabama Invasive Plant Council (ALIPC) in 2003, a committee dedicated to assessment and listing of invasive plants was convened – the ALIPC Invasive Plant Listing Committee. Committee members were drawn from the wide diversity of expertise of the Council, which welcomes participation by all land-use and water-use managers, owners,...

  11. Coevolution between Native and Invasive Plant Competitors: Implications for Invasive Species Management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasive species may establish in communities because they are better competitors than natives, but in order to remain community dominants, the competitive advantage of invasive species must be persistent. Native species that are not extirpated when highly invasive species are introduced are likely...

  12. Invasion of a mined landscape: what habitat characteristics are influencing the occurrence of invasive plants?

    Treesearch

    D. Lemke; I.A. Tazisong; Y. Wang; J.A. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the world, the invasion of alien plants is an increasing threat to native biodiversity. Invasion is especially prevalent in areas affected by land transformation and anthropogenic disturbance. Surface mines are a major disturbance, and thus may promote the establishment and expansion of invasive plant communities. Environmental and habitat factors that may...

  13. Invasive plants and their ecological strategies: Prediction and explanation of woody plant invasion in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herron, P.M.; Martine, C.T.; Latimer, A.M.; Leicht-Young, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective management of introduced species requires the early identification of species that pose a significant threat of becoming invasive. To better understand the invasive ecology of species in New England, USA, we compiled a character data set with which to compare non-native species that are known invaders to non-native species that are not currently known to be invasive. In contrast to previous biological trait-based models, we employed a Bayesian hierarchical analysis to identify sets of plant traits associated with invasiveness for each of three growth forms (vines, shrubs, and trees). The resulting models identify a suite of 'invasive traits' highlighting the ecology associated with invasiveness for each of three growth forms. The most effective predictors of invasiveness that emerged from our model were 'invasive elsewhere', 'fast growth rate', 'native latitudinal range', and 'growth form'. The contrast among growth forms was pronounced. For example, 'wind dispersal' was positively correlated with invasiveness in trees, but negatively correlated in shrubs and vines. The predictive model was able to correctly classify invasive plants 67% of the time (22/33), and non-invasive plants 95% of the time (204/215). A number of potential future invasive species in New England that deserve management consideration were identified. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  14. A functional trait perspective on plant invasion.

    PubMed

    Drenovsky, Rebecca E; Grewell, Brenda J; D'Antonio, Carla M; Funk, Jennifer L; James, Jeremy J; Molinari, Nicole; Parker, Ingrid M; Richards, Christina L

    2012-07-01

    Global environmental change will affect non-native plant invasions, with profound potential impacts on native plant populations, communities and ecosystems. In this context, we review plant functional traits, particularly those that drive invader abundance (invasiveness) and impacts, as well as the integration of these traits across multiple ecological scales, and as a basis for restoration and management. We review the concepts and terminology surrounding functional traits and how functional traits influence processes at the individual level. We explore how phenotypic plasticity may lead to rapid evolution of novel traits facilitating invasiveness in changing environments and then 'scale up' to evaluate the relative importance of demographic traits and their links to invasion rates. We then suggest a functional trait framework for assessing per capita effects and, ultimately, impacts of invasive plants on plant communities and ecosystems. Lastly, we focus on the role of functional trait-based approaches in invasive species management and restoration in the context of rapid, global environmental change. To understand how the abundance and impacts of invasive plants will respond to rapid environmental changes it is essential to link trait-based responses of invaders to changes in community and ecosystem properties. To do so requires a comprehensive effort that considers dynamic environmental controls and a targeted approach to understand key functional traits driving both invader abundance and impacts. If we are to predict future invasions, manage those at hand and use restoration technology to mitigate invasive species impacts, future research must focus on functional traits that promote invasiveness and invader impacts under changing conditions, and integrate major factors driving invasions from individual to ecosystem levels.

  15. E-commerce trade in invasive plants.

    PubMed

    Humair, Franziska; Humair, Luc; Kuhn, Fabian; Kueffer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Biological invasions are a major concern in conservation, especially because global transport of species is still increasing rapidly. Conservationists hope to anticipate and thus prevent future invasions by identifying and regulating potentially invasive species through species risk assessments and international trade regulations. Among many introduction pathways of non-native species, horticulture is a particularly important driver of plant invasions. In recent decades, the horticultural industry expanded globally and changed structurally through the emergence of new distribution channels, including internet trade (e-commerce). Using an automated search algorithm, we surveyed, on a daily basis, e-commerce trade on 10 major online auction sites (including eBay) of approximately three-fifths of the world's spermatophyte flora. Many recognized invasive plant species (>500 species) (i.e., species associated with ecological or socio-economic problems) were traded daily worldwide on the internet. A markedly higher proportion of invasive than non-invasive species were available online. Typically, for a particular plant family, 30-80% of recognized invasive species were detected on an auction site, but only a few percentages of all species in the plant family were detected on a site. Families that were more traded had a higher proportion of invasive species than families that were less traded. For woody species, there was a significant positive relationship between the number of regions where a species was sold and the number of regions where it was invasive. Our results indicate that biosecurity is not effectively regulating online plant trade. In the future, automated monitoring of e-commerce may help prevent the spread of invasive species, provide information on emerging trade connectivity across national borders, and be used in horizon scanning exercises for early detection of new species and their geographic source areas in international trade.

  16. Contemporary review of minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Rui; Turley, Ryan S; Blazer, Dan G

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the current literature describing various minimally invasive techniques for and to review short-term outcomes after minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). METHODS PD remains the only potentially curative treatment for periampullary malignancies, including, most commonly, pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Minimally invasive approaches to this complex operation have begun to be increasingly reported in the literature and are purported by some to reduce the historically high morbidity of PD associated with the open technique. In this systematic review, we have searched the literature for high-quality publications describing minimally invasive techniques for PD-including laparoscopic, robotic, and laparoscopic-assisted robotic approaches (hybrid approach). We have identified publications with the largest operative experiences from well-known centers of excellence for this complex procedure. We report primarily short term operative and perioperative results and some short term oncologic endpoints. RESULTS Minimally invasive techniques include laparoscopic, robotic and hybrid approaches and each of these techniques has strong advocates. Consistently, across all minimally invasive modalities, these techniques are associated less intraoperative blood loss than traditional open PD (OPD), but in exchange for longer operating times. These techniques are relatively equivalent in terms of perioperative morbidity and short term oncologic outcomes. Importantly, pancreatic fistula rate appears to be comparable in most minimally invasive series compared to open technique. Impact of minimally invasive technique on length of stay is mixed compared to some traditional open series. A few series have suggested that initiation of and time to adjuvant therapy may be improved with minimally invasive techniques, however this assertion remains controversial. In terms of short-terms costs, minimally invasive PD is significantly higher than that of OPD. CONCLUSION Minimally

  17. A functional trait perspective on plant invasion

    PubMed Central

    Drenovsky, Rebecca E.; Grewell, Brenda J.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Funk, Jennifer L.; James, Jeremy J.; Molinari, Nicole; Parker, Ingrid M.; Richards, Christina L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Global environmental change will affect non-native plant invasions, with profound potential impacts on native plant populations, communities and ecosystems. In this context, we review plant functional traits, particularly those that drive invader abundance (invasiveness) and impacts, as well as the integration of these traits across multiple ecological scales, and as a basis for restoration and management. Scope We review the concepts and terminology surrounding functional traits and how functional traits influence processes at the individual level. We explore how phenotypic plasticity may lead to rapid evolution of novel traits facilitating invasiveness in changing environments and then ‘scale up’ to evaluate the relative importance of demographic traits and their links to invasion rates. We then suggest a functional trait framework for assessing per capita effects and, ultimately, impacts of invasive plants on plant communities and ecosystems. Lastly, we focus on the role of functional trait-based approaches in invasive species management and restoration in the context of rapid, global environmental change. Conclusions To understand how the abundance and impacts of invasive plants will respond to rapid environmental changes it is essential to link trait-based responses of invaders to changes in community and ecosystem properties. To do so requires a comprehensive effort that considers dynamic environmental controls and a targeted approach to understand key functional traits driving both invader abundance and impacts. If we are to predict future invasions, manage those at hand and use restoration technology to mitigate invasive species impacts, future research must focus on functional traits that promote invasiveness and invader impacts under changing conditions, and integrate major factors driving invasions from individual to ecosystem levels. PMID:22589328

  18. Anaesthesia for minimally invasive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dec, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is rising in popularity. It offers well-known benefits to the patient. However, restricted access to the surgical site and gas insufflation into the body cavities may result in severe complications. From the anaesthetic point of view MIS poses unique challenges associated with creation of pneumoperitoneum, carbon dioxide absorption, specific positioning and monitoring a patient to whom the anaesthetist has often restricted access, in a poorly lit environment. Moreover, with refinement of surgical procedures and growing experience the anaesthetist is presented with patients from high-risk groups (obese, elderly, with advanced cardiac and respiratory disease) who once were deemed unsuitable for the laparoscopic technique. Anaesthetic management is aimed at getting the patient safely through the procedure, minimizing the specific risks arising from laparoscopy and the patient's coexisting medical problems, ensuring quick recovery and a relatively pain-free postoperative course with early return to normal function. PMID:26865885

  19. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  20. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  1. Non-invasive glucose monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A non-invasive method for determining blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam (e.g., at a wavelength of 700 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor in the anterior chamber is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated aqueous humor; and then determining the blood glucose level (or the level of another analyte of interest) for the subject from the Raman spectrum. Preferably, the detecting step is followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing method is also disclosed.

  2. Chapter 8: Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Praveen; Wise, Sarah K

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFRS) is a disease of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity that typically affects immunocompromised patients in the acute fulminant form. Early symptoms can often mimic rhinosinusitis, while late symptoms can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Swelling and mucosal thickening can quickly progress to pale or necrotic tissue in the nasal cavity and sinuses, and the disease can rapidly spread and invade the palate, orbit, cavernous sinus, cranial nerves, skull base, carotid artery, and brain. IFRS can be life threatening if left undiagnosed or untreated. While the acute fulminant form of IFRS is the most rapidly progressive and destructive, granulomatous and chronic forms also exist. Diagnosis of IFRS often mandates imaging studies in conjunction with clinical, endoscopic, and histopathological examination. Treatment of IFRS consists of reversing the underlying immunosuppression, antifungal therapy, and aggressive surgical debridement. With early diagnosis and treatment, IFRS can be treated and increase patient survival.

  3. Understanding macroscale invasion patterns and processes with FIA data

    Treesearch

    Songlin Fei; Basil V. Iannone III; Christopher M. Oswalt; Qinfeng Guo; Kevin M. Potter; Sonja N. Oswalt; Bryan C. Pijanowski; Gabriela C. Nunez-Mir

    2015-01-01

    Using empirical data from FIA, we modeled invasion richness and invasion prevalence as functions of 22 factors reflective of propagule pressure and/or habitat invasibility across the continental US. Our statistical models suggest that both propagule pressure and habitat invasibility contribute to macroscale patterns of forest plant invasions. Our investigation provides...

  4. An overview of recent research in marine biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Farrah T; Briski, Elizabeta

    2017-01-01

    The Topical Collection on Invasive Species includes 50 articles addressing many tenets of marine invasion ecology. The collection covers important topics relating to propagule pressure associated with transport vectors, species characteristics, attributes of recipient ecosystems, invasion genetics, biotic interactions, testing of invasion hypotheses, invasion dynamics and spread, and impacts of nonindigenous species. This article summarizes some of the collection's highlights.

  5. Comparison of the clinicopathological features of invasive ductal, invasive lobular, and mixed (invasive ductal + invasive lobular) carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Zengel, Baha; Yararbas, Ulkem; Duran, Ali; Uslu, Adam; Elıyatkın, Nukhet; Demırkıran, Mehmet Ali; Cengiz, Fevzi; Şimşek, Cenk; Postacı, Hakan; Vardar, Enver; Durusoy, Raika

    2015-07-01

    In this retrospective analysis, the clinicopathological features and pattern of metastatic spread of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), and mixed ductal/lobular carcinoma (MDLC), together with the type and outcome of surgical intervention, were comparatively evaluated. A total of 633 breast cancer patients with histopathological subtype IDC, ILC or MDLC were included in the study. The mean age was 52.6 ± 12.7 years. Follow-up period ranged between 0 and 33 (median 6.0) years. The groups were compared with respect to age, tumor size, nodal involvement, stage, hormonal therapy, multicentricity, multifocality, bilaterality, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu, p53, and Ki67 expression, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates, and surgical approach. The distribution of patients was as follows: IDC 508 (80.3 %), ILC 78 (12.3 %), MDLC 47 (7.4 %). Among the parameters evaluated, statistically significant differences were observed in mean tumor size (IDC 2.5 ± 1.98 cm, ILC 3.0 ± 1.8 cm, MDLC 3.2 ± 2.4 cm), advanced T stage (T3 + T4) at diagnosis (IDC 14.7 %, ILC 21.4 %, MDLC 25.6 %), N stage (N0 was dominant in IDC and ILC; N3 was dominant in MDLC), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (stage II was dominant in IDC and ILC; stage III was dominant in MDLC), HER2/neu expression (IDC 23.8 %, ILC 11.8 %, MDLC 21.4 %), and frequency of bone metastasis (IDC 14.3 %, ILC 17.9 %, MDLC 25.5 %). MDLC-type tumors have different histopathological characteristics and are often diagnosed at advanced stage. However, their survival outcomes do not vary significantly from ILC and IDC.

  6. Antarctic Crabs: Invasion or Endurance?

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Huw J.; Whittle, Rowan J.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the “discovery” of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This “invasion hypothesis” suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40–15 million years ago and are only now returning as “warm” enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60°S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0°C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day “crab invasion”. We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the “invasion

  7. Invasive neurostimulation in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Plow, Ela B; Machado, Andre

    2014-07-01

    The last decade has seen a growing interest in adjuvant treatments that synergistically influence mechanisms underlying rehabilitation of paretic upper limb in stroke. One such approach is invasive neurostimulation of spared cortices at the periphery of a lesion. Studies in animals have shown that during training of paretic limb, adjuvant stimulation targeting the peri-infarct circuitry enhances mechanisms of its reorganization, generating functional advantage. Success of early animal studies and clinical reports, however, failed to translate to a phase III clinical trial. As lesions in humans are diffuse, unlike many animal models, peri-infarct circuitry may not be a feasible, or consistent target across most. Instead, alternate mechanisms, such as changing transcallosal inhibition between hemispheres, or reorganization of other viable regions in motor control, may hold greater potential. Here, we review comprehensive mechanisms of clinical recovery and factors that govern which mechanism(s) become operative when. We suggest novel approaches that take into account a patient's initial clinical-functional state, and findings from neuroimaging and neurophysiology to guide to their most suitable mechanism for ideal targeting. Further, we suggest new localization schemes, and bypass strategies that indirectly target peri-lesional circuitry, and methods that serve to counter technical and theoretical challenge in identifying and stimulating such targets at the periphery of infarcts in humans. Last, we describe how stimulation may modulate mechanisms differentially across varying phases of recovery- a temporal effect that may explain missed advantage in clinical trials and help plan for the next stage. With information presented here, future trials would effectively be able to target patient's specific mechanism(s) with invasive (or noninvasive) neurostimulation for the greatest, most consistent benefit.

  8. Principles for ecologically based invasive plant management

    Treesearch

    Jeremy J. James; Brenda S. Smith; Edward A. Vasquez; Roger L. Sheley

    2010-01-01

    Land managers have long identified a critical need for a practical and effective framework for designing restoration strategies, especially where invasive plants dominate. A holistic, ecologically based, invasive plant management (EBIPM) framework that integrates ecosystem health assessment, knowledge of ecological processes, and adaptive management into a successional...

  9. Plant invasions in China - challenges and chances.

    PubMed

    Axmacher, Jan C; Sang, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species cause serious environmental and economic harm and threaten global biodiversity. We set out to investigate how quickly invasive plant species are currently spreading in China and how their resulting distribution patterns are linked to socio-economic and environmental conditions. A comparison of the invasive plant species density (log species/log area) reported in 2008 with current data shows that invasive species were originally highly concentrated in the wealthy, southeastern coastal provinces of China, but they are currently rapidly spreading inland. Linear regression models based on the species density and turnover of invasive plants as dependent parameters and principal components representing key socio-economic and environmental parameters as predictors indicate strong positive links between invasive plant density and the overall phytodiversity and associated climatic parameters. Principal components representing socio-economic factors and endemic plant density also show significant positive links with invasive plant density. Urgent control and eradication measures are needed in China's coastal provinces to counteract the rapid inland spread of invasive plants. Strict controls of imports through seaports need to be accompanied by similarly strict controls of the developing horticultural trade and underpinned by awareness campaigns for China's increasingly affluent population to limit the arrival of new invaders. Furthermore, China needs to fully utilize its substantial native phytodiversity, rather than relying on exotics, in current large-scale afforestation projects and in the creation of urban green spaces.

