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Sample records for permeability surface cerebral

  1. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  2. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  3. MRI of Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, James R.; Chopp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability using MRI and its application to cerebral ischemia are reviewed. Measurement of BBB permeability using MRI has been employed to evaluate ischemic damage during acute and subacute phases of stroke and to predict hemorrhagic transformation. There is also an emerging interest on the development and use of MRI to monitor vascular structural changes and angiogenesis during stroke recovery. In this review, we describe MRI BBB permeability and susceptibility-weighted MRI measurements and its applications to evaluate ischemic damage during the acute and subacute phases of stroke and vascular remodeling during stroke recovery. PMID:23997835

  4. Modulation of cerebral microvascular permeability by endothelial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Brian T; Egleton, Richard D; Davis, Thomas P

    2005-07-01

    Nicotine increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in vivo. This implies a possible role for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the regulation of cerebral microvascular permeability. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in cerebral microvessels was investigated with immunofluorescence microscopy. Positive immunoreactivity was found for receptor subunits alpha3, alpha5, alpha7, and beta2, but not subunits alpha4, beta3, or beta4. Blood-brain barrier permeability was assessed via in situ brain perfusion with [14C]sucrose. Nicotine increased the rate of sucrose entry into the brain from 0.3 +/- 0.1 to 1.1 +/- 0.2 microl.g(-1).min(-1), as previously described. This nicotine-induced increase in blood-brain barrier permeability was significantly attenuated by both the blood-brain barrier-permeant nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine and the blood-brain barrier-impermeant nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium to 0.5 +/- 0.2 and 0.3 +/- 0.2 microl.g(-1).min(-1), respectively. These data suggest that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on the cerebral microvascular endothelium mediate nicotine-induced changes in blood-brain barrier permeability.

  5. The effects of Bordetella pertussis vaccine on cerebral vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Amiel, S A

    1976-12-01

    The effect of Bordetella pertussis vaccine on the cerebral vascular permeability in the mouse was studied by a radio-isotope method (131I-labelled HSA). Intravenous injection of 4 x 1010 heat-killed pertussis organisms caused a measurable increase in permeability in normal mice. Cryoinjury to the cerebral hemispheres resulted in a striking increase in vascular permeability at 24 h. This declined within 48 h and stabilized at a level fractionally higher than normal at 7 days ("healed lesion"). When pertussis organisms were injected into mice bearing ("healed lesion"). When pertussis organisms were injected into mice bearing "healed lesions" the increase in permeability was similar in magnitude to that in uninjured brain. The effect was increased by a second administration of pertussis 24 h after the first. The action of pertussis on a newly inflicted cryoinjury was protective. It is suggested that permeability changes in the cerebral vessels may be involved in the evolution of the encephalopathy attributed to the use of Bordetella pertussis vaccine in man.

  6. Permeability equipment for porous friction surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standiford, D. L.; Graul, R. A.; Lenke, L. R.

    1985-04-01

    Hydroplaning is the loss of traction between tires and pavement due to the presence of a layer of water. This loss of traction can result in loss of vehicle control. A porous friction surface (PFS) applied over an existing pavement permits the water to drain laterally and vertically away from the tire path, effectively lowering hydroplaning potential. Equipment used to measure pavement drainage (permeability) is discussed with respect to usage on porous friction surface. Background information on hydroplaning, flow theory, and PFS field performance as they are affected by permeability are also presented. Two dynamic test devices and four static devices are considered for measuring PFS permeability. Permeability tests are recommended to measure PFS permeability for maintenance purposes and construction control. Dynamic devices cited could possibly estimate hydroplaning potential; further research must be done to determine this. Permeability devices cannot be used to accurately estimate friction of a pavement surface, however, decreased permeability of a pavement infers a decrease in friction.

  7. Positron emission tomographic measurement of cerebral blood flow and permeability-surface area product of water using (/sup 15/O)water and (/sup 11/C)butanol

    SciTech Connect

    Herscovitch, P.; Raichle, M.E.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.

    1987-10-01

    We have previously adapted Kety's tissue autoradiographic method for measuring regional CBF in laboratory animals to the measurement of CBF in humans with positron emission tomography (PET) and H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O. Because this model assumes diffusion equilibrium between tissue and venous blood, the use of a diffusion-limited tracer, such as H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O, may lead to an underestimation of CBF. We therefore validated the use of (/sup 11/C)butanol as an alternative freely diffusible tracer for PET. We then used it in humans to determine the underestimation of CBF that occurs with H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O, and thereby were able to calculate the extraction Ew and permeability-surface area product PSw of H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O. Measurements of the permeability of rhesus monkey brain to (/sup 11/C)butanol, obtained by means of an intracarotid injection, external detection technique, demonstrated that this tracer is freely diffusible up to a CBF of at least 170 ml/min-100 g. CBF measured in baboons with the PET autoradiographic method and (/sup 11/C)butanol was then compared with CBF measured in the same animals with a standard residue detection method. An excellent correspondence was obtained between both of these measurements. Finally, paired PET measurements of CBF were made with both H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O and (/sup 11/C)butanol in 17 normal human subjects. Average global CBF was significantly greater when measured with (/sup 11/C)butanol (53.1 ml/min-100 g) than with H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O (44.4 ml/min-100 g). Average global Ew was 0.84 and global PSw was 104 ml/min-100 g. Regional measurements showed a linear relationship between local PSw and CBF, while Ew was relatively uniform throughout the brain. Simulations were used to determine the potential error associated with the use of an incorrect value for the brain-blood partition coefficient for (/sup 11/C)butanol and to calculate the effect of tissue heterogeneity and errors in flow measurement on the calculation of PSw.

  8. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X.; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia. PMID:25601765

  9. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia.

  10. Use of permeability surface area-product to differentiate intracranial tumours from abscess

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, N; Rahmat, K; Mah, E; Waran, V; Tan, LK; Chong, HT

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Clinical and radiological findings of intracranial abscesses may mimic the findings of brain tumours and vice versa. However, the discrimination is of great clinical importance in planning treatment and in following prognosis and response to therapy. This study evaluates the Computed Tomography (CT) perfusion parameters, especially the permeability index, with the aim of evaluating the usefulness of dynamic CT perfusion imaging as an alternative tool to differentiate necrotic brain tumours and intracerebral abscesses. Materials and Methods A total of 21 patients underwent perfusion CT study and were divided into 2 groups: Group 1, patients with necrotic brain tumours (n=13); and Group 2, patients with cerebral abscesses (n=8). The mean perfusion parameters were obtained from the enhancing part of the lesion. The relative ratios were then calculated by using the results from mirrored regions within the contralateral hemisphere as reference. Results The results of this study showed that there was significant difference in the relative permeability surface values between necrotic brain tumours and cerebral abscesses (p=0.005). By applying the ROC curve, a value of 25.1 for rPS was found to be the best estimate to distinguish necrotic brain tumours from cerebral abscesses with a specificity of 88 % and sensitivity of 70 %. Conclusion CT perfusion, especially permeability surface, may allow for better differentiation of cerebral abscesses from brain tumours, making it a strong additional imaging modality in the early diagnosis of these two entities. PMID:21611026

  11. [Corticosteroids and cerebral vessel permeability during embryonic development].

    PubMed

    Ribatti, D; Virgintino, D

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cortisol on the development of the blood-brain barrier (b.b.b.) were microscopically investigated in the chick embryo optic tectum using horseradish peroxidase (hrp) as marker of vascular permeability. Hrp was injected intracardially at the 15th and 21st incubation day (i.d.), i.e. 5 and 11 days after the last administration of the drug (10 micrograms/50 microliters saline solution at the 8th and 10th i.d.). This treatment caused damage to the maturation process of the b.b.b. to hrp. The intraneural blood vessel walls were not able to prevent the marker extravasation which was massive at the 15th i.d. and circumscribed to limited perivascular areas at the 21st i.d. A possible pathogenetic mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed. PMID:2739535

  12. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, T.; Smith, L.; Moosdorf, N.; Hartmann, J.; Durr, H.H.; Manning, A.H.; Van Beek, L. P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of ???5 ?? 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, Tom; Smith, Leslie; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Durr, Hans H.; Manning, Andrew H.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of -5 x 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change.

  14. Assessing the potential for restoration of surface permeability for permeable pavements through maintenance.

    PubMed

    Drake, Jennifer; Bradford, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Permeable pavements (PPs) have been in use as stormwater management systems in Canada and the United States for over 20 years. After years of exposure to sediment and debris build-up, surface clogging reduces the infiltration of stormwater and inhibits the hydraulic and environmental functions of the pavement. Removal of surface material has been shown to restore infiltration but the majority of studies have been limited to small-scale testing. This paper presents the results of small- and full-sized equipment testing aimed at restoring surface permeability, including the first testing of regenerative-air and vacuum-sweeping streetsweepers in Ontario. Maintenance achieved partial restoration of PP surface permeability. Post-treatment surface infiltration rates displayed large spatial variability, highlighting that localized conditions throughout the pavement have a confounding influence on the overall effectiveness of maintenance. The impact of maintenance may be improved by establishing regular cleaning intervals and developing instructional guidelines for pavement owners and equipment operators.

  15. Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Delayed Cerebral Infarction after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ivanidze, J.; Kesavabhotla, K.; Kallas, O.N.; Mir, D.; Baradaran, H.; Gupta, A.; Segal, A.Z.; Claassen, J.; Sanelli, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Patients with SAH are at increased risk of delayed infarction. Early detection and treatment of delayed infarction remain challenging. We assessed blood-brain barrier permeability, measured as permeability surface area product, by using CTP in patients with SAH with delayed infarction. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a retrospective study of patients with SAH with delayed infarction on follow-up NCCT. CTP was performed before the development of delayed infarction. CTP data were postprocessed into permeability surface area product, CBF, and MTT maps. Coregistration was performed to align the infarcted region on the follow-up NCCT with the corresponding location on the CTP maps obtained before infarction. Permeability surface area product, CBF, and MTT values were then obtained in the location of the subsequent infarction. The contralateral noninfarcted region was compared with the affected side in each patient. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine statistical significance. Clinical data were collected at the time of CTP and at the time of follow-up NCCT. RESULTS Twenty-one patients with SAH were included in the study. There was a statistically significant increase in permeability surface area product in the regions of subsequent infarction compared with the contralateral control regions (P < .0001). However, CBF and MTT values were not significantly different in these 2 regions. Subsequent follow-up NCCT demonstrated new delayed infarction in all 21 patients, at which time 38% of patients had new focal neurologic deficits. CONCLUSIONS Our study reveals a statistically significant increase in permeability surface area product preceding delayed infarction in patients with SAH. Further investigation of early permeability changes in SAH may provide new insights into the prediction of delayed infarction. PMID:25572949

  16. MEAUSREMENT OF THE SURFACE PERMEABILITY OF BASEMENT CONCRETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development, testing, and use of a portable surface permeameter suitable for field use in measuring the surface permeability of concrete in new houses. he permeameter measures the airflow induced by a pressure difference across a temporary test seal appli...

