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Sample records for permeability scaling-up technique

  1. An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations

    SciTech Connect

    Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu

    1997-08-01

    Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

  2. Imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Scaling up in Class 1 reservoir type rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, L.; Brinkmeyer, A.; Doughty, D.

    1993-04-01

    A synergistic rock characterization methodology has been developed. It derives reservoir engineering parameters from X-ray tomography (CT) scanning, computer assisted petrographic image analysis, minipermeameter measurements, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). This rock characterization methodology is used to investigate the effect of small-scale rock heterogeneity on oil distribution and recovery. It is also used to investigate the applicability of imaging technologies to the development of scaleup procedures from core plug to whole core, by comparing the results of detailed simulations with the images ofthe fluid distributions observed by CT scanning. By using the rock and fluid detailed data generated by imaging technology describe, one can verify directly, in the laboratory, various scaling up techniques. Asan example, realizations of rock properties statistically and spatially compatible with the observed values are generated by one of the various stochastic methods available (fuming bands) and are used as simulator input. The simulation results were compared with both the simulation results using the true rock properties and the fluid distributions observed by CT. Conclusions regarding the effect of the various permeability models on waterflood oil recovery were formulated.

  3. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01

    to advance the fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics by systematically investigating the effect of design and operating variables, to evaluate the reported dimensionless groups as scaling factors, and to establish a reliable scale-up methodology for the TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters based on hydrodynamic similarity via advanced measurement and computational techniques. An additional objective is to develop an on-line non-invasive measurement technique based on gamma ray densitometry (i.e. Nuclear Gauge Densitometry) that can be installed and used for coater process monitoring to ensure proper performance and operation and to facilitate the developed scale-up methodology. To achieve the objectives set for the project, the work will use optical probes and gamma ray computed tomography (CT) (for the measurements of solids/voidage holdup cross-sectional distribution and radial profiles along the bed height, spouted diameter, and fountain height) and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) (for the measurements of the 3D solids flow field, velocity, turbulent parameters, circulation time, solids lagrangian trajectories, and many other of spouted bed related hydrodynamic parameters). In addition, gas dynamic measurement techniques and pressure transducers will be utilized to complement the obtained information. The measurements obtained by these techniques will be used as benchmark data to evaluate and validate the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models (two fluid model or discrete particle model) and their closures. The validated CFD models and closures will be used to facilitate the developed methodology for scale-up, design and hydrodynamic similarity. Successful execution of this work and the proposed tasks will advance the fundamental understanding of the coater flow field and quantify it for proper and safe design, scale-up, and performance. Such achievements will overcome the barriers to AGR applications and will help assure that the US maintains

  4. Scale effects: HCMM data simulation. Usage of filtering techniques for scaling-up simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digennaro, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Image reduction used to simulate increase in altitude of an acquisition platform is equivalent to data smoothing, and can be achieved either by neighborhood averaging or by filtering techniques. The averaging approach is limited for accurate simulation. A filtering method is described which was based on the hypothesis that all changes due to altitude increase can be represented by a point spread function. Determination of the scale function and factor are discussed as well as implementation of the filtering. Filtering can be either in the spatial or frequency domain. In the spatial domain, filtering consists of the convolution of the image with the weights mask, and then of the declination of the points according to the appropriates scale factor. A simulation of an aircraft day image in the infrared channel is examined.

  5. Scaling up Psycholinguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation contains several projects, each addressing different questions with different techniques. In chapter 1, I argue that they are unified thematically by their goal of "scaling up psycholinguistics"; they are all aimed at analyzing large data-sets using tools that reveal patterns to propose and test mechanism-neutral hypotheses about…

  6. Extraction of bioactives from Orthosiphon stamineus using microwave and ultrasound-assisted techniques: Process optimization and scale up.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung-Hung; See, Tiam-You; Yusoff, Rozita; Ngoh, Gek-Cheng; Kow, Kien-Woh

    2017-04-15

    This work demonstrated the optimization and scale up of microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) of bioactive compounds from Orthosiphon stamineus using energy-based parameters such as absorbed power density and absorbed energy density (APD-AED) and response surface methodology (RSM). The intensive optimum conditions of MAE obtained at 80% EtOH, 50mL/g, APD of 0.35W/mL, AED of 250J/mL can be used to determine the optimum conditions of the scale-dependent parameters i.e. microwave power and treatment time at various extraction scales (100-300mL solvent loading). The yields of the up scaled conditions were consistent with less than 8% discrepancy and they were about 91-98% of the Soxhlet extraction yield. By adapting APD-AED method in the case of UAE, the intensive optimum conditions of the extraction, i.e. 70% EtOH, 30mL/g, APD of 0.22W/mL, AED of 450J/mL are able to achieve similar scale up results.

  7. Scaling up as Catachresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The metaphor of scaling up is the wrong one to use for describing and prescribing educational change. Many of the strategies being employed to achieve scaling up are counter-productive: they conceive of practitioners as delivery agents or consumers, rather than as co-constructors of change. An approach to educational innovation based on the…

  8. Scaling up Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Richards, Evan; Kustusch, Mary Bridget; Ding, Lin; Beichner, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The SCALE-UP (Student-Centered Activities for Large Enrollment for Undergraduate Programs) project was developed to implement reforms designed for small classes into large physics classes. Over 50 schools across the country, ranging from Wake Technical Community College to Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have adopted it for classes of…

  9. Evaluating Permeability Enchancement Using Electrical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Pritchett

    2008-09-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) development projects involve the artificial stimulation of relatively impermeable high-temperature underground regions (at depths of 2-4 kilometers or more) to create sufficient permeability to permit underground fluid circulation, so that hot water can be withdrawn from production wells and used to generate electric power. Several major research projects of this general type have been undertaken in the past in New Mexico (Fenton Hill), Europe, Japan and Australia. Recent U.S. activities along these lines focus mainly on stimulating peripheral areas of existing operating hydrothermal fields rather than on fresh 'greenfield' sites, but the long-term objective of the Department of Energy's EGS program is the development of large-scale power projects based on EGS technology (MIT, 2006; NREL, 2008). Usually, stimulation is accomplished by injecting water into a well at high pressure, enhancing permeability by the creation and propagation of fractures in the surrounding rock (a process known as 'hydrofracturing'). Beyond just a motivation, low initial system permeability is also an essential prerequisite to hydrofracturing. If the formation permeability is too high, excessive fluid losses will preclude the buildup of sufficient pressure to fracture rock. In practical situations, the actual result of injection is frequently to re-open pre-existing hydrothermally-mineralized fractures, rather than to create completely new fractures by rupturing intact rock. Pre-existing fractures can often be opened using injection pressures in the range 5-20 MPa. Creation of completely new fractures will usually require pressures that are several times higher. It is preferable to undertake development projects of this type in regions where tectonic conditions are conducive to shear failure, so that when pre-existing fractures are pressurized they will fail by shearing laterally. If this happens, the fracture will often stay open afterwards even if

  10. Correlation of Three Techniques for Determining Soil Permeability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winneberger, John T.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses problems of acquiring adequate results when measuring for soil permeability. Correlates three relatively simple techniques that could be helpful to the inexperienced technician dealing with septic tank practices. An appendix includes procedures for valid percolation tests. (MLB)

  11. Scale up of large ALON windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Kashalikar, Uday; Foti, Robyn; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALON® Optical Ceramic) combines broadband transparency with excellent mechanical properties. ALON's cubic structure means that it is transparent in its polycrystalline form, allowing it to be manufactured by conventional powder processing techniques. Surmet has established a robust manufacturing process, beginning with synthesis of ALON® powder, continuing through forming/heat treatment of blanks, and ending with optical fabrication of ALON® windows. Surmet has made significant progress in our production capability in recent years. Additional scale up of Surmet's manufacturing capability, for larger sizes and higher quantities, is currently underway. ALON® transparent armor represents the state of the art in protection against armor piercing threats, offering a factor of two in weight and thickness savings over conventional glass laminates. Tiled and monolithic windows have been successfully produced and tested against a range of threats. Large ALON® window are also of interest to a range of visible to Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) sensor applications. These applications often have stressing imaging requirements which in turn require that these large windows have optical characteristics including excellent homogeneity of index of refraction and very low stress birefringence. Surmet is currently scaling up its production facility to be able to make and deliver ALON® monolithic windows as large as ~19x36-in. Additionally, Surmet has plans to scale up to windows ~3ftx3ft in size in the coming years. Recent results with scale up and characterization of the resulting blanks will be presented.

  12. The SCALE-UP Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichner, Robert

    2015-03-01

    The Student Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) project was developed nearly 20 years ago as an economical way to provide collaborative, interactive instruction even for large enrollment classes. Nearly all research-based pedagogies have been designed with fairly high faculty-student ratios. The economics of introductory courses at large universities often precludes that situation, so SCALE-UP was created as a way to facilitate highly collaborative active learning with large numbers of students served by only a few faculty and assistants. It enables those students to learn and succeed not only in acquiring content, but also to practice important 21st century skills like problem solving, communication, and teamsmanship. The approach was initially targeted at undergraduate science and engineering students taking introductory physics courses in large enrollment sections. It has since expanded to multiple content areas, including chemistry, math, engineering, biology, business, nursing, and even the humanities. Class sizes range from 24 to over 600. Data collected from multiple sites around the world indicates highly successful implementation at more than 250 institutions. NSF support was critical for initial development and dissemination efforts. Generously supported by NSF (9752313, 9981107) and FIPSE (P116B971905, P116B000659).

  13. Evaluation of Various Pulse-Decay Laboratory Permeability Measurement Techniques for Highly Stressed Coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ruimin; Harpalani, Satya; Pandey, Rohit

    2017-02-01

    The transient technique for laboratory permeability measurement, proposed by Brace et al. (J Geophys Res 73:2225-2236, 1968) and widely used for conventional gas reservoir rocks, is the preferred method when testing low-permeability rocks in the laboratory. However, Brace et al.'s solution leads to considerable errors since it does not take into account compressive storage and sorption effect when applied to sorptive rocks, such as, coals and shales. To verify the applicability of this solution when used to characterize fluid flow behavior of coal, an in-depth investigation of permeability evolution for flow of helium and methane depletion was conducted for San Juan coals using the pressure pulse-decay method under best replicated in situ conditions. Three permeability solutions, Brace et al.'s (1968), Dicker and Smits's (International meeting on petroleum engineering, Society of Petroleum Engineers, 1988) and Cui et al.'s (Geofluids 9:208-223, 2009), were utilized to establish the permeability trends. Both helium and methane permeability results exhibited very small difference between the Brace et al.'s solution and Dicker and Smits's solution, indicating that the effect of compressive storage is negligible. However, methane permeability enhancement at low pressures due to coal matrix shrinkage resulting from gas desorption can be significant and this was observed in pressure response plots and the estimated permeability values using Cui et al.'s solution only. Therefore, it is recommended that Cui et al.'s solution be employed to correctly include the sorption effect when testing coal permeability using the transient technique. A series of experiments were also carried out to establish the stress-dependent permeability trend under constant effective stress condition, and then quantify the sole contribution of the sorption effect on permeability variation. By comparison with the laboratory data obtained under in situ stress/strain condition, it was verified that

  14. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mira Stone; Tillman, Fred D.; Choi, Jee-Won; Smith, James A.

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10 -14 to 10 -9 m 2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3×10 -13 m 2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8×10 -10 m 2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2×10 -9 to 1.5×10 -9 m 2, and ranged from 3.6×10 -9 to 6.8×10 -9 m 2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0×10 -14 m 2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3×10 -14 m 2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit was achieved

  15. An improved technique for computing permeability from NMR measurements in mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Dugan, Brandon

    2011-08-01

    We develop a technique for extending nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) permeability estimation to clay-rich sediments. Our technique builds on the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) equation by using porosity, grain size, specific surface, and magnetic susceptibility data to yield more accurate permeability estimation in mudstones with large pore surface areas and complex mineralogies. Based on measurements of natural sediments as well as resedimented laboratory mixtures of silica, bentonite, and kaolinite powders, we find that our method predicts permeability values that match measured values over four orders of magnitude and among lithologies that vary widely in grain size, mineralogy, and surface area. Our results show that the relationship between NMR data and permeability is a function of mineralogy and grain geometry, and that permeability predictions in clay-rich sediments can be improved with insights regarding the nature of the pore system made by the Kozeny theory. This technique extends the utility of NMR measurements beyond typical reservoir-quality rocks to a wide range of lithologies.

  16. Characterization of Filtration Scale-Up Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Luna, Maria L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Jagoda, Lynette K.

    2009-03-09

    The scale-up performance of sintered stainless steel crossflow filter elements planned for use at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) and at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were characterized in partial fulfillment (see Table S.1) of the requirements of Test Plan TP RPP WTP 509. This test report details the results of experimental activities related only to filter scale-up characterization. These tests were performed under the Simulant Testing Program supporting Phase 1 of the demonstration of the pretreatment leaching processes at PEP. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the tests discussed herein for Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to address the data needs of Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-07-004. Scale-up characterization tests employ high-level waste (HLW) simulants developed under the Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-469. The experimental activities outlined in TP-RPP-WTP-509 examined specific processes from two broad areas of simulant behavior: 1) leaching performance of the boehmite simulant as a function of suspending phase chemistry and 2) filtration performance of the blended simulant with respect to filter scale-up and fouling. With regard to leaching behavior, the effect of anions on the kinetics of boehmite leaching was examined. Two experiments were conducted: 1) one examined the effect of the aluminate anion on the rate of boehmite dissolution and 2) another determined the effect of secondary anions typical of Hanford tank wastes on the rate of boehmite dissolution. Both experiments provide insight into how compositional variations in the suspending phase impact the effectiveness of the leaching processes. In addition, the aluminate anion studies provide information on the consequences of gibbsite in waste. The latter derives from the expected fast dissolution of gibbsite relative to boehmite. This test report concerns only results of the filtration performance with respect to scale-up. Test results for boehmite

  17. "Scaling Up" Good Practices in Girls' Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subrahmanian, Ramya

    2005-01-01

    This publication focuses on strategies for meeting international targets and national goals for universalizing girls' access to, retention in and completion of quality education. This will be done through "scaling up" successful interventions, or components of interventions that can be replicated. UNESCO published this book within the…

  18. Lessons Learned on "Scaling Up" of Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Having developed a technology-based teaching unit on weather that appeared to work well for middle school students, Nancy Butler Songer and her colleagues at the University of Michigan decided in the late 1990s to take the next logical step in their research program: They scaled up. This article discusses lessons learned by several faculty…

  19. Measuring permeability, Young's modulus, and stress relaxation by the beam-bending technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichit-Vadakan, Wilasa

    Recent interest in the permeability of cement paste, mortars, and concrete lies in the need to gain further understanding of mechanisms affecting the durability of these materials. Conventional techniques for measuring permeability are cumbersome and often take days to complete just one measurement. This thesis proposes a new technique for measuring the permeability. The advantage of this technique is that the results are obtained in a few minutes to a few hours; moreover, there is no problem with leaks or need for high pressures. The method is particularly well suited for examining the changes in permeability and viscoelastic properties of young cement paste samples. When a saturated rod of a porous material is instantaneously deflected under three-point bending, two types of relaxation processes occur simultaneously: hydrodynamic relaxation, caused by the flow of liquid in the porous body to restore ambient pressure, and viscoelastic relaxation of the solid network. By measuring the decrease in the force required to sustain a constant deflection, it is possible to obtain the permeability and Young's modulus from the hydrodynamic relaxation function, in addition to the stress relaxation function of the sample. The exact viscoelastic solution is developed and the total relaxation is shown to be very closely approximated as the product of the hydrodynamic and stress relaxation functions. The analytical results are verified on porous VycorRTM glass saturated in various solvents, including normal alcohols, water, and glycerol. The results show excellent agreement with the theory. Consistent with observations of previous workers, the permeability is found to be influenced by the size of the solvent molecule; by assuming that the pore surfaces are covered with a monolayer of immobile solvent, the observed variation can be explained. The evolution of the permeability, Young's modulus, and stress relaxation function are reported for Type III Portland cement paste with

  20. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

    PubMed

    Olson, M S; Tillman, F D; Choi, J W; Smith, J A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10(-14) to 10(-9) m2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3 x 10(-13) m2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8 x 10(-10) m2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2 x 10(-9) to 1.5 x 10(-9) m2, and ranged from 3.6 x 10(-9) to 6.8 x 10(-9) m2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0 x 10(-14) m2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3 x 10(-14) m2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit

  1. Scaling up: Distributed machine learning with cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, F.J.; Hennessy, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    Machine-learning methods are becoming increasingly popular for automated data analysis. However, standard methods do not scale up to massive scientific and business data sets without expensive hardware. This paper investigates a practical alternative for scaling up: the use of distributed processing to take advantage of the often dormant PCs and workstations available on local networks. Each workstation runs a common rule-learning program on a subset of the data. We first show that for commonly used rule-evaluation criteria, a simple form of cooperation can guarantee that a rule will look good to the set of cooperating learners if and only if it would look good to a single learner operating with the entire data set. We then show how such a system can further capitalize on different perspectives by sharing learned knowledge for significant reduction in search effort. We demonstrate the power of the method by learning from a massive data set taken from the domain of cellular fraud detection. Finally, we provide an overview of other methods for scaling up machine learning.

  2. Scale up of proteoliposome derived Cochleate production.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Caridad; Bracho, Gustavo; Lastre, Miriam; González, Domingo; Gil, Danay; Acevedo, Reinaldo; del Campo, Judith; Taboada, Carlos; Solís, Rosa L; Barberá, Ramón; Pérez, Oliver

    2006-04-12

    Cochleate are highly stable structures with promising immunological features. Cochleate structures are usually obtaining from commercial lipids. Proteoliposome derived Cochleate are derived from an outer membrane vesicles of Neisseria meningitidis B. Previously, we obtained Cochleates using dialysis procedures. In order to increase the production process, we used a crossflow system (CFS) that allows easy scale up to obtain large batches in an aseptic environment. The raw material and solutions used in the production process are already approved for human application. This work demonstrates that CFS is very efficient process to obtain Cochleate structures with a yield of more than 80% and the immunogenicity comparable to that obtained by dialysis membrane.

  3. Scaling-up in the vicinity of wells in heterogeneous field

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the equivalent gridblock permeability obtained by the scaling-up procedure from fine gridblocks depends on the boundary conditions. In the literature, most boundary conditions considered represent a ``linear`` flow pattern, while in reservoir simulation, ``radial`` flow plays an important role and is related directly to well production forecasts. In this paper, the authors will show the need for a specific treatment of the scaling-up procedure in the vicinity of wells due to the ``radial`` flow pattern with a high pressure gradient. On reservoir field scale, two types of flow should be considered: (1) the ``linear`` flow pattern, which usually represents a low pressure gradient region; and (2) the ``radial`` flow pattern, which usually represents a high pressure gradient region. The determination of the equivalent absolute permeabilities by ``radial`` flow patterns is discussed in this paper. The scaled-up parameters consist of transmissibility and numerical productivity index (PI).

  4. Scale-up of hollow fiber extractors

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, A.F.; Fair, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a commercial-scale hollow fiber extraction system was investigated by the Separations Research Program (SRP) at the University of Texas at Austin. In this work, hexanol was extracted from water into octanol using a large-scale extraction/distillation system. In the membrane extractor studies, the octanol-rich phase was fed on the tube-side while in the packed column studies, the octanol-rich phase was chosen as the dispersed phase. This chemical system was selected because of its high solute distribution coefficient. As a result, the required solvent to feed ratio was low which creates hydraulic problems for conventional dispersive extractors such as the packed column. Under identical operating conditions, the mass transfer performance of the hollow fiber extractor compared favorably with that of a commercial-scale type 2 structured packing. A height equivalent to a theoretical stage (HETS) of 1.5 meters was obtained with the membrane extractor as compared to 15 meters for the type 2 structured packing. A staged hollow fiber extraction mass transfer model for scale-up was developed and found to agree with data obtained in this work and with data obtained earlier using the n-butanol/succinic acid/water system.

  5. Scaling Up Decision Theoretic Planning to Planetary Rover Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Dearden, Richard; Washington, Rich

    2004-01-01

    Because of communication limits, planetary rovers must operate autonomously during consequent durations. The ability to plan under uncertainty is one of the main components of autonomy. Previous approaches to planning under uncertainty in NASA applications are not able to address the challenges of future missions, because of several apparent limits. On another side, decision theory provides a solid principle framework for reasoning about uncertainty and rewards. Unfortunately, there are several obstacles to a direct application of decision-theoretic techniques to the rover domain. This paper focuses on the issues of structure and concurrency, and continuous state variables. We describes two techniques currently under development that address specifically these issues and allow scaling-up decision theoretic solution techniques to planetary rover planning problems involving a small number of goals.

  6. A casting and imaging technique for determining void geometry and relative permeability behavior of a single fracture specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.L.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1990-01-01

    A casting technique has been developed for making translucent replicas of the void space of natural rock fractures. Attenuation of light shined through the cast combined with digital image analysis provides a pointwise definition of fracture apertures. The technique has been applied to a fracture specimen from Dixie Valley, Nevada, and the measured void space geometry has been used to develop theoretical predictions of two-phase relative permeability. A strong anisotropy in relative permeabilities has been found, which is caused by highly anisotropic spatial correlations among fracture apertures. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  7. A guide to scaling up population health interventions.

    PubMed

    Milat, Andrew J; Newson, Robyn; King, Lesley; Rissel, Chris; Wolfenden, Luke; Bauman, Adrian; Redman, Sally; Giffin, Michael

    2016-01-28

    The 'how to' of scaling up public health interventions for maximum reach and outcomes is receiving greater attention; however, there remains a paucity of practical tools to guide those actively involved in scaling up processes in high-income countries. To fill this gap, the New South Wales Ministry of Health developed Increasing the scale of population health interventions: a guide (2014). The guide was informed by a systematic review of scaling up models and methods, and a two-round Delphi process with a sample of senior policy makers, practitioners and researchers actively involved in scaling up processes. Although it is a practical guide to assist health policy makers, health practitioners and others responsible for scaling up effective population health interventions, it can also be used by researchers in the design of research studies that are potentially suitable for scaling up, particularly where research-practice collaborations are involved. The guide is divided into four steps: step 1, 'scalability assessment', aims to determine if an intervention is scalable; step 2, 'developing a scale up plan', aims to develop a practical and workable scaling up plan that can be used to convince stakeholders there is a compelling case for action. Step 3, 'preparing for scale up', aims to identify ways of securing resources needed for going to scale, operating at scale, and building a foundation of legitimacy and support to sustain the scaling up effort through the implementation stage; and step 4, 'scaling up the intervention', involves putting the plan developed in step 2 into place. Although the guide is written as though the user is starting from the point of assessing the scalability of an intervention, later steps can be used by those already involved in scaling up to review their implementation processes. The guide is not intended to be prescriptive. Its purpose is to help policy makers, practitioners, researchers and other decision makers decide on appropriate

  8. Scale-up of miscible flood processes

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  9. Scale Up in Education. Volume 1: Ideas in Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Barbara Ed.; McDonald, Sarah-Kathryn Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Scale Up in Education, Volume 1: Ideas in Principle" examines the challenges of "scaling up" from a multidisciplinary perspective. It brings together contributions from disciplines that routinely take promising innovations to scale, including medicine, business, engineering, computing, and education. Together the contributors explore appropriate…

  10. Readiness for Change. Scaling-Up Brief. Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixsen, Dean L.; Blase, Karen A.; Horner, Rob; Sugai, George

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this "Brief" is to define the variables a state or large district leadership team may wish to consider as they determine if they are "ready" to invest in the scaling-up of an innovation in education. As defined here, "scaling up" means that at least 60% of the students who could benefit from an innovation have access to that…

  11. Multisite Studies and Scaling up in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A scale-up study in education typically expands the sample of students, schools, districts, and/or practices or materials used in smaller studies in ways that build in heterogeneity. Yet surprisingly little is known about the factors that promote successful scaling up efforts in education, in large part due to the absence of empirically supported…

  12. Using soft computing techniques to predict corrected air permeability using Thomeer parameters, air porosity and grain density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooruddin, Hasan A.; Anifowose, Fatai; Abdulraheem, Abdulazeez

    2014-03-01

    Soft computing techniques are recently becoming very popular in the oil industry. A number of computational intelligence-based predictive methods have been widely applied in the industry with high prediction capabilities. Some of the popular methods include feed-forward neural networks, radial basis function network, generalized regression neural network, functional networks, support vector regression and adaptive network fuzzy inference system. A comparative study among most popular soft computing techniques is presented using a large dataset published in literature describing multimodal pore systems in the Arab D formation. The inputs to the models are air porosity, grain density, and Thomeer parameters obtained using mercury injection capillary pressure profiles. Corrected air permeability is the target variable. Applying developed permeability models in recent reservoir characterization workflow ensures consistency between micro and macro scale information represented mainly by Thomeer parameters and absolute permeability. The dataset was divided into two parts with 80% of data used for training and 20% for testing. The target permeability variable was transformed to the logarithmic scale as a pre-processing step and to show better correlations with the input variables. Statistical and graphical analysis of the results including permeability cross-plots and detailed error measures were created. In general, the comparative study showed very close results among the developed models. The feed-forward neural network permeability model showed the lowest average relative error, average absolute relative error, standard deviations of error and root means squares making it the best model for such problems. Adaptive network fuzzy inference system also showed very good results.

  13. Techniques to Determine Maintenace Frequency of Permeable Pavement Systems with Time Domain Reflectometers (TDRs

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the surface clogs in permeable pavement systems, they lose effectiveness and require maintenance. There is limited direct guidance for determining when maintenance is needed to prevent surface runoff bypass. Research is being conducted using multiple time domain reflectomete...

  14. Distributed machine learning: Scaling up with coarse-grained parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, F.J.; Hennessy, D.N.

    1994-12-31

    Machine teaming methods are becoming accepted as additions to the biologist`s data-analysis tool kit. However, scaling these techniques up to large data sets, such as those in biological and medical domains, is problematic in terms of both the required computational search effort and required memory (and the detrimental effects of excessive swapping). Our approach to tackling the problem of scaling up to large datasets is to take advantage of the ubiquitous workstation networks that are generally available in scientific and engineering environments. This paper introduces the notion of the invariant-partitioning property--that for certain evaluation criteria it is possible to partition a data set across multiple processors such that any rule that is satisfactory over the entire data set will also be satisfactory on at least one subset. In addition, by taking advantage of cooperation through interprocess communication, it is possible to build distributed learning algorithms such that only rules that are satisfactory over the entire data set will be learned. We describe a distributed learning system, CorPRL, that takes advantage of the invariant-partitioning property to learn from very large data sets, and present results demonstrating CorPRL`s effectiveness in analyzing data from two databases.

  15. A new scale-up approach for dispersive mixing in twin-screw compounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Graeme; Bigio, David I.; Andersen, Paul; Wetzel, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Scale-up rules in polymer processing are critical in ensuring consistency in product quality and properties when transitioning from low volume laboratory mixing processes to high volume industrial compounding. The scale-up approach investigated in this study evaluates the processes with respect to dispersive mixing. Demand of polymer composites with solid additives, such as carbon microfibers and nanotubes, has become increasingly popular. Dispersive mixing breaks down particles that agglomerate, which is paramount in processing composites because solid additives tend to collect and clump. The amount of stress imparted on the material governs the degree of dispersive mixing. A methodology has been developed to characterize the Residence Stress Distribution (RSD) within a twin-screw extruder in real time through the use of polymeric stress beads. Through this technique, certain mixing scale-up rules can be analyzed. The following research investigated two different scale-up rules. The industry standard for mixing scale-up takes the ratio of outer diameters cubed to convert the volumetric flow rate from the smaller process to a flow rate appropriate in the larger machine. This procedure then resolves both operating conditions since shear rate remains constant. The second rule studied is based on percent drag flow, or the fraction of pumping potential, for different elements along the screw configuration. The percent drag flow rule aims to bring greater focus to operating conditions when scaling-up with respect to dispersive mixing. Through the use of the RSD methodology and a Design of Experiment (DOE) approach, rigorous statistical analysis was used to determine the validity between the scale-up rules of argument.

  16. A quality by design approach to scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Badawy, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    High-shear wet granulation is a complex process that in turn makes scale-up a challenging task. Scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process has been studied extensively in the past with various different methodologies being proposed in the literature. This review article discusses existing scale-up principles and categorizes the various approaches into two main scale-up strategies - parameter-based and attribute-based. With the advent of quality by design (QbD) principle in drug product development process, an increased emphasis toward the latter approach may be needed to ensure product robustness. In practice, a combination of both scale-up strategies is often utilized. In a QbD paradigm, there is also a need for an increased fundamental and mechanistic understanding of the process. This can be achieved either by increased experimentation that comes at higher costs, or by using modeling techniques, that are also discussed as part of this review.

  17. In-situ permeability measurements with direct push techniques: Phase II topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, W.; Mason, N.; Chipman, V.; Kisiel, K.; Stockton, J.

    1999-03-01

    This effort designed, fabricated, and field tested the engineering prototype of the Cone Permeameter{trademark} system. The integrated system includes the instrumented penetrometer probe, air and water pumps, flowrate controls, flow sensors, and a laptop-controlled data system. All of the equipment is portable and can be transported as luggage on airlines. The data system acquired and displays the process measurements (pressures, flows, and downhole temperature) in real time and calculates the resulting permeability. The measurement probe is a 2 inch diameter CPT rod section, incorporating a screened injection zone near the lower end of the rod and multiple sensitive absolute pressure sensors embedded in the probe at varying distances from the injection zone. Laboratory tests in a large test cell demonstrated the system's ability to measure nominally 1 Darcy permeability soil (30 to 40 Darcy material had been successfully measured in the Phase 1 effort). These tests also provided a shakedown of the system and identified minor instrument problems, which were resolved. Supplemental numerical modeling was conducted to evaluate the effects of layered permeability (heterogeneity) and anisotropy on the measurement system's performance. The general results of the analysis were that the Cone Permeameter could measure accurately, in heterogeneous media, the volume represented by the sample port radii if the outer pressure ports were used. Anisotropic permeability, while readily analyzed numerically, is more complicated to resolve with the simple analytical approach of the 1-D model, and will need further work to quantify. This phase culminated in field demonstrations at the DOE Savannah River Site. Saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements were completed at the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin, and air permeability measurements were conducted at the M Area Integrated Demonstration Site and the 321 M area. The saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements were the most

  18. Scaling up breastfeeding programmes in a complex adaptive world.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Hall Moran, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    The 2016 Breastfeeding Lancet Series continues to provide unequivocal evidence regarding the numerous benefits that optimal breastfeeding practices offer to children and women worldwide and the major savings that improving these practices can have as a result of their major public health benefits. Unfortunately, this knowledge remains underutilized as there has been little progress scaling up effective breastfeeding programmes globally. Improving the uptake and scaling up of effective national breastfeeding programmes that are potent enough to improve exclusive breastfeeding duration should be a top priority for all countries. Complex analysis systems longitudinal research is needed to understand how best to empower decision makers to achieve this goal through well-validated participatory decision-making tools to help their countries assess baseline needs, including costs, as well as progress with their scaling-up efforts. Sound systems thinking frameworks and scaling-up models are now available to guide and research prospectively future scaling-up efforts that can be replicated, with proper adaptations, across countries.

  19. Scale-up of a pan-coating process.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Turton, Richard; Joshi, Nitin; Hammerman, Elizabeth; Ergun, James

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a practical scale-up model for a solvent-based pan-coating process. Practical scale-up rules to determine the key parameters (pan load, pan speed, spray rate, air flow) required to control the process are proposed. The proposed scale-up rules are based on a macroscopic evaluation of the coating process. Implementation of these rules does not require complex experimentation or prediction of model parameters. The proposed scale-up rules were tested by conducting coating scale-up and scale-down experiments on 24-inch and 52-inch Vector Hi-coaters. The data demonstrate that using these rules led to similar cumulative drug release profiles (f2 > 50; and P Analysis of Variance [PANOVA] > 0.05 for cumulative percentage of drug released after 12 hours [Cum12]) from tablets made at 24- and 52-inch scales. Membrane characteristics such as opacity and roughness were also similar across the 2 scales. The effects of the key process variables on coat weight uniformity and membrane characteristics were also studied. Pan speed was found to be the most significant factor related to coating uniformity. Spray droplet size was found to affect the membrane roughness significantly, whereas opacity was affected by the drying capacity.

  20. Scaling Up Impact on Nutrition: What Will It Take?1234

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Stuart; Menon, Purnima; Kennedy, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Despite consensus on actions to improve nutrition globally, less is known about how to operationalize the right mix of actions—nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive—equitably, at scale, in different contexts. This review draws on a large scaling-up literature search and 4 case studies of large-scale nutrition programs with proven impact to synthesize critical elements for impact at scale. Nine elements emerged as central: 1) having a clear vision or goal for impact; 2) intervention characteristics; 3) an enabling organizational context for scaling up; 4) establishing drivers such as catalysts, champions, systemwide ownership, and incentives; 5) choosing contextually relevant strategies and pathways for scaling up, 6) building operational and strategic capacities; 7) ensuring adequacy, stability, and flexibility of financing; 8) ensuring adequate governance structures and systems; and 9) embedding mechanisms for monitoring, learning, and accountability. Translating current political commitment to large-scale impact on nutrition will require robust attention to these elements. PMID:26178028

  1. Brazilian meningococcal C conjugate vaccine: Scaling up studies.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Renata Chagas; de Souza, Iaralice Medeiros; da Silva, Milton Neto; Silva, Flavia de Paiva; Figueira, Elza Scott; Leal, Maria de Lurdes; Jessouroun, Ellen; da Silva, José Godinho; Medronho, Ricardo de Andrade; da Silveira, Ivna Alana Freitas Brasileiro

    2015-08-20

    Several outbreaks caused by Neisseria meningitidis group C have been occurred in different regions of Brazil. A conjugate vaccine for Neisseria meningitidis was produced by chemical linkage between periodate-oxidized meningococcal C polysaccharide and hydrazide-activated monomeric tetanus toxoid via a modified reductive amination conjugation method. Vaccine safety and immunogenicity tested in Phase I and II trials showed satisfactory results. Before starting Phase III trials, vaccine production was scaled up to obtain industrial lots under Good Manufacture Practices (GMP). Comparative analysis between data obtained from industrial and pilot scales of the meningococcal C conjugate bulk showed similar execution times in the scaling up production process without significant losses or alterations in the quality attributes of purified compounds. In conclusion, scale up was considered satisfactory and the Brazilian meningococcal conjugate vaccine production aiming to perform Phase III trials is feasible.

  2. Scaling-Up Successfully: Pathways to Replication for Educational NGOs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jowett, Alice; Dyer, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Non-government organisations (NGOs) are big players in international development, critical to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and constantly under pressure to "achieve more". Scaling-up their initiatives successfully and sustainably can be an efficient and cost effective way for NGOs to increase their impact across a…

  3. Sustaining and Scaling up the Impact of Professional Development Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehetmeier, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with a crucial topic: which factors influence the sustainability and scale-up of a professional development programme's impact? Theoretical models and empirical findings from impact research (e.g. Zehetmeier and Krainer, "ZDM Int J Math" 43(6/7):875-887, 2011) and innovation research (e.g. Cobb and Smith,…

  4. New tuberculosis technologies: challenges for retooling and scale-up.

    PubMed

    Pai, M; Palamountain, K M

    2012-10-01

    The availability of new tools does not mean that they will be adopted, used correctly, scaled up or have public health impact. Experience to date with new diagnostics suggests that many national tuberculosis programmes (NTPs) in high-burden countries are reluctant to adopt and scale up new tools, even when these are backed by evidence and global policy recommendations. We suggest that there are several common barriers to effective national adoption and scale-up of new technologies: global policy recommendations that do not provide sufficient information for scale-up, complex decision-making processes and weak political commitment at the country level, limited engagement of and support to NTP managers, high cost of tools and poor fit with user needs, unregulated markets and inadequate business models, limited capacity for laboratory strengthening and implementation research, and insufficient advocacy and donor support. Overcoming these barriers will require enhanced country-level advocacy, resources, technical assistance and political commitment. Some of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) countries are emerging as early adopters of policies and technologies, and are increasing their investments in TB control. They may provide the first opportunities to fully assess the public health impact of new tools.

  5. Lessons from a Scale-Up of Residentially Linked Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Jeffrey S.; Patch, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One form of learning community involves students taking a shared academic course while living together. At Elon University between 2011 and 2015, in a partnership between academic and student life portions of the university, this form of learning community was scaled up to include more than half of first-year students in the fall semester. Each…

  6. Millions Learning: Scaling up Quality Education in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Jenny Perlman; Winthrop, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    "Millions Learning: Scaling up Quality Education in Developing Countries" tells the story of where and how quality education has scaled in low- and middle-income countries. The story emerges from wide-ranging research on scaling and learning, including 14 in-depth case studies from around the globe. Ultimately, "Millions…

  7. Three Collaborative Models for Scaling Up Evidence-Based Practices

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosemarie; Jones, Helen; Marsenich, Lynne; Sosna, Todd; Price, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The current paper describes three models of research-practice collaboration to scale-up evidence-based practices (EBP): (1) the Rolling Cohort model in England, (2) the Cascading Dissemination model in San Diego County, and (3) the Community Development Team model in 53 California and Ohio counties. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) and KEEP are the focal evidence-based practices that are designed to improve outcomes for children and families in the child welfare, juvenile justice, and mental health systems. The three scale-up models each originated from collaboration between community partners and researchers with the shared goal of wide-spread implementation and sustainability of MTFC/KEEP. The three models were implemented in a variety of contexts; Rolling Cohort was implemented nationally, Cascading Dissemination was implemented within one county, and Community Development Team was targeted at the state level. The current paper presents an overview of the development of each model, the policy frameworks in which they are embedded, system challenges encountered during scale-up, and lessons learned. Common elements of successful scale-up efforts, barriers to success, factors relating to enduring practice relationships, and future research directions are discussed. PMID:21484449

  8. Scaling up Strategies for Change: Change in Formative Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Truus; Feijs, Els

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses some of the results of the CATCH (Classroom Assessment as a basis for Teacher Change) project. CATCH was meant to develop, apply and scale up a professional development programme designed to change teachers' instruction by helping them change their formative assessment practices. The authors focus on the analysis of three…

  9. Charter Operators Spell Out Barriers to "Scaling Up"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    The pace at which the highest-performing charter-management organizations (CMOs) are "scaling up" is being determined largely by how rapidly they can develop and hire strong leaders and acquire physical space, and by the level of support they receive for growth from city or state policies, say leaders from some charter organizations…

  10. Scaling up complex interventions: insights from a realist synthesis.

    PubMed

    Willis, Cameron D; Riley, Barbara L; Stockton, Lisa; Abramowicz, Aneta; Zummach, Dana; Wong, Geoff; Robinson, Kerry L; Best, Allan

    2016-12-19

    Preventing chronic diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, requires complex interventions, involving multi-component and multi-level efforts that are tailored to the contexts in which they are delivered. Despite an increasing number of complex interventions in public health, many fail to be 'scaled up'. This study aimed to increase understanding of how and under what conditions complex public health interventions may be scaled up to benefit more people and populations.A realist synthesis was conducted and discussed at an in-person workshop involving practitioners responsible for scaling up activities. Realist approaches view causality through the linkages between changes in contexts (C) that activate mechanisms (M), leading to specific outcomes (O) (CMO configurations). To focus this review, three cases of complex interventions that had been successfully scaled up were included: Vibrant Communities, Youth Build USA and Pathways to Education. A search strategy of published and grey literature related to each case was developed, involving searches of relevant databases and nominations from experts. Data extracted from included documents were classified according to CMO configurations within strategic themes. Findings were compared and contrasted with guidance from diffusion theory, and interpreted with knowledge users to identify practical implications and potential directions for future research.Four core mechanisms were identified, namely awareness, commitment, confidence and trust. These mechanisms were activated within two broad scaling up strategies, those of renewing and regenerating, and documenting success. Within each strategy, specific actions to change contexts included building partnerships, conducting evaluations, engaging political support and adapting funding models. These modified contexts triggered the identified mechanisms, leading to a range of scaling up outcomes, such as commitment of new communities, changes in relevant

  11. Collaborative Group Learning using the SCALE-UP Pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Gerald

    2011-10-01

    The time-honored conventional lecture (``teaching by telling'') has been shown to be an ineffective mode of instruction for science classes. In these cases, where the enhancement of critical thinking skills and the development of problem-solving abilities are emphasized, collaborative group learning environments have proven to be far more effective. In addition, students naturally improve their teamwork skills through the close interaction they have with their group members. Early work on the Studio Physics model at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the mid-1990's was extended to large classes via the SCALE-UP model pioneered at North Carolina State University a few years later. In SCALE-UP, students sit at large round tables in three groups of three --- in this configuration, they carry out a variety of pencil/paper exercises (ponderables) using small whiteboards and perform hands-on activities like demos and labs (tangibles) throughout the class period. They also work on computer simulations using a shared laptop for each group of three. Formal lecture is reduced to a minimal level and the instructor serves more as a ``coach'' to facilitate the academic ``drills'' that the students are working on. Since its inception in 1997, the SCALE-UP pedagogical approach has been adopted by over 100 institutions across the country and about 20 more around the world. In this talk, I will present an overview of the SCALE-UP concept and I will outline the details of its deployment at George Washington University over the past 4 years. I will also discuss empirical data from assessments given to the SCALE-UP collaborative classes and the regular lecture classes at GWU in order to make a comparative study of the effectiveness of the two methodologies.

  12. Scale up services for mental disorders: a call for action.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, D; Flisher, A J; Lund, C; Patel, V; Saxena, S; Thornicroft, G; Tomlinson, M

    2007-10-06

    We call for the global health community, governments, donors, multilateral agencies, and other mental health stakeholders, such as professional bodies and consumer groups, to scale up the coverage of services for mental disorders in all countries, but especially in low-income and middle-income countries. We argue that a basic, evidence-based package of services for core mental disorders should be scaled up, and that protection of the human rights of people with mental disorders and their families should be strengthened. Three questions are critical to the scaling-up process. What resources are needed? How can progress towards these goals be monitored? What should be the priorities for mental health research? To address these questions, we first estimated that the amount needed to provide services on the necessary scale would be US$2 per person per year in low-income countries and $3-4 in lower middle-income countries, which is modest compared with the requirements for scaling-up of services for other major contributors to the global burden of disease. Second, we identified a series of core and secondary indicators to track the progress that countries make toward achievement of mental health goals; many of these indicators are already routinely monitored in many countries. Third, we did a priority-setting exercise to identify gaps in the evidence base in global mental health for four categories of mental disorders. We show that funding should be given to research that develops and assesses interventions that can be delivered by people who are not mental health professionals, and that assesses how health systems can scale up such interventions across all routine-care settings. We discuss strategies to overcome the five main barriers to scaling-up of services for mental disorders; one major strategy will be sustained advocacy by diverse stakeholders, especially to target multilateral agencies, donors, and governments. This Series has provided the evidence for advocacy

  13. Scaling up adsorption media reactors for copper removal with the aid of dimensionless numbers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption media may be used to sorb copper in an aquatic environment for pollution control. Effective design of adsorption media reactors is highly dependent on selection of the hydraulic residence time when scaling up a pilot-scale reactor to a field-scale reactor. This paper seeks to improve scaling-up technique of the reactor design process through the use of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers via a dimensional analysis. A new scaling-up theory is developed in this study through a joint consideration of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers for a constant media particle size such that a balance between transport control and reaction control can be harmonized. A series of column breakthrough tests at varying hydraulic residence times revealed a clear peak adsorption capacity at a Damköhler number of 2.74. The Péclet numbers for the column breakthrough tests indicated that mechanical dispersion is an important effect that requires further consideration in the scaling-up process. However, perfect similitude of the Damköhler number cannot be maintained for a constant media particle size, and relaxation of hydrodynamic similitude through variation of the Péclet number must occur.

  14. High-throughput screening and scale-up of cocrystals using resonant acoustic mixing.

    PubMed

    Nagapudi, Karthik; Umanzor, Evelyn Yanez; Masui, Colin

    2017-02-14

    This paper explores the effectiveness of resonant acoustic mixing RAM for screening and scale up of cocrystals. 16 cocrystal systems were selected as test cases based on previous literature precedent. A 96 well plate set up in conjunction with zirconia beads was used for cocrystal screening using RAM. A success rate of 80% was obtained in the screen for plates containing solvent or solvent plus Zirconia beads. A proof of concept production of hydrated and anhydrous cocrystals of 1:1 Theophylline Citric acid system at a 400mg scale was demonstrated using solvent and bead assisted RAM. Finally the parameters affecting the scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals was explored in a systematic fashion using a Design of Experiments DOE approach. The RAM parameters of acceleration and mixing time were optimized using the DOE approach. A quantitative XRPD method was developed to determine the extent of conversion to the cocrystal when using RAM Mixing time of 2h and an acceleration of 60G were determined to be optimal. The optimized parameters were used to demonstrate scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals at an 80 gram scale with a net yield of 94%. RAM is thus established as an environmentally friendly mechanochemical technique for both high throughput screening and scaled up production of cocrystals.

  15. Considerations for Scale-Up of Ferronickel Electric Smelting Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundermark, R. J.; Nelson, L. R.

    2017-02-01

    In ferronickel smelting, the selective carbothermic reduction of calcined nickel laterite ores in large electric furnaces yields a crude ferronickel product. The optimal process for nickel laterite smelting requires a fine balance between the metallurgical requirements of the process (feed composition, nickel recovery, energy consumption, product quality) and the capabilities of the feeding, tapping and off-gas systems, and especially of the furnace crucible and electrical system. The scale-up of nickel laterite smelting operations over the last 50 years has seen a tenfold increase in furnace power input. Furnace operations within the industry are examined to identify common trends and some new metrics are proposed which incorporate the combination of electrode power densities and the impact of alloy nickel grade on gas generation rates, and hence local electrode gas fluxes, which may impact on future scale-up of ferronickel furnaces.

  16. Scaling up of manufacturing processes of recycled carpet based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    In this work, feasibility of recycling post-consumer carpets using a modified vacuum assisted resisted molding process into large-scale components was successfully demonstrated. The scale up also included the incorporation of nano-clay films in the carpet composites. It is expected that the films will enhance the ability of the composite to withstand environmental degradation and also serve as a fire retardant. Low-cost resins were used to fabricate the recycled carpet-based composites. The scale up in terms of process was achieved by manufacturing composites without a hot press and thereby saving additional equipment cost. Mechanical and physical properties were evaluated. Large-scale samples demonstrated mechanical properties that were different from results from small samples. Acoustic tests indicate good sound absorption of the carpet composite. Cost analysis of the composite material based on the cost of the raw materials and the manufacturing process has been presented.

  17. Breastfeeding peer counseling: from efficacy through scale-up.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Donna J; Morel, Katherine; Anderson, Alex Kojo; Damio, Grace; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-08-01

    An increasing number of publications have evaluated various breastfeeding peer counseling models. This article describes a systematic review of (a) the randomized trials assessing the effectiveness of breastfeeding peer counseling in improving rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration, exclusivity, and maternal and child health outcomes and (b) scientific literature describing the scale-up of breastfeeding peer counseling programs. Twenty-six peer-reviewed publications were included in this review. The overwhelming majority of evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating breastfeeding peer counseling indicates that peer counselors effectively improve rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity. Peer counseling interventions were also shown to significantly decrease the incidence of infant diarrhea and significantly increase the duration of lactational amenorrhea. Breastfeeding peer counseling initiatives are effective and can be scaled up in both developed and developing countries as part of well-coordinated national breastfeeding promotion or maternal-child health programs.

  18. Drug nanocrystals: A way toward scale-up.

    PubMed

    Raghava Srivalli, Kale Mohana; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2016-07-01

    Drug nanocrystals comprise unique drug delivery platforms playing a significantly important and distinctive role in drug delivery and as such, the industry and academia are spending a lot of their time and money in developing the nanocrystal products. The current research works in this field depict a vivid shift from lab scale optimization studies to scale up focused studies. In this emerging scenario of nanocrystal technology, a review on some exemplary and progressing research studies with either scalability as their objective or upscaling as their future scope may smoothen the future upscaling attempts in this field. Hence, this paper reviews the efforts of such research works as case studies since an analysis of such research studies may input certain beneficial knowledge to carry out more scale up based research works on nanocrystals.

  19. Scale-up and modeling of forced chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Starr, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    The forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process has been scaled-up from a maximum of 7.6 cm dia. disk to fabrication of 24 cm dia. disks, 1.6 cm in thickness. The components are turbine rotor subelements produced from polar weave Tyranno fibers preforms. The disks were subjected to non-destructive testing and spin-tested to high rpm. The processing conditions were modeled with the GTCVI code to aid in optimization.

  20. Scale-up and kinetic modeling for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Imamoglu, Esra; Sukan, Fazilet Vardar

    2013-09-01

    Bioethanol was produced from acidic hydrolysate of rice hulls using recombinant Escherichia coli KO11. Two different issues (scale-up and kinetic modeling) were evaluated simultaneously and concomitantly for bioethanol production. During the step-wise scale-up process from 100 mL shaken flask to 10 L stirred-tank bioreactor, the constant Reynolds number and the constant impeller tip speed were evaluated as scale-up methodologies under laboratory conditions. It was determined that the volumetric bioethanol productivity was 88% higher in 10 L bioreactor in comparison to the value of 0.21 g L(-1) h(-1) in shaken flask. The modified Monod and Luedeking-Piret models provided an accurate approach for the modeling of the experimental data. Ethanol concentration reached the maximum level of 29.03 g/L, which was 5% higher than the value of model prediction in 10 L bioreactor. The findings of this research could contribute to the industrial scale productions especially from lignocellulosic raw materials.

  1. New Technique for TOC Estimation Based on Thermal Core Logging in Low-Permeable Formations (Bazhen fm.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Evgeny; Popov, Yury; Spasennykh, Mikhail; Kozlova, Elena; Chekhonin, Evgeny; Zagranovskaya, Dzhuliya; Belenkaya, Irina; Alekseev, Aleksey

    2016-04-01

    A practical method of organic-rich intervals identifying within the low-permeable dispersive rocks based on thermal conductivity measurements along the core is presented. Non-destructive non-contact thermal core logging was performed with optical scanning technique on 4 685 full size core samples from 7 wells drilled in four low-permeable zones of the Bazhen formation (B.fm.) in the Western Siberia (Russia). The method employs continuous simultaneous measurements of rock anisotropy, volumetric heat capacity, thermal anisotropy coefficient and thermal heterogeneity factor along the cores allowing the high vertical resolution (of up to 1-2 mm). B.fm. rock matrix thermal conductivity was observed to be essentially stable within the range of 2.5-2.7 W/(m*K). However, stable matrix thermal conductivity along with the high thermal anisotropy coefficient is characteristic for B.fm. sediments due to the low rock porosity values. It is shown experimentally that thermal parameters measured relate linearly to organic richness rather than to porosity coefficient deviations. Thus, a new technique employing the transformation of the thermal conductivity profiles into continuous profiles of total organic carbon (TOC) values along the core was developed. Comparison of TOC values, estimated from the thermal conductivity values, with experimental pyrolytic TOC estimations of 665 samples from the cores using the Rock-Eval and HAWK instruments demonstrated high efficiency of the new technique for the organic rich intervals separation. The data obtained with the new technique are essential for the SR hydrocarbon generation potential, for basin and petroleum system modeling application, and estimation of hydrocarbon reserves. The method allows for the TOC richness to be accurately assessed using the thermal well logs. The research work was done with financial support of the Russian Ministry of Education and Science (unique identification number RFMEFI58114X0008).

  2. Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1997-08-01

    Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

  3. Development of bioassay techniques with extracts from semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T.L.; White, P.; Mackay, D.; Metcalfe, C.

    1995-12-31

    Semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), consisting of polyethylene bags filled with triolein, have been used to monitor for lipophilic organic contaminants in water. Although extracts from SPMDs have most often been analyzed for concentrations of organic contaminants, there is also the potential to monitor the toxicity of these extracts using in vitro and in vivo bioassays. SPMDs were deployed for four weeks at several sites along a corridor extending from Peche Island in the Detroit River to Pelee Island in western Lake Erie to monitor the distribution of toxic organic contaminants in the water. Analysis of the extracts from the SPMDs for concentrations of PCBs and other organochlorine compounds, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) indicated that the regions in the Detroit River within the Trenton Channel and near Zug Island were the most highly contaminated. Bioassays conducted with extracts from the SPMDs included the in vitro SOS Chromotest for genotoxic activity, an acute lethality test with Daphnia magna, and a fish embryotoxicity test with embryos of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). These bioassay data generally indicated that the toxicity and concentrations of organic contaminants in the SPMD extracts were correlated. This study indicates that there is potential to use short-term bioassays of extracts from SPMDs to monitor for in situ contamination in the aquatic environment.

  4. Droplet size measurements for spray dryer scale-up.

    PubMed

    Thybo, Pia; Hovgaard, Lars; Andersen, Sune Klint; Lindeløv, Jesper Saederup

    2008-01-01

    This study was dedicated to facilitate scale-up in spray drying from an atomization standpoint. The purpose was to investigate differences in operating conditions between a pilot and a production scale nozzle. The intension was to identify the operating ranges in which the two nozzles produced similar droplet size distributions. Furthermore, method optimization and validation were also covered. Externally mixing two-fluid nozzles of similar designs were used in this study. Both nozzles are typically used in commercially available spray dryers, and they have been characterized with respect to droplet size distributions as a function of liquid type, liquid flow rate, atomization gas flow rate, liquid orifice diameter, and atomization gas orifice diameter. All droplet size measurements were carried out by using the Malvern Spraytec with nozzle operating conditions corresponding to typical settings for spray drying. This gave droplets with Sauter Mean Diameters less than 40 microm and typically 5-20 microm. A model previously proposed by Mansour and Chigier was used to correlate the droplet size to the operating parameters. It was possible to make a correlation for water incorporating the droplet sizes for both the pilot scale and the production scale nozzle. However, a single correlation was not able to account properly for the physical properties of the liquid to be atomized. Therefore, the droplet size distributions of ethanol could not be adequately predicted on the basis of the water data. This study has shown that it was possible to scale up from a pilot to production scale nozzle in a systematic fashion. However, a prerequisite was that the nozzles were geometrically similar. When externally mixing two-fluid nozzles are used as atomizers, the results obtained from this study could be a useful guideline for selecting appropriate operating conditions when scaling up the spray-drying process.

  5. Active galactic nuclei as scaled-up Galactic black holes.

    PubMed

    McHardy, I M; Koerding, E; Knigge, C; Uttley, P; Fender, R P

    2006-12-07

    A long-standing question is whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary like Galactic black hole systems when appropriately scaled up by mass. If so, we can then determine how AGN should behave on cosmological timescales by studying the brighter and much faster varying Galactic systems. As X-ray emission is produced very close to the black holes, it provides one of the best diagnostics of their behaviour. A characteristic timescale--which potentially could tell us about the mass of the black hole--is found in the X-ray variations from both AGN and Galactic black holes, but whether it is physically meaningful to compare the two has been questioned. Here we report that, after correcting for variations in the accretion rate, the timescales can be physically linked, revealing that the accretion process is exactly the same for small and large black holes. Strong support for this linkage comes, perhaps surprisingly, from the permitted optical emission lines in AGN whose widths (in both broad-line AGN and narrow-emission-line Seyfert 1 galaxies) correlate strongly with the characteristic X-ray timescale, exactly as expected from the AGN black hole masses and accretion rates. So AGN really are just scaled-up Galactic black holes.

  6. Scaling-up Transformation of Multisensor Images with Multiple Resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaohui; Zhang, Renhua; Su, Hongbo; Tian, Jing; Xia, Jun

    2009-01-01

    For scaling up low resolution multispectral images (LRMIs) with high resolution panchromatic image (HRPI), intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) can produce satisfactory spatial enhancement but usually introduces spectral distortion in the fused high resolution multispectral images (HRMIs). In this paper, to minimize this problem, we present a generalized intensity modulation (GIM) by extending the IHS transform to an arbitrary number of LRMIs, which uses the information of the spectral response functions (SRFs) of the multispectral and panchromatic sensors. Before modulation, the generalized intensity is enhanced by injecting details extracted from the HRPI by means of empirical mode decomposition. After the enhanced generalized intensity is substituted for the old one, the HRMIs are obtained through the GIM. Quickbird images are used to illustrate the superiority of this proposed method. Extensive comparison results based on visual analysis and Wald’s protocol demonstrate that the proposed method is more encouraging for scaling up the LRMIs with the HRPI spectrally and spatially than the tested fusion methods. PMID:22573959

  7. Scale-up in microwave-accelerated organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, H

    2006-01-01

    Microwave-assisted organic chemistry has received strong exposure in the literature over the last decade, and nowadays more and more research chemists are successfully applying microwave technology to organic reactions on a small scale. However, the efficient application of this technology to cover the specific needs of larger-scale preparations, e.g., in a kilo lab, remains to be shown. We therefore initiated a study to investigate the scalability of microwave technology. Two different microwave systems designed for large-scale operation were evaluated in order to characterize strengths and weaknesses of each instrument with regard to scale-up. Special focus was directed on temperature/pressure limits, handling of suspensions, ability to rapidly heat and cool, robustness, and overall processing time. Based on the results of this study, a batch microwave reactor with a reaction volume of approximately 1.1 1 was purchased and installed in the kilo lab. Several reactions have been performed successfully on a 50- to 100-g scale in our laboratory, showing that a scale-up from a 15 ml scale to a 1-1 scale is feasible. In general, a significant reduction of reaction time was achievable, in some cases yields and selectivity were also improved. Nevertheless, a major weakness of the available systems is the limited vessel size, which is, in most cases, far below a suitable reaction volume required for work in a kilo lab.

  8. 77 FR 25469 - Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale-Up Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale- Up Grants Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.411A (Scale-up grants). AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department... in Innovation (i3) Scale-up grant competition (March 27 i3 Scale-up NIA). This notice extends...

  9. Quantity Versus Quality: A Survey Experiment to Improve the Network Scale-up Method

    PubMed Central

    Feehan, Dennis M.; Umubyeyi, Aline; Mahy, Mary; Hladik, Wolfgang; Salganik, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The network scale-up method is a promising technique that uses sampled social network data to estimate the sizes of epidemiologically important hidden populations, such as sex workers and people who inject illicit drugs. Although previous scale-up research has focused exclusively on networks of acquaintances, we show that the type of personal network about which survey respondents are asked to report is a potentially crucial parameter that researchers are free to vary. This generalization leads to a method that is more flexible and potentially more accurate. In 2011, we conducted a large, nationally representative survey experiment in Rwanda that randomized respondents to report about one of 2 different personal networks. Our results showed that asking respondents for less information can, somewhat surprisingly, produce more accurate size estimates. We also estimated the sizes of 4 key populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection in Rwanda. Our estimates were higher than earlier estimates from Rwanda but lower than international benchmarks. Finally, in this article we develop a new sensitivity analysis framework and use it to assess the possible biases in our estimates. Our design can be customized and extended for other settings, enabling researchers to continue to improve the network scale-up method. PMID:27015875

  10. Quality by design: scale-up of freeze-drying cycles in pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Roberto; Fissore, Davide; Barresi, Antonello A; Rastelli, Massimo

    2013-09-01

    This paper shows the application of mathematical modeling to scale-up a cycle developed with lab-scale equipment on two different production units. The above method is based on a simplified model of the process parameterized with experimentally determined heat and mass transfer coefficients. In this study, the overall heat transfer coefficient between product and shelf was determined by using the gravimetric procedure, while the dried product resistance to vapor flow was determined through the pressure rise test technique. Once model parameters were determined, the freeze-drying cycle of a parenteral product was developed via dynamic design space for a lab-scale unit. Then, mathematical modeling was used to scale-up the above cycle in the production equipment. In this way, appropriate values were determined for processing conditions, which allow the replication, in the industrial unit, of the product dynamics observed in the small scale freeze-dryer. This study also showed how inter-vial variability, as well as model parameter uncertainty, can be taken into account during scale-up calculations.

  11. Uncertainty of permeability and specific storage due to experimental error during data acquisition for pulse-transient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, I.; Rathbun, A. P.; Saffer, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Transient fluid flow through rock is governed by two hydraulic properties: permeability (k) and the specific storage (Ss), which are often determined by the pulse-transient technique when k is extremely low (e.g. k < 10-19 m2). The basic test system is composed of a pressure-confined rock sample connected to two closed reservoirs at its upstream and downstream ends. A pulse of pressure at the upstream boundary drives transient flow through the sample to the downstream end. The rock properties, k and Ss, can be determined by time-based recording of only one variable, the pressure change in each reservoir. Experimental error during data acquisition propagates through the data reduction process, leading to uncertainty in experimental results. In addition, unlike steady-state systems, the pressure-time curves are influenced by the compressive storage of the reservoirs and both the dimensions and properties of the sample. Thus, uncertainty in k and Ss may arise from errors in measurement of sample dimension, fluid pressure, or reservoir storages. In this study, the uncertainty in sample dimension is considered to be negligible, and reasonable error ranges in pressure and system storage measurements are considered. We first calculated pressure errors (P) induced by the difference between assumed, or experimentally measured values of k and Ss and their true values. Based on this result, the sensitivity coefficient (∂k/∂P and ∂Ss/∂P) is theoretically ~10 in percentage, i.e. 1% error of the pulse on average during a test cycle produces ~10% uncertainty in k and Ss. The sensitivity coefficient may become larger when the ratio of sample storage to upstream reservoir storage is extremely small. We also examined the sensitivity of experimental error in measuring the storage capacity of system reservoirs to uncertainty in resulting values of k and Ss. Because the reservoirs are typically small for tight rock samples and irregular in shape due to the combination of tubing

  12. Fish erythrocytes are bicarbonate permeable: problems with determining carbonic anhydrase activity using the modified boat technique.

    PubMed

    Heming, T A; Randall, D J

    1982-01-10

    Effects of foaming agents (blood plasma, bovine serum albumin, polyvinyl-pyrrolidinone) and defoaming agents (octanol, n-foam) on manometric determination of carbonic anhydrase activity in intact erythrocytes of fish were examined. Foaming agents abolished the activity of red cells. Defoaming agents increased the activity and negated any differences in carbonic anhydrase activity between whole blood (red cells in plasma) and "Cortland" blood (red cells in saline). It is concluded that effects of plasma on the carbonic anhydrase activity of intact erythrocytes of fish measured using the modified boat technique are largely nonspecific and related to reagent foaming during mixing, rather than to the action of a specific enzyme inhibitor.