  10. The Invasive Plant Species Education Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Kevin; James, Krista; Carlson, Kitrina; D'Angelo, Jean

    2010-01-01

    To help high school students gain a solid understanding of invasive plant species, university faculty and students from the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) and a local high school teacher worked together to develop the Invasive Plant Species (IPS) Education Guide. The IPS Education Guide includes nine lessons that give students an…

  11. Alien invasive species and international trade

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emergency control measures for invasive species often rely on use of pesticides and other destructive practices. Public concern about pesticide contamination of the ground water and the environment has lead to increased restrictions on the use of pesticides for control of many destructive invasive ...

  12. Microparasites and Placental Invasiveness in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Capellini, Isabella; Nunn, Charles L.; Barton, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Placental invasiveness—the number of maternal tissue layers separating fetal tissues from maternal blood—is variable across mammalian species. Although this diversity is likely to be functionally important, variation in placental invasiveness remains unexplained. Here we test the hypothesis that increased risk of transplacental transmission of pathogens from the mother to the fetus promotes the evolution of non-invasive placentation, the most likely derived condition in eutherian mammals. Specifically, we predict that non-invasive placentation is associated with increased microparasite species richness relative to more invasive placental types, based on the assumption that higher numbers of microparasites in a population reflects greater risk of transplacental transmission to fetuses. As predicted, higher bacteria species richness is associated with non-invasive placentation. Protozoa species richness, however, shows the opposite pattern. Because invasive placentae facilitate the transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus, we propose that the ancestral condition of invasive placentation is retained under selection for protection of newborns from higher risk of postnatal protozoan infection. Hence, our findings suggest that a tradeoff exists between protection against bacterial infection prenatally and protozoan infection postnatally. Future studies are needed to investigate how maternal prevalence of infection and the relative pre- versus postnatal risk of fetal infection by different microparasite groups vary among mammalian hosts in relation to placental invasiveness. PMID:26168031

  13. Indirect effects of parasites in invasions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduced species disrupt native communities and biodiversity worldwide. Parasitic infections (and at times, their absence) are thought to be a key component in the success and impact of biological invasions by plants and animals. They can facilitate or limit invasions, and positively or negatively...

  14. Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Surgery I

    PubMed Central

    Ailawadi, Gorav; Agnihotri, Arvind K.; Mehall, John R.; Wolfe, J. Alan; Hummel, Brian W.; Fayers, Trevor M.; Farivar, R. Saeid; Grossi, Eugene A.; Guy, T. Sloane; Hargrove, W. Clark; Khan, Junaid H.; Lehr, Eric J.; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Murphy, Douglas A.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Ryan, William H.; Salemi, Arash; Segurola, Romualdo J.; Shemin, Richard J.; Smith, J. Michael; Smith, Robert L.; Weldner, Paul W.; Goldman, Scott M.; Lewis, Clifton T. P.; Barnhart, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Widespread adoption of minimally invasive mitral valve repair and replacement may be fostered by practice consensus and standardization. This expert opinion, first of a 3-part series, outlines current best practices in patient evaluation and selection for minimally invasive mitral valve procedures, and discusses preoperative planning for cannulation and myocardial protection. PMID:27654407

  15. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 1)

    Treesearch

    Mee-Sook Kim; Jack Butler

    2008-01-01

    This electronic newsletter (Invasive Species Science Update) is published by the Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) Cross-Program, Interdisciplinary Project team on Invasive Species. This newsletter will be published 3 times per year and is intended to enhance communication among RMRS scientists, wildland managers, other partners, stakeholders, and customers about...

  16. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 6)

    Treesearch

    Paula Fornwalt

    2013-01-01

    The sixth issue of the Rocky Mountain Research Station's (RMRS) Invasive Species Science Update is now complete. Published approximately once per year, this newsletter keeps managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, and covers breaking news related to invasive species issues. The newsletter is produced by...

  17. Book review: Encyclopedia of biological invasions

    Treesearch

    Qinfeng Guo

    2011-01-01

    Species introductions and consequent biotic invasions and homogenization are major components of global change that are drawing increasing concern and various levels of actions and reactions around the world. Invasion ecology has advanced rapidly during the last few decades, and the discipline is now increasingly integrated with the social and economic sciences. A...

  18. The Invasive Plant Species Education Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Kevin; James, Krista; Carlson, Kitrina; D'Angelo, Jean

    2010-01-01

    To help high school students gain a solid understanding of invasive plant species, university faculty and students from the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) and a local high school teacher worked together to develop the Invasive Plant Species (IPS) Education Guide. The IPS Education Guide includes nine lessons that give students an…

  19. Domestic exotics and the perception of invasibility

    Treesearch

    Qinfeng Guo; Robert Ricklefs

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility of an area to invasion by exotic species is often judged by the fraction of introduced species in the local biota. However, the degree of invasion, particularly in mainland areas, has often been underestimated because of the exclusion of ‘domestic exotics’ (those introduced to internal units from within the national border) in calculations. Because all...

  20. Invasive disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Crump, John A; van Ingen, Jakko; Morrissey, Anne B; Boeree, Martin J; Mavura, Daudi R; Swai, Britta; Thielman, Nathan M; Bartlett, John A; Grossman, Henning; Maro, Venance P; van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Data on nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease in sub-Saharan Africa are limited. During 2006-2008, we identified 3 HIV-infected patients in northern Tanzania who had invasive NTM; 2 were infected with "Mycobacterium sherrisii" and 1 with M. avium complex sequevar MAC-D. Invasive NTM disease is present in HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. Chapter 3: Plant invasions and fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Matthew L. Brooks

    2008-01-01

    The alteration of fire regimes is one of the most significant ways that plant invasions can affect ecosystems (Brooks and others 2004; D'Antonio 2000; D'Antonio and Vitousek 1992; Vitousek 1990). The suites of changes that can accompany an invasion include both direct effects of invaders on native plants through competitive interference, and indirect effects...

  2. Economic Analysis of Biological Invasions in Forests

    Treesearch

    Tomas P. Holmes; Julian Aukema; Jeffrey Englin; Robert G. Haight; Kent Kovacs; Brian Leung

    2014-01-01

    Biological invasions of native forests by nonnative pests result from complex stochastic processes that are difficult to predict. Although economic optimization models describe efficient controls across the stages of an invasion, the ability to calibrate such models is constrained by lack of information on pest population dynamics and consequent economic damages. Here...

  3. Economic aspects of invasive forest pest management

    Treesearch

    Thomas P. Holmes; Kathleen P. Bell; Brenna Byrne; Jeremy S. Wilson

    2008-01-01

    The past decade has evidenced growing concern with the causes and consequences of biological invasions, many of which are economic in nature(Perrings et al. 2002). The risk of a new pest introduction is positively correlated with world trade flows (Costello and McAusland 2003, Margolis et al. 2005) and new invasions threaten the productivity and biological diversity of...

  4. Lack of belowground mutualisms hinders Pinaceae invasions.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Martin A; Horton, Thomas R; Simberloff, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Why particular invasions succeed and others fail is not well understood. The role of soil biota has been proposed as important. However, the role of mutualists has received much less attention than that of pathogens. Here we report that lack of adequate ectomycorrhizal fungi hinders invasion by exotic Pinaceae on Isla Victoria, Argentina, by reducing both the probability of establishment and growth of invading individuals. More than one hundred exotic tree species were introduced to this island ca. 80 years ago, but invasive trees are found in high densities only in areas adjacent to plantations. With a series of greenhouse and field experiments we found lower mycorrhizal colonization levels and few fungal species far from original plantings, and key fungal mutualists are confined to areas near plantations, probably owing to dispersal limitations. Low inoculum levels far from the plantations are retarding the invasion. Our experiments indicate that positive interactions belowground can play a key but underappreciated role in invasion dynamics.

  5. Foam invasion through a single pore.

    PubMed

    Delbos, Aline; Pitois, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    We investigate experimentally the behavior of liquid foams pumped at a given flow rate through a single pore, in the situation where the pore diameter is smaller than the bubble diameter. Results reveal that foam invasion can be observed only within a restricted range of values for the dimensionless flow rate and the foam liquid fraction. Within this foam invasion regime, the liquid content of invading foams is measured to be three times higher than the initial liquid content. Outside this regime, both gas alone and liquid alone invasion regimes can be observed. The gas invasion regime results from the rupture of foam films during local T1, during bubble rearrangements events induced by foam flow, whereas the liquid invasion regime is allowed by the formation of a stable cluster of jammed bubbles at the pore's opening.

  6. The hallmarks of CAFs in cancer invasion.

    PubMed

    Attieh, Youmna; Vignjevic, Danijela Matic

    2016-11-01

    The ability of cancer cells to move out of the primary tumor and disseminate through the circulation to form metastases is one of the main contributors to poor patient outcome. The tumor microenvironment provides a niche that supports cancer cell invasion and proliferation. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a highly enriched cell population in the tumor microenvironment that plays an important role in cancer invasion. However, it remains unclear whether CAFs directly stimulate cancer cell invasion or they remodel the extracellular matrix to make it more permissive for invasion. Here we discuss paracrine communication between cancer cells and CAFs that promotes tumor invasion but also stimulates CAFs to remodel the matrix increasing cancer dissemination.

  7. Mitochondrial redox signaling and cancer invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Enns, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The concept that invasive cancer is associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by mitochondria is consistent with an ROS-mediated signaling mechanism. As a tumor grows, it encounters adverse microenvironments, one of which is low oxygen (hypoxia), which selects tumor cells with characteristics of increased invasiveness. Hypoxic environments select for tumor cells with stabilized HIF1 apha, a transcription factor that regulates genes coding for pro-tumor cytokines that signal stromal cells such as macrophages and fibroblasts to support an invasive tumor cell phenotype. HIF1 alpha-mediated switches in the energy production of tumor cells from OXPHOS to glycolysis, as well as age-associated decreases in the metabolic rate of the host, enhance invasive qualities of tumor cells. An increase in environmental oxygen in combination with a mitochondrial targeted catalase mimetic and a metabolism booster may be of interest to investigate as a treatment strategy for invasive cancer. PMID:22886605

  8. Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Arian D; Johnson, Christopher N; Ritchie, Euan G; O'Neill, Adam J

    2010-08-01

    Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia's apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom-up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re-establish top-down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity.

  9. A reported 20-gene expression signature to predict lymph node-positive disease at radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is clinically not applicable

    PubMed Central

    van Kessel, Kim E. M.; van de Werken, Harmen J. G.; Lurkin, Irene; Ziel – van der Made, Angelique C. J.; Zwarthoff, Ellen C.; Boormans, Joost L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) provides a small but significant survival benefit. Nevertheless, controversies on applying NAC remain because the limited benefit must be weight against chemotherapy-related toxicity and the delay of definitive local treatment. Therefore, there is a clear clinical need for tools to guide treatment decisions on NAC in MIBC. Here, we aimed to validate a previously reported 20-gene expression signature that predicted lymph node-positive disease at radical cystectomy in clinically node-negative MIBC patients, which would be a justification for upfront chemotherapy. Methods We studied diagnostic transurethral resection of bladder tumors (dTURBT) of 150 MIBC patients (urothelial carcinoma) who were subsequently treated by radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. RNA was isolated and the expression level of the 20 genes was determined on a qRT-PCR platform. Normalized Ct values were used to calculate a risk score to predict the presence of node-positive disease. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA expression data was analyzed to subsequently validate the results. Results In a univariate regression analysis, none of the 20 genes significantly correlated with node-positive disease. The area under the curve of the risk score calculated by the 20-gene expression signature was 0.54 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.44-0.65) versus 0.67 for the model published by Smith et al. Node-negative patients had a significantly lower tumor grade at TURBT (p = 0.03), a lower pT stage (p<0.01) and less frequent lymphovascular invasion (13% versus 38%, p<0.01) at radical cystectomy than node-positive patients. In addition, in the TCGA data, none of the 20 genes was differentially expressed in node-negative versus node-positive patients. Conclusions We conclude that a 20-gene expression signature developed for nodal staging of MIBC at radical cystectomy could not be validated on a qRT-PCR platform in a

  10. Evolutionary dynamics of tree invasions: complementing the unified framework for biological invasions

    PubMed Central

    Dickie, Ian A.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Hirsch, Heidi; Crous, Casparus J.; Meyerson, Laura A.; Burgess, Treena I.; Zimmermann, Thalita G.; Klock, Metha M.; Siemann, Evan; Erfmeier, Alexandra; Aragon, Roxana; Montti, Lia; Le Roux, Johannes J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Evolutionary processes greatly impact the outcomes of biological invasions. An extensive body of research suggests that invasive populations often undergo phenotypic and ecological divergence from their native sources. Evolution also operates at different and distinct stages during the invasion process. Thus, it is important to incorporate evolutionary change into frameworks of biological invasions because it allows us to conceptualize how these processes may facilitate or hinder invasion success. Here, we review such processes, with an emphasis on tree invasions, and place them in the context of the unified framework for biological invasions. The processes and mechanisms described are pre-introduction evolutionary history, sampling effect, founder effect, genotype-by-environment interactions, admixture, hybridization, polyploidization, rapid evolution, epigenetics and second-genomes. For the last, we propose that co-evolved symbionts, both beneficial and harmful, which are closely physiologically associated with invasive species, contain critical genetic traits that affect the evolutionary dynamics of biological invasions. By understanding the mechanisms underlying invasion success, researchers will be better equipped to predict, understand and manage biological invasions. PMID:28039118

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of tree invasions: complementing the unified framework for biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Zenni, Rafael Dudeque; Dickie, Ian A; Wingfield, Michael J; Hirsch, Heidi; Crous, Casparus J; Meyerson, Laura A; Burgess, Treena I; Zimmermann, Thalita G; Klock, Metha M; Siemann, Evan; Erfmeier, Alexandra; Aragon, Roxana; Montti, Lia; Le Roux, Johannes J

    2016-12-30

    Evolutionary processes greatly impact the outcomes of biological invasions. An extensive body of research suggests that invasive populations often undergo phenotypic and ecological divergence from their native sources. Evolution also operates at different and distinct stages during the invasion process. Thus, it is important to incorporate evolutionary change into frameworks of biological invasions because it allows us to conceptualize how these processes may facilitate or hinder invasion success. Here, we review such processes, with an emphasis on tree invasions, and place them in the context of the unified framework for biological invasions. The processes and mechanisms described are pre-introduction evolutionary history, sampling effect, founder effect, genotype-by-environment interactions, admixture, hybridization, polyploidization, rapid evolution, epigenetics, and second-genomes. For the last, we propose that co-evolved symbionts, both beneficial and harmful, which are closely physiologically associated with invasive species, contain critical genetic traits that affect the evolutionary dynamics of biological invasions. By understanding the mechanisms underlying invasion success, researchers will be better equipped to predict, understand, and manage biological invasions.

  12. Invasive plants may promote predator-mediated feedback that inhibits further invasion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lauren M; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the impacts of invasive species requires placing invasion within a full community context. Plant invaders are often considered in the context of herbivores that may drive invasion by avoiding invaders while consuming natives (enemy escape), or inhibit invasion by consuming invaders (biotic resistance). However, predators that attack those herbivores are rarely considered as major players in invasion. Invasive plants often promote predators, generally by providing improved habitat. Here, we show that predator-promoting invaders may initiate a negative feedback loop that inhibits invasion. By enabling top-down control of herbivores, predator-promoting invaders lose any advantage gained through enemy escape, indirectly favoring natives. In cases where palatable invaders encounter biotic resistance, predator promotion may allow an invader to persist, but not dominate. Overall, results indicate that placing invaders in a full community context may reveal reduced impacts of invaders compared to expectations based on simple plant-plant or plant-herbivore subsystems.

  13. Invasive plants may promote predator-mediated feedback that inhibits further invasion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lauren M; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of invasive species requires placing invasion within a full community context. Plant invaders are often considered in the context of herbivores that may drive invasion by avoiding invaders while consuming natives (enemy escape), or inhibit invasion by consuming invaders (biotic resistance). However, predators that attack those herbivores are rarely considered as major players in invasion. Invasive plants often promote predators, generally by providing improved habitat. Here, we show that predator-promoting invaders may initiate a negative feedback loop that inhibits invasion. By enabling top-down control of herbivores, predator-promoting invaders lose any advantage gained through enemy escape, indirectly favoring natives. In cases where palatable invaders encounter biotic resistance, predator promotion may allow an invader to persist, but not dominate. Overall, results indicate that placing invaders in a full community context may reveal reduced impacts of invaders compared to expectations based on simple plant–plant or plant–herbivore subsystems. PMID:26120430

  14. Non-invasive (and minimally invasive) diagnosis of oesophageal varices.

    PubMed

    de Franchis, Roberto

    2008-10-01

    Current guidelines recommend screening all cirrhotic patients by endoscopy, to identify patients at risk of bleeding who should undergo prophylactic treatment. However, since the prevalence of varices in cirrhotic patients is variable, universal screening would imply a large number of unnecessary endoscopies and a heavy burden for endoscopy units. In addition, compliance to screening programs may be hampered by the perceived unpleasantness of endoscopy. Predicting the presence of oesophageal varices by non-invasive means might increase compliance and would permit to restrict the performance of endoscopy to those patients with a high probability of having varices. Over the years, several studies have addressed this issue by assessing the potential of biochemical, clinical and ultrasound parameters, transient elastography, CT scanning and video capsule endoscopy. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio, CT scanning and video capsule endoscopy have shown promising performance characteristics, although none of them is equivalent to EGD. These methods are perceived by patients as preferable to endoscopy and thus might increase adherence to screening programs. Whether this will compensate for the lower sensitivity of these alternative techniques, and ultimately improve the outcomes if more patients undergo screening, is the crucial question that will have to be answered in the future.