  17. Real-time estimation of paracellular permeability of cerebral endothelial cells by capacitance sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Jo, Dong; Lee, Rimi; Hyoung Kim, Jin; Oh Jun, Hyoung; Geol Lee, Tae; Hun Kim, Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Vascular integrity is important in maintaining homeostasis of brain microenvironments. In various brain diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and multiple sclerosis, increased paracellular permeability due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier is linked with initiation and progression of pathological conditions. We developed a capacitance sensor array to monitor dielectric responses of cerebral endothelial cell monolayer, which could be utilized to evaluate the integrity of brain microvasculature. Our system measured real-time capacitance values which demonstrated frequency- and time-dependent variations. With the measurement of capacitance at the frequency of 100 Hz, we could differentiate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a representative permeability-inducing factor, on endothelial cells and quantitatively analyse the normalized values. Interestingly, we showed differential capacitance values according to the status of endothelial cell monolayer, confluent or sparse, evidencing that the integrity of monolayer was associated with capacitance values. Another notable feature was that we could evaluate the expression of molecules in samples in our system with the reference of real-time capacitance values. We suggest that this dielectric spectroscopy system could be successfully implanted as a novel in vitro assay in the investigation of the roles of paracellular permeability in various brain diseases.

  18. High surface area, high permeability carbon monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    The goal of this work is to prepare carbon monoliths having precisely tailored pore size distribution. Prior studies have demonstrated that poly(acrylonitrile) can be processed into a precursor having tailored macropore structure. Since the macropores were preserved during pyrolysis, this synthetic process provided a route to porous carbon having macropores with size =0.1 to 10{mu}m. No micropores of size <2 nm could be detected in the carbon, however, by nitrogen adsorption. In the present work, the authors have processed a different polymer, poly(vinylidene chloride) into a macroporous precursor, Pyrolysis produced carbon monoliths having macropores derived from the polymer precursor as well as extensive microporosity produced during the pyrolysis of the polymer. One of these carbons had BET surface area of 1,050 m{sup 2}/g and about 1.2 cc/g total pore volume, with about 1/3 of the total pore volume in micropores and the remainder in 1{mu}m macropores. No mesopores in the intermediate size range could be detected by nitrogen adsorption. Carbon materials having high surface area as well as micron size pores have potential applications as electrodes for double layer supercapacitors containing liquid electrolyte, or as efficient media for performing chemical separations.

  19. Liquid Spills on Permeable Soil Surfaces: Experimental Confirmations

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Carver S.; Keller, Jason M.

    2005-09-29

    Predictive tools for assessing the quantity of a spill on a soil from the observed spreading area could contribute to improving remediation when it is necessary. On a permeable soil, the visible spill area only hints about the amount of liquid that might reside below the surface. An understanding of the physical phenomena involved with spill propagation on a soil surface is key to assessing the liquid amount possibly present beneath the surface. The objective of this study is an improved prediction capability for spill behavior.

  20. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value.

  1. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value. PMID:20087768

  2. Surface gas permeability of porous building materials: measurement, analysis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, David K. W.

    In many events affecting our civil infrastructure, such as contamination or weathering, it is likely that only the surfaces of the affected building materials will be available for non-destructive measurements. In this work, we describe and analyze surface gas permeability measurements on a variety of natural and engineered building materials using two types of relatively new, non-destructive surface permeameters. It is shown that the surface gas permeability measurements correlate well with each other and could provide rapid estimates of macroscopic gas permeability and degradation of materials due to weathering. It is hypothesized that surface permeability can be used to predict macroscopic wicking of water. The results indicated that macroscopic wicking correlated reasonably well with surface permeability measurements of uniform materials with low permeabilities such as sandstones and clay brick.

  3. Fractal dimension of cerebral surfaces using magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Prasad, R.R.

    1988-11-01

    The calculation of the fractal dimension of the surface bounded by the grey matter in the normal human brain using axial, sagittal, and coronal cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented. The fractal dimension in this case is a measure of the convolutedness of this cerebral surface. It is proposed that the fractal dimension, a feature that may be extracted from MR images, may potentially be used for image analysis, quantitative tissue characterization, and as a feature to monitor and identify cerebral abnormalities and developmental changes.

  4. Phospholipid surface bilayers at the air-water interface. II. Water permeability of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine surface bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, L; Gershfeld, N L

    1985-01-01

    Dispersions of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in water have been reported to form a structure at 29 degrees C at the equilibrium air/water surface with a molecular density equal to that of a typical bilayer. In this study, the water permeability of this structure has been evaluated by measuring the rate of water evaporation from DMPC dispersions in water in the temperature range where the surface film density exceeds that of a monolayer. Evaporation rates for the lipid dispersions did not deviate from those for lipid-free systems throughout the entire temperature range examined (20-35 degrees C) except at 29 degrees C, where a barrier to evaporation was detected. This strengthens the view that the structure that forms at this temperature has the properties of a typical bilayer. PMID:3978199

  5. Surface Reconstruction and Optimization of Cerebral Cortex for Application Use.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Sun; Park, Sang Kyu

    2016-03-01

    For the purposes of virtual surgery, medical education, medical communication, and realistic surface models of anatomic structures are required. In the most involved method, surface models can be made using segmentation and three-dimensional reconstruction procedures. Such models, however, are computationally expensive, and can be difficult to use. Therefore, optimization is often performed manually, but this is a time-consuming job that requires considerable artistic talent. In this article, the authors describe a method that uses Maya and ZBrush to construct optimized surface models of anatomic structures. The authors take 235 anatomic images generated from a cadaver, and perform segmentation and surface reconstruction using Photoshop and Mimics. Reconstructed surface models of the cerebral cortex are then optimized and divided by a morphing technique in Maya and ZBrush for use in medical applications. The optimized surface models do not require significant storage space, and are easily manufactured and modified. The resulting surface models can be displayed off-line and on-line in real time, as well as on smart phones. Using commercial software with the specialized functions described in this study, it is expected that the efficiencies produced by the proposed method will enable researchers to conveniently create surface models from serially sectioned images such as computed tomographs and magnetic resonance images. The surface models created in this research will also have widespread applications in both medical education and communication. PMID:26854785

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Maintains Normal Vascular Permeability by Preserving Endothelial Surface Glycocalyx in Intact Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min; Fan, Jie; Tarbell, John, M.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was found to protect the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity-dependent shedding of ESG in cultured endothelial cell studies. We aimed to further test that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels. Methods We quantified the ESG in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery and measured the vascular permeability to albumin in the presence and absence of 1 μM S1P. We also measured permeability to albumin in the presence of MMP inhibitors and compared the measured permeability with those predicted by a transport model for the inter-endothelial cleft. Results We found that in the absence of S1P, the fluorescence intensity of the FITC-anti-heparan sulfate labeled ESG was ~10% of that in the presence of S1P, while the measured permeability to albumin was ~6.5 fold that in the presence of S1P. Similar results were observed with MMP inhibition. The predictions by the mathematical model further confirmed that S1P maintains microvascular permeability by preserving ESG. Conclusions Our results show that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels, consistent with parallel observation in cultured endothelial monolayers. PMID:27015105

  7. Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase Transformation and Surface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Ying Chen

    2005-06-30

    Two-phase flow through fractured media is important in petroleum, geothermal, and environmental applications. However, the actual physics and phenomena that occur inside fractures are poorly understood, and oversimplified relative permeability curves are commonly used in fractured reservoir simulations. In this work, an experimental apparatus equipped with a high-speed data acquisition system, real-time visualization, and automated image processing technology was constructed to study three transparent analog fractures with distinct surface roughnesses: smooth, homogeneously rough, and randomly rough. Air-water relative permeability measurements obtained in this study were compared with models suggested by earlier studies and analyzed by examining the flow structures. A method to evaluate the tortuosities induced by the blocking phase, namely the channel tortuosity, was proposed from observations of the flow structure images. The relationship between the coefficients of channel tortuosity and the relative permeabilities was studied with the aid of laboratory experiments and visualizations. Experimental data from these fractures were used to develop a broad approach for modeling two-phase flow behavior based on the flow structures. Finally, a general model deduced from these data was proposed to describe two-phase relative permeabilities in both smooth and rough fractures. For the theoretical analysis of liquid-vapor relative permeabilities, accounting for phase transformations, the inviscid bubble train models coupled with relative permeability concepts were developed. The phase transformation effects were evaluated by accounting for the molecular transport through liquid-vapor interfaces. For the steam water relative permeabilities, we conducted steam-water flow experiments in the same fractures as used for air-water experiments. We compared the flow behavior and relative permeability differences between two-phase flow with and without phase transformation effects

  8. Liquid film condensation along a vertical surface in a thin porous medium with large anisotropic permeability.

    PubMed

    Sanya, Arthur S O; Akowanou, Christian; Sanya, Emile A; Degan, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The problems of steady film condensation on a vertical surface embedded in a thin porous medium with anisotropic permeability filled with pure saturated vapour are studied analytically by using the Brinkman-Darcy flow model. The principal axes of anisotropic permeability are oriented in a direction that non-coincident with the gravity force. On the basis of the flow permeability tensor due to the anisotropic properties and the Brinkman-Darcy flow model adopted by considering negligible macroscopic and microscopic inertial terms, boundary-layer approximations in the porous liquid film momentum equation is solved analytically. Scale analysis is applied to predict the order-of-magnitudes involved in the boundary layer regime. The first novel contribution in the mathematics consists in the use of the anisotropic permeability tensor inside the expression of the mathematical formulation of the film condensation problem along a vertical surface embedded in a porous medium. The present analytical study reveals that the anisotropic permeability properties have a strong influence on the liquid film thickness, condensate mass flow rate and surface heat transfer rate. The comparison between thin and thick porous media is also presented. PMID:26034679