  13. Microbial bioelectrosynthesis of hydrogen: Current challenges and scale-up.

    PubMed

    Kitching, Michael; Butler, Robin; Marsili, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable energy supplies are needed to supplement and eventually replace fossil fuels. Molecular hydrogen H2 is a clean burning, high-energy fuel that is also used as reducing gas in industrial processes. H2 is mainly synthesized by steam reforming of natural gas, a non-renewable fuel. There are biosynthetic strategies for H2 production; however, they are associated with poor yield and have high cost. The application of an electrochemical driving force in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) improves the yield of biological reactions. The performance of the MEC is influenced by experimental parameters such as the electrode material, reactor design, microbial consortia and the substrate. In this review, factors that affect the performance of MECs are discussed and critically analysed. The potential for scale-up of H2 bioelectrosynthesis is also discussed.

  14. Scaling up digital circuit computation with DNA strand displacement cascades.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lulu; Winfree, Erik

    2011-06-03

    To construct sophisticated biochemical circuits from scratch, one needs to understand how simple the building blocks can be and how robustly such circuits can scale up. Using a simple DNA reaction mechanism based on a reversible strand displacement process, we experimentally demonstrated several digital logic circuits, culminating in a four-bit square-root circuit that comprises 130 DNA strands. These multilayer circuits include thresholding and catalysis within every logical operation to perform digital signal restoration, which enables fast and reliable function in large circuits with roughly constant switching time and linear signal propagation delays. The design naturally incorporates other crucial elements for large-scale circuitry, such as general debugging tools, parallel circuit preparation, and an abstraction hierarchy supported by an automated circuit compiler.

  15. Scaling Up Family Therapy in Fragile, Conflict-Affected States.

    PubMed

    Charlés, Laurie L

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the design and delivery of two international family therapy-focused mental health and psychosocial support training projects, one in a fragile state and one in a post-conflict state. The training projects took place in Southeast Asia and the Middle East/North Africa. Each was funded, supported, and implemented by local, regional, and international stakeholders, and delivered as part of a broader humanitarian agenda to develop human resource capacity to work with families affected by atrocities. The two examples illustrate how task-shifting/task-sharing and transitional justice approaches were used to inform the scaling-up of professionals involved in each project. They also exemplify how state-citizen phenomena in each location affected the project design and delivery.

  16. Accounting for the cost of scaling-up health interventions.

    PubMed

    Johns, Benjamin; Baltussen, Rob

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies such as the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health have highlighted the need for expanding the coverage of services for HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, immunisations and other diseases. In order for policy makers to plan for these changes, they need to analyse the change in costs when interventions are 'scaled-up' to cover greater percentages of the population. Previous studies suggest that applying current unit costs to an entire population can misconstrue the true costs of an intervention. This study presents the methodology used in WHO-CHOICE's generalised cost effectiveness analysis, which includes non-linear cost functions for health centres, transportation and supervision costs, as well as the presence of fixed costs of establishing a health infrastructure. Results show changing marginal costs as predicted by economic theory.

  17. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Limiting conditions/scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Takriff, M.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H(sub 2) from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: 1. Culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; 2. Mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; 3. Bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; 4. Evaluation of biological synthetic gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; 5. Process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and 6. Economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses.

  18. TA Beliefs in a SCALE-UP Style Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBeck, George; Settelmeyer, Sam; Li, Sissi; Demaree, Dedra

    2010-10-01

    In Spring 2010, the Oregon State University physics department instituted a SCALE-UP (Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs) style studio classroom in the introductory, calculus-based physics series. In our initial implementation, comprised of two hours lecture, two hours of studio, and two hours lab work, the studio session was lead by a faculty member and either 2 GTAs or 1 GTA and 1 LA. We plan to move to a model where senior GTAs can lead studio sections after co-teaching with the faculty member. It is critical that we know how to prepare and support the instructional team in facilitating student learning in this setting. We examine GTA and LA pedagogical beliefs through reflective journaling, interviews, and personal experience of the authors. In particular, we examine how these beliefs changed over their first quarter of instruction, as well as the resources used to adapt to the new classroom environment.

  19. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  20. Carnosol purification. Scaling-up centrifugal partition chromatography separations.

    PubMed

    Bouju, Elodie; Berthod, Alain; Faure, Karine

    2016-09-30

    This paper illustrates the application of a recently proposed protocol allowing the scale-up prediction on hydrostatic countercurrent chromatography columns (centrifugal partition chromatographs or CPC). A commercial extract of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) was used as the starting material containing 0.48% of carnosol, an active pharmaceutical ingredient with great potential. After a rapid method development on a small-scale 35-mL CPC instrument that allowed for the determination of the solvent system and maximum sample concentration and volume, the purification was transferred on two larger instruments using the "free space between peaks" method. The method takes into account the technical limitations of the larger instruments, such as pressure and/or maximum centrifugal field, and allows, by simply running an analytical-sized injection on the large scale rotor, to give an accurate prediction of the maximum sample load and best throughput. The 0.27g of rosemary extract maximum load on a 35-mL CPC was transferred as a 1.9g load on a 254-mL medium size CPC and 9g load on a 812-mL CPC. The maximum process efficiency of 3.1mg of carnosol per hour obtained on the small 35-mL column was transferred on the 254-mL CPC giving 8.3mg/h and, on the larger 812-mL column 49.4mg of carnosol could be obtained per hour. If the scaling-up in CPC instruments is not directly homothetic, it can be highly predictable through a few simple experiments.

  1. Scaling Up Data-Centric Middleware on a Cluster Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D T; Franklin, M J; Garlick, J; Abdulla, G M

    2005-04-29

    Data-centric workflow middleware systems are workflow systems that treat data as first class objects alongside programs. These systems improve the usability, responsiveness and efficiency of workflow execution over cluster (and grid) computers. In this work, we explore the scalability of one such system, GridDB, on cluster computers. We measure the performance and scalability of GridDB in executing data-intensive image processing workflows from the SuperMACHO astrophysics survey on a large cluster computer. Our first experimental study concerns the scale-up of GridDB. We make a rather surprising finding, that while the middleware system issues many queries and transactions to a DBMS, file system operations present the first-tier bottleneck. We circumvent this bottleneck and increase the scalability of GridDB by more than 2-fold on our image processing application (up to 128 nodes). In a second study, we demonstrate the sensitivity of GridDB performance (and therefore application performance) to characteristics of the workflows being executed. To manage these sensitivities, we provide guidelines for trading off the costs and benefits of GridDB at a fine-grain.

  2. Fungal biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: mechanism and scale up

    PubMed Central

    Kitching, Michael; Ramani, Meghana; Marsili, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a widespread research tool because of their oxidation resistance, biocompatibility and stability. Chemical methods for AuNP synthesis often produce toxic residues that raise environmental concern. On the other hand, the biological synthesis of AuNPs in viable microorganisms and their cell-free extracts is an environmentally friendly and low-cost process. In general, fungi tolerate higher metal concentrations than bacteria and secrete abundant extracellular redox proteins to reduce soluble metal ions to their insoluble form and eventually to nanocrystals. Fungi harbour untapped biological diversity and may provide novel metal reductases for metal detoxification and bioreduction. A thorough understanding of the biosynthetic mechanism of AuNPs in fungi is needed to reduce the time of biosynthesis and to scale up the AuNP production process. In this review, we describe the known mechanisms for AuNP biosynthesis in viable fungi and fungal protein extracts and discuss the most suitable bioreactors for industrial AuNP biosynthesis. PMID:25154648

  3. Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Jacki

    2011-04-15

    Social impacts occur at various scales, from the micro-scale of the individual to the macro-scale of the community. Identifying the macro-scale social changes that results from an impacting event is a common goal of social impact assessment (SIA), but is challenging as multiple factors simultaneously influence social trends at any given time, and there are usually only a small number of cases available for examination. While some methods have been proposed for establishing the contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change, they remain relatively untested. This paper critically reviews methods recommended to assess macro-scale social impacts, and proposes and demonstrates a new approach. The 'scaling up' method involves developing a chain of logic linking change at the individual/site scale to the community scale. It enables a more problematised assessment of the likely contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change than previous approaches. The use of this approach in a recent study of change in dairy farming in south east Australia is described.

  4. Challenges and Opportunities in Scaling-Up Nutrition in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Darnton-Hill, Ian; Samman, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare continues to be in a state of flux; conventionally, this provides opportunities and challenges. The opportunities include technological breakthroughs, improved economies and increasing availability of healthcare. On the other hand, economic disparities are increasing and leading to differing accessibility to healthcare, including within affluent countries. Nutrition has received an increase in attention and resources in recent decades, a lot of it stimulated by the rise in obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. An increase in ageing populations also has meant increased interest in nutrition-related chronic diseases. In many middle-income countries, there has been an increase in the double burden of malnutrition with undernourished children and overweight/obese parents and adolescents. In low-income countries, an increased evidence base has allowed scaling-up of interventions to address under-nutrition, both nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive interventions. Immediate barriers (institutional, structural and biological) and longer-term barriers (staffing shortages where most needed and environmental impacts on health) are discussed. Significant barriers remain for the near universal access to healthcare, especially for those who are socio-economically disadvantaged, geographically isolated, living in war zones or where environmental damage has taken place. However, these barriers are increasingly being recognized, and efforts are being made to address them. The paper aims to take a broad view that identifies and then comments on the many social, political and scientific factors affecting the achievement of improved nutrition through healthcare. PMID:27417744

  5. Scaling-up ultrasound standing wave enhanced sedimentation filters.

    PubMed

    Prest, Jeff E; Treves Brown, Bernard J; Fielden, Peter R; Wilkinson, Stephen J; Hawkes, Jeremy J

    2015-02-01

    Particle concentration and filtration is a key stage in a wide range of processing industries and also one that can be present challenges for high throughput, continuous operation. Here we demonstrate some features which increase the efficiency of ultrasound enhanced sedimentation and could enable the technology the potential to be scaled up. In this work, 20 mm piezoelectric plates were used to drive 100 mm high chambers formed from single structural elements. The coherent structural resonances were able to drive particles (yeast cells) in the water to nodes throughout the chamber. Ultrasound enhanced sedimentation was used to demonstrate the efficiency of the system (>99% particle clearance). Sub-wavelength pin protrusions were used for the contacts between the resonant chamber and other elements. The pins provided support and transferred power, replacing glue which is inefficient for power transfer. Filtration energies of ∼4 J/ml of suspension were measured. A calculation of thermal convection indicates that the circulation could disrupt cell alignment in ducts >35 mm high when a 1K temperature gradient is present; we predict higher efficiencies when this maximum height is observed. For the acoustic design, although modelling was minimal before construction, the very simple construction allowed us to form 3D models of the nodal patterns in the fluid and the duct structure. The models were compared with visual observations of particle movement, Chladni figures and scanning laser vibrometer mapping. This demonstrates that nodal planes in the fluid can be controlled by the position of clamping points and that the contacts could be positioned to increase the efficiency and reliability of particle manipulations in standing waves.

  6. 17β-carboxamide steroids--in vitro prediction of human skin permeability and retention using PAMPA technique.

    PubMed

    Dobričić, Vladimir; Marković, Bojan; Nikolic, Katarina; Savić, Vladimir; Vladimirov, Sote; Čudina, Olivera

    2014-02-14

    In this paper, twenty-two 17β-carboxamide steroids were synthesized from five corticosteroids (hydrocortisone, prednisolone, methylprednisolone, dexamethasone and betamethasone) in two steps. The first step was periodic acid oxydation of these corticosteroids to corresponding cortienic acids and the second step was amidation of thus obtained cortienic acids with esterified l-amino acids. These compounds are potential soft corticosteroids with local anti-inflammatory activity in the skin. Parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) was applied in order to predict permeability and retention of these compounds in human skin. Comparison of permeability and retention parameters between 17β-carboxamide steroids and corresponding corticosteroids was performed. Compounds with significantly higher retention were identified and the derivative that does not have significantly higher permeability was underlined. Molecular structures of all compounds were optimized by use of Gaussian semiempirical/PM3 method. Geometrical, thermodynamic, physicochemical and electronical molecular parameters of the optimized structures were calculated and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) analysis was performed in order to explain permeability and retention of these compounds. ANN-, PLS- and MLR-QSPR models were created. Quality of these models was evaluated by commonly used statistical parameters and the most reliable models were selected. Analyzing descriptors in the selected models, main molecular properties that influence permeability and retention in the PAMPA artificial membrane were identified. Based on these data, further structural modifications could be applied in order to increase retention without significant increase of permeability, which can positively affect potential local anti-inflammatory activity of these compounds. Selected QSPR models could be used as in silico tool for predicting human skin permeability and retention of novel 17

  7. Using Advanced Modeling to Accelerate the Scale-Up of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David; Sun, Xin; Storlie, Curtis; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-18

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of many approaches that are critical for significantly reducing domestic and global CO2 emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Clean Coal Technology Program Plan envisions 2nd generation CO2 capture technologies ready for demonstration-scale testing around 2020 with the goal of enabling commercial deployment by 2025 [1]. Third generation technologies have a similarly aggressive timeline. A major challenge is that the development and scale-up of new technologies in the energy sector historically takes up to 15 years to move from the laboratory to pre-deployment and another 20 to 30 years for widespread industrial scale deployment. In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale up new carbon capture technologies. The CCSI Toolset (1) enables promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of processes and devices, (2) reduces the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes by using optimization techniques to focus development on the best overall process conditions and by using detailed device-scale models to better understand and improve the internal behavior of complex equipment, and (3) provides quantitative predictions of device and process performance during scale up based on rigorously validated smaller scale simulations that take into account model and parameter uncertainty[2]. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  8. Scaling up debris-flow experiments on a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C.; Capart, H.; Crone, T. J.; Grinspum, E.; Hsu, L.; Kaufman, D.; Li, L.; Ling, H.; Reitz, M. D.; Smith, B.; Stark, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    Boundary forces generated by debris flows can be powerful enough to erode bedrock and cause considerable damage to infrastructure during runout. Formulation of an erosion-rate law for debris flows is therefore a high priority, and it makes sense to build such a law around laboratory experiments. However, running experiments big enough to generate realistic boundary forces is a logistical challenge to say the least [1]. One alternative is to run table-top simulations with unnaturally weak but fast-eroding pseudo-bedrock, another is to extrapolate from micro-erosion of natural substrates driven by unnaturally weak impacts; hybrid-scale experiments have also been conducted [2]. Here we take a different approach in which we scale up granular impact forces by running our experiments under enhanced gravity in a geotechnical centrifuge [3]. Using a 40cm-diameter rotating drum [2] spun at up to 100g, we generate debris flows with an effective depth of over several meters. By varying effective gravity from 1g to 100g we explore the scaling of granular flow forces and the consequent bed and wall erosion rates. The velocity and density structure of these granular flows is monitored using laser sheets, high-speed video, and particle tracking [4], and the progressive erosion of the boundary surfaces is measured by laser scanning. The force structures and their fluctuations within the granular mass and at the boundaries are explored with contact dynamics numerical simulations that mimic the lab experimental conditions [5]. In this presentation we summarize these results and discuss how they can contribute to the formulation of debris-flow erosion law. [1] Major, J. J. (1997), Journal of Geology 105: 345-366, doi:10.1086/515930 [2] Hsu, L. (2010), Ph.D. thesis, University of California, Berkeley [3] Brucks, A., et al (2007), Physical Review E 75, 032301, doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.75.032301 [4] Spinewine, B., et al (2011), Experiments in Fluids 50: 1507-1525, doi: 10.1007/s00348

  9. Application of advanced seismic reflection imaging techniques to mapping permeable zones at Dixie Valley, Nevada. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-18

    Multifold seismic reflection data from the Dixie Valley geothermal field in Nevada were reprocessed using a nonlinear optimization scheme called simulated annealing to model subsurface acoustic velocities, followed by a pre-stack Kirchhoff migration to produce accurate and detailed depth-migrated images of subsurface structure. In contrast to conventional processing techniques, these methods account for significant lateral variations in velocity and thus have the potential ability to image steeply-dipping faults and fractures that may affect permeability within geothermal fields. The optimization scheme develops two-dimensional velocity models to within 6% of velocities obtained from well and surface geologic data. Only the seismic data (i.e., first arrival times of P waves) are used to construct the velocity models and pre-stack migration images, and no other a priori assumptions are invoked. Velocities obtained by processing individual seismic tracks were integrated to develop a block diagram of velocities to 2.3 km depth within the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Details of the tectonic and stratigraphic structure allowed three dimensional extension of the interpretations of two dimensional data. Interpretations of the processed seismic data are compared with well data, surface mapping, and other geophysical data. The Dixie Valley fault along the southeastern Stillwater Range Piedmont is associated with a pronounced lateral velocity gradient that is interpreted to represent the juxtaposition of relatively low velocity basin-fill strata in the hanging wall against higher velocity crystalline rocks in the footwall. The down-dip geometry of the fault was evaluated by inverting arrival times from a negative move-out event, which we associate with the dipping fault plane, on individual shot gathers for seismic line SRC-3 for the location and depth of the associated reflection points on the fault.

  10. Scale-up of ecological experiments: Density variation in the mobile bivalve Macomona liliana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Davod C.; Walters, R.; Thrush, S.; Dayton, P.

    1997-01-01

    At present the problem of scaling up from controlled experiments (necessarily at a small spatial scale) to questions of regional or global importance is perhaps the most pressing issue in ecology. Most of the proposed techniques recommend iterative cycling between theory and experiment. We present a graphical technique that facilitates this cycling by allowing the scope of experiments, surveys, and natural history observations to be compared to the scope of models and theory. We apply the scope analysis to the problem of understanding the population dynamics of a bivalve exposed to environmental stress at the scale of a harbour. Previous lab and field experiments were found not to be 1:1 scale models of harbour-wide processes. Scope analysis allowed small scale experiments to be linked to larger scale surveys and to a spatially explicit model of population dynamics.

  11. Interconnected, microporous hollow fibers for tissue engineering: commercially relevant, industry standard scale-up manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tuin, Stephen A; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-09-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in the field of tissue engineering to create functional tissue using biomimetic three-dimensional scaffolds that support cell growth, proliferation, and extracellular matrix production. However, many of these constructs are severely limited by poor nutrient diffusion throughout the tissue-engineered construct, resulting in cell death and tissue necrosis at the core. Nutrient transport can be improved by creation and use of scaffolds with hollow and microporous fibers, significantly improving permeability and nutrient diffusion. The purpose of this review is to highlight current technological advances in the fabrication of hollow fibers with interconnected pores throughout the fiber walls, with specific emphasis on developing hollow porous nonwoven fabrics for use as tissue engineering constructs via industry standard processing technologies: Spunbond processing and polymer melt extrusion. We outline current methodologies to create hollow and microporous scaffolds with the aim of translating that knowledge to the production of such fibers into nonwoven tissue engineering scaffolds via spunbond technology, a commercially relevant and viable melt extrusion manufacturing approach that allows for facile scale-up.

  12. Scale-up of the production of highly reactive biogenic magnetite nanoparticles using Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J M; Muhamadali, H; Coker, V S; Cooper, J; Lloyd, J R

    2015-06-06

    Although there are numerous examples of large-scale commercial microbial synthesis routes for organic bioproducts, few studies have addressed the obvious potential for microbial systems to produce inorganic functional biomaterials at scale. Here we address this by focusing on the production of nanoscale biomagnetite particles by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, which was scaled up successfully from laboratory- to pilot plant-scale production, while maintaining the surface reactivity and magnetic properties which make this material well suited to commercial exploitation. At the largest scale tested, the bacterium was grown in a 50 l bioreactor, harvested and then inoculated into a buffer solution containing Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide and an electron donor and mediator, which promoted the formation of magnetite in under 24 h. This procedure was capable of producing up to 120 g of biomagnetite. The particle size distribution was maintained between 10 and 15 nm during scale-up of this second step from 10 ml to 10 l, with conserved magnetic properties and surface reactivity; the latter demonstrated by the reduction of Cr(VI). The process presented provides an environmentally benign route to magnetite production and serves as an alternative to harsher synthetic techniques, with the clear potential to be used to produce kilogram to tonne quantities.

  13. Scale-down/scale-up studies leading to improved commercial beer fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nienow, Alvin W; Nordkvist, Mikkel; Boulton, Christopher A

    2011-08-01

    Scale-up/scale-down techniques are vital for successful and safe commercial-scale bioprocess design and operation. An example is given in this review of recent studies related to beer production. Work at the bench scale shows that brewing yeast is not compromised by mechanical agitation up to 4.5 W/kg; and that compared with fermentations mixed by CO(2) evolution, agitation ≥ 0.04 W/kg is able to reduce fermentation time by about 20%. Work at the commercial scale in cylindroconical fermenters shows that, without mechanical agitation, most of the yeast sediments into the cone for about 50% of the fermentation time, leading to poor temperature control. Stirrer mixing overcomes these problems and leads to a similar reduction in batch time as the bench-scale tests and greatly reduces its variability, but is difficult to install in extant fermenters. The mixing characteristics of a new jet mixer, a rotary jet mixer, which overcomes these difficulties, are reported, based on pilot-scale studies. This change enables the advantages of stirring to be achieved at the commercial scale without the problems. In addition, more of the fermentable sugars are converted into ethanol. This review shows the effectiveness of scale-up/scale-down studies for improving commercial operations. Suggestions for further studies are made: one concerning the impact of homogenization on the removal of vicinal diketones and the other on the location of bubble formation at the commercial scale.

  14. Semantic Representation and Scale-Up of Integrated Air Traffic Management Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Ranjan, Shubha; Wei, Mie; Eshow, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Each day, the global air transportation industry generates a vast amount of heterogeneous data from air carriers, air traffic control providers, and secondary aviation entities handling baggage, ticketing, catering, fuel delivery, and other services. Generally, these data are stored in isolated data systems, separated from each other by significant political, regulatory, economic, and technological divides. These realities aside, integrating aviation data into a single, queryable, big data store could enable insights leading to major efficiency, safety, and cost advantages. In this paper, we describe an implemented system for combining heterogeneous air traffic management data using semantic integration techniques. The system transforms data from its original disparate source formats into a unified semantic representation within an ontology-based triple store. Our initial prototype stores only a small sliver of air traffic data covering one day of operations at a major airport. The paper also describes our analysis of difficulties ahead as we prepare to scale up data storage to accommodate successively larger quantities of data -- eventually covering all US commercial domestic flights over an extended multi-year timeframe. We review several approaches to mitigating scale-up related query performance concerns.

  15. Scale up, optimization and stability analysis of Curcumin C3 complex-loaded nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle based delivery of anticancer drugs have been widely investigated. However, a very important process for Research & Development in any pharmaceutical industry is scaling nanoparticle formulation techniques so as to produce large batches for preclinical and clinical trials. This process is not only critical but also difficult as it involves various formulation parameters to be modulated all in the same process. Methods In our present study, we formulated curcumin loaded poly (lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-CURC). This improved the bioavailability of curcumin, a potent natural anticancer drug, making it suitable for cancer therapy. Post formulation, we optimized our process by Reponse Surface Methodology (RSM) using Central Composite Design (CCD) and scaled up the formulation process in four stages with final scale-up process yielding 5 g of curcumin loaded nanoparticles within the laboratory setup. The nanoparticles formed after scale-up process were characterized for particle size, drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, surface morphology, in vitro release kinetics and pharmacokinetics. Stability analysis and gamma sterilization were also carried out. Results Results revealed that that process scale-up is being mastered for elaboration to 5 g level. The mean nanoparticle size of the scaled up batch was found to be 158.5 ± 9.8 nm and the drug loading was determined to be 10.32 ± 1.4%. The in vitro release study illustrated a slow sustained release corresponding to 75% drug over a period of 10 days. The pharmacokinetic profile of PLGA-CURC in rats following i.v. administration showed two compartmental model with the area under the curve (AUC0-∞) being 6.139 mg/L h. Gamma sterilization showed no significant change in the particle size or drug loading of the nanoparticles. Stability analysis revealed long term physiochemical stability of the PLGA-CURC formulation. Conclusions A successful effort towards

  16. Advanced Palladium Membrane Scale-up for Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, Sean; Magdefrau, Neal; She, Ying; Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine

    2012-10-31

    The main objective of this project was to construct, test, and demonstrate a Pd-Cu metallic tubular membrane micro-channel separator capable of producing 2 lb day{sup -1} H{sub 2} at 95% recovery when operating downstream of an actual coal gasifier. A key milestone for the project was to complete a pilot-scale gasifier test by 1 September 2011 and demonstrate the separation of 2 lb day{sup -1} H{sub 2} to verify progress toward the DOE's goals prior to down-selection for larger-scale (100 lb day{sup -1}) hydrogen separator development. Three different pilot-scale (1.5 ft{sup 2}) separators were evaluated downstream of coal gasifiers during four different tests and the key project milestone was achieved in August 2011, ahead of schedule. During three of those tests, all of the separators demonstrated or exceeded the targeted separation rate of 2 lb day{sup -1} H{sub 2}. The separator design was proved to be leak tight and durable in the presence of gasifier exhaust contaminants at temperatures and pressures up to 500 °C and 500 psia. The contaminants in the coal gasifier syngas for the most part had negligible impact on separator performance, with H{sub 2} partial pressure being the greatest determinant of membrane performance. Carbon monoxide and low levels of H{sub 2}S (<39 ppmv) had no effect on H{sub 2} permeability, in agreement with laboratory experiments. However, higher levels of H{sub 2}S (>100 ppmv) were shown to significantly reduce H{sub 2} separation performance. The presence of trace metals, including mercury and arsenic, appeared to have no effect based on the experimental data. Subscale Pd-Cu coupon tests further quantified the impact of H{sub 2}S on irreversible sulfide formation in the UTRC separators. Conditions that have a thermodynamic driving force to form coke were found to reduce the performance of the separators, presumably by blockage of effective separation area with carbon deposits. However, it was demonstrated that both in situ and ex

  17. Scale Up of Pan Coating Process Using Quality by Design Principles.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anjali M; Pandey, Preetanshu

    2015-11-01

    Scale up of pan coating process is of high importance to the pharmaceutical and food industry. The number of process variables and their interdependence in a pan coating process can make it a rather complex scale-up problem. This review discusses breaking down the coating process variables into three main categories: pan-related, spray-related, and thermodynamic-related factors. A review on how to scale up each of these factors is presented via two distinct strategies--"macroscopic" and "microscopic" scale-up. In a Quality by Design paradigm, where an increased process understanding is required, there is increased emphasis on "microscopic" scale-up, which by definition ensures a more reproducible process and thereby robust scale-up. This article also reviews the various existing and new modeling and process analytical technology tools that can provide additional information to facilitate a more fundamental understanding of the coating process.

  18. SCALE-UP OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    K. JOTHIMURUGESAN; S.K. GANGWAL

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop advanced regenerable sorbents for hot gas desulfurization in IGCC systems. The specific objective was to develop durable advanced sorbents that demonstrate a strong resistance to attrition and chemical deactivation, and high sulfidation activity at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F). Twenty sorbents were synthesized in this work. Details of the preparation technique and the formulations are proprietary, pending a patent application, thus no details regarding the technique are divulged in this report. Sulfidations were conducted with a simulated gas containing (vol %) 10 H{sub 2}, 15 CO, 5 CO{sub 2}, 0.4-1 H{sub 2}S, 15 H{sub 2}O, and balance N{sub 2} in the temperature range of 343-538 C. Regenerations were conducted at temperatures in the range of 400-600 C with air-N{sub 2} mixtures. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives were investigated that promote regeneration at lower temperatures. Characterization were performed for fresh, sulfided and regenerated sorbents.

  19. What are the barriers to scaling up health interventions in low and middle income countries? A qualitative study of academic leaders in implementation science

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most low and middle income countries (LMICs) are currently not on track to reach the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). One way to accelerate progress would be through the large-scale implementation of evidence-based health tools and interventions. This study aimed to: (a) explore the barriers that have impeded such scale-up in LMICs, and (b) lay out an “implementation research agenda”—a series of key research questions that need to be addressed in order to help overcome such barriers. Methods Interviews were conducted with fourteen key informants, all of whom are academic leaders in the field of implementation science, who were purposively selected for their expertise in scaling up in LMICs. Interviews were transcribed by hand and manually coded to look for emerging themes related to the two study aims. Barriers to scaling up, and unanswered research questions, were organized into six categories, representing different components of the scaling up process: attributes of the intervention; attributes of the implementers; scale-up approach; attributes of the adopting community; socio-political, fiscal, and cultural context; and research context. Results Factors impeding the success of scale-up that emerged from the key informant interviews, and which are areas for future investigation, include: complexity of the intervention and lack of technical consensus; limited human resource, leadership, management, and health systems capacity; poor application of proven diffusion techniques; lack of engagement of local implementers and of the adopting community; and inadequate integration of research into scale-up efforts. Conclusions Key steps in expanding the evidence base on implementation in LMICs include studying how to: simplify interventions; train “scale-up leaders” and health workers dedicated to scale-up; reach and engage communities; match the best delivery strategy to the specific health problem and context; and raise the low

  20. Crustal permeability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, Tom; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth’s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures.  The practical importance of permeability – and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability – is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production (“fracking”), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration.  Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment.  This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. 

  1. Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  2. EFFECT OF PRELOADING ON THE SCALE-UP OF GAC MICRO- COLUMNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A previously presented microcolumn scale-up procedure is evaluated. Scale-up assumptions that involve equal capacities in microcolumns and field columns are studied in an effort to determine whether preloading activated carbon with a natural water significantly reduces the carbo...

  3. What Does It Take to Scale Up and Sustain Evidence-Based Practices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Janette K.; Boardman, Alison G.; Mcmaster, Kristen L.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the strategic scaling up of evidence-based practices. The authors draw from the scholarly work of fellow special education researchers and from the field of learning sciences. The article defines scaling up as the process by which researchers or educators initially implement interventions on a small scale, validate them, and…

  4. Strategies for Scaling Up: Promoting Parent Involvement through Family-School-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayakawa, Momoko; Reynolds, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility, creativity, and collaboration are required to successfully meet the needs of each school when scaling up family engagement programs across a diverse range of communities. Flexibility, creativity, and collaboration are required to successfully meet the needs of each school when scaling up family engagement programs across a diverse…

  5. Fundamental Issues Concerning the Sustainment and Scaling Up of Professional Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirosh, Dina; Tsamir, Pessia; Levenson, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The issue of sustaining and scaling up professional development for mathematics teachers raises several fundamental issues for researchers. This commentary addresses various definitions for sustainability and scaling up and how these definitions may affect the design of programs as well as the design of research. We consider four of the papers in…

  6. 'Scaling-up is a craft not a science': Catalysing scale-up of health innovations in Ethiopia, India and Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Neil; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Dimka, Ritgak; Fanta, Feleke; Mangham-Jefferies, Lindsay; Schellenberg, Joanna; Tamire-Woldemariam, Addis; Walt, Gill; Wickremasinghe, Deepthi

    2014-11-01

    Donors and other development partners commonly introduce innovative practices and technologies to improve health in low and middle income countries. Yet many innovations that are effective in improving health and survival are slow to be translated into policy and implemented at scale. Understanding the factors influencing scale-up is important. We conducted a qualitative study involving 150 semi-structured interviews with government, development partners, civil society organisations and externally funded implementers, professional associations and academic institutions in 2012/13 to explore scale-up of innovative interventions targeting mothers and newborns in Ethiopia, the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh and the six states of northeast Nigeria, which are settings with high burdens of maternal and neonatal mortality. Interviews were analysed using a common analytic framework developed for cross-country comparison and themes were coded using Nvivo. We found that programme implementers across the three settings require multiple steps to catalyse scale-up. Advocating for government to adopt and finance health innovations requires: designing scalable innovations; embedding scale-up in programme design and allocating time and resources; building implementer capacity to catalyse scale-up; adopting effective approaches to advocacy; presenting strong evidence to support government decision making; involving government in programme design; invoking policy champions and networks; strengthening harmonisation among external programmes; aligning innovations with health systems and priorities. Other steps include: supporting government to develop policies and programmes and strengthening health systems and staff; promoting community uptake by involving media, community leaders, mobilisation teams and role models. We conclude that scale-up has no magic bullet solution - implementers must embrace multiple activities, and require substantial support from donors and governments in

  7. Reactor scale up for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Lynd, Lee; Bakker, André; LaRoche, Richard; Wyman, Charles

    2010-05-01

    The absence of a systematic scale-up approach for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to commodity products is a significant bottleneck to realizing the potential benefits offered by such conversion. Motivated by this, we undertook to develop a scale-up approach for conversion of waste paper sludge to ethanol. Physical properties of the system were measured and correlations were developed for their dependence upon cellulose conversion. Just-suspension of solid particles was identified as the scale up criterion based on experiments at lab scale. The impeller speed for just solids suspension at large scale was predicted using computational fluid dynamics simulations. The scale-up strategy was validated by analyzing mixing requirements such as solid-liquid mass transfer under the predicted level of agitation at large scale. The scale-up approach enhances the prediction of reactor performance and helps provide guidelines for the analysis and design of large scale bioreactors based on bench scale experimentation.

  8. Optimisation of rosemary oil encapsulation in polycaprolactone and scale-up of the process.

    PubMed

    Ephrem, Elissa; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Fessi, Hatem; Charcosset, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Rosemary essential oil (REO) has many biological activities, such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, cognition-enhancing, analgesic and antimicrobial activities. The aim of this study was to prepare, at laboratory scale and larger scale, nanoencapsulating REO in order to reduce its volatilisation, light sensitivity and to enhance its water solubility. The nanoprecipitation method was applied to prepare polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanocapsules loaded with REO at laboratory scale and then the optimal formulation obtained was scaled-up (×6) using the membrane contactor technique. The effect of several parameters, such as the evaporation method, the type of emulsifiers and the amount of the formulation products (PCL, REO, emulsifiers, etc.) on the REO-loaded nanocapsules properties (mean size, polydispersity index (PdI), zeta potential and REO loss) was evaluated at laboratory scale in order to obtain the optimal formulation. REO-loaded nanocapsules obtained from nanoprecipitation presented a nanometric mean size (220 ± 10 nm) with a PdI below 0.25, indicating an adequate homogeneity of the system, a negative zeta potential (-19.9 ± 4.6 mV) and a high encapsulation efficiency (∼99% for the major components). In addition, the membrane contactor technique gave similar results using an adequate pressure of the organic phase (0.8-1.2 bar). It is then suggested that the nanoprecipitation method can be suitable for the preparation of essential oil-loaded nanocapsules.

  9. Understanding pathways for scaling up health services through the lens of complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Paina, Ligia; Peters, David H

    2012-08-01

    Despite increased prominence and funding of global health initiatives, efforts to scale up health services in developing countries are falling short of the expectations of the Millennium Development Goals. Arguing that the dominant assumptions for scaling up are inadequate, we propose that interpreting change in health systems through the lens of complex adaptive systems (CAS) provides better models of pathways for scaling up. Based on an understanding of CAS behaviours, we describe how phenomena such as path dependence, feedback loops, scale-free networks, emergent behaviour and phase transitions can uncover relevant lessons for the design and implementation of health policy and programmes in the context of scaling up health services. The implications include paying more attention to local context, incentives and institutions, as well as anticipating certain types of unintended consequences that can undermine scaling up efforts, and developing and implementing programmes that engage key actors through transparent use of data for ongoing problem-solving and adaptation. We propose that future efforts to scale up should adapt and apply the models and methodologies which have been used in other fields that study CAS, yet are underused in public health. This can help policy makers, planners, implementers and researchers to explore different and innovative approaches for reaching populations in need with effective, equitable and efficient health services. The old assumptions have led to disappointed expectations about how to scale up health services, and offer little insight on how to scale up effective interventions in the future. The alternative perspectives offered by CAS may better reflect the complex and changing nature of health systems, and create new opportunities for understanding and scaling up health services.

  10. Scaling-up Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning Techniques for Teaching Large Information Systems Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevathan, Jarrod; Myers, Trina; Gray, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Promoting engagement during lectures becomes significantly more challenging as class sizes increase. Therefore, lecturers need to experiment with new teaching methodologies to embolden deep learning outcomes and to develop interpersonal skills amongst students. Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning is a teaching approach that uses highly…

  11. The Effect of Various Vehicles on the Naproxen Permeability through Rat Skin: A Mechanistic Study by DSC and FT-IR Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Anayatollah; Hedayatipour, Najme; Moghimipour, Eskandar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of different vehicles on drug permeability and microstructure of intercellular or lipids in SC layer of skin. Methods: Pre-treated skin of rat using some vehicles including Labarac PG ,Transcutol P, tween 80, span 80 and propylene glycol (PG), were mounted on specialized design franz-diffusion cell was used to assess naproxen permeation and parameters such as permeability coefficients and state flux (Jss) were evaluated. Any differences in peak position and also change in symmetric and asymmetric stretching of C-H bond, lipid ester carbonyl stretching in SC, C=O stretching (Amide I) and C-N stretching of keratin (Amide II) absorbance using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were considered to investigate the enhancing mechanism. DSC method was utilized to compare their mean transition temperature (Tm) and enthalpies (ΔH). Results: Steady-state flux (Jss), permeability coefficient (Kp) and diffusion coefficient (D) were significantly (p<0.05) increased by using their span80 showed the biggest enhancement ratio (ERflux) and Transcutol P, Labrafac PG, Tween 80 and Propylene glycol were at the next levels. In comprised to hydrated rat skin the maximum increase in diffusion coefficient was for Tween 80(p<0.05), Lipid fluidization, lipid disruption structure and the irreversible denaturation of proteins in the SC layer of skin by span 80, Tween 80, Labrafac PG, Transcutol P and propylene glycol, were indicated by FT-IR and DSC techniques. Conclusion: It is concluded that naproxen permeation through rat skin may be facilitated by utilizing the vehicle systems. Lipid fluidization and lipid extraction are among suggested mechanisms. PMID:27099831

  12. Scale-up of stirring as foam disruption (SAFD) to industrial scale.

    PubMed

    Hoeks, Frans W J M M; Boon, Lotte A; Studer, Fabian; Wolff, Menno O; van der Schot, Freija; Vrabél, Peter; van der Lans, Rob G J M; Bujalski, Waldemar; Manelius, Asa; Blomsten, Gustav; Hjorth, Sven; Prada, Giovanna; Luyben, Karel Ch A M; Nienow, Alvin W

    2003-02-01

    Foam disruption by agitation-the stirring as foam disruption (SAFD) technique-was scaled up to pilot and production scale using Rushton turbines and an up-pumping hydrofoil impeller, the Scaba 3SHP1. The dominating mechanism behind SAFD-foam entrainment-was also demonstrated at production scale. The mechanistic model for SAFD defines a fictitious liquid velocity generated by the (upper) impeller near the dispersion surface, which is correlated with complete foam disruption. This model proved to be scalable, thus enabling the model to be used for the design of SAFD applications. Axial upward pumping impellers appeared to be more effective with respect to SAFD than Rushton turbines, as demonstrated by retrofitting a 12,000 l bioreactor, i.e. the triple Rushton configuration was compared with a mixed impeller configuration from Scaba with a 20% lower ungassed power draw. The retrofitted impeller configuration allowed 10% more broth without risking excessive foaming. In this way a substantial increase in the volumetric productivity of the bioreactor was achieved. Design recommendations for the application of SAFD are given in this paper. Using these recommendations for the design of a 30,000 l scale bioreactor, almost foamless Escherichia coli fermentations were realised.

  13. Scaling up graph-based semisupervised learning via prototype vector machines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Lan, Liang; Kwok, James T; Vucetic, Slobodan; Parvin, Bahram

    2015-03-01

    When the amount of labeled data are limited, semisupervised learning can improve the learner's performance by also using the often easily available unlabeled data. In particular, a popular approach requires the learned function to be smooth on the underlying data manifold. By approximating this manifold as a weighted graph, such graph-based techniques can often achieve state-of-the-art performance. However, their high time and space complexities make them less attractive on large data sets. In this paper, we propose to scale up graph-based semisupervised learning using a set of sparse prototypes derived from the data. These prototypes serve as a small set of data representatives, which can be used to approximate the graph-based regularizer and to control model complexity. Consequently, both training and testing become much more efficient. Moreover, when the Gaussian kernel is used to define the graph affinity, a simple and principled method to select the prototypes can be obtained. Experiments on a number of real-world data sets demonstrate encouraging performance and scaling properties of the proposed approach. It also compares favorably with models learned via l1 -regularization at the same level of model sparsity. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach in producing highly parsimonious and accurate models for semisupervised learning.

  14. Materials Engineering and Scale Up of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Westman, Matthew P.; Chun, Jaehun; Choi, Young Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2016-01-25

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high hydrogen content of 14-16 wt% below 200°C and high volumetric density. In our previous paper, we selected AB in silicone oil as a role model for a slurry hydrogen storage system. Materials engineering properties were optimized by increasing solid loading by using an ultra-sonic process. In this paper, we proceeded to scale up to liter size batches with solid loadings up to 50 wt% (8 wt% H2) with dynamic viscosities less than 1000cP at 25°C. The use of a non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-15, shows significant promise in controlling the level of foaming produced during the thermal dehydrogenation of the AB. Through the development of new and efficient processing techniques and the ability to adequately control the foaming, stable homogenous slurries of high solid loading have been demonstrated as a viable hydrogen delivery source.

  15. Experimental Study on Scale-Up of Solid-Liquid Stirred Tank with an Intermig Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongliang; Zhao, Xing; Zhang, Lifeng; Yin, Pan

    2017-02-01

    The scale-up of a solid-liquid stirred tank with an Intermig impeller was characterized via experiments. Solid concentration, impeller just-off-bottom speed and power consumption were measured in stirred tanks of different scales. The scale-up criteria for achieving the same effect of solid suspension in small-scale and large-scale vessels were evaluated. The solids distribution improves if the operating conditions are held constant as the tank is scaled-up. The results of impeller just-off-bottom speed gave X = 0.868 in the scale-up relationship ND X = constant. Based on this criterion, the stirring power per unit volume obviously decreased at N = N js, and the power number ( N P) was approximately equal to 0.3 when the solids are uniformly distributed in the vessels.

  16. Methodologies Used for Scaling-up From a Single Energy Production Unit to State Energy Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimdina, Ginta; Timma, Lelde; Veidenbergs, Ivars; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2015-12-01

    In a well-functioning and sustainable national energy sector, each of its elements should function with maximum efficiency. To ensure maximum efficiency and study possible improvement of the sector, a scaling-up framework is presented in this work. The scaling-up framework means that the starting point is a CHP unit and its operation, the next step of aggregation is in a district heating network, followed by a municipal energy plan and finally leading to a low carbon strategy. In this framework the authors argue, that the successful, innovative practices developed and tested at the lower level of aggregation can be then transferred to the upper levels of aggregation, thus leading to a scaling-up effect of innovative practices. The work summarizes 12 methodologies used in the energy sector, by dividing these methodologies among the levels of aggregation in a scaling-up framework.

  17. Scaling up and error analysis of transpiration for Populus euphratica in a desert riparian forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, J.; Li, W.; Feng, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Water consumption information of the forest stand is the most important factor for regional water resources management. However, water consumption of individual trees are usually measured based on the limited sample trees , so, it is an important issue how to realize eventual scaling up of data from a series of sample trees to entire stand. Estimation of sap flow flux density (Fd) and stand sapwood area (AS-stand) are among the most critical factors for determining forest stand transpiration using sap flow measurement. To estimate Fd, the various links in sap flow technology have great impact on the measurement of sap flow, to estimate AS-stand, an appropriate indirect technique for measuring each tree sapwood area (AS-tree) is required, because it is impossible to measure the AS-tree of all trees in a forest stand. In this study, Fd was measured in 2 mature P. euphratic trees at several radial depths, 0~10, 10~30mm, using sap flow sensors with the heat ratio method, the relationship model between AS-tree and stem diameter (DBH), growth model of AS-tree were established, using investigative original data of DBH, tree-age, and AS-tree. The results revealed that it can achieve scaling up of transpiration from sample trees to entire forest stand using AS-tree and Fd, however, the transpiration of forest stand (E) will be overvalued by 12.6% if using Fd of 0~10mm, and it will be underestimated by 25.3% if using Fd of 10~30mm, it implied that major uncertainties in mean stand Fd estimations are caused by radial variations in Fd. E will be obviously overvalued when the AS-stand is constant, this result imply that it is the key to improve the prediction accuracy that how to simulate the AS-stand changes in the day scale; They also showed that the potential errors in transpiration with a sample size of approximately ≥30 were almost stable for P.euphrtica, this suggests that to make an allometric equation it might be necessary to sample at least 30 trees.

  18. Column test-based optimization of the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technique for remediating groundwater contaminated by landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yinbo; Zhang, Chang; Li, Xiongfei; Chen, Zhiliang; Huang, Junyi; Li, Xia; Flores, Giancarlo; Kamon, Masashi

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the optimum composition of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) materials for remediating groundwater heavily contaminated by landfill leachate, in column tests using various mixtures of zero-valent iron (ZVI), zeolite (Zeo) and activated carbon (AC) with 0.01-0.25, 3.0-5.0 and 0.7-1.0mm grain sizes, respectively. The main contributors to the removal of organic/inorganic contaminants were ZVI and AC, and the optimum weight ratio of the three PRB materials for removing the contaminants and maintaining adequate hydraulic conductivity was found to be 5:1:4. Average reductions in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and contents of total nitrogen (TN), ammonium, Ni, Pb and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from test samples using this mixture were 55.8%, 70.8%, 89.2%, 70.7%, 92.7% and 94.2%, respectively. We also developed a systematic method for estimating the minimum required thickness and longevity of the PRB materials. A ≥ 309.6 cm layer with the optimum composition is needed for satisfactory longevity, defined here as meeting the Grade III criteria (the Chinese National Bureau of Standards: GB/T14848/93) for in situ treatment of the sampled groundwater for ≥ 10 years.

  19. Column test-based optimization of the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technique for remediating groundwater contaminated by landfill leachates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yinbo; Zhang, Chang; Li, Xiongfei; Chen, Zhiliang; Huang, Junyi; Li, Xia; Flores, Giancarlo; Kamon, Masashi

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the optimum composition of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) materials for remediating groundwater heavily contaminated by landfill leachate, in column tests using various mixtures of zero-valent iron (ZVI), zeolite (Zeo) and activated carbon (AC) with 0.01-0.25, 3.0-5.0 and 0.7-1.0 mm grain sizes, respectively. The main contributors to the removal of organic/inorganic contaminants were ZVI and AC, and the optimum weight ratio of the three PRB materials for removing the contaminants and maintaining adequate hydraulic conductivity was found to be 5:1:4. Average reductions in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and contents of total nitrogen (TN), ammonium, Ni, Pb and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from test samples using this mixture were 55.8%, 70.8%, 89.2%, 70.7%, 92.7% and 94.2%, respectively. We also developed a systematic method for estimating the minimum required thickness and longevity of the PRB materials. A ≥ 309.6 cm layer with the optimum composition is needed for satisfactory longevity, defined here as meeting the Grade III criteria (the Chinese National Bureau of Standards: GB/T14848/93) for in situ treatment of the sampled groundwater for ≥ 10 years.

  20. Comparison of a laboratory and a production coating spray gun with respect to scale-up.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ronny; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2007-01-19

    A laboratory spray gun and a production spray gun were investigated in a scale-up study. Two Schlick spray guns, which are equipped with a new antibearding cap, were used in this study. The influence of the atomization air pressure, spray gun-to tablet bed distance, polymer solution viscosity, and spray rate were analyzed in a statistical design of experiments. The 2 spray guns were compared with respect to the spray width and height, droplet size, droplet velocity, and spray density. The droplet size, velocity, and spray density were measured with a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer. A successful scale-up of the atomization is accomplished if similar droplet sizes, droplet velocities, and spray densities are achieved in the production scale as in the laboratory scale. This study gives basic information for the scale-up of the settings from the laboratory spray gun to the production spray gun. Both spray guns are highly comparable with respect to the droplet size and velocity. The scale-up of the droplet size should be performed by an adjustment of the atomization air pressure. The scale-up of the droplet velocity should be performed by an adjustment of the spray gun to tablet bed distance. The presented statistical model and surface plots are convenient and powerful tools for scaling up the spray settings if the spray gun is changed from laboratory spray gun to the production spray gun.

  1. Scaling up depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA): a systematic literature review illustrating the AIDED model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), often known by the brand name Depo-Provera, has increased globally, particularly in multiple low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). As a reproductive health technology that has scaled up in diverse contexts, DMPA is an exemplar product innovation with which to illustrate the utility of the AIDED model for scaling up family health innovations. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the enabling factors and barriers to scaling up DMPA use in LMICs. We searched 11 electronic databases for academic literature published through January 2013 (n = 284 articles), and grey literature from major health organizations. We applied exclusion criteria to identify relevant articles from peer-reviewed (n = 10) and grey literature (n = 9), extracting data on scale up of DMPA in 13 countries. We then mapped the resulting factors to the five AIDED model components: ASSESS, INNOVATE, DEVELOP, ENGAGE, and DEVOLVE. Results The final sample of sources included studies representing variation in geographies and methodologies. We identified 15 enabling factors and 10 barriers to dissemination, diffusion, scale up, and/or sustainability of DMPA use. The greatest number of factors were mapped to the ASSESS, DEVELOP, and ENGAGE components. Conclusions Findings offer early empirical support for the AIDED model, and provide insights into scale up of DMPA that may be relevant for other family planning product innovations. PMID:23915274

  2. Freeze-Drying Process Development and Scale-Up: Scale-Up of Edge Vial Versus Center Vial Heat Transfer Coefficients, Kv.

    PubMed

    Pikal, Michael J; Bogner, Robin; Mudhivarthi, Vamsi; Sharma, Puneet; Sane, Pooja

    2016-11-01

    This report presents calculations of the difference between the vial heat transfer coefficient of the "edge vial" and the "center vial" at all scales. The only scale-up adjustment for center vials is for the contribution of radiation from the shelf upon which the vial sits by replacing the emissivity of the laboratory dryer shelf with the emissivity of the production dryer shelf. With edge vials, scales-up adjustments are more complex. While convection is not important, heat transfer from the wall to the bands (surrounding the vial array) by radiation and directly from the band to the vials by both radiation and conduction is important; this radiation heat transfer depends on the emissivity of the vial and the bands and is nearly independent of the emissivity of the dryer walls. Differences in wall temperatures do impact the edge vial effect and scale-up, and estimates for wall temperatures are needed for both laboratory and manufacturing dryers. Auto-loading systems (no bands) may give different edge vial heat transfer coefficients than when operating with bands. Satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental values of the edge vial effect indicate that results calculated from the theory are of useful accuracy.

  3. Scaling up experimental ocean acidification and warming research: from individuals to the ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Ana M; Fernandes, José A; Faulwetter, Sarah; Nunes, Joana; Rastrick, Samuel P S; Mieszkowska, Nova; Artioli, Yuri; Yool, Andrew; Calosi, Piero; Arvanitidis, Christos; Findlay, Helen S; Barange, Manuel; Cheung, William W L; Widdicombe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    . Scaling up the results of experimental climate change research requires approaches that account for long-term, multiscale responses to multiple stressors, in an ecosystem context.

  4. Statistical data generated through CFD to aid in the scale-up of shear sensitive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Irfan; Das, Shankhadeep; Cloeter, Mike; Gillis, Paul; Poindexter, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A number of industrial processes are considered shear-sensitive, where the product quality depends on achieving the right balance between mixing energy input and the resulting strain rate distribution in the process. Examples of such industrial processes are crystallization, flocculation and suspension polymerization. Scale-up of such processes are prone to a number of challenges including the optimization of mixing and shear rate distribution in the process. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be a valuable tool to aid in the process scale-up; however for modeling purpose, the process will often need to be simplified appropriately to reduce the computational complexity. Commercial CFD tools with appropriate Lagrangian particle tracking models can be used to gather statistical data such as maximum strain rate distribution and maximum number of passes through a specific strain rate. This presentation will discuss such statistical tools and their application to a model scale-up problem.

  5. Emerging freeze-drying process development and scale-up issues.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajal Manubhai; Pikal, Michael J

    2011-03-01

    Although several guidelines do exist for freeze-drying process development and scale-up, there are still a number of issues that require additional attention. The objective of this review article is to discuss some emerging process development and scale-up issue with emphasis on effect of load condition and freeze-drying in novel container systems such as syringes, Lyoguard trays, ampoules, and 96-well plates. Understanding the heat and mass transfer under different load conditions and for freeze-drying in these novel container systems will help in developing a robust freeze-drying process which is also easier to scale-up. Further research and development needs in these emerging areas have also been addressed.

  6. Enabling and challenging factors in institutional reform: The case of SCALE-UP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Kathleen; Knaub, Alexis; Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa; Beichner, Robert J.

    2016-06-01

    While many innovative teaching strategies exist, integration into undergraduate science teaching has been frustratingly slow. This study aims to understand the low uptake of research-based instructional innovations by studying 21 successful implementations of the Student Centered Active Learning with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) instructional reform. SCALE-UP significantly restructures the classroom environment and pedagogy to promote highly active and interactive instruction. Although originally designed for university introductory physics courses, SCALE-UP has spread to many other disciplines at hundreds of departments around the world. This study reports findings from in-depth, open-ended interviews with 21 key contact people involved with successful secondary implementations of SCALE-UP throughout the United States. We defined successful implementations as those who restructured their pedagogy and classroom and sustained and/or spread the change. Interviews were coded to identify the most common enabling and challenging factors during reform implementation and compared to the theoretical framework of Kotter's 8-step Change Model. The most common enabling influences that emerged are documenting and leveraging evidence of local success, administrative support, interaction with outside SCALE-UP user(s), and funding. Many challenges are linked to the lack of these enabling factors including difficulty finding funding, space, and administrative and/or faculty support for reform. Our focus on successful secondary implementations meant that most interviewees were able to overcome challenges. Presentation of results is illuminated with case studies, quotes, and examples that can help secondary implementers with SCALE-UP reform efforts specifically. We also discuss the implications for policy makers, researchers, and the higher education community concerned with initiating structural change.

  7. 78 FR 19495 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Scale-Up and Post-Approval Changes: Manufacturing Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Scale-Up and Post-Approval...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a scale-up and... Oral Dosage Forms--Scale-Up and Post-Approval Changes: Chemistry, Manufacturing and Controls, In...

  8. Heat and mass transfer scale-up issues during freeze drying: II. Control and characterization of the degree of supercooling.

    PubMed

    Rambhatla, Shailaja; Ramot, Roee; Bhugra, Chandan; Pikal, Michael J

    2004-08-05

    This study aims to investigate the effect of the ice nucleation temperature on the primary drying process using an ice fog technique for temperature-controlled nucleation. In order to facilitate scale up of the freeze-drying process, this research seeks to find a correlation of the product resistance and the degree of supercooling with the specific surface area of the product. Freeze-drying experiments were performed using 5% wt/vol solutions of sucrose, dextran, hydroxyethyl starch (HES), and mannitol. Temperature-controlled nucleation was achieved using the ice fog technique where cold nitrogen gas was introduced into the chamber to form an "ice fog," thereby facilitating nucleation of samples at the temperature of interest. Manometric temperature measurement (MTM) was used during primary drying to evaluate the product resistance as a function of cake thickness. Specific surface areas (SSA) of the freeze-dried cakes were determined. The ice fog technique was refined to successfully control the ice nucleation temperature of solutions within 1 degrees C. A significant increase in product resistance was produced by a decrease in nucleation temperature. The SSA was found to increase with decreasing nucleation temperature, and the product resistance increased with increasing SSA. The ice fog technique can be refined into a viable method for nucleation temperature control. The SSA of the product correlates well with the degree of supercooling and with the resistance of the product to mass transfer (ie, flow of water vapor through the dry layer). Using this correlation and SSA measurements, one could predict scale-up drying differences and accordingly alter the freeze-drying process so as to bring about equivalence of product temperature history during lyophilization.

  9. "Scaling Up" Educational Change: Some Musings on Misrecognition and Doxic Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Educational policy-makers around the world are strongly committed to the notion of "scaling up". This can mean anything from encouraging more teachers to take up a pedagogical innovation, all the way through to system-wide efforts to implement "what works" across all schools. In this paper, I use Bourdieu's notions of…

  10. Final-Year Results from the i3 Scale-Up of Reading Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Henry; Sirinides, Philip; Gray, Abby; Davila, Heather Goldsworthy; Sam, Cecile; Blalock, Toscha; Blackman, Horatio; Anderson-Clark, Helen; Schiera, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the 2010 economic stimulus, a $55 million "Investing in Innovation" (i3) grant from the US Department of Education was awarded to scale up Reading Recovery across the nation. This paper presents the final round of results from the large-scale, mixed methods randomized evaluation of the implementation and impacts of Reading…

  11. Lessons from scaling up a depression treatment program in primary care in Chile.

    PubMed

    Araya, Ricardo; Alvarado, Rubén; Sepúlveda, Rodrigo; Rojas, Graciela

    2012-09-01

    In Chile, the National Depression Detection and Treatment Program (Programa Nacional de Diagnóstico y Tratamiento de la Depresión, PNDTD) in primary care is a rare example of an evidence-based mental health program that was scaled up to the national level in a low- or middle-income country. This retrospective qualitative study aimed to better understand how policymakers made the decision to scale up mental health services to the national level, and to explore the elements, contexts, and processes that facilitated the decision to implement and sustain PNDTD. In-depth semistructured interviews with six key informants selected through intentional sampling were conducted in August-December 2008. Interviewees were senior officers at the Ministry of Health who were directly involved in the decision to scale up the program. Results yielded four elements pivotal to the decisionmaking process: scientific evidence, teamwork and leadership, strategic alliances, and program institutionalization. Each element contributed to building consensus, securing funding, attracting resources, and gaining lasting support from policymakers. Additionally, a review of available documentation led the authors to consider sociopolitical context and use of the media to be important factors. While research evidence for the effectiveness of mental health services in the primary care setting continues to accumulate, low- and middle-income countries should get started on the lengthy process of scaling up by incorporating the elements that led to decisionmaking and implementation of the PNDTD in Chile.

  12. 77 FR 25152 - Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale-Up Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale- Up Grants Correction In notice document 2012-7362 appearing on pages 18216-18229 in the issue of Tuesday, March 27, 2012 make the...

  13. Scaling up Comprehensive Sexuality Education in Nigeria: From National Policy to Nationwide Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huaynoca, Silvia; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Yaqub, Nuhu, Jr.; Denno, Donna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Nigeria is one of few countries that reports having translated national policies on school-based comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) into near-nationwide implementation. We analysed data using the World Health Organization-ExpandNet framework, which provides a systematic structure for planning and managing the scaling up of health innovations.…

  14. Education Reform Support: A Framework for Scaling Up School Reform. Policy Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healey, F. Henry; DeStefano, Joseph

    The Bureau for Africa of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has been examining in detail the question of how best to support and sustain sectorwide education reform in Africa. The USAID and Education Commission of the States jointly sponsored a seminar in October 1996 to examine the issue of "scaling up" and…

  15. Investing in the foundation of sustainable development: pathways to scale up for early childhood development.

    PubMed

    Richter, Linda M; Daelmans, Bernadette; Lombardi, Joan; Heymann, Jody; Boo, Florencia Lopez; Behrman, Jere R; Lu, Chunling; Lucas, Jane E; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael; Dua, Tarun; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Stenberg, Karin; Gertler, Paul; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2017-01-07

    Building on long-term benefits of early intervention (Paper 2 of this Series) and increasing commitment to early childhood development (Paper 1 of this Series), scaled up support for the youngest children is essential to improving health, human capital, and wellbeing across the life course. In this third paper, new analyses show that the burden of poor development is higher than estimated, taking into account additional risk factors. National programmes are needed. Greater political prioritisation is core to scale-up, as are policies that afford families time and financial resources to provide nurturing care for young children. Effective and feasible programmes to support early child development are now available. All sectors, particularly education, and social and child protection, must play a role to meet the holistic needs of young children. However, health provides a critical starting point for scaling up, given its reach to pregnant women, families, and young children. Starting at conception, interventions to promote nurturing care can feasibly build on existing health and nutrition services at limited additional cost. Failure to scale up has severe personal and social consequences. Children at elevated risk for compromised development due to stunting and poverty are likely to forgo about a quarter of average adult income per year, and the cost of inaction to gross domestic product can be double what some countries currently spend on health. Services and interventions to support early childhood development are essential to realising the vision of the Sustainable Development Goals.

  16. Compaction Scale Up and Optimization of Cylindrical Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey J. Einerson; Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott E. Niedzialek; W. Clay Richardson; Scott G. Nagley

    2012-10-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of designed experiments have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel. Results from these experiments are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operational using nuclear fuel materials. The process is being certified for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts for the AGR-5/6/7 experiment at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  17. Introduction to SCALE-UP: Student-Centered Activities for Large Enrollment University Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beichner, Robert J.; Saul, Jeffery M.; Allain, Rhett J.; Deardorff, Duane L.; Abbott, David S.

    SCALE-UP is an extension of the highly successful IMPEC (Integrated Math, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry) project, one of North Carolina State's curricular reform efforts undertaken as part of the SUCCEED coalition. The authors utilize the interactive, collaboratively based instruction that worked well in smaller class settings and find ways…

  18. Scaling Up Success: Lessons Learned from Technology-Based Educational Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris, Ed.; Honan, James P., Ed.; Peters, Laurence C., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Drawing from the information presented at a conference sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Technology in Education Consortium, educators, researchers, and policymakers translate theory into practice to provide a hands-on resource that describes different models for scaling up success. This resource…

  19. Declining tuberculosis case notification rates with the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Sandy, C.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Zishiri, C.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Zimbabwe has a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) driven tuberculosis (TB) epidemic, with antiretroviral therapy (ART) scaled up in the public sector since 2004. Objective: To determine whether national ART scale-up was associated with annual national TB case notification rates (CNR), stratified by disease type and category, between 2000 and 2013. Design: This was a retrospective study using aggregate data from global reports. Results: The number of people living with HIV and retained on ART from 2004 to 2013 increased from 8400 to 665 299, with ART coverage increasing from <0.5% to 48%. TB CNRs, all types and categories, increased from 2000 to 2003, and declined thereafter from 2004 to 2013. The decreases in annual TB notifications between the highest rates (before 2004) and lowest rates (2013) were all forms of TB (56%), new TB (60%), previously treated TB (53%), new smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) (40%), new smear-negative/smear-unknown PTB (58%) and extra-pulmonary TB (58%). Conclusion: Significant declines in TB CNRs were observed during ART scale-up, especially for smear-negative PTB and extra-pulmonary TB. These encouraging national trends support the continued scale-up of ART for people living with HIV as a way of tackling the twin epidemics of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome and TB in Zimbabwe. PMID:27695678

  20. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  1. Integrated Graduate and Continuing Education in Protein Chromatography for Bioprocess Development and Scale-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carta, Jungbauer

    2011-01-01

    We describe an intensive course that integrates graduate and continuing education focused on the development and scale-up of chromatography processes used for the recovery and purification of proteins with special emphasis on biotherapeutics. The course includes lectures, laboratories, teamwork, and a design exercise and offers a complete view of…

  2. Declining tuberculosis case notification rates with the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Takarinda, K C; Harries, A D; Sandy, C; Mutasa-Apollo, T; Zishiri, C

    2016-09-01

    Setting: Zimbabwe has a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) driven tuberculosis (TB) epidemic, with antiretroviral therapy (ART) scaled up in the public sector since 2004. Objective: To determine whether national ART scale-up was associated with annual national TB case notification rates (CNR), stratified by disease type and category, between 2000 and 2013. Design: This was a retrospective study using aggregate data from global reports. Results: The number of people living with HIV and retained on ART from 2004 to 2013 increased from 8400 to 665 299, with ART coverage increasing from <0.5% to 48%. TB CNRs, all types and categories, increased from 2000 to 2003, and declined thereafter from 2004 to 2013. The decreases in annual TB notifications between the highest rates (before 2004) and lowest rates (2013) were all forms of TB (56%), new TB (60%), previously treated TB (53%), new smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) (40%), new smear-negative/smear-unknown PTB (58%) and extra-pulmonary TB (58%). Conclusion: Significant declines in TB CNRs were observed during ART scale-up, especially for smear-negative PTB and extra-pulmonary TB. These encouraging national trends support the continued scale-up of ART for people living with HIV as a way of tackling the twin epidemics of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome and TB in Zimbabwe.