  15. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  16. Quantifying levels of biological invasion: towards the objective classification of invaded and invasible ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Catford, Jane A; Vesk, Peter A; Richardson, David M; Pyšek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Biological invasions are a global phenomenon that threatens biodiversity, and few, if any, ecosystems are free from alien species. The outcome of human-mediated introductions is affected by the invasiveness of species and invasibility of ecosystems, but research has primarily focused on defining, characterizing and identifying invasive species; ecosystem invasibility has received much less attention. A prerequisite for characterizing invasibility is the ability to compare levels of invasion across ecosystems. In this paper, we aim to identify the best way to quantify the level of invasion by nonnative animals and plants by reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of different metrics. We explore how interpretation and choice of these measures can depend on the objective of a study or management intervention. Based on our review, we recommend two invasion indices and illustrate their use by applying them to two case studies. Relative alien species richness and relative alien species abundance indicate the contribution that alien species make to a community. They are easy to measure, can be applied to various taxa, are independent of scale and are comparable across regions and ecosystems, and historical data are often available. The relationship between relative alien richness and abundance can indicate the presence of dominant alien species and the trajectory of invasion over time, and can highlight ecosystems and sites that are heavily invaded or especially susceptible to invasion. Splitting species into functional groups and examining invasion patterns of transformer species may be particularly instructive for gauging effects of alien invasion on ecosystem structure and function. Establishing standard, transparent ways to define and quantify invasion level will facilitate meaningful comparisons among studies, ecosystem types and regions. It is essential for progress in ecology and will help guide ecosystem restoration and management.

  17. Successful approaches for battling invasive species in developed countries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biological invasions increasingly threaten natural resources and reduce biological diversity worldwide. To curtail biological invasions, developed countries have adopted multitire approaches that systematically address the process of invasion, encompassing introduction, establishment, spread and nat...

  18. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  19. Invasive aspergillosis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Chatterjee, Shiv Sekhar; Das, Ashim; Shivaprakash, M R

    2011-04-01

    To review invasive aspergillosis (IA) in developing countries, we included those countries, which are mentioned in the document of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), called the Emerging and Developing Economies List, 2009. A PubMed/Medline literature search was performed for studies concerning IA reported during 1970 through March 2010 from these countries. IA is an important cause of morbidity and mortality of hospitalized patients of developing countries, though the exact frequency of the disease is not known due to inadequate reporting and facilities to diagnose. Only a handful of centers from India, China, Thailand, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Sudan, South Africa, Turkey, Hungary, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Argentina had reported case series of IA. As sub-optimum hospital care practice, hospital renovation work in the vicinity of immunocompromised patients, overuse or misuse of steroids and broad-spectrum antibiotics, use of contaminated infusion sets/fluid, and increase in intravenous drug abusers have been reported from those countries, it is expected to find a high rate of IA among patients with high risk, though hard data is missing in most situations. Besides classical risk factors for IA, liver failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and tuberculosis are the newly recognized underlying diseases associated with IA. In Asia, Africa and Middle East sino-orbital or cerebral aspergillosis, and Aspergillus endophthalmitis are emerging diseases and Aspergillus flavus is the predominant species isolated from these infections. The high frequency of A. flavus isolation from these patients may be due to higher prevalence of the fungus in the environment. Cerebral aspergillosis cases are largely due to an extension of the lesion from invasive Aspergillus sinusitis. The majority of the centers rely on conventional techniques including direct microscopy, histopathology, and culture to diagnose IA

  20. Invasive predators and global biodiversity loss

    PubMed Central

    Glen, Alistair S.; Nimmo, Dale G.; Ritchie, Euan G.; Dickman, Chris R.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species threaten biodiversity globally, and invasive mammalian predators are particularly damaging, having contributed to considerable species decline and extinction. We provide a global metaanalysis of these impacts and reveal their full extent. Invasive predators are implicated in 87 bird, 45 mammal, and 10 reptile species extinctions—58% of these groups’ contemporary extinctions worldwide. These figures are likely underestimated because 23 critically endangered species that we assessed are classed as “possibly extinct.” Invasive mammalian predators endanger a further 596 species at risk of extinction, with cats, rodents, dogs, and pigs threatening the most species overall. Species most at risk from predators have high evolutionary distinctiveness and inhabit insular environments. Invasive mammalian predators are therefore important drivers of irreversible loss of phylogenetic diversity worldwide. That most impacted species are insular indicates that management of invasive predators on islands should be a global conservation priority. Understanding and mitigating the impact of invasive mammalian predators is essential for reducing the rate of global biodiversity loss. PMID:27638204

  1. Global threat to agriculture from invasive species

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Dean R.; Sheppard, Andy W.; Cook, David C.; De Barro, Paul J.; Worner, Susan P.; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species present significant threats to global agriculture, although how the magnitude and distribution of the threats vary between countries and regions remains unclear. Here, we present an analysis of almost 1,300 known invasive insect pests and pathogens, calculating the total potential cost of these species invading each of 124 countries of the world, as well as determining which countries present the greatest threat to the rest of the world given their trading partners and incumbent pool of invasive species. We find that countries vary in terms of potential threat from invasive species and also their role as potential sources, with apparently similar countries sometimes varying markedly depending on specifics of agricultural commodities and trade patterns. Overall, the biggest agricultural producers (China and the United States) could experience the greatest absolute cost from further species invasions. However, developing countries, in particular, Sub-Saharan African countries, appear most vulnerable in relative terms. Furthermore, China and the United States represent the greatest potential sources of invasive species for the rest of the world. The analysis reveals considerable scope for ongoing redistribution of known invasive pests and highlights the need for international cooperation to slow their spread. PMID:27325781

  2. Eating the competition speeds up invasions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard J

    2011-04-23

    Many introduced species engage in intraguild predation (IGP), the consumption of species with which they compete for shared resources. While the factors influencing local persistence of IG predator and prey species are well-understood, using these factors to predict the invasion speed of an introduced IG predator has received less attention. Existing theory predicts that native competitors slow invasions via depletion of shared resources, but this fails to account for additional resources acquired when an invader consumes competitors. Here, I outline a general framework for understanding the effect of IGP on invasion speeds. I find that invaders that consume native competitors may be able to spread where invasion by pure competitors would fail, and that invasion speed increases with increasing levels of IGP. Notably, if the benefit from consuming competitors outweighs the loss of shared resources to competitors, invasion proceeds faster than invasion in the absence of competitors. This may explain empirical observations of rapid spread rates of invaders that feed at multiple trophic levels.

  3. Fort Collins Science Center: Invasive Species Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Tom

    2004-01-01

    FORT is also the administrative home of the National Institute of Invasive Species Science, a growing consortium of partnerships between government and private organizations established by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its many cooperators. The Institute was formed to develop cooperative approaches for invasive species science that meet the urgent needs of land managers and the public. Its mission is to work with others to coordinate data and research from many sources to predict and reduce the effects of harmful nonnative plants, animals, and diseases in natural areas and throughout the United States, with a strategic approach to information management, research, modeling, technical assistance, and outreach. The Institute research team will develop local-, regional-, and national- scale maps of invasive species and identify priority invasive species, vulnerable habitats, and pathways of invasion. County-level and point data on occurrence will be linked to plot-level and site-level information on species abundance and spread. FORT scientists and Institute partners are working to integrate remote sensing data and GIS-based predictive models to track the spread of invasive species across the country. This information will be linked to control and restoration efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Understanding both successes and failures will advance the science of invasive species containment and control as well as restoration of habitats and native biodiversity.

  4. Global threat to agriculture from invasive species.

    PubMed

    Paini, Dean R; Sheppard, Andy W; Cook, David C; De Barro, Paul J; Worner, Susan P; Thomas, Matthew B

    2016-07-05

    Invasive species present significant threats to global agriculture, although how the magnitude and distribution of the threats vary between countries and regions remains unclear. Here, we present an analysis of almost 1,300 known invasive insect pests and pathogens, calculating the total potential cost of these species invading each of 124 countries of the world, as well as determining which countries present the greatest threat to the rest of the world given their trading partners and incumbent pool of invasive species. We find that countries vary in terms of potential threat from invasive species and also their role as potential sources, with apparently similar countries sometimes varying markedly depending on specifics of agricultural commodities and trade patterns. Overall, the biggest agricultural producers (China and the United States) could experience the greatest absolute cost from further species invasions. However, developing countries, in particular, Sub-Saharan African countries, appear most vulnerable in relative terms. Furthermore, China and the United States represent the greatest potential sources of invasive species for the rest of the world. The analysis reveals considerable scope for ongoing redistribution of known invasive pests and highlights the need for international cooperation to slow their spread.

  5. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  6. Assessing Biofuel Crop Invasiveness: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Buddenhagen, Christopher Evan; Chimera, Charles; Clifford, Patti

    2009-01-01

    Background There is widespread interest in biofuel crops as a solution to the world's energy needs, particularly in light of concerns over greenhouse-gas emissions. Despite reservations about their adverse environmental impacts, no attempt has been made to quantify actual, relative or potential invasiveness of terrestrial biofuel crops at an appropriate regional or international scale, and their planting continues to be largely unregulated. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a widely accepted weed risk assessment system, we analyzed a comprehensive list of regionally suitable biofuel crops to show that seventy percent have a high risk of becoming invasive versus one-quarter of non-biofuel plant species and are two to four times more likely to establish wild populations locally or be invasive in Hawaii or in other locations with a similar climate. Conclusions/Significance Because of climatic and ecological similarities, predictions of biofuel crop invasiveness in Hawaii are applicable to other vulnerable island and subtropical ecosystems worldwide. We demonstrate the utility of an accessible and scientifically proven risk assessment protocol that allows users to predict if introduced species will become invasive in their region of interest. Other evidence supports the contention that propagule pressure created by extensive plantings will exacerbate invasions, a scenario expected with large-scale biofuel crop cultivation. Proactive measures, such as risk assessments, should be employed to predict invasion risks, which could then be mitigated via implementation of appropriate planting policies and adoption of the “polluter-pays” principle. PMID:19384412

  7. Dynamics of an experimental microbial invasion.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Francisco; Zamor, Richard M; Najar, Fares Z; Roe, Bruce A; Hambright, K David

    2015-09-15

    The ecological dynamics underlying species invasions have been a major focus of research in macroorganisms for the last five decades. However, we still know little about the processes behind invasion by unicellular organisms. To expand our knowledge of microbial invasions, we studied the roles of propagule pressure, nutrient supply, and biotic resistance in the invasion success of a freshwater invasive alga, Prymnesium parvum, using microcosms containing natural freshwater microbial assemblages. Microcosms were subjected to a factorial design with two levels of nutrient-induced diversity and three levels of propagule pressure, and incubated for 7 d, during which P. parvum densities and microbial community composition were tracked. Successful invasion occurred in microcosms receiving high propagule pressure whereas nutrients or community diversity played no role in invasion success. Invaded communities experienced distinctive changes in composition compared with communities where the invasion was unsuccessful. Successfully invaded microbial communities had an increased abundance of fungi and ciliates, and decreased abundances of diatoms and cercozoans. Many of these changes mirrored the microbial community changes detected during a natural P. parvum bloom in the source system. This role of propagule pressure is particularly relevant for P. parvum in the reservoir-dominated southern United States because this species can form large, sustained blooms that can generate intense propagule pressures for downstream sites. Human impact and global climate change are currently causing widespread environmental changes in most southern US freshwater systems that may facilitate P. parvum establishment and, when coupled with strong propagule pressure, could put many more systems at risk for invasion.

  8. Dynamics of an experimental microbial invasion

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Francisco; Zamor, Richard M.; Najar, Fares Z.; Roe, Bruce A.; Hambright, K. David

    2015-01-01

    The ecological dynamics underlying species invasions have been a major focus of research in macroorganisms for the last five decades. However, we still know little about the processes behind invasion by unicellular organisms. To expand our knowledge of microbial invasions, we studied the roles of propagule pressure, nutrient supply, and biotic resistance in the invasion success of a freshwater invasive alga, Prymnesium parvum, using microcosms containing natural freshwater microbial assemblages. Microcosms were subjected to a factorial design with two levels of nutrient-induced diversity and three levels of propagule pressure, and incubated for 7 d, during which P. parvum densities and microbial community composition were tracked. Successful invasion occurred in microcosms receiving high propagule pressure whereas nutrients or community diversity played no role in invasion success. Invaded communities experienced distinctive changes in composition compared with communities where the invasion was unsuccessful. Successfully invaded microbial communities had an increased abundance of fungi and ciliates, and decreased abundances of diatoms and cercozoans. Many of these changes mirrored the microbial community changes detected during a natural P. parvum bloom in the source system. This role of propagule pressure is particularly relevant for P. parvum in the reservoir-dominated southern United States because this species can form large, sustained blooms that can generate intense propagule pressures for downstream sites. Human impact and global climate change are currently causing widespread environmental changes in most southern US freshwater systems that may facilitate P. parvum establishment and, when coupled with strong propagule pressure, could put many more systems at risk for invasion. PMID:26324928

  9. Study of melanoma invasion by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sulé-Suso, J.; Sockalingum, G. D.

    2008-02-01

    Compared to other forms of skin cancer, a malignant melanoma has a high risk of spreading to other parts of the body. Melanoma invasion is a complex process involving changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction and cell-cell interactions. To fully understand the factors which control the invasion process, a human skin model system was reconstructed. HBL (a commercially available cell line) melanoma cells were seeded on a skin model with and without the presence of keratinocytes and/or fibroblasts. After 14 days culture, the skin specimens were fixed, parafin embedded and cut into 7 µm sections. The de-parafinised sections were investigated by synchrotron Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy to study skin cell invasion behaviour. The advantage of using FTIR is its ability to obtain the fingerprint information of the invading cells in terms of protein secondary structure in comparison to non-invading cells and the concentration of the enzyme (matrix-metalloproteinase) which digests protein matrix, near the invading cells. With aid of the spectral mapping images, it is possible to pinpoint the cells in non-invasion and invasion area and analyse the respective spectra. It has been observed that the protein bands in cells and matrix shifted between non-invasive and invasive cells in the reconstructed skin model. We hypothesise that by careful analysis of the FTIR data and validation by other models, FTIR studies can reveal information on which type of cells and proteins are involved in melanoma invasion. Thus, it is possible to trace the cell invasion path by mapping the spectra along the interface of cell layer and matrix body by FTIR spectroscopy.

  10. Invasion exponents in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetrius, Lloyd; Gundlach, Volker Matthias; Ochs, Gunter

    2009-03-01

    This article is concerned with the characterization of invasion exponents in biological networks defined by a population of replicating elements: molecules, cells, higher organisms. We show that the outcome of competition between an invader and a resident population is a stochastic process, determined by the rate at which a population returns to its steady state after a random perturbation in the parameters that characterize the replicating elements. This return rate is defined by the macroscopic parameter evolutionary entropy, a measure of the diversity of the interaction between the individuals in the population. We also show that the evolutionary stability of a population, that is the invulnerability of a resident to the introduction of an invader competing for the available resources, are given by extremal states of entropy. These results which pertain to networks of interacting molecules, cells and higher organisms, are generalizations of results established for demographic networks, that is populations of replicating organisms parametrized by the ages at which they reproduce and die.

  11. Galactomannan antigenemia in invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, E; Lehmann, P F

    1979-01-01

    Galactomannan (GM) extracted from mycelia of Aspergillus fumigatus with cold dilute alkali reacted with antiserum specific for an antigen that circulated in invasive aspergillosis in rabbits and humans. The GM was purified by its affinity for concanavalin A and was separated from a nonantigenic glucan by gel permeation on Sephacryl S-200. The GM molecular weight of between 25,000 to 75,000 was smaller than the antigen present in infected rabbit serum which was retained by an ultrafiltration membrane that had a nominal molecular weight limit of 125,000. The ratio of galactose to mannose present in GM was 1:1.17. The serological activity of GM was stable to boiling but labile to 0.01 N HCl, implicating galactofuranose as an antigenic determinant. Analysis of purified GM by methylation-gas chromatography suggested a structure consisting of a 1 leads to 6-linked mannan backbone with oligogalactoside side chains 3 units long, terminating in galactofuranose. The presence of mannose as a side chain component was also inferred. Another antigen of A. fumigatus, which did not bind to concanavalin A, was isolated after tandem chromatography on diethylaminoethyl- and carboxymethyl-Sephadex and was identified as a galactan. The galactan inhibited the immune precipitation of GM was specific antiserum. Images PMID:383620

  12. Invasive leaf resources alleviate density dependence in the invasive mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Zarrabi, Ali A.; Lounibos, L. Philip

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between invasive species can have important consequences for the speed and impact of biological invasions. Containers occupied by the invasive mosquito, Aedes albopictus Skuse, may be sensitive to invasive plants whose leaves fall into this larval habitat. To examine the potential for interactions between invasive leaf species and larval A. albopictus, we conducted a field survey of leaf material found with A. albopictus in containers in Palm Beach County, Florida and measured density dependent responses of A. albopictus larvae to two invasive and one native leaf species in laboratory experiments. We found increased diversity of leaf species, particularly invasive species, in areas further from the urbanized coast, and a significant positive association between the presence of Schinus terebinthifolious (Brazilian pepper) and the abundance of A. albopictus. In laboratory experiments, we determined that larval growth and survivorship were significantly affected by both larval density and leaf species which, in turn, resulted in higher population performance on the most abundant invasive species (Brazilian pepper) relative to the most abundant native species, Quercus virginiana (live oak). These results suggest invasive leaf species can alleviate density dependent reductions in population performance in A. albopictus, and may contribute to its invasion success and potential to spread infectious disease. PMID:22523473

  13. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

    PubMed

    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants.