  9. Surface tension driven processes densify and retain permeability in magma and lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ben M.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Ian Schipper, C.; Mark Jellinek, A.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kelly Russell, J.; Lavallée, Yan; Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    We offer new insights into how an explosive eruption can transition into an effusive eruption. Magma containing >0.2 wt% dissolved water has the potential to vesiculate to a porosity in excess of 80 vol.% at atmospheric pressure. Thus all magmas contain volatiles at depth sufficient to form foams and explosively fragment. Yet gas is often lost passively and effusive eruptions ensue. Magmatic foams are permeable and understanding permeability in magma is crucial for models that predict eruptive style. Permeability also governs magma compaction models. Those models generally imply that a reduction in magma porosity and permeability generates an increased propensity for explosivity. Here, our experimental results show that surface tension stresses drive densification without creating an impermeable 'plug', offering an additional explanation of why dense magmas can avoid explosive eruption. In both an open furnace and a closed autoclave, we subject pumice samples with initial porosity of ∼70 vol.% to a range of isostatic pressures (0.1-11 MPa) and temperatures (350-950 °C) relevant to shallow volcanic environments. Our experimental data and models constrain the viscosity, permeability, timescales, and length scales over which densification by pore-scale surface tension stresses competes with density-driven compaction. Where surface tension dominates the dynamics, densification halts at a plateau connected porosity of ∼25 vol.% for our samples. SEM, pycnometry and micro-tomography show that in this process (1) microporous networks are destroyed, (2) the relative pore network surface area decreases, and (3) a remaining crystal framework enhances the longevity of macro-pore connectivity and permeability critical for sustained outgassing. We propose that these observations are a consequence of a surface tension-driven retraction of viscous pore walls at areas of high bubble curvature (micro-vesicular network terminations), and that this process drives bulk

  10. Evaluation of Surface Infiltration Testing Procedures in Permeable Pavement Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete provides limited guidance on how to select testing locations, so research is needed to evaluate how testing sites should be selected and how results should be interpreted to assess surface ...

  11. Evaluation of Surface and Subsurface Processes in Permeable Pavement Infiltration Trenches

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems can be affected by clogging of the pavement surface and/or clogging at the interface where the subsurface storage layer meets the underlying soil. As infiltration and exfiltration are the primary functional mechanisms for ...

  12. Methods to Use Surface Infiltration Tests in Permeable Pavement Systems to Determine Maintenance Frequency

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, there is limited guidance on selecting test sites to measure surface infiltration rates in permeable pavement systems to determine maintenance frequency. The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete suggest to either (1) p...

  13. X-ray microtomography characterization of porosity, permeability and reactive surface changes during dissolution.

    PubMed

    Gouze, Philippe; Luquot, Linda

    2011-03-01

    Numerical programs for simulating flow and reactive transport in porous media are essential tools for predicting reservoir properties changes triggered by CO(2) underground injection. At reservoir scale, meshed models in which equations are solved assuming that constant macroscopic properties can be defined in each cells, are widely used. However, the parameterization of the dissolution-precipitation problem and of the feedback effects of these processes on the flow field is still challenging. The problem arises from the mismatch between the scales at which averaged parameters are defined in the meshed model and the scale at which chemical reactions occur and modify the pore network geometry. In this paper we investigate the links between the dissolution mechanisms that control the porosity changes and the related changes of the reactive surface area and of the permeability. First, the reactive surface area is computed from X-ray microtomography data obtained before and after a set of dissolution experiments of pure calcite rock samples using distinctly different brine-CO(2) mixtures characterizing homogeneous to heterogeneous dissolution regimes. The results are used to validate the power law empirical model relating the reactive surface area to porosity proposed by Luquot and Gouze (2009). Second, we investigate the spatial distribution of the effective hydraulic radius and of the tortuosity, two structural parameters that control permeability, in order to explain the different porosity-permeability relationships observed for heterogeneous and homogeneous dissolution regimes. It is shown that the increase of permeability is due to the decrease of the tortuosity for homogeneous dissolution, whereas it is due to the combination of tortuosity decrease and hydraulic radius increase for heterogeneous dissolution. For the intermediate dissolution regime, identified to be the optimal regime for increasing permeability with small changes in porosity, the increase of

  14. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator transiently enhances blood-brain barrier permeability during cerebral ischemia through vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated endothelial endocytosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Nobuo; Yamakawa, Kasumi; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Hokamura, Kazuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) modulates cerebrovascular permeability and exacerbates brain injury in ischemic stroke, but its mechanisms remain unclear. We studied the involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated endocytosis in the increase of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability potentiated by rt-PA after ischemic stroke. The rt-PA treatment at 4 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion induced a transient increase in BBB permeability after ischemic stroke in mice, which was suppressed by antagonists of either low-density lipoprotein receptor families (LDLRs) or VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). In immortalized bEnd.3 endothelial cells, rt-PA treatment upregulated VEGF expression and VEGFR-2 phosphorylation under ischemic conditions in an LDLR-dependent manner. In addition, rt-PA treatment increased endocytosis and transcellular transport in bEnd.3 monolayers under ischemic conditions, which were suppressed by the inhibition of LDLRs, VEGF, or VEGFR-2. The rt-PA treatment also increased the endocytosis of endothelial cells in the ischemic brain region after stroke in mice. These findings indicate that rt-PA increased BBB permeability via induction of VEGF, which at least partially mediates subsequent increase in endothelial endocytosis. Therefore, inhibition of VEGF induction may have beneficial effects after thrombolytic therapy with rt-PA treatment after stroke.

  15. Influence of thickness and permeability of endothelial surface layer on transmission of shear stress in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, SongPeng; Zhang, XiangJun; Tian, Yu; Meng, YongGang; Lipowsky, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    The molecular coating on the surface of microvascular endothelium has been identified as a barrier to transvascular exchange of solutes. With a thickness of hundreds of nanometers, this endothelial surface layer (ESL) has been treated as a porous domain within which fluid shear stresses are dissipated and transmitted to the solid matrix to initiate mechanotransduction events. The present study aims to examine the effects of the ESL thickness and permeability on the transmission of shear stress throughout the ESL. Our results indicate that fluid shear stresses rapidly decrease to insignificant levels within a thin transition layer near the outer boundary of the ESL with a thickness on the order of ten nanometers. The thickness of the transition zone between free fluid and the porous layer was found to be proportional to the square root of the Darcy permeability. As the permeability is reduced ten-fold, the interfacial fluid and solid matrix shear stress gradients increase exponentially two-fold. While the interfacial fluid shear stress is positively related to the ESL thickness, the transmitted matrix stress is reduced by about 50% as the ESL thickness is decreased from 500 to 100 nm, which may occur under pathological conditions. Thus, thickness and permeability of the ESL are two main factors that determine flow features and the apportionment of shear stresses between the fluid and solid phases of the ESL. These results may shed light on the mechanisms of force transmission through the ESL and the pathological events caused by alterations in thickness and permeability of the ESL.

  16. Surface Infiltration Rates of Permeable Surfaces: Six Month Update (November 2009 through April 2010)

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the end of October 2009, EPA opened a parking lot on the Edison Environmental Center that included three parking rows of permeable pavement. The construction was a cooperative effort among EPA’s Office of Administration and Resources Management, National Risk Management Resea...

  17. A Review of the Mechanisms of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Treatment for Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Nobuo; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular homeostasis is maintained by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which forms a mechanical and functional barrier between systemic circulation and the central nervous system (CNS). In patients with ischemic stroke, the recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is used to accelerate recanalization of the occluded vessels. However, rt-PA is associated with a risk of increasing intracranial bleeding (ICB). This effect is thought to be caused by the increase in cerebrovascular permeability though various factors such as ischemic reperfusion injury and the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), but the detailed mechanisms are unknown. It was recently found that rt-PA treatment enhances BBB permeability not by disrupting the BBB, but by activating the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) system. The VEGF regulates both the dissociation of endothelial cell (EC) junctions and endothelial endocytosis, and causes a subsequent increase in vessel permeability through the VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) activation in ECs. Here, we review the possibility that rt-PA increases the penetration of toxic molecules derived from the bloodstream including rt-PA itself, without disrupting the BBB, and contributes to these detrimental processes in the cerebral parenchyma. PMID:26834557

  18. Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Model after Localized Brain Cooling in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Soo; Kwon, Mi Jung; Lee, Phil Hye; Ju, Young-Su; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kwan Seop

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Materials and Methods Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20℃) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Results Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min-1 vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min-1, p = 0.661 for Ktrans; 0.30 ± 0.05 min-1 vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min-1, p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion Localized brain cooling (20℃) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. PMID:27587960

  19. Correlations between effective permeability and marrow contact channels surface of vertebral endplates.

    PubMed

    Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Accadbled, Franck; Molinier, François; Bonnevialle, Nicolas; de Gauzy, Jérôme Sales; Swider, Pascal

    2010-09-01

    Homeostasis of the intervertebral disc relies on nutrient supply and waste clearance through the dense capillary network that is in contact with the cartilage endplate (CEP). We developed a micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT) method to quantify the marrow contact channel surface (MCCS) with the CEP and to validate the hypothesis according to which MCCS was correlated to the effective permeability of the vertebral endplate (VEP) and influenced by the mechanical stimuli. The influence of compression loading on local vascularization was investigated. Six 4-week-old skeletally immature pigs were instrumented with left pedicle screws and rod at both T5-T6 and L1-L2 levels to create asymmetrical spine tethers. After 3 months of growth, three cylindrical specimens of the VEP (one central and two lateral right and left) were obtained from both the instrumented and the control levels. We used a previously validated method for measuring permeability. Micro-CT analysis (resolution 12 microm) yielded a gray-scale 2D-image of the discal end of each specimen converted into a binary 2D-image to derive the MCCS. Correlations between MCCS and effective permeability were assessed. Effective permeability and MCCS were significantly decreased compared to the control group especially on the tethered side (-41.5%, p = 0.004 and -52.5%, p = 0.0009, respectively). Correlations were significant and showed maximal value (r(2) = 0.430, p < 0.0001) on the tethered side involving maximal compressive loadings. Mechanical stimuli, due to unbalanced growth, altered the vascularization and the convective properties of the CEP. The cascade of mechanobiological events should offer perspectives for research on disc degeneration and attempted treatment. PMID:20225324