  3. Enabling and Challenging Factors in Institutional Reform: The Case of SCALE-UP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Kathleen; Knaub, Alexis; Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa; Beichner, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    While many innovative teaching strategies exist, integration into undergraduate science teaching has been frustratingly slow. This study aims to understand the low uptake of research-based instructional innovations by studying 21 successful implementations of the Student Centered Active Learning with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) instructional…

  4. Smallness, Autonomy, and Choice: Scaling Up. Statewide "Safe Places" for Distinctive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    For those who would like to see Ron Wolk's vision of schools realized, the challenge of scaling up is the most daunting one faced. Skeptics like to say, "Oh well, that 'X' and 'Y' did something really special is irrelevant; they're exceptions." But the author's experience suggests that today's exceptions can become tomorrow's norms. If that is to…

  5. Scaling up STEM Academies Statewide: Implementation, Network Supports, and Early Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Viki; House, Ann; Sherer, David; Singleton, Corinne; Wang, Haiwen; Klopfenstein, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a case study of scaling up the T-STEM initiative in Texas. Data come from the four-year longitudinal evaluation of the Texas High School Project (THSP). The evaluation studied the implementation and impact of T-STEM and the other THSP reforms using a mixed-methods design, including qualitative case studies; principal,…

  6. Early College for All: Efforts to Scale up Early Colleges in Multiple Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Given the positive impacts of the small, stand-alone early college model and the desire to provide those benefits to more students, organizations have begun efforts to scale up the early college model in a variety of settings. These efforts have been supported by the federal government, particularly by the Investing in Innovation (i3) program.…

  7. Scaling-up voluntary medical male circumcision – what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    Ledikwe, Jenny H; Nyanga, Robert O; Hagon, Jaclyn; Grignon, Jessica S; Mpofu, Mulamuli; Semo, Bazghina-werq

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the joint United Nations agency program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) recommended voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) as an add-on strategy for HIV prevention. Fourteen priority countries were tasked with scaling-up VMMC services to 80% of HIV-negative men aged 15–49 years by 2016, representing a combined target of 20 million circumcisions. By December 2012, approximately 3 million procedures had been conducted. Within the following year, there was marked improvement in the pace of the scale-up. During 2013, the total number of circumcisions performed nearly doubled, with approximately 6 million total circumcisions conducted by the end of the year, reaching 30% of the initial target. The purpose of this review article was to apply a systems thinking approach, using the WHO health systems building blocks as a framework to examine the factors influencing the scale-up of the VMMC programs from 2008–2013. Facilitators that accelerated the VMMC program scale-up included: country ownership; sustained political will; service delivery efficiencies, such as task shifting and task sharing; use of outreach and mobile services; disposable, prepackaged VMMC kits; external funding; and a standardized set of indicators for VMMC. A low demand for the procedure has been a major barrier to achieving circumcision targets, while weak supply chain management systems and the lack of adequate financial resources with a heavy reliance on donor support have also adversely affected scale-up. Health systems strengthening initiatives and innovations have progressively improved VMMC service delivery, but an understanding of the contextual barriers and the facilitators of demand for the procedure is critical in reaching targets. There is a need for countries implementing VMMC programs to share their experiences more frequently to identify and to enhance best practices by other programs. PMID:25336991

  8. Scaling-up voluntary medical male circumcision - what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Ledikwe, Jenny H; Nyanga, Robert O; Hagon, Jaclyn; Grignon, Jessica S; Mpofu, Mulamuli; Semo, Bazghina-Werq

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the joint United Nations agency program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) recommended voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) as an add-on strategy for HIV prevention. Fourteen priority countries were tasked with scaling-up VMMC services to 80% of HIV-negative men aged 15-49 years by 2016, representing a combined target of 20 million circumcisions. By December 2012, approximately 3 million procedures had been conducted. Within the following year, there was marked improvement in the pace of the scale-up. During 2013, the total number of circumcisions performed nearly doubled, with approximately 6 million total circumcisions conducted by the end of the year, reaching 30% of the initial target. The purpose of this review article was to apply a systems thinking approach, using the WHO health systems building blocks as a framework to examine the factors influencing the scale-up of the VMMC programs from 2008-2013. Facilitators that accelerated the VMMC program scale-up included: country ownership; sustained political will; service delivery efficiencies, such as task shifting and task sharing; use of outreach and mobile services; disposable, prepackaged VMMC kits; external funding; and a standardized set of indicators for VMMC. A low demand for the procedure has been a major barrier to achieving circumcision targets, while weak supply chain management systems and the lack of adequate financial resources with a heavy reliance on donor support have also adversely affected scale-up. Health systems strengthening initiatives and innovations have progressively improved VMMC service delivery, but an understanding of the contextual barriers and the facilitators of demand for the procedure is critical in reaching targets. There is a need for countries implementing VMMC programs to share their experiences more frequently to identify and to enhance best practices by other programs.

  9. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of gas injection processes are reported. The research examines how the physical mechanisms at work during a gas injection project interact to determine process performance. In particular, the authors examine: the interactions of equilibrium phase behavior and two-phase flow that determine local displacement efficiency and minimum miscibility pressure, the combined effects of viscous fingering, gravity segregation and heterogeneity that control sweep efficiency in 2- and 3-dimensional porous media, the use of streamtube/streamline methods to create very efficient simulation technique for multiphase compositional displacements, the scaling of viscous, capillary and gravity forces for heterogeneous reservoirs, and the effects of the thin films and spreading behavior on three-phase flow. The following key results are documented: rigorous procedures for determination of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) or minimum miscibility enrichment (MME) for miscibility have been developed for multicomponent systems; the complex dependence of MMP`s for nitrogen/methane floods on oil and injection gas composition observed experimentally is explained for the first time; the presence of layer-like heterogeneities strongly influences the interplay of gravity segregation and viscous fingering, as viscous fingers adapt to preferential flow paths and low permeability layers restrict vertical flow; streamtube/streamline simulation techniques are demonstrated for a variety of injection processes in 2 and 3 dimensions; quantitative scaling estimates for the transitions from capillary-dominated to gravity-dominated to viscous-dominated flows are reported; experimental results are given that demonstrate that high pressure CO{sub 2} can be used to generate low IFT gravity drainage in fractured reservoirs if fractures are suitably connected; and the effect of wetting and spreading behavior on three-phase flow is described. 209 refs.

  10. Single Layer Centrifugation Can Be Scaled-Up Further to Process up to 150 mL Semen

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, J. M.; van Wienen, M.; Wallgren, M.

    2011-01-01

    Single-Layer centrifugation has been used to improve the quality of sperm samples in several species. However, where stallion or boar semen is to be used for AI, larger volumes of semen have to be processed than for other species, thus limiting the effectiveness of the original technique. The objective of the present study was to scale up the SLC method for both stallion and boar semen. Stallion semen could be processed in 100 mL glass tubes without a loss of sperm quality, and similarly, boar semen could be processed in 200 mL and 500 mL tubes without losing sperm quality. The results of these preliminary studies are encouraging, and larger trials are underway to evaluate using these methods in the field. PMID:23738111

  11. Freeze drying--principles and practice for successful scale-up to manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tsinontides, S C; Rajniak, P; Pham, D; Hunke, W A; Placek, J; Reynolds, S D

    2004-08-06

    Freeze Drying involves transfer of heat and mass to and from the product under preparation, respectively, thus it is necessary to scale these transport phenomena appropriately from pilot plant to manufacturing-scale units to maintain product quality attributes. In this manuscript we describe the principal approach and tools utilized to successfully transfer the lyophilization process of a labile pharmaceutical product from pilot plant to manufacturing. Based on pilot plant data, the lyophilization cycle was tested during limited scale-up trials in manufacturing to identify parameter set-point values and test process parameter ranges. The limited data from manufacturing were then used in a single-vial mathematical model to determine manufacturing lyophilizer heat transfer coefficients, and subsequently evaluate the cycle robustness at scale-up operating conditions. The lyophilization cycle was then successfully demonstrated at target parameter set-point values.

  12. Progress on scaling up integrated services for sexual and reproductive health and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Attawell, Kathy; Druce, Nel

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper considers new developments to strengthen sexual and reproductive health and HIV linkages and discusses factors that continue to impede progress. It is based on a previous review undertaken for the United Kingdom Department for International Development in 2006 that examined the constraints and opportunities to scaling up these linkages. We argue that, despite growing evidence that linking sexual and reproductive health and HIV is feasible and beneficial, few countries have achieved significant scale-up of integrated service provision. A lack of common understanding of terminology and clear technical operational guidance, and separate policy, institutional and financing processes continue to represent significant constraints. We draw on experience with tuberculosis and HIV integration to highlight some lessons. The paper concludes that there is little evidence to determine whether funding for health systems is strengthening linkages and we make several recommendations to maximize opportunities represented by recent developments. PMID:20072770

  13. Pretreatment optimization of Sorghum pioneer biomass for bioethanol production and its scale-up.

    PubMed

    Koradiya, Manoj; Duggirala, Srinivas; Tipre, Devayani; Dave, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Based on one parameter at a time, saccharification of delignified sorghum biomass by 4% and 70% v/v sulfuric acid resulted in maximum 30.8 and 33.8 g% sugar production from biomass respectively. The Box Behnken Design was applied for further optimization of acid hydrolysis. As a result of the designed experiment 36.3g% sugar production was achieved when 3% v/v H2SO4 treatment given for 60 min at 180°C. The process was scaled-up to treat 2 kg of biomass. During the screening of yeast cultures, isolate C, MK-I and N were found to be potent ethanol producers from sorghum hydrolyzate. Culture MK-I was the best so used for scale up of ethanol production up to 25 L capacity, which gave a yield of 0.49 g ethanol/g sugar from hydrolyzate obtained from 2 kg of sorghum biomass.

  14. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation: challenges and prospects towards scaled-up production.

    PubMed

    RenNanqi; GuoWanqian; LiuBingfeng; CaoGuangli; DingJie

    2011-06-01

    Among different technologies of hydrogen production, bio-hydrogen production exhibits perhaps the greatest potential to replace fossil fuels. Based on recent research on dark fermentative hydrogen production, this article reviews the following aspects towards scaled-up application of this technology: bioreactor development and parameter optimization, process modeling and simulation, exploitation of cheaper raw materials and combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation. Bioreactors are necessary for dark-fermentation hydrogen production, so the design of reactor type and optimization of parameters are essential. Process modeling and simulation can help engineers design and optimize large-scale systems and operations. Use of cheaper raw materials will surely accelerate the pace of scaled-up production of biological hydrogen. And finally, combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation holds considerable promise, and has successfully achieved maximum overall hydrogen yield from a single substrate. Future development of bio-hydrogen production will also be discussed.

  15. From Project to Program: Tupange's Experience with Scaling Up Family Planning Interventions in Urban Kenya.

    PubMed

    Keyonzo, Nelson; Nyachae, Paul; Kagwe, Peter; Kilonzo, Margaret; Mumba, Feddis; Owino, Kenneth; Kichamu, George; Kigen, Bartilol; Fajans, Peter; Ghiron, Laura; Simmons, Ruth

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative in Kenya, the Tupange Project (2010-2015), successfully applied the ExpandNet approach to sustainably scale up family planning interventions, first in Machakos and Kakamega, and subsequently also in its three core cities, Nairobi, Kisumu and Mombasa. This new focus meant shifting from a "project" to a "program" approach, which required paying attention to government leadership and ownership, limiting external inputs, institutionalizing interventions in existing structures and emphasizing sustainability. The paper also highlights the project's efforts to prepare for the future scale up of Tupange's interventions in other counties to support continuing and improved access to family planning services in the new context of devolution (decentralization) in Kenya.

  16. Decline in national tuberculosis notifications with national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kanyerere, H; Mganga, A; Harries, A D; Tayler-Smith, K; Jahn, A; Chimbwandira, F M; Mpunga, J

    2014-06-21

    From 2000 to 2012, Malawi scaled up antiretroviral therapy (ART) from <3000 to 404 905 persons living with HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome), representing an ART coverage of 40.6% among those living with HIV. During this time, annual tuberculosis (TB) notifications declined by 28%, from 28 234 to 20 463. Percentage declines in annual TB case notifications were as follows: new TB (26%), recurrent TB (40%), new smear-positive pulmonary TB (19%), new smear-negative pulmonary TB (42%), extra-pulmonary TB (19%), HIV-positive TB (30%) and HIV-negative TB (10%). The decline in TB notifications is associated with ART scale-up, supporting its value in controlling TB in high HIV prevalence areas in sub-Saharan Africa.

  17. Scale-up and economic analysis of biodiesel production from municipal primary sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Olkiewicz, Magdalena; Torres, Carmen M; Jiménez, Laureano; Font, Josep; Bengoa, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Municipal wastewater sludge is a promising lipid feedstock for biodiesel production, but the need to eliminate the high water content before lipid extraction is the main limitation for scaling up. This study evaluates the economic feasibility of biodiesel production directly from liquid primary sludge based on experimental data at laboratory scale. Computational tools were used for the modelling of the process scale-up and the different configurations of lipid extraction to optimise this step, as it is the most expensive. The operational variables with a major influence in the cost were the extraction time and the amount of solvent. The optimised extraction process had a break-even price of biodiesel of 1232 $/t, being economically competitive with the current cost of fossil diesel. The proposed biodiesel production process from waste sludge eliminates the expensive step of sludge drying, lowering the biodiesel price.

  18. Pore-Water Extraction Scale-Up Study for the SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Last, George V.; Lanigan, David C.

    2013-01-15

    The phenomena related to pore-water extraction from unsaturated sediments have been previously examined with limited laboratory experiments and numerical modeling. However, key scale-up issues have not yet been addressed. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling were conducted to specifically examine pore-water extraction for sediment conditions relevant to the vadose zone beneath the SX Tank Farm at Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Available SX Tank Farm data were evaluated to generate a conceptual model of the subsurface for a targeted pore-water extraction application in areas with elevated moisture and Tc-99 concentration. The hydraulic properties of the types of porous media representative of the SX Tank Farm target application were determined using sediment mixtures prepared in the laboratory based on available borehole sediment particle size data. Numerical modeling was used as an evaluation tool for scale-up of pore-water extraction for targeted field applications.

  19. Scale Up of Extended Thin Film Electrocatalyst Structures (ETFECS) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight discusses how NREL synthesized >1 gram of platinum ETFECS (nanotubes) for use as novel fuel cell catalysts. These materials represent the cumulative yield of four individual batch syntheses (each >250 milligrams yield). By producing these materials at gram quantity, NREL has shown the viability of scale up and produced sufficient material to allow further validation of properties, as well as in-depth electrode optimization and fuel cell testing.

  20. CYMIC{reg_sign} -- Boiler scale-up and full scale demonstration experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Kokko, A.; Karvinen, R.; Ahlstedt, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the CYMIC boiler scale-up principles, first full scale experiences from demonstration plant and results from mathematical modelling of the cyclones. CYMIC pilot testing was successfully completed with very positive results, the next step was a CYMIC scale-up and full scale demonstration. The 30 MWth demonstration plant was commissioned during the fall of 1994. The plant is owned by VAPO Oy and it is in the city of Lieksa, eastern Finland. The CYMIC has been scaled up by developing six different cyclones and the multiplication system to cover the capacity range from 30 to 600 MWth. The design of this CYMIC series and the first sold industrial scale CYMIC are presented in the paper. The scale-up of the cyclone was mathematically modelled by Professor Karvinen and his group at Tampere University of Technology. The model which uses Sflow-code was tested and the parameters were set using the pilot test results. The model operated well, so three bigger cyclones were calculated. The first was the cyclone for the Lieksa plant and the other two were bigger standard cyclones. Particles were also included in the model. The variables in the calculations were the cyclone diameter, inlet vane shape and position. Commissioning of the Lieksa plant began in August 1994. The process including operation of the cyclone and the gaslock were then verified at full scale. Flue gas emissions, the combustion efficiency and the performance of the cyclone were also measured. This paper discuss the most interesting results of the measurements.

  1. Mainstreaming nutrition into maternal and child health programmes: scaling up of exclusive breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Nita; Kabir, A K M Iqbal; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2008-04-01

    Interventions to promote exclusive breastfeeding have been estimated to have the potential to prevent 13% of all under-5 deaths in developing countries and are the single most important preventive intervention against child mortality. According to World Health Organization and United Nations Children Funds (UNICEF), only 39% infants are exclusively breastfed for less than 4 months. This review examines programme efforts to scale up exclusive breastfeeding in different countries and draws lesson for successful scale-up. Opportunities and challenges in scaling up of exclusive breastfeeding into Maternal and Child Health programmes are identified. The key processes required for exclusive breastfeeding scale-up are: (1) an evidence-based policy and science-driven technical guidelines; and (2) an implementation strategy and plan for achieving high exclusive breastfeeding rates in all strata of society, on a sustainable basis. Factors related to success include political will, strong advocacy, enabling policies, well-defined short- and long-term programme strategy, sustained financial support, clear definition of roles of multiple stakeholders and emphasis on delivery at the community level. Effective use of antenatal, birth and post-natal contacts at homes and through community mobilization efforts is emphasized. Formative research to ensure appropriate intervention design and delivery is critical particularly in areas with high HIV prevalence. Strong communication strategy and support, quality trainers and training contributed significantly to programme success. Monitoring and evaluation with feedback systems that allow for periodic programme corrections and continued innovation are central to very high coverage. Legal framework must make it possible for mothers to exclusively breastfeed for at least 4 months. Sustained programme efforts are critical to achieve high coverage and this requires strong national- and state-level leadership.

  2. Scaling up functional traits for ecosystem services with remote sensing: concepts and methods.

    PubMed

    Abelleira Martínez, Oscar J; Fremier, Alexander K; Günter, Sven; Ramos Bendaña, Zayra; Vierling, Lee; Galbraith, Sara M; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A; Ordoñez, Jenny C

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem service-based management requires an accurate understanding of how human modification influences ecosystem processes and these relationships are most accurate when based on functional traits. Although trait variation is typically sampled at local scales, remote sensing methods can facilitate scaling up trait variation to regional scales needed for ecosystem service management. We review concepts and methods for scaling up plant and animal functional traits from local to regional spatial scales with the goal of assessing impacts of human modification on ecosystem processes and services. We focus our objectives on considerations and approaches for (1) conducting local plot-level sampling of trait variation and (2) scaling up trait variation to regional spatial scales using remotely sensed data. We show that sampling methods for scaling up traits need to account for the modification of trait variation due to land cover change and species introductions. Sampling intraspecific variation, stratification by land cover type or landscape context, or inference of traits from published sources may be necessary depending on the traits of interest. Passive and active remote sensing are useful for mapping plant phenological, chemical, and structural traits. Combining these methods can significantly improve their capacity for mapping plant trait variation. These methods can also be used to map landscape and vegetation structure in order to infer animal trait variation. Due to high context dependency, relationships between trait variation and remotely sensed data are not directly transferable across regions. We end our review with a brief synthesis of issues to consider and outlook for the development of these approaches. Research that relates typical functional trait metrics, such as the community-weighted mean, with remote sensing data and that relates variation in traits that cannot be remotely sensed to other proxies is needed. Our review narrows the gap between

  3. Moving from a project to programmatic response: scaling up harm reduction in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anindya; Sharma, Mukta

    2010-03-01

    The response to the HIV epidemics among people who inject drugs in Asia began to emerge in the early to mid 1990s, with the rather hesitant implementation of small-scale needle syringe programmes and community care initiatives aiming to support those who were already living with the virus. Since then Asia has seen a significant scaling up of harm reduction, despite very limited resources and difficult policy and legislative environments. One of the major reasons this has happened, is the utilisation of programme based approaches and the firm entrenchment of harm reduction thinking within national HIV/AIDS programmes and strategic plans--in most cases aided by multilateral and bilateral donors. Several models of scale up have been noted in Asia. The transition away from project based approaches, while on the whole positive, can also have a negative impact if the involvement of civil society and a client focussed approach is not protected. Also there are implications for which models of capacity building can be systematised for ongoing scale up. Most crucially, the tensions between drug policy, human rights and public health policies need to be resolved if harm reduction services are to be made available to the millions in Asia who are still unable to access these services.

  4. Innovate Use of SCALE-UP for Teaching General Education Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Luke; Rogers, M.

    2006-12-01

    Current development at Ithaca College is focused on transforming our general education astronomy courses from lecture-based into hands-on, active-learning courses by using the SCALE-UP model. SCALE-UP (Student Centered Activities for Large Enrollment University Physics) pioneered at North Carolina State University expands the successes of Studio Physics (developed at RPI) to large enrollment courses. Studio Physics does away with the usual lecture/recitation/laboratory sessions by having one dynamic, active-learning environment for approximately 40 students. SCALE-UP expands this model to accommodate 100+ students by using large round tables usually seating nine students who work in groups of three. Classes meet three times per week with each class blending lecture, hands-on activities, group problem solving, and the use of student polling devices. It is expected that this mode of teaching astronomy will lead to a better understanding of astronomy and the nature of science. We just finished renovating two existing classrooms and two storerooms to create a 99-seat active learning room. This poster will present the steps we took from initial planning meetings to our current curriculum development stage. We will highlight how we obtained administration buy-in, obtained funding, and planned the renovation with our facilities staff. We will also present our plans for curriculum development and assessment of our efforts.

  5. Scale-up of nature’s tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Joanna L.; Knothe, Lillian E.; Whan, Renee M.; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L. Knothe

    2017-01-01

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently “smart” material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues’ biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials. PMID:28074876

  6. Theoretical and Practical Issues That Are Relevant When Scaling Up hMSC Microcarrier Production Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jossen, Valentin; Schirmer, Cedric; Mostafa Sindi, Dolman; Eibl, Regine; Kraume, Matthias; Pörtner, Ralf; Eibl, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for allogeneic cell therapies has created a large amount of interest. However, this presupposes the availability of efficient scale-up procedures. Promising results have been reported for stirred bioreactors that operate with microcarriers. Recent publications focusing on microcarrier-based stirred bioreactors have demonstrated the successful use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and suspension criteria (NS1u, NS1) for rapidly scaling up hMSC expansions from mL- to pilot scale. Nevertheless, one obstacle may be the formation of large microcarrier-cell-aggregates, which may result in mass transfer limitations and inhomogeneous distributions of stem cells in the culture broth. The dependence of microcarrier-cell-aggregate formation on impeller speed and shear stress levels was investigated for human adipose derived stromal/stem cells (hASCs) at the spinner scale by recording the Sauter mean diameter (d32) versus time. Cultivation at the suspension criteria provided d32 values between 0.2 and 0.7 mm, the highest cell densities (1.25 × 106 cells mL−1 hASCs), and the highest expansion factors (117.0 ± 4.7 on day 7), while maintaining the expression of specific surface markers. Furthermore, suitability of the suspension criterion NS1u was investigated for scaling up microcarrier-based processes in wave-mixed bioreactors for the first time. PMID:26981131

  7. Nurse Family Partnership: Comparing Costs per Family in Randomized Trials Versus Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R; Hendrie, Delia

    2015-12-01

    The literature that addresses cost differences between randomized trials and full-scale replications is quite sparse. This paper examines how costs differed among three randomized trials and six statewide scale-ups of nurse family partnership (NFP) intensive home visitation to low income first-time mothers. A literature review provided data on pertinent trials. At our request, six well-established programs reported their total expenditures. We adjusted the costs to national prices based on mean hourly wages for registered nurses and then inflated them to 2010 dollars. A centralized data system provided utilization. Replications had fewer home visits per family than trials (25 vs. 31, p = .05), lower costs per client ($8860 vs. $12,398, p = .01), and lower costs per visit ($354 vs. $400, p = .30). Sample size limited the significance of these differences. In this type of labor intensive program, costs probably were lower in scale-up than in randomized trials. Key cost drivers were attrition and the stable caseload size possible in an ongoing program. Our estimates reveal a wide variation in cost per visit across six state programs, which suggests that those planning replications should not expect a simple rule to guide cost estimations for scale-ups. Nevertheless, NFP replications probably achieved some economies of scale.

  8. Scale-up of nature’s tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Joanna L.; Knothe, Lillian E.; Whan, Renee M.; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L. Knothe

    2017-01-01

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently “smart” material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues’ biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials.

  9. Nurse Family Partnership: Comparing Costs per Family in Randomized Trials versus Scale-up

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.; Hendrie, Delia

    2015-01-01

    The literature that addresses cost differences between randomized trials and full-scale replications is quite sparse. This paper examines how costs differed among three randomized trials and six statewide scale-ups of Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) intensive home visitation to low income first-time mothers. A literature review provided data on pertinent trials. At our request, six well-established programs reported their total expenditures. We adjusted the costs to national prices based on mean hourly wages for registered nurses and then inflated them to 2010 dollars. A centralized data system provided utilization. Replications had fewer home visits per family than trials (25 vs. 31, p = .05), lower costs per client ($8,860 vs. $12,398, p = .01), and lower costs per visit ($354 vs. $400, p = .30). Sample size limited the significance of these differences. In this type of labor intensive program, costs probably were lower in scale-up than in randomized trials. Key cost drivers were attrition and the stable caseload size possible in an ongoing program. Our estimates reveal a wide variation in cost per visit across six state programs, which suggests that those planning replications should not expect a simple rule to guide cost estimations for scale-ups. Nevertheless, NFP replications probably achieved some economies of scale. PMID:26507844

  10. Scale-up of nature's tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials.

    PubMed

    Ng, Joanna L; Knothe, Lillian E; Whan, Renee M; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L Knothe

    2017-01-11

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently "smart" material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues' biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials.

  11. HIV testing as prevention among MSM in China: the business of scaling-up.

    PubMed

    Fan, Elsa L

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the emergence of goumai fuwu, or contracting with social organisations to provide social services, in the HIV/AIDS sector in China. In particular, I interrogate the outsourcing of HIV testing to community-based organisations (CBOs) serving men who have sex with men (MSM) as a means of scaling-up testing in this population, and how the commodification of testing enables new forms of surveillance and citizenship to emerge. In turn, I tie the scaling-up of testing and its commodification to the sustainability of CBOs as they struggle to survive. In recent years, the HIV/AIDS response in China has shifted to expanding testing among MSM in order to reduce new infections. This response has been catalysed by the transition to sexual contact as the primary transmission route for HIV and the rising rates of infection among MSM, leading government institutions and international donors to mobilise CBOs to expand testing. These efforts to scale-up are as much about testing as they are about making visible this hidden population. CBOs, in facilitating testing, come to rely on outsourcing as a long-term funding base and in doing so, unintentionally extend the reach of the state into the everyday lives of MSM.

  12. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  13. Specimen Referral Network to Rapidly Scale-Up CD4 Testing: The Hub and Spoke Model for Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Frantz Jean; Osborne, Anna Janick; Elias, Viala Jean; Buteau, Josiane; Boncy, Jacques; Elong, Angela; Dismer, Amber; Sasi, Vikram; Domercant, Jean Wysler; Lauture, Daniel; Balajee, S Arunmozhi; Marston, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Regular and quality CD4 testing is essential to monitor disease progression in people living with HIV. In Haiti, most laboratories have limited infrastructure and financial resources and have relied on manual laboratory techniques. We report the successful implementation of a national specimen referral network to rapidly increase patient coverage with quality CD4 testing while at the same time building infrastructure for referral of additional sample types over time. Method Following a thorough baseline analysis of facilities, expected workload, patient volumes, cost of technology and infrastructure constraints at health institutions providing care to HIV patients, the Haitian National Public Health Laboratory designed and implemented a national specimen referral network. The specimen referral network was scaled up in a step-wise manner from July 2011 to July 2014. Results Fourteen hubs serving a total of 67 healthcare facilities have been launched; in addition, 10 healthcare facilities operate FACSCount machines, 21 laboratories operate PIMA machines, and 11 healthcare facilities are still using manual CD4 tests. The number of health institutions able to access automated CD4 testing has increased from 27 to 113 (315%). Testing volume increased 76% on average. The number of patients enrolled on ART at the first healthcare facilities to join the network increased 182% within 6 months following linkage to the network. Performance on external quality assessment was acceptable at all 14 hubs. Conclusion A specimen referral network has enabled rapid uptake of quality CD4 testing, and served as a backbone to allow for other future tests to be scaled-up in a similar way. PMID:26900489

  14. Implementation of legal abortion in Nepal: a model for rapid scale-up of high-quality care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Unsafe abortion's significant contribution to maternal mortality and morbidity was a critical factor leading to liberalization of Nepal's restrictive abortion law in 2002. Careful, comprehensive planning among a range of multisectoral stakeholders, led by Nepal's Ministry of Health and Population, enabled the country subsequently to introduce and scale up safe abortion services in a remarkably short timeframe. This paper examines factors that contributed to rapid, successful implementation of legal abortion in this mountainous republic, including deliberate attention to the key areas of policy, health system capacity, equipment and supplies, and information dissemination. Important elements of this successful model of scaling up safe legal abortion include: the pre-existence of postabortion care services, through which health-care providers were already familiar with the main clinical technique for safe abortion; government leadership in coordinating complementary contributions from a wide range of public- and private-sector actors; reliance on public-health evidence in formulating policies governing abortion provision, which led to the embrace of medical abortion and authorization of midlevel providers as key strategies for decentralizing care; and integration of abortion care into existing Safe Motherhood and the broader health system. While challenges remain in ensuring that all Nepali women can readily exercise their legal right to early pregnancy termination, the national safe abortion program has already yielded strong positive results. Nepal's experience making high-quality abortion care widely accessible in a short period of time offers important lessons for other countries seeking to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity from unsafe abortion and to achieve Millennium Development Goals. PMID:22475782

  15. Discrete element method based scale-up model for material synthesis using ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanam, Priya Radhi

    Mechanical milling is a widely used technique for powder processing in various areas. In this work, a scale-up model for describing this ball milling process is developed. The thesis is a combination of experimental and modeling efforts. Initially, Discrete Element Model (DEM) is used to describe energy transfer from milling tools to the milled powder for shaker, planetary, and attritor mills. The rolling and static friction coefficients are determined experimentally. Computations predict a quasisteady rate of energy dissipation, E d, for each experimental configuration. It is proposed that the milling dose defined as a product of Ed and milling time, t, divided by the mass of milled powder, mp characterizes the milling progress independently of the milling device or milling conditions used. Once the milling dose is determined for one experimental configuration, it can be used to predict the milling time required to prepare the same material in any milling configuration, for which Ed is calculated. The concept is validated experimentally for DEM describing planetary and shaker mills. For attritor, the predicted Ed includes substantial contribution from milling tool interaction events with abnormally high forces (>103 N). The energy in such events is likely dissipated to heat or plastically deform milling tools rather than refine material. Indeed, DEM predictions for the attritor correlate with experiments when such events are ignored in the analysis. With an objective of obtaining real-time indicators of milling progress, power, torque, and rotation speed of the impeller of an attritor mill are measured during preparation of metal matrix composite powders in the subsequent portion of this thesis. Two material systems are selected and comparisons made between in-situ parameters and experimental milling progress indicators. It is established that real-time measurements can certainly be used to describe milling progress. However, they need to be interpreted carefully

  16. Formative evaluation of antiretroviral therapy scale-up efficiency in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Glenn; Ryan, Gery; Taylor, Stephanie

    2007-11-01

    With millions in need of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the developing world, and scarce human and fiscal resources available, we conducted a formative evaluation of scale-up operations at clinics associated with AIDS Healthcare Foundation in Africa to identify lessons learned for improving scale-up efficiency. Site visits were made to six selected clinics in Uganda, Zambia, and South Africa, during which semistructured interviews with key stake-holders and observation of client flows and clinic operations were performed. This evaluation revealed the following lessons related to factors that are critical to efficient ART scale-up: (1) to ensure steady ART uptake, it is important to involve the community and community leaders in outreach, HIV education, and program decision-making; (2) minimizing bottlenecks to smooth patient flow requires efficient staff allocation to appropriate clinical duties, streamlined clinic visit schedule protocols, and tapping clients and the HIV community as a key source of labor; (3) to minimize clients dropping out of care, structures should be developed that enable clients to provide support and a "safety net" for helping each other remain in care; (4) computerized record management systems are essential for accurate antiretroviral inventory and dispensing records, quality assurance monitoring, and client enrollment records and visit scheduling; (5) effective organizational management and human resource policies are essential to maintain high job performance and satisfaction and limit burnout; (6) to maximize impact on social and economic health, it is important for ART programs to develop effective mechanisms for coordinating and referring clients to support service organizations.

  17. Scale up and application of biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis in Enhanced Oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Amani, Hossein; Mehrnia, Mohammad Reza; Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Haghighi, Manouchehr; Soudi, Mohammad Reza

    2010-09-01

    There is a lack of fundamental knowledge about the scale up of biosurfactant production. In order to develop suitable technology of commercialization, carrying out tests in shake flasks and bioreactors was essential. A reactor with integrated foam collector was designed for biosurfactant production using Bacillus subtilis isolated from agricultural soil. The yield of biosurfactant on biomass (Y(p/x)), biosurfactant on sucrose (Y(p/s)), and the volumetric production rate (Y) for shake flask were obtained about 0.45 g g(-1), 0.18 g g(-1), and 0.03 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively. The best condition for bioreactor was 300 rpm and 1.5 vvm, giving Y(x/s), Y(p/x), Y(p/s), and Y of 0.42 g g(-1), 0.595 g g(-1), 0.25 g g(-1), and 0.057 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively. The biosurfactant maximum production, 2.5 g l(-1), was reached in 44 h of growth, which was 28% better than the shake flask. The obtained volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) values at optimum conditions in the shake flask and the bioreactor were found to be around 0.01 and 0.0117 s(-1), respectively. Comparison of K(L)a values at optimum conditions shows that biosurfactant production scaling up from shake flask to bioreactor can be done with K(L) a as scale up criterion very accurately. Nearly 8% of original oil in place was recovered using this biosurfactant after water flooding in the sand pack.

  18. Scaling-up the medical workforce in Timor-Leste: challenges of a great leap forward.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Jorge; Dussault, Gilles; Buchan, James; Ferrinho, Paulo

    2013-11-01

    The health services system of Timor-Leste (T-L) will, by 2015, add 800 physicians, most of them trained in Cuba, to the 233 employed by the national health system in 2010-2011. The need for more physicians is not in discussion: poor health indicators, low coverage and utilization of services, and poor quality of services are well documented in T-L. However, the choice of this scaling-up, with a relatively narrow focus on the medical workforce, needs to be assessed for its relevance to the health profile of the country, for its comprehensiveness in terms of other complementary measures needed to make it effective. This article discusses the potential effects of the rapid scaling-up of the medical workforce, and the organizational capacity needed to monitor the process and eventually mitigate any deleterious consequences. The analysis is based on a review of documentation collected on site (T-L) and on interviews with key-informants conducted in 2011. We stress that any workforce scaling-up is not simply a matter of increasing numbers of professionals, but should combine improved training, distribution, working conditions, management and motivation, as a means towards better performing health services' systems. This is a major challenge in a context of limited organizational and managerial capacity, underdeveloped information systems, limited training and research capacity, and dependency on foreign aid and technical assistance. Potential risks are associated with funding the additional costs of recruiting more personnel, associated expenditures on infrastructure, equipment and consumables, the impact on current staff mix, and the expected increased demand for services. We conclude that failing to manage effectively the forthcoming "great leap forward" will have long term effects: formal policies and plans for the balanced development of the health workforce, as well as strengthened institutions are urgently needed.

  19. Scale-up considerations relevant to experimental studies of nuclear waste-package behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, D.G.; Peters, R.D.

    1986-04-01

    Results from a study that investigated whether testing large-scale nuclear waste-package assemblages was technically warranted are reported. It was recognized that the majority of the investigations for predicting waste-package performance to date have relied primarily on laboratory-scale experimentation. However, methods for the successful extrapolation of the results from such experiments, both geometrically and over time, to actual repository conditions have not been well defined. Because a well-developed scaling technology exists in the chemical-engineering discipline, it was presupposed that much of this technology could be applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance. A review of existing literature documented numerous examples where a consideration of scaling technology was important. It was concluded that much of the existing scale-up technology is applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance for both size and time extrapolations and that conducting scale-up studies may be technically merited. However, the applicability for investigating the complex chemical interactions needs further development. It was recognized that the complexity of the system, and the long time periods involved, renders a completely theoretical approach to performance prediction almost hopeless. However, a theoretical and experimental study was defined for investigating heat and fluid flow. It was concluded that conducting scale-up modeling and experimentation for waste-package performance predictions is possible using existing technology. A sequential series of scaling studies, both theoretical and experimental, will be required to formulate size and time extrapolations of waste-package performance.

  20. Scaling Up Early Infant Male Circumcision: Lessons From the Kingdom of Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Laura; Benzerga, Wendy; Mirira, Munamato; Adamu, Tigistu; Shissler, Tracey; Bitchong, Raymond; Malaza, Mandla; Mamba, Makhosini; Mangara, Paul; Curran, Kelly; Khumalo, Thembisile; Mlambo, Phumzile; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel; Maziya, Vusi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The government of the Kingdom of Swaziland recognizes that it must urgently scale up HIV prevention interventions, such as voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). Swaziland has adopted a 2-phase approach to male circumcision scale-up. The catch-up phase prioritizes VMMC services for adolescents and adults, while the sustainability phase involves the establishment of early infant male circumcision (EIMC). Swaziland does not have a modern-day tradition of circumcision, and the VMMC program has met with client demand challenges. However, since the launch of the EIMC program in 2010, Swaziland now leads the Eastern and Southern Africa region in the scale-up of EIMC. Here we review Swaziland’s program and its successes and challenges. Methods: From February to May 2014, we collected data while preparing Swaziland’s “Male Circumcision Strategic and Operational Plan for HIV Prevention 2014–2018.” We conducted structured stakeholder focus group discussions and in-depth interviews, and we collected EIMC service delivery data from an implementing partner responsible for VMMC and EIMC service delivery. Data were summarized in consolidated narratives. Results: Between 2010 and 2014, trained providers performed more than 5,000 EIMCs in 11 health care facilities in Swaziland, and they reported no moderate or severe adverse events. According to a broad group of EIMC program stakeholders, an EIMC program needs robust support from facility, regional, and national leadership, both within and outside of HIV prevention coordination bodies, to promote institutionalization and ownership. Providers and health care managers in 3 of Swaziland’s 4 regional hospitals suggest that when EIMC is introduced into reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health platforms, dedicated staff attention can help ensure that EIMC is performed amid competing priorities. Creating informed demand from communities also supports EIMC as a service delivery priority

  1. Recommendations for scale-up of community-based misoprostol distribution programs.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nuriya; Kapungu, Chisina; Carnahan, Leslie; Geller, Stacie

    2014-06-01

    Community-based distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in resource-poor settings has been shown to be safe and effective. However, global recommendations for prenatal distribution and monitoring within a community setting are not yet available. In order to successfully translate misoprostol and PPH research into policy and practice, several critical points must be considered. A focus on engaging the community, emphasizing the safe nature of community-based misoprostol distribution, supply chain management, effective distribution, coverage, and monitoring plans are essential elements to community-based misoprostol program introduction, expansion, or scale-up.

  2. Scale-Up of a Titanium Carbonitride Coating System for Titanium Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    7J A09 25 pRATT AND HTNY AIRCRAFT GROUP WEST PALM BEACH FL 6-ETC F/6 116 SCALER OF A TITANIUM CARBONITRIDE COATING SYSTM FOR TITANIUN--ETC(U) JUL 80...on parts coated in the new reactor. DD OAN1 1473 to, TI0N of, I Nov6Go Is OBSOL.ETE Unclassified S N 002- L.01.t 6601SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Of THIS...alloy parts . DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION PARAMETER DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SCALED-UP, HOT-WALL REACTOR The reactor design and construction, and the

  3. Advanced modeling to accelerate the scale up of carbon capture technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Sun, XIN; Storlie, Curtis B.; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-01

    In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale-up new carbon capture technologies. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  4. An integrated health sector response to violence against women in Malaysia: lessons for supporting scale up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaysia has been at the forefront of the development and scale up of One-Stop Crisis Centres (OSCC) - an integrated health sector model that provides comprehensive care to women and children experiencing physical, emotional and sexual abuse. This study explored the strengths and challenges faced during the scaling up of the OSCC model to two States in Malaysia in order to identify lessons for supporting successful scale-up. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with health care providers, policy makers and key informants in 7 hospital facilities. This was complemented by a document analysis of hospital records and protocols. Data were coded and analysed using NVivo 7. Results The implementation of the OSCC model differed between hospital settings, with practise being influenced by organisational systems and constraints. Health providers generally tried to offer care to abused women, but they are not fully supported within their facility due to lack of training, time constraints, limited allocated budget, or lack of referral system to external support services. Non-specialised hospitals in both States struggled with a scarcity of specialised staff and limited referral options for abused women. Despite these challenges, even in more resource-constrained settings staff who took the initiative found it was possible to adapt to provide some level of OSCC services, such as referring women to local NGOs or community support groups, or training nurses to offer basic counselling. Conclusions The national implementation of OSCC provides a potentially important source of support for women experiencing violence. Our findings confirm that pilot interventions for health sector responses to gender based violence can be scaled up only when there is a sound health infrastructure in place – in other words a supportive health system. Furthermore, the successful replication of the OSCC model in other similar settings requires that the model – and the system

  5. 78 FR 32381 - Applications for New Awards, Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale-up and Validation Grants...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Applications for New Awards, Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale- up and Validation Grants; Correction AGENCY... Scale-up and Validation grants (78 FR 25977) and (78 FR 25990). The NIAs inadvertently omitted part of... level of scale) on a relevant outcome (as defined in this notice). The grantee must make...

  6. Principles for Scaling Up: Choosing, Measuring Effects, and Promoting the Widespread Use of Educational Innovation. CSE Report 634

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of scaling up of educational innovation is to produce robust, effective, replicable outcomes. This report addresses requirements to support scale-up of scientifically vetted innovation (or new ideas that are built on the findings of quality research and development). In this report, a number of issues are considered: the context of…

  7. Permeability of cork to gases.

    PubMed

    Faria, David P; Fonseca, Ana L; Pereira, Helen; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2011-04-27

    The permeability of gases through uncompressed cork was investigated. More than 100 samples were assessed from different plank qualities to provide a picture of the permeability distribution. A novel technique based on a mass spectrometer leak detector was used to directly measure the helium flow through the central area of small disks 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick. The permeability for nitrogen, oxygen, and other gases was measured by the pressure rise technique. Boiled and nonboiled cork samples from different sections were evaluated. An asymmetric frequency distribution ranging 3 orders of magnitude (roughly from 1 to 1000 μmol/(cm·atm·day)) for selected samples without macroscopic defects was found, having a peak below 100 μmol/(cm·atm·day). Correlation was found between density and permeability: higher density samples tend to show lower permeability. However, boiled cork showed a mean lower permeability despite having a lower density. The transport mechanism of gases through cork was also examined. Calculations suggest that gases permeate uncompressed cork mainly through small channels between cells under a molecular flow regime. The diameter of such channels was estimated to be in the range of 100 nm, in agreement with the plasmodesmata size in the cork cell walls.

  8. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  9. Nano-emulsions prepared by the phase inversion composition method: preparation variables and scale up.

    PubMed

    Solè, Isabel; Pey, Carmen M; Maestro, Alicia; González, Carmen; Porras, Montserrat; Solans, Conxita; Gutiérrez, José M

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this work is to study, through experimental design, the effect of vessel geometry and scale-up in the properties of nano-emulsions prepared through the phase inversion composition method (PIC). Results show that a proper mixing is crucial for small droplet-sized nano-emulsions, especially when remaining free oil is found together with the key liquid crystal phase formed during the emulsification process. In these cases, mixing must be near the perfect mixed model. Proper geometries must be selected to promote a good mixture. Small addition rates V(ad) and high mixing rates omega promote the necessary mixing level. However, results indicate that, if free oil remains together with liquid crystal formed during emulsification, a too high omega could promote coalescence of oil droplets. When a cubic liquid crystal phase Pm3n is formed instead during emulsification, without free oil, coalescence is not promoted, probably due to the extremely high viscosity. For the system where Pm3n is formed during emulsification, scale-up cannot be done, as it would be expected, maintaining adimensional variables--Reynolds, Re, and adimensional time. A perfect correspondence between scales is observed when the total addition time and the lineal mixing rate are maintained between scales instead. Re, i.e. the ratio between inertial and viscous forces, does not seem adequate to describe the system, as inertial forces are worthless due to the extremely high viscosity.

  10. Commercial scale validation of a process scale-up model for lubricant blending of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Joseph; Schlack, Holger

    2014-11-20

    An experimental study was conducted to verify that lubrication mixing in commercial-scale bin blenders can be described by a previously-reported lubrication blending process scale-up model. Specifically, the mixing of two placebo formulations (2:1 MCC:lactose, and 2:1 MCC:DCP) with 1% magnesium stearate in 100, 400, and 2000 L bin blenders at 30% and 70% blend fill levels for several extents of lubricant mixing was examined. The lubricated powder blends were assessed for bulk/tapped density and powder flow, as measured by Hausner's ratio. The blends were then compressed into tablets and evaluated for tensile strength, friability, and disintegration. It was observed that the lubrication rate constant, γ, for tablet tensile strength and for bulk specific volume were similar. Furthermore, powder flow, as measured by Hausner's ratio, improved with increased extent of lubrication. Tablet disintegration and tablet friability were both minimally affected as a result of extended lubrication for the placebos blends evaluated in this study. The results of this study confirm that the lubrication mixing model can be applied to scale-up the lubrication blending process from batches made in 30 mL bottle blenders to batches made in 2000 L bin blenders, which is a range of nearly five orders of magnitude.

  11. Scale-up from batch to flow-through wet milling process for injectable depot formulation.

    PubMed

    Lehocký, Róbert; Pěček, Daniel; Štěpánek, František

    2016-12-01

    Injectable depot formulations are aimed at providing long-term sustained release of a drug into systemic circulation, thus reducing plasma level fluctuations and improving patient compliance. The particle size distribution of the formulation in the form of suspension is a key parameter that controls the release rate. In this work, the process of wet stirred media milling (ball milling) of a poorly water-soluble substance has been investigated with two main aims: (i) to determine the parametric sensitivity of milling kinetics; and (ii) to develop scale-up methodology for process transfer from batch to flow-through arrangement. Ball milling experiments were performed in two types of ball mills, a batch mill with a 30ml maximum working volume, and a flow-through mill with a 250ml maximum working volume. Milling parameters were investigated in detail by methodologies of QbD to map the parametric space. Specifically, the effects of ball size, ball fill level, and rpm on the particle breakage kinetics were systematically investigated at both mills, with an additional parameter (flow-rate) in the case of the flow-through mill. The breakage rate was found to follow power-law kinetics with respect to dimensionless time, with an asymptotic d50 particle size in the range of 200-300nm. In the case of the flow-through mill, the number of theoretical passes through the mill was found to be an important scale-up parameter.

  12. Scale-up of hydrophobin-assisted recombinant protein production in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Lauri J; Bailey, Michael J; Joensuu, Jussi J; Ritala, Anneli

    2014-05-01

    Plant suspension cell cultures are emerging as an alternative to mammalian cells for production of complex recombinant proteins. Plant cell cultures provide low production cost, intrinsic safety and adherence to current regulations, but low yields and costly purification technology hinder their commercialization. Fungal hydrophobins have been utilized as fusion tags to improve yields and facilitate efficient low-cost purification by surfactant-based aqueous two-phase separation (ATPS) in plant, fungal and insect cells. In this work, we report the utilization of hydrophobin fusion technology in tobacco bright yellow 2 (BY-2) suspension cell platform and the establishment of pilot-scale propagation and downstream processing including first-step purification by ATPS. Green fluorescent protein-hydrophobin fusion (GFP-HFBI) induced the formation of protein bodies in tobacco suspension cells, thus encapsulating the fusion protein into discrete compartments. Cultivation of the BY-2 suspension cells was scaled up in standard stirred tank bioreactors up to 600 L production volume, with no apparent change in growth kinetics. Subsequently, ATPS was applied to selectively capture the GFP-HFBI product from crude cell lysate, resulting in threefold concentration, good purity and up to 60% recovery. The ATPS was scaled up to 20 L volume, without loss off efficiency. This study provides the first proof of concept for large-scale hydrophobin-assisted production of recombinant proteins in tobacco BY-2 cell suspensions.

  13. Volumetric scale-up of a three stage fermentation system for food waste treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kon; Han, Gui Hwan; Oh, Baek Rock; Chun, Young Nam; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kim, Si Wouk

    2008-07-01

    In this study, a volumetric scale-up of this system was designed and built on a field pilot-scale (total digester volume 10 m(3)), with the results from the field pilot-scale experiments compared with those from the bench-scale (total digester volume 0.4 m(3)) process prior to scale-up. The reduction rate of total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) and the maximum methane content produced in the biogas from the bench-scale system were 90.6% and 72%; whereas those from the field pilot-scale system were 90.1% and 68%, respectively. The estimated methane yields were 282 and 254 l CH(4)/kg tCOD(degraded) in bench and field pilot-scale fermentation systems, respectively. These results indicate that the three stage fermentation system developed in this study can be applied as a commercial process for the disposal of food waste in view of process stability.

  14. Biohydrogen production from microalgal biomass: energy requirement, CO2 emissions and scale-up scenarios.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana F; Ortigueira, Joana; Alves, Luís; Gouveia, Luísa; Moura, Patrícia; Silva, Carla

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a life cycle inventory of biohydrogen production by Clostridium butyricum through the fermentation of the whole Scenedesmus obliquus biomass. The main purpose of this work was to determine the energy consumption and CO2 emissions during the production of hydrogen. This was accomplished through the fermentation of the microalgal biomass cultivated in an outdoor raceway pond and the preparation of the inoculum and culture media. The scale-up scenarios are discussed aiming for a potential application to a fuel cell hybrid taxi fleet. The H2 yield obtained was 7.3 g H2/kg of S. obliquus dried biomass. The results show that the production of biohydrogen required 71-100 MJ/MJ(H2) and emitted about 5-6 kg CO2/MJ(H2). Other studies and production technologies were taken into account to discuss an eventual process scale-up. Increased production rates of microalgal biomass and biohydrogen are necessary for bioH2 to become competitive with conventional production pathways.

  15. Why did the scale-up of HIV treatment work? A case example from Malawi.

    PubMed

    Harries, Anthony D; Makombe, Simon D; Libamba, Edwin; Schouten, Erik J

    2011-08-01

    The national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi is based on a public health approach, with principles and practices borrowed from the successful DOTS (directly observed treatment short course-the system used to successfully deliver antituberculosis treatment to people in some of the poorest countries of the world) tuberculosis control framework. During the first 6 years, the number of patients registered on treatment increased from 3000 to >350,000 in both the public and private sectors. The most important reasons for this success have been strong international and national leadership combined with adequate funds, a standardized approach to ART with practical guidelines, an approved national scale-up plan with clear, time-bound milestones; investment in an intensive program of training and accreditation of ART sites, quarterly supervision and monitoring of ART and operational research, rational drug forecasting and no stock-outs of drugs during the first few years, and involvement of the private sector. The looming challenges of human resources, guaranteed financial support, better but also more expensive ART regimens, use of electronic medical records to monitor response to therapy, and attention to HIV prevention need to be met head-on and solved if the momentum of the earlier years is to be maintained.

  16. A practical approach for the scale-up of roller compaction process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weixian; Sprockel, Omar L

    2016-09-01

    An alternative approach for the scale-up of ribbon formation during roller compaction was investigated, which required only one batch at the commercial scale to set the operational conditions. The scale-up of ribbon formation was based on a probability method. It was sufficient in describing the mechanism of ribbon formation at both scales. In this method, a statistical relationship between roller compaction parameters and ribbon attributes (thickness and density) was first defined with DoE using a pilot Alexanderwerk WP120 roller compactor. While the milling speed was included in the design, it has no practical effect on granule properties within the study range despite its statistical significance. The statistical relationship was then adapted to a commercial Alexanderwerk WP200 roller compactor with one experimental run. The experimental run served as a calibration of the statistical model parameters. The proposed transfer method was then confirmed by conducting a mapping study on the Alexanderwerk WP200 using a factorial DoE, which showed a match between the predictions and the verification experiments. The study demonstrates the applicability of the roller compaction transfer method using the statistical model from the development scale calibrated with one experiment point at the commercial scale.

  17. Microbial electrolysis cell scale-up for combined wastewater treatment and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Gil-Carrera, L; Escapa, A; Mehta, P; Santoyo, G; Guiot, S R; Morán, A; Tartakovsky, B

    2013-02-01

    This study demonstrates microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) scale-up from a 50mL to a 10L cell. Initially, a 50mL membraneless MEC with a gas diffusion cathode was operated on synthetic wastewater at different organic loads. It was concluded that process scale-up might be best accomplished using a "reactor-in-series" concept. Consequently, 855mL and 10L MECs were built and operated. By optimizing the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the 855mL MEC and individually controlling the applied voltages of three anodic compartments with a real-time optimization algorithm, a COD removal of 5.7g L(R)(-1)d(-1) and a hydrogen production of 1.0-2.6L L(R)(-1)d(-1) was achieved. Furthermore, a two MECs in series 10L setup was constructed and operated on municipal wastewater. This test showed a COD removal rate of 0.5g L(R)(-1)d(-1), a removal efficiency of 60-76%, and an energy consumption of 0.9Whperg of COD removed.

  18. Scaling-up of complex whole-cell bioconversions in conventional and non-conventional media.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marco P C; de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Fernandes, Pedro

    2010-07-01

    The use of whole cells is becoming a more common approach in pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries in order to obtain pure compounds with fewer production steps, higher yields, and cleaner processes, as compared to those achieved with traditional strategies. Whole cells are often used as enzymes pools, in particular when multi-step reactions and/or co-factor regeneration are envisaged. Nonetheless, published information on the scale-up of such systems both in aqueous and in two-phase aqueous-organic systems is relatively scarce. The present work aims to evaluate suitable scale-up criteria in conventional and non-conventional medium for a whole-cell bioconversion that uses resting cells of Mycobacterium sp. NRRL B-3805 to cleave the side chain of beta-sitosterol, a poorly water-soluble substrate. The experiments were performed in 24-well microtiter plates and in 250 mL shaken flasks as orbital stirred systems, and in 300 mL stirred tanks as mechanically stirred systems. Results show that productivity yields were similar in all scales tested, when maintaining oxygen mass transfer coefficients constant in aqueous systems, or when maintaining constant volumetric power consumption in aqueous-organic two-phase systems.

  19. A technique for estimating one-dimensional diffusion coefficients in low-permeability sedimentary rock using X-ray radiography: comparison with through-diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Cavé, Lisa; Al, Tom; Xiang, Yan; Vilks, Peter

    2009-01-07

    The measurement of diffusive properties of low-permeability rocks is of interest to the nuclear power industry, which is considering the option of deep geologic repositories for management of radioactive waste. We present a simple, non-destructive, constant source in-diffusion method for estimating one-dimensional pore diffusion coefficients (D(p)) in geologic materials based on X-ray radiography. Changes in X-ray absorption coefficient (Deltamicro) are used to quantify changes in relative concentration (C/C(0)) of an X-ray attenuating iodide tracer as the tracer solution diffuses through the rock pores. Estimated values of D(p) are then obtained by fitting an analytical solution to the measured concentration profiles over time. Measurements on samples before and after saturation with iodide can also be used to determine iodide-accessible porosity (phi(I)). To evaluate the radiography method, results were compared with traditional steady-state through-diffusion measurements on two rock types: shale and limestone. Values of D(p) of (4.8+/-2.5)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) (mean+/-standard deviation) were measured for samples of Queenston Formation shale and (2.6+/-1.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for samples of Cobourg Formation limestone using the radiography method. The range of results for each rock type agree well with D(p) values of (4.6+/-2.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for shale and (3.5+/-1.8)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for limestone, calculated from through-diffusion experiments on adjacent rock samples. Low porosity (0.01 to 0.03) and heterogeneous distribution of porosity in the Cobourg Formation may be responsible for the slightly poorer agreement between radiography and through-diffusion results for limestones. Mean values of phi(I) for shales (0.060) and limestones (0.028) were close to mean porosity measurements made on bulk samples by the independent water loss technique (0.062 and 0.020 for shales and limestones, respectively). Radiography measurements offer the advantage of time

  20. Prediction of blood-brain barrier permeation of α-adrenergic and imidazoline receptor ligands using PAMPA technique and quantitative-structure permeability relationship analysis.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Jelica; Nikolic, Katarina; Dobričić, Vladimir; Agbaba, Danica

    2015-02-20

    Imidazoline receptor ligands are a numerous family of biologically active compounds known to produce central hypotensive effect by interaction with both α2-adrenoreceptors (α2-AR) and imidazoline receptors (IRs). Recent hypotheses connect those ligands with several neurological disorders. Therefore some IRs ligands are examined as novel centrally acting antihypertensives and drug candidates for treatment of various neurological diseases. Effective Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) permeability (P(e)) of 18 IRs/α-ARs ligands and 22 Central Nervous System (CNS) drugs was experimentally determined using Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA) and studied by the Quantitative-Structure-Permeability Relationship (QSPR) methodology. The dominant molecules/cations species of compounds have been calculated at pH = 7.4. The analyzed ligands were optimized using Density Functional Theory (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)) included in ChemBio3D Ultra 13.0 program and molecule descriptors for optimized compounds were calculated using ChemBio3D Ultra 13.0, Dragon 6.0 and ADMET predictor 6.5 software. Effective permeability of compounds was used as dependent variable (Y), while calculated molecular parametres were used as independent variables (X) in the QSPR study. SIMCA P+ 12.0 was used for Partial Least Square (PLS) analysis, while the stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) modeling were performed using STASTICA Neural Networks 4.0. Predictive potential of the formed models was confirmed by Leave-One-Out Cross- and external-validation and the most reliable models were selected. The descriptors that are important for model building are identified as well as their influence on BBB permeability. Results of the QSPR studies could be used as time and cost efficient screening tools for evaluation of BBB permeation of novel α-adrenergic/imidazoline receptor ligands, as promising drug candidates for treatment of hypertension or neurological diseases.

  1. Scaling up watershed model parameters--Flow and load simulations of the Edisto River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Benedict, Stephen T.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The Edisto River is the longest and largest river system completely contained in South Carolina and is one of the longest free flowing blackwater rivers in the United States. The Edisto River basin also has fish-tissue mercury concentrations that are some of the highest recorded in the United States. As part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to expand the understanding of relations among hydrologic, geochemical, and ecological processes that affect fish-tissue mercury concentrations within the Edisto River basin, analyses and simulations of the hydrology of the Edisto River basin were made with the topography-based hydrological model (TOPMODEL). The potential for scaling up a previous application of TOPMODEL for the McTier Creek watershed, which is a small headwater catchment to the Edisto River basin, was assessed. Scaling up was done in a step-wise process beginning with applying the calibration parameters, meteorological data, and topographic wetness index data from the McTier Creek TOPMODEL to the Edisto River TOPMODEL. Additional changes were made with subsequent simulations culminating in the best simulation, which included meteorological and topographic wetness index data from the Edisto River basin and updated calibration parameters for some of the TOPMODEL calibration parameters. Comparison of goodness-of-fit statistics between measured and simulated daily mean streamflow for the two models showed that with calibration, the Edisto River TOPMODEL produced slightly better results than the McTier Creek model, despite the significant difference in the drainage-area size at the outlet locations for the two models (30.7 and 2,725 square miles, respectively). Along with the TOPMODEL hydrologic simulations, a visualization tool (the Edisto River Data Viewer) was developed to help assess trends and influencing variables in the stream ecosystem. Incorporated into the visualization tool were the water-quality load models TOPLOAD, TOPLOAD-H, and LOADEST

  2. Scale-up and evaluation of high solid ionic liquid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment is receiving significant attention as a potential process that enables fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass and produces high yields of fermentable sugars suitable for the production of renewable fuels. However, successful optimization and scale up of IL pretreatment involves challenges, such as high solids loading, biomass handling and transfer, washing of pretreated solids and formation of inhibitors, which are not addressed during the development stages at the small scale in a laboratory environment. As a first in the research community, the Joint BioEnergy Institute, in collaboration with the Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit, a Department of Energy funded facility that supports academic and industrial entities in scaling their novel biofuels enabling technologies, have performed benchmark studies to identify key challenges associated with IL pretreatment using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and subsequent enzymatic saccharification beyond bench scale. Results Using switchgrass as the model feedstock, we have successfully executed 600-fold, relative to the bench scale (6 L vs 0.01 L), scale-up of IL pretreatment at 15% (w/w) biomass loading. Results show that IL pretreatment at 15% biomass generates a product containing 87.5% of glucan, 42.6% of xylan and only 22.8% of lignin relative to the starting material. The pretreated biomass is efficiently converted into monosaccharides during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis at 10% loading over a 150-fold scale of operations (1.5 L vs 0.01 L) with 99.8% fermentable sugar conversion. The yield of glucose and xylose in the liquid streams were 94.8% and 62.2%, respectively, and the hydrolysate generated contains high titers of fermentable sugars (62.1 g/L of glucose and 5.4 g/L cellobiose). The overall glucan and xylan balance from pretreatment and saccharification were 95.0% and 77.1%, respectively. Enzymatic inhibition by [C2mim][OAc] at high solids

  3. Process engineering and scale-up of autotrophic Clostridium strain P11 syngas fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundiyana, Dimple Kumar Aiyanna

    Scope and Method of Study. Biomass gasification followed by fermentation of syngas to ethanol is a potential process to produce bioenergy. The process is currently being researched under laboratory- and pilot-scale in an effort to optimize the process conditions and make the process feasible for commercial production of ethanol and other biofuels such as butanol and propanol. The broad research objectives for the research were to improve ethanol yields during syngas fermentation and to design a economical fermentation process. The research included four statistically designed experimental studies in serum bottles, bench-scale and pilot-scale fermentors to screen alternate fermentation media components, to determine the effect of process parameters such as pH, temperature and buffer on syngas fermentation, to determine the effect of key limiting nutrients of the acetyl-CoA pathway in a continuous series reactor design, and to scale-up the syngas fermentation in a 100-L pilot scale fermentor. Findings and Conclusions. The first experimental study identified cotton seed extract (CSE) as a feasible medium for Clostridium strain P11 fermentation. The study showed that CSE at 0.5 g L-1 can potentially replace all the standard Clostridium strain P11 fermentation media components while using a media buffer did not significantly improve the ethanol production when used in fermentation with CSE. Scale-up of the CSE fermentation in 2-L and 5-L stirred tank fermentors showed 25% increase in ethanol yield. The second experimental study showed that syngas fermentation at 32°C without buffer was associated with higher ethanol concentration and reduced lag time in switching to solventogenesis. Conducting fermentation at 40°C or by lowering incubation pH to 5.0 resulted in reduced cell growth and no production of ethanol or acetic acid. The third experiment studied the effect of three limiting nutrients, calcium pantothenate, vitamin B12 and CoCl2 on syngas fermentation. Results

  4. Performance of a scaled-up Microbial Fuel Cell with iron reduction as the cathode reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Liu, Fei; van Rijnsoever, Lucas S.; Saakes, Michel; Hamelers, Hubertus V. M.; Buisman, Cees J. N.