  14. Plant invasion across space and time: factors affecting nonindigenous species success during four stages of invasion.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Kathleen A; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    Invasive nonindigenous plant species (NIPS) threaten native diversity, alter ecosystem processes, and may interact with other components of global environmental change. Here, a general framework is outlined that attempts to connect patterns of plant invasion to processes underlying these patterns at four well-established spatio-temporal stages of the invasion process: transport, colonization, establishment, and landscape spread. At each stage we organize findings and ideas about the filters that limit NIPS success and the interaction of these filters with historical aspects of introduction events, NIPS traits, and ecosystem properties. While it remains difficult to draw conclusions about the risk of invasion across ecosystems, to delineate universal 'invader traits', or to predict large-scale extinctions following invasions, this review highlights the growing body of research that suggests that the success of invasive NIPS is controlled by a series of key processes or filters. These filters are common to all invasion events, and will interact throughout the stages of plant invasion, although the relative importance of a filter may be stage, species or location specific. It is suggested that both research and management programs may benefit from employing multiscale and stage approaches to studying and controlling invasion. We further use the framework to briefly examine potential interactions between climate change and filters that limit NIPS invasion.

  15. Invasive leaf resources alleviate density dependence in the invasive mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Reiskind, Michael H; Zarrabi, Ali A; Lounibos, L Philip

    2010-07-01

    Interactions between invasive species can have important consequences for the speed and impact of biological invasions. Containers occupied by the invasive mosquito, Aedes albopictus Skuse, may be sensitive to invasive plants whose leaves fall into this larval habitat. To examine the potential for interactions between invasive leaf species and larval A. albopictus, we conducted a field survey of leaf material found with A. albopictus in containers in Palm Beach County, Florida and measured density dependent responses of A. albopictus larvae to two invasive and one native leaf species in laboratory experiments. We found increased diversity of leaf species, particularly invasive species, in areas further from the urbanized coast, and a significant positive association between the presence of Schinus terebinthifolious (Brazilian pepper) and the abundance of A. albopictus. In laboratory experiments, we determined that larval growth and survivorship were significantly affected by both larval density and leaf species which, in turn, resulted in higher population performance on the most abundant invasive species (Brazilian pepper) relative to the most abundant native species, Quercus virginiana (live oak). These results suggest invasive leaf species can alleviate density dependent reductions in population performance in A. albopictus, and may contribute to its invasion success and potential to spread infectious disease.

  16. Aquatic invasive species: Lessons from cancer research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Adam; Ray, Andrew; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Gross, Jackson A.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic invasive species are disrupting ecosystems with increasing frequency. Successful control of these invasions has been rare: Biologists and managers have few tools for fighting aquatic invaders. In contrast, the medical community has long worked to develop tools for preventing and fighting cancer. Its successes are marked by a coordinated research approach with multiple steps: prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment options and rehabilitation. The authors discuss how these steps can be applied to aquatic invasive species, such as the American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus), in the Northern Rocky Mountain region of the United States, to expedite tool development and implementation along with achievement of biodiversity conservation goals.

  17. Clinical technique for invasive cervical root resorption

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Luiz Fernando Machado; Silveira, Carina Folgearini; Martos, Josué; Piovesan, Edno Moacir; César Neto, João Batista

    2011-01-01

    This clinical case report describes the diagnosis and treatment of an external invasive cervical resorption. A 17-year-old female patient had a confirmed diagnosis of invasive cervical resorption class 4 by cone beam computerized tomography. Although, there was no communication with the root canal, the invasive resorption process was extending into the cervical and middle third of the root. The treatment of the cervical resorption of the lateral incisor interrupted the resorptive process and restored the damaged root surface and the dental functions without any esthetic sequelae. Both the radiographic examination and computed tomography are imperative to reveal the extent of the defect in the differential diagnosis. PMID:22144822

  18. Minimally invasive treatments for venous compression syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hulsberg, Paul C.; McLoney, Eric; Partovi, Sasan; Davidson, Jon C.

    2016-01-01

    The management of venous compression syndromes has historically been reliant on surgical treatment when conservative measures fail. There are, however, several settings in which endovascular therapy can play a significant role as an adjunct or even a replacement to more invasive surgical methods. We explore the role of minimally invasive treatment options for three of the most well-studied venous compression syndromes. The clinical aspects and pathophysiology of Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS), nutcracker syndrome, and May-Thurner syndrome are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the role that interventionalists can play in minimally invasive treatment. PMID:28123978

  19. The Nebulous Ecology of Native Invasions.

    PubMed

    Nackley, Lloyd L; West, Adam G; Skowno, Andrew L; Bond, William J

    2017-09-07

    In the Anthropocene, alien species are no longer the only category of biological organism establishing and rapidly spreading beyond historical boundaries. We review evidence showing that invasions by native species are a global phenomenon and present case studies from Southern Africa, and elsewhere, that reveal how climate-mediated expansions of native plants into adjacent communities can emulate the functional and structural changes associated with invasions by alien plant species. We conclude that integrating native invasions into ecological practice and theory will improve mechanistic models and better inform policy and adaptive ecological management in the 21st century. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evolution Arrests Invasions of Cooperative Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Kirill S.

    2015-11-01

    Population expansions trigger many biomedical and ecological transitions, from tumor growth to invasions of non-native species. Although population spreading often selects for more invasive phenotypes, we show that this outcome is far from inevitable. In cooperative populations, mutations reducing dispersal have a competitive advantage. Such mutations then steadily accumulate at the expansion front, bringing invasion to a halt. Our findings are a rare example of evolution driving the population into an unfavorable state, and they could lead to new strategies to combat unwelcome invaders.

  1. [CD147 expression in non-invasive and invasive breast carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Saki; Sakurai, Kenichi; Suzuki, Shuhei; Hara, Yukiko; Maeda, Tetsuyo; Hirano, Tomohisa; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Amano, Sadao; Koshinaga, Tsugumichi

    2014-10-01

    CD147 is a multifunctional membrane glycoprotein involved in tumor invasion, and is overexpressed in many solid tumors. However, the role of CD147 in breast cancer is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate CD147 expression in non-invasive and invasive ductal carcinomas. We recruited 156 breast cancer patients who underwent radical operations at our hospital up until 2002. We performed immunohistochemistry on their tumor specimens, and compared these data with clinicopathological factors. We divided the patients into two groups: group A was comprised of non-invasive ductal carcinomas and group B, invasive ductal carcinomas. The CD147-positive rate was 62.8% for all patients and was higher in group B than group A. In all cases, the CD147-positive rate correlated with clinical stage, number of metastatic lymph nodes, and tumor size. These results implied that CD147 may be involved in the process of breast cancer invasion.

  2. Environmental modeling framework invasiveness: analysis and implications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental modeling frameworks support scientific model development by providing an Application Programming Interface (API) which model developers use to implement models. This paper presents results of an investigation on the framework invasiveness of environmental modeling frameworks. Invasiv...

  3. Environmental modeling framework invasiveness: analysis and implications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental modeling frameworks support scientific model development by providing an Application Programming Interface (API) which model developers use to implement models. This paper presents results of an investigation on the framework invasiveness of environmental modeling frameworks. Invasiven...

  4. Minimally invasive surgery for Achilles tendon pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Minimally invasive trauma and orthopedic surgery is increasingly common, though technically demanding. Its use for pathologies of the Achilles tendon (AT) hold the promise to allow faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, and improved functional outcomes when compared to traditional open procedures, which can lead to difficulty with wound healing because of the tenuous blood supply and increased chance of wound breakdown and infection. We present the recent advances in the field of minimally invasive AT surgery for tendinopathy, acute ruptures, chronic tears, and chronic avulsions of the AT. In our hands, minimally invasive surgery has provided similar results to those obtained with open surgery, with decreased perioperative morbidity, decreased duration of hospital stay, and reduced costs. So far, the studies on minimally invasive orthopedic techniques are of moderate scientific quality with short follow-up periods. Multicenter studies with longer follow-up are needed to justify the long-term advantages of these techniques over traditional ones. PMID:24198547

  5. Will extreme climatic events facilitate biological invasions?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extreme climatic events, such as intense heat waves, hurricanes, floods and droughts, can dramatically affect ecological and evolutionary processes, and more extreme events are projected with ongoing climate change. However, the implications of these events for biological invasions, which themselves...

  6. How to manage biological invasions under globalization.

    PubMed

    Perrings, Charles; Dehnen-Schmutz, Katharina; Touza, Julia; Williamson, Mark

    2005-05-01

    Protecting national borders against biological invasions is becoming increasingly difficult because those whose actions result in invasions seldom bear legal responsibility for those actions. Invasion costs are often an externality (an unintended side effect) of international trade. Externalities are best dealt with by internalizing them; that is, by getting those who harm society to meet the cost. This is the 'polluter pays principle', which, under current trade rules, is difficult to implement. Tariffs could, however, be used to confront exporters with the costs of their actions, and the right to do this should be embedded in trade agreements. At the same time, international aid could be used to protect donor societies against the inability of some other countries to take appropriate biosecurity measures. The impact of invasions can thus be reduced by tackling their economic externalities.

  7. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. Chest . 2012;141(2 ... bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart failure - overview High blood cholesterol ...

  8. Microbial invasions: the process, patterns, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mallon, Cyrus Alexander; Elsas, Jan Dirk van; Salles, Joana Falcão

    2015-11-01

    There has recently been a surge of literature examining microbial invasions into a variety of environments. These studies often include a component of biological diversity as a major factor determining an invader's fate, yet common results are rarely cross-compared. Since many studies only present a snapshot of the entire invasion process, a bird's eye view is required to piece together the entire continuum, which we find consists of introduction, establishment, spread, and impact phases. We further examine the patterns and mechanisms associated with invasion resistance and create a mechanistic synthesis governed by the species richness, species evenness, and resource availability of resident communities. We conclude by exploring the advantages of using a theoretical invasion framework across different fields.

  9. Invasive exotics on the Channel Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEachern, K.; Chaney, S.

    1999-01-01

    Contains spatial distributions of 80 invasive taxa from field surveys 1998-1999 on five islands. Linked database includes information such as occurrence density, vigor, phenology, habitat condition, associated species, substrates.

  10. EBIPM 2013 planner for preventing weed invasion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using a calendar format, this publication is designed for land managers to make management decisions for preventing weed invasions in a timely manner. For each month there are recommendations for wee prevention management actions....

  11. Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

    2007-12-01

    Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review).

  12. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  13. Cell-ECM Interactions in Tumor Invasion.

    PubMed

    He, Xiuxiu; Lee, Byoungkoo; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The cancer cells obtain their invasion potential not only by genetic mutations, but also by changing their cellular biophysical and biomechanical features and adapting to the surrounding microenvironments. The extracellular matrix, as a crucial component of the tumor microenvironment, provides the mechanical support for the tissue, mediates the cell-microenvironment interactions, and plays a key role in cancer cell invasion. The biomechanics of the extracellular matrix, particularly collagen, have been extensively studied in the biomechanics community. Cell migration has also enjoyed much attention from both the experimental and modeling efforts. However, the detailed mechanistic understanding of tumor cell-ECM interactions, especially during cancer invasion, has been unclear. This chapter reviews the recent advances in the studies of ECM biomechanics, cell migration, and cell-ECM interactions in the context of cancer invasion.

  14. 77 FR 23740 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ..., ecological, and human health impacts that invasive species cause. The Council is co-chaired by the Secretary... the Pacific Northwest. A ``systems thinking'' approach to this meeting in both ecological...

  15. The social dimensions of invasive plants.

    PubMed

    Head, Lesley

    2017-06-06

    Invasive plants pose a major environmental management issue. Research into the social dimensions of this issue has flourished over the past decade, as part of the critical examination of relations between human and nonhuman worlds. The social sciences and humanities have made substantial contributions to conceptualizing invasiveness and nativeness; understanding the perceptions, attitudes and values of diverse stakeholders; and analysing the politics and practices of invasive plant management. Cultural analysis allows areas of conflict and commonality to be identified. Social complexity must be added to ecological complexity to understand the causal relationships underlying invasions; and linear understandings of science-policy relationships are too simplistic. Productive connections have been established between recent social and natural science approaches in the context of rapid environmental change and unpredictable futures. Nonetheless, the prevalence of human exceptionalism in the ecological sciences constitutes a major point of divergence between social and natural science perspectives.

  16. Territorial Invasion in the Classroom: Invadee Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Gilda Moss

    1980-01-01

    Reported are the results of a study testing dominance and subordination among the spatially central and peripheral in 14 college classrooms. Differences in the defense of territory, upon invasion, between spatially central and spatially peripheral humans were investigated. (BT)

  17. 78 FR 70317 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... duty of the Council is to provide national leadership regarding invasive species issues. The purpose of... address below.) Call-in number and access code will be provided upon request by calling 202-208-5978...

  18. Monitoring of space invasions: the historical aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudinin, B. A.; Kruchinenko, V. G.; Steklov, A. F.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Dashkiev, G. N.; Steklov, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    The article presents the basic historical stages of creation and development of Network for registration of fireballs invasion into Earth's atmosphere, and perspectives of research of these phenomena in Ukraine.

  19. Invasive Aspergillosis: Epidemiology, Clinical Aspects, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Kevin S; Kauffman, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    Invasive aspergillosis remains an often fatal, difficult-to treat infection in immunocompromised patients. Patients not classically defined as immunocompromised, especially those in an intensive care unit setting, also develop invasive aspergillosis. Clinical clues suggesting angioinvasion and radiographic modalities, especially computed tomographic scans, combined with newer non-culture-based diagnostic techniques, have allowed earlier recognition of invasive aspergillosis. Although mortality remains high, it has greatly decreased over the past 15 years. Voriconazole has supplanted amphotericin B, with its various toxicities, as primary treatment for invasive aspergillosis. Combination therapy with voriconazole and an echinocandin for initial therapy, based on results from a recent controlled clinical trial, could become the standard of care in high-risk patients.

  20. The ethics of surgically invasive neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Ford, Paul J; Deshpande, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    A clear understanding of distinctions and definitions is necessary before determining which types of surgically invasive neuroscience research should be permitted and how the experimental protocols can properly be undertaken. A failure to clarify the ethical distinctions in invasive neuroscience research hinders attempts at ethical analysis and guidance. At least four main distinctions need to be addressed: "invasiveness" as an important moral characteristic; special brain-mind-related risks; research participant selection; and ideologic interpretation of human function. Harm and not invasiveness is the metric by which to measure the ethical permissibility of research. Because of a class of harms to minds and selves, special attention should be paid to value considerations. These considerations need to be addressed by researchers, funders, and review boards to create proper safeguards from conception of research through final application of results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Palep, Jaydeep H

    2009-01-01

    The term “robot” was coined by the Czech playright Karel Capek in 1921 in his play Rossom's Universal Robots. The word “robot” is from the check word robota which means forced labor. The era of robots in surgery commenced in 1994 when the first AESOP (voice controlled camera holder) prototype robot was used clinically in 1993 and then marketed as the first surgical robot ever in 1994 by the US FDA. Since then many robot prototypes like the Endoassist (Armstrong Healthcare Ltd., High Wycombe, Buck, UK), FIPS endoarm (Karlsruhe Research Center, Karlsruhe, Germany) have been developed to add to the functions of the robot and try and increase its utility. Integrated Surgical Systems (now Intuitive Surgery, Inc.) redesigned the SRI Green Telepresence Surgery system and created the daVinci Surgical System® classified as a master-slave surgical system. It uses true 3-D visualization and EndoWrist®. It was approved by FDA in July 2000 for general laparoscopic surgery, in November 2002 for mitral valve repair surgery. The da Vinci robot is currently being used in various fields such as urology, general surgery, gynecology, cardio-thoracic, pediatric and ENT surgery. It provides several advantages to conventional laparoscopy such as 3D vision, motion scaling, intuitive movements, visual immersion and tremor filtration. The advent of robotics has increased the use of minimally invasive surgery among laparoscopically naïve surgeons and expanded the repertoire of experienced surgeons to include more advanced and complex reconstructions. PMID:19547687

  2. [History of minimally invasive surgery].