  20. Impact of caprock permeability on vertical ground surface displacements in geological underground utilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Tillner, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Geological underground utilisation inducing pore pressure changes in underground reservoirs is generally accompanied by hydro-mechanical processes. Thereby, pore pressure increase due to fluid injection may trigger ground surface uplift, while a decrease in pore pressure due to reservoir fluid production is known to induce ground subsidence. Different coupled hydro-mechanical simulation studies (e.g. Klimkowski et al., 2015, Kempka et al., 2014, Tillner et al., 2014) indicate that ground surface displacements can achieve a magnitude of several decimetres, if storage or production operations are being carried out at an industrial scale. Consequently, detailed knowledge on the parameters impacting ground surface uplift or subsidence is of major interest for the success of any geological underground utilisation in order to avoid surface infrastructure damage by spatially varying deformations. Furthermore, ground subsidence may result increased groundwater levels as experienced in different underground coal mining districts. In the present study, we carried out coupled hydro-mechanical simulations to account for the impact of caprock permeability on ground surface displacements resulting from geological underground utilisation. Thereto, different simulation scenarios were investigated using a synthetic 3D coupled numerical simulation model with varying caprock permeability and vertical location of the open well section in the target reservoir. Material property ranges were derived from available literature, while a normal faulting stress state was applied in all simulation scenarios. Our simulation results demonstrate that caprock permeability has a significant impact on the pressure development, and thus on vertical displacements at the ground surface as well as at the reservoir top. An increase in caprock permeability from 1 x 10-20 m2 by two orders of magnitude doubles vertical displacements at the ground surface, whereas vertical displacements at the reservoir top

  1. Understanding the effects of permeability heterogeneity and connectivity on surface water-groundwater exchange using multiscale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryshlak, T. T.; Sawyer, A. H.; Stonedahl, S. H.; Soltanian, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Permeability heterogeneity and channel morphology both control surface water-groundwater exchange (hyporheic exchange) and therefore influence stream ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. However, the effects of permeability heterogeneity are less understood than channel morphology due to the challenge of measuring permeability at relevant scales in the field. Permeability fields in streambeds often have sharp, discontinuous contrasts ranging by orders of magnitudes (e.g. sand-clay contacts). To better understand the effects of permeability heterogeneity we modeled hyporheic exchange in bimodal permeability fields consisting of sand and clay in a representative low-gradient stream. Heterogeneity was developed using a Markov Chain approach for representing sand and clay stratasets using commonly observed characteristics of sediments including volumetric proportions and mean lengths. The channel topography was generated and characterized using Fourier series. Hydraulic head was assigned along the streambed as a function of topography and stream velocity. Initial results show that sedimentary structure, specifically the positioning of sand strata, controls hyporheic exchange depth and fluxes. Particle tracing simulations test the hypothesis that uncertainty in solute residence times increases as the connectivity of permeable sand strata increases due to the partitioning of solutes between connected and stagnant flow paths. These results will lead to a better understanding of how heterogeneity and the structure of highly permeable strata influences hyporheic residence times and biogeochemical processes.

  2. Atomic diffusion on vicinal surfaces: step roughening impact on step permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranguelov, B.; Michailov, M.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of mass transport in material science for systems with reduced dimensionality holds special academic and technological attention since the fine diffusion control of adatoms could initiate exotic nanoscale patterning at epitaxial interfaces. The present study brings out important details of the atomic diffusion mechanisms on vicinal surfaces, accounting for the subtle competition between an external field imposed on the migrating adatoms and the roughening of the steps bordering the atomic terraces. The computational model reveals a temperature gap for breakdown of step permeability in the vicinity of the step roughening transition and sheds light on recently observed experimental results for atomic step dynamics on Si surfaces. The present study also demonstrates the extended capability of atomistic models in computer simulations to unravel simultaneous effects, to distinguish between them, and finally to assess their specific contribution to experimentally observed complex physical phenomena.

  3. An automated pipeline for cortical surface generation and registration of the cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Ibanez, Luis; Gelas, Arnaud; Yeo, B. T. Thomas; Niethammer, Marc; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2011-03-01

    The human cerebral cortex is one of the most complicated structures in the body. It has a highly convoluted structure with much of the cortical sheet buried in sulci. Based on cytoarchitectural and functional imaging studies, it is possible to segment the cerebral cortex into several subregions. While it is only possible to differentiate the true anatomical subregions based on cytoarchitecture, the surface morphometry aligns closely with the underlying cytoarchitecture and provides features that allow the surface of the cortex to be parcellated based on the sulcal and gyral patterns that are readily visible on the MR images. We have developed a fully automated pipeline for the generation and registration of cortical surfaces in the spherical domain. The pipeline initiates with the BRAINS AutoWorkup pipeline. Subsequently, topology correction and surface generation is performed to generate a genus zero surface and mapped to a sphere. Several surface features are then calculated to drive the registration between the atlas surface and other datasets. A spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm is used to co-register an atlas surface onto a subject surface. A lobar based atlas of the cerebral cortex was created from a manual parcellation of the cortex. The atlas surface was then co-registered to five additional subjects using a spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm. The labels from the atlas surface were warped on the subject surface and compared to the manual raters. The average Dice overlap index was 0.89 across all regions.

  4. Stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance of permeable pavement layers.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-Guang; Lv, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Zhen-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the laboratory-scale permeable pavement layers, including a surface permeable brick layer, coarse sand bedding layers (thicknesses = 2, 3.5, and 5 cm), and single-graded gravel sub-base layers (thicknesses = 15, 20, 25, and 30 cm), were built to evaluate stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance. And, the infiltration rate (I) and concentrations of suspended solids (SS), total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen (TN) were measured under the simulated rainfall intensity of 72.4 mm/h over duration of 60 min. The results indicate that the thickness factor primarily influences the infiltration rate and pollutant removal rate. The highest steady infiltration rate was for surface brick layer 51.0 mm/h, for 5-cm sand bedding layer 32.3 mm/h, and for 30-cm gravel sub-base layer 42.3 mm/h, respectively. The SS average removal rate was relative higher (79.8 ∼ 98.6 %) for all layers due to the interception and filtration. The average removal rates of TP and COD were for surface layer 71.2 and 24.1 %, for 5-cm bedding layer 54.8 and 9.0 %, and for 20-cm sub-base layer 72.2 and 26.1 %. Ammonia nitrogen and TN cannot steadily be removed by layers according to the experiment results. The optimal thickness of bedding sands was 5 cm, and that of sub-base gravels was 20 ∼ 30 cm. PMID:26429141

  5. Stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance of permeable pavement layers.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-Guang; Lv, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Zhen-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the laboratory-scale permeable pavement layers, including a surface permeable brick layer, coarse sand bedding layers (thicknesses = 2, 3.5, and 5 cm), and single-graded gravel sub-base layers (thicknesses = 15, 20, 25, and 30 cm), were built to evaluate stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance. And, the infiltration rate (I) and concentrations of suspended solids (SS), total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen (TN) were measured under the simulated rainfall intensity of 72.4 mm/h over duration of 60 min. The results indicate that the thickness factor primarily influences the infiltration rate and pollutant removal rate. The highest steady infiltration rate was for surface brick layer 51.0 mm/h, for 5-cm sand bedding layer 32.3 mm/h, and for 30-cm gravel sub-base layer 42.3 mm/h, respectively. The SS average removal rate was relative higher (79.8 ∼ 98.6 %) for all layers due to the interception and filtration. The average removal rates of TP and COD were for surface layer 71.2 and 24.1 %, for 5-cm bedding layer 54.8 and 9.0 %, and for 20-cm sub-base layer 72.2 and 26.1 %. Ammonia nitrogen and TN cannot steadily be removed by layers according to the experiment results. The optimal thickness of bedding sands was 5 cm, and that of sub-base gravels was 20 ∼ 30 cm.

  6. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain capillary permeability following high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: a positron emission tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.C.; Dhawan, V.; Strother, S.C.; Sidtis, J.J.; Evans, A.C.; Allen, J.C.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rate constants and blood-to-brain transport of rubidium were estimated using positron emission tomography in an adolescent patient with a brain tumor, before and after chemotherapy with intravenous high-dose methotrexate. Widespread depression of cerebral glucose metabolism was apparent 24 hours after drug administration, which may reflect reduced glucose phosphorylation, and the influx rate constant for /sup 82/Rb was increased, indicating a drug-induced alteration in blood-brain barrier function. Associated changes in neuropsychological performance, electroencephalogram, and plasma amino acid concentration were identified in the absence of evidence of systemic methotrexate toxicity, suggesting primary methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  7. Effects of Streptococcus sanguinis Bacteriocin on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Membrane Permeability, and Ultrastructure of Candida Thallus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengli; Zhao, Yingnan; Xia, Xue; Dong, Xue; Ge, Wenyu; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans (C.a) and Candida tropicalis (C.t) were treated with Streptococcus sanguinis bacteriocin (S.s bacteriocin), respectively; the bacteriostatic dynamics of S.s bacteriocin, their effects on cell surface hydrophobicity, leakage of inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance, cytosolic calcium concentration, and ultrastructure changes of Candida thallus were detected and analyzed. The results showed that inhibitory effect of S.s bacteriocin on C.a and C.t reached peak level at 24 h, the cell-surface hydrophobicity decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after S.s bacteriocin treatment, and there was leakage of cytoplasmic inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance from C.a and C.t; cytosolic calcium concentration decreased greatly. After 24 h treatment by S.s bacteriocin, depressive deformity and defect could be found in the cell surface of C.a and C.t; the thallus displayed irregular forms: C.a was shrunken, there was unclear margins abutting upon cell wall and cell membrane, nucleus disappeared, and cytoplasm was inhomogeneous; likewise, C.t was first plasmolysis, and then the cytoplasm was shrunk, the ultrastructure of cell wall and cell membrane was continuously damaged, and the nucleus was karyolysis. It was illustrated that S.s bacteriocin had similar antifungal effect on C.a and C.t; their cell surface hydrophobicity, membrane permeability, and ultrastructure were changed significantly on exposure to S.s bacteriocin. PMID:26064919