    Scale-up studies of Microbial Fuel Cells are required before practical application comes into sight. We studied an MFC with a surface area of 0.5 m 2 and a volume of 5 L. Ferric iron (Fe 3+) was used as the electron acceptor to improve cathode performance. MFC performance increased in time as a combined result of microbial growth at the bio-anode, increase in iron concentration from 1 g L -1 to 6 g L -1, and increased activity of the iron oxidizers to regenerate ferric iron. Finally, a power density of 2.0 W m -2 (200 W m -3) was obtained. Analysis of internal resistances showed that anode resistance decreased from 109 to 7 mΩ m 2, while cathode resistance decreased from 939 to 85 mΩ m 2. The cathode was the main limiting factor, contributing to 58% of the total internal resistance. Maximum energy efficiency of the MFC was 41%.

  5. Elimination of blinding trachoma by 2020: a call for rapid scale-up and strengthening programmes.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Danny; Gebre, Teshome; Rono, Hillary

    2014-09-01

    Elimination of blinding trachoma is targeted for the year 2020, making scale-up extremely urgent. Preferred practices have been developed for mass drug administration and trichiasis surgery to assist new countries and districts. However, these need to be utilised on a broader scale to ensure quality output of programmes and the highest coverage possible of their implementation. Although in recent years there has been a significant increase in programmatic funding, there are still gaps. In addition, continued insecurity in several regions and outbreaks that require refocusing of staff threaten the goal. Close partnerships and collaboration enable the trachoma community to be well on track to reaching the goal, but it cannot be business as usual to achieve this.

  6. Scale-up of Lithium Aluminate Pellet Manufacturing with a Flowable Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenberg, Glenn W.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Kurosky, Randal P.; Tonn, D.; Carty, W.

    2004-01-01

    Thin-walled, high-density lithium aluminate pellets are challenging to manufacture for nuclear reactor applications. The key to scale-up of production was the development of flowable, high density, lithium aluminate powder that permitted (1) automated isostatic pressing, (2) low compaction during pressing, (3) low shrinkage during firing, (4) elimination of chlorine-containing fumed alumina and (5) near-net shape forming. A triple spray drying process was developed that included: (I) a unique-feedstock blend cycle, (II) a post-calcination grinding cycle, and (III) a high-pH final cycle with high solids loading slurry that was spray dried into flowable high-density spheres with large, uniform diameters. Today, pellet manufacturing at a rate of more than 400,000 per year is possible.

  7. Evaluation of liquid-fed ceramic melter scale-up correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Koegler, S.S.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1988-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the parameters governing factors of scale for liquid-fed ceramic melters (LFCMs) in order to design full-scale melters using smaller-scale melter data. Results of melter experiments conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) are presented for two feed compositions and five different liquid-fed ceramic melters. The melter performance data including nominal feed rate and glass melt rate are correlated as a function of melter surface area. Comparisons are made between the actual melt rate data and melt rates predicted by a cold cap heat transfer model. The heat transfer model could be used in scale-up calculations, but insufficient data are available on the cold cap characteristics. Experiments specifically designed to determine heat transfer parameters are needed to further develop the model. 17 refs.

  8. Standards of Evidence for Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Scale-up Research in Prevention Science: Next Generation.

    PubMed

    Gottfredson, Denise C; Cook, Thomas D; Gardner, Frances E M; Gorman-Smith, Deborah; Howe, George W; Sandler, Irwin N; Zafft, Kathryn M

    2015-10-01

    A decade ago, the Society of Prevention Research (SPR) endorsed a set of standards for evidence related to research on prevention interventions. These standards (Flay et al., Prevention Science 6:151-175, 2005) were intended in part to increase consistency in reviews of prevention research that often generated disparate lists of effective interventions due to the application of different standards for what was considered to be necessary to demonstrate effectiveness. In 2013, SPR's Board of Directors decided that the field has progressed sufficiently to warrant a review and, if necessary, publication of "the next generation" of standards of evidence. The Board convened a committee to review and update the standards. This article reports on the results of this committee's deliberations, summarizing changes made to the earlier standards and explaining the rationale for each change. The SPR Board of Directors endorses "The Standards of Evidence for Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Scale-up Research in Prevention Science: Next Generation."

  9. Scaling Up Chronic Disease Prevention Interventions in Lower- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Gaziano, Thomas A.; Pagidipati, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Chronic diseases are increasingly becoming a health burden in lower-and middle-income countries, putting pressure on public health efforts to scale up interventions. This article reviews current efforts in interventions on a population and individual level. Population-level interventions include ongoing efforts to reduce smoking rates, reduce intake of salt and trans–fatty acids, and increase physical activity in increasingly sedentary populations. Individual-level interventions include control and treatment of risk factors for chronic diseases and secondary prevention. This review also discusses the barriers in interventions, particularly those specific to low- and middle-income countries. Continued discussion of proven cost-effective interventions for chronic diseases in the developing world will be useful for improving public health policy. PMID:23297660

  10. Single remote sensing image scale-up combining modulation transform function compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shixiang; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Nan; He, Hongyan; Jiang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing images usually need scale-up for visualization or representation, using only one original image. According to the performance of detective sensors, a new and more applicable method is proposed here. To enhance the high-frequency components, the modulation transform function compensation (MTFC) part focuses on how to adjust the spatial response before and after launch, under signal-to-noise ratio control. This largely reduces the ring phenomenon from incorrect point spread function guesses. Then a contour stencil prior manages to limit edge artifacts in the upscaled image after MTFC. An iterative backprojection operation with fast convergence is also utilized to bring about intensity and contour consistency. We finally present our analysis based on real images with parallel design for full speed. Compared with existing algorithms, the operator illustrates its potential to keep geometric features and extend the visual and quantitative quality for further analysis.

  11. Programme science research on medical male circumcision scale-up in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ronald H; Wawer, Maria J; Kigozi, Godfrey

    2013-08-01

    Three randomised trials demonstrate that voluntary medical male circumcision (MMC) reduces male HIV acquisition by 50-60%, and post-trial surveillance has shown that the effects are long lasting. Scale-up of services has been initiated in 14 high-priority sub-Saharan African countries with high rates of HIV and low prevalence of MMC. However, circumcision coverage in the region remains low. Challenges to MMC rollout include suboptimal demand among higher-risk men, the need to expand access and reduce costs of MMC through personnel task shifting and task sharing, assuring and maintaining a high quality of service provision, and the testing and introduction of non-surgical devices. In addition, early infant male circumcision has not been adequately evaluated in Africa. Here, we describe challenges to implementation and discuss the ongoing and future role of implementation and programme science in addressing such challenges.

  12. Scaling-up and ionic liquid-based extraction of pectinases from Aspergillus flavipes cultures.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Márquez, Vicente E; Martínez-Trujillo, M Aurora; Aguilar Osorio, Guillermo; Patiño, Faustino; Álvarez, María S; Rodríguez, Ana; Sanromán, M Ángeles; Deive, Francisco J

    2017-02-01

    The viability of the scaling-up of pectinases production by Aspergillus flavipes at 5L-bioreactor scale has been demonstrated by keeping constant the power input, and a drastic increase in the endo- and exopectinolytic enzyme production was recorded (7- and 40-fold, respectively). The main process variables were modelled by means of logistic and Gompertz equations. In order to overcome the limitations of the conventional downstream strategies, a novel extraction strategy was proposed on the basis of the adequate salting-out potential of two biocompatible cholinium-based ionic liquids (N1112OHCl and N1112OHH2PO4) in aqueous solutions of Tergitol, reaching more than 90% of extraction.

  13. Edge electrospinning: a facile needle-less approach to realize scaled up production of quality nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochinski, J. R.; Curtis, C.; Roman, M. P.; Clarke, L. I.; Wang, Q.; Thoppey, N. M.; Gorga, R. E.

    2014-03-01

    Utilizing unconfined polymer fluids (e.g., from solution or melt), edge electrospinning provides a straightforward approach for scaled up production of high quality nanofibers through the formation of many parallel jets. From simple geometries (using solution contained within a sharp-edged bowl or on a flat plate), jets form and spontaneously re-arrange on the fluid surface near the edge. Using appropriate control of the electric field induced feed rate, comparable per jet fabrication as traditional single-needle electrospinning can be realized, resulting in nanofibers with similar diameters, diameter distribution, and collected mat porosity. The presence of multiple jets proportionally enhances the production rate of the system, with minimal experimental complexity and without the possibility of clogging. Extending this needle-less approach to commercial polyethylene polymers, micron scale fibers can be melt electrospun using a similar apparatus. Support from National Science Foundation (CMMI-0800237).

  14. Processing parameters associated with scale-up of balloon film production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, D. M.; Harrison, I. R.

    1993-01-01

    A method is set forth for assessing strain-rate profiles that can be used to develop a scale-up theory for blown-film extrusion. Strain rates are evaluated by placing four ink dots on the stalk of an extruded bubble to follow the displacements of the dots as a function of time. The instantaneous Hencky strain is obtained with the displacement data and plotted for analysis. Specific attention is given to potential sources of error in the distance measurements and corrections for these complex bubble geometries. The method is shown to be effective for deriving strain-rate data related to different processing parameters for the production of balloon film. The strain rates can be compared to frostline height, blow-up ratio, and take-up ratio to optimize these processing variables.

  15. Scale up aspects of directional solidification and Czochralski silicon growth processes in traveling magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropka, Natasha; Ervik, Torunn; Czupalla, Matthias; Kiessling, Frank M.

    2016-10-01

    We performed 3D simulations of directional solidification (DS) and Czochralski (Cz) silicon growth processes in traveling magnetic fields (TMFs) and verified them with the experimental data that were available. Particularly, we studied silicon DS growth in real G1, G2 and G5 size setups and Cz growth in 6″ and 24″ crucibles in furnaces provided with KRISTMAG® heater magnet modules (HMMs). TMFs were used for a solid/liquid interface shaping and for a melt stirring. Based on our simulation findings, we discussed scale up challenges and proposed a method for safe upscaling. The method related all present driving forces using dimensionless numbers: Grashof (Gr), Stephan (Ste), Reynolds (Re), Shielding (S) and magnetic forcing number (F).

  16. Scale-up of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis laboratory services, Peru.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sonya S; Yagui, Martin; Ascencios, Luis; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Quispe, Neyda; Bonilla, Cesar; Blaya, Joaquin; Taylor, Allison; Contreras, Carmen; Cegielski, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, the Peruvian National Tuberculosis (TB) Program, the National Reference Laboratory (NRL), Socios en Salud, and US partners have worked to strengthen the national TB laboratory network to support treatment of multidrug-resistant TB. We review key lessons of this experience. The preparation phase involved establishing criteria for drug susceptibility testing (DST), selecting appropriate DST methods, projecting the quantity of DST and culture to ensure adequate supplies, creating biosafe laboratory facilities for DST, training laboratory personnel on methods, and validating DST methods at the NRL. Implementation involved training providers on DST indications, validating conventional and rapid first-line DST methods at district laboratories, and eliminating additional delays in specimen transport and result reporting. Monitoring included ongoing quality control and quality assurance procedures. Hurdles included logistics, coordinating with policy, competing interests, changing personnel, communications, and evaluation. Operational research guided laboratory scale-up and identified barriers to effective capacity building.

  17. Scale-up of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Laboratory Services, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Yagui, Martin; Ascencios, Luis; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Quispe, Neyda; Bonilla, Cesar; Blaya, Joaquin; Taylor, Allison; Contreras, Carmen; Cegielski, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the Peruvian National Tuberculosis (TB) Program, the National Reference Laboratory (NRL), Socios en Salud, and US partners have worked to strengthen the national TB laboratory network to support treatment of multidrug-resistant TB. We review key lessons of this experience. The preparation phase involved establishing criteria for drug susceptibility testing (DST), selecting appropriate DST methods, projecting the quantity of DST and culture to ensure adequate supplies, creating biosafe laboratory facilities for DST, training laboratory personnel on methods, and validating DST methods at the NRL. Implementation involved training providers on DST indications, validating conventional and rapid first-line DST methods at district laboratories, and eliminating additional delays in specimen transport and result reporting. Monitoring included ongoing quality control and quality assurance procedures. Hurdles included logistics, coordinating with policy, competing interests, changing personnel, communications, and evaluation. Operational research guided laboratory scale-up and identified barriers to effective capacity building. PMID:18439349

  18. Scale-up of phosphate remobilization from sewage sludge in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Happe, Manuel; Sugnaux, Marc; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Stauffer, Marc; Zufferey, Géraldine; Kahoun, Thomas; Salamin, Paul-André; Egli, Thomas; Comninellis, Christos; Grogg, Alain-François; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate remobilization from digested sewage sludge containing iron phosphate was scaled-up in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). A 3litre triple chambered MFC was constructed. This reactor was operated as a microbial fuel cell and later as a microbial electrolysis cell to accelerate cathodic phosphate remobilization. Applying an additional voltage and exceeding native MFC power accelerated chemical base formation and the related phosphate remobilization rate. The electrolysis approach was extended using a platinum-RVC cathode. The pH rose to 12.6 and phosphate was recovered by 67% in 26h. This was significantly faster than using microbial fuel cell conditions. Shrinking core modelling particle fluid kinetics showed that the reaction resistance has to move inside the sewage sludge particle for considerable rate enhancement. Remobilized phosphate was subsequently precipitated as struvite and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated low levels of cadmium, lead, and other metals as required by law for recycling fertilizers.

  19. Drawdown of floating solids in stirred tanks: scale-up study using CFD modeling.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Yogesh; Falk, Rick; Graham, Lisa; Koganti, Venkat

    2011-10-14

    This work shows development of a scale up correlation using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations for floating solids drawdown operation in stirred tanks. Discrete phase modeling (DPM) simulations were used in conjunction with the lab scale experimental measurements to develop a semi-empirical correlation for the prediction of rate of drawdown of floating solid particles. The rate was correlated to average liquid velocity at the free liquid surface. Since, this correlation is based on a fundamental hydrodynamic parameter, velocity, rather than an operating parameters such as the impeller speed, it can be used for a variety of impeller types and tank geometries. The correlation was developed based on the data obtained from the 2L tank using four different tank designs and was validated against the data obtained from the 10L scale tank. The correlation was further extended to the pilot and the commercial scale tanks ranging from 40L to 4000L scale based solely on the CFD model.

  20. Teaching assistant-student interactions in a modified SCALE-UP classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBeck, George; Demaree, Dedra

    2012-02-01

    In the spring term of 2010, Oregon State University (OSU) began using a SCALE-UP style classroom in the instruction of the introductory calculus-based physics series. Instruction in this classroom was conducted in weekly two-hour sessions facilitated by the primary professor and either two graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) or a graduate teaching assistant and an undergraduate learning assistant (LA). During the course of instruction, two of the eight tables in the room were audio and video recorded. We examine the practices of the GTAs in interacting with the students through both qualitative and quantitative analyses of these recordings. Quantitatively, significant differences are seen between the most experienced GTA and the rest. A major difference in confidence is also observed in the qualitative analysis of this GTA compared to a less experienced GTA.

  1. Scaling-up of membraneless microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) for domestic wastewater treatment: Bottlenecks and limitations.

    PubMed

    Escapa, A; San-Martín, M I; Mateos, R; Morán, A

    2015-03-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) have the potential to become a sustainable domestic wastewater (dWW) treatment system. However, new scale-up experiences are required to gain knowledge of critical issues in MEC designs. In this study we assess the ability of two twin membraneless MEC units (that are part of a modular pilot-scale MEC) to treat dWW. Batch tests yielded COD removal efficiencies as high as 92%, with most of the hydrogen (>80% of the total production) being produced during the first 48h. During the continuous tests, MECs performance deteriorated significantly (energy consumption was relatively high and COD removal efficiencies fell below 10% in many cases), which was attributed to an inadequate configuration of the anodic chamber, insufficient mixing inside this chamber, inefficient hydrogen management on the cathode side and finally to dWW in itself. Some alternatives to the current design are suggested.

  2. Novel method for constructing a large-scale design space in lubrication process by using Bayesian estimation based on the reliability of a scale-up rule.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jin; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    A reliable large-scale design space was constructed by integrating the reliability of a scale-up rule into the Bayesian estimation without enforcing a large-scale design of experiments (DoE). A small-scale DoE was conducted using various Froude numbers (X(1)) and blending times (X(2)) in the lubricant blending process for theophylline tablets. The response surfaces, design space, and their reliability of the compression rate of the powder mixture (Y(1)), tablet hardness (Y(2)), and dissolution rate (Y(3)) on a small scale were calculated using multivariate spline interpolation, a bootstrap resampling technique, and self-organizing map clustering. A constant Froude number was applied as a scale-up rule. Experiments were conducted at four different small scales with the same Froude number and blending time in order to determine the discrepancies in the response variables between the scales so as to indicate the reliability of the scale-up rule. Three experiments under an optimal condition and two experiments under other conditions were performed on a large scale. The response surfaces on the small scale were corrected to those on the large scale by Bayesian estimation using the large-scale results and the reliability of the scale-up rule. Large-scale experiments performed under three additional sets of conditions showed that the corrected design space was more reliable than the small-scale design space even when there was some discrepancy in the pharmaceutical quality between the manufacturing scales. This approach is useful for setting up a design space in pharmaceutical development when a DoE cannot be performed at a commercial large manufacturing scale.

  3. Is the Scale Up of Malaria Intervention Coverage Also Achieving Equity?

    PubMed Central

    Steketee, Richard W.; Eisele, Thomas P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Methods Malaria in Africa is most severe in young children and pregnant women, particularly in rural and poor households. In many countries, malaria intervention coverage rates have increased as a result of scale up; but this may mask limited coverage in these highest-risk populations. Reports were reviewed from nationally representative surveys in African malaria-endemic countries from 2006 through 2008 to understand how reported intervention coverage rates reflect access by the most at-risk populations. Results Reports were available from 27 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHSs), Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICSs), and Malaria Indicator Surveys (MISs) during this interval with data on household intervention coverage by urban or rural setting, wealth quintile, and sex. Household ownership of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) varied from 5% to greater than 60%, and was equitable by urban/rural and wealth quintile status among 13 (52%) of 25 countries. Malaria treatment rates for febrile children under five years of age varied from less than 10% to greater than 70%, and while equitable coverage was achieved in 8 (30%) of 27 countries, rates were generally higher in urban and richest quintile households. Use of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnant women varied from 2% to more than 60%, and again tended to be higher in urban and richest quintile households. Across all countries, there were no significant male/female inequalities seen for children sleeping under ITNs or receiving antimalarial treatment for febrile illness. Parasitemia and anemia rates from eight national surveys showed predominance in poor and rural populations. Conclusions/Significance Recent efforts to scale up malaria intervention coverage have achieved equity in some countries (especially with ITNs), but delivery methods in other countries are not addressing the most at-risk populations. As countries seek universal malaria intervention coverage, their delivery

  4. Supervision, monitoring and evaluation of nationwide scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Libamba, Edwin; Makombe, Simon; Mhango, Eustice; de Ascurra Teck, Olga; Limbambala, Eddie; Schouten, Erik J.; Harries, Anthony D.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the supervision, monitoring and evaluation strategies used to assess the delivery of antiretroviral therapy during nationwide scale-up of treatment in Malawi. METHODS: In the first quarter of 2005, the HIV Unit of the Ministry of Health and its partners (the Lighthouse Clinic; Médecins Sans Frontières-Belgium, Thyolo district; and WHO's Country Office) undertook structured supervision and monitoring of all public sector health facilities in Malawi delivering antiretroviral therapy. FINDINGS: Data monitoring showed that by the end of 2004, there were 13,183 patients (5274 (40%) male, 12 527 (95%) adults) who had ever started antiretroviral therapy. Of patients who had ever started, 82% (10 761/13,183) were alive and taking antiretrovirals; 8% (1026/13,183) were dead; 8% (1039/13,183) had been lost to follow up; <1% (106/13,183) had stopped treatment; and 2% (251/13,183) had transferred to another facility. Of those alive and on antiretrovirals, 98% (7098/7258) were ambulatory; 85% (6174/7258) were fit to work; 10% (456/4687) had significant side effects; and, based on pill counts, 96% (6824/7114) had taken their treatment correctly. Mistakes in the registration and monitoring of patients were identified and corrected. Drug stocks were checked, and one potential drug stock-out was averted. As a result of the supervisory visits, by the end of March 2005 recruitment of patients to facilities scheduled to start delivering antiretroviral therapy had increased. CONCLUSION: This report demonstrates the importance of early supervision for sites that are starting to deliver antiretroviral therapy, and it shows the value of combining data collection with supervision. Making regular supervisory and monitoring visits to delivery sites are essential for tracking the national scale-up of delivery of antiretrovirals. PMID:16628306

  5. Scaling-up from species to ecosystems: How close can we get to actual decomposition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poca, María; Vaieretti, María Victoria; Cingolani, Ana María; Pérez-Harguindeguy, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Predicting global changes and their effects on ecosystem functioning has been a central issue of ecology during the last decades. Scaling-up from species characteristics to ecosystem processes is a common approach to achieve that goal. However, ecosystem processes are shaped by complex interactions between biotic and abiotic components, complicating their predictability. We evaluated how close we can get to ecosystem-level decomposition (i.e. in situ litter mixtures decomposition) based on aggregated functional traits (calculated as weighted averages of species litter quality and decomposability) in mountain grasslands patches of central Argentina. We found that aggregated functional traits were not significantly correlated to in situ decomposition; i.e. contrary to other works, in our system it is not possible to scale up from species characteristics to ecosystem-level decomposition. This pattern was consistent when litter quality and decomposability were weighted by either species standing biomass or by litter input. These two ways of aggregation were highly correlated, indicating that standing biomass was a good proxy of the contribution that species make to litter layer. Aggregated functional traits were strongly associated to litter mixtures decomposability (a proxy for community-level decomposition), indicating that there are no strong interactions among litters of the species decomposing together. However, litter mixtures decomposability was not correlated to in situ decomposition, showing that community-level and ecosystem-level decomposition were not related. We suggest that the soil environment generated by vegetation structure of the different grassland patches could be controlling in situ decomposition. The prediction of decomposition and nutrient cycling changes associated to land-use change calls for the consideration of variables which integrate different controls; i.e. not only species identity and abundance, but also climate and microclimate. In

  6. Manufacturing process scale-up of optical grade transparent spinel ceramic at ArmorLine Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilman, Joseph; Voyles, John; Nick, Joseph; Shaffer, Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    While transparent Spinel ceramic's mechanical and optical characteristics are ideal for many Ultraviolet (UV), visible, Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR), Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR), and multispectral sensor window applications, commercial adoption of the material has been hampered because the material has historically been available in relatively small sizes (one square foot per window or less), low volumes, unreliable supply, and with unreliable quality. Recent efforts, most notably by Technology Assessment and Transfer (TA and T), have scaled-up manufacturing processes and demonstrated the capability to produce larger windows on the order of two square feet, but with limited output not suitable for production type programs. ArmorLine Corporation licensed the hot-pressed Spinel manufacturing know-how of TA and T in 2009 with the goal of building the world's first dedicated full-scale Spinel production facility, enabling the supply of a reliable and sufficient volume of large Transparent Armor and Optical Grade Spinel plates. With over $20 million of private investment by J.F. Lehman and Company, ArmorLine has installed and commissioned the largest vacuum hot press in the world, the largest high-temperature/high-pressure hot isostatic press in the world, and supporting manufacturing processes within 75,000 square feet of manufacturing space. ArmorLine's equipment is capable of producing window blanks as large as 50" x 30" and the facility is capable of producing substantial volumes of material with its Lean configuration and 24/7 operation. Initial production capability was achieved in 2012. ArmorLine will discuss the challenges that were encountered during scale-up of the manufacturing processes, ArmorLine Optical Grade Spinel optical performance, and provide an overview of the facility and its capabilities.

  7. Metabolic Profiling of Geobacter sulfurreducens during Industrial Bioprocess Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I; Allwood, J William; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Correa, Elon; Alrabiah, Haitham; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-05-15

    During the industrial scale-up of bioprocesses it is important to establish that the biological system has not changed significantly when moving from small laboratory-scale shake flasks or culturing bottles to an industrially relevant production level. Therefore, during upscaling of biomass production for a range of metal transformations, including the production of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens, from 100-ml bench-scale to 5-liter fermentors, we applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a metabolic fingerprinting approach followed by the analysis of bacterial cell extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling. FTIR results clearly differentiated between the phenotypic changes associated with different growth phases as well as the two culturing conditions. Furthermore, the clustering patterns displayed by multivariate analysis were in agreement with the turbidimetric measurements, which displayed an extended lag phase for cells grown in a 5-liter bioreactor (24 h) compared to those grown in 100-ml serum bottles (6 h). GC-MS analysis of the cell extracts demonstrated an overall accumulation of fumarate during the lag phase under both culturing conditions, coinciding with the detected concentrations of oxaloacetate, pyruvate, nicotinamide, and glycerol-3-phosphate being at their lowest levels compared to other growth phases. These metabolites were overlaid onto a metabolic network of G. sulfurreducens, and taking into account the levels of these metabolites throughout the fermentation process, the limited availability of oxaloacetate and nicotinamide would seem to be the main metabolic bottleneck resulting from this scale-up process. Additional metabolite-feeding experiments were carried out to validate the above hypothesis. Nicotinamide supplementation (1 mM) did not display any significant effects on the lag phase of G. sulfurreducens cells grown in the 100-ml serum bottles. However

  8. High-Throughput Synthesis, Screening, and Scale-Up of Optimized Conducting Indium Tin Oxides.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Peter; Makwana, Neel M; Tighe, Christopher J; Gruar, Robert I; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J; Darr, Jawwad A

    2016-02-08

    A high-throughput optimization and subsequent scale-up methodology has been used for the synthesis of conductive tin-doped indium oxide (known as ITO) nanoparticles. ITO nanoparticles with up to 12 at % Sn were synthesized using a laboratory scale (15 g/hour by dry mass) continuous hydrothermal synthesis process, and the as-synthesized powders were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under standard synthetic conditions, either the cubic In2O3 phase, or a mixture of InO(OH) and In2O3 phases were observed in the as-synthesized materials. These materials were pressed into compacts and heat-treated in an inert atmosphere, and their electrical resistivities were then measured using the Van der Pauw method. Sn doping yielded resistivities of ∼ 10(-2) Ω cm for most samples with the lowest resistivity of 6.0 × 10(-3) Ω cm (exceptionally conductive for such pressed nanopowders) at a Sn concentration of 10 at %. Thereafter, the optimized lab-scale composition was scaled-up using a pilot-scale continuous hydrothermal synthesis process (at a rate of 100 g/hour by dry mass), and a comparable resistivity of 9.4 × 10(-3) Ω cm was obtained. The use of the synthesized TCO nanomaterials for thin film fabrication was finally demonstrated by deposition of a transparent, conductive film using a simple spin-coating process.

  9. Geriatric health policy in India: The need for scaling-up implementation

    PubMed Central

    Paul, N. Sherin Susan; Asirvatham, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    In an anticipation of the rising geriatric population in India, the Central government constituted the National Policy for Older Persons in 1999 to promote the health and welfare of senior citizens in India. A major strategy of this policy is to encourage families to take care of their older family members. The policy also encourages voluntary organizations to supplement the care provided by the family and provide care and protection to vulnerable elderly people. The implementation of this policy, particularly in the rural areas, has been negligible and calls for a scaling-up of programs to address the physical, psychological, and social needs of the poor. Due to breakdown of the joint family system and the migration of the younger generation to the towns and cities, the elderly parents in the villages are left to fend for themselves. Too old to work and with little or no source of income, the elders are struggling even to satisfy their basic needs. This article primarily focuses on the various facets of elderly care in India. As a fledgling nation in elderly care, we should take cues from other nations who have pioneered in this field and should constantly evolve to identify and face the various challenges that come up, especially from rural India. The Rural Unit for Health and Social Affairs Department of a well-known Medical College in South India has developed a “senior recreation day care” model which proves to be a useful replicable model to improve the quality of life and nutritional status of the elderly in the lower rungs of society. More than a decade since its inception, it is now the right time to assess the implementation of our geriatric health policy and scale-up programs so that the elderly in our country, irrespective of urban and rural, will have a dignified and good quality life. PMID:27843821

  10. Scale-up of diluted sulfuric acid hydrolysis for producing sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate (SBHH).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rita de Cássia L B; Rocha, George J M; Rodrigues, Durval; Filho, Hélcio J I; Felipe, Maria das Graças A; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2010-02-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was pretreated with diluted sulfuric acid to obtain sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate (SBHH). Experiments were conducted in laboratory and semi-pilot reactors to optimize the xylose recovery and to reduce the generation of sugar degradation products, as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). The hydrolysis scale-up procedure was based on the H-Factor, that combines temperature and residence time and employs the Arrhenius equation to model the sulfuric acid concentration (100 mg(acid)/g(dm)) and activation energy (109 kJ/mol). This procedure allowed the mathematical estimation of the results through simulation of the conditions prevailing in the reactors with different designs. The SBHH obtained from different reactors but under the same H-Factor of 5.45+/-0.15 reached similar xylose yield (approximately 74%) and low concentration of sugar degradation products, as furfural (0.082 g/L) and HMF (0.0071 g/L). Also, the highest lignin degradation products (phenolic compounds) were rho-coumarilic acid (0.15 g/L) followed by ferulic acid (0.12 g/L) and gallic acid (0.035 g/L). The highest concentration of ions referred to S (3433.6 mg/L), Fe (554.4 mg/L), K (103.9 mg/L). The H-Factor could be used without dramatically altering the xylose and HMF/furfural levels. Therefore, we could assume that H-Factor was directly useful in the scale-up of the hemicellulosic hydrolysate production.

  11. Minnesota wood energy scale-up project 1994 establishment cost data

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Pierce, R.; Kroll, T.

    1996-03-18

    The Minnesota Wood Energy Scale-up Project began in late 1993 with the first trees planted in the spring of 1994. The purpose of the project is to track and monitor economic costs of planting, maintaining and monitoring larger scale commercial plantings. For 15 years, smaller scale research plantings of hybrid poplar have been used to screen for promising, high-yielding poplar clones. In this project 1000 acres of hybrid poplar trees were planted on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land near Alexandria, Minnesota in 1994. The fourteen landowners involved re-contracted with the CRP for five-year extensions of their existing 10-year contracts. These extended contracts will expire in 2001, when the plantings are 7 years old. The end use for the trees planted in the Minnesota Wood Energy Scale-up Project is undetermined. They will belong to the owner of the land on which they are planted. There are no current contracts in place for the wood these trees are projected to supply. The structure of the wood industry in the Minnesota has changed drastically over the past 5 years. Stumpage values for fiber have risen to more than $20 per cord in some areas raising the possibility that these trees could be used for fiber rather than energy. Several legislative mandates have forced the State of Minnesota to pursue renewable energy including biomass energy. These mandates, a potential need for an additional 1700 MW of power by 2008 by Northern States Power, and agricultural policies will all affect development of energy markets for wood produced much like agricultural crops. There has been a tremendous amount of local and international interest in the project. Contractual negotiations between area landowners, the CRP, a local Resource Conservation and Development District, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and others are currently underway for additional planting of 1000 acres in spring 1995.

  12. Computational psychotherapy research: scaling up the evaluation of patient-provider interactions.

    PubMed

    Imel, Zac E; Steyvers, Mark; Atkins, David C

    2015-03-01

    In psychotherapy, the patient-provider interaction contains the treatment's active ingredients. However, the technology for analyzing the content of this interaction has not fundamentally changed in decades, limiting both the scale and specificity of psychotherapy research. New methods are required to "scale up" to larger evaluation tasks and "drill down" into the raw linguistic data of patient-therapist interactions. In the current article, we demonstrate the utility of statistical text analysis models called topic models for discovering the underlying linguistic structure in psychotherapy. Topic models identify semantic themes (or topics) in a collection of documents (here, transcripts). We used topic models to summarize and visualize 1,553 psychotherapy and drug therapy (i.e., medication management) transcripts. Results showed that topic models identified clinically relevant content, including affective, relational, and intervention related topics. In addition, topic models learned to identify specific types of therapist statements associated with treatment-related codes (e.g., different treatment approaches, patient-therapist discussions about the therapeutic relationship). Visualizations of semantic similarity across sessions indicate that topic models identify content that discriminates between broad classes of therapy (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. psychodynamic therapy). Finally, predictive modeling demonstrated that topic model-derived features can classify therapy type with a high degree of accuracy. Computational psychotherapy research has the potential to scale up the study of psychotherapy to thousands of sessions at a time. We conclude by discussing the implications of computational methods such as topic models for the future of psychotherapy research and practice.

  13. Trans-National Scale-Up of Services in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Shahin, Ilan; Sohal, Raman; Ginther, John; Hayden, Leigh; MacDonald, John A.; Mossman, Kathryn; Parikh, Himanshu; McGahan, Anita; Mitchell, Will; Bhattacharyya, Onil

    2014-01-01

    Background Scaling up innovative healthcare programs offers a means to improve access, quality, and health equity across multiple health areas. Despite large numbers of promising projects, little is known about successful efforts to scale up. This study examines trans-national scale, whereby a program operates in two or more countries. Trans-national scale is a distinct measure that reflects opportunities to replicate healthcare programs in multiple countries, thereby providing services to broader populations. Methods Based on the Center for Health Market Innovations (CHMI) database of nearly 1200 health programs, the study contrasts 116 programs that have achieved trans-national scale with 1,068 single-country programs. Data was collected on the programs' health focus, service activity, legal status, and funding sources, as well as the programs' locations (rural v. urban emphasis), and founding year; differences are reported with statistical significance. Findings This analysis examines 116 programs that have achieved trans-national scale (TNS) across multiple disease areas and activity types. Compared to 1,068 single-country programs, we find that trans-nationally scaled programs are more donor-reliant; more likely to focus on targeted health needs such as HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria, or family planning rather than provide more comprehensive general care; and more likely to engage in activities that support healthcare services rather than provide direct clinical care. Conclusion This work, based on a large data set of health programs, reports on trans-national scale with comparison to single-country programs. The work is a step towards understanding when programs are able to replicate their services as they attempt to expand health services for the poor across countries and health areas. A subset of these programs should be the subject of case studies to understand factors that affect the scaling process, particularly seeking to identify mechanisms that lead to

  14. An update on operation experience and scale-up with CYMIC{reg_sign}

    SciTech Connect

    Kokko, A.; Alliston, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the operational experiences with the first full-scale CYMIC{reg_sign} demonstration plant, the scale-up principles of CYMIC{reg_sign}, and finally a large-scale CYMIC{reg_sign} case. Kvaerner Pulping`s new-generation circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, CYMIC{reg_sign} offers a multi-fuel combustion solution with low emissions, high efficiency and high availability. With the cyclone built inside the boiler furnace, its space requirements are extremely small. Due to the watercooled construction, the refractories are thin, minimizing the need for maintenance. The pilot testing with CYMIC{reg_sign} was successfully completed and with positive results in 1992. The next step was a CYMIC{reg_sign} scale-up and a full-scale demonstration project. The 32 MW{sub th} demonstration plant owned by VAPO Oy in the town of Lieksa, eastern Finland, is now in continuous operation. The CYMIC{reg_sign} has been further scaled by developing six standard cyclone sizes. The CYMIC{reg_sign}`s square furnace size can be varied and can be multiplied, offering a stepless capacity range from small Lieksa size units to utility boilers. The design of the CYMIC{reg_sign} process, including operation of the cyclone and the gas lock, has been verified. In addition, tests have been run measuring flue gas emissions and combustion efficiency. The most interesting results from these tests are discussed. A 185 MW{sub th} CYMIC{reg_sign} unit is now operating at the Rauma paper mill of Unite Paper Mills, Finland. The project began in November 1994 and the boiler started up in the summer of 1996. The design and the performance of this CYMIC{reg_sign} unit are presented.

  15. Benchmarks to measure readiness to integrate and scale up newborn survival interventions.

    PubMed

    Moran, Allisyn C; Kerber, Kate; Pfitzer, Anne; Morrissey, Claudia S; Marsh, David R; Oot, David A; Sitrin, Deborah; Guenther, Tanya; Gamache, Nathalie; Lawn, Joy E; Shiffman, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    Neonatal mortality accounts for 40% of under-five child mortality. Evidence-based interventions exist, but attention to implementation is recent. Nationally representative coverage data for these neonatal interventions are limited; therefore proximal measures of progress toward scale would be valuable for tracking change among countries and over time. We describe the process of selecting a set of benchmarks to assess scale up readiness or the degree to which health systems and national programmes are prepared to deliver interventions for newborn survival. A prioritization and consensus-building process was co-ordinated by the Saving Newborn Lives programme of Save the Children, resulting in selection of 27 benchmarks. These benchmarks are categorized into agenda setting (e.g. having a national newborn survival needs assessment); policy formulation (e.g. the national essential drugs list includes injectable antibiotics at primary care level); and policy implementation (e.g. standards for care of sick newborns exist at district hospital level). Benchmark data were collected by in-country stakeholders teams who filled out a standard form and provided evidence to support each benchmark achieved. Results are presented for nine countries at three time points: 2000, 2005 and 2010. By 2010, substantial improvement was documented in all selected countries, with three countries achieving over 75% of the benchmarks and an additional five countries achieving over 50% of the benchmarks. Progress on benchmark achievement was accelerated after 2005. The policy process was similar in all countries, but did not proceed in a linear fashion. These benchmarks are a novel method to assess readiness to scale up, an important construct along the pathway to scale for newborn care. Similar exercises may also be applicable to other global health issues.

  16. Scaling up the 454 Titanium Library Construction and Pooling of Barcoded Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Phung, Wilson; Hack, Christopher; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2009-03-23

    We have been developing a high throughput 454 library construction process at the Joint Genome Institute to meet the needs of de novo sequencing a large number of microbial and eukaryote genomes, EST, and metagenome projects. We have been focusing efforts in three areas: (1) modifying the current process to allow the construction of 454 standard libraries on a 96-well format; (2) developing a robotic platform to perform the 454 library construction; and (3) designing molecular barcodes to allow pooling and sorting of many different samples. In the development of a high throughput process to scale up the number of libraries by adapting the process to a 96-well plate format, the key process change involves the replacement of gel electrophoresis for size selection with Solid Phase Reversible Immobilization (SPRI) beads. Although the standard deviation of the insert sizes increases, the overall quality sequence and distribution of the reads in the genome has not changed. The manual process of constructing 454 shotgun libraries on 96-well plates is a time-consuming, labor-intensive, and ergonomically hazardous process; we have been experimenting to program a BioMek robot to perform the library construction. This will not only enable library construction to be completed in a single day, but will also minimize any ergonomic risk. In addition, we have implemented a set of molecular barcodes (AKA Multiple Identifiers or MID) and a pooling process that allows us to sequence many targets simultaneously. Here we will present the testing of pooling a set of selected fosmids derived from the endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. By combining the robotic library construction process and the use of molecular barcodes, it is now possible to sequence hundreds of fosmids that represent a minimal tiling path of this genome. Here we present the progress and the challenges of developing these scaled-up processes.

  17. Pyrotechnic deflagration velocity and permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Begeal, D R; Stanton, P L

    1982-01-01

    Particle size, porosity, and permeability of the reactive material have long been considered to be important factors in propellant burning rates and the deflagration-to-detonation transition in explosives. It is reasonable to assume that these same parameters will also affect the deflagration velocity of pyrotechnics. This report describes an experimental program that addresses the permeability of porous solids (particulate beds), in terms of particle size and porosity, and the relationship between permeability and the behavior of pyrotechnics and explosives. The experimental techniques used to acquire permeability data and to characterize the pyrotechnic burning are discussed. Preliminary data have been obtained on the burning characteristics of titanium hydride/potassium perchlorate (THKP) and boron/calcium chromate (BCCR). With THKP, the velocity of a pressure wave (from hot product gases) in the unburned region shows unsteady behavior which is related to the initial porosity or permeability. Simultaneous measurements with pressure gauges and ion gauges reveal that the pressure wave precedes the burn front. Steady burning of BCCR was observed with pressure gauge diagnostics and with a microwave interferometry technique.

  18. Nanowire-organic thin film transistor integration and scale up towards developing sensor array for biomedical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashanth S.; Hankins, Phillip T.; Rai, Pratyush; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2010-04-01

    Exploratory research works have demonstrated the capability of conducting nanowire arrays in enhancing the sensitivity and selectivity of bio-electrodes in sensing applications. With the help of different surface manipulation techniques, a wide range of biomolecules have been successfully immobilized on these nanowires. Flexible organic electronics, thin film transistor (TFT) fabricated on flexible substrate, was a breakthrough that enabled development of logic circuits on flexible substrate. In many health monitoring scenarios, a series of biomarkers, physical properties and vital signals need to be observed. Since the nano-bio-electrodes are capable of measuring all or most of them, it has been aptly suggested that a series of electrode (array) on single substrate shall be an excellent point of care tool. This requires an efficient control system for signal acquisition and telemetry. An array of flexible TFTs has been designed that acts as active matrix for controlled switching of or scanning by the sensor array. This array is a scale up of the flexible organic TFT that has been fabricated and rigorously tested in previous studies. The integration of nanowire electrodes to the organic electronics was approached by growing nanowires on the same substrate as TFTs and fl ip chip packaging, where the nanowires and TFTs are made on separate substrates. As a proof of concept, its application has been explored in various multi-focal biomedical sensing applications, such as neural probes for monitoring neurite growth, dopamine, and neuron activity; myocardial ischemia for spatial monitoring of myocardium.

  19. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Melanie A; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2015-07-07

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up.

  20. Permeability of normal versus carious dentin.

    PubMed

    Pashley, E L; Talman, R; Horner, J A; Pashley, D H

    1991-10-01

    Although a number of reports have been published demonstrating that carious dentin is less permeable than normal dentin, these reports have been qualitative rather than quantitative. The purpose of this in vitro study was to apply a quantitative technique to the study of the permeability of carious human teeth before and after excavation, before and after removal of the smear layer and before and after preparation of a control cavity of similar size and depth in normal dentin subjected to the same measurements, for comparative purposes. Dentin permeability was measured as a hydraulic conductance. The permeability values measured at each step in the protocol were expressed as a percent of the maximum permeability of both cavities, permitting each tooth the serve as its own control. Carious lesions exhibited a slight degree of permeability (2.3 +/- 0.6% of controls) which remained unchanged after excavation of the lesions. Removal of the smear layer in the excavated carious lesions increased the permeability significantly to 6.9 +/- 3.2%. Preparation of a control cavity of the same area and depth increased the permeability slightly. Removal of its smear layer increased the permeability of the dentin 91%. These results confirm previous qualitative studies that carious dentin, even after excavation and removal of the smear layer has a very low permeability.

  1. Anisotropic hydraulic permeability in compressed articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    The extent to which articular cartilage hydraulic permeability is anisotropic is largely unknown, despite its importance for understanding mechanisms of joint lubrication, load bearing, transport phenomena, and mechanotransduction. We developed and applied new techniques for the direct measurement of hydraulic permeability within statically compressed adult bovine cartilage explant disks, dissected such that disk axes were perpendicular to the articular surface. Applied pressure gradients were kept small to minimize flow-induced matrix compaction, and fluid outflows were measured by observation of a meniscus in a glass capillary under a microscope. Explant disk geometry under radially unconfined axial compression was measured by direct microscopic observation. Pressure, flow, and geometry data were input to a finite element model where hydraulic permeabilities in the disk axial and radial directions were determined. At less than 10% static compression, near free-swelling conditions, hydraulic permeability was nearly isotropic, with values corresponding to those of previous studies. With increasing static compression, hydraulic permeability decreased, but the radially directed permeability decreased more dramatically than the axially directed permeability such that strong anisotropy (a 10-fold difference between axial and radial directions) in the hydraulic permeability tensor was evident for static compression of 20-40%. Results correspond well with predictions of a previous microstructurally-based model for effects of tissue mechanical deformations on glycosaminoglycan architecture and cartilage hydraulic permeability. Findings inform understanding of structure-function relationships in cartilage matrix, and suggest several biomechanical roles for compression-induced anisotropic hydraulic permeability in articular cartilage.

  2. Scaling up a Mobile Telemedicine Solution in Botswana: Keys to Sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Ndlovu, Kagiso; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Park, Elizabeth; Dikai, Zambo; Kovarik, Carrie L.

    2014-01-01

    Effective health care delivery is significantly compromised in an environment where resources, both human and technical, are limited. Botswana’s health care system is one of the many in the African continent with few specialized medical doctors, thereby posing a barrier to patients’ access to health care services. In addition, the traditional landline and non-robust Information Technology (IT) network infrastructure characterized by slow bandwidth still dominates the health care system in Botswana. Upgrading of the landline IT infrastructure to meet today’s health care demands is a tedious, long, and expensive process. Despite these challenges, there still lies hope in health care delivery utilizing wireless telecommunication services. Botswana has recently experienced tremendous growth in the mobile telecommunication industry coupled with an increase in the number of individually owned mobile devices. This growth inspired the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP) to collaborate with local partners to explore using mobile devices as tools to improve access to specialized health care delivery. Pilot studies were conducted across four medical specialties, including radiology, oral medicine, dermatology, and cervical cancer screening. Findings from the studies became vital evidence in support of the first scale-up project of a mobile telemedicine solution in Botswana, also known as “Kgonafalo.” Some technical and social challenges were encountered during the initial studies, such as malfunctioning of mobile devices, accidental damage of devices, and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. These challenges brought about lessons learnt, including a strong need for unwavering senior management support, establishment of solid local public-private partnerships, and efficient project sustainability plans. Sustainability milestones included the development and signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Botswana government and a private

  3. The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichner, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    How do you keep a classroom of 100 undergraduates actively learning? Can students practice communication and teamwork skills in a large class? How do you boost the performance of underrepresented groups? The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) Project has addressed these concerns. Because of their inclusion in a leading introductory physics textbook, project materials are used by more than 1/3 of all science, math, and engineering majors nationwide. The room design and pedagogy have been adopted at more than 100 leading institutions across the country. Physics, chemistry, math, astronomy, biology, engineering, earth sciences, and even literature classes are currently being taught this way. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. We promote active learning in a redesigned classroom for 100 students or more. (Of course, smaller classes can also benefit.) Class time is spent primarily on "tangibles" and "ponderables"--hands-on activities, simulations, and interesting questions. Nine students sit in three teams at round tables. Instructors circulate and engage in Socratic dialogues. The setting looks like a banquet hall, with lively interactions nearly all the time. Hundreds of hours of classroom video and audio recordings, transcripts of numerous interviews and focus groups, data from conceptual learning assessments (using widely-recognized instruments in a pretest/posttest protocol), and collected portfolios of student work are part of our rigorous assessment effort. Our findings (based on data from over 16,000 students collected over five years as well as replications at adopting sites) can be summarized as the following: 1) Female failure rate is 1/5 of previous levels, even though more is demanded of students. 2) Minority failure rate is 1/4 that seen in traditionally taught courses. 3) At-risk students are more

  4. Scaling up a Mobile Telemedicine Solution in Botswana: Keys to Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Ndlovu, Kagiso; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Park, Elizabeth; Dikai, Zambo; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2014-01-01

    Effective health care delivery is significantly compromised in an environment where resources, both human and technical, are limited. Botswana's health care system is one of the many in the African continent with few specialized medical doctors, thereby posing a barrier to patients' access to health care services. In addition, the traditional landline and non-robust Information Technology (IT) network infrastructure characterized by slow bandwidth still dominates the health care system in Botswana. Upgrading of the landline IT infrastructure to meet today's health care demands is a tedious, long, and expensive process. Despite these challenges, there still lies hope in health care delivery utilizing wireless telecommunication services. Botswana has recently experienced tremendous growth in the mobile telecommunication industry coupled with an increase in the number of individually owned mobile devices. This growth inspired the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP) to collaborate with local partners to explore using mobile devices as tools to improve access to specialized health care delivery. Pilot studies were conducted across four medical specialties, including radiology, oral medicine, dermatology, and cervical cancer screening. Findings from the studies became vital evidence in support of the first scale-up project of a mobile telemedicine solution in Botswana, also known as "Kgonafalo." Some technical and social challenges were encountered during the initial studies, such as malfunctioning of mobile devices, accidental damage of devices, and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. These challenges brought about lessons learnt, including a strong need for unwavering senior management support, establishment of solid local public-private partnerships, and efficient project sustainability plans. Sustainability milestones included the development and signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Botswana government and a private

  5. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  6. Scale-up of counter-current chromatography: demonstration of predictable isocratic and quasi-continuous operating modes from the test tube to pilot/process scale.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana

    2009-12-11

    Predictable scale-up from test tube derived distribution ratios and analytical-scale sample loading optimisation is demonstrated using a model sample system of benzyl alcohol and p-cresol in a heptane:ethyl acetate:methanol:water phase system with the new 18 L Maxi counter-current chromatography centrifuge. The versatility of having a liquid stationary phase with its high loading capacity and flexible operating modes is demonstrated at two different scales by separating and concentrating target compounds using a mixture of caffeine, vanillin, naringenin and carvone using a quasi-continuous technique called intermittent counter-current extraction.

  7. National malaria control and scaling up for impact: the Zambia experience through 2006.

    PubMed

    Steketee, Richard W; Sipilanyambe, Naawa; Chimumbwa, John; Banda, James J; Mohamed, Abdirahman; Miller, John; Basu, Suprotik; Miti, Simon K; Campbell, Carlos C

    2008-07-01

    With its 2006-2011 National Malaria Strategic Plan, Zambia committed to control malaria at a national scale. This scale-up for impact approach was facilitated by sound business planning and financing in 2006 of approximately US$35 million. Compared with surveys in 2001 and 2004, a 2006 national survey of 14,681 persons in 2,999 households at the end of the transmission season showed substantial coverage increases for preventive interventions. Ownership and use rates of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) among vulnerable groups doubled, with 44% of households owning ITNs and 23% of children less than five years of age and 24% of pregnant women using them. Roll Back Malaria Abuja targets for intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) were exceeded, with 62% of pregnant women receiving at least two doses of IPTp. As of 2006, Zambia is demonstrating substantial progress toward the national targets (80% population coverage rates for the interventions) and aspires to show that malaria need not be its leading health problem, and that malaria control is a sound national investment.

  8. Understanding Barriers to Scaling Up HIV-Assisted Partner Services in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Goyette, Marielle; Wamuti, Beatrice Muthoni; Owuor, Mercy; Bukusi, David; Maingi, Peter Mutiti; Otieno, Felix Abuna; Cherutich, Peter; Ng'ang'a, Anne; Farquhar, Carey

    2016-11-01

    Assisted partner services (APS) are more effective than passive referral in identifying new cases of HIV in many settings. Understanding the barriers to the uptake of APS in sub-Saharan Africa is important before its scale up. In this qualitative study, we explored client, community, and healthcare worker barriers to APS within a cluster randomized trial of APS in Kenya. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with clients who declined enrollment in the APS study and 9 focus group discussions with health advisors, HIV testing and counseling (HTC) counselors, and the general HTC client population. Two analysts coded the data using an open coding approach and identified major themes and subthemes. Many participants reported needing more time to process an HIV-positive result before providing partner information. Lack of trust in the HTC counselor led many to fear a breach of confidentiality, which exacerbated the fears of stigma in the community and relationship conflicts. The type of relationship affected the decision to provide partner information, and the lack of understanding of APS at the community level contributed to the discomfort in enrolling in the study. Establishing trust between the client and HTC counselor may increase uptake of APS in Kenya. A client's decision to provide partner information may depend on the type of relationship he or she is in, and alternative methods of disclosure may need to be offered to accommodate different contexts. Spreading awareness about APS in the community may make clients more comfortable providing partner information.

  9. Optimization and scale-up of a fluid bed tangential spray rotogranulation process.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, J; Dumont, H; Bertrand, F; Legros, R

    2007-04-20

    The production of pellets in the pharmaceutical industry generally involves multi-step processing: (1) mixing, (2) wet granulation, (3) spheronization and (4) drying. While extrusion-spheronization processes have been popular because of their simplicity, fluid-bed rotogranulation (FBRG) is now being considered as an alternative, since it offers the advantages of combining the different steps into one processing unit, thus reducing processing time and material handling. This work aimed at the development of a FBRG process for the production of pellets in a 4.5-l Glatt GCPG1 tangential spray rotoprocessor and its optimization using factorial design. The factors considered were: (1) rotor disc velocity, (2) gap air pressure, (3) air flow rate, (4) binder spray rate and (5) atomization pressure. The pellets were characterized for their physical properties by measuring size distribution, roundness and flow properties. The results indicated that: pellet mean particle size is negatively affected by air flow rate and rotor plate speed, while binder spray rate has a positive effect on size; pellet flow properties are enhanced by operating with increased air flow rate and worsened with increased binder spray rate. Multiple regression analysis enabled the identification of an optimal operating window for production of acceptable pellets. Scale-up of these operating conditions was tested in a 30-l Glatt GPCG15 FBRG.

  10. Image and spectral fidelity study of hyperspectral remote sensing image scaling up based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ni; Ma, Yi; Bao, Yuhai

    2015-08-01

    Wavelet transform is a kind of effective image-scale transformation method, which can achieve multi-scale transformation by distinguishing the low-frequency information and the high-frequency information. Hyperspectral remote sensing data combining image with spectrum has almost continuous spectrum that is the important premise of extracting hyperspectral image information, while scale transformation will inevitably lead to the change of image and spectra. Therefore, it is important to study the image and spectral fidelity after wavelet transform. In this paper, the Proba CHRIS hyperspectral remote sensing image of Yellow River Estuary Wetland is used to investigate the image and spectral fidelity of image transformed by wavelet which remained the low-frequency information. The level 1-3 of up-scale images are obtained and then compared with the original. Then image and spectral fidelity is quantitatively analyzed. The results show that the image fidelity is slightly reduced by up-scale transformation, but near-infrared images have a larger distortion than other bands. With the increasing scaling up, the distortion of spectrum is more and more great, but spectral fidelity is overall well. For the typical wetland objects, Phragmites austrialis has the best spectral correlation, Spartina has a small spectra change, and aquaculture water spectral distortion is most remarkable.

  11. Context matters: Successes and challenges of intrapartum care scale-up in four districts of Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Tappis, Hannah; Koblinsky, Marge; Winch, Peter J; Turkmani, Sabera; Bartlett, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Reducing preventable maternal mortality and achieving Sustainable Development Goal targets for 2030 will require increased investment in improving access to quality health services in fragile and conflict-affected states. This study explores the conditions that affect availability and utilisation of intrapartum care services in four districts of Afghanistan where mortality studies were conducted in 2002 and 2011. Information on changes in each district was collected through interviews with community members; service providers; and district, provincial and national officials. This information was then triangulated with programme and policy documentation to identify factors that affect the coverage of safe delivery and emergency obstetric care services. Comparison of barriers to maternal health service coverage across the four districts highlights the complexities of national health policy planning and resource allocation in Afghanistan, and provides examples of the types of challenges that must be addressed to extend the reach of life-saving maternal health interventions to women in fragile and conflict-affected states. Findings suggest that improvements in service coverage must be measured at a sub-national level, and context-specific service delivery models may be needed to effectively scale up intrapartum care services in extremely remote or insecure settings.

  12. High speed electrospinning for scaled-up production of amorphous solid dispersion of itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsombor K; Balogh, Attila; Démuth, Balázs; Pataki, Hajnalka; Vigh, Tamás; Szabó, Bence; Molnár, Kolos; Schmidt, Bence T; Horák, Péter; Marosi, György; Verreck, Geert; Van Assche, Ivo; Brewster, Marcus E

    2015-03-01

    High speed electrospinning (HSES), compatible with pharmaceutical industry, was used to demonstrate the viability of the preparation of drug-loaded polymer nanofibers with radically higher productivity than the known single-needle electrospinning (SNES) setup. Poorly water-soluble itraconazole (ITRA) was formulated with PVPVA64 matrix polymer using four different solvent-based methods such as HSES, SNES, spray drying (SD) and film casting (FC). The formulations were assessed in terms of improvement in the dissolution rate of ITRA (using a "tapped basket" dissolution configuration) and analysed by SEM, DSC and XRPD. Despite the significantly increased productivity of HSES, the obtained morphology was very similar to the SNES nanofibrous material. ITRA transformed into an amorphous form, according to the DSC and XRPD results, in most cases except the FC samples. The limited dissolution of crystalline ITRA could be highly improved: fast dissolution occurred (>90% within 10min) in the cases of both (the scaled-up and the single-needle) types of electrospun fibers, while the improvement in the dissolution rate of the spray-dried microspheres was significantly lower. Production of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) with the HSES system proved to be flexibly scalable and easy to integrate into a continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing line, which opens new routes for the development of industrially relevant nanopharmaceuticals.

  13. Optimization and Scale-up of Inulin Extraction from Taraxacum kok-saghyz roots.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Thomas; Klemm, Andrea; Ziesse, Patrick; Harms, Karsten; Wach, Wolfgang; Rupp, Steffen; Hirth, Thomas; Zibek, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    The optimization and scale-up of inulin extraction from Taraxacum kok-saghyz Rodin was successfully performed. Evaluating solubility investigations, the extraction temperature was fixed at 85 degrees C. The inulin stability regarding degradation or hydrolysis could be confirmed by extraction in the presence of model inulin. Confirming stability at the given conditions the isolation procedure was transferred from a 1 L- to a 1 m3-reactor. The Reynolds number was selected as the relevant dimensionless number that has to remain constant in both scales. The stirrer speed in the large scale was adjusted to 3.25 rpm regarding a 300 rpm stirrer speed in the 1 L-scale and relevant physical and process engineering parameters. Assumptions were confirmed by approximately homologous extraction kinetics in both scales. Since T. kok-saghyz is in the focus of research due to its rubber content side-product isolation from residual biomass it is of great economic interest. Inulin is one of these additional side-products that can be isolated in high quantity (- 35% of dry mass) and with a high average degree of polymerization (15.5) in large scale with a purity of 77%.

  14. Scaling up the national methadone maintenance treatment program in China: achievements and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenyuan; Hao, Yang; Sun, Xinhua; Gong, Xiuli; Li, Fang; Li, Jianhua; Rou, Keming; Sullivan, Sheena G; Wang, Changhe; Cao, Xiaobin; Luo, Wei; Wu, Zunyou

    2010-01-01

    China’s methadone maintenance treatment program was initiated in 2004 as a small pilot project in just eight sites. It has since expanded into a nationwide program encompassing more than 680 clinics covering 27 provinces and serving some 242 000 heroin users by the end of 2009. The agencies that were tasked with the program’s expansion have been confronted with many challenges, including high drop-out rates, poor cooperation between local governing authorities and poor service quality at the counter. In spite of these difficulties, ongoing evaluation has suggested reductions in heroin use, risky injection practices and, importantly, criminal behaviours among clients, which has thus provided the impetus for further expansion. Clinic services have been extended to offer clients a range of ancillary services, including HIV, syphilis and hepatitis C testing, information, education and communication, psychosocial support services and referrals for treatment of HIV, tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases. Cooperation between health and public security officials has improved through regular meetings and dialogue. However, institutional capacity building is still needed to deliver sustainable and standardized services that will ultimately improve retention rates. This article documents the steps China made in overcoming the many barriers to success of its methadone program. These lessons might be useful for other countries in the region that are scaling-up their methadone programs. PMID:21113034

  15. Ensembl Genomes 2013: scaling up access to genome-wide data

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Paul Julian; Allen, James E.; Christensen, Mikkel; Davis, Paul; Falin, Lee J.; Grabmueller, Christoph; Hughes, Daniel Seth Toney; Humphrey, Jay; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Khobova, Julia; Langridge, Nicholas; McDowall, Mark D.; Maheswari, Uma; Maslen, Gareth; Nuhn, Michael; Ong, Chuang Kee; Paulini, Michael; Pedro, Helder; Toneva, Iliana; Tuli, Mary Ann; Walts, Brandon; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Derek; Youens-Clark, Ken; Monaco, Marcela K.; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Xuehong; Ware, Doreen; Bolser, Daniel M.; Howe, Kevin Lee; Kulesha, Eugene; Lawson, Daniel; Staines, Daniel Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species. The project exploits and extends technologies for genome annotation, analysis and dissemination, developed in the context of the vertebrate-focused Ensembl project, and provides a complementary set of resources for non-vertebrate species through a consistent set of programmatic and interactive interfaces. These provide access to data including reference sequence, gene models, transcriptional data, polymorphisms and comparative analysis. This article provides an update to the previous publications about the resource, with a focus on recent developments. These include the addition of important new genomes (and related data sets) including crop plants, vectors of human disease and eukaryotic pathogens. In addition, the resource has scaled up its representation of bacterial genomes, and now includes the genomes of over 9000 bacteria. Specific extensions to the web and programmatic interfaces have been developed to support users in navigating these large data sets. Looking forward, analytic tools to allow targeted selection of data for visualization and download are likely to become increasingly important in future as the number of available genomes increases within all domains of life, and some of the challenges faced in representing bacterial data are likely to become commonplace for eukaryotes in future. PMID:24163254

  16. Time-resolved transglottal pressure measurements in a scaled up vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringenberg, Hunter; Krane, Michael; Rogers, Dylan; Misfeldt, Mitchel; Wei, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Experimental measurements of flow through a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The simplified 10x scale vocal fold model from Krane, et al. (2007) was used to examine fundamental features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. Of particular interest was the temporal variation of transglottal pressure multiplied by the volume flow rate through the glottis throughout an oscillation cycle. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data have been presented in previous APS-DFD meetings. This talk will focus more on the relation between the flow and aeroacoustics associated with vocal fold oscillations. Supported by the NIH.