    PubMed

    Radojcić, Branka; Jokić, Radoica; Grebeldinger, Slobodan; Meljnikov, Igor; Radojić, Nikola

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a historical review and development of minimally invasive surgery. The interest of physicians to "look into the internal organs" has existed since the ancient time. The first described endoscopy was by Hippocrates. He made reference to a rectal speculum. The credit for modern endoscopy belongs to Bozzini. He developed a light conductor which he called "Lichleiter" to avoid the problems of inadequate illumination. In 1853, Desormeaux first introduced the "Lichtleiter" of Bozzini to a patient. Many developments, which occurred independently but almost simultaneously, produced breakthroughs for endoscopy and laparoscopy that were bases for modern instruments. In 1901, Kelling coined the term "coelioskope" to describe the technique that used a cystoscope to examine the abdominal cavity of dogs. In 1910, Jacobaeus used the term "laparothorakoskopie" for the fist time. In 1938, Veress developed the spring-loaded needle for draining ascites and evacuating fluid and air from the chest. Its current modifications make the "Veress" needle a perfect tool to achieve pneumnoperitoneum during laparoscopic surgery. In 1970, Hasson developed a technique performing laparoscopy through a miniature leparotomy incision. The first solid state camera was introduced in 1982 that was the start of "video-laparoscopy". In 1981 Kurt Semm performed first laparoscopic appendectomy. Within a year, all standard surgical procedures were performed laparoscopically. The authors also analyzed the new surgical techniques, such as telesurgery, robotics and virtual reality in current surgical practice. They specially enmphasized the use of laparoscopic access in pediatric surgery which has become a new gold standard in surgical treatment of pediatric patients.

  3. Soil modification by invasive plants: Effects on native and invasive species of mixed-grass prairies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, N.R.; Larson, D.L.; Huerd, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive plants are capable of modifying attributes of soil to facilitate further invasion by conspecifics and other invasive species. We assessed this capability in three important plant invaders of grasslands in the Great Plains region of North America: leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum). In a glasshouse, these three invasives or a group of native species were grown separately through three cycles of growth and soil conditioning in both steam-pasteurized and non-pasteurized soils, after which we assessed seedling growth in these soils. Two of the three invasive species, Bromus and Agropyron, exhibited significant self-facilitation via soil modification. Bromus and Agropyron also had significant facilitative effects on other invasives via soil modification, while Euphorbia had significant antagonistic effects on the other invasives. Both Agropyron and Euphorbia consistently suppressed growth of two of three native forbs, while three native grasses were generally less affected. Almost all intra- and interspecific effects of invasive soil conditioning were dependent upon presence of soil biota from field sites where these species were successful invaders. Overall, these results suggest that that invasive modification of soil microbiota can facilitate plant invasion directly or via 'cross-facilitation' of other invasive species, and moreover has potential to impede restoration of native communities after removal of an invasive species. However, certain native species that are relatively insensitive to altered soil biota (as we observed in the case of the forb Linum lewisii and the native grasses), may be valuable as 'nurse'species in restoration efforts. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. Carcasses of invasive species are predominantly utilized by invasive scavengers in an island ecosystem

    DOE PAGES

    Abernethy, Erin F.; Turner, Kelsey L.; Beasley, James C.; ...

    2016-10-01

    Invasive species have significantly affected ecosystems, particularly islands, and species invasions continue with increasing globalization. Largely unstudied, the influence of invasive species on island ecosystem functions, especially scavenging and decomposition, could be substantive. Quantifying carcass utilization by different scavengers and shifts in community dynamics in the presence of invasive animals is of particular interest for understanding impacts on nutrient recycling. Invasive species could benefit greatly from carcass resources within highly invaded island ecosystems, through increased invasion success and population growth, subsequently exacerbating their impacts on native species. Here, we quantified how experimentally placed invasive amphibian, reptile, small mammal, and birdmore » carcasses were utilized by vertebrate and invertebrate scavengers on the Big Island of Hawai’i in three island habitats: a barren lava field, a vegetated lava field, and a rainforest. We used camera traps to record vertebrate scavengers removing carcasses and elapsed time until removal. We evaluated differences in cavenging between vertebrates and invertebrates and within the vertebrate community across different habitats and carcass types. Despite the small carcass sizes (<1 kg) used in this study, 55% of carcasses were removed by vertebrate scavengers, all invasive: mongoose, rodents, cats, pigs, and a common myna. Our data indicate that invasive vertebrate scavengers in this island ecosystem are highly efficient at assimilating a range of carrion resources across a variety of habitats. Carcasses of invasive animals could contribute substantially to energy budgets of other invasive vertebrate species. Finally, this may be a critical component contributing to successful invasions especially on islands and subsequent impacts on ecosystem function.« less

  5. Aquatic plant community invasibility and scale-dependent patterns in native and invasive species richness.

    PubMed

    Capers, Robert S; Selsky, Roslyn; Bugbee, Gregory J; White, Jason C

    2007-12-01

    Invasive species richness often is negatively correlated with native species richness at the small spatial scale of sampling plots, but positively correlated in larger areas. The pattern at small scales has been interpreted as evidence that native plants can competitively exclude invasive species. Large-scale patterns have been understood to result from environmental heterogeneity, among other causes. We investigated species richness patterns among submerged and floating-leaved aquatic plants (87 native species and eight invasives) in 103 temperate lakes in Connecticut (northeastern USA) and found neither a consistently negative relationship at small (3-m2) scales, nor a positive relationship at large scales. Native species richness at sampling locations was uncorrelated with invasive species richness in 37 of the 60 lakes where invasive plants occurred; richness was negatively correlated in 16 lakes and positively correlated in seven. No correlation between native and invasive species richness was found at larger spatial scales (whole lakes and counties). Increases in richness with area were uncorrelated with abiotic heterogeneity. Logistic regression showed that the probability of occurrence of five invasive species increased in sampling locations (3 m2, n = 2980 samples) where native plants occurred, indicating that native plant species richness provided no resistance against invasion. However, the probability of three invasive species' occurrence declined as native plant density increased, indicating that density, if not species richness, provided some resistance with these species. Density had no effect on occurrence of three other invasive species. Based on these results, native species may resist invasion at small spatial scales only in communities where density is high (i.e., in communities where competition among individuals contributes to community structure). Most hydrophyte communities, however, appear to be maintained in a nonequilibrial condition by

  6. Future of Minimally Invasive Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Whealon, Matthew; Vinci, Alessio; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is slowly taking over as the preferred operative approach for colorectal diseases. However, many of the procedures remain technically difficult. This article will give an overview of the state of minimally invasive surgery and the many advances that have been made over the last two decades. Specifically, we discuss the introduction of the robotic platform and some of its benefits and limitations. We also describe some newer techniques related to robotics. PMID:27582647

  7. Minimally Invasive Forefoot Surgery in France.

    PubMed

    Meusnier, Tristan; Mukish, Prikesht

    2016-06-01

    Study groups have been formed in France to advance the use of minimally invasive surgery. These techniques are becoming more frequently used and the technique nuances are continuing to evolve. The objective of this article was to advance the awareness of the current trends in minimally invasive surgery for common diseases of the forefoot. The percutaneous surgery at the forefoot is less developed at this time, but also will be discussed.

  8. Perspectives on invasive amphibians in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Forti, Lucas Rodriguez; Becker, C. Guilherme; Tacioli, Leandro; Pereira, Vânia Rosa; Santos, André Cid F. A.; Oliveira, Igor; Haddad, Célio F. B.; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Introduced species have the potential to become invasive and jeopardize entire ecosystems. The success of species establishing viable populations outside their original extent depends primarily on favorable climatic conditions in the invasive ranges. Species distribution modeling (SDM) can thus be used to estimate potential habitat suitability for populations of invasive species. Here we review the status of six amphibian species with invasive populations in Brazil (four domestic species and two imported species). We (i) modeled the current habitat suitability and future potential distribution of these six focal species, (ii) reported on the disease status of Eleutherodactylus johnstonei and Phyllodytes luteolus, and (iii) quantified the acoustic overlap of P. luteolus and Leptodactylus labyrinthicus with three co-occurring native species. Our models indicated that all six invasive species could potentially expand their ranges in Brazil within the next few decades. In addition, our SDMs predicted important expansions in available habitat for 2 out of 6 invasive species under future (2100) climatic conditions. We detected high acoustic niche overlap between invasive and native amphibian species, underscoring that acoustic interference might reduce mating success in local frogs. Despite the American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus being recognized as a potential reservoir for the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) in Brazil, we did not detect Bd in the recently introduced population of E. johnstonei and P. luteolus in the State of São Paulo. We emphasize that the number of invasive amphibian species in Brazil is increasing exponentially, highlighting the urgent need to monitor and control these populations and decrease potential impacts on the locally biodiverse wildlife. PMID:28938024

  9. Apoptosis and Tumor Invasion in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    12-18): Characterize changes in gene expression and DNA fragmentation associated with the acquisition of the invasive phenotype in parental MCF-7...cathepsin B and uPA have been assessed by RT-PCR. The protein levels have been assessed by Western analysis. DNA fragmentation remains to be assessed...acquisition of the invasive phenotype on parental MCF-7 cells. Characterize the changes in gene expression and Page 5 of 16 DNA fragmentation . [Status

  10. The evolution of invasiveness in garden ants.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Sylvia; Ugelvig, Line V; Drijfhout, Falko P; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C; Steiner, Florian M; Seifert, Bernhard; Hughes, David P; Schulz, Andreas; Petersen, Klaus S; Konrad, Heino; Stauffer, Christian; Kiran, Kadri; Espadaler, Xavier; d'Ettorre, Patrizia; Aktaç, Nihat; Eilenberg, Jørgen; Jones, Graeme R; Nash, David R; Pedersen, Jes S; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear why some species become successful invaders whilst others fail, and whether invasive success depends on pre-adaptations already present in the native range or on characters evolving de-novo after introduction. Ants are among the worst invasive pests, with Lasius neglectus and its rapid spread through Europe and Asia as the most recent example of a pest ant that may become a global problem. Here, we present the first integrated study on behavior, morphology, population genetics, chemical recognition and parasite load of L. neglectus and its non-invasive sister species L. turcicus. We find that L. neglectus expresses the same supercolonial syndrome as other invasive ants, a social system that is characterized by mating without dispersal and large networks of cooperating nests rather than smaller mutually hostile colonies. We conclude that the invasive success of L. neglectus relies on a combination of parasite-release following introduction and pre-adaptations in mating system, body-size, queen number and recognition efficiency that evolved long before introduction. Our results challenge the notion that supercolonial organization is an inevitable consequence of low genetic variation for chemical recognition cues in small invasive founder populations. We infer that low variation and limited volatility in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles already existed in the native range in combination with low dispersal and a highly viscous population structure. Human transport to relatively disturbed urban areas thus became the decisive factor to induce parasite release, a well established general promoter of invasiveness in non-social animals and plants, but understudied in invasive social insects.

  11. Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cebulski, Włodzimierz; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz W.

    2014-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in the management of infected pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25653725

  12. [DIAGNOSIS OF VASCULAR INVASION BY PANCREATIC TUMORS].

    PubMed

    Dronov, O I; Zemskov, S V; Bakunets, P P

    2016-02-01

    Basing on analysis of own material (84 patients) and data of literature there was established, that vascular invasion by pancreatic tumors constitutes the main obstacle for conduction of the patients' radical treatment. Early diagnosis permits radical resectability of the patients, what constitutes the only one effective method of treatment. In vascular invasion by tumor a surgeon experience and professional preparation determines possibility of the extended operation performance with intervention on affected main vessel, enhancing the treatment radicalism.

  13. Perspectives on invasive amphibians in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Forti, Lucas Rodriguez; Becker, C Guilherme; Tacioli, Leandro; Pereira, Vânia Rosa; Santos, André Cid F A; Oliveira, Igor; Haddad, Célio F B; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Introduced species have the potential to become invasive and jeopardize entire ecosystems. The success of species establishing viable populations outside their original extent depends primarily on favorable climatic conditions in the invasive ranges. Species distribution modeling (SDM) can thus be used to estimate potential habitat suitability for populations of invasive species. Here we review the status of six amphibian species with invasive populations in Brazil (four domestic species and two imported species). We (i) modeled the current habitat suitability and future potential distribution of these six focal species, (ii) reported on the disease status of Eleutherodactylus johnstonei and Phyllodytes luteolus, and (iii) quantified the acoustic overlap of P. luteolus and Leptodactylus labyrinthicus with three co-occurring native species. Our models indicated that all six invasive species could potentially expand their ranges in Brazil within the next few decades. In addition, our SDMs predicted important expansions in available habitat for 2 out of 6 invasive species under future (2100) climatic conditions. We detected high acoustic niche overlap between invasive and native amphibian species, underscoring that acoustic interference might reduce mating success in local frogs. Despite the American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus being recognized as a potential reservoir for the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) in Brazil, we did not detect Bd in the recently introduced population of E. johnstonei and P. luteolus in the State of São Paulo. We emphasize that the number of invasive amphibian species in Brazil is increasing exponentially, highlighting the urgent need to monitor and control these populations and decrease potential impacts on the locally biodiverse wildlife.

  14. Invasive crayfish in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; McCreary, Brome; Adams, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Invasive species directly threaten freshwater biodiversity, particularly in regions of high aquatic richness like the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Crayfish are among the most impactful of aquatic invasive species. Invasive crayfish are considered ecosystem engineers due to their ability to alter basic wetland properties, such as reducing vegetation and bank integrity and increasing turbidity. In areas where invasion is advanced, crayfish pose major economic and ecological problems. Crayfish have been widely introduced for aquaculture and can become established in a wide range of habitat conditions. They also may be spread by anglers who use them as bait. Several non-native crayfish are established in the PNW, but the extent of their invasion is not well known. At least two groups are known from scattered sites in the PNW, and both have proven problematic for native species in other parts of the world: Red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and several members of the genus Orconectes. Both groups are native to areas of the eastern United States. Both are identified globally as invasives of high concern and appear on the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's "10 Most Unwanted" and the U.S. Forest Service's "Primary Species of Concern" lists for stream systems in the PNW. Despite the presence of introduced crayfish in the PNW and their high potential for negative effects, the scope of their invasion and effects on aquatic systems are not well known. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), along with local groups and state agencies, is working to clarify crayfish distribution and to outline which basins may not yet be invaded. Other goals are to improve understanding of habitat associations of invasive crayfish and their potential effects on native crayfish.

  15. Facts About Invasive Bighead and Silver Carps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Duane C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC), Columbia, Missouri, carry out basic and applied research on the ecology of invasive fishes in the Missouri and Mississippi river basins. Emphasis is placed on improving understanding of the life cycles of bighead and silver carp to provide information needed to manage these aggressively invasive species. USGS scientists collaborate with Federal and State management agencies and universities, nationally and internationally, to fill critical science information gaps.

  16. Minimally invasive osteosynthesis technique for articular fractures.

    PubMed

    Beale, Brian S; Cole, Grayson

    2012-09-01

    Articular fractures require accurate reduction and rigid stabilization to decrease the chance of osteoarthritis and joint dysfunction. Articular fractures have been traditionally repaired by arthrotomy and internal fixation. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been introduced to treat articular fractures, reducing patient morbidity and improving the accuracy of reduction. A variety of techniques, including distraction, radiographic imaging, and arthroscopy, are used with the minimally invasive osteosynthesis technique of articular fractures to achieve a successful repair and outcome.