  8. Effects of Streptococcus sanguinis Bacteriocin on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Membrane Permeability, and Ultrastructure of Candida Thallus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shengli; Zhao, Yingnan; Xia, Xue; Dong, Xue; Ge, Wenyu; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans (C.a) and Candida tropicalis (C.t) were treated with Streptococcus sanguinis bacteriocin (S.s bacteriocin), respectively; the bacteriostatic dynamics of S.s bacteriocin, their effects on cell surface hydrophobicity, leakage of inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance, cytosolic calcium concentration, and ultrastructure changes of Candida thallus were detected and analyzed. The results showed that inhibitory effect of S.s bacteriocin on C.a and C.t reached peak level at 24 h, the cell-surface hydrophobicity decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after S.s bacteriocin treatment, and there was leakage of cytoplasmic inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance from C.a and C.t; cytosolic calcium concentration decreased greatly. After 24 h treatment by S.s bacteriocin, depressive deformity and defect could be found in the cell surface of C.a and C.t; the thallus displayed irregular forms: C.a was shrunken, there was unclear margins abutting upon cell wall and cell membrane, nucleus disappeared, and cytoplasm was inhomogeneous; likewise, C.t was first plasmolysis, and then the cytoplasm was shrunk, the ultrastructure of cell wall and cell membrane was continuously damaged, and the nucleus was karyolysis. It was illustrated that S.s bacteriocin had similar antifungal effect on C.a and C.t; their cell surface hydrophobicity, membrane permeability, and ultrastructure were changed significantly on exposure to S.s bacteriocin. PMID:26064919

  9. Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.

    1999-05-11

    A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO{sub 2} at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere. 3 figs.

  10. Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, Robert R.; Schroeder, John L.

    1999-05-11

    A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO.sub.2 at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere.

  11. A highly permeable and enhanced surface area carbon-cloth electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. L.; Zhao, T. S.; Zeng, Y. K.; An, L.; Wei, L.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a high-performance porous electrode, made of KOH-activated carbon-cloth, is developed for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The macro-scale porous structure in the carbon cloth formed by weaving the carbon fibers in an ordered manner offers a low tortuosity (∼1.1) and a broad pore distribution from 5 μm to 100 μm, rendering the electrode a high hydraulic permeability and high effective ionic conductivity, which are beneficial for the electrolyte flow and ion transport through the porous electrode. The use of KOH activation method to create nano-scale pores on the carbon-fiber surfaces leads to a significant increase in the surface area for redox reactions from 2.39 m2 g-1 to 15.4 m2 g-1. The battery assembled with the present electrode delivers an energy efficiency of 80.1% and an electrolyte utilization of 74.6% at a current density of 400 mA cm-2, as opposed to an electrolyte utilization of 61.1% achieved by using a conventional carbon-paper electrode. Such a high performance is mainly attributed to the combination of the excellent mass/ion transport properties and the high surface area rendered by the present electrode. It is suggested that the KOH-activated carbon-cloth electrode is a promising candidate in redox flow batteries.

  12. Nobiletin protects against cerebral ischemia via activating the p-Akt, p-CREB, BDNF and Bcl-2 pathway and ameliorating BBB permeability in rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Xiangjian; Chen, Linyu; Zhao, Xumeng; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Jian

    2013-07-01

    There is cumulative evidence that the serine-threonine kinase Akt and its downstream nuclear transcription factor CREB are involved in neuronal survival and protection. The Akt activates and phosphorylates CREB at Ser133, resulting in the up-regulation of pro-survival CREB target genes such as BDNF and Bcl-2. Thus, Akt/CREB signaling pathway may be one propitious target for treatment of ischemic cerebral injury. Nobiletin (NOB) exhibits a wide spectrum of beneficial biological properties including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic actions and contributes to reverse learning impairment in Alzheimer's disease rat. However, little is currently known regarding the exact role of NOB in ischemic stroke. Here, we designed to evaluate its possible therapeutic effect on cerebral ischemia. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) and randomly divided into five groups: Sham (sham-operated+0.05% Tween-80), MCAO (pMCAO+0.9% saline), Vehicle group (pMCAO+0.05% Tween-80), NOB-L (pMCAO+NOB 10 mg/kg) and NOB-H (pMCAO+NOB 25 mg/kg) groups. Rats were pre-administered intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days before surgery and then received once again immediately after surgery. Neurological deficit scores, brain water content and infarct volume were evaluated at 24 h after stroke. Additionally, the activities of Akt, CREB, BDNF, Bcl-2 and claudin-5 in ischemic brain cortex were analyzed by the methods of immunohistochemistry, western blot and RT-qPCR. Compared with Vehicle group, neurological deficits and brain edema were relieved in NOB-H group (P<0.05), infarct volume was lessened in both NOB-L and NOB-H groups (P<0.05) at 24 h after stroke. Immunohistochemistry, western blot and RT-qPCR analysis indicated that NOB dramatically promoted the activities of Akt, CREB, BDNF and Bcl-2 (P<0.05). Meanwhile, claudin-5 expression was also enhanced. On the basis of these findings, we concluded that NOB protected the

  13. An integrated software suite for surface-based analyses of cerebral cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, D. C.; Drury, H. A.; Dickson, J.; Harwell, J.; Hanlon, D.; Anderson, C. H.

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe and illustrate an integrated trio of software programs for carrying out surface-based analyses of cerebral cortex. The first component of this trio, SureFit (Surface Reconstruction by Filtering and Intensity Transformations), is used primarily for cortical segmentation, volume visualization, surface generation, and the mapping of functional neuroimaging data onto surfaces. The second component, Caret (Computerized Anatomical Reconstruction and Editing Tool Kit), provides a wide range of surface visualization and analysis options as well as capabilities for surface flattening, surface-based deformation, and other surface manipulations. The third component, SuMS (Surface Management System), is a database and associated user interface for surface-related data. It provides for efficient insertion, searching, and extraction of surface and volume data from the database.

  14. Translating Human Effective Jejunal Intestinal Permeability to Surface-Dependent Intrinsic Permeability: a Pragmatic Method for a More Mechanistic Prediction of Regional Oral Drug Absorption.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Morales, Andrés; Lennernäs, Hans; Aarons, Leon; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2015-09-01

    Regional intestinal effective permeability (P(eff)) values are key for the understanding of drug absorption along the whole length of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The distal regions of the GI tract (i.e. ileum, ascending-transverse colon) represent the main sites for GI absorption when there is incomplete absorption in the upper GI tract, e.g. for modified release formulations. In this work, a new and pragmatic method for the estimation of (passive) intestinal permeability in the different intestinal regions is being proposed, by translating the observed differences in the available mucosal surface area along the human GI tract into corrections of the historical determined jejunal P(eff) values. These new intestinal P(eff) values or "intrinsic" P(eff)(P(eff,int)) were subsequently employed for the prediction of the ileal absorption clearance (CL(abs,ileum)) for a set of structurally diverse compounds. Additionally, the method was combined with a semi-mechanistic absorption PBPK model for the prediction of the fraction absorbed (f(abs)). The results showed that P(eff,int) can successfully be employed for the prediction of the ileal CL(abs) and the f(abs). P(eff,int) also showed to be a robust predictor of the f(abs) when the colonic absorption was allowed in the PBPK model, reducing the overprediction of f(abs) observed for lowly permeable compounds when using the historical P(eff) values. Due to its simplicity, this approach provides a useful alternative for the bottom-up prediction of GI drug absorption, especially when the distal GI tract plays a crucial role for a drug's GI absorption.

  15. Decreased permeability surface area for glucose in obese women with postprandial hyperglycemia: no effect of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sandqvist, M; Strindberg, L; Lönnroth, P; Jansson, P-A

    2013-08-01

    Insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment is recognized as a potential mechanism contributing to insulin resistance. In this study, we compared a marker of microvascular function, the permeability surface area for glucose (PS(glu)), and forearm glucose uptake after an OGTT in obese women with impaired glucose metabolism and healthy lean nondiabetic women, with the aim to characterize whether decreased permeability surface area for glucose or decreased glucose uptake may contribute to postprandial hyperglycemia in the obese group. In addition, we evaluated whether the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor tadalafil, in a randomized double blind placebo controlled design, might attenuate postprandial glucose levels in obese women. For these purposes, intramuscular microdialysis, blood sampling from arterial and venous blood of the forearm, and measurements of forearm blood flow were performed. The results showed an impaired permeability surface area for glucose (IAUC PS(glu) 31±13 vs. 124±31; p<0.05) in obese when compared with lean participants, but no differences in forearm glucose uptake appeared between the groups. Furthermore, a single dose of tadalafil 10 mg showed no improvement of the permeability surface area for glucose, glucose uptake, or circulating glucose levels in obese participants. In conclusion, the postprandial PS(glu) response was impaired in obese women showing postprandial hyperglycemia, indicating a compromised microcirculation. However, we were unable to demonstrate any acute effect on either vascular function or glucose uptake of the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor tadalafil. PMID:23613014

  16. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Bowman; Zhaohui Li; Stephen J. Roy; Todd Burt; Timothy L. Johnson; Richard L. Johnson

    1999-08-30

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector.