  17. Magnetic properties and scale-up of nanostructured cobalt carbide permanent magnetic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Zamanpour, Mehdi Bennett, Steven; Taheri, Parisa; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2014-05-07

    Co{sub x}C magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a modified polyol process without using a rare-earth catalyst during the synthesis process. The present results show admixtures of Co{sub 2}C and Co{sub 3}C phases possessing magnetization values exceeding 45 emu/g and coercivity values exceeding 2.3 kOe at room temperature. Moreover, these experiments have illuminated the important role of surfactants, reaction temperature, and reaction duration on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of Co{sub x}C, while tetraethylene glycol was employed as a reducing agent. The role of the ratios of Co{sub 2}C and Co{sub 3}C phases in the admixture magnetic properties is discussed. The crystallographic structure and particle size of the Co{sub x}C nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to determine magnetic properties. Scale-up of synthesis to more than 5 g per batch was demonstrated with no significant degradation of magnetic properties.

  18. Magnetic properties and scale-up of nanostructured cobalt carbide permanent magnetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamanpour, Mehdi; Bennett, Steven; Taheri, Parisa; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2014-05-01

    CoxC magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a modified polyol process without using a rare-earth catalyst during the synthesis process. The present results show admixtures of Co2C and Co3C phases possessing magnetization values exceeding 45 emu/g and coercivity values exceeding 2.3 kOe at room temperature. Moreover, these experiments have illuminated the important role of surfactants, reaction temperature, and reaction duration on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of CoxC, while tetraethylene glycol was employed as a reducing agent. The role of the ratios of Co2C and Co3C phases in the admixture magnetic properties is discussed. The crystallographic structure and particle size of the CoxC nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to determine magnetic properties. Scale-up of synthesis to more than 5 g per batch was demonstrated with no significant degradation of magnetic properties.

  19. Multiphase flow modeling: A tool to aid in scale up of processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2010-10-01

    Multiphase flows are ubiquitous in chemical processing industries. Traditional approach has been to ignore fluid dynamical effects by invoking simplifying assumptions of homogeneity, but pay the price during scale-up of processes. The question that I address is ``Can Multiphase flow modeling come to our rescue in minimizing the need for pilot scale experiments?'' On the fundamental side, we have developed algorithms for direct numerical simulation of multiphase flows. For dispersed rigid particles as in suspension flows, sedimentation etc, we couple the Navier-Stokes equations with the rigid body dynamics in a rigorous fashion to track the particle motion in a fluid. For deformable bubbles/droplets dispersed in another fluid, we also track their motion in an Eulerian grid. The two classes of algorithms show great promise in attempting direct simulation of multiphase flows, from which we can extract statistically meaningful average behavior of suspensions or bubbly flows. On the other hand, there is an immediate need to study flow of complex fluids of industrial importance. Such cases include polymer blending processes, erosion in pipelines and process vessels and mass transfer in packed beds. In such studies we use volume averaged equations as the basis of flow models coupled with experimental validation of such predictions in an effort to develop scale invariant closure models that are needed as part of the volume averaged flow models.

  20. Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1991-07-01

    A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew C. Morrison; Kenneth J. Bateman; Michael F. Simpson

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS Matthew C. Morrison, Kenneth J. Bateman, Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 The ceramic waste process is the intended method for disposing of waste salt electrolyte, which contains fission products from the fuel-processing electrorefiners (ER) at the INL. When mixed and processed with other materials, the waste salt can be stored in a durable ceramic waste form (CWF). The development of the CWF has recently progressed from small-scale testing and characterization to full-scale implementation and experimentation using surrogate materials in lieu of the ER electrolyte. Two full-scale (378 kg and 383 kg) CWF test runs have been successfully completed with final densities of 2.2 g/cm3 and 2.1 g/cm3, respectively. The purpose of the first CWF was to establish material preparation parameters. The emphasis of the second pre-qualification test run was to evaluate a preliminary multi-section CWF container design. Other considerations were to finalize material preparation parameters, measure the material height as it consolidates in the furnace, and identify when cracking occurs during the CWF cooldown process.

  2. Transforming Global Health by Improving the Science of Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Margaret E; Yamey, Gavin; Angell, Sonia Y; Beith, Alix; Cotlear, Daniel; Guanais, Frederico; Jacobs, Lisa; Saxenian, Helen; Victora, Cesar; Goosby, Eric

    2016-03-01

    In its report Global Health 2035, the Commission on Investing in Health proposed that health investments can reduce mortality in nearly all low- and middle-income countries to very low levels, thereby averting 10 million deaths per year from 2035 onward. Many of these gains could be achieved through scale-up of existing technologies and health services. A key instrument to close this gap is policy and implementation research (PIR) that aims to produce generalizable evidence on what works to implement successful interventions at scale. Rigorously designed PIR promotes global learning and local accountability. Much greater national and global investments in PIR capacity will be required to enable the scaling of effective approaches and to prevent the recycling of failed ideas. Sample questions for the PIR research agenda include how to close the gap in the delivery of essential services to the poor, which population interventions for non-communicable diseases are most applicable in different contexts, and how to engage non-state actors in equitable provision of health services in the context of universal health coverage.

  3. Scaling up the global nursing health workforce: contributions of an international organization.

    PubMed

    Rukholm, Ellen E; Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg; Talbot, Lise R; Bednash, Geraldine; Raines, Fay; Potempa, Kathleen; Nugent, Pauline; Clark, Dame Jill Macleod; Bernhauser, Sue; Parfitt, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In this paper key highlights of the scholarly work presented at the Toronto 2008 Global Alliance for Nursing Education & Scholarship (GANES) conference are summarized, challenges opportunities and issues facing nursing education globally arising from the conference discourse are outlined and initial steps are suggested as a way forward to a shared global view of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education and scholarship. This shared view arises from beginning understandings of the issues and opportunities we face globally starting with and building upon the lessons learned from the literature and from the experiences of nursing educators and nursing education organization locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. The theme of the groundbreaking GANES Toronto conference was "Educating the future nursing and health workforce: A global challenge". One hundred seventy delegates from 17 countries attended the event, with over 80 papers presented. A primary focus of GANES is the contribution of a strategic alliance of national nursing education organizations to contribute to nursing education leading practices and policy that address the scaling up of global nursing and health workforce. The founding members of GANES see a clear link between a strong educational infrastructure and strong scholarship activities in nursing and the ability of a society to be healthy and prosperous. Evidence presented at the recent GANES conference supports that belief. Through the strength of partnerships and other capacity-building efforts, member countries can support each other to address the global nursing education and health challenges while respecting the local issues.

  4. Scale-up synthesis of lipase-catalyzed palm esters in stirred-tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Keng, P S; Basri, M; Ariff, A B; Abdul Rahman, M B; Abdul Rahman, R N Z; Salleh, A B

    2008-09-01

    Lipase-catalyzed production of palm esters by alcoholysis of palm oil with oleyl alcohol in n-hexane was performed in 2L stirred-tank reactor (STR). Investigation on the performance of reactor operation was carried out in batch mode STR with single impeller mounted on the centrally located shaft. Rushton turbine (RT) impellers provide the highest reaction yield (95.8%) at lower agitation speed as compared to AL-hydrofoil (AL-H) and 2-bladed elephant ear (EE) impellers. Homogenous enzyme particles suspension was obtained at 250 rpm by using RT impeller. At higher impeller speed, the shear effect on the enzyme particles caused by agitation has decreased the reaction performance. Palm esters reaction mixture in STR follows Newtons' law due to the linear relation between the shear stress (tau) and shear rate (dupsilon/dy). High stability of Lipozyme RM IM was observed as shown by its ability to be repeatedly used to give high percentage yield (79%) of palm esters even after 15 cycles of reaction. The process was successfully scale-up to 75 L STR (50 L working volume) based on a constant impeller tip speed approach, which gave the yield of 97.2% after 5h reaction time.

  5. Stem Cell Spheroids and Ex Vivo Niche Modeling: Rationalization and Scaling-Up.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Isotta; Massai, Diana; Morbiducci, Umberto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Pesce, Maurizio; Messina, Elisa

    2017-03-13

    Improved protocols/devices for in vitro culture of 3D cell spheroids may provide essential cues for proper growth and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells (S/PCs) in their niche, allowing preservation of specific features, such as multi-lineage potential and paracrine activity. Several platforms have been employed to replicate these conditions and to generate S/PC spheroids for therapeutic applications. However, they incompletely reproduce the niche environment, with partial loss of its highly regulated network, with additional hurdles in the field of cardiac biology, due to debated resident S/PCs therapeutic potential and clinical translation. In this contribution, the essential niche conditions (metabolic, geometric, mechanical) that allow S/PCs maintenance/commitment will be discussed. In particular, we will focus on both existing bioreactor-based platforms for the culture of S/PC as spheroids, and on possible criteria for the scaling-up of niche-like spheroids, which could be envisaged as promising tools for personalized cardiac regenerative medicine, as well as for high-throughput drug screening.

  6. Methadone Maintenance Therapy in Vietnam: An Overview and Scaling-Up Plan

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tam T. M.; Nguyen, Long T.; Pham, Manh D.; Vu, Hoang H.; Mulvey, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Vietnam is among the countries with the highest rate of HIV transmission through injecting drug users. HIV prevalence among injecting drug users is 20% and up to 50% in many provinces. An estimated number of drug users in the country by the end of 2011 were 171,000 in which the most common is heroin (85%). Detoxification at home, community, and in rehabilitation centers have been the main modalities for managing heroin addiction until Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) was piloted in 2008. Recent reports have demonstrated positive treatment outcomes. Incidence of HIV was found remarkably low among patients on MMT. Treatment has significantly improved the quality of life as well as stability for society. The government has granted the Ministry of Health (MoH) to expand Methadone treatment to at least 30 provinces to provide treatment for more than 80,000 drug users by 2015. The Vietnam Administration for HIV/AIDS Control (VAAC) and MOH have outlined the role and responsibility of key departments at the central and local levels in implementing and maintaining MMT treatment. This paper will describe the achievements of the MMT pilot program and the scaling-up plan as well as strategies to ensure quality and sustainability and to overcome the challenges in the coming years. PMID:23227351

  7. Public-private interactions on health in South Africa: opportunities for scaling up.

    PubMed

    Kula, Nothemba; Fryatt, Robert J

    2014-08-01

    South Africa has long recognized partnerships between the public and private sectors as a policy objective in health, but experience is still limited and poorly documented. The objectives of this article are to understand the factors that increase the likelihood of success of public-private interactions in South Africa, and identify and discuss opportunities for them to be scaled up. There is a strong legislative framework and a number of guidelines and tools that have been developed by the Treasury for managing partnerships. The review of literature confirmed the need for the state to have effective regulations in order to oversee quality and standards and to provide stewardship and oversight. The public sector requires sufficient capacity not only to manage relationships with the private sector but also to enable innovation and experimentation. Evaluation is an integral part of all interactions not only to learn from successes but also to identify any perverse incentives that may lead to unintended consequences. Four case studies show that the private for-profit sector is already engaged in a number of projects that are closely aligned to current health system reform priorities. Factors that increase the likelihood of interactions being successful include: increasing the government's capacity to manage public-private relationships; choosing public-private interactions that are strategically important to national goals; building a knowledge base on what works, where and why; moving from pilots to large scale initiatives; harnessing the contracting expertise in private providers; and encouraging innovation and learning.

  8. Destruction of nuclear organic waste by supercritical water oxidation. Scale-up of the process

    SciTech Connect

    Moussiere, S.; Roubaud, A.; Fournel, B.

    2007-07-01

    In order to design and then define appropriate dimensions for a supercritical oxidation reactor, a 2D and 3D simulation of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer during the oxidation process has been performed. The solver used is a commercial code, Fluent 6.2. The turbulent flow field in the reactor, created by the stirrer is taken into account with a k-omega model and a swirl imposed to the fluid. In the 3D case the rotation of the stirrer can be modeled thanks to the sliding mesh model. The reactivity of the system is taken into account with a classical combustion model EDC. Comparisons with experimental temperature measurements validate the ability of the CFD modeling to simulate the supercritical water oxidation process. Simulation results provide us a view inside the reactor on the flow, temperature fields and the oxidation localization and development. Results indicate that the flow can be considered as piston-like, heat transfers are strongly enhanced by the stirring. Hence the scaling up of the reactor volume, to reach a treatment capacity of 1 Kg/h of pure organics, can be done regarding the necessary residence times and temperature distribution needed for a complete destruction of the organic matter. (authors)

  9. Scaling up the national methadone maintenance treatment program in China: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenyuan; Hao, Yang; Sun, Xinhua; Gong, Xiuli; Li, Fang; Li, Jianhua; Rou, Keming; Sullivan, Sheena G; Wang, Changhe; Cao, Xiaobin; Luo, Wei; Wu, Zunyou

    2010-12-01

    China's methadone maintenance treatment program was initiated in 2004 as a small pilot project in just eight sites. It has since expanded into a nationwide program encompassing more than 680 clinics covering 27 provinces and serving some 242 000 heroin users by the end of 2009. The agencies that were tasked with the program's expansion have been confronted with many challenges, including high drop-out rates, poor cooperation between local governing authorities and poor service quality at the counter. In spite of these difficulties, ongoing evaluation has suggested reductions in heroin use, risky injection practices and, importantly, criminal behaviours among clients, which has thus provided the impetus for further expansion. Clinic services have been extended to offer clients a range of ancillary services, including HIV, syphilis and hepatitis C testing, information, education and communication, psychosocial support services and referrals for treatment of HIV, tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases. Cooperation between health and public security officials has improved through regular meetings and dialogue. However, institutional capacity building is still needed to deliver sustainable and standardized services that will ultimately improve retention rates. This article documents the steps China made in overcoming the many barriers to success of its methadone program. These lessons might be useful for other countries in the region that are scaling-up their methadone programs.

  10. Scale-up of biopesticide production processes using wastewater sludge as a raw material.

    PubMed

    Yezza, A; Tyagi, R D; Valèro, J R; Surampalli, R Y; Smith, J

    2004-12-01

    Studies were conducted on the production of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-based biopesticides to ascertain the performance of the process in shake flasks, and in two geometrically similar fermentors (15 and 150 l) utilizing wastewater sludge as a raw material. The results showed that it was possible to achieve better oxygen transfer in the larger capacity fermentor. Viable cell counts increased by 38-55% in the bioreactor compared to shake flasks. As for spore counts, an increase of 25% was observed when changing from shake flask to fermentor experiments. Spore counts were unchanged in bench (15 l) and pilot scale (5.3-5.5 e(+08) cfu/ml; 150 l). An improvement of 30% in the entomotoxicity potential was obtained at pilot scale. Protease activity increased by two to four times at bench and pilot scale, respectively, compared to the maximum activity obtained in shake flasks. The maximum protease activity (4.1 IU/ml) was obtained in pilot scale due to better oxygen transfer. The Bt fermentation process using sludge as raw material was successfully scaled up and resulted in high productivity for toxin protein yield and a high protease activity.

  11. Nb3Sn accelerator magnet technology scale up using cos-theta dipole coils

    SciTech Connect

    Nobrega, F.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Carcagno, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is working on the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets using shell-type dipole coils and the wind-and-react method. As a part of the first phase of technology development, Fermilab built and tested six 1 m long dipole model magnets and several dipole mirror configurations. The last three dipoles and two mirrors reached their design fields of 10-11 T. The technology scale up phase has started by building 2 m and 4 m dipole coils and testing them in a mirror configuration in which one of the two coils is replaced by a half-cylinder made of low carbon steel. This approach allows for shorter fabrication times and extensive instrumentation preserving almost the same level of magnetic field and Lorentz forces in the coils as in a complete dipole model magnet. This paper presents details on the 2 m (HFDM07) and 4 m long (HFDM08) Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole mirror magnet design and fabrication technology, as well as the magnet test results which are compared with 1 m long models.

  12. Scaling up the Hydrologic Effects of Forest Thinning in Semi-Arid Basins of Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, H. A.; White, D. D.; Gupta, H. V.; Vivoni, E. R.; Sampson, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the effects of intensive forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins is critical to achieving water resources sustainability in the water limited Southwestern US, where disturbances to headwater catchment forests, can scale up to significant perturbations of the basin-scale water balance components. In northern Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI) is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of Ponderosa pine along the Mogollon Rim. In this study, we examine the potential impacts of the 4FRI initiative on the hydrology of the Verde, Tonto and Salt rivers, which provide much of the water supply to the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. Long-term (20 year) simulations conducted using the tRIBS physically based spatially distributed model reveal shifts in the spatio-temporal regimes, and in the triggering processes, of runoff and integrated discharge as a response to feasible forest thinning scenarios. Specifically, our analysis suggests that alterations to the interception, evapotranspiration, recharge and snow processes within the forested areas will result in changes to long term water yield, and to extreme (peak and low flow) values. The results are helping local and regional water managers and policy makers to better understand the potential consequences of intensive forest removal and thereby influence decision making related to land use and the management of water resources.

  13. Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Wingerson

    2004-12-15

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

  14. Simulation for Supporting Scale-Up of a Fluidized Bed Reactor for Advanced Water Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simplified kinetic information for phenols degradation as a model. The simulation shows that, by using Fe3+ and Fe2+ mixtures as catalyst, TOC degradation up to 45% was achieved for contaminant range of 40–90 mg/L within 60 min. The concentration profiles and hydrodynamic characteristics were also generated. A subsequent scale-up study was also conducted using similitude method. The analysis shows that up to 10 L working volume, the models developed are applicable. The study proves that, using appropriate modeling and simulation, data can be predicted for designing and operating FBR for wastewater treatment. PMID:25309949

  15. Linear Nitramine (DNDA-57): Synthesis, Scale-Up, Characterization, and Quantitative Estimation by GC/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Naik, N. H.; Gore, G. M.; Sikder, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Dinitro-diaza-alkanes (DNDA-57) are linear nitramine plasticizers and find use in low-temperature sensitivity coefficient propellants. DNDA-57 is a mixture of 2,4-dinitro-2,4-diazapentane (DNDA-5), 2,4-dinitro-2,4-diazahexane (DNDA-6), and 3,5-dinitro-3,5-diazaheptane (DNDA-7) with percentage composition of 40 ± 5%, 44 ± 5% and 11 ± 2%, respectively. The synthesis process of DNDA-57 was established with slight modification of the reaction parameters to obtain good yield and the process was scaled up. The synthesized compound was thoroughly characterized by spectroscopic as well as thermal methods. The present study emphasizes gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC/MS) characterization by electron impact (EI) mode and chemical ionization (CI) mode to determine the fragmentation pattern. Further, the identified components were confirmed with general characterization. The study reveals that DNDA-5, DNDA-6, and DNDA-7 follow identical decomposition pattern. The friction and impact sensitivity study unveils the insensitive nature of DNDA-57.

  16. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  17. Reactive compatibilizer-tracer: A powerful tool for designing, scaling up and optimizing reactive blending processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei-Yun; Feng, Lian-Fang; Zhang, Cai-Liang; Hu, Guo-Hua

    2015-05-01

    A concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer is developed to study reactive polymer blending processes in a twin screw extruder. It is summarized as follows. Fluorescent moieties such as anthracene are attached to a reactive compatibilizer so that the latter can be served both as a compatibilizer and a tracer. When evaluating its compatibilizing efficiency for a polymer blending system, unlike the polymer components of the blend which are continuously fed to the extruder, the reactive compatibilizer-tracer is added as a pulse. The concentration of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer in the polymer blend at the die exit is measured, in-line and in real time, using probes capable of detecting the signal of the emission of fluorescent moieties of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer. In the meantime, the corresponding size of the dispersed phase domains of the blend is determined off-line. These two pieces of information allow assessing the compatibilizing efficiency of a reactive compatibilizer in a much easier manner and using a much smaller amount of compatibilizer. Consequently, the concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer can help select most appropriate compatibilizers under real industrial polymer blending conditions as well as scaling up and/or optimizing them.

  18. A Proven, Industrial Magnetron Sputtering System With Excellent Expansion And Scale-Up Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, D.

    1987-11-01

    Airco Solar Products began as a business unit of Airco Temescal in the early 1970's. The first large area magnetron sputtering deposition occurred in 1974, and the first large area magnetron sputtering system was built and operated under contract to Guardian Industries in Carleton, Michigan in 1977, and was later sold to Guardian. This system continues in three-shift production today. A smaller development system, designed for use in the architectural glass coating industry, was introduced in parallel with the large area coaters. There are now over seventeen of these systems, called the ILS-1600, in use or on order throughout the world. This is a proven, industrial-style development sputter deposition system and has an excellent field record in the areas of versatility and low maintenance requirements. Airco Solar Products has recently begun to market this system into other applications such as the photovoltaics industry, the flat panel display industry and other specialty industries. The features of this system such as overall design, expandability, process scale-up and available options will be discussed. Expanded versions of this system currently in the field will be reviewed, and future applications will be discussed.

  19. Scaling-up permafrost thermal measurements in western Alaska using an ecotype approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William L.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Torre Jorgenson, M.

    2016-10-01

    Permafrost temperatures are increasing in Alaska due to climate change and in some cases permafrost is thawing and degrading. In areas where degradation has already occurred the effects can be dramatic, resulting in changing ecosystems, carbon release, and damage to infrastructure. However, in many areas we lack baseline data, such as subsurface temperatures, needed to assess future changes and potential risk areas. Besides climate, the physical properties of the vegetation cover and subsurface material have a major influence on the thermal state of permafrost. These properties are often directly related to the type of ecosystem overlaying permafrost. In this paper we demonstrate that classifying the landscape into general ecotypes is an effective way to scale up permafrost thermal data collected from field monitoring sites. Additionally, we find that within some ecotypes the absence of a moss layer is indicative of the absence of near-surface permafrost. As a proof of concept, we used the ground temperature data collected from the field sites to recode an ecotype land cover map into a map of mean annual ground temperature ranges at 1 m depth based on analysis and clustering of observed thermal regimes. The map should be useful for decision making with respect to land use and understanding how the landscape might change under future climate scenarios.

  20. Transforming Global Health by Improving the Science of Scale-Up

    PubMed Central

    Kruk, Margaret E.; Yamey, Gavin; Angell, Sonia Y.; Beith, Alix; Cotlear, Daniel; Guanais, Frederico; Jacobs, Lisa; Saxenian, Helen; Victora, Cesar; Goosby, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In its report Global Health 2035, the Commission on Investing in Health proposed that health investments can reduce mortality in nearly all low- and middle-income countries to very low levels, thereby averting 10 million deaths per year from 2035 onward. Many of these gains could be achieved through scale-up of existing technologies and health services. A key instrument to close this gap is policy and implementation research (PIR) that aims to produce generalizable evidence on what works to implement successful interventions at scale. Rigorously designed PIR promotes global learning and local accountability. Much greater national and global investments in PIR capacity will be required to enable the scaling of effective approaches and to prevent the recycling of failed ideas. Sample questions for the PIR research agenda include how to close the gap in the delivery of essential services to the poor, which population interventions for non-communicable diseases are most applicable in different contexts, and how to engage non-state actors in equitable provision of health services in the context of universal health coverage. PMID:26934704

  1. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  2. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  3. Model-based scale-up methodology for aerobic fed-batch bioprocesses: application to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production.

    PubMed

    Monsalve-Bravo, Gloria Milena; Garelli, Fabricio; Mozumder, Md Salatul Islam; Alvarez, Hernan; De Battista, Hernan

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a general model-based methodology to scale-up fed-batch bioprocesses. The idea behind this approach is to establish a dynamics hierarchy, based on a model of the process, that allows the designer to determine the proper scale factors as well as at which point of the fed-batch the process should be scaled up. Here, concepts and tools of linear control theory, such as the singular value decomposition of the Hankel matrix, are exploited in the context of process design. The proposed scale-up methodology is first described in a bioprocesses general framework highlighting its main features, key variables and parameters. Then, it is applied to a polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) fed-batch bioreactor and compared with three empirical criteria, that are traditionally employed to determine the scale factors of these processes, showing the usefulness and distinctive features of this proposal. Moreover, this methodology provides theoretical support to a frequently used empirical rule: scale-up aerobic bioreactors at constant volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient. Finally, similar process dynamic behavior and PHB production set at the laboratory scale are predicted at the new operating scale, while it is also determined that is rarely possible to reproduce similar dynamic behavior of the bioreactor using empirical scale-up criteria.

  4. Comparison of a Traditional Teaching Model to the Scale-Up Teaching Model in Undergraduate Biology: A Mixed Method Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mears, Samantha

    This project compared a SCALE-UP teaching model to a traditional teaching model. Traditional teaching is now considered a poor motivator for student performance and interests, and the SCALE-UP model was proposed to combat these problems. SCALE-UP classrooms are designed to encourage cooperative learning as well as other active learning methods. The study looked at teacher and student opinions of the two models to determine which one they preferred and why. The study also compared the students' grades between the two classes to see if there was a difference between test scores, as well as learning gains for pre-test to post-test. Student and teacher behaviors were also quantified based on categories of engagement in class. The purpose of this study was to support the literature on the idea of a viable and better option to traditional lecture in the form of the SCALE-UP model. Based on the results, students prefer and enjoy a SCALE-UP classroom more than a traditional lecture. The students also performed better and learn more when compared to the traditional lecture class.

  5. Excellence in Physics Education Award: SCALE-UP, Student Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichner, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) Project combines curricula and a specially-designed instructional space to enhance learning. SCALE-UP students practice communication and teamwork skills while performing activities that enhance their conceptual understanding and problem solving skills. This can be done with small or large classes and has been implemented at more than 250 institutions. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. SCALE-UP classtime is spent primarily on ``tangibles'' and ``ponderables''--hands-on measurements/observations and interesting questions. There are also computer simulations (called ``visibles'') and hypothesis-driven labs. Students sit at tables designed to facilitate group interactions. Instructors circulate and engage in Socratic dialogues. The setting looks like a banquet hall, with lively interactions nearly all the time. Impressive learning gains have been measured at institutions across the US and internationally. This talk describes today's students, how lecturing got started, what happens in a SCALE-UP classroom, and how the approach has spread. The SCALE-UP project has greatly benefitted from numerous Grants made by NSF and FIPSE to NCSU and other institutions.

  6. Evaluating Ecotypes as a means of Scaling-up Permafrost Thermal Measurements in Western Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    In many regions, permafrost temperatures are increasing due to climate change and in some cases permafrost is thawing and degrading. In areas where degradation has already occurred the effects can be dramatic, resulting in changing ecosystems, carbon release, and damage to infrastructure. Yet in many areas we lack baseline data, such as subsurface temperatures, needed to assess future changes and potential risk areas. Besides climate, the physical properties of the vegetation cover and subsurface material have a major influence on the thermal state of permafrost. These properties are often directly related to the type of ecosystem overlaying permafrost. Thus, classifying the landscape into general ecotypes might be an effective way to scale up permafrost thermal data. To evaluate using ecotypes as a way of scaling-up permafrost thermal data within a region we selected an area in Western Alaska, the Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, which is on the boundary between continuous and discontinuous permafrost. This region was selected because previously an ecological land classification had been conducted and a very high-resolution ecotype map was generated. Using this information we selected 18 spatially distributed sites covering the most abundant ecotypes, where we are collecting low vertical resolution soil temperature data to a depth of 1.5 meters at most sites. At three additional core sites, we are collecting air temperature, snow depth, and high vertical resolution soil temperature to a depth of 3 meters. The sites were installed in the summers of 2011 and 2012; consequently, we have at least two years of data from all sites. Mean monthly and mean annual air temperature and snow depth for all three core sites are similar within the 2012-2014 period. Additionally, the average air temperature and snow depth from our three cores sites compares well with that of a nearby meteorological station for which long-term data is available. During the study period snow depth

  7. Radio-isotope production scale-up at the University of Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, Robert Jerome

    2014-06-19

    Our intent has been to scale up our production capacity for a subset of the NSAC-I list of radioisotopes in jeopardy, so as to make a significant impact on the projected national needs for Cu-64, Zr-89, Y-86, Ga-66, Br-76, I-124 and other radioisotopes that offer promise as PET synthons. The work-flow and milestones in this project have been compressed into a single year (Aug 1, 2012- July 31, 2013). The grant budget was virtually dominated by the purchase of a pair of dual-mini-cells that have made the scale-up possible, now permitting the Curie-level processing of Cu-64 and Zr-89 with greatly reduced radiation exposure. Mile stones: 1. We doubled our production of Cu-64 and Zr-89 during the grant period, both for local use and out-bound distribution to ≈ 30 labs nationwide. This involved the dove-tailing of beam schedules of both our PETtrace and legacy RDS cyclotron. 2. Implemented improved chemical separation of Zr-89, Ga-66, Y-86 and Sc-44, with remote, semi-automated dissolution, trap-and-release separation under LabView control in the two dual-mini-cells provided by this DOE grant. A key advance was to fit the chemical stream with miniature radiation detectors to confirm the transfer operations. 3. Implemented improved shipping of radioisotopes (Cu-64, Zr-89, Tc-95m, and Ho-163) with approved DOT 7A boxes, with a much-improved FedEx shipping success compared to our previous steel drums. 4. Implemented broad range quantitative trace metal analysis, employing a new microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer (Agilent 4200) capable of ppb sensitivity across the periodic table. This new instrument will prove essential in bringing our radiometals into FDA compliance needing CoA’s for translational research in clinical trials. 5. Expanded our capabilities in target fabrication, with the purchase of a programmable 1600 oC inert gas tube furnace for the smelting of binary alloy target materials. A similar effort makes use of our RF induction furnace, allowing

  8. When does seed limitation matter for scaling up reforestation from patches to landscapes?

    PubMed

    Caughlin, T Trevor; Elliott, Stephen; Lichstein, Jeremy W

    2016-12-01

    Restoring forest to hundreds of millions of hectares of degraded land has become a centerpiece of international plans to sequester carbon and conserve biodiversity. Forest landscape restoration will require scaling up ecological knowledge of secondary succession from small-scale field studies to predict forest recovery rates in heterogeneous landscapes. However, ecological field studies reveal widely divergent times to forest recovery, in part due to landscape features that are difficult to replicate in empirical studies. Seed rain can determine reforestation rate and depends on landscape features that are beyond the scale of most field studies. We develop mathematical models to quantify how landscape configuration affects seed rain and forest regrowth in degraded patches. The models show how landscape features can alter the successional trajectories of otherwise identical patches, thus providing insight into why some empirical studies reveal a strong effect of seed rain on secondary succession, while others do not. We show that seed rain will strongly limit reforestation rate when patches are near a threshold for arrested succession, when positive feedbacks between tree canopy cover and seed rain occur during early succession, and when directed dispersal leads to between-patch interactions. In contrast, seed rain has weak effects on reforestation rate over a wide range of conditions, including when landscape-scale seed availability is either very high or very low. Our modeling framework incorporates growth and survival parameters that are commonly estimated in field studies of reforestation. We demonstrate how mathematical models can inform forest landscape restoration by allowing land managers to predict where natural regeneration will be sufficient to restore tree cover. Translating quantitative forecasts into spatially targeted interventions for forest landscape restoration could support target goals of restoring millions of hectares of degraded land and help

  9. Scale-up studies of the electrosynthesis of dinitrogen pentoxide in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Harrar, J.E.; Quong, R.; Rigdon, L.P.; McGuire, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    The method for the electrosynthesis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} in nitric acid by anodic oxidation of N{sub 2}O{sub 4} has been scaled up to produce quantities of 15 to 50 kg of solution containing 20 to 30 weight percent. A two- or three-cell, divided, plate-and-frame electrolyzer operated in the bipolar mode was employed to test various combinations of candidate electrode coatings and separators, and to study the electrochemical characteristics of the process. Two sizes of electrolyzers were used, each having single-electrode areas of 0.096 and 0.25 m{sup 2}. The best performing anode/substrate materials were either Pt-Ir on niobium, or IrO{sub 2} on aluminum; the best cathode materials were Pt or Pt-Ir on niobium. The preferred cell separator is a hydrophilic, porous polytetrafluorene-ethylene diaphragm, but an FEP-polymer anion-exchange membrane is also satisfactory. Production of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} was achieved with chemical yields of 80 to 90% and current efficiencies of 50 to 70%. Maximum current densities were in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 A/cm{sup 2}. Cell voltages were 3 to 5 V and specific energies were 1.6 to 1.8 kWh/kg. In the electrolyzer catholyte, N{sub 2}O{sub 4} is generated at nearly theoretical yield, and could be recovered and recycled as an anolyte feedstock. The E{sup o{prime}} of the N{sub 2}O{sub 5}/N{sub 2}O{sub 4} couple in anhydrous nitric acid was estimated to be +1.66 {+-} 0.02 V vs. SHE.

  10. Scaled-up separation of cellobiohydrolase1 from a cellulase mixture by ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhuoliang; Lane, Andrew N; Willing, Gerold A; Berson, R Eric

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose often involves cellulases produced by Trichoderma reesei, of which cellobiohydrolase1 (CBH1) is the most abundant (about 60% of total cellulases) and plays an important role in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A method for separating sufficient quantities from the bulk cellulase cocktail is highly desirable for many studies, such as those that aim to characterize binding and hydrolysis kinetics of CBH1. In this work, CBH1 was separated from other Spezyme CP cellulases by ion-exchange chromatography using an efficient modification of a smaller scale process. The ion-exchange column was connected to a vacuum manifold system to provide a steady flow through parallel columns and thus achieve scale-up for enzyme separation. With five 5-mL columns running in parallel, about 55 mg of CBH1 was separated from 145 mg of Spezyme CP in a single separation. Step elution was used to replace the continuous gradient used at smaller scale. The purified CBH1 was collected in the fraction eluted with a buffer containing 0.33 M salt and showed comparable purity and activity as the enzyme purified by a fast protein liquid chromatography system. The stability of separated CBH1 was studied for up to 2 days and good thermal stability was observed. Separated CBH1 also showed both high adsorption to bacterial microcrystalline cellulose with ~4 μmol/g maximum adsorption and a K(a) of 5.55 ± 2.34 μM(-1) , and good hydrolytic activity based on atomic force microscopy observations that show a reduction in fiber height.

  11. Computational Psychotherapy Research: Scaling up the evaluation of patient-provider interactions

    PubMed Central

    Imel, Zac E.; Steyvers, Mark; Atkins, David C.

    2014-01-01

    In psychotherapy, the patient-provider interaction contains the treatment’s active ingredients. However, the technology for analyzing the content of this interaction has not fundamentally changed in decades, limiting both the scale and specificity of psychotherapy research. New methods are required in order to “scale up” to larger evaluation tasks and “drill down” into the raw linguistic data of patient-therapist interactions. In the current paper we demonstrate the utility of statistical text analysis models called topic models for discovering the underlying linguistic structure in psychotherapy. Topic models identify semantic themes (or topics) in a collection of documents (here, transcripts). We used topic models to summarize and visualize 1,553 psychotherapy and drug therapy (i.e., medication management) transcripts. Results showed that topic models identified clinically relevant content, including affective, content, and intervention related topics. In addition, topic models learned to identify specific types of therapist statements associated with treatment related codes (e.g., different treatment approaches, patient-therapist discussions about the therapeutic relationship). Visualizations of semantic similarity across sessions indicate that topic models identify content that discriminates between broad classes of therapy (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy vs. psychodynamic therapy). Finally, predictive modeling demonstrated that topic model derived features can classify therapy type with a high degree of accuracy. Computational psychotherapy research has the potential to scale up the study of psychotherapy to thousands of sessions at a time, and we conclude by discussing the implications of computational methods such as topic models for the future of psychotherapy research and practice. PMID:24866972

  12. Scaling Up Scientific Discovery in Sleep Medicine: The National Sleep Research Resource

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Dennis A.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Mueller, Remo; Kim, Matthew; Rueschman, Michael; Mobley, Daniel; Sahoo, Satya S.; Jayapandian, Catherine P.; Cui, Licong; Morrical, Michael G.; Surovec, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Redline, Susan

    2016-01-01

    . Scaling up scientific discovery in sleep medicine: the National Sleep Research Resource. SLEEP 2016;39(5):1151–1164. PMID:27070134

  13. Scaling up the evaluation of psychotherapy: evaluating motivational interviewing fidelity via statistical text classification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Behavioral interventions such as psychotherapy are leading, evidence-based practices for a variety of problems (e.g., substance abuse), but the evaluation of provider fidelity to behavioral interventions is limited by the need for human judgment. The current study evaluated the accuracy of statistical text classification in replicating human-based judgments of provider fidelity in one specific psychotherapy—motivational interviewing (MI). Method Participants (n = 148) came from five previously conducted randomized trials and were either primary care patients at a safety-net hospital or university students. To be eligible for the original studies, participants met criteria for either problematic drug or alcohol use. All participants received a type of brief motivational interview, an evidence-based intervention for alcohol and substance use disorders. The Motivational Interviewing Skills Code is a standard measure of MI provider fidelity based on human ratings that was used to evaluate all therapy sessions. A text classification approach called a labeled topic model was used to learn associations between human-based fidelity ratings and MI session transcripts. It was then used to generate codes for new sessions. The primary comparison was the accuracy of model-based codes with human-based codes. Results Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses of model-based codes showed reasonably strong sensitivity and specificity with those from human raters (range of area under ROC curve (AUC) scores: 0.62 – 0.81; average AUC: 0.72). Agreement with human raters was evaluated based on talk turns as well as code tallies for an entire session. Generated codes had higher reliability with human codes for session tallies and also varied strongly by individual code. Conclusion To scale up the evaluation of behavioral interventions, technological solutions will be required. The current study demonstrated preliminary, encouraging findings regarding the utility

  14. Scaling up nutrition in fragile and conflict-affected states: the pivotal role of governance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sebastian A J; Perez-Ferrer, Carolina; Griffiths, Andrew; Brunner, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Acute and chronic undernutrition undermine conditions for health, stability and socioeconomic development across the developing world. Although fragile and conflict-affected states have some of the highest rates of undernutrition globally, their response to the multilateral 'Scaling Up Nutrition' (SUN) initiative in its first two-year period was ambivalent. The purpose of this research was to investigate factors affecting fragile and conflict-affected states' engagement with SUN, and to examine what differentiated those fragile states that joined SUN in its first phase from those that did not. Drawing on global databases (Unicef, World Bank, UNDP), and qualitative country case studies (Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sierra Leone, Pakistan and Yemen) we used bivariate logistic regressions and principal component analysis to assess social, economic and political factors across 41 fragile states looking for systematic differences between those that had signed up to SUN before March 2013 (n = 16), and those that had not (n = 25). While prevalence of malnutrition, health system functioning and level of citizen empowerment had little or no impact on a fragile state's likelihood of joining SUN, the quality of governance (QOG) strongly predicted accession. SUN-signatory fragile states scored systematically better on the World Bank's Country Policy and Institutional Assessment (CPIA) and the Worldwide Governance Indicators 'effectiveness of government' indices. We conclude that strengthening governance in fragile states may enhance their engagement with initiatives such as SUN, but also (recognising the potential for endogeneity), that the way aid is structured and delivered in fragile states may be an underlying determinant of whether and how governance in such contexts improves. The research demonstrates that more nuanced analysis of conditions within and among countries classed as 'fragile and conflict-affected' is both possible and necessary if aid

  15. Technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) influenza vaccine manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Barry; Boulanger, Robert; Fino, Mireli; Srivastava, Indresh; Holtz, Kathy; Khramtsov, Nikolai; McPherson, Clifton; Meghrous, Jamal; Kubera, Paul; Cox, Manon M J

    2014-09-22

    Multiple different hemagglutinin (HA) protein antigens have been reproducibly manufactured at the 650L scale by Protein Sciences Corporation (PSC) based on an insect cell culture with baculovirus infection. Significantly, these HA protein antigens were produced by the same Universal Manufacturing process as described in the biological license application (BLA) for the first recombinant influenza vaccine approved by the FDA (Flublok). The technology is uniquely designed so that a change in vaccine composition can be readily accommodated from one HA protein antigen to another one. Here we present a vaccine candidate to combat the recently emerged H7N9 virus as an example starting with the genetic sequence for the required HA, creation of the baculovirus and ending with purified protein antigen (or vaccine component) at the 10L scale accomplished within 38 days under GMP conditions. The same process performance is being achieved at the 2L, 10L, 100L, 650L and 2500L scale. An illustration is given of how the technology was transferred from the benchmark 650L scale facility to a retrofitted microbial facility at the 2500L scale within 100 days which includes the time for facility engineering changes. The successful development, technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok process has major implications for being ready to make vaccine rapidly on a worldwide scale as a defense against pandemic influenza. The technology described does not have the same vulnerability to mutations in the egg adapted strain, and resulting loss in vaccine efficacy, faced by egg based manufacture.

  16. Scale-up model describing the impact of lubrication on tablet tensile strength.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Joseph; Moore, Francis

    2010-10-31

    Lubrication of 2:1 and 1:1 blends of microcrystalline cellulose and spray-dried lactose or dibasic calcium phosphate (DCP) with 0.33% or 1% magnesium stearate, as model free-flowing pharmaceutical formulations, was performed in rotary drum blenders. Blender process parameters examined in this study included type (Bin, V, and Turbula), volume (0.75-Quart to 200-L), fraction of headspace in the blender after the blend is loaded (30-70%), speed (6-202 rpm), and time (up to 225 min). Based on analysis of the experimental data, the following model for the impact of the lubrication process on tablet tensile strength at 0.85 solid fraction, TS(SF=0.85), was obtained, TS(SF=0.85)=TS(SF=0.85,0) [βexp(-γ×V(1/3)×F(headspace)×r)+(1-β)], where V is blender volume, F(headspace) is the headspace fraction, r is the number of revolutions (i.e. speed × time), TS(SF=0.85,0) is the initial tensile strength of the blend, β is the sensitivity of the blend to lubrication, and γ is the lubrication rate constant of the formulation. This model can be used to maintain tensile strength during scale-up, by ensuring that (V(1/3)F(headspace)r)(1)=(V(1/3)F(headspace)r)(2). The model also suggests that formulations with DCP are less sensitive to lubrication and more slowly lubricated than formulations with spray-dried lactose (i.e. smaller β and γ values).

  17. Scaling up the predator functional response in heterogeneous environment: when Holling type III can emerge?

    PubMed

    Cordoleani, Flora; Nerini, David; Morozov, Andrey; Gauduchon, Mathias; Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    2013-11-07

    Accurate parametrization of functional terms in model equations is of great importance for reproducing the dynamics of real food webs. Constructing models over large spatial and temporal scales using mathematical expressions obtained based on microcosm experiments can be erroneous. Here, using a generic spatial predator-prey model, we show that scaling up the microscale functional response of a predator can result in qualitative alterations of functional response on macroscales. In particular, a global functional response of sigmoid type (Holling type III) can emerge as a result of non-linear averaging of non-sigmoid local responses (Holling type I or II). We demonstrate that alteration between the local and the global response in the model is a result of the interplay between density-dependent dispersal of the predator across the habitat and heterogeneity of the environment. Using the method of aggregation of variables, we analytically derive the mathematical formulation of the global functional response as a function of the total amount of prey in the system, and reveal the key parameters which control the emergence of a Holling type III global response. We argue that this mechanism by which a global Holling type III emerges from a local Holling type II response has not been reported in the literature yet: in particular, Holling type III can emerge in the case of a fixed gradient of resource distribution across the habitat, which would be impossible in priorly suggested mechanisms. As a case study, we consider the interaction between phytoplankton and zooplankton grazers in the water column; and we show that the emergence of a Holling type III global response can allow for the efficient top-down regulation of primary producers and stabilization of planktonic ecosystems under eutrophic conditions.

  18. THE FERMI BUBBLES AS A SCALED-UP VERSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-09-20

    In this study, we treat Fermi bubbles as a scaled-up version of supernova remnants (SNRs). The bubbles are created through activities of the super-massive black hole (SMBH) or starbursts at the Galactic center (GC). Cosmic-rays (CRs) are accelerated at the forward shocks of the bubbles like SNRs, which means that we cannot decide whether the bubbles were created by the SMBH or starbursts from the radiation from the CRs. We follow the evolution of CR distribution by solving a diffusion-advection equation, considering the reduction of the diffusion coefficient by CR streaming. In this model, gamma rays are created through hadronic interaction between CR protons and the gas in the Galactic halo. In the GeV band, we can well reproduce the observed flat distribution of gamma-ray surface brightness because some amount of gas is left behind the shock. The edge of the bubbles is fairly sharp owing to the high gas density behind the shock and the reduction of the diffusion coefficient there. The latter also contributes the hard gamma-ray spectrum of the bubbles. We find that the CR acceleration at the shock began when the bubbles were small, and the time scale of the energy injection at the GC was much smaller than the age of the bubbles. We predict that if CRs are accelerated to the TeV regime, the apparent bubble size should be larger in the TeV band, which could be used to discriminate our hadronic model from other leptonic models. We also present neutrino fluxes.

  19. STANFORD IN-SITU HIGH RATE YBCO PROCESS: TRANSFER TO METAL TAPES AND PROCESS SCALE UP

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm R. Beasley; Robert H.Hammond

    2009-04-14

    Executive Summary The materials science understanding of high rate low cost processes for Coated Conductor will benefit the application to power utilities for low loss energy transportation and power generation as well for DOD applications. The research in this program investigated several materials processing approaches that are new and original, and are not being investigated elsewhere. This work added to the understanding of the material science of high rate PVD growth of HTSC YBCO assisted by a liquid phase. A new process discovered uses amorphous glassy precursors which can be made at high rate under flexible conditions of temperature and oxygen, and later brought to conditions of oxygen partial pressure and temperature for rapid conversion to YBCO superconductor. Good critical current densities were found, but further effort is needed to optimize the vortex pinning using known artificial inclusions. A new discovery of the physics and materials science of vortex pinning in the HTSC system using Sm in place of Y came at growth at unusually low oxygen pressure resulting in clusters of a low or non superconducting phase within the nominal high temperature phase. The driving force for this during growth is new physics, perhaps due to the low oxygen. This has the potential for high current in large magnetic fields at low cost, applicable to motors, generators and transformers. The technical demands of this project were the motivation for the development of instrumentation that could be essential to eventual process scale up. These include atomic absorption based on tunable diode lasers for remote monitoring and control of evaporation sources (developed under DARPA support), and the utility of Fourier Transform Infrared Reflectivity (FTIR) for aid in the synthesis of complex thin film materials (purchased by a DURIP-AFOSR grant).

  20. Interagency Collaborative Team Model for Capacity Building to Scale-Up Evidence-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hurlburt, Michael; Aarons, Gregory A; Fettes, Danielle; Willging, Cathleen; Gunderson, Lara; Chaffin, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Background System-wide scale up of evidence-based practice (EBP) is a complex process. Yet, few strategic approaches exist to support EBP implementation and sustainment across a service system. Building on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) implementation framework, we developed and are testing the Interagency Collaborative Team (ICT) process model to implement an evidence-based child neglect intervention (i.e., SafeCare®) within a large children’s service system. The ICT model emphasizes the role of local agency collaborations in creating structural supports for successful implementation. Methods We describe the ICT model and present preliminary qualitative results from use of the implementation model in one large scale EBP implementation. Qualitative interviews were conducted to assess challenges in building system, organization, and home visitor collaboration and capacity to implement the EBP. Data collection and analysis centered on EBP implementation issues, as well as the experiences of home visitors under the ICT model. Results Six notable issues relating to implementation process emerged from participant interviews, including: (a) initial commitment and collaboration among stakeholders, (b) leadership, (c) communication, (d) practice fit with local context, (e) ongoing negotiation and problem solving, and (f) early successes. These issues highlight strengths and areas for development in the ICT model. Conclusions Use of the ICT model led to sustained and widespread use of SafeCare in one large county. Although some aspects of the implementation model may benefit from enhancement, qualitative findings suggest that the ICT process generates strong structural supports for implementation and creates conditions in which tensions between EBP structure and local contextual variations can be resolved in ways that support the expansion and maintenance of an EBP while preserving potential for public health benefit. PMID:27512239

  1. Roller compaction process development and scale up using Johanson model calibrated with instrumented roll data.

    PubMed

    Nesarikar, Vishwas V; Patel, Chandrakant; Early, William; Vatsaraj, Nipa; Sprockel, Omar; Jerzweski, Robert

    2012-10-15

    Roller compaction is a dry granulation process used to convert powder blends into free flowing agglomerates. During scale up or transfer of roller compaction process, it is critical to maintain comparable ribbon densities at each scale in order to achieve similar tensile strengths and subsequently similar particle size distribution of milled material. Similar ribbon densities can be reached by maintaining analogous normal stress applied by the rolls on ribbon for a given gap between rolls. Johanson (1965) developed a model to predict normal stress based on material properties and roll diameter. However, the practical application of Johanson model to estimate normal stress on the ribbon is limited due to its requirement of accurate estimate of nip pressure i.e. pressure at the nip angle. Another weakness of Johanson model is the assumption of a fixed angle of wall friction that leads to use of a fixed nip angle in the model. To overcome the above mentioned limitations, we developed a novel approach using roll force equations based on a modified Johanson model in which the requirement of pressure value at nip angle was eliminated. An instrumented roll on WP120 roller compactor was used to collect normal stress data measured at three locations across the width of a roll (P1, P2, P3), as well as gap and nip angle data on ribbon for placebo and various active blends along with corresponding process parameters. The nip angles were estimated directly using experimental pressure profile data of each run. The roll force equation of Johanson model was validated using normal stress, gap, and nip angle data of the placebo runs. The calculated roll force values compared well with those determined from the roll force equation provided for the Alexanderwerk(®) WP120 roller compactor. Subsequently, the calculation was reversed to estimate normal stress and corresponding ribbon densities as a function of gap and RFU (roll force per unit roll width). A placebo model was developed

  2. Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. First quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1993--December 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.L.

    1993-12-14

    This multidisciplinary study is designed to provide improvements in advanced reservoir characterization techniques. This goal is to be accomplished through: (1) an examination of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability in the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs of Wyoming; (2) the placement of that variation and anisotropy into paleogeographic, depositional, and diagenetic frameworks; (3) the development of pore-system imagery techniques for the calculation of relative permeability; and (4) reservoir simulations testing the impact of relative permeability anisotropy and spatial variation on Tensleep Sandstone reservoir enhanced oil recovery. Concurrent efforts are aimed at understanding the spatial and dynamic alteration in sandstone reservoirs that is caused by rock-fluid interaction during CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery processes. The work focuses on quantifying the interrelationship of fluid-rock interaction with lithologic characterization in terms of changes in relative permeability, wettability, and pore structure, and with fluid characterization in terms of changes in chemical composition and fluid properties. This work will establish new criteria for the susceptibility of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs to formation alteration that results in a change in relative permeability and wellbore scale damage. This task will be accomplished by flow experiments using core material; examination of regional trends in water chemistry; examination of local water chemistry trends on the scale of a field; and chemical modeling of the reservoir and experimental systems in order to scale-up the experiments to reservoir conditions.

  3. Film Permeability Determination Using Static Permeability Cells

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The permeability of tarps to soil fumigant pesticides varies depending on the active ingredient chemical: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methyl bromide, chloropicrin, or other. The diffusion rate can be represented by the mass transfer coefficient (MTC).

  4. Optimization and scale-up of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors using computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Christian; Josten, Andre; Götz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the analysis of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors was developed and used to optimize the scale up of the process. The model includes reaction kinetics data obtained under well defined conditions comparable to the situation in the packed bed. The model was validated in terms of flow conditions and reaction kinetics by comparison with experimental data. Experimental validation and the following model parameter studies by simulation were performed on the basis of a column with 0.3 g oligonucleotide capacity. The scale-up studies based on CFD modelling were calculated on a 440 g scale (oligonucleotide capacity).

  5. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  6. Key considerations in scaling up male circumcision in Tanzania: views of the urban residents in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Francis, Joel M; Kakoko, Deodatus; Tarimo, Edith A M; Munseri, Patricia; Bakari, Muhammad; Sandstrom, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Male circumcision (MC) reduces the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STI) including HIV. The WHO and UNAIDS recommend male circumcision as an additional intervention to prevent HIV infection. Tanzania is embarking on activities to scale up safe male circumcision for HIV prevention and other related health benefits. In line with this, it is crucial to assess views of the population using specific groups. This paper describes perceptions on male circumcision and strategies of enhancing uptake of male circumcision in urban Tanzania using members of the police force. This cross sectional survey was conducted among members of the police force in Dar es Salaam Tanzania from January 2010 to July 2010. The police officer serves as a source of the clinical trial participants in on-going phase I/II HIV vaccine trials. Three hundred and thirteen (313) police officers responded to a self-administered questionnaire that comprised of socio-demographic characteristics, reasons for not circumcising, perceptions regarding circumcision, methods of enhancing male circumcision, communication means and barriers to promote circumcision. This was followed by a physical examination to determine male circumcision status. The prevalence of circumcision was 96%. Most (69%) reported to have been circumcised in the hospital. The reported barriers to male circumcision among adults and children were: anticipation of pain, cost, fear to lose body parts, and lack of advice for adult's circumcision. Sensitization of parents who take children to the reproductive and child health services was recommended by most respondents as the appropriate strategy to promote male circumcision. The least recommended strategy was for the women to sensitize men. Use of radio programs and including male circumcision issues in school curricula as means of enhancing community sensitization regarding male circumcision were also highly recommended. Other recommendations include use of public media, seminars at

  7. Scaling up carbon storage in human-dominated heterogeneous landscapes in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, W.; Brown, D. G.; Kiger, S.; Nassauer, J. I.; Robinson, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    Humans alter vegetation worldwide for a variety of purposes, including production of timber, food, fuelwood, and biofuels. While providing key social and economic benefits, these activities alter vegetation community composition, vertical structure, ecology, and biogeochemistry including carbon cycling. Joint outcomes at the landscape scale, such as ecological and social outcomes, arise over time through coupled social-ecological processes and feedbacks. We focused on measuring and modeling carbon storage in low-density (exurban) residential landscapes in southeastern Michigan, but our findings are relevant for human-dominated vegetation more broadly, particularly scaling up carbon storage in fragmented and spatially heterogeneous tree cover. We studied soil and vegetation carbon storage in 23, 1 km-scale landscapes that had been converted to low-density residential land from agricultural land or forest remnant patches in the last 50 years. The use of three hierarchical spatial scales was key. These included (1) distinct ecological zones at the sub-parcel scale, such as dense trees and shrubs, turfgrass, and turfgrass with sparse woody vegetation; (2) traditional land-cover categories at the sub-1-km scale such as tree cover and impervious surfaces; and (3) differences among four distinct neighborhood types, distinguished by parcel size, road access, and tree cover, at the sub-township to regional scale. Low-density residential land stored ca. 19,000 g C / m2 on average, which is much lower than that of individual old-growth forest patches in the region, but surprisingly similar to C storage in regionally-averaged second-growth forests. In residential land, the presence of large trees was important to C storage but interestingly, many large trees occurred outside of forest patches. Another important location for C storage in our exurban landscapes was soil to 1 m depth, which stored greater C than comparative forests in the region. This high soil C storage arose

  8. Long-Term Outcomes on Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large Scale-Up Program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Seema T.; Chang, Charlotte A.; Eisen, Geoffrey; Jolayemi, Toyin; Banigbe, Bolanle; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background While there has been a rapid global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy programs over the past decade, there are limited data on long-term outcomes from large cohorts in resource-constrained settings. Our objective in this evaluation was to measure multiple outcomes during first-line antiretroviral therapy in a large treatment program in Nigeria. Methods We conducted a retrospective multi-site program evaluation of adult patients (age ≥15 years) initiating antiretroviral therapy between June 2004 and February 2012 in Nigeria. The baseline characteristics of patients were described and longitudinal analyses using primary endpoints of immunologic recovery, virologic rebound, treatment failure and long-term adherence patterns were conducted. Results Of 70,002 patients, 65.2% were female and median age was 35 (IQR: 29–41) years; 54.7% were started on a zidovudine-containing and 40% on a tenofovir-containing first-line regimen. Median CD4+ cell counts for the cohort started at 149 cells/mm3 (IQR: 78–220) and increased over duration of ART. Of the 70,002 patients, 1.8% were reported as having died, 30.1% were lost to follow-up, and 0.1% withdrew from treatment. Overall, of those patients retained and with viral load data, 85.4% achieved viral suppression, with 69.3% achieving suppression by month 6. Of 30,792 patients evaluated for virologic failure, 24.4% met criteria for failure and of 45,130 evaluated for immunologic failure, 34.0% met criteria for immunologic failure, with immunologic criteria poorly predicting virologic failure. In adjusted analyses, older age, ART regimen, lower CD4+ cell count, higher viral load, and inadequate adherence were all predictors of virologic failure. Predictors of immunologic failure differed slightly, with age no longer predictive, but female sex as protective; additionally, higher baseline CD4+ cell count was also predictive of failure. Evaluation of long-term adherence patterns revealed that the majority of patients

  9. Spatial Translation and Scaling Up of LID Practices in Deer Creek Watershed in East Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vittorio, Damien

    This study investigated two important aspects of hydrologic effects of low impact development (LID) practices at the watershed scale by (1) examining the potential benefits of scaling up of LID design, and (2) evaluating downstream effects of LID design and its spatial translation within a watershed. The Personal Computer Storm Water Management Model (PCSWMM) was used to model runoff reduction with the implementation of LID practices in Deer Creek watershed (DCW), Missouri. The model was calibrated from 2003 to 2007 (R2 = 0.58 and NSE = 0.57), and validated from 2008 to 2012 (R2 = 0.64 and NSE = 0.65) for daily direct runoff. Runoff simulated for the study period, 2003 to 2012 (NSE = 0.61; R2 = 0.63), was used as the baseline for comparison to LID scenarios. Using 1958 areal imagery to assign land cover, a predevelopment scenario was constructed and simulated to assess LID scenarios' ability to restore predevelopment hydrologic conditions. The baseline and all LID scenarios were simulated using 2006 National Land Cover Dataset. The watershed was divided in 117 subcatchments, which were clustered in six groups of approximately equal areas and two scaling concepts consisting of incremental scaling and spatial scaling were modelled. Incremental scaling was investigated using three LID practices (rain barrel, porous pavement, and rain garden). Each LID practice was simulated at four implementation levels (25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) in all subcatchments for the study period (2003 to 2012). Results showed an increased runoff reduction, ranging from 3% to 31%, with increased implementation level. Spatial scaling was investigated by increasing the spatial extent of LID practices using the subcatchment groups and all three LID practices (combined) implemented at 50% level. Results indicated that as the spatial extent of LID practices increased the runoff reduction at the outlet also increased, ranging from 3% to 19%. Spatial variability of LID implementation was examined by

  10. Teacher Teams and School Processes in Scaling-Up a Content Literacy Innovation in High Schools. Final Report: The Evaluation of the Scale-Up of Reading Apprenticeship through the Reading Apprenticeship Improving Secondary Education (RAISE) Project. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Denis; Zacamy, Jenna; Lazarev, Valeriy; Lin, Li; Jaciw, Andrew P.; Hegseth, Whitney

    2015-01-01

    We report on the scaling up of a high school content literacy framework, Reading Apprenticeship, over a period of four years as part of the independent evaluation of an Investing in Innovation grant from the U.S. Department of Education to WestEd's Strategic Literacy Institute (SLI). Our goal was to understand the school processes that support…

  11. Culture scale-up studies as seen from the viewpoint of oxygen supply and dissolved carbon dioxide stripping.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naoki; Kano, Kenjiro; Maki, Yasuyuki; Dobashi, Toshiaki

    2009-04-01

    Oxygen supply and dissolved carbon dioxide (dCO(2)) stripping are two of the most important control parameters in cell culture. In this study, we investigated the effect of scale-up on the volumetric gas transfer coefficient with bioreactors of different sizes (working volume: 80 L, 500 L, 2000 L, and 10,000 L; aspect ratio: 1.0-1.6). Sparging air into water increased the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a), an index of oxygen supply efficiency, by scale-up roughly in proportion to the depth of the water. A corresponding increase in k(L)a was found in a real cell culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells. dCO(2) stripping efficiency was evaluated in water tests using changes in k(L)a(co2), an index defined in relation to k(L)a. k(L)a(co2) increased following surface aeration, but the rate of increase was reduced by scale-up, which was attributed to a decrease in the liquid surface-to-volume ratio. A similar decrease in efficiency was observed in a 2000 L bioreactor by increasing the liquid volume at constant liquid surface area. The observed scale-up effects are discussed based on a simple theoretical consideration.

  12. Scaling Up HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Africa. What Can Evaluation Studies Tell Us About Potential Prevention Impacts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Although there is a widespread belief that scaling up HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) programs in Africa will have large prevention benefits through reductions in risk behaviors, these claims are difficult to establish from existing evaluations of VCT. Considerations from behavioral models and the available data suggest that as VCT…

  13. Beginning with sustainable scale up in mind: initial results from a population, health and environment project in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Ghiron, Laura; Shillingi, Lucy; Kabiswa, Charles; Ogonda, Godfrey; Omimo, Antony; Ntabona, Alexis; Simmons, Ruth; Fajans, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Small-scale pilot projects have demonstrated that integrated population, health and environment approaches can address the needs and rights of vulnerable communities. However, these and other types of health and development projects have rarely gone on to influence larger policy and programme development. ExpandNet, a network of health professionals working on scaling up, argues this is because projects are often not designed with future sustainability and scaling up in mind. Developing and implementing sustainable interventions that can be applied on a larger scale requires a different mindset and new approaches to small-scale/pilot testing. This paper shows how this new approach is being applied and the initial lessons from its use in the Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin Project currently underway in Uganda and Kenya. Specific lessons that are emerging are: 1) ongoing, meaningful stakeholder engagement has significantly shaped the design and implementation, 2) multi-sectoral projects are complex and striving for simplicity in the interventins is challenging, and 3) projects that address a sharply felt need experience substantial pressure for scale up, even before their effectiveness is established. Implicit in this paper is the recommendation that other projects would also benefit from applying a scale-up perspective from the outset.