  17. Effects of invasive plants on arthropods.

    PubMed

    Litt, Andrea R; Cord, Erin E; Fulbright, Timothy E; Schuster, Greta L

    2014-12-01

    Non-native plants have invaded nearly all ecosystems and represent a major component of global ecological change. Plant invasions frequently change the composition and structure of vegetation communities, which can alter animal communities and ecosystem processes. We reviewed 87 articles published in the peer-reviewed literature to evaluate responses of arthropod communities and functional groups to non-native invasive plants. Total abundance of arthropods decreased in 62% of studies and increased in 15%. Taxonomic richness decreased in 48% of studies and increased in 13%. Herbivorous arthropods decreased in response to plant invasions in 48% of studies and increased in 17%, likely due to direct effects of decreased plant diversity. Predaceous arthropods decreased in response to invasive plants in 44% of studies, which may reflect indirect effects due to reductions in prey. Twenty-two percent of studies documented increases in predators, which may reflect changes in vegetation structure that improved mobility, survival, or web-building for these species. Detritivores increased in 67% of studies, likely in response to increased litter and decaying vegetation; no studies documented decreased abundance in this functional group. Although many researchers have examined effects of plant invasions on arthropods, sizeable information gaps remain, specifically regarding how invasive plants influence habitat and dietary requirements. Beyond this, the ability to predict changes in arthropod populations and communities associated with plant invasions could be improved by adopting a more functional and mechanistic approach. Understanding responses of arthropods to invasive plants will critically inform conservation of virtually all biodiversity and ecological processes because so many organisms depend on arthropods as prey or for their functional roles, including pollination, seed dispersal, and decomposition. Given their short generation times and ability to respond rapidly to

  18. Computer-aided Diagnosis-generated Kinetic Features of Breast Cancer at Preoperative MR Imaging: Association with Disease-free Survival of Patients with Primary Operable Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Jin You; Kang, Hyun Jung; Shin, Jong Ki; Kang, Taewoo; Lee, Seok Won; Bae, Young Tae

    2017-03-02

    Purpose To retrospectively investigate the relationship between the kinetic features of breast cancer assessed with computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) at preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and disease-free survival in patients with primary operable invasive breast cancer. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. The authors identified 329 consecutive women (mean age, 52.9 years; age range, 32-88 years) with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who had undergone preoperative MR imaging and surgery between January 2012 and February 2013. All MR images were retrospectively reviewed by using a commercially available CAD system, and the following kinetic parameters were noted for each lesion: peak enhancement (highest pixel signal intensity in the first series obtained after administration of contrast material), angio-volume (total volume of the enhancing lesion), and delayed enhancement profiles (the proportions of washout, plateau, and persistently enhancing component within a tumor). Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify the relationship between CAD-generated kinetics and disease-free survival after adjusting for clinical-pathologic variables. Results A total of 36 recurrences developed at a median follow-up of 50 months (range, 15-55 months). CAD-measured peak enhancement at preoperative MR imaging enabled differentiation between patients with and patients without recurrence (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.728; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.676, 0.775; P < .001). Multivariate Cox analysis showed that a higher peak enhancement (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.001; 95% CI: 1.000, 1.002; P = .004), a higher washout component (HR = 1.029; 95% CI: 1.005, 1.054; P = .017), and lymphovascular invasion at histopathologic examination (HR = 3.011; 95% CI: 1.302, 6.962; P = .010) were associated with poorer disease

  19. Dynamics of cancerous tissue correlates with invasiveness.

    PubMed

    West, Ann-Katrine Vransø; Wullkopf, Lena; Christensen, Amalie; Leijnse, Natascha; Tarp, Jens Magelund; Mathiesen, Joachim; Erler, Janine Terra; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2017-03-06

    Two of the classical hallmarks of cancer are uncontrolled cell division and tissue invasion, which turn the disease into a systemic, life-threatening condition. Although both processes are studied, a clear correlation between cell division and motility of cancer cells has not been described previously. Here, we experimentally characterize the dynamics of invasive and non-invasive breast cancer tissues using human and murine model systems. The intrinsic tissue velocities, as well as the divergence and vorticity around a dividing cell correlate strongly with the invasive potential of the tissue, thus showing a distinct correlation between tissue dynamics and aggressiveness. We formulate a model which treats the tissue as a visco-elastic continuum. This model provides a valid reproduction of the cancerous tissue dynamics, thus, biological signaling is not needed to explain the observed tissue dynamics. The model returns the characteristic force exerted by an invading cell and reveals a strong correlation between force and invasiveness of breast cancer cells, thus pinpointing the importance of mechanics for cancer invasion.

  20. [Pharmacoeconomics of therapy in invasive candidiasis].

    PubMed

    Grau-Cerrato, Santiago; Ferrández-Quirante, Olivia

    2009-03-31

    Invasive candidiasis episodes have increased during last years and they have been related with high rates of crude mortality. Invasive candidiasis-related deaths have not diminished significantly with the introduction of antifungals in the past decade. Finantial managers are worried about extra costs from acquisition of new antifungal agents. This review includes the main studies age-stratified to assess different variables related to the economic burden of invasive candidiasis. Systematic review of biomedic databases including Medline, PubMed and EMBASE. The studies show hospital stay as the main variable related with higher impact in the increase of invasive candidiasis costs. Acquisition costs of antifungals have a very low impact in the invasive candidiasis costs. Pharmacoeconomics applied in candidiasis invasive therapy must avoid assessing acquisition costs of antifungals exclusively, needing to include both direct and indirect costs associated with this fungal infection. The cost of antifungal acquisition represents a low impact in the overall economic burden of this fungal infection. Further pharmacoeconomics evaluations should be performed including similar definitions to decrease the possible bias in results interpretation.

  1. Invasive species management and research using GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcombe, Tracy R.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.

    2007-01-01

    Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are powerful tools in the field of invasive species management. GIS can be used to create potential distribution maps for all manner of taxa, including plants, animals, and diseases. GIS also performs well in the early detection and rapid assessment of invasive species. Here, we used GIS applications to investigate species richness and invasion patterns in fish in the United States (US) at the 6-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) level. We also created maps of potential spread of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) in the southeastern US at the 8-digit HUC level using regression and environmental envelope techniques. Equipped with this potential map, resource managers can target their field surveys to areas most vulnerable to invasion. Advances in GIS technology, maps, data, and many of these techniques can be found on websites such as the National Institute of Invasive Species Science (www.NIISS.org). Such websites provide a forum for data sharing and analysis that is an invaluable service to the invasive species community.

  2. The evolutionary consequences of biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Andrew V; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2008-01-01

    A major challenge of invasion biology is the development of a predictive framework that prevents new invasions. This is inherently difficult because different biological characteristics are important at the different stages of invasion: opportunity/transport, establishment and spread. Here, we draw from recent research on a variety of taxa to examine the evolutionary causes and consequences of biological invasions. The process of introduction may favour species with characteristics that promote success in highly disturbed, human-dominated landscapes, thus exerting novel forms of selection on introduced populations. Moreover, evidence is accumulating that multiple introductions can often be critical to the successful establishment and spread of introduced species, as they may be important sources of genetic variation necessary for adaptation in new environments or may permit the introduction of novel traits. Thus, not only should the introduction of new species be prevented, but substantial effort should also be directed to preventing the secondary introduction of previously established species (and even movement of individuals among introduced populations). Modern molecular techniques can take advantage of genetic changes postintroduction to determine the source of introduced populations and their vectors of spread, and to elucidate the mechanisms of success of some invasive species. Moreover, the growing availability of genomic tools will permit the identification of underlying genetic causes of invasive success.

  3. Perspectives on trans-Pacific biological invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.

    2002-01-01

    Trans-Pacific biological invasion is one of the most striking and influential biological phenomena occurring in modern times and the process is still accelerating, and the associated invasives form neo-disjuncts (cf. many well-known paleo-disjuncts) between eastern Asia and North America. To better understand this phenomenon and the related taxa, I address the following questions: 1) what types of species (e.g., life/growth form) have been, or are likely to be, associated with trans-Pacific (eastern Asia, North America) invasions; 2) what has happened or may happen to these species after their remote geographic separation, and 3) what aspects of these species and their native and non-native habitats should be better understood for improved control. To answer these questions, comparisons of the invasive species' characteristics in their native and invaded habitats need to be examined, including: l) genetics, 2) life history/morphology (e.g., plant size, seed size, etc.), 3) ecology (e.g., life/growth forms, pollinators, competitors), 4) distributions (e.g., range size, shape, latitude) in their native (source) and introduced (target) ranges or habitats, and 5) physical factors such as soil, water, and climate. The purpose of these studies is 1) to identify the limiting factors that restrict the distributions of exotic species in native ranges, 2) to understand why invasive species are successful in the introduced ranges, 3) to predict possible future invasions, and, ultimately, 4) to provide information for more efficient and effective management.

  4. PERSPECTIVE: Physical aspects of cancer invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiot, Caterina; Pugno, Nicola; Delsanto, Pier Paolo; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2007-12-01

    Invasiveness, one of the hallmarks of tumor progression, represents the tumor's ability to expand into the host tissue by means of several complex biochemical and biomechanical processes. Since certain aspects of the problem present a striking resemblance with well-known physical mechanisms, such as the mechanical insertion of a solid inclusion in an elastic material specimen (G Eaves 1973 The invasive growth of malignant tumours as a purely mechanical process J. Pathol. 109 233; C Guiot, N Pugno and P P Delsanto 2006 Elastomechanical model of tumor invasion Appl. Phys. Lett. 89 233901) or a water drop impinging on a surface (C Guiot, P P Delsanto and T S Deisboeck 2007 Morphological instability and cancer invasion: a 'splashing water drop' analogy Theor. Biol. Med. Model 4 4), we propose here an analogy between these physical processes and a cancer system's invasive branching into the surrounding tissue. Accounting for its solid and viscous properties, we then arrive, as a unifying model, to an analogy with a granular solid. While our model has been explicitly formulated for multicellular tumor spheroids in vitro, it should also contribute to a better understanding of tumor invasion in vivo.

  5. Dynamics of cancerous tissue correlates with invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    West, Ann-Katrine Vransø; Wullkopf, Lena; Christensen, Amalie; Leijnse, Natascha; Tarp, Jens Magelund; Mathiesen, Joachim; Erler, Janine Terra; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2017-01-01

    Two of the classical hallmarks of cancer are uncontrolled cell division and tissue invasion, which turn the disease into a systemic, life-threatening condition. Although both processes are studied, a clear correlation between cell division and motility of cancer cells has not been described previously. Here, we experimentally characterize the dynamics of invasive and non-invasive breast cancer tissues using human and murine model systems. The intrinsic tissue velocities, as well as the divergence and vorticity around a dividing cell correlate strongly with the invasive potential of the tissue, thus showing a distinct correlation between tissue dynamics and aggressiveness. We formulate a model which treats the tissue as a visco-elastic continuum. This model provides a valid reproduction of the cancerous tissue dynamics, thus, biological signaling is not needed to explain the observed tissue dynamics. The model returns the characteristic force exerted by an invading cell and reveals a strong correlation between force and invasiveness of breast cancer cells, thus pinpointing the importance of mechanics for cancer invasion. PMID:28262796

  6. High biofilm production by invasive multiresistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Keli Cristine; DA Silva Paim, Thiago Galvão; DE Oliveira, Caio Fernando; D'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2011-11-01

    Biofilm-forming staphylococci are known for being opportunistic and invasive pathogens that cause severe disease, mostly catheter-related infections. Early detection and pathogenic strains carrying highly transferable resistance cassettes epidemiology are essential for infection spread control. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate staphylococci biofilm formation and SCCmec typing. Biofilm production and SCCmec typing were evaluated using a semi-quantitative method based on microtiter plates and a multiplex PCR for types, I-V, respectively. Blood cultures and peripheral intravenous device (IVD) staphylococci were consecutively enrolled and allocated into two different groups (invasive and colonizing) based on clinical and microbiological criteria. Seventy-four invasive and 30 colonizing isolates from distinct patients were studied. Vancomycin was the most administrated antimicrobial agent among these patient's treatments. Biofilm formation was observed in 89% of invasive and 64% of colonizing isolates (p < 0.05). There was significant difference regarding SCCmec typing between colonizing and invasive isolates when harboring SCCmec types IV or V (p < 0.05), but no correlation between biofilm intensity and SCCmec types was verified. The SCCmec elements spread are still ongoing and for that reason, antimicrobial resistance evolution in invasive and colonizing biofilm-forming staphylococci is highly relevant. © 2011 The Authors. APMIS © 2011 APMIS.

  7. Non-invasive ventilation for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Fidelma; Bradley, Judy M; Piper, Amanda J

    2017-02-20

    Non-invasive ventilation may be a means to temporarily reverse or slow the progression of respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis by providing ventilatory support and avoiding tracheal intubation. Using non-invasive ventilation, in the appropriate situation or individuals, can improve lung mechanics through increasing airflow and gas exchange and decreasing the work of breathing. Non-invasive ventilation thus acts as an external respiratory muscle. This is an update of a previously published review. To compare the effect of non-invasive ventilation versus no non-invasive ventilation in people with cystic fibrosis for airway clearance, during sleep and during exercise. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We searched the reference lists of each trial for additional publications possibly containing other trials.Most recent search: 08 August 2016. Randomised controlled trials comparing a form of pressure preset or volume preset non-invasive ventilation to no non-invasive ventilation used for airway clearance or during sleep or exercise in people with acute or chronic respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis. Three reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion criteria and methodological quality, and extracted data. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 191 participants. Seven trials evaluated single treatment sessions, one evaluated a two-week intervention, one evaluated a six-week intervention and one a three-month intervention. It is only possible to blind trials of airway clearance and overnight ventilatory support to the outcome assessors. In most of the trials we judged there was an unclear risk of bias with regards to blinding due to inadequate descriptions. The six-week trial was the only one judged to have a low risk of bias for all

  8. Dynamics of cancerous tissue correlates with invasiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Ann-Katrine Vransø; Wullkopf, Lena; Christensen, Amalie; Leijnse, Natascha; Tarp, Jens Magelund; Mathiesen, Joachim; Erler, Janine Terra; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2017-03-01

    Two of the classical hallmarks of cancer are uncontrolled cell division and tissue invasion, which turn the disease into a systemic, life-threatening condition. Although both processes are studied, a clear correlation between cell division and motility of cancer cells has not been described previously. Here, we experimentally characterize the dynamics of invasive and non-invasive breast cancer tissues using human and murine model systems. The intrinsic tissue velocities, as well as the divergence and vorticity around a dividing cell correlate strongly with the invasive potential of the tissue, thus showing a distinct correlation between tissue dynamics and aggressiveness. We formulate a model which treats the tissue as a visco-elastic continuum. This model provides a valid reproduction of the cancerous tissue dynamics, thus, biological signaling is not needed to explain the observed tissue dynamics. The model returns the characteristic force exerted by an invading cell and reveals a strong correlation between force and invasiveness of breast cancer cells, thus pinpointing the importance of mechanics for cancer invasion.

  9. Minimally Invasive Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kristina M.; Neubauer, Nikki L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been utilized in the field of obstetrics and gynecology as far back as the 1940s when culdoscopy was first introduced as a visualization tool. Gynecologists then began to employ minimally invasive surgery for adhesiolysis and obtaining biopsies but then expanded its use to include procedures such as tubal sterilization (Clyman (1963), L. E. Smale and M. L. Smale (1973), Thompson and Wheeless (1971), Peterson and Behrman (1971)). With advances in instrumentation, the first laparoscopic hysterectomy was successfully performed in 1989 by Reich et al. At the same time, minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology was being developed alongside its benign counterpart. In the 1975s, Rosenoff et al. reported using peritoneoscopy for pretreatment evaluation in ovarian cancer, and Spinelli et al. reported on using laparoscopy for the staging of ovarian cancer. In 1993, Nichols used operative laparoscopy to perform pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer patients. The initial goals of minimally invasive surgery, not dissimilar to those of modern medicine, were to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery and therefore improve patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. This review will summarize the history and use of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology and also highlight new minimally invasive surgical approaches currently in development. PMID:23997959

  10. The lymphatic system in clinically localized urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: morphologic characteristics and predictive value.