  17. Surface Vulnerability of Cerebral Cortex to Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Fralick, Drew; Shen, Ting; Qiu, Meihui; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Kaida; Shen, Dinggang; Fang, Yiru

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is accompanied by atypical brain structure. This study first presents the alterations in the cortical surface of patients with MDD using multidimensional structural patterns that reflect different neurodevelopment. Sixteen first-episode, untreated patients with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. The cortical maps of thickness, surface area, and gyrification were examined using the surface-based morphometry (SBM) approach. Increase of cortical thickness was observed in the right posterior cingulate region and the parietal cortex involving the bilateral inferior, left superior parietal and right paracentral regions, while decreased thickness was noted in the parietal cortex including bilateral pars opercularis and left precentral region, as well as the left rostral-middle frontal regions in patients with MDD. Likewise, increased or decreased surface area was found in five sub-regions of the cingulate gyrus, parietal and frontal cortices (e.g., bilateral inferior parietal and superior frontal regions). In addition, MDD patients exhibited a significant hypergyrification in the right precentral and supramarginal region. This integrated structural assessment of cortical surface suggests that MDD patients have cortical alterations of the frontal, parietal and cingulate regions, indicating a vulnerability to MDD during earlier neurodevelopmental process. PMID:25793287

  18. Changes in the permeability and morphology of dentine surfaces after brushing with a Thai herbal toothpaste: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Vajrabhaya, La-ongthong; Korsuwannawong, Suwanna; Harnirattisai, Choltacha; Teinchai, Chayada

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate dentine permeability after brushing with Twin Lotus®, Thai herbal toothpaste by comparing with Sensodyne Rapid Relief®, a commercial desensitizing toothpaste, and also after artificial saliva (AS) immersion or citric acid challenge. Materials and Methods: Dentine discs from human mandibular third molars were divided into three groups (n = 20) and brushed with either experimental toothpaste or water (control) for 2 min with an automated toothbrush. Then, 10 discs were immersed in AS, and the other 10 discs were immersed in 6% citric acid to simulate the conditions of the oral environment. The dentine permeability of each specimen was measured before brushing and after each treatment using a fluid filtration system. Morphological changes in the dentine were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Both toothpastes significantly reduced dentine permeability, and a crystalline precipitate was observed on the dentine surface under SEM observation. No significant difference was found between the two toothpaste groups with regard to dentine permeability after brushing and AS or acid immersion. Conclusions: The dentine permeability reduction caused by the two toothpastes did not differ after brushing or after AS or citric acid immersion. PMID:27095904

  19. Functional and structural mapping of human cerebral cortex: solutions are in the surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, D. C.; Drury, H. A.; Joshi, S.; Miller, M. I.

    1998-01-01

    The human cerebral cortex is notorious for the depth and irregularity of its convolutions and for its variability from one individual to the next. These complexities of cortical geography have been a chronic impediment to studies of functional specialization in the cortex. In this report, we discuss ways to compensate for the convolutions by using a combination of strategies whose common denominator involves explicit reconstructions of the cortical surface. Surface-based visualization involves reconstructing cortical surfaces and displaying them, along with associated experimental data, in various complementary formats (including three-dimensional native configurations, two-dimensional slices, extensively smoothed surfaces, ellipsoidal representations, and cortical flat maps). Generating these representations for the cortex of the Visible Man leads to a surface-based atlas that has important advantages over conventional stereotaxic atlases as a substrate for displaying and analyzing large amounts of experimental data. We illustrate this by showing the relationship between functionally specialized regions and topographically organized areas in human visual cortex. Surface-based warping allows data to be mapped from individual hemispheres to a surface-based atlas while respecting surface topology, improving registration of identifiable landmarks, and minimizing unwanted distortions. Surface-based warping also can aid in comparisons between species, which we illustrate by warping a macaque flat map to match the shape of a human flat map. Collectively, these approaches will allow more refined analyses of commonalities as well as individual differences in the functional organization of primate cerebral cortex.

  20. Functional and structural mapping of human cerebral cortex: Solutions are in the surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Van Essen, David C.; Drury, Heather A.; Joshi, Sarang; Miller, Michael I.

    1998-01-01

    The human cerebral cortex is notorious for the depth and irregularity of its convolutions and for its variability from one individual to the next. These complexities of cortical geography have been a chronic impediment to studies of functional specialization in the cortex. In this report, we discuss ways to compensate for the convolutions by using a combination of strategies whose common denominator involves explicit reconstructions of the cortical surface. Surface-based visualization involves reconstructing cortical surfaces and displaying them, along with associated experimental data, in various complementary formats (including three-dimensional native configurations, two-dimensional slices, extensively smoothed surfaces, ellipsoidal representations, and cortical flat maps). Generating these representations for the cortex of the Visible Man leads to a surface-based atlas that has important advantages over conventional stereotaxic atlases as a substrate for displaying and analyzing large amounts of experimental data. We illustrate this by showing the relationship between functionally specialized regions and topographically organized areas in human visual cortex. Surface-based warping allows data to be mapped from individual hemispheres to a surface-based atlas while respecting surface topology, improving registration of identifiable landmarks, and minimizing unwanted distortions. Surface-based warping also can aid in comparisons between species, which we illustrate by warping a macaque flat map to match the shape of a human flat map. Collectively, these approaches will allow more refined analyses of commonalities as well as individual differences in the functional organization of primate cerebral cortex. PMID:9448242

  1. Studies on water transport through the sweet cherry fruit surface: IX. Comparing permeability in water uptake and transpiration.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Marco; Lau, Steffen; Knoche, Moritz

    2005-01-01

    Water uptake and transpiration were studied through the surface of intact sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit, exocarp segments (ES) and cuticular membranes (CM) excised from the cheek of sweet cherry fruit and astomatous CM isolated from Schefflera arboricola (Hayata) Hayata, Citrus aurantium L., and Stephanotis floribunda Brongn. leaves or from Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. and Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum Fasciculatum Group fruit. ES and CM were mounted in diffusion cells. Water (deionized) uptake into intact sweet cherry fruit, through ES or CM interfacing water as a donor and a polyethyleneglycol (PEG 6000, osmotic pressure 2.83 MPa)-containing receiver was determined gravimetrically. Transpiration was quantified by monitoring weight loss of a PEG 6000-containing donor (2.83 MPa) against dry silica as a receiver. The permeability coefficients for osmotic water uptake and transpiration were calculated from the amount of water taken up or transpired per unit surface area and time, and the driving force for transport. Permeability during osmotic water uptake was markedly higher than during transpiration in intact sweet cherry fruit (40.2-fold), excised ES of sweet cherry fruit (12.5- to 53.7-fold) and isolated astomatous fruit and leaf CM of a range of species (on average 23.0-fold). Partitioning water transport into stomatal and cuticular components revealed that permeability of the sweet cherry fruit cuticle for water uptake was 11.9-fold higher and that of stomata 56.8-fold higher than the respective permeability during transpiration. Increasing water vapor activity in the receiver from 0 to 1 increased permeability during transpiration across isolated sweet cherry fruit CM about 2.1-fold. Permeability for vapor uptake from saturated water vapor into a PEG 6000 receiver solution was markedly lower than from liquid water, but of similar magnitude to the permeability during self-diffusion of (3)H(2)O in the absence of osmotica. The energy of activation for

  2. Studies on water transport through the sweet cherry fruit surface: IX. Comparing permeability in water uptake and transpiration.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Marco; Lau, Steffen; Knoche, Moritz

    2005-01-01

    Water uptake and transpiration were studied through the surface of intact sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit, exocarp segments (ES) and cuticular membranes (CM) excised from the cheek of sweet cherry fruit and astomatous CM isolated from Schefflera arboricola (Hayata) Hayata, Citrus aurantium L., and Stephanotis floribunda Brongn. leaves or from Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. and Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum Fasciculatum Group fruit. ES and CM were mounted in diffusion cells. Water (deionized) uptake into intact sweet cherry fruit, through ES or CM interfacing water as a donor and a polyethyleneglycol (PEG 6000, osmotic pressure 2.83 MPa)-containing receiver was determined gravimetrically. Transpiration was quantified by monitoring weight loss of a PEG 6000-containing donor (2.83 MPa) against dry silica as a receiver. The permeability coefficients for osmotic water uptake and transpiration were calculated from the amount of water taken up or transpired per unit surface area and time, and the driving force for transport. Permeability during osmotic water uptake was markedly higher than during transpiration in intact sweet cherry fruit (40.2-fold), excised ES of sweet cherry fruit (12.5- to 53.7-fold) and isolated astomatous fruit and leaf CM of a range of species (on average 23.0-fold). Partitioning water transport into stomatal and cuticular components revealed that permeability of the sweet cherry fruit cuticle for water uptake was 11.9-fold higher and that of stomata 56.8-fold higher than the respective permeability during transpiration. Increasing water vapor activity in the receiver from 0 to 1 increased permeability during transpiration across isolated sweet cherry fruit CM about 2.1-fold. Permeability for vapor uptake from saturated water vapor into a PEG 6000 receiver solution was markedly lower than from liquid water, but of similar magnitude to the permeability during self-diffusion of (3)H(2)O in the absence of osmotica. The energy of activation for

  3. The Influence of Selected Liquid and Soil Properties on the Propagation of Spills over Flat Permeable Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jason M.; Simmons, Carver S.

    2005-02-15

    In an effort to determine spill characteristics, information about a spill's spatial distribution with time is being studied. For permeable surfaces, spill phenomenology is controlled by liquid and soil properties, the most relevant of which are presented in this report. The pertinent liquid and soil properties were tabulated for ten liquids and four soils. The liquids represented an array of organic compounds, some of which are or are soon to be documented in the liquid spectra library by the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The soils were chosen based on ongoing surface spectra work and to represent a range of relevant soil properties. The effect of the liquid and soil properties on spill phenomenology were explored using a spill model that couples overland flow described by gravity currents with the Green-Ampt infiltration model. From the simulations, liquid viscosity was found to be a controlling liquid property in determining the amount of time a spill remains on the surface, with the surface vanish time decreasing as viscosity decreased. This was attributed to decreasing viscosity increasing both the hydraulic conductivity of the soil and allowing for the spill to more quickly spread out onto an unsaturated soil surface. Soil permeability also controlled vanish times with the vanish times increasing as permeability decreased, corresponding to finer textured materials. Maximum spill area was found to be largely controlled by liquid viscosity on coarse, highly permeable soils. On the less permeable soils maximum spill area began to be controlled by the steady-area spill height due to the restricting of infiltration to the extent that the spill is then able to reach its steady-area spill height. Simulations performed with and without the inclusion of capillarity in the Green-Ampt infiltration model displayed the importance of capillarity in describing infiltration rate in fine textured soils. In coarse textured

  4. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera-Rico, M.; Lopez-Rendon, X.; Rivera-Ordonez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.

    2012-10-23

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2} of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15 Multiplication-Sign 15 cm{sup 2} in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  5. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; López-Rendón, X.; Rivera-Ordóñez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.