  14. Community Health Workers in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: What Do We Know About Scaling Up and Sustainability?

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Dilpreet; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Taylor, Lauren; Curry, Leslie; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to provide a systematic review of the determinants of success in scaling up and sustaining community health worker (CHW) programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Methods. We searched 11 electronic databases for academic literature published through December 2010 (n = 603 articles). Two independent reviewers applied exclusion criteria to identify articles that provided empirical evidence about the scale-up or sustainability of CHW programs in LMICs, then extracted data from each article by using a standardized form. We analyzed the resulting data for determinants and themes through iterated categorization. Results. The final sample of articles (n = 19) present data on CHW programs in 16 countries. We identified 23 enabling factors and 15 barriers to scale-up and sustainability, which were grouped into 3 thematic categories: program design and management, community fit, and integration with the broader environment. Conclusions. Scaling up and sustaining CHW programs in LMICs requires effective program design and management, including adequate training, supervision, motivation, and funding; acceptability of the program to the communities served; and securing support for the program from political leaders and other health care providers. PMID:23678926

  15. Scaling up Corporate Social Investments in Education: Five Strategies That Work. Global Views. Policy Paper 2012-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Fleet, Justin W.

    2012-01-01

    Scaling up good corporate social investment practices in developing countries is crucial to realizing the "Education for All" and "Millennium Development Goals". Yet very few corporate social investments have the right mix of vision, financing, cross-sector engagement and leadership to come to scale. Globally, 67 million…

  16. Collaboration, negotiation, and coalescence for interagency-collaborative teams to scale-up evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Aarons, Gregory A; Fettes, Danielle L; Hurlburt, Michael S; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Gunderson, Lara; Willging, Cathleen E; Chaffin, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Implementation and scale-up of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is often portrayed as involving multiple stakeholders collaborating harmoniously in the service of a shared vision. In practice, however, collaboration is a more complex process that may involve shared and competing interests and agendas, and negotiation. The present study examined the scale-up of an EBP across an entire service system using the Interagency Collaborative Team approach. Participants were key stakeholders in a large-scale county-wide implementation of an EBP to reduce child neglect, SafeCare. Semistructured interviews and/or focus groups were conducted with 54 individuals representing diverse constituents in the service system, followed by an iterative approach to coding and analysis of transcripts. The study was conceptualized using the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment framework. Although community stakeholders eventually coalesced around implementation of SafeCare, several challenges affected the implementation process. These challenges included differing organizational cultures, strategies, and approaches to collaboration; competing priorities across levels of leadership; power struggles; and role ambiguity. Each of the factors identified influenced how stakeholders approached the EBP implementation process. System-wide scale-up of EBPs involves multiple stakeholders operating in a nexus of differing agendas, priorities, leadership styles, and negotiation strategies. The term collaboration may oversimplify the multifaceted nature of the scale-up process. Implementation efforts should openly acknowledge and consider this nexus when individual stakeholders and organizations enter into EBP implementation through collaborative processes.

  17. Schinus terebinthifolius countercurrent chromatography (Part II): Intra-apparatus scale-up and inter-apparatus method transfer.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fernanda das Neves; Vieira, Mariana Neves; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Jerz, Gerold; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães; Ignatova, Svetlana

    2016-09-30

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) is being widely used across the world for purification of various materials, especially in natural product research. The predictability of CCC scale-up has been successfully demonstrated using specially designed instruments of the same manufacturer. The reality is that the most of CCC users do not have access to such instruments and do not have enough experience to transfer methods from one CCC column to another. This unique study of three international teams is based on innovative approach to simplify the scale-up between different CCC machines using fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius berries dichloromethane extract as a case study. The optimized separation methodology, recently developed by the authors (Part I), was repeatedly performed on CCC columns of different design available at most research laboratories across the world. Hexane - ethyl acetate - methanol - water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was used as solvent system with masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids as target compounds to monitor stationary phase retention and calculate peak resolution. It has been demonstrated that volumetric, linear and length scale-up transfer factors based on column characteristics can be directly applied to different i.d., volume and length columns independently on instrument make in an intra-apparatus scale-up and inter-apparatus method transfer.

  18. Scale-Up of Safe & Civil Schools' Model for School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolkowski, Keith; Strycker, Lisa; Ward, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the scale-up of a Safe & Civil Schools "Foundations: Establishing Positive Discipline Policies" positive behavioral interventions and supports initiative through 4 years of "real-world" implementation in a large urban school district. The study extends results from a previous randomized controlled trial…

  19. School Processes That Can Drive Scaling-Up of an Innovation, or Contribute to Its Abandonment. Conference Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacamy, Jenna; Newman, Denis; Lazarev, Valeriy; Lin, Li

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a multi-year study of the scale-up of Reading Apprenticeship (RA), an approach to improve academic literacy by helping teachers provide the support students need to be successful readers in the content areas. WestEd's Strategic Literacy Initiative (SLI), began developing the program in 1995 and has since reached…

  20. Scale up tools in reactive extrusion and compounding processes. Could 1D-computer modeling be helpful?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradel, J.-L.; David, C.; Quinebèche, S.; Blondel, P.

    2014-05-01

    Industrial scale-up (or scale down) in Compounding and Reactive Extrusion processes is one of the most critical R&D challenges. Indeed, most of High Performances Polymers are obtained within a reactive compounding involving chemistry: free radical grafting, in situ compatibilization, rheology control... but also side reactions: oxidation, branching, chain scission... As described by basic Arrhenius and kinetics laws, the competition between all chemical reactions depends on residence time distribution and temperature. Then, to ensure the best possible scale up methodology, we need tools to match thermal history of the formulation along the screws from a lab scale twin screw extruder to an industrial one. This paper proposes a comparison between standard scale-up laws and the use of Computer modeling Software such as Ludovic® applied and compared to experimental data. Scaling data from a compounding line to another one, applying general rules (for example at constant specific mechanical energy), shows differences between experimental and computed data, and error depends on the screw speed range. For more accurate prediction, 1D-Computer Modeling could be used to optimize the process conditions to ensure the best scale-up product, especially in temperature sensitive reactive extrusion processes. When the product temperature along the screws is the key, Ludovic® software could help to compute the temperature profile along the screws and extrapolate conditions, even screw profile, on industrial extruders.

  1. Collaboration, Negotiation, and Coalescence for Interagency-Collaborative Teams to Scale-up Evidence-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Fettes, Danielle; Hurlburt, Michael; Palinkas, Lawrence; Gunderson, Lara; Willging, Cathleen; Chaffin, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective Implementation and scale-up of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is often portrayed as involving multiple stakeholders collaborating harmoniously in the service of a shared vision. In practice, however, collaboration is a more complex process that may involve shared and competing interests and agendas, and negotiation. The present study examined the scale-up of an EBP across an entire service system using the Interagency Collaborative Team (ICT) approach. Methods Participants were key stakeholders in a large-scale county-wide implementation of an EBP to reduce child neglect, SafeCare®. Semi-structured interviews and/or focus groups were conducted with 54 individuals representing diverse constituents in the service system, followed by an iterative approach to coding and analysis of transcripts. The study was conceptualized using the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) framework. Results Although community stakeholders eventually coalesced around implementation of SafeCare, several challenges affected the implementation process. These challenges included differing organizational cultures, strategies, and approaches to collaboration, competing priorities across levels of leadership, power struggles, and role ambiguity. Each of the factors identified influenced how stakeholders approached the EBP implementation process. Conclusions System wide scale-up of EBPs involves multiple stakeholders operating in a nexus of differing agendas, priorities, leadership styles, and negotiation strategies. The term collaboration may oversimplify the multifaceted nature of the scale-up process. Implementation efforts should openly acknowledge and consider this nexus when individual stakeholders and organizations enter into EBP implementation through collaborative processes. PMID:24611580

  2. Evidence and AIDS activism: HIV scale-up and the contemporary politics of knowledge in global public health.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The HIV epidemic is widely recognised as having prompted one of the most remarkable intersections ever of illness, science and activism. The production, circulation, use and evaluation of empirical scientific 'evidence' played a central part in activists' engagement with AIDS science. Previous activist engagement with evidence focused on the social and biomedical responses to HIV in the global North as well as challenges around ensuring antiretroviral treatment (ART) was available in the global South. More recently, however, with the roll-out and scale-up of large public-sector ART programmes and new multi-dimensional prevention efforts, the relationships between evidence and activism have been changing. Scale-up of these large-scale treatment and prevention programmes represents an exciting new opportunity while bringing with it a host of new challenges. This paper examines what new forms of evidence and activism will be required to address the challenges of the scaling-up era of HIV treatment and prevention. It reviews some recent controversies around evidence and HIV scale-up and describes the different forms of evidence and activist strategies that will be necessary for a robust response to these new challenges.

  3. Evidence and AIDS activism: HIV scale-up and the contemporary politics of knowledge in global public health

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV epidemic is widely recognised as having prompted one of the most remarkable intersections ever of illness, science and activism. The production, circulation, use and evaluation of empirical scientific ‘evidence’ played a central part in activists’ engagement with AIDS science. Previous activist engagement with evidence focused on the social and biomedical responses to HIV in the global North as well as challenges around ensuring antiretroviral treatment (ART) was available in the global South. More recently, however, with the roll-out and scale-up of large public-sector ART programmes and new multi-dimensional prevention efforts, the relationships between evidence and activism have been changing. Scale-up of these large-scale treatment and prevention programmes represents an exciting new opportunity while bringing with it a host of new challenges. This paper examines what new forms of evidence and activism will be required to address the challenges of the scaling-up era of HIV treatment and prevention. It reviews some recent controversies around evidence and HIV scale-up and describes the different forms of evidence and activist strategies that will be necessary for a robust response to these new challenges. PMID:24498918

  4. Impact of SCALE-UP on science teaching self-efficacy of students in general education science courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassani, Mary Kay Kuhr

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two pedagogical models used in general education science on non-majors' science teaching self-efficacy. Science teaching self-efficacy can be influenced by inquiry and cooperative learning, through cognitive mechanisms described by Bandura (1997). The Student Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) model of inquiry and cooperative learning incorporates cooperative learning and inquiry-guided learning in large enrollment combined lecture-laboratory classes (Oliver-Hoyo & Beichner, 2004). SCALE-UP was adopted by a small but rapidly growing public university in the southeastern United States in three undergraduate, general education science courses for non-science majors in the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters. Students in these courses were compared with students in three other general education science courses for non-science majors taught with the standard teaching model at the host university. The standard model combines lecture and laboratory in the same course, with smaller enrollments and utilizes cooperative learning. Science teaching self-efficacy was measured using the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument - B (STEBI-B; Bleicher, 2004). A science teaching self-efficacy score was computed from the Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PTSE) factor of the instrument. Using non-parametric statistics, no significant difference was found between teaching models, between genders, within models, among instructors, or among courses. The number of previous science courses was significantly correlated with PTSE score. Student responses to open-ended questions indicated that students felt the larger enrollment in the SCALE-UP room reduced individual teacher attention but that the large round SCALE-UP tables promoted group interaction. Students responded positively to cooperative and hands-on activities, and would encourage inclusion of more such activities in all of the

  5. High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-up and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Ben; Turk, Brian; Denton, David; Gupta, Raghubir

    2015-09-30

    Gasification is a technology for clean energy conversion of diverse feedstocks into a wide variety of useful products such as chemicals, fertilizers, fuels, electric power, and hydrogen. Existing technologies can be employed to clean the syngas from gasification processes to meet the demands of such applications, but they are expensive to build and operate and consume a significant fraction of overall parasitic energy requirements, thus lowering overall process efficiency. RTI International has developed a warm syngas desulfurization process (WDP) utilizing a transport-bed reactor design and a proprietary attrition-resistant, high-capacity solid sorbent with excellent performance replicated at lab, bench, and pilot scales. Results indicated that WDP technology can improve both efficiency and cost of gasification plants. The WDP technology achieved ~99.9% removal of total sulfur (as either H2S or COS) from coal-derived syngas at temperatures as high as 600°C and over a wide range of pressures (20-80 bar, pressure independent performance) and sulfur concentrations. Based on the success of these tests, RTI negotiated a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy for precommercial testing of this technology at Tampa Electric Company’s Polk Power Station IGCC facility in Tampa, Florida. The project scope also included a sweet water-gas-shift process for hydrogen enrichment and an activated amine process for 90+% total carbon capture. Because the activated amine process provides some additional non-selective sulfur removal, the integration of these processes was expected to reduce overall sulfur in the syngas to sub-ppmv concentrations, suitable for most syngas applications. The overall objective of this project was to mitigate the technical risks associated with the scale up and integration of the WDP and carbon dioxide capture technologies, enabling subsequent commercial-scale demonstration. The warm syngas cleanup pre-commercial test unit

  6. Scaling up carbonyl sulfide (COS) fluxes from leaf and soil to the canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fulin; Yakir, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) with atmospheric concentrations around 500 ppt is an analog of CO2 which can potentially serve as powerful and much needed tracer of photosynthetic CO2 uptake, and global gross primary production (GPP). However, questions remain regarding the application of this approach due to uncertainties in the contributions of different ecosystem components to the canopy scale fluxes of COS. We used laser quantum cascade spectroscopy in combination with soil and branch chambers, and eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem exchange fluxes of COS and CO2 (NEE) in citrus orchard during the driest summer month to test our ability to integrate the chamber measurements into the ecosystem fluxes. The results indicated that: 1) Soil fluxes showed clear gradient from continuous uptake under the trees in wet soil of up to -4 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 emission of ~0.5 umol m-2s-1) to emission in dry hot and exposed soil between rows of trees of up to +3 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 emission of ~11 umol m-2s-1). In all cases a clear correlation between fluxes and soil temperature was observed. 2) At the leaf scale, midday uptake was ~5.5 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 uptake of ~1.8 umol m-2s-1). Some nighttime COS uptake was observed in the citrus leaves consistent with nocturnal leaf stomatal conductance. Leaf relative uptake (LRU) of COS vs. CO2 was not constant over the diurnal cycle, but showed exponential correlation with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime. 3) At the canopy scale mid-day summer flux reached -12.0 pmol m-2s-1 (NEE ~6 umol m-2s-1) with the diurnal patterns of COS fluxes following those of CO2 fluxes during the daytime, but with small COS uptake fluxes maintained also during the night when significant CO2 emission fluxes were observed. The canopy-scale fluxes always indicated COS uptake, irrespective of the soil emission effects. GPP estimates were consistent with conventional indirect estimates based on NEE and nocturnal measurements. Scaling up

  7. Systems approach to monitoring and evaluation guides scale up of the Standard Days Method of family planning in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Igras, Susan; Sinai, Irit; Mukabatsinda, Marie; Ngabo, Fidele; Jennings, Victoria; Lundgren, Rebecka

    2014-05-01

    There is no guarantee that a successful pilot program introducing a reproductive health innovation can also be expanded successfully to the national or regional level, because the scaling-up process is complex and multilayered. This article describes how a successful pilot program to integrate the Standard Days Method (SDM) of family planning into existing Ministry of Health services was scaled up nationally in Rwanda. Much of the success of the scale-up effort was due to systematic use of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) data from several sources to make midcourse corrections. Four lessons learned illustrate this crucially important approach. First, ongoing M&E data showed that provider training protocols and client materials that worked in the pilot phase did not work at scale; therefore, we simplified these materials to support integration into the national program. Second, triangulation of ongoing monitoring data with national health facility and population-based surveys revealed serious problems in supply chain mechanisms that affected SDM (and the accompanying CycleBeads client tool) availability and use; new procedures for ordering supplies and monitoring stockouts were instituted at the facility level. Third, supervision reports and special studies revealed that providers were imposing unnecessary medical barriers to SDM use; refresher training and revised supervision protocols improved provider practices. Finally, informal environmental scans, stakeholder interviews, and key events timelines identified shifting political and health policy environments that influenced scale-up outcomes; ongoing advocacy efforts are addressing these issues. The SDM scale-up experience in Rwanda confirms the importance of monitoring and evaluating programmatic efforts continuously, using a variety of data sources, to improve program outcomes.

  8. Scaling up paediatric HIV care with an integrated, family-centred approach: an observational case study from Uganda.

    PubMed

    Luyirika, Emmanuel; Towle, Megan S; Achan, Joyce; Muhangi, Justus; Senyimba, Catherine; Lule, Frank; Muhe, Lulu

    2013-01-01

    Family-centred HIV care models have emerged as an approach to better target children and their caregivers for HIV testing and care, and further provide integrated health services for the family unit's range of care needs. While there is significant international interest in family-centred approaches, there is a dearth of research on operational experiences in implementation and scale-up. Our retrospective case study examined best practices and enabling factors during scale-up of family-centred care in ten health facilities and ten community clinics supported by a non-governmental organization, Mildmay, in Central Uganda. Methods included key informant interviews with programme management and families, and a desk review of hospital management information systems (HMIS) uptake data. In the 84 months following the scale-up of the family-centred approach in HIV care, Mildmay experienced a 50-fold increase of family units registered in HIV care, a 40-fold increase of children enrolled in HIV care, and nearly universal coverage of paediatric cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. The Mildmay experience emphasizes the importance of streamlining care to maximize paediatric capture. This includes integrated service provision, incentivizing care-seeking as a family, creating child-friendly service environments, and minimizing missed paediatric testing opportunities by institutionalizing early infant diagnosis and provider-initiated testing and counselling. Task-shifting towards nurse-led clinics with community outreach support enabled rapid scale-up, as did an active management structure that allowed for real-time review and corrective action. The Mildmay experience suggests that family-centred approaches are operationally feasible, produce strong coverage outcomes, and can be well-managed during rapid scale-up.

  9. Systems approach to monitoring and evaluation guides scale up of the Standard Days Method of family planning in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Igras, Susan; Sinai, Irit; Mukabatsinda, Marie; Ngabo, Fidele; Jennings, Victoria; Lundgren, Rebecka

    2014-01-01

    There is no guarantee that a successful pilot program introducing a reproductive health innovation can also be expanded successfully to the national or regional level, because the scaling-up process is complex and multilayered. This article describes how a successful pilot program to integrate the Standard Days Method (SDM) of family planning into existing Ministry of Health services was scaled up nationally in Rwanda. Much of the success of the scale-up effort was due to systematic use of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) data from several sources to make midcourse corrections. Four lessons learned illustrate this crucially important approach. First, ongoing M&E data showed that provider training protocols and client materials that worked in the pilot phase did not work at scale; therefore, we simplified these materials to support integration into the national program. Second, triangulation of ongoing monitoring data with national health facility and population-based surveys revealed serious problems in supply chain mechanisms that affected SDM (and the accompanying CycleBeads client tool) availability and use; new procedures for ordering supplies and monitoring stockouts were instituted at the facility level. Third, supervision reports and special studies revealed that providers were imposing unnecessary medical barriers to SDM use; refresher training and revised supervision protocols improved provider practices. Finally, informal environmental scans, stakeholder interviews, and key events timelines identified shifting political and health policy environments that influenced scale-up outcomes; ongoing advocacy efforts are addressing these issues. The SDM scale-up experience in Rwanda confirms the importance of monitoring and evaluating programmatic efforts continuously, using a variety of data sources, to improve program outcomes. PMID:25276581

  10. Informing policy and programme decisions for scaling up the PMTCT and paediatric HIV response through joint technical missions.

    PubMed

    Jashi, Mariam; Viswanathan, Rekha; Ekpini, Rene; Chandan, Upjeet; Idele, Priscilla; Luo, Chewe; Legins, Ken; Chatterjee, Anirban

    2013-07-01

    In 2005, due to slow global progress in the scale-up of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and paediatric HIV programmes, the Inter-agency Task Team (IATT) on the Prevention of HIV infection among Pregnant Women, Mothers, and their Children initiated joint technical missions (JTMs) to countries of high HIV disease burden. The JTMs were intended to galvanize country actions for a more comprehensive response to PMTCT and paediatric HIV by bringing national and global stakeholders together to review national policies and programmes and develop country-specific recommendations for accelerating scale-up. Between 2005 and 2010, the IATT conducted JTMs in 18 low- and middle-income countries. In 2007, to assess the role played by the missions, a review in the first eight countries (Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, India, Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia) that hosted JTMs was undertaken. Country progress was assessed through desk review and key informant interviews. For each country, documents reviewed included JTM reports, baseline data for PMTCT and paediatric HIV care and treatment, and 2004 to 2007 trend data on key PMTCT and paediatric HIV indicators. Drawing upon the findings, this paper posits that JTMs contributed to national scale-up of PMTCT and paediatric HIV programmes through strengthening governance and co-ordination mechanisms for the programmes, promoting enabling policy environments, and supporting the development of national scale-up plans, which have been critical for leveraging additional financial resources for scale-up. Although the impact of the JTMs could be enhanced through greater follow-up and continued targeted assistance in technical areas such as infant and young child feeding, community-based programming and supply chain management, findings indicate that the JTMs are a useful mechanism for informing policy and programme decisions necessary for scaling up PMTCT and paediatric HIV responses. Moreover, by bringing

  11. Permeability of Dentine

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Farid Bin Che

    2003-01-01

    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it. PMID:23365497

  12. Two stage hydrolysis of corn stover at high solids content for mixing power saving and scale-up applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2015-11-01

    A two stage hydrolysis of corn stover was designed to solve the difficulties between sufficient mixing at high solids content and high power input encountered in large scale bioreactors. The process starts with the quick liquefaction to convert solid cellulose to liquid slurry with strong mixing in small reactors, then followed the comprehensive hydrolysis to complete saccharification into fermentable sugars in large reactors without agitation apparatus. 60% of the mixing energy consumption was saved by removing the mixing apparatus in large scale vessels. Scale-up ratio was small for the first step hydrolysis reactors because of the reduced reactor volume. For large saccharification reactors in the second step, the scale-up was easy because of no mixing mechanism was involved. This two stage hydrolysis is applicable for either simple hydrolysis or combined fermentation processes. The method provided a practical process option for industrial scale biorefinery processing of lignocellulose biomass.

  13. Supporting Replication and Scale-Up of Evidence-Based Home Visiting Programs: Assessing the Implementation Knowledge Base

    PubMed Central

    Del Grosso, Patricia; Supplee, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, researchers, policymakers, and practitioners have expressed a growing interest in the use of interventions with scientific evidence of effectiveness. Reproducing positive effects shown in research, however, requires more than simply adopting an evidence-based program. There is growing recognition across disciplines of the importance of implementation research to guide adoption, replication, and scale-up of evidence-based interventions. We evaluate the state of the knowledge base supporting replication and scale-up of evidence-based programs by reviewing information on implementation included in the research literature on 22 home visiting programs that have or are building an evidence base. We used the Interactive Systems Framework for Dissemination and Implementation to assess programs. PMID:25033117

  14. Lessons learned from scaling up a community-based health program in the Upper East Region of northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Awoonor-Williams, John Koku; Sory, Elias Kavinah; Nyonator, Frank K; Phillips, James F; Wang, Chen; Schmitt, Margaret L

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ghana's Community-Based Health Planning and Service (CHPS) initiative is envisioned to be a national program to relocate primary health care services from subdistrict health centers to convenient community locations. The initiative was launched in 4 phases. First, it was piloted in 3 villages to develop appropriate strategies. Second, the approach was tested in a factorial trial, which showed that community-based care could reduce childhood mortality by half in only 3 years. Then, a replication experiment was launched to clarify appropriate activities for implementing the fourth and final phase—national scale up. This paper discusses CHPS progress in the Upper East Region (UER) of Ghana, where the pace of scale up has been much more rapid than in the other 9 regions of the country despite exceedingly challenging economic, ecological, and social circumstances. The UER employed 5 strategies that facilitated scale up: (1) nurse recruitment from their home districts to improve worker morale and cultural grounding, balanced with some social distance from the village community to ensure client confidentiality, particularly regarding family planning use; (2) prioritization of CHPS planning and continuous review in management meetings to make necessary modifications to the initiative's approach; (3) community engagement and advocacy to local politicians to mobilize resources for financing start-up costs; (4) a shared and consistent vision about CHPS among health administration leaders to ensure appropriate resources and commitment to the initiative; and (5) knowledge exchange visits between new and advanced CHPS implementers to facilitate learning and scale up within and between districts. PMID:25276522

  15. Improving the Network Scale-Up Estimator: Incorporating Means of Sums, Recursive Back Estimation, and Sampling Weights

    PubMed Central

    Habecker, Patrick; Dombrowski, Kirk; Khan, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Researchers interested in studying populations that are difficult to reach through traditional survey methods can now draw on a range of methods to access these populations. Yet many of these methods are more expensive and difficult to implement than studies using conventional sampling frames and trusted sampling methods. The network scale-up method (NSUM) provides a middle ground for researchers who wish to estimate the size of a hidden population, but lack the resources to conduct a more specialized hidden population study. Through this method it is possible to generate population estimates for a wide variety of groups that are perhaps unwilling to self-identify as such (for example, users of illegal drugs or other stigmatized populations) via traditional survey tools such as telephone or mail surveys—by asking a representative sample to estimate the number of people they know who are members of such a “hidden” subpopulation. The original estimator is formulated to minimize the weight a single scaling variable can exert upon the estimates. We argue that this introduces hidden and difficult to predict biases, and instead propose a series of methodological advances on the traditional scale-up estimation procedure, including a new estimator. Additionally, we formalize the incorporation of sample weights into the network scale-up estimation process, and propose a recursive process of back estimation “trimming” to identify and remove poorly performing predictors from the estimation process. To demonstrate these suggestions we use data from a network scale-up mail survey conducted in Nebraska during 2014. We find that using the new estimator and recursive trimming process provides more accurate estimates, especially when used in conjunction with sampling weights. PMID:26630261

  16. Scaling Up of Breastfeeding Promotion Programs in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: the “Breastfeeding Gear” Model12

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Curry, Leslie; Minhas, Dilpreet; Taylor, Lauren; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Breastfeeding (BF) promotion is one of the most cost-effective interventions to advance mother–child health. Evidence-based frameworks and models to promote the effective scale up and sustainability of BF programs are still lacking. A systematic review of peer-reviewed and gray literature reports was conducted to identify key barriers and facilitators for scale up of BF programs in low- and middle-income countries. The review identified BF programs located in 28 countries in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Asia. Study designs included case studies, qualitative studies, and observational quantitative studies. Only 1 randomized, controlled trial was identified. A total of 22 enabling factors and 15 barriers were mapped into a scale-up framework termed “AIDED” that was used to build the parsimonious breastfeeding gear model (BFGM). Analogous to a well-oiled engine, the BFGM indicates the need for several key “gears” to be working in synchrony and coordination. Evidence-based advocacy is needed to generate the necessary political will to enact legislation and policies to protect, promote, and support BF at the hospital and community levels. This political-policy axis in turn drives the resources needed to support workforce development, program delivery, and promotion. Research and evaluation are needed to sustain the decentralized program coordination “gear” required for goal setting and system feedback. The BFGM helps explain the different levels of performance in national BF outcomes in Mexico and Brazil. Empirical research is recommended to further test the usefulness of the AIDED framework and BFGM for global scaling up of BF programs. PMID:23153733

  17. Program to Develop High Strength Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Mill Products - Phase IV-B-Scale - up to 3200 lb Billet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-25

    Part 31. 5. "Design Mechanical Properties, Fracture Toughness, Fatigue Properties, Exfoliation and Stress - Corrosion Resistance of 7050 Sheet, Plate...Forgings, P/M Processing, Fracture Toughness, Stress Corrosion , Fatigue f— rSSTRACT (Continue on reverse side it necessary and Identify by block...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGEfWlan Data Bntend) 20. Continued and stress corrosion compared to existing commercial I/M alloys. Scaled-up P/M extrusions and die

  18. Mobilizing women's groups for improved maternal and newborn health: evidence for impact, and challenges for sustainability and scale up.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2012-10-01

    Research conducted over the past decade has shown that community-based interventions can improve the survival and health of mothers and newborns in low- and middle-income countries. Interventions engaging women's groups in participatory learning and action meetings and other group activities, for example, have led to substantial increases in neonatal survival in high-mortality settings. Participatory interventions with women's groups work by providing a forum for communities to develop a common understanding of maternal and neonatal problems, as well as locally acceptable and sustainable strategies to address these. Potential partners for scaling up interventions with women's groups include government community health workers and volunteers, as well as organizations working with self-help groups. It is important to tailor scale-up efforts to local contexts, while retaining fidelity to the intervention, by ensuring that the mobilization of women's groups complements other local programs (e.g. home visits), and by providing capacity building for participatory learning and action methods across a range of nongovernmental organizations and government stakeholders. Research into scale-up mechanisms and effectiveness is needed to inform further implementation, and prospective surveillance of maternal and neonatal mortality in key scale-up sites can provide valuable data for measuring impact and for advocacy. There is a need for further research into the role of participatory interventions with women's groups to improve the quality of health services, health, and nutrition beyond the perinatal period, as well as the role of groups in influencing non-health issues, such as women's decision-making power.

  19. Scaling up of breastfeeding promotion programs in low- and middle-income countries: the "breastfeeding gear" model.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Curry, Leslie; Minhas, Dilpreet; Taylor, Lauren; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2012-11-01

    Breastfeeding (BF) promotion is one of the most cost-effective interventions to advance mother-child health. Evidence-based frameworks and models to promote the effective scale up and sustainability of BF programs are still lacking. A systematic review of peer-reviewed and gray literature reports was conducted to identify key barriers and facilitators for scale up of BF programs in low- and middle-income countries. The review identified BF programs located in 28 countries in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Asia. Study designs included case studies, qualitative studies, and observational quantitative studies. Only 1 randomized, controlled trial was identified. A total of 22 enabling factors and 15 barriers were mapped into a scale-up framework termed "AIDED" that was used to build the parsimonious breastfeeding gear model (BFGM). Analogous to a well-oiled engine, the BFGM indicates the need for several key "gears" to be working in synchrony and coordination. Evidence-based advocacy is needed to generate the necessary political will to enact legislation and policies to protect, promote, and support BF at the hospital and community levels. This political-policy axis in turn drives the resources needed to support workforce development, program delivery, and promotion. Research and evaluation are needed to sustain the decentralized program coordination "gear" required for goal setting and system feedback. The BFGM helps explain the different levels of performance in national BF outcomes in Mexico and Brazil. Empirical research is recommended to further test the usefulness of the AIDED framework and BFGM for global scaling up of BF programs.

  20. Scale-up of Routine Viral Load Testing in Resource-Poor Settings: Current and Future Implementation Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Teri; Cohn, Jennifer; Bonner, Kimberly; Hargreaves, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Despite immense progress in antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up, many people still lack access to basic standards of care, with our ability to meet the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS 90-90-90 treatment targets for HIV/AIDS dependent on dramatic improvements in diagnostics. The World Health Organization recommends routine monitoring of ART effectiveness using viral load (VL) testing at 6 months and every 12 months, to monitor treatment adherence and minimize failure, and will publish its VL toolkit later this year. However, the cost and complexity of VL is preventing scale-up beyond developed countries and there is a lack of awareness among clinicians as to the long-term patient benefits and its role in prolonging the longevity of treatment programs. With developments in this diagnostic field rapidly evolving—including the recent improvements for accurately using dried blood spots and the imminent appearance to the market of point-of-care technologies offering decentralized diagnosis—we describe current barriers to VL testing in resource-limited settings. Effective scale-up can be achieved through health system and laboratory system strengthening and test price reductions, as well as tackling multiple programmatic and funding challenges. PMID:26743094

  1. Up-scaling expectations among Pakistan's HIV bureaucrats: entrepreneurs of the self and job precariousness post-scale-up.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ayaz

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has documented how the expansion of HIV programming has produced new subjectivities among the recipients of interventions. However, this paper contends that changes in politics, power and subjectivities may also be seen among the HIV bureaucracy in the decade of scale-up. One year's ethnographic fieldwork was conducted among AIDS control officials in Pakistan at a moment of rolling back a World Bank-financed Enhanced Programme. In 2003, the World Bank convinced the Musharraf regime to scale up the HIV response, offering a multimillion dollar soft loan package. I explore how the Enhanced Programme initiated government employees into a new transient work culture and turned the AIDS control programmes into a hybrid bureaucracy. However, the donor money did not last long and individuals' entrepreneurial abilities were tested in a time of crisis engendered by dependence on aid, leaving them precariously exposed to job insecurity, and undermining the continuity of AIDS prevention and treatment in the country. I do not offer a story of global 'best practices' thwarted by local 'lack of capacity', but an ethnographic critique of the transnational HIV apparatus and its neoliberal underpinning. I suggest that this Pakistan-derived analysis is more widely relevant in the post-scale-up decade.

  2. Sustainability and scale-up of household water treatment and safe storage practices: Enablers and barriers to effective implementation.

    PubMed

    Ojomo, Edema; Elliott, Mark; Goodyear, Lorelei; Forson, Michael; Bartram, Jamie

    2015-11-01

    Household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) provides a solution, when employed correctly and consistently, for managing water safety at home. However, despite years of promotion by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), governments and others, boiling is the only method to achieve scale. Many HWTS programs have reported strong initial uptake and use that then decreases over time. This study maps out enablers and barriers to sustaining and scaling up HWTS practices. Interviews were carried out with 79 practitioners who had experience with HWTS programs in over 25 countries. A total of 47 enablers and barriers important to sustaining and scaling up HWTS practices were identified. These were grouped into six domains: user guidance on HWTS products; resource availability; standards, certification and regulations; integration and collaboration; user preferences; and market strategies. Collectively, the six domains cover the major aspects of moving products from development to the consumers. It is important that each domain is considered in all programs that aim to sustain and scale-up HWTS practices. Our findings can assist governments, NGOs, and other organizations involved in HWTS to approach programs more effectively and efficiently.

  3. What are the constraints and opportunities for HIVST scale-up in Africa? Evidence from Kenya, Malawi and South Africa

    PubMed Central

    van Rooyen, Heidi; Tulloch, Olivia; Mukoma, Wanjiru; Makusha, Tawanda; Chepuka, Lignet; Knight, Lucia C; Peck, Roger B; Lim, Jeanette M; Muturi, Nelly; Chirwa, Ellen; Taegtmeyer, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV self-testing (HIVST) has the potential to increase uptake of HIV testing among untested populations in sub-Saharan Africa and is on the brink of scale-up. However, it is unclear to what extent HIVST would be supported by stakeholders, what policy frameworks are in place and how variations between contexts might influence country-preparedness for scale-up. This qualitative study assessed the perceptions of HIVST among stakeholders in three sub-Saharan countries. Methods Fifty-four key informant interviews were conducted in Kenya (n=16), Malawi (n=26) and South Africa (n=12) with government policy makers, academics, activists, donors, procurement specialists, laboratory practitioners and health providers. A thematic analysis was conducted in each country and a common coding framework allowed for inter-country analysis to identify common and divergent themes across contexts. Results Respondents welcomed the idea of an accurate, easy-to-use, rapid HIV self-test which could increase testing across all populations. High-risk groups, such as men, Men who have sex with men (MSM), couples and young people in particular, could be targeted through a range of health facility and community-based distribution points. HIVST is already endorsed in Kenya, and political support for scale-up exists in South Africa and Malawi. However, several caveats remain. Further research, policy and ensuing guidelines should consider how to regulate, market and distribute HIVST, ensure quality assurance of tests and human rights, and critically, link testing to appropriate support and treatment services. Low literacy levels in some target groups would also need context-specific consideration before scale up. World Health Organization (WHO) policy and regulatory frameworks are needed to guide the process in those areas which are new or specific to self-testing. Conclusions Stakeholders in three HIV endemic sub-Saharan countries felt that HIVST will be an important complement to

  4. Permeability of porour rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K.; Rust, A.; Wright, H.; Roberge, J.

    2003-04-01

    The development of permeability in bubble-bearing magmas determines the efficiency of volatile escape during their ascent through volcanic conduits, which, in turn, controls their explosive potential. As permeability requires bubble connectivity, relationships between permeability and porosity in silicic magmas must be controlled by the formation, growth, deformation and coalescence of their constituent bubbles. Although permeability data on porous volcanic pyroclasts are limited, the database can be greatly extended by including data for ceramic and metallic foams1. Several studies indicate that a single number does not adequately describe the permeability of a foam because inertial effects, which predominate at high flow rates, cause deviations from Darcy's law. These studies suggest that permeability is best modeled using the Forschheimer equation to determine both the Darcy permeability (k1) and the non-Darcian (k2) permeability. Importantly, at the high porosities of ceramic foams (75-95%), both k1 and k2 are strongly dependent on pore size and geometry, suggesting that measurement of these parameters provides important information on foam structure. We determined both the connected porosity (by He-pycnometry) and the permeability (k1 and k2) of rhyolitic samples having a wide range in porosity (22-85%) and vesicle textures. In general, these data support previous observations of a power law relationship between connected porosity and Darcy permeability2. In detail, variations in k1 increase at higher porosities. Similarly, k2 generally increases in both mean and standard deviation with increasing porosity. Measurements made on three mutually perpendicular cores from individual pumice clasts suggest that some of the variability can be explained by anisotropy in the vesicle structure. By comparison with ceramic foams, we suggest that the remaining variability results from differences either in average vesicle size or, more likely, in the size of apertures

  5. Investigation of remote sensing scale up for hot cell waste tank applications. CPAC optical moisture monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report discusses work done to investigate the feasibility of using non-contact optical absorption to remotely sense the surface moisture content of salt cake materials. Optical measurements were made in a dimensionally scaled setup to investigate this technique for in-situ waste tank applications. Moisture measurements were obtained from BY-104 simulant samples with 0 wt%, 10 wt%, and 20 wt% moisture content using the back-scattered light from a pulsed infrared optical parametric converter (OPC) laser source operating from 1.51 to 2.12 micron. An InGaAs detector, with 0.038 steradian solid angle (hemisphere = 6.28 steradians) collection angle was used to detect the back-scattered light. This work indicated that there was sufficient back-scatter from the BY-104 material to provide an indication of the surface moisture content.

  6. Permeability of edible coatings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Khatkar, B S; Garg, M K; Wilson, L A

    2010-01-01

    The permeabilities of water vapour, O2 and CO2 were determined for 18 coating formulations. Water vapour transmission rate ranged from 98.8 g/m(2).day (6% beeswax) to 758.0 g/m(2).day (1.5% carboxymethyl cellulose with glycerol). O2 permeability at 14 ± 1°C and 55 ± 5% RH ranged from 1.50 to 7.95 cm(3)cm cm(-2)s(-1)Pa(-1), with CO2 permeability 2 to 6 times as high. Permeability to noncondensable gases (O2 and CO2) was higher for hydrophobic (peanut oil followed by beeswax) coatings as compared to hydrophilic (whey protein concentrate and carboxymethyl cellulose).

  7. Large Scale Solar Velocities on Time Scales up to Thirty Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, John Gunther

    1997-08-01

    This work studied solar supergranulation and methods of improving solar oscillation measurements. The supergranulation size scale and lifetime were found to be independent of heliographic latitude. The observed supergranule size scales were 31.7 ± 1.6 Mm in the East-West direction and 32.0 ± 1.6 Mm in the North-South direction; the mean lifetime was 23.4 ± 1.1 hours. Persistent granules were observed with the sizes of ~60 Mm and lifetimes of up to 160 hours, these features were found to affect supergranule lifetime measurements. Improvements of solar oscillation measurements were sought through three means: active region noise modeling, simulation the GONG instrument, and merging GONG data with IRIS data. The active region noise model, MDV, was tested and found promising. A simulation revealed a transmission profile ripple in the GONG instrument which could explain the observed velocity errors. A technique for merging GONG and IRIS data was developed and tested with satisfactory results.

  8. Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Compositional and first-contact miscible simulations of viscous fingering and gravity segregation are compared to show that the two techniques can give very different results. Also, analyzed are two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in which gravity segregation and viscous fingering interact. The simulations show that 2D and 3D flows can differ significantly. A comparison of analytical solutions for three-component two-phase flow with experimental results for oil/water/alcohol systems is reported. While the experiments and theory show reasonable agreement, some differences remain to be explained. The scaling behavior of the interaction of gravity segregation and capillary forces is investigated through simulations and through scaling arguments based on analysis of the differential equations. The simulations show that standard approaches do not agree well with results of low IFT displacements. The scaling analyses, however, reveal flow regimes where capillary, gravity, or viscous forces dominate the flow.

  9. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Compositional and first-contact miscable simulations of viscous fingering and gravity segregation are compared to show that the two techniques can give very different results. Also, analyzed are two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in which gravity segregation and viscous fingering interact. The simulations show that 2D and 3D flows can differ significantly. A comparison of analytical solutions for three-component two-phase flow with experimental results for oil/water/alcohol systems is reported. While the experiments and theory show reasonable agreement, some differences remain to be explained. The scaling behavior of the interaction of gravity segregation and capillary forces is investigated through simulations and through scaling arguments based on analysis of the differential equations. The simulations show that standard approaches do not agree well with results of low IFT displacements. The scaling analyses, however, reveal flow regimes where capillary, gravity, or viscous forces dominate the flow.

  10. Scale-up of green nanoscience pathway for optically transparent nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Druffel, Thad; Mulic, Ines; Isaacs, Steven; Powers, Galen

    2011-03-16

    A technology to deposit multi-layered thin films with discrete refractive indices over wide areas and onto highly flexible substrates simply does not exist. Vision Dynamics LLC (VDL) has developed andcommercialized inorganic-organic nanocomposite coatings systems for the ophthalmic industry that maintain high transparency even though the inorganic nanoparticles occupy over half of the volume of the nanocomposite. Enormous commercial opportunities exist for this technology as anti-reflective coatings on consumer electronic displays ($24B annually), solar cells with improved transmission ($10B annually), UV-protection coatings for organic solar cells, and thermal management coatings for architectural windows. In this SBIR phase I project, the team set out to prove feasibility of extending deposition of familiar nanocomposite chemistry over wide-areas using a roll-to-roll manufacturing technique. The team approached this project by generalizing tasks into three different hubs: 1) implementation of green design principles, 2) synthesis and formulation of nanoparticle dispersions, and 3) implementing roll-to-roll process and conducting spray-coating feasibility studies. The team has successfully prepared dispersions of titania nanoparticles with average particle size of 15 nm and narrow size distributions. The particles have been functionalized with methacryloxylpropyltrimethoxysilane and formulated with dipentaeurythritol dipentaacrylate monomer and 1 hydroxycyclohexylphenyl ketone as a photo-initiator. With the aid of collaborators at the University of Kentucky, the team developed a hydroxide audita to assess the number of available hydroxyl groups present on a variety of metal oxide nanoparticles as a function of measured surface area (from BET measurements) and overall hydroxide content (from TGA measurements). The developed procedure can be used for future optimization of the silanization procedure. In addition, the team has shown that nanoparticles with

  11. Scaling up multi-camera tracking for real-world deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Yogesh; Gong, Shaogang

    2012-10-01

    A user-assisted multi-camera tracking system employing several key novel methodologies has previously been shown to be highly effective in assisting human users in tracking targets of interest through industry-standard-LIDS multi-camera benchmark data.1 A prototype system was developed in order to test and evaluate the effectiveness of this approach. In this paper, we develop this system further in order to improve tracking accuracy and further facilitate scalability to arbitrary numbers of camera views across much larger spatial areas and different locations. Specifically, we describe the following three areas of improvement: (1) dynamic learning mechanisms apply user feedback in adapting internal models to improve performance over time; (2) modular design and hardware acceleration techniques are explored with a view to real-time performance, extensive configurability to leverage available hardware and scalability to larger datasets; and (3) re-design of the user interface for deployment as a secure asynchronous remote web-based service. We conduct an extensive evaluation of the system in terms of: (1) tracking performance; and (2) the speed of the system in computation and in usage over a network. We use a newly collected real-world dataset significantly more challenging than i-LIDS, which comprises six cameras covering two London Underground stations. We show that: (1) dynamic learning is effective; (2) the user-assisted paradigm retains its effectiveness with this significantly more challenging dataset; (3) large-scale deployment and real-time computation is feasible due to linear scalability; (4) context-aware user search strategies and external non-visual information can aid search convergence; and (5) storage and querying of meta-data is a bottleneck to be overcome.

  12. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Use of streamtube to model multiphase flow is demonstrated to be a fast and accurate approach for displacements that are dominated by reservoir heterogeneity. The streamtube technique is particularly powerful for multiphase compositional displacements because it represents the effects of phase behavior with a one-dimensional flow and represents the effects of heterogeneity through the locations of streamtubes. A new approach for fast calculations of critical tie-lines directly from criticality conditions is reported. A global triangular structure solution for four-component flow systems, whose tie-lies meet at the edge of a quaternary phase diagram or lie in planes is presented. Also demonstrated is the extension of this solution to multicomponent systems under the same assumptions. The interplay of gravity, capillary and viscous forces on final residual oil saturation is examined experimentally and theoretically. The analysis of vertical equilibrium conditions for three-phase gravity drainage shows that almost all oil can be recovered from the top part of a reservoir. The prediction of spreading and stability of thin film is performed to investigate three-phase gravity drainage mechanisms. Finally, experimental results from gravity drainage of crude oil in the presence of CO{sub 2} suggest that gravity drainage could be an efficient oil recovery process for vertically fractured reservoirs.

  13. Comparison of Steady State Method and Transient Methods for Water Permeability Measurement in Low Permeability Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulin, P. F.; Bretonnier, P.; Gland, N.

    2010-12-01

    Very low permeability geomaterials (order of nanoDarcy (10-21 m2)), such as clays rocks, are studied for many industrial applications such as production from unconventional reserves of oil and gas, CO2 geological storage and deep geological disposal of high-level long-lived nuclear wastes. For these last two applications, clay efficiency as barrier relies mainly on their very low permeability. Laboratory measurement of low permeability to water (below 10-19 m2) remains a technical challenge. Some authors argue that steady state methods are irrelevant due to the time required to stabilize water fluxes in such low permeability media. Most of the authors measuring low permeabilities use a transient technique called pulse decay. This study aims to compare objectively these different types of permeability tests performed on a single clay sample. For the steady state method, a high precision pump was used to impose a pressure gradient and to measure the small resulting water flow rate at steady state. We show that with a suitable set-up, the steady state method enables to measure a very low permeability of 8 10-22 m2 in a period of three days. For a comparable duration, the pulse decay test, most commonly used for such low permeability measurements, provides only an average estimate of the permeability. Permeability measurements by pulse decay require to perform simulations to interpret the pressure relaxation signals. Many uncertainties remain such as the determination of the reservoirs storage factor, micro leakage effect, or the determination of the initial pulse pressure. All these uncertainties have a very significant impact on the determination of sample permeability and specific storage. Opposite to the wide-spread idea that transient techniques are required to measure very low permeability, we show that direct steady state measurement of water permeability with suitable equipments can be much faster and more accurate than measurement by pulse decay, especially in

  14. Scaling up delivery of contraceptive implants in sub-Saharan Africa: operational experiences of Marie Stopes International

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, Susan; Thurston, Sarah; Weinberger, Michelle; Nuccio, Olivia; Fuchs-Montgomery, Nomi

    2014-01-01

    Contraceptive implants offer promising opportunities for addressing the high and growing unmet need for modern contraceptives in sub-Saharan Africa. Marie Stopes International (MSI) offers implants as one of many family planning options. Between 2008 and 2012, MSI scaled up voluntary access to implants in 15 sub-Saharan African countries, from 80,041 implants in 2008 to 754,329 implants in 2012. This 9-fold increase amounted to more than 1.7 million implants delivered cumulatively over the 5-year period. High levels of client satisfaction were attained alongside service provision scale up by using existing MSI service delivery channels—mobile outreach, social franchising, and clinics—to implement strategies that broadened access for underserved clients and maintained service quality. Use of adaptive and context-specific service delivery models and attention to key operational components, including sufficient numbers of trained providers, strong supply chains, diverse financing mechanisms, and implant removal services, underpinned our service delivery efforts. Accounting for 70% of the implants delivered by MSI in 2012, mobile outreach services through dedicated MSI provider teams played a central role in scale-up efforts, fueled in part by the provision of free or heavily subsidized services. Social franchising also demonstrated promise for future program growth, along with MSI clinics. Continued high growth in implant provision between 2011 and 2012 in all sub-Saharan African countries indicates the region's capacity for further service delivery expansion. Meeting the expected rising demand for implants and ensuring long-term sustainable access to the method, as part of a comprehensive method mix, will require continued use of appropriate service delivery models, effective operations, and ongoing collaboration between the private, public, and nongovernmental sectors. MSI's experience can be instructive for future efforts to ensure contraceptive access and

  15. Bioprocess integration for human mesenchymal stem cells: from up to downstream processing scale-up to cell proteome characterization.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Bárbara; Aguiar, Tiago; Carvalho, Sofia B; Silva, Marta M; Gomes, Ricardo A; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Peixoto, Cristina; Serra, Margarida; Alves, Paula M

    2017-02-04

    To deliver the required cell numbers and doses to therapy, scaling-up production and purification processes (at least to the liter-scale) while maintaining cells' characteristics is compulsory. Therefore, the aim of this work was to prove scalability of an integrated streamlined bioprocess compatible with current good manufacturing practices (cGMP) comprised by cell expansion, harvesting and volume reduction unit operations using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) isolated from bone marrow (BM-MSC) and adipose tissue (AT-MSC). BM-MSC and AT-MSC expansion and harvesting steps were scaled-up from spinner flasks to 2L scale stirred tank single-use bioreactor using synthetic microcarriers and xeno-free medium, ensuring high cellular volumetric productivities (50×10(6) cell.L(-1).day(-1)), expansion factors (14-16 fold) and cell recovery yields (80%). For the concentration step, flat sheet cassettes (FSC) and hollow fiber cartridges (HF) were compared showing a fairly linear scale-up, with a need to slightly decrease the permeate flux (30-50 LMH, respectively) to maximize cell recovery yield. Nonetheless, FSC allowed to recover 18% more cells after a volume reduction factor of 50. Overall, at the end of the entire bioprocess more than 65% of viable (>95%) hMSC could be recovered without compromising cell's critical quality attributes (CQA) of viability, identity and differentiation potential. Alongside the standard quality assays for evaluating hMSC's CQA, a proteomics workflow based on mass spectrometry tools was established to characterize the impact of processing on hMSC' CQA; These analytical tools constitute a powerful tool to be used in process design and development.

  16. Scaling up delivery of contraceptive implants in sub-Saharan Africa: operational experiences of Marie Stopes International.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Susan; Thurston, Sarah; Weinberger, Michelle; Nuccio, Olivia; Fuchs-Montgomery, Nomi

    2014-02-01

    Contraceptive implants offer promising opportunities for addressing the high and growing unmet need for modern contraceptives in sub-Saharan Africa. Marie Stopes International (MSI) offers implants as one of many family planning options. Between 2008 and 2012, MSI scaled up voluntary access to implants in 15 sub-Saharan African countries, from 80,041 implants in 2008 to 754,329 implants in 2012. This 9-fold increase amounted to more than 1.7 million implants delivered cumulatively over the 5-year period. High levels of client satisfaction were attained alongside service provision scale up by using existing MSI service delivery channels-mobile outreach, social franchising, and clinics-to implement strategies that broadened access for underserved clients and maintained service quality. Use of adaptive and context-specific service delivery models and attention to key operational components, including sufficient numbers of trained providers, strong supply chains, diverse financing mechanisms, and implant removal services, underpinned our service delivery efforts. Accounting for 70% of the implants delivered by MSI in 2012, mobile outreach services through dedicated MSI provider teams played a central role in scale-up efforts, fueled in part by the provision of free or heavily subsidized services. Social franchising also demonstrated promise for future program growth, along with MSI clinics. Continued high growth in implant provision between 2011 and 2012 in all sub-Saharan African countries indicates the region's capacity for further service delivery expansion. Meeting the expected rising demand for implants and ensuring long-term sustainable access to the method, as part of a comprehensive method mix, will require continued use of appropriate service delivery models, effective operations, and ongoing collaboration between the private, public, and nongovernmental sectors. MSI's experience can be instructive for future efforts to ensure contraceptive access and choice

  17. Scaling up watershed model parameters: flow and load simulations of the Edisto River Basin, South Carolina, 2007-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Benedict, Stephen T.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to expand the understanding of relations among hydrologic, geochemical, and ecological processes that affect fish-tissue mercury concentrations within the Edisto River Basin, analyses and simulations of the hydrology of the Edisto River Basin were made using the topography-based hydrological model (TOPMODEL). A primary focus of the investigation was to assess the potential for scaling up a previous application of TOPMODEL for the McTier Creek watershed, which is a small headwater catchment to the Edisto River Basin. Scaling up was done in a step-wise manner, beginning with applying the calibration parameters, meteorological data, and topographic-wetness-index data from the McTier Creek TOPMODEL to the Edisto River TOPMODEL. Additional changes were made for subsequent simulations, culminating in the best simulation, which included meteorological and topographic wetness index data from the Edisto River Basin and updated calibration parameters for some of the TOPMODEL calibration parameters. The scaling-up process resulted in nine simulations being made. Simulation 7 best matched the streamflows at station 02175000, Edisto River near Givhans, SC, which was the downstream limit for the TOPMODEL setup, and was obtained by adjusting the scaling factor, including streamflow routing, and using NEXRAD precipitation data for the Edisto River Basin. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of model-fit efficiency and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for simulation 7 were 0.78 and 0.89, respectively. Comparison of goodness-of-fit statistics between measured and simulated daily mean streamflow for the McTier Creek and Edisto River models showed that with calibration, the Edisto River TOPMODEL produced slightly better results than the McTier Creek model, despite the substantial difference in the drainage-area size at the outlet locations for the two models (30.7 and 2,725 square miles, respectively). Along with the TOPMODEL

  18. Application of twin screw extrusion to the manufacture of cocrystals: scale-up of AMG 517-sorbic acid cocrystal production.

    PubMed

    Daurio, Dominick; Nagapudi, Karthik; Li, Lan; Quan, Peter; Nunez, Fernando-Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    The application of twin screw extrusion (TSE) in the scale-up of cocrystal production was investigated by using AMG 517-sorbic acid as a model system. Extrusion parameters that influenced conversion to the cocrystal such as temperature, feed rate and screw speed were investigated. Extent of conversion to the cocrystal was found to have a strong dependence on temperature and a moderate dependence on feed rate and screw speed. Cocrystals made by the TSE process were found to have superior mechanical properties than solution grown cocrystals. Additionally, moving to a TSE process eliminated the need for solvent.

  19. WWC Review of the Report "Evaluation of the i3 Scale-up of Reading Recovery Year One Report, 2011-12." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    For the 2013 study, "Evaluation of the i3 Scale-up of Reading Recovery Year One Report, 2011-12," researchers examined the Year 1 impacts of the Investing in Innovation (i3) scale-up of "Reading Recovery"®, a short-term intervention for struggling readers, on the reading achievement of first-grade students. The analytic sample…

  20. Identifying the Characteristics of Effective High Schools: Report from Year One of the National Center on Scaling up Effective Schools. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Stacey; Cohen-Vogel, Lora; Osborne-Lampkin, La'Tara

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Scaling up Effective Schools (NCSU) is a five-year project working to develop, implement, and test new processes to scale up effective practices in high schools that districts will be able to apply within the context of their own unique goals and circumstances. This report describes the activities and findings of the first…

  1. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults.

  2. Scaling Up: Kilolumen Solid-State Lighting Exceeding 100 LPW via Remote Phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Waqidi Falicoff

    2008-09-15

    This thirty-month project was successful in attaining its ambitious objectives of demonstrating a radically novel 'remote-phosphor' LED light source that can out-perform conventional conformal coated phosphor LED sources. Numerous technical challenges were met with innovative techniques and optical configurations. This product development program for a new generation of solid-state light sources has attained unprecedented luminosity (over 1 kilo-lumen) and efficacy (based on the criterion lumens per 100mw radiant blue). LPI has successfully demonstrated its proprietary technology for optical synthesis of large uniform sources out of the light output of an array of separated LEDs. Numerous multiple blue LEDs illuminate single a phosphor patch. By separating the LEDs from the phosphor, the phosphor and LEDs operate cooler and with higher efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions (from startup to steady state). Other benefits of the system include: better source uniformity, more types of phosphor can be used (chemical interaction and high temperatures are no longer an issue), and the phosphor can be made up from a pre-manufactured sheet (thereby lowering cost and complexity of phosphor deposition). Several laboratory prototypes were built and operated at the expected high performance level. The project fully explored two types of remote phosphor system: transmissive and reflective. The first was found to be well suited for a replacement for A19 type incandescent bulbs, as it was able to replicate the beam pattern of a traditional filament bulb. The second type has the advantages that it is pre-collimate source that has an adjustable color temperature. The project was divided in two phases: Phase I explored a transmissive design and Phase II of the project developed reflective architectures. Additionally, in Phase II the design of a spherical emitting transmissive remote phosphor bulb was developed that is suitable for replacement of A19 and similar light

  3. Capacity utilization and the cost of primary care visits: Implications for the costs of scaling up health interventions

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Taghreed; Ebener, Steeve; Johns, Benjamin; Evans, David B

    2008-01-01

    Objective A great deal of international attention has been focussed recently on how much additional funding is required to scale up health interventions to meet global targets such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Most of the cost estimates that have been made in response have assumed that unit costs of delivering services will not change as coverage increases or as more and more interventions are delivered together. This is most unlikely. The main objective of this paper is to measure the impact of patient load on the cost per visit at primary health care facilities and the extent to which this would influence estimates of the costs and financial requirements to scale up interventions. Methods Multivariate regression analysis was used to explore the determinants of variability in unit costs using data for 44 countries with a total of 984 observations. Findings Controlling for other possible determinants, we find that the cost of an outpatient visit is very sensitive to the number of patients seen by providers each day at primary care facilities. Each 1% increase in patient through-put results, on average, in a 27% reduction in the cost per visit (p < 0.0001), which can lead to a difference of up to $30 in the observed costs of an outpatient visit at primary facilities in the same setting, other factors held constant. Conclusion Variability in capacity utilization, therefore, need to be taken into account in cost estimates, and the paper develops a method by which this can be done. PMID:19014524

  4. FatMan vs. LittleBoy: Scaling up Linear Algebraic Operations in Scale-out Data Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Seung-Hwan; Xu, Luna; Butt, Ali R; Sukumar, Sreenivas Rangan; Kannan, Ramakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Linear algebraic operations such as matrix manipulations form the kernel of many machine learning and other crucial algorithms. Scaling up as well as scaling out such algorithms are highly desirable to enable efficient processing over millions of data points. To this end, we present a matrix manipulation approach to effectively scale-up each node in a scale-out data parallel platform such as Apache Spark. Specifically, we enable hardware acceleration for matrix multiplications in a distributed Spark setup without user intervention. Our approach supports both dense and sparse distributed matrices, and provides flexible control of acceleration by matrix density. We demonstrate the benefit of our approach for generalized matrix multiplication operations over large matrices with up to four billion elements. To connect the effectiveness of our approach with machine learning applications, we performed Gramian matrix computation via generalized matrix multiplications. Our experiments show that our approach achieves more than 2x performance speed-up, and up to 96.1% computation improvement, compared to a state of the art Spark MLlib for dense matrices.

  5. Towards high power output of scaled-up benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) using multiple electron collectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingchuan; Williams, Isaiah; Li, Yan; Wang, Lei; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios; McCutcheon, Jeffrey; Li, Baikun

    2016-05-15

    This study aimed at achieving high power output of benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) with novel geometric anode setups (inverted tube granular activated charcoal (IT-GAC) and carbon cloth roll (CCR)) and multiple anodes/electron collectors. The lab-scale tests showed the power density of IT-GAC and CCR anodes achieved at 2.92 and 2.55 W m(-2), the highest value ever reported in BMFCs. The power density of BMFCs substantially increased with electron collector number (titanium rods) in anodes. The connection of multiple electron collectors with multiple cathodes had much higher total voltage/current output than that with single cathode. The possibility of maintaining high power density at scaled-up BMFCs was explored by arranging multiple anodes in sediment. The compact configuration of multiple CCR anodes contacting each other did not deteriorate the performance of individual anodes, showing the feasibility of maximizing anode numbers per sediment footprint and achieving high power output. Multiple IT-GAC and CCR anodes with multiple collectors effectively utilized sediment at both horizontal and vertical directions and enhanced electron collection efficiency. This study demonstrated that bacterial adhesion and electron collection should be optimized on small anodes in order to maintain high power density and achieve high power output in the scaled-up BMFCs.

  6. An investigation of viscous-mediated coupling of crickets cercal hair sensors using a scaled up model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagirisamy, Pasupathy S.; Jeronimidis, George; Le Moàl, Valerie

    2009-08-01

    Viscous coupling between filiform hair sensors of insects and arthropods has gained considerable interest recently. Study of viscous coupling between hairs at micro scale with current technologies is proving difficult and hence the hair system has been physically scaled up by a factor of 100. For instance, a typical filiform hair of 10 μm diameter and 1000 μm length has been physically scaled up to 1 mm in diameter and 100mm in length. At the base, a rotational spring with a bonded strain gauge provides the restoring force and measures the angle of deflection of the model hair. These model hairs were used in a glycerol-filled aquarium where the velocity of flow and the fluid properties were determined by imposing the Reynolds numbers compatible with biological system. Experiments have been conducted by varying the separation distance and the relative position between the moveable model hairs, of different lengths and between the movable and rigid hairs of different lengths for the steady velocity flow with Reynolds numbers of 0.02 and 0.05. In this study, the viscous coupling between hairs has been characterised. The effect of the distance from the physical boundaries, such as tank walls has also been quantified (wall effect). The purpose of this investigation is to provide relevant information for the design of MEMS systems mimicking the cricket's hair array.

  7. Constraints, synergies and avenues for scaling up breastfeeding, antibiotics for pneumonia and IMCI interventions in the Cusco region, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Gericke, Christian A

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this qualitative case study was to assess the feasibility of scaling up exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months, antibiotics for pneumonia and integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) child interventions in three districts of the Cusco region, Peru. Methods: During field visits, constraints, synergies and solutions to the implementation of the selected interventions were collected through observational recording and interviews of mothers, health workers, and health managers/decision makers. Results are presented for each intervention according to the health system level where they occurred: mother/community, health worker, health centre, and political/managerial levels. Findings: This case study demonstrates that it is feasible to scale up exclusive breastfeeding, antibiotics for pneumonia and IMCI interventions in poverty-stricken rural areas of a low-income country. Factors that helped and hindered the implementation were identified for each intervention. Conclusions: The need for a coherent multi-sector approach that includes regulation, implementation and monitoring of health policies and education of all involved stakeholders was apparent. This study also demonstrates that global health interventions need to undergo local adaptation. Identifying local constraints and facilitating factors in a systematic way as proposed in this study is a useful step to increase their effectiveness and reach at the local level and to identify areas for improvement in the original intervention policies. PMID:24358831

  8. Scaling up of physical activity interventions in Brazil: how partnerships and research evidence contributed to policy action

    PubMed Central

    Hoehner, Christine M.; Hallal, Pedro C.; Reis, Rodrigo S.; Simoes, Eduardo J.; Malta, Deborah C.; Pratt, Michael; Brownson, Ross C.