    PubMed

    Bolenz, Christian; Auer, Matthias; Ströbel, Philipp; Heinzelbecker, Julia; Schubert, Charlotte; Trojan, Lutz

    2013-11-01

    To assess the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and lymphangiogenesis in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) and to identify predictors of progression in patients treated by transurethral resection (TUR). One hundred eleven patients who underwent TUR for UCB were retrospectively included. Lymphatic endothelial cells were stained immunohistochemically [D2-40 (podoplanin) antibody in all samples; Prox-1, LYVE-1, and VEGFR-3 (Flt-4) in subgroups]. LVD was measured in representative intratumoral (ITLVD), peritumoral (PTLVD), and nontumoral (NTLVD) areas using standardized criteria. Double-immunostainings with D2-40/CD-34 were performed to distinguish between blood and lymphatic vessels, and D2-40/Ki-67 stainings were done to detect lymphangiogenesis. Lymph-specific parameters were correlated with pathologic and clinical characteristics. In patients with non-muscle-invasive UCB (n = 76) univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify predictors of progression. The PTLVD was significantly higher than ITLVD and NTLVD (P < 0.001). Proliferating lymphatic vessels were observed in all specimens assessed with D2-40/Ki-67. Characteristic suburothelial D2-40 positivity was observed in noninvasive pTa tumors. LYVE-1-stainings revealed the existence of tumor-associated macrophages. The presence of intratumoral lymphatic vessels was significantly associated with higher tumor stage, high grade, and sessile growth (all P < 0.001). Muscle-invasive tumors (P = 0.020), higher grade (P = 0.026), the presence of lymphovascular invasion (P < 0.001), and concomitant carcinoma in situ (CIS) (P = 0.020), sessile growth (P = 0.004), and loss of suburothelial D2-40 positivity (P = 0.031) were associated with disease progression in univariable analysis. LVD values in any area were not significantly associated with progression despite detection of proliferating lymphatic vessels. The presence of concomitant CIS was identified as an independent predictor of progression on

  11. Worldwide Alien Invasion: A Methodological Approach to Forecast the Potential Spread of a Highly Invasive Pollinator

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ecological impacts of alien species invasion are a major threat to global biodiversity. The increasing number of invasion events by alien species and the high cost and difficulty of eradicating invasive species once established require the development of new methods and tools for predicting the most susceptible areas to invasion. Invasive pollinators pose serious threats to biodiversity and human activity due to their close relationship with many plants (including crop species) and high potential competitiveness for resources with native pollinators. Although at an early stage of expansion, the bumblebee species Bombus terrestris is becoming a representative case of pollinator invasion at a global scale, particularly given its high velocity of invasive spread and the increasing number of reports of its impacts on native bees and crops in many countries. We present here a methodological framework of habitat suitability modeling that integrates new approaches for detecting habitats that are susceptible to Bombus terrestris invasion at a global scale. Our approach did not include reported invaded locations in the modeling procedure; instead, those locations were used exclusively to evaluate the accuracy of the models in predicting suitability over regions already invaded. Moreover, a new and more intuitive approach was developed to select the models and evaluate different algorithms based on their performance and predictive convergence. Finally, we present a comprehensive global map of susceptibility to Bombus terrestris invasion that highlights priority areas for monitoring. PMID:26882479

  12. Coevolution between native and invasive plant competitors: implications for invasive species management

    PubMed Central

    Leger, Elizabeth A; Espeland, Erin K

    2010-01-01

    Invasive species may establish in communities because they are better competitors than natives, but in order to remain community dominants, the competitive advantage of invasive species must be persistent. Native species that are not extirpated when highly invasive species are introduced are likely to compete with invaders. When population sizes and genetic diversity of native species are large enough, natives may be able to evolve traits that allow them to co-occur with invasive species. Native species may also evolve to become significant competitors with invasive species, and thus affect the fitness of invaders. Invasive species may respond in turn, creating either transient or continuing coevolution between competing species. In addition to demographic factors such as population size and growth rates, a number of factors including gene flow, genetic drift, the number of selection agents, encounter rates, and genetic diversity may affect the ability of native and invasive species to evolve competitive ability against one another. We discuss how these factors may differ between populations of native and invasive plants, and how this might affect their ability to respond to selection. Management actions that maintain genetic diversity in native species while reducing population sizes and genetic diversity in invasive species could promote the ability of natives to evolve improved competitive ability. PMID:25567917

  13. Invasive Species Science Branch: research and management tools for controlling invasive species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Robert N.; Walters, Katie D.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive, nonnative species of plants, animals, and disease organisms adversely affect the ecosystems they enter. Like “biological wildfires,” they can quickly spread and affect nearly all terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Invasive species have become one of the greatest environmental challenges of the 21st century in economic, environmental, and human health costs, with an estimated effect in the United States of more than $120 billion per year. Managers of the Department of the Interior and other public and private lands often rank invasive species as their top resource management problem. The Invasive Species Science Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center provides research and technical assistance relating to management concerns for invasive species, including understanding how these species are introduced, identifying areas vulnerable to invasion, forecasting invasions, and developing control methods. To disseminate this information, branch scientists are developing platforms to share invasive species information with DOI cooperators, other agency partners, and the public. From these and other data, branch scientists are constructing models to understand and predict invasive species distributions for more effective management. The branch also has extensive herpetological and population biology expertise that is applied to harmful reptile invaders such as the Brown Treesnake on Guam and Burmese Python in Florida.

  14. Invasive Insects Differ from Non-Invasive in Their Thermal Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Kenis, Marc; Honěk, Alois; Skuhrovec, Jiří; Pyšek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether two basic thermal requirements for insect development, lower developmental thresholds, i.e. temperatures at which development ceases, and sums of effective temperatures, i.e. numbers of day degrees above the lower developmental thresholds necessary to complete development, differ among insect species that proved to be successful invaders in regions outside their native range and those that did not. Focusing on species traits underlying invasiveness that are related to temperature provides insights into the mechanisms of insect invasions. The screening of thermal requirements thus could improve risk-assessment schemes by incorporating these traits in predictions of potentially invasive insect species. We compared 100 pairs of taxonomically-related species originating from the same continent, one invasive and the other not reported as invasive. Invasive species have higher lower developmental thresholds than those never recorded outside their native ranges. Invasive species also have a lower sum of effective temperatures, though not significantly. However, the differences between invasive and non-invasive species in the two physiological measures were significantly inversely correlated. This result suggests that many species are currently prevented from invading by low temperatures in some parts of the world. Those species that will overcome current climatic constraints in regions outside their native distribution due to climate change could become even more serious future invaders than present-day species, due to their potentially faster development. PMID:26090826

  15. Adaptive invasive species distribution models: A framework for modeling incipient invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uden, Daniel R.; Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.; Corral, Lucia; Fricke, Kent A.

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of species distribution model(s) (SDM) for approximating, explaining, and predicting changes in species’ geographic locations is increasingly promoted for proactive ecological management. Although frameworks for modeling non-invasive species distributions are relatively well developed, their counterparts for invasive species—which may not be at equilibrium within recipient environments and often exhibit rapid transformations—are lacking. Additionally, adaptive ecological management strategies address the causes and effects of biological invasions and other complex issues in social-ecological systems. We conducted a review of biological invasions, species distribution models, and adaptive practices in ecological management, and developed a framework for adaptive, niche-based, invasive species distribution model (iSDM) development and utilization. This iterative, 10-step framework promotes consistency and transparency in iSDM development, allows for changes in invasive drivers and filters, integrates mechanistic and correlative modeling techniques, balances the avoidance of type 1 and type 2 errors in predictions, encourages the linking of monitoring and management actions, and facilitates incremental improvements in models and management across space, time, and institutional boundaries. These improvements are useful for advancing coordinated invasive species modeling, management and monitoring from local scales to the regional, continental and global scales at which biological invasions occur and harm native ecosystems and economies, as well as for anticipating and responding to biological invasions under continuing global change.

  16. Coevolution between native and invasive plant competitors: implications for invasive species management.

    PubMed

    Leger, Elizabeth A; Espeland, Erin K

    2010-03-01

    Invasive species may establish in communities because they are better competitors than natives, but in order to remain community dominants, the competitive advantage of invasive species must be persistent. Native species that are not extirpated when highly invasive species are introduced are likely to compete with invaders. When population sizes and genetic diversity of native species are large enough, natives may be able to evolve traits that allow them to co-occur with invasive species. Native species may also evolve to become significant competitors with invasive species, and thus affect the fitness of invaders. Invasive species may respond in turn, creating either transient or continuing coevolution between competing species. In addition to demographic factors such as population size and growth rates, a number of factors including gene flow, genetic drift, the number of selection agents, encounter rates, and genetic diversity may affect the ability of native and invasive species to evolve competitive ability against one another. We discuss how these factors may differ between populations of native and invasive plants, and how this might affect their ability to respond to selection. Management actions that maintain genetic diversity in native species while reducing population sizes and genetic diversity in invasive species could promote the ability of natives to evolve improved competitive ability.

  17. Worldwide Alien Invasion: A Methodological Approach to Forecast the Potential Spread of a Highly Invasive Pollinator.

    PubMed

    Acosta, André L; Giannini, Tereza C; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera L; Saraiva, Antonio M

    2016-01-01

    The ecological impacts of alien species invasion are a major threat to global biodiversity. The increasing number of invasion events by alien species and the high cost and difficulty of eradicating invasive species once established require the development of new methods and tools for predicting the most susceptible areas to invasion. Invasive pollinators pose serious threats to biodiversity and human activity due to their close relationship with many plants (including crop species) and high potential competitiveness for resources with native pollinators. Although at an early stage of expansion, the bumblebee species Bombus terrestris is becoming a representative case of pollinator invasion at a global scale, particularly given its high velocity of invasive spread and the increasing number of reports of its impacts on native bees and crops in many countries. We present here a methodological framework of habitat suitability modeling that integrates new approaches for detecting habitats that are susceptible to Bombus terrestris invasion at a global scale. Our approach did not include reported invaded locations in the modeling procedure; instead, those locations were used exclusively to evaluate the accuracy of the models in predicting suitability over regions already invaded. Moreover, a new and more intuitive approach was developed to select the models and evaluate different algorithms based on their performance and predictive convergence. Finally, we present a comprehensive global map of susceptibility to Bombus terrestris invasion that highlights priority areas for monitoring.

  18. 78 FR 9724 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Meetings AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: Pursuant... Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 31 nonfederal invasive species experts and...

  19. Positive feedback between mycorrhizal fungi and plants influences plant invasion success and resistance to invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Ruyi; Tang, Jianjun; Yang, Haishui; Hu, Shuijin; Chen, Xin

    2010-08-24

    Negative or positive feedback between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plants can contribute to plant species interactions, but how this feedback affects plant invasion or resistance to invasion is not well known. Here we tested how alterations in AMF community induced by an invasive plant species generate feedback to the invasive plant itself and affect subsequent interactions between the invasive species and its native neighbors. We first examined the effects of the invasive forb Solidago canadensis L. on AMF communities comprising five different AMF species. We then examined the effects of the altered AMF community on mutualisms formed with the native legume forb species Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl. and on the interaction between the invasive and native plants. The host preferences of the five AMF were also assessed to test whether the AMF form preferred mutualistic relations with the invasive and/or the native species. We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum) while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field. The host preference test showed that S. canadensis had promoted the abundance of AMF species (G. geosporum) that most promoted its own growth. As a consequence, the altered AMF community enhanced the competitiveness of invasive S. canadensis at the expense of K. striata. Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference. This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant.

  20. Positive Feedback between Mycorrhizal Fungi and Plants Influences Plant Invasion Success and Resistance to Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Ruyi; Tang, Jianjun; Yang, Haishui; Hu, Shuijin; Chen, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Negative or positive feedback between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plants can contribute to plant species interactions, but how this feedback affects plant invasion or resistance to invasion is not well known. Here we tested how alterations in AMF community induced by an invasive plant species generate feedback to the invasive plant itself and affect subsequent interactions between the invasive species and its native neighbors. We first examined the effects of the invasive forb Solidago canadensis L. on AMF communities comprising five different AMF species. We then examined the effects of the altered AMF community on mutualisms formed with the native legume forb species Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl. and on the interaction between the invasive and native plants. The host preferences of the five AMF were also assessed to test whether the AMF form preferred mutualistic relations with the invasive and/or the native species. We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum) while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field. The host preference test showed that S. canadensis had promoted the abundance of AMF species (G. geosporum) that most promoted its own growth. As a consequence, the altered AMF community enhanced the competitiveness of invasive S. canadensis at the expense of K. striata. Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference. This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant. PMID:20808770

  1. Cortactin is associated with perineural invasion in the deep invasive front area of laryngeal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Eliane Papa; Rosa, Fabíola Encinas; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custódio; Villacis, Rolando André Rios; Coudry, Renata de Almeida; Tagliarini, José Vicente; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2011-09-01

    The cortactin gene, mapped at 11q13, has been associated with an aggressive clinical course in many cancers because of its function of invasiveness. This study evaluated CTTN protein and its prognostic value in the deep invasive front and superficial areas of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The transcript expression levels were evaluated in a subset of cases. Overexpression of CTTN cytoplasmatic protein (80% of cases in both the deep invasive front and superficial areas) and transcript (30% of samples) was detected in a significant number of cases. In more than 20% of cases, observation verified membrane immunostaining in the deep invasive front and superficial areas. Perineural invasion was significantly associated with N stage and recurrence (P = .0058 and P = .0037, respectively). Higher protein expression levels were correlated with perineural invasion (P = .004) in deep invasive front cells, suggesting that this area should be considered a prognostic tool in laryngeal carcinomas. Although most cases had moderate to strong CTTN expression on the tumor surface, 2 sets of cases revealed a differential expression pattern in the deep invasive front. A group of cases with absent to weak expression of CTTN in the deep invasive front showed good prognosis parameters, and a second group with moderate to strong expression of CTTN were associated with an unfavorable prognosis, suggesting an association with worse outcome. Taken together, these results suggest that the deep invasive front might be considered a grading system in laryngeal carcinomas and that cortactin is a putative marker of worse outcome in the deep invasive front of laryngeal carcinomas.

  2. Effective radiation doses associated with non-invasive versus invasive assessment of coronary anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Toth, G G; Ntalianis, A; Ntarladimas, Y; de Booij, M; De Winter, O; Barbato, E; Pilet, B; Van Mieghem, C; Wijns, W; De Bruyne, B

    2015-06-01

    To compare the effective radiation dose (ERD) needed to obtain information on coronary anatomy and physiology by a non-invasive versus an invasive diagnostic strategy. Knowledge of anatomy and physiology is needed for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). There is, however, a growing concern about detrimental long-term effects of radiation associated with diagnostic procedures. In a total of 671 patients with suspected CAD, we compared the ERD needed to obtain anatomical and physiological information through a non-invasive strategy or an invasive strategy. The non-invasive strategy consisted of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The invasive strategy included coronary angiography (CA) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement. In 464 patients, the data were acquired in Period 2009 and in 207 the data were acquired in Period 2011 (after each period, the CCTA- and the CA-equipment had been upgraded). For the Period 2009 total ERD of the non-invasive approach was significantly larger compared to the invasive approach (28.45 ± 5.37 mSv versus 15.79 ± 7.95 mSv, respectively; P < 0.0001). For Period 2011, despite the significant decrease in ERD for both groups (P<0.0001 for both), the ERD remained higher for the non-invasive approach compared to the invasive approach (16.67 ± 10.45 mSv vs. 10.36 ± 5.87 mSv, respectively; P < 0.0001). Simulation of various diagnostic scenarios showed cumulative radiation dose is the lowest when a first positive test is followed by an invasive strategy. To obtain anatomic and physiologic information in patients with suspected CAD, the combination of CA and FFR is associated with lower ERD than the combination of CCTA and SPECT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Micromanipulator: effectiveness in minimally invasive neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Jain, R; Kato, Y; Sano, H; Imizu, S; Watanabe, S; Yamaguchi, S; Shinya, N; Jindal, V; Kanno, T

    2003-08-01

    Minimally invasive surgeries by innovative approaches are practiced in all fields. The evolution of microneurosurgery has revolutionized the results in neurosurgery. Use of endoscopes and navigation has made microsurgery less invasive. Another development to make minimally invasive microneurosurgery further lesser invasive is the use of micromanipulator. The use and effectiveness of manually controlled micromanipulator system is presented. The manually controlled micromanipulator system consists of three parts, i.e., a basic micromanipulator, manipulator supporting device and the manual control. The micromanipulator fitted in supporting device is arranged before the start of surgery. The supporting device used is pneumatically driven powered endoscopic holding device (Mitaka Kohki Co., Tokyo) In maximum number of times we used the system for endoscopic assisted cerebrovascular microneurosurgery. In a span of two months we used it in thirty aneurysm clipping surgeries. The endoscope fitted in system has three ranges of motions (forward/backward, upside/down and sideways). We use MACHIDA rigid endoscope with internal diameter of 2.7 mm (smallest diameter endoscope available). Special features of this endoscope are accurate visualization at a deeper plane, stable movements and availability of single focus point for long time. All these features are valuable during pre- and postoperative clipping observation. The aim of development of micromanipulator system was to further reduce invasiveness. A significant improvement in manual dexterity is possible when working through the micromanipulator interface, which dampens human physiological tremor. The physiological tremor would render the manual dexterity unsafe at the end of lever arm of long instruments. Thus, the use endoscope becomes practical. The minimally invasive microneurosurgery can be further made lesser invasive by use of micromanipulator and we are convinced that this will facilitate more accurate and

  4. Stakeholder participation in management of invasive vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ford-Thompson, Adriana E S; Snell, Carolyn; Saunders, Glen; White, Piran C L

    2012-04-01

    Stakeholders are increasingly involved in species conservation. We sought to understand what features of a participatory conservation program are associated with its ecological and social outcomes. We conducted a case study of the management of invasive vertebrates in Australia. Invasive vertebrates are a substantial threat to Australia's native species, and stakeholder participation in their management is often necessary for their control. First, we identified potential influences on the ecological and social outcomes of species conservation programs from the literature. We used this information to devise an interview questionnaire, which we administered to managers of 34 participatory invasive-vertebrate programs. Effects of invasive species were related to program initiator (agency or citizen), reasons for use of a participatory approach, and stakeholder composition. Program initiator was also related to the participation methods used, level of governance (i.e., governed by an agency or citizens), changes in stakeholder interactions, and changes in abundance of invasive species. Ecological and social outcomes were related to changes in abundance of invasive species and stakeholder satisfaction. We identified relations between changes in the number of participants, stakeholder satisfaction, and occurrence of conflict. Potential ways to achieve ecological and social goals include provision of governmental support (e.g., funding) to stakeholders and minimization of gaps in representation of stakeholder groups or individuals to, for example, increase conflict mitigation. Our findings provide guidance for increasing the probability of achieving ecological and social objectives in management of invasive vertebrates and may be applicable to other participatory conservation programs. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Targeting invasive properties of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Arozarena, Imanol; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer notorious for its metastatic potential. As an initial step of the metastatic cascade, melanoma cells part from the primary tumour and invade the surrounding tissue, which is crucial for their dissemination and the formation of distant secondary tumours. Over the last two decades, our understanding of both, general and melanoma specific mechanisms of invasion has significantly improved, but to date no efficient therapeutic strategy tackling the invasive properties of melanoma cells has reached the clinic. In this review, we assess the major contributions towards the understanding of the molecular biology of melanoma cell invasion with a focus on melanoma specific traits. These traits are based on the neural crest origin of melanoma cells and explain their intrinsic invasive nature. A particular emphasis is given not only to lineage specific signalling mediated by TGFβ, and noncanonical and canonical WNT signalling, but also to the role of PDE5A and RHO-GTPases in modulating modes of melanoma cell invasion. We discuss existing caveats in the current understanding of the metastatic properties of melanoma cells, as well as the relevance of the 'phenotype switch' model and 'co-operativity' between different phenotypes in heterogeneous tumours. At the centre of these phenotypes is the lineage commitment factor microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, one of the most crucial regulators of the balance between de-differentiation (neural crest specific gene expression) and differentiation (melanocyte specific gene expression) that defines invasive and noninvasive melanoma cell phenotypes. Finally, we provide insight into the current evidence linking resistance to targeted therapies to invasive properties of melanoma cells. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Global phylogenetics of Diuraphis noxia (Hemiptera: Aphididae), an invasive aphid species: Evidence for multiple invasions into North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Critical to the study of an invasive species is understanding the number and origin of invasions that have occurred, as well as the rate or potential of post-invasion adaptation and geographic range expansion. One virulent, invasive insect species that has caused much damage in the United States is...