    2012-10-01

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 ×1 cm2 of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15×15 cm2 in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  6. Seismic wave propagation in a very permeable water-saturated surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GéLi, Louis; Bard, Pierre-Yves; Schmitts, Denis P.

    1987-07-01

    According to Biot's (1956a, b) model, the presence of water plays an important role in the propagation of seismic waves in at least three different ways: (1) in an infinite medium, water saturation induces an attenuation that can be accounted for by a complex formulation of wave velocities, as in viscoelastic media; (2) at the boundaries of the saturated medium, pore pressure and water flux determine specific continuity conditions; and (3) there is a second compressional wave, called the P2 wave. In this paper, we discuss the latter two effects. Biot's model is presented first, with homogenization theory used to provide the numerical values of the different coefficients used in the model. In an infinite medium, the model is of practical interest when the frequency ƒ is about the same order of magnitude as a characteristic frequency noted ƒc, which depends on the properties of the constituents. This limits the application of Biot's model to a few particular fields in geophysics. In a layered medium, Biot's model has a wider scope in that it provides a tool for modeling fluid-solid interaction at the boundaries of the saturated medium. This is illustrated in our paper for the case of a very permeable water-saturated surface layer over an elastic half-space. Two examples are given; in the first example (rigid sands) we discuss the physics of the strongly attenuated P2 wave predicted by Biot, the amplitude of which becomes significant when the ƒ/ƒc ratio is about equal to or greater than 0.1. In the second example (soft unconsolidated sediments) the P2 wave is negligible, but the calculation of the complete wave field is required when the ƒ/ƒc ratio is about 0.01. There is no adequate equivalent single phase model that gives a correct estimation of the amplitude of the ground motion. In this case, we argue that the P2 wave is not important in itself, but Biot's model allows the description of the fluid-solid interaction at the water table; continuity of effective

  7. Water Quality Performance of Three Side-by-Side Permeable Pavement Surface Materials: Three Year Update

    EPA Science Inventory

    Communities are increasingly installing structural low impact development (LID) practices to mange stormwater and reduce pollutant loads associated with stormwater runoff. Permeable pavement is a LID practice that has limited research on working-scale, side-by-side performance o...

  8. Functional specializations in human cerebral cortex analyzed using the Visible Man surface-based atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, H. A.; Van Essen, D. C.

    1997-01-01

    We used surface-based representations to analyze functional specializations in the human cerebral cortex. A computerized reconstruction of the cortical surface of the Visible Man digital atlas was generated and transformed to the Talairach coordinate system. This surface was also flattened and used to establish a surface-based coordinate system that respects the topology of the cortical sheet. The linkage between two-dimensional and three-dimensional representations allows the locations of published neuroimaging activation foci to be stereotaxically projected onto the Visible Man cortical flat map. An analysis of two activation studies related to the hearing and reading of music and of words illustrates how this approach permits the systematic estimation of the degree of functional segregation and of potential functional overlap for different aspects of sensory processing.

  9. Structural and functional analyses of human cerebral cortex using a surface-based atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, D. C.; Drury, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed the geometry, geography, and functional organization of human cerebral cortex using surface reconstructions and cortical flat maps of the left and right hemispheres generated from a digital atlas (the Visible Man). The total surface area of the reconstructed Visible Man neocortex is 1570 cm2 (both hemispheres), approximately 70% of which is buried in sulci. By linking the Visible Man cerebrum to the Talairach stereotaxic coordinate space, the locations of activation foci reported in neuroimaging studies can be readily visualized in relation to the cortical surface. The associated spatial uncertainty was empirically shown to have a radius in three dimensions of approximately 10 mm. Application of this approach to studies of visual cortex reveals the overall patterns of activation associated with different aspects of visual function and the relationship of these patterns to topographically organized visual areas. Our analysis supports a distinction between an anterior region in ventral occipito-temporal cortex that is selectively involved in form processing and a more posterior region (in or near areas VP and V4v) involved in both form and color processing. Foci associated with motion processing are mainly concentrated in a region along the occipito-temporal junction, the ventral portion of which overlaps with foci also implicated in form processing. Comparisons between flat maps of human and macaque monkey cerebral cortex indicate significant differences as well as many similarities in the relative sizes and positions of cortical regions known or suspected to be homologous in the two species.

  10. Regional Cerebral Blood Flow (rCBF) in Developmental Dyslexia: Activation during Reading in a Surface and Deep Dyslexic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynd, George W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The exploratory study examined patterns of regional cerebral blood flow in a surface and a deep dyslexic during reading. Significant differences in gray matter blood flow were found between subjects and normal controls. Also differences existed between the surface and deep dyslexic in the distribution of cortical perfusion. (Author/DB)

  11. Systematization and distribution of the middle cerebral artery on the brain surface in pampas fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus).

    PubMed

    Depedrini, J S; Campos, R

    2007-12-01

    The present study has analysed 30 pampas fox brains (Pseudalopex gymnocercus), injected with latex, aiming to systematize and describe the distribution and vascularization territories of the middle cerebral artery. After being originated from the rostral branch of the internal carotid artery this vessel formed the following collateral branches: rostral choroidal artery, rostral and caudal central branches and cortical branches. Before crossing the lateral rhinal sulcus, the common trunk of the middle cerebral artery frequently bifurcated in a rostral and a caudal branch. In a smaller amount, the common trunk did not show any bifurcation, ramifying in arborescence. The vascular territory of the pampas fox middle cerebral artery included the lateral cerebral fossa, the lateral third of the olfactory trigone, the two rostral thirds of the piriform lobe, the lateral olfactory tract and most of the convex surface of the cerebral hemisphere, except for the more rostromedial areas of the frontal lobe bordering the endomarginal sulcus in the parietal and occipital lobes as well as the transverse fissure at the caudal pole of the cerebral hemisphere.

  12. Permeability and kinetic coefficients for mesoscale BCF surface step dynamics: Discrete two-dimensional deposition-diffusion equation analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Renjie; Evans, James W.; Oliveira, Tiago J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, a discrete version of deposition-diffusion equations appropriate for description of step flow on a vicinal surface is analyzed for a two-dimensional grid of adsorption sites representing the stepped surface and explicitly incorporating kinks along the step edges. Model energetics and kinetics appropriately account for binding of adatoms at steps and kinks, distinct terrace and edge diffusion rates, and possible additional barriers for attachment to steps. Analysis of adatom attachment fluxes as well as limiting values of adatom densities at step edges for nonuniform deposition scenarios allows determination of both permeability and kinetic coefficients. Behavior of these quantities is assessedmore » as a function of key system parameters including kink density, step attachment barriers, and the step edge diffusion rate.« less

  13. Effect of Seat Surface Inclination on Postural Stability and forward Reaching Efficiency in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherng, Rong-Ju; Lin, Hui-Chen; Ju, Yun-Huei; Ho, Chin-Shan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of seat surface inclination on postural stability and forward reaching efficiency in 10 children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and 16 typically developing (TD) children. The children performed a static sitting and a forward reaching task while sitting on a height- and inclination-adjustable…

  14. A novel control algorithm for interaction between surface waves and a permeable floating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Pei-Wei; Alsaedi, A.; Hayat, T.; Chen, Cheng-Wu

    2016-04-01

    An analytical solution is undertaken to describe the wave-induced flow field and the surge motion of a permeable platform structure with fuzzy controllers in an oceanic environment. In the design procedure of the controller, a parallel distributed compensation (PDC) scheme is utilized to construct a global fuzzy logic controller by blending all local state feedback controllers. A stability analysis is carried out for a real structure system by using Lyapunov method. The corresponding boundary value problems are then incorporated into scattering and radiation problems. They are analytically solved, based on separation of variables, to obtain series solutions in terms of the harmonic incident wave motion and surge motion. The dependence of the wave-induced flow field and its resonant frequency on wave characteristics and structure properties including platform width, thickness and mass has been thus drawn with a parametric approach. From which mathematical models are applied for the wave-induced displacement of the surge motion. A nonlinearly inverted pendulum system is employed to demonstrate that the controller tuned by swarm intelligence method can not only stabilize the nonlinear system, but has the robustness against external disturbance.

  15. Linking microearthquakes to fracture permeability change: The role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Takuya; Watanabe, Noriaki; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Despite its importance, the relation between microearthquakes (MEQs) and changes in hydraulic properties during hydraulic stimulation of a fractured reservoir has rarely been explored, and it is still not well understood. To investigate this relation, we first formulate a plausible scale dependence, where fracture length and shear displacement are variables, for channeling flow through heterogeneous aperture distributions for joints and faults. By combining this formulation with the concept of the seismic moment, we derive quantitative relations between the moment magnitude (Mw) of MEQs and the fracture permeability change in the directions orthogonal to (kfault,⊥/kjoint) and parallel to (kfault,∥/kjoint) the shear displacement, in the form kfault,⊥>/kjoint=116.4×100.46Mw and kfault,>/>/>/kjoint=13.1×100.46Mw. Despite the simplicity of the derivation, these relations have the potential to explain the results of field experiments on hydraulic stimulation, such as the enhanced geothermal systems at Soultz-sous-Fôret and Basel.

  16. The permeability of puerarin loaded poly(butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles coated with polysorbate 80 on the blood-brain barrier and its protective effect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-xia; Liu, An-chang; Yu, Shu-wen; Wang, Zeng-xin; Lin, Xiao-qian; Zhai, Guang-xi; Zhang, Qing-zhu

    2013-01-01

    Puerarin (PUE) is a good candidate for treating stroke, but its low concentration in brain after administration limits its curative efficacy. The aim of the present work was to design and characterize PUE loaded poly(butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles (PBCN) coated with polysorbate 80 (Ps 80), and to evaluate the effect of PBCN on the permeability of PUE across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the effect of PUE loaded PBCN on the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PUE loaded PBCN were successfully prepared by anionic polymerization method with the mean particle size of 201.2 nm and the zeta potential of -7.72 mV. The in vitro release behavior of PUE from the nanoparticles showed a biphasic profile manner with an initial burst release followed by a sustained release. The results of pharmacokinetic and biodistribution to brain performed in mice after intravenous administration showed that the drug concentrations in blood and brain for PUE loaded PBCN were both greater than these for the free drug. Moreover, compared with free drug, the vein injection of PUE loaded PBCN exerted the better neuroprotective effect in rats with focal cerebral ischemic injury via significantly decreasing neurological deficit scores, increasing body weight, lowing brain water content, and reducing the infarct volume. The results indicated that this preparation may reduce the total dose required for the stroke therapy with concurrent reduction in dose related toxicity. All these findings suggest that PBCN could enhance the transport of PUE to brain and have a potential as a neuroprotective agent in the focal cerebral ischemic injury.