    2013-01-01

    The global health burden due to physical inactivity is enormous and growing. There is a need to consider new ways of generating evidence and to identify the role of government in promoting physical activity at the population level. In this paper, we summarize key findings from a large-scale cross-national collaboration to understand physical activity promotion in Brazil. We describe the main aspects of the partnership of Project GUIA (Guide for Useful Interventions for Activity in Brazil and Latin America) that sustained the collaborative effort for eight years and describe how the evidence gathered from the collaboration triggered political action in Brazil to scale up a physical activity intervention at the national level. Project GUIA is a cross-national multidisciplinary research partnership designed to understand and evaluate current efforts for physical activity promotion at the community level in Latin America. This example of scaling up is unprecedented for promoting health in the region and is an example that must be followed and evaluated. PMID:24323944

  9. Using Benefit-Cost Analysis to Scale Up Early Childhood Programs through Pay-for-Success Financing

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Judy A.; Reynolds, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing access to high-quality preschool programs is a high priority at local, state, and federal levels. Recently, two initiatives to expand preschool programming in Illinois and Utah have used funds from private investors to scale up existing programs. Private-sector social impact investors provide funding to nonprofit or public preschool providers to increase the number of children served. If the measured outcomes from preschool participation meet pre-determined goals, then the estimated government cost savings arising from these preschool interventions are used to repay the investors. Social impact investing with a “Pay for Success” contract can help budget-constrained governments expand proven or promising preventive interventions without the need to increase taxes. Cost-benefit analysis plays a crucial role in helping to identify which social, educational or health interventions are suitable for this type of innovative financing. Cost-benefit analysts are needed to design the structure of the success payments that the government will make to the private investors. This paper describes social impact borrowing as a new method for financing public services, outlines the contribution of cost-benefit analysis, and discusses the innovative use of social impact financing to promote scaling up of the evidence-based Child Parent Centers and other early childhood programs. PMID:27882288

  10. Scaled-up bioconversion of fish waste to liquid fertilizer using a 5 L ribbon-type reactor.

    PubMed

    Dao, Van Thingoc; Kim, Joong Kyun

    2011-10-01

    A scaled-up conversion process of fish waste to liquid fertilizer was performed in a 5 L ribbon-type reactor. Biodegradation was performed by inoculation of autoclaved fish waste with 5.84 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1) of mixed microorganisms for 96 h. As a result, the pH changed from 6.92 to 5.72, the cell number reached 7.28 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1), and approximately 430 g (28.3%) of fish waste was degraded. Analyses indicated that the 96 h culture of inoculated fish waste possessed comparable fertilizing ability to commercial fertilizers in hydroponic culture with amino acid contents of 6.91 g 100 g(-1). Therefore, the scaled-up production achieved a more satisfactory fish waste degradation rate (3.61 g h(-1)) than the flask-scale production (0.24 g h(-1)). The biodegraded broth of fish waste at room temperature did not undergo putrefaction for 6 months due to the addition of 1% lactate.

  11. Climate-related environmental stress in intertidal grazers: scaling-up biochemical responses to assemblage-level processes

    PubMed Central

    Cappiello, Mario; Del Corso, Antonella; Lenzarini, Francesca; Peroni, Eleonora; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Organisms are facing increasing levels of environmental stress under climate change that may severely affect the functioning of biological systems at different levels of organization. Growing evidence suggests that reduction in body size is a universal response of organisms to global warming. However, a clear understanding of whether extreme climate events will impose selection directly on phenotypic plastic responses and how these responses affect ecological interactions has remained elusive. Methods We experimentally investigated the effects of extreme desiccation events on antioxidant defense mechanisms of a rocky intertidal gastropod (Patella ulyssiponensis), and evaluated how these effects scaled-up at the population and assemblage levels. Results With increasing levels of desiccation stress, limpets showed significant lower levels of total glutathione, tended to grow less and had reduced per capita interaction strength on their resources. Discussion Results suggested that phenotypic plasticity (i.e., reduction in adults’ body size) allowed buffering biochemical responses to stress to scale-up at the assemblage level. Unveiling the linkages among different levels of biological organization is key to develop indicators that can anticipate large-scale ecological impacts of climate change. PMID:27781156

  12. Improving health outcomes through concurrent HIV program scale-up and health system development in Rwanda: 20 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Nsanzimana, Sabin; Prabhu, Krishna; McDermott, Haley; Karita, Etienne; Forrest, Jamie I; Drobac, Peter; Farmer, Paul; Mills, Edward J; Binagwaho, Agnes

    2015-09-09

    The 1994 genocide against the Tutsi destroyed the health system in Rwanda. It is impressive that a small country like Rwanda has advanced its health system to the point of now offering near universal health insurance coverage. Through a series of strategic structural changes to its health system, catalyzed through international assistance, Rwanda has demonstrated a commitment towards improving patient and population health indicators. In particular, the rapid scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has become a great success story for Rwanda. The country achieved universal coverage of ART at a CD4 cell count of 200 cells/mm(3) in 2007 and increased the threshold for initiation of ART to ≤350 cells/mm(3) in 2008. Further, 2013 guidelines raised the threshold for initiation to ≤500 cells/mm(3) and suggest immediate therapy for key affected populations. In 2015, guidelines recommend offering immediate treatment to all patients. By reviewing the history of HIV and the scale-up of treatment delivery in Rwanda since the genocide, this paper highlights some of the key innovations of the Government of Rwanda and demonstrates the ways in which the national response to the HIV epidemic has catalyzed the implementation of interventions that have helped strengthen the overall health system.

  13. Global Learning Scales up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Becoming more global is a familiar refrain for many a school administrator or curriculum developer wrestling with delivering 21st century skills. Over the past decade, districts have expanded their foreign language programs, added Mandarin Chinese to the mix, and in some cases launched language immersion classes in their elementary schools. Others…

  14. Scaling up from field to region for wind erosion prediction using a field-scale wind erosion model and GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zobeck, T.M.; Parker, N.C.; Haskell, S.; Guoding, K.

    2000-01-01

    Factors that affect wind erosion such as surface vegetative and other cover, soil properties and surface roughness usually change spatially and temporally at the field-scale to produce important field-scale variations in wind erosion. Accurate estimation of wind erosion when scaling up from fields to regions, while maintaining meaningful field-scale process details, remains a challenge. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of using a field-scale wind erosion model with a geographic information system (GIS) to scale up to regional levels and to quantify the differences in wind erosion estimates produced by different scales of soil mapping used as a data layer in the model. A GIS was used in combination with the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ), a field-scale wind erosion model, to estimate wind erosion for two 50 km2 areas. Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery from 1993 with 30 m resolution was used as a base map. The GIS database layers included land use, soils, and other features such as roads. The major land use was agricultural fields. Data on 1993 crop management for selected fields of each crop type were collected from local government agency offices and used to 'train' the computer to classify land areas by crop and type of irrigation (agroecosystem) using commercially available software. The land area of the agricultural land uses was overestimated by 6.5% in one region (Lubbock County, TX, USA) and underestimated by about 21% in an adjacent region (Terry County, TX, USA). The total estimated wind erosion potential for Terry County was about four times that estimated for adjacent Lubbock County. The difference in potential erosion among the counties was attributed to regional differences in surface soil texture. In a comparison of different soil map scales in Terry County, the generalised soil map had over 20% more of the land area and over 15% greater erosion potential in loamy sand soils than did the detailed soil map. As

  15. Coming home to die? The association between migration and mortality in rural Tanzania before and after ART scale-up

    PubMed Central

    Levira, Francis; Todd, Jim; Masanja, Honorati

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior to the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART), demographic surveillance cohort studies showed higher mortality among migrants than residents in many rural areas. Objectives This study quantifies the overall and AIDS-specific mortality between migrants and residents prior to ART, during ART scale-up, and after widespread availability of ART in Rufiji district in Tanzania. Design In Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), the follow-up of individuals aged 15–59 years was categorized into three periods: before ART (1998–2003), during ART scale-up (2004–2007), and after widespread availability of ART (2008–2011). Residents were those who never migrated within and beyond HDSS, internal migrants were those who moved within the HDSS, and external migrants were those who moved into the HDSS from outside. Mortality rates were estimated from deaths and person-years of observations calculated in each time period. Hazard ratios were estimated to compare mortality between migrants and residents. AIDS deaths were identified from verbal autopsy, and the odds ratio of dying from AIDS between migrants and residents was estimated using the multivariate logistic regression model. Results Internal and external migrants experienced higher overall mortality than residents before the introduction of ART. After widespread availability of ART overall mortality were similar for internal and external migrants. These overall mortality experiences observed were similar for males and females. In the multivariate logistic regression model, adjusting for age, sex, education, and social economic status, internal migrants had similar likelihood of dying from AIDS as residents (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70–1.87) while external migrants were 70% more likely to die from AIDS compared to residents prior to the introduction of ART (AOR=1.70, 95% CI: 1.06–2.73). After widespread availability of ART with the same adjustment

  16. Bioinspired nanovalves with selective permeability and pH sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z.; Huang, X.; Schenderlein, M.; Moehwald, H.; Xu, G.-K.; Shchukin, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems with controlled permeability and release functionality, which are among the successful examples of living beings to survive in evolution, have attracted intensive investigation and have been mimicked due to their broad spectrum of applications. We present in this work, for the first time, an example of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs)-inspired controlled release system that exhibits on-demand release of angstrom-sized molecules. We do so in a cost-effective way by stabilizing porous cobalt basic carbonates as nanovalves and realizing pH-sensitive release of entrapped subnano cargo. The proof-of-concept work also consists of the establishment of two mathematical models to explain the selective permeability of the nanovalves. Finally, gram-sized (or larger) quantities of the bio-inspired controlled release system can be synthesized through a scaling-up strategy, which opens up opportunities for controlled release of functional molecules in wider practical applications.Biological systems with controlled permeability and release functionality, which are among the successful examples of living beings to survive in evolution, have attracted intensive investigation and have been mimicked due to their broad spectrum of applications. We present in this work, for the first time, an example of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs)-inspired controlled release system that exhibits on-demand release of angstrom-sized molecules. We do so in a cost-effective way by stabilizing porous cobalt basic carbonates as nanovalves and realizing pH-sensitive release of entrapped subnano cargo. The proof-of-concept work also consists of the establishment of two mathematical models to explain the selective permeability of the nanovalves. Finally, gram-sized (or larger) quantities of the bio-inspired controlled release system can be synthesized through a scaling-up strategy, which opens up opportunities for controlled release of functional molecules in wider practical applications

  17. [Experience in scaling up the film coating process for theophylline sustained-release pellets in mass production].

    PubMed

    Grunenberg, P; Lorck, C; Jünger, H; Laicher, A

    1998-05-01

    The scale-up of the film coating process for the production of Bronchoretard pellets (theophylline, CAS 58-55-9) is an example for the successful setup of a modern production technology designed to meet the increasing GMP requirements while taking into consideration ecological and economical aspects. This technology provides a reduction in polymer losses on drying from approx. 20% to under 5% and a distinct improvement in the reproducibility of the in vitro dissolution profiles. Double batch sizes and higher spray rates allow for a substantially higher batch turnover. A production line installed exclusively for Bronchoretard pellets and specific process optimization measures resulted in considerably lower lag-times of the equipment.

  18. Scale-up of the process to obtain functional ingredients based in plasma protein concentrates from porcine blood.

    PubMed

    Parés, Dolors; Toldrà, Mònica; Saguer, Elena; Carretero, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of a scaled-up process to obtain two protein concentrates from porcine blood plasma, i.e. serum and albumin, for use as functional food ingredients was assessed. The process consisted of fractionating plasma proteins by salting out, concentrating and purifying fractions by means of membrane technology, and subsequently dehydrating through spray-drying. The fractionation process allowed a good isolation of the desired proteins, which were then concentrated and desalted in a tangential flow filtration (TFF) process combining ultra and diafiltration. Purification, pre-concentration and dehydration were successfully achieved. The functional properties of dehydrated serum and albumin were determined. As compared to the same hemoderivatives obtained by a lab-scale production system, serum maintained the gelling properties; albumin exhibited similar foaming properties; and both serum and albumin concentrates showed slightly improved emulsifying properties.

  19. Scaling up food production in the Upper Mississippi river basin: modeling impacts on water quality and nutrient cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, E. E.; Martin, P. A.; Schuble, T. J.; Yan, E.; Demissie, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Agricultural production imposes significant environmental stress on the landscape, both in the intensity and extent of agricultural activities. Among the most significant impacts, agriculture dominates the natural reactive nitrogen cycle, with excess reactive nitrogen leading to the degraded quality of inland and coastal waters. In the U.S., policymakers and stakeholders nationwide continue to debate strategies for decreasing environmental degradation from agricultural lands. Such strategies aim to optimize the balance among competing demands for food, fuel and ecosystem services. One such strategy increasingly discussed in the national debate is that of localizing food production around urban areas, developing what some have recently called “foodsheds”. However, the environmental impacts of localizing food production around population centers are not well-understood given the hard-to-generalize variety seen in management practices currently employed among local farms marketing food crops directly to consumers. As a first, landscape level study of potential impacts from scaling up this type of agriculture, we use the USDA Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to quantify environmental impacts from developing foodsheds for all population centers in the Upper Mississippi river basin. Specifically, we focus on nutrient cycling and water quality impacts determining direct greenhouse gas emissions and changes to nutrient runoff from increased food production in this watershed. We investigate a variety of scenarios in which food production is scaled up to the regional level using different types of farm management practices, ranging from conventional production of fruits and vegetables, to production of these products from small-scale, diversified systems integrating conservation easements. In addition to impacts on nutrient cycling and water quality, we also characterize relative levels of productivity in conjunction with overall demand for food associated

  20. Scale-up of a liquid static culture process for hyperproduction of ganoderic acid by the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ya-Jie; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2003-01-01

    Scale-up of a liquid static culture process was studied for hyperproduction of ganoderic acid (GA) by a famous Chinese traditional medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum. Initial volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) and area of liquid surface per liquid volume (A(s)) were identified as key factors affecting cell growth and GA accumulation in liquid static cultures of G. lucidum, on the basis of which a multilayer static bioreactor was designed. At a low initial K(L)a level of 2.1 h(-1), a thick layer of white mycelia was formed on the liquid surface, and an optimal production of total GA (i.e., GA production in the liquid and on the liquid surface) was obtained. Both the formation of white mycelia and production of GA on the liquid surface were enhanced with an increase of A(s) within the range as investigated (0.24-1.53 cm(2)/mL). At an A(s) value of 0.90 cm(2)/mL, the total GA production reached maximum. A successful scale-up from a 20-mL static T-flask to a 7.5-L three-layer static bioreactor was achieved based on initial K(L)a. The maximum biomass (20.8 +/- 0.1 g DW/L), GA content (4.96 +/- 0.13 mg/100 mg DW), and total GA production (976 +/- 35 mg/L) were attained in static bioreactors. Not only GA content but also its production obtained in this work were the highest ever reported.

  1. Scaling-up microbial fuel cells: configuration and potential drop phenomenon at series connection of unit cells in shared anolyte.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehee; An, Junyeong; Kim, Bongkyu; Jang, Jae Kyung; Kim, Byung Hong; Chang, In Seop

    2012-06-01

    To scale-up microbial fuel cells (MFCs), installing multiple unit cells in a common reactor has been proposed; however, there has been a serious potential drop when connecting unit cells in series. To determine the source of the loss, a basic stack-MFC (BS-MFC) has been devised, and the results show that the phenomenon is due to ions on the anode electrode traveling through the electrolyte to be reduced at the cathode connected in series. As calculated by means of the percentage potential drop, the degree of potential drop decreased with an increase in the unit-cell distance. When the distance was increased from 1 to 8 cm, the percentage potential drop in BS-MFC1 decreased from 46.76 ± 0.90 to 45.08 ± 0.70 % and in BS-MFC2 from 46.41 ± 0.95 to 43.82 ± 2.23 %. As the p-value of the t-test was lower than 0.05, the difference was considered significant; however, if the unit cells are installed far enough from each other to avoid the potential drop phenomenon, the system will be less dense, consequently reducing the ratio of electrode area per volume of anode compartment and decreasing the power density of the system. Finally, this study suggests design criteria for scaling-up MFC systems: Multiple-electrode-installed MFCs are modularized, and the unit cells are connected in series across the module (connecting each unit cell does not share the anolyte).

  2. Antiretroviral Treatment Scale-Up and Tuberculosis Mortality in High TB/HIV Burden Countries: An Econometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Isabel; Bendavid, Eran; Korenromp, Eline L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in patients with active tuberculosis (TB), but the population-level relationship between ART coverage and TB mortality is untested. We estimated the reduction in population-level TB mortality that can be attributed to increasing ART coverage across 41 high HIV-TB burden countries. Methods We compiled TB mortality trends between 1996 and 2011 from two sources: (1) national program-reported TB death notifications, adjusted for annual TB case detection rates, and (2) WHO TB mortality estimates. National coverage with ART, as proportion of HIV-infected people in need, was obtained from UNAIDS. We applied panel linear regressions controlling for HIV prevalence (5-year lagged), coverage of TB interventions (estimated by WHO and UNAIDS), gross domestic product per capita, health spending from domestic sources, urbanization, and country fixed effects. Results Models suggest that that increasing ART coverage was followed by reduced TB mortality, across multiple specifications. For death notifications at 2 to 5 years following a given ART scale-up, a 1% increase in ART coverage predicted 0.95% faster mortality rate decline (p = 0.002); resulting in 27% fewer TB deaths in 2011 alone than would have occurred without ART. Based on WHO death estimates, a 1% increase in ART predicted a 1.0% reduced TB death rate (p<0.001), and 31% fewer deaths in 2011. TB mortality was higher at higher HIV prevalence (p<0.001), but not related to coverage of isoniazid preventive therapy, cotrimoxazole preventive therapy, or other covariates. Conclusion This econometric analysis supports a substantial impact of ART on population-level TB mortality realized already within the first decade of ART scale-up, that is apparent despite variable-quality mortality data. PMID:27536864

  3. A qualitative assessment of methadone maintenance therapy program in Nepal: evidence to scaling up at national level.

    PubMed

    Singh, P M; Shrestha, D M; Bhandari, G P

    2014-09-01

    Methadone maintenance therapy is widely accepted form of substitution therapy in people with Opioid dependent client. It is a kind of harm reduction strategy which prevents the spread of HIV and hepatitis among injecting drug users. It also improves quality of life and help decrease crime and other social issues. The program has been in Nepal for few years. The clients are increasing more each day and the demand for the program is also increasing. There is an urgent need of scaling-up the program in Nepal to address the increasing number of clients and unreached clients. This is an attempt to assess qualitatively the methadone maintenance therapy program in Nepal to generate evidences as a support to existing programs and to scale up the program in unreached population. The qualitative study revealed that the clients had adequate knowledge on the program and the program is quite satisfactory. However, they have to wait for a long to get enrollment in the program, there is no counseling session and they were more concern about the quality of the drug. Despite many lacunae, the participants found the program very useful in terms of developing good relation with family members, decreasing the necessity of money, being able to attend social functions, health and economic benefits, time saving, easily getting job. On the other hand, they were experiencing adverse effect such as decreasing sexual performance, dental caries, nausea, social stigma due to misuse of the program by some clients which are not properly addressed by the program. The program can be improved by making it priority problem at national level by the government, improving it as one stop shopping such as providing counseling, medicine and skill development program at one place.

  4. Changes in the burden of malaria following scale up of malaria control interventions in Mutasa District, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To better understand trends in the burden of malaria and their temporal relationship to control activities, a survey was conducted to assess reported cases of malaria and malaria control activities in Mutasa District, Zimbabwe. Methods Data on reported malaria cases were abstracted from available records at all three district hospitals, three rural hospitals and 25 rural health clinics in Mutasa District from 2003 to 2011. Results Malaria control interventions were scaled up through the support of the Roll Back Malaria Partnership, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and The President’s Malaria Initiative. The recommended first-line treatment regimen changed from chloroquine or a combination of chloroquine plus sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine to artemisinin-based combination therapy, the latter adopted by 70%, 95% and 100% of health clinics by 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. Diagnostic capacity improved, with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) available in all health clinics by 2008. Vector control consisted of indoor residual spraying and distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets. The number of reported malaria cases initially increased from levels in 2003 to a peak in 2008 but then declined 39% from 2008 to 2010. The proportion of suspected cases of malaria in older children and adults remained high, ranging from 75% to 80%. From 2008 to 2010, the number of RDT positive cases of malaria decreased 35% but the decrease was greater for children younger than five years of age (60%) compared to older children and adults (26%). Conclusions The burden of malaria in Mutasa District decreased following the scale up of malaria control interventions. However, the persistent high number of cases in older children and adults highlights the need for strategies to identify locally effective control measures that target all age groups. PMID:23815862

  5. Benefits and Challenges of Scaling Up Expansion of Marine Protected Area Networks in the Verde Island Passage, Central Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Horigue, Vera; Pressey, Robert L.; Mills, Morena; Brotánková, Jana; Cabral, Reniel; Andréfouët, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Locally-established marine protected areas (MPAs) have been proven to achieve local-scale fisheries and conservation objectives. However, since many of these MPAs were not designed to form ecologically-connected networks, their contributions to broader-scale goals such as complementarity and connectivity can be limited. In contrast, integrated networks of MPAs designed with systematic conservation planning are assumed to be more effective—ecologically, socially, and economically—than collections of locally-established MPAs. There is, however, little empirical evidence that clearly demonstrates the supposed advantages of systematic MPA networks. A key reason is the poor record of implementation of systematic plans attributable to lack of local buy-in. An intermediate scenario for the expansion of MPAs is scaling up of local decisions, whereby locally-driven MPA initiatives are coordinated through collaborative partnerships among local governments and their communities. Coordination has the potential to extend the benefits of individual MPAs and perhaps to approach the potential benefits offered by systematic MPA networks. We evaluated the benefits of scaling up local MPAs to form networks by simulating seven expansion scenarios for MPAs in the Verde Island Passage, central Philippines. The scenarios were: uncoordinated community-based establishment of MPAs; two scenarios reflecting different levels of coordinated MPA expansion through collaborative partnerships; and four scenarios guided by systematic conservation planning with different contexts for governance. For each scenario, we measured benefits through time in terms of achievement of objectives for representation of marine habitats. We found that: in any governance context, systematic networks were more efficient than non-systematic ones; systematic networks were more efficient in broader governance contexts; and, contrary to expectations but with caveats, the uncoordinated scenario was slightly more

  6. Scale-Up of SLIP Process: Producing Nanoengineered Coatings at High Volumes to Meet Multi-Directorate Needs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K C; Sanders, D M; Moffitt, K C; Marquez, R; Spadaccini, C

    2005-10-27

    There are a variety of applications that require the use of nanoengineered surfaces for separation applications. Surfaces are commonly functionalized in order to facilitate the purification of gases and liquids. Functionalization often requires the application of a polymer to the surface. The most common means is to dissolve the polymer in a solvent and then either cast or spray it onto the surface. This traditional approach causes two severe limitations: (1) the polymer must be soluble; (2) the solvent must be removed from the final coating. The first limitation often eliminates many potential candidate polymers. The second limitation is influential on the transport and separation properties of the coating. Low levels of residual solvents can significantly degrade the ability of the coating to perform the separation process. These two issues can be overcome through the use of ''Solvent-Less vapor deposition followed by In-situ Polymerization'' (SLIP). The SLIP process was originally developed for the fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets. This application required the deposition of films of 100 to 200 microns in thickness onto a spherical substrate. The process consists of two evaporation chambers each containing a quantity of monomer. The precursors, monomers, are vaporized and flow though a mixing nozzle and eventually are deposited on a substrate surface. They react at the surface and form a nanoengineered polymer film. The SLIP process has been utilized to develop composite membranes for gas and liquid separation applications. Polyimide films that range in thickness from 50 to 400 nm were deposited onto a range of substrates. The SLIP process has been shown to be robust and current plans are in place to scale-up the process. This scale-up would enable the coating of flat sheets and fibers. This paper will outline the roadmap to constructing a pilot scale SLIP system in order to meet multiple programmatic needs.

  7. Scaled-up manufacturing of recombinant antibodies produced by plant cells in a 200-L orbitally-shaken disposable bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Raven, Nicole; Rasche, Stefan; Kuehn, Christoph; Anderlei, Tibor; Klöckner, Wolf; Schuster, Flora; Henquet, Maurice; Bosch, Dirk; Büchs, Jochen; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells have emerged as a promising platform for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins, offering efficient protein secretion, favourable growth characteristics and cultivation in containment under a controlled environment. The cultivation of BY-2 cells in disposable bioreactors is a useful alternative to conventional stainless steel stirred-tank reactors, and orbitally-shaken bioreactors could provide further advantages such as simple bag geometry, scalability and predictable process settings. We carried out a scale-up study, using a 200-L orbitally-shaken bioreactor holding disposable bags, and BY-2 cells producing the human monoclonal antibody M12. We found that cell growth and recombinant protein accumulation were comparable to standard shake flask cultivation, despite a 200-fold difference in cultivation volume. Final cell fresh weights of 300-387 g/L and M12 yields of ∼20 mg/L were achieved with both cultivation methods. Furthermore, we established an efficient downstream process for the recovery of M12 from the culture broth. The viscous spent medium prevented clarification using filtration devices, but we used expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography with SP Sepharose as an alternative for the efficient capture of the M12 antibody. EBA was introduced as an initial purification step prior to protein A affinity chromatography, resulting in an overall M12 recovery of 75-85% and a purity of >95%. Our results demonstrate the suitability of orbitally-shaken bioreactors for the scaled-up cultivation of plant cell suspension cultures and provide a strategy for the efficient purification of antibodies from the BY-2 culture medium.

  8. Scale-Up, Retention and HIV/STI Prevalence Trends among Female Sex Workers Attending VICITS Clinics in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Miranda, Sonia; Jacobson, Jerry O.; Loya-Montiel, Itzel; Mendizabal-Burastero, Ricardo; Galindo-Arandi, César; Flores, Carlos; Chen, Sanny Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2007, Guatemala integrated STI clinical service with an HIV prevention model into four existing public health clinics to prevent HIV infection, known as the VICITS strategy. We present the first assessment of VICITS scale-up, retention, HIV and STI prevalence trends, and risk factors associated with HIV infection among Female Sex Workers (FSW) attending VICITS clinics in Guatemala. Methods Demographic, behavioral and clinical data were collected using a standardized form. Data was analyzed by year and health center. HIV and STI prevalence were estimated from routine visits. Retention was estimated as the percent of new users attending VICITS clinics who returned for at least one follow-up visit to any VICITS clinic within 12 months. Separate multivariate logistic regression models were conducted to investigate factors associated with HIV infection and program retention. Results During 2007–2011 5,682 FSW visited a VICITS clinic for the first-time. HIV prevalence varied from 0.4% to 5.8%, and chlamydia prevalence from 0% to 14.3%, across sites. Attending the Puerto Barrios clinic, having a current syphilis infection, working primarily on the street, and using the telephone or internet to contact clients were associated with HIV infection. The number of FSW accessing VICITS annually increased from 556 to 2,557 (361%) during the period. In 2011 retention varied across locations from 7.7% to 42.7%. Factors negatively impacting retention included current HIV diagnosis, having practiced sex work in another country, being born in Honduras, and attending Marco Antonio Foundation or Quetzaltenango clinic sites. Systematic time trends did not emerge, however 2008 and 2010 were characterized by reduced retention. Conclusions Our data show local differences in HIV prevalence and clinic attendance that can be used to prioritize prevention activities targeting FSW in Guatemala. VICITS achieved rapid scale-up; however, a better understanding of the causes of

  9. An Appraisal of Female Sex Work in Nigeria - Implications for Designing and Scaling Up HIV Prevention Programmes

    PubMed Central

    Ikpeazu, Akudo; Momah-Haruna, Amaka; Madu Mari, Baba; Thompson, Laura H.; Ogungbemi, Kayode; Daniel, Uduak; Aboki, Hafsatu; Isac, Shajy; Gorgens, Marelize; Mziray, Elizabeth; Njie, Ndella; Akala, Francisca Ayodeji; Emmanuel, Faran; Odek, Willis Omondi; Blanchard, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Nigeria is complex with diverse factors driving the epidemic. Accordingly, Nigeria's National Agency for the Control of AIDS is coordinating a large-scale initiative to conduct HIV epidemic appraisals across all states. These appraisals will help to better characterize the drivers of the epidemic and ensure that the HIV prevention programmes match the local epidemic context, with resources allocated to interventions that have the greatest impact locally. Currently, the mapping and size estimation of Female Sex Workers (FSWs) - a major component of the appraisal has been completed in seven states. These states are using the data generated to plan, prioritize and scale-up sub-national HIV prevention programmes. Methodology It involved a two-level process of identifying and validating locations where FSWs solicit and/or meet clients (“hotspots”). In the first level, secondary key informants were interviewed to collect information about the geographic location and description of the hotspots. For the second level, FSWs were interviewed at each hotspot and information on population size estimates, typologies and operational dynamics of the FSWs were collected. Results Across the seven states, a total of 17,266 secondary key informants and 5,732 FSWs were interviewed. 10,233 hotspots were identified with an estimated 126,489 FSWs ranging from 5,920 in Anambra to 46,691 in Lagos. The most common hotspots were bars/nightclubs (30%), hotels/lodges (29.6%), streets (16.6%), and brothels (14.6%). Furthermore, the population density of FSWs (per thousand adult men) across the states ranged from 2 in Anambra to 17 in the Federal Capital Territory. Conclusion FSW populations in Nigeria are large and diverse, with substantial differences between and within states. Improved understanding of the location, population size, density, organizational typologies and clients of sex work has informed and is central to Nigeria's planning process for

  10. The Costs of Scaling Up HIV Prevention for High Risk Groups: Lessons Learned from the Avahan Programme in India

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, Sudhashree; Guinness, Lorna; Pickles, Michael; Shetty, Govindraj Y.; Alary, Michel; Vickerman, Peter; Vassall, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study objective is to measure, analyse costs of scaling up HIV prevention for high-risk groups in India, in order to assist the design of future HIV prevention programmes in South Asia and beyond. Design Prospective costing study. Methods This study is one of the most comprehensive studies of the costs of HIV prevention for high-risk groups to date in both its scope and size. HIV prevention included outreach, sexually transmitted infections (STI) services, condom provision, expertise enhancement, community mobilisation and enabling environment activities. Economic costs were collected from 138 non-government organisations (NGOs) in 64 districts, four state level lead implementing partners (SLPs), and the national programme level (Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF)) office over four years using a top down costing approach, presented in US$ 2011. Results Mean total unit costs (2004–08) per person reached at least once a year and per monthly contact were US$ 235(56–1864) and US$ 82(12–969) respectively. 35% of the cost was incurred by NGOs, 30% at the state level SLP and 35% at the national programme level. The proportion of total costs by activity were 34% for expertise enhancement, 37% for programme management (including support and supervision), 22% for core HIV prevention activities (outreach and STI services) and 7% for community mobilisation and enabling environment activities. Total unit cost per person reached fell sharply as the programme expanded due to declining unit costs above the service level (from US$ 477 per person reached in 2004 to US$ 145 per person reached in 2008). At the service level also unit costs decreased slightly over time from US$ 68 to US$ 64 per person reached. Conclusions Scaling up HIV prevention for high risk groups requires significant investment in expertise enhancement and programme administration. However, unit costs decreased with programme expansion in spite of an increase in the scope of activities

  11. Scale-up potential of ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography method to produce biologically active inositol phosphates.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Jamel S

    2002-01-25

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the possibility that an analytical ion-pair HPLC procedure used to determine phytic acid (IP6) and its degradation products (IP3-IP5) can be transformed to a preparative purification method. A commercial phytic acid (CPA) preparation was separated into its component fractions of IP3, IP4, IPS, and IP6 on two C18 columns (1.8 and 4.2 ml) using 51% methanol containing 0.6-1% tetrabutylammonium hydroxide as ion-pair reagent and 0-0.025 M formic acid (pH 4.3) as eluent at 1.7 and 3.0 cm/min linear velocity, respectively, and 40 degrees C. Elution was monitored at 40 degrees C by a refractive index detector. Reproducible separation of CPA into four well-resolved peaks on these columns was possible after optimizing method variables, particularly the concentration of ion-pair reagent in the injected sample (>1.5%). The same separations were obtained after CPA loads were scaled up 25 times on a steel column (15 cm x 19 mm I.D.), packed with Ethyl C2 sorbent (10 microm) and on a 25 cm x 21.2 mm I.D. C18 column, but at a reduced linear velocity to increase the resolution. Therefore, this optimization of separation not only is useful for analysis of phytic acid and its degradation products but also it provides key parameters for scale up for further fractionation and characterization.

  12. National malaria vector control policy: an analysis of the decision to scale-up larviciding in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Tesfazghi, Kemi; Hill, Jenny; Jones, Caroline; Ranson, Hilary; Worrall, Eve

    2016-01-01

    Background: New vector control tools are needed to combat insecticide resistance and reduce malaria transmission. The World Health Organization (WHO) endorses larviciding as a supplementary vector control intervention using larvicides recommended by the WHO Pesticides Evaluation Scheme (WHOPES). The decision to scale-up larviciding in Nigeria provided an opportunity to investigate the factors influencing policy adoption and assess the role that actors and evidence play in the policymaking process, in order to draw lessons that help accelerate the uptake of new methods for vector control. Methods: A retrospective policy analysis was carried out using in-depth interviews with national level policy stakeholders to establish normative national vector control policy or strategy decision-making processes and compare these with the process that led to the decision to scale-up larviciding. The interviews were transcribed, then coded and analyzed using NVivo10. Data were coded according to pre-defined themes from an analytical policy framework developed a priori. Results: Stakeholders reported that the larviciding decision-making process deviated from the normative vector control decision-making process. National malaria policy is normally strongly influenced by WHO recommendations, but the potential of larviciding to contribute to national economic development objectives through larvicide production in Nigeria was cited as a key factor shaping the decision. The larviciding decision involved a restricted range of policy actors, and notably excluded actors that usually play advisory, consultative and evidence generation roles. Powerful actors limited the access of some actors to the policy processes and content. This may have limited the influence of scientific evidence in this policy decision. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that national vector control policy change can be facilitated by linking malaria control objectives to wider socioeconomic considerations and

  13. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  14. Operational modelling to guide implementation and scale-up of diagnostic tests within the health system: exploring opportunities for parasitic disease diagnostics based on example application for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Langley, Ivor; Adams, Emily; Doulla, Basra; Squire, S Bertel

    2014-12-01

    Research and innovation in the diagnosis of infectious and parasitic diseases has led to the development of several promising diagnostic tools, for example in malaria there is extensive literature concerning the use of rapid diagnostic tests. This means policymakers in many low and middle income countries need to make difficult decisions about which of the recommended tools and approaches to implement and scale-up. The test characteristics (e.g. sensitivity and specificity) of the tools alone are not a sufficient basis on which to make these decisions as policymakers need to also consider the best combination of tools, whether the new tools should complement or replace existing diagnostics and who should be tested. Diagnostic strategies need dovetailing to different epidemiology and structural resource constraints (e.g. existing diagnostic pathways, human resources and laboratory capacity). We propose operational modelling to assist with these complex decisions. Projections of patient, health system and cost impacts are essential and operational modelling of the relevant elements of the health system could provide these projections and support rational decisions. We demonstrate how the technique of operational modelling applied in the developing world to support decisions on diagnostics for tuberculosis, could in a parallel way, provide useful insights to support implementation of appropriate diagnostic innovations for parasitic diseases.

  15. Scale-Up of CdTe Photovoltaic Device Processes for Commercial Application: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-196

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D.

    2013-02-01

    Through this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, NREL and PrimeStar Solar will work together to scale up the NREL CdTe photovoltaic process from the laboratory to produce photovoltaic devices in a size that is commercially viable. The work in this phase will focus on the transference of NREL CdTe device fabrication techniques to PrimeStar Solar. NREL and PrimeStar Solar will engage in a series of technical exchange meetings and laboratory training sessions to transfer the knowledge of CdTe PV film growth from NREL to PrimeStar Solar. PrimeStar Solar will grow thin films on PrimeStar Solar equipment and interleave them with NREL-grown films in an effort to develop a commercial scale process on PrimeStar Solar equipment. Select NREL film growth equipment will be upgraded either by PrimeStar Solar or at PrimeStar Solar's expense to increase equipment reliability and throughput.

  16. Extraction of Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen from Seawater by an Electrochemical Acidification Cell. Part 3. Scaled-up Mobile Unit Studies (Calendar Year 2011)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-30

    Electrochemical Acidification Cell Part III: Scaled-up Mobile Unit Studies (Calendar Year 2011) May 30, 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is...Hydrogen from Seawater by an Electrochemical Acidification Cell Part III: Scaled-up Mobile Unit Studies (Calendar Year 2011) Heather D. Willauer, Dennis R...Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 41 Heather D. Willauer (202) 767-2673 Electrochemical acidification cell Carbon

  17. A SCALE-UP Mock-Up: Comparison of Student Learning Gains in High- and Low-Tech Active-Learning Environments.

    PubMed

    Soneral, Paula A G; Wyse, Sara A

    2017-01-01

    Student-centered learning environments with upside-down pedagogies (SCALE-UP) are widely implemented at institutions across the country, and learning gains from these classrooms have been well documented. This study investigates the specific design feature(s) of the SCALE-UP classroom most conducive to teaching and learning. Using pilot survey data from instructors and students to prioritize the most salient SCALE-UP classroom features, we created a low-tech "Mock-up" version of this classroom and tested the impact of these features on student learning, attitudes, and satisfaction using a quasi--experimental setup. The same instructor taught two sections of an introductory biology course in the SCALE-UP and Mock-up rooms. Although students in both sections were equivalent in terms of gender, grade point average, incoming ACT, and drop/fail/withdraw rate, the Mock-up classroom enrolled significantly more freshmen. Controlling for class standing, multiple regression modeling revealed no significant differences in exam, in-class, preclass, and Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology Concept Inventory scores between the SCALE-UP and Mock-up classrooms. Thematic analysis of student comments highlighted that collaboration and whiteboards enhanced the learning experience, but technology was not important. Student satisfaction and attitudes were comparable. These results suggest that the benefits of a SCALE-UP experience can be achieved at lower cost without technology features.

  18. A SCALE-UP Mock-Up: Comparison of Student Learning Gains in High- and Low-Tech Active-Learning Environments

    PubMed Central

    Soneral, Paula A. G.; Wyse, Sara A.

    2017-01-01

    Student-centered learning environments with upside-down pedagogies (SCALE-UP) are widely implemented at institutions across the country, and learning gains from these classrooms have been well documented. This study investigates the specific design feature(s) of the SCALE-UP classroom most conducive to teaching and learning. Using pilot survey data from instructors and students to prioritize the most salient SCALE-UP classroom features, we created a low-tech “Mock-up” version of this classroom and tested the impact of these features on student learning, attitudes, and satisfaction using a quasi-­experimental setup. The same instructor taught two sections of an introductory biology course in the SCALE-UP and Mock-up rooms. Although students in both sections were equivalent in terms of gender, grade point average, incoming ACT, and drop/fail/withdraw rate, the Mock-up classroom enrolled significantly more freshmen. Controlling for class standing, multiple regression modeling revealed no significant differences in exam, in-class, preclass, and Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology Concept Inventory scores between the SCALE-UP and Mock-up classrooms. Thematic analysis of student comments highlighted that collaboration and whiteboards enhanced the learning experience, but technology was not important. Student satisfaction and attitudes were comparable. These results suggest that the benefits of a SCALE-UP experience can be achieved at lower cost without technology features. PMID:28213582

  19. Liquid-permeable electrode

    DOEpatents

    Folser, George R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

  20. TREATMENT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers are an emerging alternative to traditional pump and treat systems for groundwater remediation. This technique has progressed rapidly over the past decade from laboratory bench-scale studies to full-scale implementation. Laboratory studies indicate the ...

  1. Scale-up of Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Mark A

    2014-08-27

    The project started in September, 2012 with the goal of scaling up from the existing laboratory scale process for producing carbon fiber (CF) from polyolefin (PO) based precursor fiber using a Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation stabilization process. The award was used to develop a process that was capable of producing market development quantities of CF from PO precursor fiber at a rate of 4 kg/h of CF. The CF would target properties that met or exceeded the Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicles Technology [1] standard; i.e., 172 GPa modulus and 1.72 GPa strength at greater than or equal to 1% strain. The Dow proprietary process was capable of meeting and exceeding these targets properties. Project DE-EE0005760 resulted from a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Dow and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with support from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) and DOE. In the first budget period, the main goal was to design a sulfonation-desulfonation market development plant capable of stabilizing PO precursor fiber at a rate of 5 kg/h using a sulfonation solution. The detailed design, location, and cost estimate were determined as scheduled in the Project Management Plan (PMP). In parallel with this DOE award project was a fundamentals and economic evaluation funded by The Dow Chemical Company (Dow). The goal of the Dow sponsored project was to finalize the mass balances, energy balances, and levelized cost to produce CF using the Dow process. A Go-No-Go decision was scheduled in June, 2013 based on the findings of the DOE sponsored scale up project and the Dow sponsored project. In June, 2013, Dow made the No-Go decision to halt and abandon the Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation process for stabilizing PO precursor fibers for the manufacturing of CF. This No-Go decision was identified in the original proposal and at the start of this project, and the decision was made as scheduled. The decision was based

  2. Scaling-up from an implementation trial to state-wide coverage: results from the preliminary Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The successful Greater Green Triangle Diabetes Prevention Program (GGT DPP), a small implementation trial, has been scaled-up to the Victorian state-wide ‘Life!’ programme with over 10,000 individuals enrolled. The Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS) is an evaluation of the translation from the GGT DPP to the Life! programme. We report results from the preliminary phase (pMDPS) of this evaluation. Methods The pMDPS is a randomised controlled trial with 92 individuals aged 50 to 75 at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes randomised to Life! or usual care. Intervention consisted of six structured 90-minute group sessions: five fortnightly sessions and the final session at 8 months. Participants underwent anthropometric and laboratory tests at baseline and 12 months, and provided self-reported psychosocial, dietary, and physical activity measures. Intervention group participants additionally underwent these tests at 3 months. Paired t tests were used to analyse within-group changes over time. Chi-square tests were used to analyse differences between groups in goals met at 12 months. Differences between groups for changes over time were tested with generalised estimating equations and analysis of covariance. Results Intervention participants significantly improved at 12 months in mean body mass index (−0.98 kg/m2, standard error (SE) = 0.26), weight (−2.65 kg, SE = 0.72), waist circumference (−7.45 cm, SE = 1.15), and systolic blood pressure (−3.18 mmHg, SE = 1.26), increased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (0.07 mmol/l, SE = 0.03), reduced energy from total (−2.00%, SE = 0.78) and saturated fat (−1.54%, SE = 0.41), and increased fibre intake (1.98 g/1,000 kcal energy, SE = 0.47). In controls, oral glucose at 2 hours deteriorated (0.59 mmol/l, SE = 0.27). Only waist circumference reduced significantly (−4.02 cm, SE = 0.95). Intervention participants significantly outperformed controls

  3. Applying a framework for assessing the health system challenges to scaling up mHealth in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mobile phone technology has demonstrated the potential to improve health service delivery, but there is little guidance to inform decisions about acquiring and implementing mHealth technology at scale in health systems. Using the case of community-based health services (CBS) in South Africa, we apply a framework to appraise the opportunities and challenges to effective implementation of mHealth at scale in health systems. Methods A qualitative study reviewed the benefits and challenges of mHealth in community-based services in South Africa, through a combination of key informant interviews, site visits to local projects and document reviews. Using a framework adapted from three approaches to reviewing sustainable information and communication technology (ICT), the lessons from local experience and elsewhere formed the basis of a wider consideration of scale up challenges in South Africa. Results Four key system dimensions were identified and assessed: government stewardship and the organisational, technological and financial systems. In South Africa, the opportunities for successful implementation of mHealth include the high prevalence of mobile phones, a supportive policy environment for eHealth, successful use of mHealth for CBS in a number of projects and a well-developed ICT industry. However there are weaknesses in other key health systems areas such as organisational culture and capacity for using health information for management, and the poor availability and use of ICT in primary health care. The technological challenges include the complexity of ensuring interoperability and integration of information systems and securing privacy of information. Finally, there are the challenges of sustainable financing required for large scale use of mobile phone technology in resource limited settings. Conclusion Against a background of a health system with a weak ICT environment and limited implementation capacity, it remains uncertain that the potential

  4. Scale-up of polyamide and polyester Parsol® MCX nanocapsules by interfacial polycondensation and solvent diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Stumpo, Marianna; Anselmi, Cecilia; Vauthier, Christine; Mitri, Khalil; Hanno, Ibrahim; Huang, Nicolas; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2013-10-01

    The scale-up of oil-containing polyamide nanocapsules produced by simultaneous interfacial polycondensation and solvent diffusion was successfully achieved. Up to 1,500 mL were produced by using a Y-shaped mixer device. The sizes of nanocapsules containing olive oil were modulated from 646 to 211 nm by changing process parameters without modification of the formulation composition. All the results of nanocapsule diameters (dsc) expressed as a function of the Reynolds number (Re) showed the existence of a typical power-law relationship. It was demonstrated that the high turbulences created upon nanocapsule formation are the most important parameter allowing to nanocapsule size to be controlled without modifying the formulation composition. Finally, the power-law relationship was used to predict the size of nanocapsules composed of polyamide or polyester and loaded with Parsol(®) MCX. The physico-chemical properties of both polyamide and polyester nanocapsules at the laboratory scale were compared to the ones obtained at the pilot scale. The encapsulation efficiency was higher than 98% in both types of nanocapsules at the laboratory and the pilot scales. The in vitro releases of Parsol(®) MCX from polyester nanocapsules were reproducible at both scales. This is the first time such a power-law was described for the preparation of nanocapsules by interfacial polycondensation and solvent diffusion.

  5. Scale up of a novel tri-substrate fermentation for enhanced production of Aspergillus niger lipase for tallow hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Edwinoliver, N G; Thirunavukarasu, K; Naidu, R B; Gowthaman, M K; Kambe, T Nakajima; Kamini, N R

    2010-09-01

    A novel tri-substrate fermentation (TSF) process was developed for the production of lipase from Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594 using agro-industrial residues, wheat bran (WB), coconut oil cake (COC) and an agro-product, wheat rawa (WR). The lipase activity was 628.7+/-13 U/g dry substrate (U/gds) at 30 degrees C and 96 h and growth studies indicated that addition of WR significantly augmented the biomass and lipase production. Scale up of lipase production at 100g and 3 kg (3 x 1 kg) tray-level batch fermentation resulted in 96% and 83.0% of enzyme activities, respectively, at 72 h. Maximum activity of 745.7+/-11U/gds was obtained, when fermented substrate was extracted in buffer containing 1% (w/v) sodium chloride and 0.5% (w/v) Triton X-100. Furthermore, the direct application of fermented substrate for tallow hydrolysis makes the process economical for industrial production of biofuel.

  6. Neonatal resuscitation in low-resource settings: What, who, and how to overcome challenges to scale up?

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Stephen N.; Lee, Anne CC; Niermeyer, Susan; English, Mike; Keenan, William J.; Carlo, Wally; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Bang, Abhay; Narayanan, Indira; Ariawan, Iwan; Lawn, Joy E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Each year approximately 10 million babies do not breathe immediately at birth, of which about 6 million require basic neonatal resuscitation. The major burden is in low-income settings, where health system capacity to provide neonatal resuscitation is inadequate. Objective To systematically review the evidence for neonatal resuscitation content, training and competency, equipment and supplies, cost, and key program considerations, specifically for resource-constrained settings. Results Evidence from several observational studies shows that facility-based basic neonatal resuscitation may avert 30% of intrapartum-related neonatal deaths. Very few babies require advanced resuscitation (endotracheal intubation and drugs) and these newborns may not survive without ongoing ventilation; hence, advanced neonatal resuscitation is not a priority in settings without neonatal intensive care. Of the 60 million nonfacility births, most do not have access to resuscitation. Several trials have shown that a range of community health workers can perform neonatal resuscitation with an estimated effect of a 20% reduction in intrapartum-related neonatal deaths, based on expert opinion. Case studies illustrate key considerations for scale up. Conclusion Basic resuscitation would substantially reduce intrapartum-related neonatal deaths. Where births occur in facilities, it is a priority to ensure that all birth attendants are competent in resuscitation. Strategies to address the gap for home births are urgently required. More data are required to determine the impact of neonatal resuscitation, particularly on long-term outcomes in low-income settings. PMID:19815203

  7. Dynamic Single-Use Bioreactors Used in Modern Liter- and m(3)- Scale Biotechnological Processes: Engineering Characteristics and Scaling Up.

    PubMed

    Löffelholz, Christian; Kaiser, Stephan C; Kraume, Matthias; Eibl, Regine; Eibl, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    During the past 10 years, single-use bioreactors have been well accepted in modern biopharmaceutical production processes targeting high-value products. Up to now, such processes have mainly been small- or medium-scale mammalian cell culture-based seed inoculum, vaccine or antibody productions. However, recently first attempts have been made to modify existing single-use bioreactors for the cultivation of plant cells and tissue cultures, and microorganisms. This has even led to the development of new single-use bioreactor types. Moreover, due to safety issues it has become clear that single-use bioreactors are the "must have" for expanding human stem cells delivering cell therapeutics, the biopharmaceuticals of the next generation. So it comes as no surprise that numerous different dynamic single-use bioreactor types, which are suitable for a wide range of applications, already dominate the market today. Bioreactor working principles, main applications, and bioengineering data are presented in this review, based on a current overview of greater than milliliter-scale, commercially available, dynamic single-use bioreactors. The focus is on stirred versions, which are omnipresent in R&D and manufacturing, and in particular Sartorius Stedim's BIOSTAT family. Finally, we examine development trends for single-use bioreactors, after discussing proven approaches for fast scaling-up processes.

  8. Scale-up of Agrobacterium-mediated transient protein expression in bioreactor-grown Nicotiana glutinosa plant cell suspension culture.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Kristin M; Larsen, Jeffrey S; Curtis, Wayne R

    2008-01-01

    The reporter gene beta-glucuronidase was transiently expressed in a 51-L bioreactor-grown plant cell suspension culture of Nicotiana glutinosa at a yield of approximately 1.1 mg through co-culture with an auxotrophic strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The three order of magnitude scale-up involved the investigation of factors contributing to transient expression including the timing of Agrobacterium inoculation relative to the plant cell growth phase, plant tissue culture hormonal triggers and plant cell cycle synchronization. The co-culture process was simplified to facilitate implementation in a pilot-scale bioreactor. At the shake flask scale it was determined that elevated concentrations of oxygen in the headspace were detrimental to transient expression levels and the addition of acetosyringone to the co-culture had a negligible effect. The bacterial preparation process was also streamlined, permitting the direct transfer of the Agrobacterium culture from a bench-scale fermentor to the pilot-scale plant cell culture bioreactor. Increasing expression levels and overcoming batch-to-batch variability despite extensive procedure systemization remain the major technical hurdles.

  9. Evaluating the effects of scaling up on the performance of bioelectrochemical systems using a technical scale microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert Keith; Harnisch, Falk; Wirth, Sebastian; Wahlandt, Helge; Dockhorn, Thomas; Dichtl, Norbert; Schröder, Uwe

    2014-07-01

    This study focuses on the challenges of the scaling up process of bioelectrochemical systems on the example of a technical scale microbial electrolysis cell referred to as the "prototype". Anodically treating real wastewater and operated in continuous mode at a hydraulic retention time of 1.23 d with an average chemical oxygen demand (COD)-loading rate of 0.5 g O2 d(-1) L Reactor(-1) the prototype on average showed COD removal efficiency of 67% with effluent concentrations of 210 mg O2 L(-1) and an ammonium elimination rate of 17.8 ± 3.9 mg Nd(-1) L Reactor(-1) resulting in effluent concentrations of 30.7 ± 3.7 mg NL(-1) with a removal efficiency of 40% at a current generation of 72 μA cm(-2) and Coulomb efficiency of 11%. A model is described as a method for comparing conventional and BES based technology using the above mentioned criteria and balancing them against the respective loading rates.

  10. Implementation of the Community Health Assistant (CHA) Cadre in Zambia: A Process Evaluation to Guide Future Scale-Up Decisions.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Katharine D; Belete, Yekoyesew W; Phiri, Sydney Chauwa; Musonda, Mutinta; Kawesha, Elizabeth Chizema; Muleya, Evelyn Mutinta; Chibawe, Caroline Phiri; van den Broek, Jan Willem; Vosburg, Kathryn Bradford

    2016-04-01

    Universal health coverage requires an adequate health workforce, including community health workers (CHWs) to reach rural communities. To improve healthcare access in rural areas, in 2010 the Government of Zambia implemented a national CHW strategy that introduced a new cadre of healthcare workers called community health assistants (CHAs). After 1 year of training the pilot class of 307 CHAs deployed in September 2012. This paper presents findings from a process evaluation of the barriers and facilitators of implementation of the CHA pilot, along with how evidence was used to guide ongoing implementation and scale-up decisions. Qualitative inquiry was used to assess implementation during the first 6 months of the program rollout, with 43 in-depth individual and 32 small group interviews across five respondent types: CHAs, supervisors, volunteer CHWs, community members, and district leadership. Potential 'implementation moderators' were explored using deductive coding and thematic analysis of participant perspectives on community acceptance of CHAs, supervision support mechanisms, and coordination with volunteer CHWs, and health system integration of a new cadre. Community acceptance of CHAs was generally high, but coordination between CHAs and existing volunteer CHWs presented some challenges. The supervision support system was found to be inconsistent, limiting assurance of consistent quality care delivered by CHAs. Underlying health system weaknesses regarding drug supply and salary payments furthermore hindered incorporation of a new cadre within the national health system. Recommendations for implementation and future scale based on the process evaluation findings are discussed.

  11. Local sustainability and scaling up for user fee exemptions: medical NGOs vis-à-vis health systems.

    PubMed

    Olivier de Sardan, Jean-Pierre; Diarra, Aïssa; Koné, Félix Yaouaga; Yaogo, Maurice; Zerbo, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Free healthcare obviously works when a partner from abroad supplies a health centre or a health district with medicines and funding on a regular basis, provides medical, administrative and managerial training, and gives incentive bonuses and daily subsistence allowances to staff. The experiments by three international NGO in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger have all been success stories. But withdrawing NGO support means that health centres that have enjoyed a time of plenty under NGO management will return to the fold of health centres run by the state in its present condition and the health system in its present condition, with the everyday consequences of late reimbursements and stock shortages. The local support given by international NGOs has more often than not an effect of triggering an addiction to aid instead of inducing local sustainability without infusion. In the same way, scaling up to the entire country a local pilot experiment conducted under an NGO involves its insertion into a national bureaucratic machine with its multiple levels, all of which are potential bottlenecks. Only experiments carried out under the "ordinary" management of the state are capable of laying bare the problems associated with this process. Without reformers 'on the inside' (within the health system itself and among health workers), no real reform of the health system induced by reformers 'from the outside' can succeed.

  12. Scaling up ATLAS production system for the LHC Run 2 and beyond: project ProdSys2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, M.; De, K.; Garcia, J.; Navarro; Golubkov, D.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Vaniachine, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Big Data processing needs of the ATLAS experiment grow continuously, as more data and more use cases emerge. For Big Data processing the ATLAS experiment adopted the data transformation approach, where software applications transform the input data into outputs. In the ATLAS production system, each data transformation is represented by a task, a collection of many jobs, submitted by the ATLAS workload management system (PanDA) and executed on the Grid. Our experience shows that the rate of task submission grows exponentially over the years. To scale up the ATLAS production system for new challenges, we started the ProdSys2 project. PanDA has been upgraded with the Job Execution and Definition Interface (JEDI). Patterns in ATLAS data transformation workflows composed of many tasks provided a scalable production system framework for template definitions of the many-tasks workflows. These workflows are being implemented in the Database Engine for Tasks (DEfT) that generates individual tasks for processing by JEDI. We report on the ATLAS experience with many-task workflow patterns in preparation for the LHC Run 2.

  13. Scaling up a chemically-defined aggregate-based suspension culture system for neural commitment of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Cláudia C; Fernandes, Tiago G; Diogo, M Margarida; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-12-01

    The demand of high cell numbers for applications in cellular therapies and drug screening requires the development of scalable platforms capable to generating highly pure populations of tissue-specific cells from human pluripotent stem cells. In this work, we describe the scaling-up of an aggregate-based culture system for neural induction of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) under chemically-defined conditions. A combination of non-enzymatic dissociation and rotary agitation was successfully used to produce homogeneous populations of hiPSC aggregates with an optimal (140 μm) and narrow distribution of diameters (coefficient of variation of 21.6%). Scalable neural commitment of hiPSCs as 3D aggregates was performed in 50 mL spinner flasks, and the process was optimized using a factorial design approach, involving parameters such as agitation rate and seeding density. We were able to produce neural progenitor cell cultures, that at the end of a 6-day neural induction process contained less than 3% of Oct4-positive cells and that, after replating, retained more than 60% of Pax6-positive neural cells. The results here presented should set the stage for the future generation of a clinically relevant number of human neural progenitors for transplantation and other biomedical applications using controlled, automated and reproducible large-scale bioreactor culture systems.

  14. Hollow Fibers Structured Packings in Olefin/Paraffin Distillation: Apparatus Scale-Up and Long-Term Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Le, Loan; Martinez, Ronald; Morrison, Malcolm

    2013-06-21

    Following the conceptual demonstration of high separation efficiency and column capacity obtained in olefin/paraffin distillation using hollow fiber structured packings (HFSPs) in a bench scale (J. Membr. Sci.2006, 2007, and 2010), we scaled-up this process with a 10-fold increase in the internal flow rate and a 3-fold increase in the module length. We confirmed that the HFSPs technology gives high separation efficiency and column capacity in iso-/n-butane distillation for 18 months. We systematically investigated the effects of packing density, concentration of light component, reflux ratio, and module age on the separation efficiency and operating stability. The comprehensive characterizations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) were carried out to probe the changes in the morphological, thermal, and mechanical properties of polypropylene (PP) hollow fibers over the aging process. Our results suggest that after a long-term exposure to light hydrocarbon environments at ≤70 °C the morphological and mechanical properties of the PP polymer do not degrade significantly in a propane/propylene and iso-/n-butane environment.

  15. Hollow Fibers Structured Packings in Olefin/Paraffin Distillation: Apparatus Scale-Up and Long-Term Stability

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Dali; Le, Loan; Martinez, Ronald; ...

    2013-06-21

    Following the conceptual demonstration of high separation efficiency and column capacity obtained in olefin/paraffin distillation using hollow fiber structured packings (HFSPs) in a bench scale (J. Membr. Sci.2006, 2007, and 2010), we scaled-up this process with a 10-fold increase in the internal flow rate and a 3-fold increase in the module length. We confirmed that the HFSPs technology gives high separation efficiency and column capacity in iso-/n-butane distillation for 18 months. We systematically investigated the effects of packing density, concentration of light component, reflux ratio, and module age on the separation efficiency and operating stability. The comprehensive characterizations using scanningmore » electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) were carried out to probe the changes in the morphological, thermal, and mechanical properties of polypropylene (PP) hollow fibers over the aging process. Our results suggest that after a long-term exposure to light hydrocarbon environments at ≤70 °C the morphological and mechanical properties of the PP polymer do not degrade significantly in a propane/propylene and iso-/n-butane environment.« less

  16. Scale-up and performance of an immobilized cell reactor separator for the production of ethanol from whey lactose

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Okos, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    An adsorbed microbial cell, trickle flow, reactor incorporating a circulating gas phase to simultaneously separate a volatile inhibitory product has shown high fermentation rates and effective product separation on a 1 in. diameter lab bench scale. Carbon dioxide generated by the fermentation is recirculated to strip the volatile fermentation product from the fermentation broth. Random and structured packings were evaluated and a parallel type structured packing was developed consisting of a plates of absorbant material to which cells are adsorbed and spaced to allow passage of the circulating gas stream. The substrate solution flows by gravity in a capillary flow fashion down through the plates in which the cells are immobilized. The theoretical reactor separation and fermentation performance as a function of plate thickness and gas channel spacing was evaluated. This reactor has been scaled up to a 6 in. ID reactor with a total reactor volume of about 50 liters using a spiral wound version of the parallel plates, and then to a 24 in. ID reactor with a reactor volume of about 1300 liters. 16 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Scaling-up anti-predator phenotypic responses of prey: impacts over multiple generations in a complex aquatic community.

    PubMed

    Peacor, Scott D; Pangle, Kevin L; Schiesari, Luis; Werner, Earl E

    2012-01-07

    Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators owing to induced changes in prey traits are predicted to influence the structure of ecological communities. However, evidence of the importance of NCEs is limited primarily to simple systems (e.g. two to four species) over relatively short periods (e.g. less than one generation). We examined the NCEs of a fish predator, arising from phenotypic plasticity in zooplankton prey traits, over multiple generations of a diverse zooplankton community. The presence of fish, caged to remove consumptive effects, strongly influenced zooplankton community structure, through both direct and indirect NCE pathways, altering the abundance of many taxa by magnitudes as large as 3 to 10-fold. Presence of fish affected different species of cladocerans and copepods both positively and negatively. A particularly striking result was the reversal of dominance in copepod taxa: presence of fish reduced the ratio of calanoids to cyclopoids from 6.3 to 0.43. Further, the NCE of fish had a strong negative trophic cascade to zooplankton resources (phytoplankton). To our knowledge, this is the first experiment to show that NCEs can influence the abundance of multiple prey species over time spans of multiple prey generations. Our findings demonstrate that adaptive phenotypic plasticity of individuals can scale-up to affect the structure of ecological communities.

  18. Population-level associations between antiretroviral therapy scale-up and all-cause mortality in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Larson, Elysia; Bendavid, Eran; Tuoane-Nkhasi, Maletela; Mbengashe, Thobile; Goldman, Thurma; Wilson, Melinda; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Our aim was to describe the association between increasing access to antiretroviral therapy and all-cause mortality in South Africa from 2005 to 2009. We undertook a longitudinal, population-level study, using antiretroviral monitoring data reported by PEPFAR implementing partners and province-level and national all-cause mortality records from Statistics South Africa (provider of official South African government statistics) to analyse the association between antiretroviral therapy and mortality. Using mixed effects models with a random intercept for province, we estimated the contemporaneous and lagging association between antiretroviral therapy and all-cause mortality in South Africa. We also conducted subgroup analyses and estimated the number of deaths averted. For each 100 HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy reported by PEPFAR implementing partners in South African treatment programmes, there was an associated 2.9 fewer deaths that year (95% CI: 1.5, 4.2) and 6.3 fewer deaths the following year (95% CI: 4.6, 8.0). The associated decrease in mortality the year after treatment reporting was seen in both adults and children, and men and women. Treatment provided from 2005 to 2008 was associated with 28,305 deaths averted from 2006 to 2009. The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in South Africa was associated with a significant reduction in national all-cause mortality.