  7. Admixture between native and invasive populations may increase invasiveness of Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed

    van Kleunen, Mark; Röckle, Michael; Stift, Marc

    2015-09-22

    Self-fertilization and admixture of genotypes from different populations can have major fitness consequences in native species. However, few studies have addressed their potential roles in invasive species. Here, we used plants of Mimulus guttatus from seven native North American, three invasive Scottish and four invasive New Zealand populations to address this. We created seeds from self-fertilization, within-population outcrossing, between-population outcrossing within the same range, and outcrossing between the native and invasive ranges. A greenhouse experiment showed that native and invasive plants of M. guttatus suffered to similar degrees from inbreeding depression, in terms of asexual reproduction and biomass production. After outcrossing with plants from other populations, M. guttatus benefited from heterosis, in terms of asexual and sexual reproduction, and biomass production, particularly when plants from native and invasive populations were crossed. This suggests that, when novel genotypes of M. guttatus from the native North American range will be introduced to the invasive ranges, subsequent outcrossing with M. guttatus plants that are already there might further boost invasiveness of this species. © 2015 The Author(s).

  8. Earthworm invasion in North America: Food resource competition affects native millipede survival and invasive earthworm reproduction

    Treesearch

    Bruce Snyder; Mac Callaham; Christopher Lowe; Paul Hendrix

    2013-01-01

    The invasive non-native earthworm Amynthas agrestis (Goto and Hatai, 1899) has recently been documented invading forests of the Appalachian Mountains in the southeastern United States. This epigeic earthworm decreases the depth of organic soil horizons, and this may play a role in the decrease of millipede richness and abundance associated with A. agrestis invasion. To...

  9. Chapter 2: Effects of fire on nonnative invasive plants and invasibility of wildland ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Kristin Zouhar; Jane Kapler Smith; Steve Sutherland

    2008-01-01

    Considerable experimental and theoretical work has been done on general concepts regarding nonnative species and disturbance, but experimental research on the effects of fire on nonnative invasive species is sparse. We begin this chapter by connecting fundamental concepts from the literature of invasion ecology to fire. Then we examine fire behavior characteristics,...

  10. Admixture between native and invasive populations may increase invasiveness of Mimulus guttatus

    PubMed Central

    van Kleunen, Mark; Röckle, Michael; Stift, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Self-fertilization and admixture of genotypes from different populations can have major fitness consequences in native species. However, few studies have addressed their potential roles in invasive species. Here, we used plants of Mimulus guttatus from seven native North American, three invasive Scottish and four invasive New Zealand populations to address this. We created seeds from self-fertilization, within-population outcrossing, between-population outcrossing within the same range, and outcrossing between the native and invasive ranges. A greenhouse experiment showed that native and invasive plants of M. guttatus suffered to similar degrees from inbreeding depression, in terms of asexual reproduction and biomass production. After outcrossing with plants from other populations, M. guttatus benefited from heterosis, in terms of asexual and sexual reproduction, and biomass production, particularly when plants from native and invasive populations were crossed. This suggests that, when novel genotypes of M. guttatus from the native North American range will be introduced to the invasive ranges, subsequent outcrossing with M. guttatus plants that are already there might further boost invasiveness of this species. PMID:26354937

  11. Hierarchical spatiotemporal matrix models for characterizing invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, M.B.; Wikle, C.K.; Dorazio, R.M.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The growth and dispersal of biotic organisms is an important subject in ecology. Ecologists are able to accurately describe survival and fecundity in plant and animal populations and have developed quantitative approaches to study the dynamics of dispersal and population size. Of particular interest are the dynamics of invasive species. Such nonindigenous animals and plants can levy significant impacts on native biotic communities. Effective models for relative abundance have been developed; however, a better understanding of the dynamics of actual population size (as opposed to relative abundance) in an invasion would be beneficial to all branches of ecology. In this article, we adopt a hierarchical Bayesian framework for modeling the invasion of such species while addressing the discrete nature of the data and uncertainty associated with the probability of detection. The nonlinear dynamics between discrete time points are intuitively modeled through an embedded deterministic population model with density-dependent growth and dispersal components. Additionally, we illustrate the importance of accommodating spatially varying dispersal rates. The method is applied to the specific case of the Eurasian Collared-Dove, an invasive species at mid-invasion in the United States at the time of this writing. ?? 2006, The International Biometric Society.

  12. Hierarchical spatiotemporal matrix models for characterizing invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, Mevin B.; Wikle, Christopher K.; Dorazio, Robert M.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The growth and dispersal of biotic organisms is an important subject in ecology. Ecologists are able to accurately describe survival and fecundity in plant and animal populations and have developed quantitative approaches to study the dynamics of dispersal and population size. Of particular interest are the dynamics of invasive species. Such nonindigenous animals and plants can levy significant impacts on native biotic communities. Effective models for relative abundance have been developed; however, a better understanding of the dynamics of actual population size (as opposed to relative abundance) in an invasion would be beneficial to all branches of ecology. In this article, we adopt a hierarchical Bayesian framework for modeling the invasion of such species while addressing the discrete nature of the data and uncertainty associated with the probability of detection. The nonlinear dynamics between discrete time points are intuitively modeled through an embedded deterministic population model with density-dependent growth and dispersal components. Additionally, we illustrate the importance of accommodating spatially varying dispersal rates. The method is applied to the specific case of the Eurasian Collared-Dove, an invasive species at mid-invasion in the United States at the time of this writing.

  13. Biological invasions, climate change and genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chown, Steven L; Hodgins, Kathryn A; Griffin, Philippa C; Oakeshott, John G; Byrne, Margaret; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2015-01-01

    The rate of biological invasions is expected to increase as the effects of climate change on biological communities become widespread. Climate change enhances habitat disturbance which facilitates the establishment of invasive species, which in turn provides opportunities for hybridization and introgression. These effects influence local biodiversity that can be tracked through genetic and genomic approaches. Metabarcoding and metagenomic approaches provide a way of monitoring some types of communities under climate change for the appearance of invasives. Introgression and hybridization can be followed by the analysis of entire genomes so that rapidly changing areas of the genome are identified and instances of genetic pollution monitored. Genomic markers enable accurate tracking of invasive species’ geographic origin well beyond what was previously possible. New genomic tools are promoting fresh insights into classic questions about invading organisms under climate change, such as the role of genetic variation, local adaptation and climate pre-adaptation in successful invasions. These tools are providing managers with often more effective means to identify potential threats, improve surveillance and assess impacts on communities. We provide a framework for the application of genomic techniques within a management context and also indicate some important limitations in what can be achieved. PMID:25667601

  14. Tumor invasion as dysregulated cell motility.

    PubMed

    Kassis, J; Lauffenburger, D A; Turner, T; Wells, A

    2001-04-01

    Investigations across a range of disciplines over the past decade have brought the study of cell motility and its role in invasion to an exciting threshold. The biophysical forces proximally involved in generating cell locomotion, as well as the underlying signaling and genomic regulatory processes, are gradually becoming elucidated. We now appreciate the intricacies of the many cellular and extracellular events that modulate cell migration. This has enabled the demonstration of a causal role of cell motility in tumor progression, with various points of 'dysregulation' of motility being responsible for promoting invasion. In this paper, we describe key fundamental principles governing cell motility and branch out to describe the essence of the data that describe these principles. It has become evident that many proposed models may indeed be converging into a tightly-woven tapestry of coordinated events which employ various growth factors and their receptors, adhesion receptors (integrins), downstream molecules, cytoskeletal components, and altered genomic regulation to accomplish cell motility. Tumor invasion occurs in response to dysregulation of many of these modulatory points; specific examples include increased signaling from the EGF receptor and through PLC gamma, altered localization and expression of integrins, changes in actin modifying proteins and increased transcription from specific promoter sites. This diversity of alterations all leading to tumor invasion point to the difficulty of correcting causal events leading to tumor invasion and rather suggest that the underlying common processes required for motility be targeted for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Biological invasions, climate change and genomics.

    PubMed

    Chown, Steven L; Hodgins, Kathryn A; Griffin, Philippa C; Oakeshott, John G; Byrne, Margaret; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2015-01-01

    The rate of biological invasions is expected to increase as the effects of climate change on biological communities become widespread. Climate change enhances habitat disturbance which facilitates the establishment of invasive species, which in turn provides opportunities for hybridization and introgression. These effects influence local biodiversity that can be tracked through genetic and genomic approaches. Metabarcoding and metagenomic approaches provide a way of monitoring some types of communities under climate change for the appearance of invasives. Introgression and hybridization can be followed by the analysis of entire genomes so that rapidly changing areas of the genome are identified and instances of genetic pollution monitored. Genomic markers enable accurate tracking of invasive species' geographic origin well beyond what was previously possible. New genomic tools are promoting fresh insights into classic questions about invading organisms under climate change, such as the role of genetic variation, local adaptation and climate pre-adaptation in successful invasions. These tools are providing managers with often more effective means to identify potential threats, improve surveillance and assess impacts on communities. We provide a framework for the application of genomic techniques within a management context and also indicate some important limitations in what can be achieved.

  16. Eight questions about invasions and ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Strayer, David L

    2012-10-01

    I pose eight questions central to understanding how biological invasions affect ecosystems, assess progress towards answering those questions and suggest ways in which progress might be made. The questions concern the frequency with which invasions affect ecosystems; the circumstances under which ecosystem change is most likely; the functions that are most often affected by invaders; the relationships between changes to ecosystems, communities, and populations; the long-term responses of ecosystems to invasions; interactions between biological invasions and other anthropogenic activities and the difficulty of managing undesirable impacts of non-native species. Some questions have been answered satisfactorily, others require more data and thought, and others might benefit from being reformulated or abandoned. Actions that might speed progress include careful development of trait-based approaches; strategic collection and publication of new data, including more frequent publication of negative results; replacement of expert opinion with hard data where needed; careful consideration of whether questions really need to be answered, especially in cases where answers are being provided for managers and policy-makers; explicit attention to and testing of the domains of theories; integrating invasions better into an ecosystem context; and remembering that our predictive ability is limited and will remain so for the foreseeable future.

  17. Non-invasive sensing for food reassurance.

    PubMed

    Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-03-07

    Consumers and governments are increasingly interested in the safety, authenticity and quality of food commodities. This has driven attention towards non-invasive sensing techniques used for rapid analyzing these commodities. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in, and available alternatives for, food assurance based on non-invasive sensing techniques. The main food quality traits of interest using non-invasive sensing techniques are sensory characteristics, chemical composition, physicochemical properties, health-protecting properties, nutritional characteristics and safety. A wide range of non-invasive sensing techniques, from optical, acoustical, electrical, to nuclear magnetic, X-ray, biosensor, microwave and terahertz, are organized according to physical principle. Some of these techniques are now in a period of transition between experimental and applied utilization and several sensors and instruments are reviewed. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of portable and wearable wireless sensing devices and connecting with mobile networks, thus finding considerable use in a wide range of food assurance applications. The need for an appropriate regulatory framework is emphasized which acts to exclude unwanted components in foods and includes needed components, with sensors as part of a reassurance framework supporting regulation and food chain management. The integration of these sensor modalities into a single technological and commercial platform offers an opportunity for a paradigm shift in food reassurance.

  18. Endemic predators, invasive prey and native diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wanger, Thomas C.; Wielgoss, Arno C.; Motzke, Iris; Clough, Yann; Brook, Barry W.; Sodhi, Navjot S.; Tscharntke, Teja

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between native diversity and invasive species can be more complex than is currently understood. Invasive ant species often substantially reduce diversity in the native ants diversity that act as natural control agents for pest insects. In Indonesia (on the island of Sulawesi), the third largest cacao producer worldwide, we show that a predatory endemic toad (Ingerophrynus celebensis) controls invasive ant (Anoplolepis gracilipes) abundance, and positively affects native ant diversity. We call this the invasive-naivety effect (an opposite of enemy release), whereby alien species may not harbour anti-predatory defences against a novel native predator. A positive effect of the toads on native ants may facilitate their predation on insect vectors of cacao diseases. Hence, toads may increase crop yield, but further research is needed on this aspect. Ironically, amphibians are globally the most threatened vertebrate class and are strongly impacted by the conversion of rainforest to cacao plantations in Sulawesi. It is, therefore, crucial to manage cacao plantations to maintain these endemic toads, as they may provide critical ecosystem services, such as invasion resistance and preservation of native insect diversity. PMID:20826488

  19. Biodiversity as a barrier to ecological invasion.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Theodore A; Naeem, Shahid; Howe, Katherine M; Knops, Johannes M H; Tilman, David; Reich, Peter

    2002-06-06

    Biological invasions are a pervasive and costly environmental problem that has been the focus of intense management and research activities over the past half century. Yet accurate predictions of community susceptibility to invasion remain elusive. The diversity resistance hypothesis, which argues that diverse communities are highly competitive and readily resist invasion, is supported by both theory and experimental studies conducted at small spatial scales. However, there is also convincing evidence that the relationship between the diversity of native and invading species is positive when measured at regional scales. Although this latter relationship may arise from extrinsic factors, such as resource heterogeneity, that covary with diversity of native and invading species at large scales, the mechanisms conferring greater invasion resistance to diverse communities at local scales remain unknown. Using neighbourhood analyses, a technique from plant competition studies, we show here that species diversity in small experimental grassland plots enhances invasion resistance by increasing crowding and species richness in localized plant neighbourhoods. Both the establishment (number of invaders) and success (proportion of invaders that are large) of invading plants are reduced. These results suggest that local biodiversity represents an important line of defence against the spread of invaders.

  20. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  1. Factors promoting marine invasions: A chemoecological approach

    PubMed Central

    Mollo, Ernesto; Gavagnin, Margherita; Carbone, Marianna; Castelluccio, Francesco; Pozone, Ferdinando; Roussis, Vassilios; Templado, José; Ghiselin, Michael T.; Cimino, Guido

    2008-01-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is losing its biological distinctiveness, and the same phenomenon is occurring in other seas. It gives urgency to a better understanding of the factors that affect marine biological invasions. A chemoecological approach is proposed here to define biotic conditions that promote biological invasions in terms of enemy escape and resource opportunities. Research has focused on the secondary metabolite composition of three exotic sea slugs found in Greece that have most probably entered the Mediterranean basin by Lessepsian migration, an exchange that contributes significantly to Mediterranean biodiversity. We have found toxic compounds with significant activity as feeding deterrents both in the cephalaspidean Haminoea cyanomarginata and in the nudibranch Melibe viridis. These findings led us to propose aposematism in the former and dietary autonomy in producing defensive metabolites in the latter case, as predisposing factors to the migration. In the third mollusk investigated, the anaspidean Syphonota geographica, the topic of marine invasions has been approached through a study of its feeding biology. The identification of the same compounds from both the viscera of each individual, separately analyzed, and their food, the seagrass Halophila stipulacea, implies a dietary dependency. The survival of S. geographica in the Mediterranean seems to be related to the presence of H. stipulacea. The initial invasion of this exotic pest would seem to have paved the way for the subsequent invasion of a trophic specialist that takes advantage of niche opportunities. PMID:18337492

  2. Diagnosis of invasive candidiasis in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis ranges from 5 to 10 cases per 1,000 ICU admissions and represents 5% to 10% of all ICU-acquired infections, with an overall mortality comparable to that of severe sepsis/septic shock. A large majority of them are due to Candida albicans, but the proportion of strains with decreased sensitivity or resistance to fluconazole is increasingly reported. A high proportion of ICU patients become colonized, but only 5% to 30% of them develop an invasive infection. Progressive colonization and major abdominal surgery are common risk factors, but invasive candidiasis is difficult to predict and early diagnosis remains a major challenge. Indeed, blood cultures are positive in a minority of cases and often late in the course of infection. New nonculture-based laboratory techniques may contribute to early diagnosis and management of invasive candidiasis. Both serologic (mannan, antimannan, and betaglucan) and molecular (Candida-specific PCR in blood and serum) have been applied as serial scree