  19. Evaluation of ethanol production from corncob using Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis CBS 6054 by volumetric scale-up.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Zhu, J Y; Scordia, Danilo; Jeffries, Thomas W

    2011-10-01

    In scale-up, the potential of ethanol production by dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment using corncob was investigated. Pretreatments were performed at 170 °C with various acid concentrations ranging from 0% to 1.656% based on oven dry weight. Following pretreatment, pretreated biomass yield ranged from 59% to 67%. More than 90% of xylan was removed at 0.828% of sulfuric acid. At same pretreatment condition, the highest glucose yield obtained from pretreated biomass by enzymatic hydrolysis was about 76%, based on a glucan content of 37/100 g. In hydrolysate obtained by pretreatment, glucose concentration was low, while xylose concentration was significantly increased above 0.368% of sulfuric acid. At 1.656% of sulfuric acid, xylose and glucose concentration was highest. In subsequent, fermentation with hydrolysate, maximal ethanol yield was attained after 24 h with 0.368% of sulfuric acid. The fermentation efficiency of hydrolysate obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis reached a maximum of 75% at an acid charge of 0.368%.

  20. Scale-up study of a multiphase photocatalytic reactor--degradation of cyanide in water over TiO2.

    PubMed

    Motegh, Mahsa; van Ommen, J Ruud; Appel, Peter W; Kreutzer, Michiel T

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an integrated view on various aspects of reactor design for photocatalytic reactions and presents a scale-up study of photocatalytic reactors. This study focuses on degrading organic pollutants in the effluent of an integrated gasification coal combustion plant over TiO2, with the target of degrading cyanide to below its allowable emission threshold set by European legislation. Here, we show the interplay of different efficiencies that affect the overall apparent photonic efficiency and the reactor volume required to achieve a certain objective in conversion. The chosen reactor configuration is rectangular slurry-bubble-columns-in-series to ensure a good mass transfer rate per photoreactor while approaching plug-flow behavior as a sum, and a high reactor surface-area-to-volume ratio for a good capture of incident photons. We consider a simple 1D photonic description of a photoreactor, in the direction of incident solar light, and implement a bidirectional scattering model for photocatalytic particles and bubbles to calculate the local rate of photon absorption and the photon absorption efficiency in the photoreactor. We show that, implementing the principles of process intensification, the large scale degradation of cyanide to below European emission limits is achievable.

  1. Scaling up close-range surveys, a challenge for the generalization of as-built data in industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hullo, J.-F.; Thibault, G.

    2014-06-01

    As-built CAD data reconstructed from Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) data are used for more than two decades by Electricité de France (EDF) to prepare maintenance operations in its facilities. But today, the big picture is renewed: "as-built virtual reality" must address a huge scale-up to provide data to an increasing number of applications. In this paper, we first present a wide multi-sensor multi-purpose scanning campaign performed in a 10 floor building of a power plant in 2013: 1083 TLS stations (about 40.109 3D points referenced under a 2 cm tolerance) and 1025 RGB panoramic images (340.106 pixels per point of view). As expected, this very large survey of high precision measurements in a complex environment stressed sensors and tools that were developed for more favourable conditions and smaller data sets. The whole survey process (tools and methods used from acquisition and processing to CAD reconstruction) underwent a detailed follow-up in order to state on the locks to a possible generalization to other buildings. Based on these recent feedbacks, we have highlighted some of these current bottlenecks in this paper: sensors denoising, automation in processes, data validation tools improvements, standardization of formats and (meta-) data structures.

  2. Scale-up studies on high shear wet granulation process from mini-scale to commercial scale.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shouhei; Fujita, Naomi; Myojo, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Takashi; Tanino, Tadatsugu

    2008-10-01

    A newly developed mini-scale high shear granulator was used for scale-up study of wet granulation process from 0.2 to 200 L scales. Under various operation conditions and granulation bowl sizes, powder mixture composed of anhydrous caffeine, D-mannitol, dibasic calcium phosphate, pregelatinized starch and corn starch was granulated by adding water. The granules were tabletted, and disintegration time and hardness of the tablets were evaluated to seek correlations of granulation conditions and tablet properties. As the granulation proceeded, disintegration time was prolonged and hardness decreased. When granulation processes were operated under the condition that agitator tip speed was the same, similar relationship between granulation time and tablet properties, such as disintegration time and hardness, between 0.2 L and 11 L scales were observed. Likewise, between 11 L and 200 L scales similar relationship was observed when operated under the condition that the force to the granulation mass was the same. From the above results, the mini-scale high shear granulator should be useful tool to predict operation conditions of large-scale granulation from its mini-scale operation conditions, where similar tablet properties should be obtained.

  3. Kinetic modeling and scale up of lipoic acid (LA) production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jayakar, Shilpa S; Singhal, Rekha S

    2013-08-01

    Scale up studies for production of lipoic acid (LA) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported in this paper for the first time. LA production in batch mode was carried out in a stirred tank bioreactor at varying agitation and aeration with maximum LA production of 512 mg/L obtained at 350 rpm and 25 % dissolved oxygen in batch culture conditions. Thus, LA production increased from 352 mg/L in shake flask to 512 mg/L in batch mode in a 5 L stirred tank bioreactor. Biomass production under these conditions was mathematically explained using logistic equation and data obtained for LA production and substrate utilization were successfully fitted using Luedeking-Piret and Mercier's models. The kinetic studies showed LA production to be growth associated. Further enhancement of LA production was carried out using fed-batch (variable volume) and semi-continuous modes of fermentation. Semi-continuous fermentation with three feeding cycles of sucrose effectively increased the production of LA from 512 to 725 mg/L.

  4. A model for scale up of family health innovations in low-income and middle-income settings: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth H; Curry, Leslie A; Taylor, Lauren A; Pallas, Sarah Wood; Talbert-Slagle, Kristina; Yuan, Christina; Fox, Ashley; Minhas, Dilpreet; Ciccone, Dana Karen; Berg, David; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Background Many family health innovations that have been shown to be both efficacious and cost-effective fail to scale up for widespread use particularly in low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC). Although individual cases of successful scale-up, in which widespread take up occurs, have been described, we lack an integrated and practical model of scale-up that may be applicable to a wide range of public health innovations in LMIC. Objective To develop an integrated and practical model of scale-up that synthesises experiences of family health programmes in LMICs. Data sources We conducted a mixed methods study that included in-depth interviews with 33 key informants and a systematic review of peer-reviewed and grey literature from 11 electronic databases and 20 global health agency web sites. Study eligibility criteria, participants and interventions We included key informants and studies that reported on the scale up of several family health innovations including Depo-Provera as an example of a product innovation, exclusive breastfeeding as an example of a health behaviour innovation, community health workers (CHWs) as an example of an organisational innovation and social marketing as an example of a business model innovation. Key informants were drawn from non-governmental, government and international organisations using snowball sampling. An article was excluded if the article: did not meet the study's definition of the innovation; did not address dissemination, diffusion, scale up or sustainability of the innovation; did not address low-income or middle-income countries; was superficial in its discussion and/or did not provide empirical evidence about scale-up of the innovation; was not available online in full text; or was not available in English, French, Spanish or Portuguese, resulting in a final sample of 41 peer-reviewed articles and 30 grey literature sources. Study appraisal and synthesis methods We used the constant comparative method of

  5. Extruder scale-up assessment in the process of extrusion-spheronization: comparison of radial and axial systems by a design of experiments approach.

    PubMed

    Désiré, Amélie; Paillard, Bruno; Bougaret, Joël; Baron, Michel; Couarraze, Guy

    2013-02-01

    Scaling-up the extrusion-spheronization process involves the separate scale-up of each of the five process steps: dry mixing, granulation, extrusion, spheronization, and drying. The aim of the study was to compare two screw extrusion systems regarding their suitability for scaling-up. Two drug substances of high- and low-solubility in water were retained at different concentrations as formulation variables. Different spheronization times were tested. The productivity of the process was followed up using the extrusion rate and yield. Pellets were characterized by their size and shape, and by their structural and mechanical properties. A response surface design of experiments was built to evaluate the influence of the different variables and their interactions on each response, and to select the type of extrusion which provides the best results in terms of product quality, the one which shows less influence on the product after scale-up ("scalability") and when the formula used changes ("robustness"), and the one which allows the possibility to adjust pellet properties with spheronization variables ("flexibility"). Axial system showed the best characteristics in terms of product quality at lab and industrial scales, the best robustness at industrial scale, and the best scalability, by comparison with radial system. Axial system thus appeared as the easiest scaled-up system. Compared to lab scale, the conclusions observed at industrial scale were the same in terms of product quality, but different for robustness and flexibility, which confirmed the importance to test the systems at industrial scale before acquiring the equipment.

  6. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.

  7. TV Weathercasters as Climate Educators: Rationale, Evidence for Effectiveness, and Potential for Nationwide Scale-Up. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maibach, E.; Cullen, H. M.; Witte, J.

    2013-12-01

    local ramifications of climate change, their viewers learn. Our current attempts to scale-up the model on a limited basis - in one state as a field experiment, and elsewhere around the nation on an uncontrolled basis - are showing promise in terms of attracting an increasing numbers of participating weathercasters. Lastly, professional associations that represent TV weathercasters (AMS and NWA), and government agencies that produce climate and weather data for meteorologists (NOAA and NASA), are committed to help scale up this model so that all interested TV weathercasters have easy access to localized information through which to educate their viewers about local weather and related implications of climate change. In sum, by engaging and empowering TV weathercasters as climate educators, we seek to increase public understanding of the relationships among climate, climate variability, climate change, weather extremes and community vulnerability, and we believe this model has considerable potential.

  8. Establishing and Scaling-Up Clinical Social Franchise Networks: Lessons Learned From Marie Stopes International and Population Services International.

    PubMed

    Thurston, Sarah; Chakraborty, Nirali M; Hayes, Brendan; Mackay, Anna; Moon, Pierre

    2015-06-17

    In many low- and middle-income countries, a majority of people seek health care from the private sector. However, fragmentation, poor economies of scale, inadequate financing, political opposition, a bias toward curative services, and weak regulatory and quality control systems pose serious challenges for the private sector. Social franchising addresses a number of these challenges by organizing small, independent health care businesses into quality-assured networks. Global franchisors Marie Stopes International (MSI) and Population Services International (PSI) have rapidly scaled their family planning social franchising programs in recent years, jointly delivering over 10.8 million couple-years of protection (CYPs) in 2014-up 26% from 8.6 million CYPs just 1 year prior. Drawing on experience across MSI's 17 and PSI's 25 social franchise networks across Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean, this article documents the organizations' operational approaches, challenges faced, and solutions implemented. The organizations provide intensive capacity building and support for private-sector providers, including clinical training, branding, monitoring quality of franchised services, and commodity support. In addition, franchising programs engage providers and clients through behavior change communication (BCC) and demand generation activities to raise awareness and to attract clients, and they implement initiatives to ensure services are affordable for the lowest-income clients. Social franchise programs offer the private sector a collective platform to better engage government in health policy advocacy and for integrating into new public health care financing and procurement mechanisms. The future of social franchising will require developing approaches to scale-up and sustain the model cost-effectively, selectively integrating other health services into the franchise package, and being responsive to evolving health care financing approaches with the potential

  9. High burden of malaria following scale-up of control interventions in Nchelenge District, Luapula Province, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria control interventions have been scaled-up in Zambia in conjunction with a malaria surveillance system. Although substantial progress has been achieved in reducing morbidity and mortality, national and local information demonstrated marked heterogeneity in the impact of malaria control across the country. This study reports the high burden of malaria in Nchelenge District, Luapula Province, Zambia from 2006 to 2012 after seven years of control measures. Methods Yearly aggregated information on cases of malaria, malaria deaths, use of malaria diagnostics, and malaria control interventions from 2006 to 2012 were obtained from the Nchelenge District Health Office. Trends in the number of malaria cases, methods of diagnosis, malaria positivity rate among pregnant women, and intervention coverage were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Malaria prevalence remained high, increasing from 38% in 2006 to 53% in 2012. Increasing numbers of cases of severe malaria were reported until 2010. Intense seasonal malaria transmission was observed with seasonal declines in the number of cases between April and August, although malaria transmission continued throughout the year. Clinical diagnosis without accompanying confirmation declined from 95% in 2006 to 35% in 2012. Intervention coverage with long-lasting insecticide-treated nets and indoor residual spraying increased from 2006 to 2012. Conclusions Despite high coverage with vector control interventions, the burden of malaria in Nchelenge District, Zambia remained high. The high parasite prevalence could accurately reflect the true burden, perhaps in part as a consequence of population movement, or improved access to care and case reporting. Quality information at fine spatial scales will be critical for targeting effective interventions and measurement of progress. PMID:24755108

  10. Establishing and Scaling-Up Clinical Social Franchise Networks: Lessons Learned From Marie Stopes International and Population Services International

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Sarah; Chakraborty, Nirali M; Hayes, Brendan; Mackay, Anna; Moon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In many low- and middle-income countries, a majority of people seek health care from the private sector. However, fragmentation, poor economies of scale, inadequate financing, political opposition, a bias toward curative services, and weak regulatory and quality control systems pose serious challenges for the private sector. Social franchising addresses a number of these challenges by organizing small, independent health care businesses into quality-assured networks. Global franchisors Marie Stopes International (MSI) and Population Services International (PSI) have rapidly scaled their family planning social franchising programs in recent years, jointly delivering over 10.8 million couple-years of protection (CYPs) in 2014—up 26% from 8.6 million CYPs just 1 year prior. Drawing on experience across MSI’s 17 and PSI’s 25 social franchise networks across Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean, this article documents the organizations’ operational approaches, challenges faced, and solutions implemented. The organizations provide intensive capacity building and support for private-sector providers, including clinical training, branding, monitoring quality of franchised services, and commodity support. In addition, franchising programs engage providers and clients through behavior change communication (BCC) and demand generation activities to raise awareness and to attract clients, and they implement initiatives to ensure services are affordable for the lowest-income clients. Social franchise programs offer the private sector a collective platform to better engage government in health policy advocacy and for integrating into new public health care financing and procurement mechanisms. The future of social franchising will require developing approaches to scale-up and sustain the model cost-effectively, selectively integrating other health services into the franchise package, and being responsive to evolving health care financing approaches with the

  11. Successful scaling-up of self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass under pool-type reactor.

    PubMed

    Idris, Juferi; Shirai, Yoshihito; Andou, Yoshito; Mohd Ali, Ahmad Amiruddin; Othman, Mohd Ridzuan; Ibrahim, Izzudin; Yamamoto, Akio; Yasuda, Nobuhiko; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    An appropriate technology for waste utilisation, especially for a large amount of abundant pressed-shredded oil palm empty fruit bunch (OFEFB), is important for the oil palm industry. Self-sustained pyrolysis, whereby oil palm biomass was combusted by itself to provide the heat for pyrolysis without an electrical heater, is more preferable owing to its simplicity, ease of operation and low energy requirement. In this study, biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass in the form of oil palm empty fruit bunch was tested in a 3-t large-scale pool-type reactor. During the pyrolysis process, the biomass was loaded layer by layer when the smoke appeared on the top, to minimise the entrance of oxygen. This method had significantly increased the yield of biochar. In our previous report, we have tested on a 30-kg pilot-scale capacity under self-sustained pyrolysis and found that the higher heating value (HHV) obtained was 22.6-24.7 MJ kg(-1) with a 23.5%-25.0% yield. In this scaled-up study, a 3-t large-scale procedure produced HHV of 22.0-24.3 MJ kg(-1) with a 30%-34% yield based on a wet-weight basis. The maximum self-sustained pyrolysis temperature for the large-scale procedure can reach between 600 °C and 700 °C. We concluded that large-scale biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis was successfully conducted owing to the comparable biochar produced, compared with medium-scale and other studies with an electrical heating element, making it an appropriate technology for waste utilisation, particularly for the oil palm industry.

  12. Demonstrate Scale-up Procedure for Glass Composite Material (GCM) for Incorporation of Iodine Loaded AgZ.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry J.; Croes, Kenneth James; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2015-07-01

    Two large size Glass Composite Material (GCM) waste forms containing AgI-MOR were fabricated. One contained methyl iodide-loaded AgI-MOR that was received from Idaho National Laboratory (INL, Test 5, Beds 1 – 3) and the other contained iodine vapor loaded AgIMOR that was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, SHB 2/9/15 ). The composition for each GCM was 20 wt% AgI-MOR and 80 wt% Ferro EG2922 low sintering temperature glass along with enough added silver flake to prevent any I2 loss during the firing process. The silver flake amounts were 1.2 wt% for the GCM with the INL AgI-MOR and 3 wt% for the GCM contained the ORNL AgI-MOR. The GCMs, nominally 100 g, were first uniaxially pressed to 6.35 cm (2.5 inch) diameter disks then cold isostatically pressed, before firing in air to 550°C for 1hr. They were cooled slowly (1°C/min) from the firing temperature to avoid any cracking due to temperature gradients. The final GCMs were ~5 cm in diameter (~2 inches) and non-porous with densities of ~4.2 g/cm³. X-ray diffraction indicated that they consisted of the amorphous glass phase with small amounts of mordenite and AgI. Furthermore, the presence of the AgI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence. Methodology for the scaled up production of GCMs to 6 inch diameter or larger is also presented.

  13. The Long Winding Road of Opioid Substitution Therapy Implementation in South-East Asia: Challenges to Scale Up

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Gary; Sharma, Mukta; Higgs, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The South-East Asia Region contains an estimated 400,000-500,000 people who inject drugs (PWID). HIV prevalence among PWID is commonly 20% or higher in Indonesia, Thailand, Myanmar and some regions of India. Opioid substitution therapy (OST) is an important HIV prevention intervention in this part of the world. However, key challenges and barriers to scale up of OST exist, including: pervasive stigma and discrimination towards PWID; criminalisation of drug use overshadowing a public health response; lack of political will and national commitment; low financial investment; focus towards traditional treatment models of detoxification and rehabilitation; inadequate dosing of OST; and poor monitoring and evaluation of programmes. Our review of local evidence highlights that OST can be successful within the Asian context. Such evidence should be utilised more widely to advocate for policy change and increased political commitment to ensure OST reaches substantially more drug users. Significance for public health Several countries in the World Health Organization South-East Asia Region can be commended for introducing opioid substitution therapy (OST) to address the ongoing HIV epidemic among people who inject drugs (PWID). Local evidence shows OST is an effective drug treatment approach in the Asian context given sufficient technical and institutional support. However, despite much progress, the number of OST dispensing sites and recipients remains totally inadequate in terms of impact upon the current HIV epidemic among PWID. Ongoing advocacy is needed if countries are to achieve the WHO’s target of 40% of PWID being dosed with OST. Greater political commitment a strengthened policy environment, capacity building for OST clinics, lessening the criminalisation of drug use and promoting a public health response will give many more PWID access to OST and slow the advance of the HIV epidemic. PMID:25170509

  14. Scaling up access to oral rehydration solution for diarrhea: Learning from historical experience in low– and high–performing countries

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Shelby E.; Morris, Saul S.; Gilbert, Sarah Skye; Mosites, Emily; Hackleman, Rob; Weum, Kristoffer L.M.; Pintye, Jillian; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This paper aims to identify factors that systematically predict why some countries that have tried to scale up oral rehydration solution (ORS) have succeeded, and others have not. Methods We examined ORS coverage over time, across countries, and through case studies. We conducted expert interviews and literature and data searches to better understand the history of ORS scale–up efforts and why they failed or succeeded in nine countries. We used qualitative, pairwise (or three–country) comparisons of geographically or otherwise similar countries that had different outcomes in terms of ORS scale–up. An algorithm was developed which scored country performance across key supply, demand and financing activities to quantitatively assess the scale–up efforts in each country. Results The vast majority of countries have neither particularly low nor encouragingly high ORS use rates. We observed three clearly identifiable contrasts between countries that achieved and sustained high ORS coverage and those that did not. Key partners across sectors have critical roles to play to effectively address supply– and demand–side barriers. Efforts must synchronize demand generation, private provider outreach and public sector work. Many donor funds are either suspended or redirected in the event of political instability, exacerbating the health challenges faced by countries in these contexts. We found little information on the cost of scale–up efforts. Conclusions We identified a number of characteristics of successful ORS scale–up programs, including involvement of a broad range of key players, addressing supply and demand generation together, and working with both public and private sectors. Dedicated efforts are needed to launch and sustain success, including monitoring and evaluation plans to track program costs and impacts. These case studies were designed to inform programmatic decision–making; thus, rigorous academic methods to qualitatively and

  15. iCCM policy analysis: strategic contributions to understanding its character, design and scale up in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    George, Asha; Rodríguez, Daniela C; Rasanathan, Kumanan; Brandes, Neal; Bennett, Sara

    2015-12-01

    Pneumonia, diarrhoea and malaria remain leading causes of death for children under 5 years of age and access to effective and appropriate treatment for sick children is extremely low where it is needed most. Integrated community case management (iCCM) enables community health workers to provide basic lifesaving treatment for sick children living in remote communities for these diseases. While many governments in sub-Saharan Africa recently changed policies to support iCCM, large variations in implementation remain. As a result, the collaboration represented in this supplement examined the policy processes underpinning iCCM through qualitative case study research in six purposively identified countries (Niger, Burkina Faso, Mali, Kenya, Malawi and Mozambique) and the global context. We introduce the supplement, by reviewing how policy analysis can inform: (a) how we frame iCCM and negotiate its boundaries, (b) how we tailor iCCM for national health systems and (c) how we foster accountability and learning for iCCM. In terms of framing, iCCM boundaries reflect how an array of actors use evidence to prioritize particular aspects of child mortality (lack of access to treatment), and how this underpins the ability to reach consensus and legitimate specific policy enterprises. When promoted at national level, contextual health system factors, such as the profile of CHWs and the history of primary health care, cannot be ignored. Adaptation to these contextual realities may lead to unintended consequences not forseen by technical or managerial expertize alone. Further scaling up of iCCM requires understanding of the political accountabilities involved, how ownership can be fostered and learning for improved policies and programs sustained. Collectively these articles demonstrate that iCCM, although often compartmentalized as a technical intervention, also reflects the larger and messier real world of health politics, policy and practice, for which policy analysis is vital

  16. Scaling-up the use of generic antiretrovirals in resource-limited countries: generic drugs for health.

    PubMed

    Beck, Eduard J; Passarelli, Carlos; Lui, Iris; Guichard, Anne-Claire; Simao, Mariangela; De Lay, Paul; Loures, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    The number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) continues to increase around the world because of the increasing number on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and their associated increase of life expectancy, in addition to the number of people newly infected with HIV each year. Unless a 'cure' can be found for HIV infection, PLHIV can anticipate the need to take antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) for the rest of their lives. Because ARVs are now being used for HIV prevention, as well as for therapeutic purposes, the need for effective, affordable ARVs with few adverse effects will continue to rise. It is important to note that the dramatic growth in treatment coverage of PLHIV seen during the past decade has been primarily due to the increased use of generic ARVs. Thus, there will be a need to scale-up the research and development, production, distribution and access to generic ARVs and ART regimens. However, these processes must occur within national and international regulated free-market economic systems and must deal with increasingly multifaceted patent issues affecting the price while ensuring the quality of the ARVs. National and international regulatory mechanisms will have to evolve, which will affect broader national and international economic and trade issues. Because of the complexity of these issues, the Editors of this Supplement conceived of asking experts in their fields to describe the various steps from relevant research and development, to production of generic ARVs, their delivery to countries and subsequently to PLHIV in low- and middle-income countries. A main objective was to highlight how these steps are interrelated, how the production and delivery of these drugs to PLHIV in resource-limited countries can be made more effective and efficient, and what the lessons are for the production and delivery of a broader set of drugs to people in low- and middle-income countries.

  17. Update to permeable pavement research at the Edison ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Abstract: The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavement including: interlocking concrete permeable pavers; porous concrete; and permeable asphalt. The parking lot is instrumented with water content reflectometers and thermistors for continuous monitoring and has four lined sections for each surface to capture permeable pavement infiltrate for water quality analyses.Previous technical releases concerning the demonstration site focused on monitoring techniques, observed chloride and nutrient concentrations, and infiltration and evaporation rates. Thispresentation summarizes past findings and addresses current water quality efforts. This presentation summarizes past findings and addresses current water quality efforts.

  18. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    The current project is a systematic research effort to quantify relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: (a) Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems, (b) Design estimates for nearly miscible displacements, (c) Design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs (d), Compositional flow visualization experiments, and (e) Simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems. The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section.

  19. Proposal of a framework for scale-up life cycle inventory: A case of nanofibers for lithium iron phosphate cathode applications.

    PubMed

    Simon, Bálint; Bachtin, Krystyna; Kiliç, Ali; Amor, Ben; Weil, Marcel

    2016-07-01

    Environmental assessments are crucial for the management of the environmental impacts of a product in a rapidly developing world. The design phase creates opportunities for acting on the environmental issues of products using life cycle assessment (LCA). However, the LCA is hampered by a lack of information originating from distinct scales along the product or technology value chain. Many studies have been undertaken to handle similar problems, but these studies are case-specific and do not analyze the development options in the initial design phase. Thus, systematic studies are needed to determine the possible scaling. Knowledge from such screening studies would open the door for developing new methods that can tackle a given scaling problem. The present article proposes a scale-up procedure that aims to generate a new life cycle inventory (LCI) on a theoretical industrial scale, based on information from laboratory experiments. Three techniques are described to obtain the new LCI. Investigation of a laboratory-scale procedure is discussed to find similar industrial processes as a benchmark for describing a theoretical large-scale production process. Furthermore, LCA was performed on a model system of nanofiber electrospinning for Li-ion battery cathode applications. The LCA results support material developers in identifying promising development pathways. For example, the present study pointed out the significant impacts of dimethylformamide on suspension preparation and the power requirements of distinct electrospinning subprocesses. Nanofiber-containing battery cells had greater environmental impacts than did the reference cell, although they had better electrochemical performance, such as better wettability of the electrode, improving the electrode's electrosorption capacity, and longer expected lifetime. Furthermore, material and energy recovery throughout the production chain could decrease the environmental impacts by 40% to 70%, making the nanofiber a

  20. Effect of RANS-Type Turbulence Models on Adiabatic Film Cooling Effectiveness over a Scaled Up Gas Turbine Blade Leading Edge Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepuri, Giridhara Babu; Talanki Puttarangasetty, Ashok Babu; Kolke, Deepak Kumar; Jesuraj, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature is one of the key technologies in raising gas turbine engine power output. Film cooling is one of the efficient cooling techniques to cool the hot section components of a gas turbine engines in turn the turbine inlet temperature can be increased. This study aims at investigating the effect of RANS-type turbulence models on adiabatic film cooling effectiveness over a scaled up gas turbine blade leading edge surfaces. For the evaluation, five different two equation RANS-type turbulent models have been taken in consideration, which are available in the ANSYS-Fluent. For this analysis, the gas turbine blade leading edge configuration is generated using Solid Works. The meshing is done using ANSYS-Workbench Mesh and ANSYS-Fluent is used as a solver to solve the flow field. The considered gas turbine blade leading edge model is having five rows of film cooling circular holes, one at stagnation line and the two each on either side of stagnation line at 30° and 60° respectively. Each row has the five holes with the hole diameter of 4 mm, pitch of 21 mm arranged in staggered manner and has the hole injection angle of 30° in span wise direction. The experiments are carried in a subsonic cascade tunnel facility at heat transfer lab of CSIR-National Aerospace Laboratory with a Reynolds number of 1,00,000 based on leading edge diameter. From the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation it is found that K-ɛ Realizable model gives more acceptable results with the experimental values, compared to the other considered turbulence models for this type of geometries. Further the CFD evaluated results, using K-ɛ Realizable model at different blowing ratios are compared with the experimental results.

  1. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  2. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  3. Impact and Cost of Scaling Up Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in the Context of the New 90-90-90 HIV Treatment Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kripke, Katharine; Reed, Jason; Hankins, Catherine; Smiley, Gregory; Laube, Catey

    2016-01-01

    Background The report of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) for World AIDS Day 2014 highlighted a Fast-Track Strategy that sets ambitious treatment and prevention targets to reduce global HIV incidence to manageable levels by 2020 and end the AIDS epidemic by 2030. The 90-90-90 treatment targets for 2020 call for 90% of people living with HIV to know their HIV status, 90% of people who know their status to receive treatment, and 90% of people on HIV treatment to be virally suppressed. This paper examines how scale-up of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) services in four priority countries in sub-Saharan Africa could contribute to ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 in the context of concerted efforts to close the treatment gap, and what the impact of VMMC scale-up would be if the 90-90-90 treatment targets were not completely met. Methods Using the Goals module of the Spectrum suite of models, this analysis modified ART (antiretroviral treatment) scale-up coverage from base scenarios to reflect the 90-90-90 treatment targets in four countries (Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, and Uganda). In addition, a second scenario was created to reflect viral suppression levels of 75% instead of 90%, and a third scenario was created in which the 90-90-90 treatment targets are reached in women, with men reaching more moderate coverage levels. Regarding male circumcision (MC) coverage, the analysis examined both a scenario in which VMMCs were assumed to stop after 2015, and one in which MC coverage was scaled up to 90% by 2020 and maintained at 90% thereafter. Results Across all four countries, scaling up VMMC is projected to provide further HIV incidence reductions in addition to those achieved by reaching the 90-90-90 treatment targets. If viral suppression levels only reach 75%, scaling up VMMC leads to HIV incidence reduction to nearly the same levels as those achieved with 90-90-90 without VMMC scale-up. If only women reach the 90-90-90 targets

  4. Community-based misoprostol for the prevention of post-partum haemorrhage: A narrative review of the evidence base, challenges and scale-up.

    PubMed

    Hobday, Karen; Hulme, Jennifer; Belton, Suzanne; Homer, Caroline Se; Prata, Ndola

    2017-03-30

    Achieving Sustainable Development Goal targets for 2030 will require persistent investment and creativity in improving access to quality health services, including skilled attendance at birth and access to emergency obstetric care. Community-based misoprostol has been extensively studied and recently endorsed by the WHO for the prevention of post-partum haemorrhage. There remains little consolidated information about experience with implementation and scale-up to date. This narrative review of the literature aimed to identify the political processes leading to WHO endorsement of misoprostol for the prevention of post-partum haemorrhage and describe ongoing challenges to the uptake and scale-up at both policy and community levels. We review the peer-reviewed and grey literature on expansion and scale-up and present the issues central to moving forward.

  5. Update to Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavements including interlocking concrete permeable pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. The permeable pavements are limited to parking spaces while adjacent driving lanes are impermeable and drain to the permeable surfaces. The parking lot is instrumented for continuous monitoring with thermistors and water content reflectometers that measure moisture as infiltrate passes through the storage gallery beneath the permeable pavements into the underlying native soil. Each permeable surface of the parking lot has four lined sections that capture infiltrate in tanks for water quality analyses; these tanks are capable of holding volumes up to 4.1 m3, which represents up to 38 mm (1.5 in.) for direct rainfall on the porous pavement and runoff from adjacent driving lanes that drain into the permeable surface.Previous technical releases concerning the demonstration site focused on monitoring techniques, observed chloride and nutrient concentrations, surface hydrology, and infiltration and evaporation rates. This presentation summarizes these past findings and addresses current water quality efforts including pH, solids analysis, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand. Stormwater runoff continues to be a major cause of water pollution in

  6. What Is Needed to Eradicate Lymphatic Filariasis? A Model-Based Assessment on the Impact of Scaling Up Mass Drug Administration Programs

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, Randee J.; Stone, Christopher M.; Steinmann, Peter; Tanner, Marcel; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a neglected tropical disease for which more than a billion people in 73 countries are thought to be at-risk. At a global level, the efforts against LF are designed as an elimination program. However, current efforts appear to aim for elimination in some but not all endemic areas. With the 2020 goal of elimination looming, we set out to develop plausible scale-up scenarios to reach global elimination and eradication. We predict the duration of mass drug administration (MDA) necessary to reach local elimination for a variety of transmission archetypes using an existing model of LF transmission, estimate the number of treatments required for each scenario, and consider implications of rapid scale-up. Methodology We have defined four scenarios that differ in their geographic coverage and rate of scale-up. For each scenario, country-specific simulations and calculations were performed that took into account the pre-intervention transmission intensity, the different vector genera, drug regimen, achieved level of population coverage, previous progress toward elimination, and potential programmatic delays due to mapping, operations, and administration. Principal Findings Our results indicate that eliminating LF by 2020 is unlikely. If MDA programs are drastically scaled up and expanded, the final round of MDA for LF eradication could be delivered in 2028 after 4,159 million treatments. However, if the current rate of scale-up is maintained, the final round of MDA to eradicate LF may not occur until 2050. Conclusions/Significance Rapid scale-up of MDA will decrease the amount of time and treatments required to reach LF eradication. It may also propel the program towards success, as the risk of failure is likely to increase with extended program duration. PMID:26451729

  7. An evaluation of the performance and acceptability of three LED fluorescent microscopes in Zambia: lessons learnt for scale-up.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Eleanor R; Kaunda, Kaunda; Harris, Jennifer B; Kapata, Nathan; Muvwimi, Mweemba W; Kruuner, Annika; Henostroza, German; Reid, Stewart E

    2011-01-01

    suggesting that a brief orientation was insufficient in this setting. These results provide important data for resource-limited settings to consider as they scale-up LED FMs.

  8. Scale-up of anaerobic 1,3-propanediol production by Clostridium butyricum DSP1 from crude glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As the production of biofuels from raw materials continuously increases, optimization of production processes is necessary. A very important issue is the development of wasteless methods of biodiesel production. One way of utilization of glycerol generated in biodiesel production is its microbial conversion to 1,3-PD (1,3-propanediol). Results The study investigated the scale-up of 1,3-PD synthesis from crude glycerol by Clostridium butyricum. Batch fermentations were carried out in 6.6 L, 42 L and 150 L bioreactors. It was observed that cultivation of C. butyricum on a pilot scale did not decrease the efficiency of 1,3-PD production. The highest concentrations of 1,3-PD, 37 g/L for batch fermentation and 71 g/L for fed-batch fermentation, were obtained in the 6.6 L bioreactor. The kinetic parameters of 1,3-PD synthesis from crude glycerol established for batch fermentation were similar regarding all three bioreactor capacities. During fed-batch fermentation, the concentration of 1,3-PD in the 150 L bioreactor was lower and the substrate was not completely utilized. That suggested the presence of multifunctional environmental stresses in the 150 L bioreactor, which was confirmed by protein analysis. Conclusion The values of effectivity parameters for 1,3-PD synthesis in batch fermentations carried out in 6.6 L, 42 L and 150 L bioreactors were similar. The parameters obtained during fed-batch fermentations in the 150 L bioreactor differed in the rate and percentage of substrate utilization. The analysis of cell proteins demonstrated that a number of multifunctional stresses occurred during fed-batch fermentations in the 150 L bioreactor, which suggests the possibility of identifying the key stages in the biochemical process where inhibition of 1,3-PD synthesis pathways can be observed. PMID:24555775

  9. Gross primary productivity of the true steppe in central Asia in relation to NDVI: scaling up CO2 fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmanov, Tagir G.; Johnson, Douglas A.; Saliendra, Nicanor Z.; Akshalov, Kanat; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2004-01-01

    Compared to other characteristics of CO2 exchange, gross primary productivity (P g ) is most directly related to photosynthetic activity. Until recently, it was considered difficult to obtain measurement-based P g . The objective of our study was to evaluate if P g can be estimated from continuous CO2 flux measurements using nonlinear identification of the nonrectangular hyperbolic model of ecosystem-scale, light-response curves. Estimates of P g and ecosystem respiration (R e ) were obtained using Bowen ratio– energy-balance measurements of CO2 exchange in a true-steppe ecosystem in northern Kazakhstan during four growing seasons (1998–2001). The maximum mean weekly apparent quantum yield (αmax) was 0.0388 mol CO2 mol photons and the maximum mean weekly P g was 28 g CO2/m2/day in July 2000. The highest mean weekly R e max (20 g CO2m2/day) was observed in July of both 1999 and 2000. Nighttime respiration calculated from daily respiration corrected for length of the dark period and temperature (using Q 10 = 2) was closely associated with measured nighttime respiration (R 2 = 0.67 to 0.93). The 4-year average annual gross primary production (GPP) was 1617 g CO2/m2/ year (range = 1308–1957). Ten-day normalized difference vegetation index corrected for the start of the season (NDVIsos) was closely associated with 10-day average P g (R 2 = 0.66 to 0.83), which was higher than R 2 values for regressions of mean 10-day net daytime fluxes on NDVIsos (0.55–0.72). This demonstrates the advantage of usingP g in scaling up flux-tower measurements compared to other characteristics (net daytime flux or net 24-h flux).

  10. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Scale-Up in Nyanza, Kenya: Evaluating Technical Efficiency and Productivity of Service Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Omondi Aduda, Dickens S.; Ouma, Collins; Onyango, Rosebella; Onyango, Mathews; Bertrand, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) service delivery is complex and resource-intensive. In Kenya’s context there is still paucity of information on resource use vis-à-vis outputs as programs scale up. Knowledge of technical efficiency, productivity and potential sources of constraints is desirable to improve decision-making. Objective To evaluate technical efficiency and productivity of VMMC service delivery in Nyanza in 2011/2012 using data envelopment analysis. Design Comparative process evaluation of facilities providing VMMC in Nyanza in 2011/2012 using output orientated data envelopment analysis. Results Twenty one facilities were evaluated. Only 1 of 7 variables considered (total elapsed operation time) significantly improved from 32.8 minutes (SD 8.8) in 2011 to 30 minutes (SD 6.6) in 2012 (95%CI = 0.0350–5.2488; p = 0.047). Mean scale technical efficiency significantly improved from 91% (SD 19.8) in 2011 to 99% (SD 4.0) in 2012 particularly among outreach compared to fixed service delivery facilities (CI -31.47959–4.698508; p = 0.005). Increase in mean VRS technical efficiency from 84% (SD 25.3) in 2011 and 89% (SD 25.1) in 2012 was not statistically significant. Benchmark facilities were #119 and #125 in 2011 and #103 in 2012. Malmquist Productivity Index (MPI) at fixed facilities declined by 2.5% but gained by 4.9% at outreach ones by 2012. Total factor productivity improved by 83% (p = 0.032) in 2012, largely due to progress in technological efficiency by 79% (p = 0.008). Conclusions Significant improvement in scale technical efficiency among outreach facilities in 2012 was attributable to accelerated activities. However, ongoing pure technical inefficiency requires concerted attention. Technological progress was the key driver of service productivity growth in Nyanza. Incorporating service-quality dimensions and using stepwise-multiple criteria in performance evaluation enhances comprehensiveness and validity. These findings

  11. Rocks of low permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 17th International Congress of the IAH (International Association of Hydrogeologists) will meet in Tucson, Ariz., January 7-10, 1985. The deadline for abstracts is March 1, 1984, and final papers are due October 15, 1984.The topic of the congress will be “Hydrogeology of Rocks of Low Permeability,” and speakers will include W. Back, J. F. Bredehoeft, G. de Marsily, J. E. Gale, P. Fritz, L. W. Gelhar, G. E. Grisak, C. W. Kreitler, M. R. Llamas, T. N. Narasimhan, I. Neretnieks, and E. P. Weeks. The congress will conclude with a panel discussion moderated by S. P. Neuman. Panelists include S. N. Davis, G. de Marsily, R. A. Freeze, P. A. Witherspoon, and I. Neretnieks.

  12. Placental Permeability of Lead

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Stanley J.

    1974-01-01

    The detection of lead in fetal tissues by chemical analysis has long been accepted as prima facie evidence for the permeability of the placenta to this nonessential trace metal. However, only a few investigations, all on lower mammalian species, have contributed any direct experimental data bearing on this physiological process. Recent radioactive tracer and radioautographic studies on rodents have shown that lead crosses the placental membranes rapidly and in significant amounts even at relatively low maternal blood levels. While it is not possible to extrapolate directly the results of these experiments to humans because of differences in placental structure and other factors, the results do serve as a warning of the possible hazard to the human embryo and fetus of even low levels of lead in the maternal system. PMID:4857497

  13. Studies on the induction of permeability in Ascaris lumbricoides eggs.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J

    1976-08-01

    The initial process in the hatching mechanism of Ascaris eggs is the sudden onset of permeability in the previously impermeable ascaroside membrane. During this change the ascaroside membrane remains intact and no chemical changes can be detected. Using the molecular probe 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulphonic acid no conformational changes were detected in the ascaroside membrane during the induction of permeability. It is suggested that either the permeability change is due to a very localized chemical or conformational change, not detectable by conventional analytical techniques, or the change is due to mechanical damage of the ascaroside membrane, brought about by the activity of the infective larva.

  14. Permeable Boundaries in Organizational Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazy, James K.; Tivnan, Brian F.; Schwandt, David R.

    The nature of the organizational boundary is investigated in the context of organizational learning. Boundary permeability is defined and hypotheses relating it to performance are tested computationally using data from 5,500 artificial organizations. We find that matching boundary permeability to the environment predicts both agent and organization survival.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Hepatitis C Prevalence Reduction with Antiviral Treatment Scale-Up in Persons Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago

    DOE PAGES

    Echevarria, Desarae; Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; ...

    2015-08-21

    New direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) provide an opportunity to combat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in persons who inject drugs (PWID). Here we use a mathematical model to predict the impact of a DAA-treatment scale-up on HCV prevalence among PWID and the estimated cost in metropolitan Chicago.

  16. Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies: Persistence of Effects Three Years after the Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie; Layzer, Carolyn; Unlu, Fatih; Wolfe, Christopher B.; Spitler, Mary Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Education needs generalizable models to scale up evidence-based practices and programs and longitudinal research evaluating the persistence of the effect of their implementation. This is particularly important given the "deep, systemic incapacity of U.S. schools, and the practitioners who work in them, to develop, incorporate, and extend new…

  17. Scale-up of ART in Malawi has reduced case notification rates in HIV-positive and HIV-negative tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kanyerere, H; Girma, B; Mpunga, J; Tayler-Smith, K; Harries, A D; Jahn, A; Chimbwandira, F M

    2016-12-21

    Setting: For 30 years, Malawi has experienced a dual epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis (TB) that has recently begun to be attenuated by the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objective: To report on the correlation between ART scale-up and annual national TB case notification rates (CNR) in Malawi, stratified by HIV-positive and HIV-negative status, from 2005 to 2015. Design: A retrospective descriptive ecological study using aggregate data from national reports. Results: From 2005 to 2015, ART was scaled up in Malawi from 28 470 to 618 488 total patients, with population coverage increasing from 2.4% to 52.2%. During this time, annual TB notifications declined by 35%, from 26 344 to 17 104, and the TB CNR per 100 000 population declined by 49%, from 206 to 105. HIV testing uptake increased from 51% to 92%. In known HIV-positive TB patients, the CNR decreased from a high of 1247/100 000 to 710/100 000, a 43% decrease. In known HIV-negative TB patients, the CNR also decreased, from a high of 66/100 000 to 49/100 000, a 26% decrease. Conclusion: TB case notifications have continued to decline in association with ART scale-up, with the decline seen more in HIV-positive than HIV-negative TB. These findings have programmatic implications for national TB control efforts.

  18. Implementation Work at Scale: An Examination of the Fidelity of Implementation Study of the Scale-Up Effectiveness Trial of Open Court Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kate; Bell, Nance; Jones, Debra Hughes; Caverly, Sarah; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Fidelity of Implementation (FOI) study that is the focus of this report was conducted as a component of a scale-up effectiveness trial of the SRA/McGraw-Hill Open Court Reading program. The overall purpose of the FOI study was to support and provide context for findings from the larger experimental impact study of Open Court Reading (OCR). To…

  19. Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies: Persistence of Effects in the Third Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie; Wolfe, Christopher B.; Spitler, Mary Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Using a cluster randomized trial design, we evaluated the persistence of effects of a research-based model for scaling up educational interventions. The model was implemented in 42 schools in two city districts serving low-resource communities, randomly assigned to three conditions. In pre-kindergarten, the two experimental interventions were…

  20. Scale-up of ART in Malawi has reduced case notification rates in HIV-positive and HIV-negative tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kanyerere, H.; Girma, B.; Mpunga, J.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Jahn, A.; Chimbwandira, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: For 30 years, Malawi has experienced a dual epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis (TB) that has recently begun to be attenuated by the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objective: To report on the correlation between ART scale-up and annual national TB case notification rates (CNR) in Malawi, stratified by HIV-positive and HIV-negative status, from 2005 to 2015. Design: A retrospective descriptive ecological study using aggregate data from national reports. Results: From 2005 to 2015, ART was scaled up in Malawi from 28 470 to 618 488 total patients, with population coverage increasing from 2.4% to 52.2%. During this time, annual TB notifications declined by 35%, from 26 344 to 17 104, and the TB CNR per 100 000 population declined by 49%, from 206 to 105. HIV testing uptake increased from 51% to 92%. In known HIV-positive TB patients, the CNR decreased from a high of 1247/100 000 to 710/100 000, a 43% decrease. In known HIV-negative TB patients, the CNR also decreased, from a high of 66/100 000 to 49/100 000, a 26% decrease. Conclusion: TB case notifications have continued to decline in association with ART scale-up, with the decline seen more in HIV-positive than HIV-negative TB. These findings have programmatic implications for national TB control efforts. PMID:28123962

  1. WWC Review of the Report "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 study, "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-Up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies," examined the effects of "Technology-enhanced, Research-based, Instruction, Assessment, and professional Development (TRIAD)," a math intervention for preschoolers that combines a curriculum, a…

  2. Local sustainability and scaling up for user fee exemptions: medical NGOs vis-à-vis health systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Free healthcare obviously works when a partner from abroad supplies a health centre or a health district with medicines and funding on a regular basis, provides medical, administrative and managerial training, and gives incentive bonuses and daily subsistence allowances to staff. The experiments by three international NGO in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger have all been success stories. But withdrawing NGO support means that health centres that have enjoyed a time of plenty under NGO management will return to the fold of health centres run by the state in its present condition and the health system in its present condition, with the everyday consequences of late reimbursements and stock shortages. The local support given by international NGOs has more often than not an effect of triggering an addiction to aid instead of inducing local sustainability without infusion. In the same way, scaling up to the entire country a local pilot experiment conducted under an NGO involves its insertion into a national bureaucratic machine with its multiple levels, all of which are potential bottlenecks. Only experiments carried out under the "ordinary" management of the state are capable of laying bare the problems associated with this process. Without reformers 'on the inside' (within the health system itself and among health workers), no real reform of the health system induced by reformers 'from the outside' can succeed. The problems relating to the sustainability of public policies in Africa, especially when the policies benefit from development aid, in the area of health among others, are familiar to researchers and policy-makers. However, as far as user fee exemptions are concerned, debates about these problems have extended well beyond the narrow circle of experts and into the public domain in the countries concerned. Throughout our research, we have observed that the sustainability of free healthcare policies is a major concern of all the actors (health workers, users

  3. Permeable membrane experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Thomas J.; Cao, Tuan Q.; Kliss, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Permeable Membrane Experiment is to gather flight data on three areas of membrane performance that are influenced by the presence of gravity. These areas are: (1) Liquid/gas phase separation, (2) gas bubble interference with diffusion through porous membranes and (3) wetting characteristics of hydrophilic membrane surfaces. These data are important in understaning the behavior of membrane/liquid/gas interfaces where surface tension forces predominate. The data will be compared with 1-g data already obtained and with predicted micrograviity behavior. The data will be used to develop designs for phase separation and plant nutrient delivery systems and will be available to the life support community for use in developing technologies which employ membranes. A conceptual design has been developed to conduct three membrane experiments, in sequence, aboard a single Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) carrier to be carried in the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. One experiment is conducted for each of the three membrane performance areas under study. These experiments are discussed in this paper.

  4. Permeability analysis of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Dias, M R; Fernandes, P R; Guedes, J M; Hollister, S J

    2012-04-05

    Porous artificial bone substitutes, especially bone scaffolds coupled with osteobiologics, have been developed as an alternative to the traditional bone grafts. The bone scaffold should have a set of properties to provide mechanical support and simultaneously promote tissue regeneration. Among these properties, scaffold permeability is a determinant factor as it plays a major role in the ability for cells to penetrate the porous media and for nutrients to diffuse. Thus, the aim of this work is to characterize the permeability of the scaffold microstructure, using both computational and experimental methods. Computationally, permeability was estimated by homogenization methods applied to the problem of a fluid flow through a porous media. These homogenized permeability properties are compared with those obtained experimentally. For this purpose a simple experimental setup was used to test scaffolds built using Solid Free Form techniques. The obtained results show a linear correlation between the computational and the experimental permeability. Also, this study showed that permeability encompasses the influence of both porosity and pore size on mass transport, thus indicating its importance as a design parameter. This work indicates that the mathematical approach used to determine permeability may be useful as a scaffold design tool.

  5. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  6. Porosity, permeability, and their relationship in granite, basalt, and tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report discusses the porosity, storage, and permeability of fractured (mainly crystalline) rock types proposed as host rock for nuclear waste repositories. The emphasis is on the inter-relationships of these properties, but a number of reported measurements are included as well. The porosity of rock is shown to consist of fracture porosity and matrix porosity; techniques are described for determining the total interconnected porosity through both laboratory and field measurement. Permeability coefficient, as obtained by experiments ranging from laboratory to crustal scale, is discussed. Finally, the problem of determining the relationship between porosity and permeability is discussed. There is no simple, all encompassing relationship that describes the dependence of permeability upon porosity. However, two particular cases have been successfully analyzed: flow through a single rough fracture, and flow through isotropic porous rock. These two cases are discussed in this report.

  7. Fractal Theory for Permeability Prediction, Venezuelan and USA Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana, Milagrosa; Altamiranda, Dignorah; Cabrera, Ana

    2014-05-01

    Inferring petrophysical parameters such as permeability, porosity, water saturation, capillary pressure, etc, from the analysis of well logs or other available core data has always been of critical importance in the oil industry. Permeability in particular, which is considered to be a complex parameter, has been inferred using both empirical and theoretical techniques. The main goal of this work is to predict permeability values on different wells using Fractal Theory, based on a method proposed by Pape et al. (1999). This approach uses the relationship between permeability and the geometric form of the pore space of the rock. This method is based on the modified equation of Kozeny-Carman and a fractal pattern, which allows determining permeability as a function of the cementation exponent, porosity and the fractal dimension. Data from wells located in Venezuela and the United States of America are analyzed. Employing data of porosity and permeability obtained from core samples, and applying the Fractal Theory method, we calculated the prediction equations for each well. At the beginning, this was achieved by training with 50% of the data available for each well. Afterwards, these equations were tested inferring over 100% of the data to analyze possible trends in their distribution. This procedure gave excellent results in all the wells in spite of their geographic distance, generating permeability models with the potential to accurately predict permeability logs in the remaining parts of the well for which there are no core samples, using even porority logs. Additionally, empirical models were used to determine permeability and the results were compared with those obtained by applying the fractal method. The results indicated that, although there are empirical equations that give a proper adjustment, the prediction results obtained using fractal theory give a better fit to the core reference data.

  8. Endothelial cell permeability to water and antipyrine

    SciTech Connect

    Garrick, R.A.

    1986-03-05

    The endothelium provides a structural barrier between plasma constituents and the tissues. The permeability characteristics of the the endothelial cells regulate the transcellular movement of materials across this barrier while other movement is paracellular. In this study the permeability of the endothelial cells to tritiated water (/sup 3/HHO) and /sup 14/C-labeled antipyrine (AP) was investigated. The cells were isolated non-enzymatically from calf pulmonary artery and were maintained in culture and used between the seventh and fifteenth passage. The cells were removed from the T-flasks with a rubber policeman, titurated with a 22g needle and centrifuged. The cells were mixed with an extracellular marker, drawn into polyethylene tubing and packed by centrifugation for use in the linear diffusion technique. All measurements were made at 37 C. The diffusion coefficients for /sup 3/HHO through the packed cells (D), the intracellular material (D/sub 2/), and the extracellular material (D/sub 1/) were 0.682, 0.932 and 2.45 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ and for AP were 0.273, 0.355 and 1.13 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ respectively. The permeability coefficient calculated by the series-parallel pathway model for /sup 3/HHO was higher than that for AP and for both /sup 3/HHO and AP were lower than those calculated for isolated lung cells and erythrocytes.

  9. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  10. Permeability theory and Palace Athena.

    PubMed

    Stamps, Arthur E

    2013-06-01

    Permeability theory suggests that safety in environments depends on how far and how easily one can perceive or move through environments. Parts of environments that limit perception or retard locomotion elicit impressions of being enclosed, so properties of environments that influence perceived enclosure are important in permeability theory. One prediction of permeability theory is that the more permeable the boundary, the less enclosed the region within that boundary will seem to be. Another prediction is that boundary depth will have little influence on perceived enclosure. These predictions were tested in the venue of Greek temples. 30 participants were tested (14 men, 16 women; M age = 40 yr.), who rated perceived enclosure for 18 stimuli. The stimuli were constructed using a virtual scene from the Tholos in Delphi with the positions of the columns forming the boundaries. The boundaries were designed to have different levels of permeability and depth. Data were analyzed in terms of effect sizes and focused comparisons. Results indicated that perceived enclosure was most strongly influenced by the visual permeability of the boundary, while depth of boundary had a much smaller effect on perceived enclosure.

  11. Is Reading Recovery an Effective Intervention for Students with Reading Difficulties? A Critique of the i3 Scale-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, James W.; Tunmer, William E.

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported i3 Scale-Up of Reading Recovery (May et al., 2015) found an effect size of +0.69 in favor of Reading Recovery compared to the control group. We discuss four issues: (a) many of the lowest achieving students were excluded from participation in Reading Recovery; (b) the control group received a range of different experiences;…

  12. Hepatitis C virus treatment for prevention among people who inject drugs: Modeling treatment scale-up in the age of direct-acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Natasha K; Vickerman, Peter; Grebely, Jason; Hellard, Margaret; Hutchinson, Sharon J; Lima, Viviane D; Foster, Graham R; Dillon, John F; Goldberg, David J; Dore, Gregory J; Hickman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Substantial reductions in hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among people who inject drugs (PWID) cannot be achieved by harm reduction interventions such as needle exchange and opiate substitution therapy (OST) alone. Current HCV treatment is arduous and uptake is low, but new highly effective and tolerable interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatments could facilitate increased uptake. We projected the potential impact of DAA treatments on PWID HCV prevalence in three settings. A dynamic HCV transmission model was parameterized to three chronic HCV prevalence settings: Edinburgh, UK (25%); Melbourne, Australia (50%); and Vancouver, Canada (65%). Using realistic scenarios of future DAAs (90% sustained viral response, 12 weeks duration, available 2015), we projected the treatment rates required to reduce chronic HCV prevalence by half or three-quarters within 15 years. Current HCV treatment rates may have a minimal impact on prevalence in Melbourne and Vancouver (<2% relative reductions) but could reduce prevalence by 26% in 15 years in Edinburgh. Prevalence could halve within 15 years with treatment scale-up to 15, 40, or 76 per 1,000 PWID annually in Edinburgh, Melbourne, or Vancouver, respectively (2-, 13-, and 15-fold increases, respectively). Scale-up to 22, 54, or 98 per 1,000 PWID annually could reduce prevalence by three-quarters within 15 years. Less impact occurs with delayed scale-up, higher baseline prevalence, or shorter average injecting duration. Results are insensitive to risk heterogeneity or restricting treatment to PWID on OST. At existing HCV drug costs, halving chronic prevalence would require annual treatment budgets of US $3.2 million in Edinburgh and approximately $50 million in Melbourne and Vancouver. Conclusion: Interferon-free DAAs could enable increased HCV treatment uptake among PWID, which could have a major preventative impact. However, treatment costs may limit scale-up, and should be addressed. (Hepatology 2013;58:1598

  13. Quality of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Services during Scale-Up: A Comparative Process Evaluation in Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Larissa; Bertrand, Jane; Rech, Dino; Harvey, Steven A.; Hatzold, Karin; Samkange, Christopher A.; Omondi Aduda, Dickens S.; Fimbo, Bennett; Cherutich, Peter; Perry, Linnea; Castor, Delivette; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid expansion of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) has raised concerns whether health systems can deliver and sustain VMMC according to minimum quality criteria. Methods and Findings A comparative process evaluation was used to examine data from SYMMACS, the Systematic Monitoring of the Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Scale-Up, among health facilities providing VMMC across two years of program scale-up. Site-level assessments examined the availability of guidelines, supplies and equipment, infection control, and continuity of care services. Direct observation of VMMC surgeries were used to assess care quality. Two sample tests of proportions and t-tests were used to examine differences in the percent of facilities meeting requisite preparedness standards and the mean number of directly-observed surgical tasks performed correctly. Results showed that safe, high quality VMMC can be implemented and sustained at-scale, although substantial variability was observed over time. In some settings, facility preparedness and VMMC service quality improved as the number of VMMC facilities increased. Yet, lapses in high performance and expansion of considerably deficient services were also observed. Surgical tasks had the highest quality scores, with lower performance levels in infection control, pre-operative examinations, and post-operative patient monitoring and counseling. The range of scale-up models used across countries additionally underscored the complexity of delivering high quality VMMC. Conclusions Greater efforts are needed to integrate VMMC scale-up and quality improvement processes in sub-Saharan African settings. Monitoring of service quality, not just adverse events reporting, will be essential in realizing the full health impact of VMMC for HIV prevention. PMID:24801073

  14. Prising open the 'black box': An epistemological critique of discursive constructions of scaling up the provision of mental health care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sara

    2015-09-01

    Global mental health research is increasingly highlighting the high levels of untreated mental illness in Africa and calling for the scaling-up of services in order to redress this situation. A particular model of care is being strongly advocated for such scale-up, and a recent explosion of research is providing guidelines for its implementation. This article seeks to open up the 'black box' of international research on scaling up the provision of mental health care in Africa, unearthing the hidden assumptions and power dynamics underpinning the knowledge produced. It insists that gaining a better understanding of care provision demands that we not only fill the gaps in knowledge but also problematize the assumptions upon which existing knowledge is based. This article demonstrates how two interrelated paradigms are strongly mediating research in this area - those of 'scientific evidence' and 'human rights'. Drawing on recent research within the sociology of scientific knowledge, and strands of postcolonial thought, it demonstrates how these paradigms are both underpinned by several contentious epistemological assumptions, assumptions which are deeply inserted within the epistemological order of Western modernity. The main argument is that through their shared ideological undertones of 'objectivity', 'universalism' and 'rationalism', these paradigms are potentially marginalizing other possibly important ways of thinking about care in Africa, ways which might not originate from modernist forms of consciousness. This article makes a plea for a more inclusive and plural archive of knowledge on scaling up mental health care in Africa, one which is more hospitable to diverse epistemological politics and moral landscapes.

  15. Seventh meeting of the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis: reaching the vision by scaling up, scaling down, and reaching out

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the 7th meeting of the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GAELF), Washington DC, November 18–19, 2012. The theme, “A Future Free of Lymphatic Filariasis: Reaching the Vision by Scaling Up, Scaling Down and Reaching Out”, emphasized new strategies and partnerships necessary to reach the 2020 goal of elimination of lymphatic filariasis (LF) as a public-health problem. PMID:24450283

  16. Clamshell excavation of a permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfetta, Antonio Di; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2006-06-01

    Nowadays, permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are one of the most widespread techniques for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants (ITRC in: Permeable reactive barriers: lessons learned/new directions. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Permeable Reactive Barriers Team 2005). Although, a variety of excavation methods have been developed, backhoe excavators are often used for the construction of PRBs. The aim of this study is to describe the emplacement of a full-scale PRB and the benefits deriving from the use of a crawler crane equipped with a hydraulic grab (also known as clamshell excavator) in the excavation phases. The studied PRB was designed to remediate a chlorinated hydrocarbons plume at an old industrial landfill site, in Avigliana, near the city of Torino, in Italy. The continuous reactive barrier was designed to be 120 m long, 13 m deep, and 0.6 m thick. The installation of the barrier was accomplished using a clamshell for the excavation of the trench and a guar-gum slurry to support the walls. The performance of this technique was outstanding and allowed the installation of the PRB in 7 days. The degree of precision of the excavation was very high because of the intrinsic characteristics of this excavation tool and of the use of a concrete curb to guide the hydraulic grab. Moreover, the adopted technique permitted a saving of bioslurry thus minimizing the amount of biocide required.

  17. The geometric mean concept for interpreting the permeability of heterogeneous geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, Patrick; Selvadurai, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Naturally occurring geomaterials are heterogeneous and the estimation of the effective permeability characteristics of such geomaterials presents a challenge not only in terms of the experimental procedures that should be used to ensure flow through the porous medium but also in the correct use of the theoretical concepts needed to accurately interpret the data. The general consensus is that the flow path in a test needs to be drastically reduced if steady state tests are considered as a suitable experimental technique. The disadvantage of flow path reduction is that the tested volume may not be altogether representative of the rock, particularly if it displays heterogeneity in the scale of the sample being tested. Also, if the sample is not correctly restrained, the differential pressures needed to initiate steady flow can introduce damage in the sample leading to erroneous estimates of permeability. The alternative approach is to use large enough samples that can capture the spatial heterogeneity but develop testing procedures that can test examine the steady state flow process as a problem in three-dimensional fluid flow that can capture the spatial distribution of permeability. The paper discusses theoretical and computational approaches that have been developed for the estimation of the spatial distribution of permeability in a cuboidal Indiana Limestone sample measuring 450 mm. The "Patch Permeability Test" developed in connection with the research allows the measurements of the surface permeability of the block and through kriging techniques estimate the permeability within the block sample. The research promotes the use of the "Geometric Mean" concept for the description of the effective permeability of the heterogeneous porous medium where the spatial distribution conforms to a lognormal pattern. The effectiveness of the approach is that the techniques can be applied to examine the effective permeability of heterogeneous low permeability materials such as

  18. Application of a chromatography model with linear gradient elution experimental data to the rapid scale-up in ion-exchange process chromatography of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kadoya, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2007-08-24

    We applied the model described in our previous paper to the rapid scale-up in the ion exchange chromatography of proteins,