  17. A Population-Average, Landmark- and Surface-based (PALS) atlas of human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Van Essen, David C

    2005-11-15

    This report describes a new electronic atlas of human cerebral cortex that provides a substrate for a wide variety of brain-mapping analyses. The Population-Average, Landmark- and Surface-based (PALS) atlas approach involves surface-based and volume-based representations of cortical shape, each available as population averages and as individual subject data. The specific PALS-B12 atlas introduced here is derived from structural MRI volumes of 12 normal young adults. Accurate cortical surface reconstructions were generated for each hemisphere, and the surfaces were inflated, flattened, and mapped to standard spherical configurations using SureFit and Caret software. A target atlas sphere was generated by averaging selected landmark contours from each of the 24 contributing hemispheres. Each individual hemisphere was deformed to this target using landmark-constrained surface registration. The utility of the resultant PALS-B12 atlas was demonstrated using a variety of analyses. (i) Probabilistic maps of sulcal identity were generated using both surface-based registration (SBR) and conventional volume-based registration (VBR). The SBR approach achieved markedly better consistency of sulcal alignment than did VBR. (ii) A method is introduced for 'multi-fiducial mapping' of volume-averaged group data (e.g., fMRI data, probabilistic architectonic maps) onto each individual hemisphere in the atlas, followed by spatial averaging across the individual maps. This yielded a population-average surface representation that circumvents the biases inherent in choosing any single hemisphere as a target. (iii) Surface-based and volume-based morphometry applied to maps of sulcal depth and sulcal identity demonstrated prominent left-right asymmetries in and near the superior temporal sulcus and Sylvian fissure. Moreover, shape variability in the temporal lobe is significantly greater in the left than the right hemisphere. The PALS-B12 atlas has been registered to other surface

  18. Selective Permeability of Uranyl Peroxide Nanocages to Different Alkali Ions: Influences from Surface Pores and Hydration Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunyi; Szymanowski, Jennifer; Burns, Peter; Liu, Tianbo

    The precise guidance to different ions across the biological channels is essential for many biological processes. An artificial nanopore system will facilitate the study of ion transport mechanism through nanosized channels and offer new views for designing nanodevices. Here we reveal that a 2.5-nm-size, fullerene-shaped molecular cluster Li48+mK12(OH)m[UO2(O2) (OH)]60-(H2O)n (m ~20 and n ~310) (U60) shows selective permeability to different alkali ions. The sub-nanometer pores on the water-ligand-rich surface of U60 are able to block Rb+ and Cs+ ions from passing through, while allow Na+ and K+ ions, which possess larger hydrated sizes, to enter the interior space of U60. An interestingly high entropy gain during the binding process between U60 and alkali ions suggest that the hydration shells of Na+i/K+ and U60 are damaged during the interaction. The ion selectivity of U60 is greatly influenced by both the morphologies of surface nanopores and the dynamics of the hydration shells. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Materials Science of Actinides Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001089.

  19. Influence of Crassostrea gigas on the permeability and microstructure of the surface layer of concrete exposed to the tidal zone of the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Lv, JianFu; Mao, JiZe; Ba, HengJing

    2015-01-01

    Concrete exposed to the tidal zone of the Yellow Sea and bearing Crassostrea gigas (CG) with differing areal coverages was investigated for evidence of biologically induced corrosion prevention. The experimental results indicated that both the chloride ion profile and the neutralization depth of the concrete decreased with increasing CG coverage. Moreover, the water absorption rate and the chloride ion permeability of concrete with the original surface intact also declined with increasing degrees of CG coverage. However, the water absorption rates of three concrete samples with 2 mm of the surface layer removed were similar, as was their chloride ion permeability. Mercury intrusion porosimetry tests indicated that CG significantly reduced the pore structure of the concrete surface layer. SEM observation revealed that the CG cementation membrane and left valve were tightly glued to the concrete surface and had a dense structure. Concrete durability indices showed that high CG coverage greatly improved concrete durability. PMID:25584410

  20. Influence of Crassostrea gigas on the permeability and microstructure of the surface layer of concrete exposed to the tidal zone of the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Lv, JianFu; Mao, JiZe; Ba, HengJing

    2015-01-01

    Concrete exposed to the tidal zone of the Yellow Sea and bearing Crassostrea gigas (CG) with differing areal coverages was investigated for evidence of biologically induced corrosion prevention. The experimental results indicated that both the chloride ion profile and the neutralization depth of the concrete decreased with increasing CG coverage. Moreover, the water absorption rate and the chloride ion permeability of concrete with the original surface intact also declined with increasing degrees of CG coverage. However, the water absorption rates of three concrete samples with 2 mm of the surface layer removed were similar, as was their chloride ion permeability. Mercury intrusion porosimetry tests indicated that CG significantly reduced the pore structure of the concrete surface layer. SEM observation revealed that the CG cementation membrane and left valve were tightly glued to the concrete surface and had a dense structure. Concrete durability indices showed that high CG coverage greatly improved concrete durability.

  1. Antibody responses to the merozoite surface protein-1 complex in cerebral malaria patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Tongren, Jon Eric; Jain, Vidhan; Nagpal, Avinash C; Kauth, Christian W; Woehlbier, Ute; Bujard, Hermann; Dash, Aditya P; Singh, Neeru; Stiles, Jonathan K; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2008-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum infection causes cerebral malaria (CM) in a subset of patients with anti-malarial treatment protecting only about 70% to 80% of patients. Why a subset of malaria patients develops CM complications, including neurological sequelae or death, is still not well understood. It is believed that host immune factors may modulate CM outcomes and there is substantial evidence that cellular immune factors, such as cytokines, play an important role in this process. In this study, the potential relationship between the antibody responses to the merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1 complex (which consists of four fragments namely: MSP-183, MSP-130, MSP-138 and MSP-142), MSP-636 and MSP-722 and CM was investigated. Methods Peripheral blood antibody responses to recombinant antigens of the two major allelic forms of MSP-1 complex, MSP-636 and MSP-722 were compared between healthy subjects, mild malaria patients (MM) and CM patients residing in a malaria endemic region of central India. Total IgG and IgG subclass antibody responses were determined using ELISA method. Results The prevalence and levels of IgG and its subclasses in the plasma varied for each antigen. In general, the prevalence of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG3 was higher in the MM patients and lower in CM patients compared to healthy controls. Significantly lower levels of total IgG antibodies to the MSP-1f38, IgG1 levels to MSP-1d83, MSP-119 and MSP-636 and IgG3 levels to MSP-1f42 and MSP-722 were observed in CM patients as compared to MM patients. Conclusion These results suggest that there may be some dysregulation in the generation of antibody responses to some MSP antigens in CM patients and it is worth investigating further whether perturbations of antibody responses in CM patients contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:18601721

  2. Permeability and relative permeability in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1990-10-01

    Important features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical correlation functions using modern image processing techniques. These correlation functions contain information about porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity, formation factor, and elastic constants, as well as the fluid permeability and relative permeability. The physical basis of this approach is discussed and examples of the results for various sandstones are presented. The analysis shows that Kozeny-Carman relations and Archie's empirical laws must be modified to account for finite percolation thresholds in order to avoid unphysical behavior in the calculated relative permeabilities. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Maintenance measures for preservation and recovery of permeable pavement surface infiltration rate--The effects of street sweeping, vacuum cleaning, high pressure washing, and milling.

    PubMed

    Winston, Ryan J; Al-Rubaei, Ahmed M; Blecken, Godecke T; Viklander, Maria; Hunt, William F

    2016-03-15

    The surface infiltration rates (SIR) of permeable pavements decline with time as sediment and debris clog pore spaces. Effective maintenance techniques are needed to ensure the hydraulic functionality and water quality benefits of this stormwater control. Eight different small-scale and full-scale maintenance techniques aimed at recovering pavement permeability were evaluated at ten different permeable pavement sites in the USA and Sweden. Maintenance techniques included manual removal of the upper 2 cm of fill material, mechanical street sweeping, regenerative-air street sweeping, vacuum street sweeping, hand-held vacuuming, high pressure washing, and milling of porous asphalt. The removal of the upper 2 cm of clogging material did not significantly improve the SIR of concrete grid paves (CGP) and permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP) due to the inclusion of fines in the joint and bedding stone during construction, suggesting routine maintenance cannot overcome improper construction. For porous asphalt maintenance, industrial hand-held vacuum cleaning, pressure washing, and milling were increasingly successful at recovering the SIR. Milling to a depth of 2.5 cm nearly restored the SIR for a 21-year old porous asphalt pavement to like-new conditions. For PICP, street sweepers employing suction were shown to be preferable to mechanical sweepers; additionally, maintenance efforts may become more intensive over time to maintain a threshold SIR, as maintenance was not 100% effective at removing clogging material. PMID:26735865

  4. Maintenance measures for preservation and recovery of permeable pavement surface infiltration rate--The effects of street sweeping, vacuum cleaning, high pressure washing, and milling.

    PubMed

    Winston, Ryan J; Al-Rubaei, Ahmed M; Blecken, Godecke T; Viklander, Maria; Hunt, William F

    2016-03-15

    The surface infiltration rates (SIR) of permeable pavements decline with time as sediment and debris clog pore spaces. Effective maintenance techniques are needed to ensure the hydraulic functionality and water quality benefits of this stormwater control. Eight different small-scale and full-scale maintenance techniques aimed at recovering pavement permeability were evaluated at ten different permeable pavement sites in the USA and Sweden. Maintenance techniques included manual removal of the upper 2 cm of fill material, mechanical street sweeping, regenerative-air street sweeping, vacuum street sweeping, hand-held vacuuming, high pressure washing, and milling of porous asphalt. The removal of the upper 2 cm of clogging material did not significantly improve the SIR of concrete grid paves (CGP) and permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP) due to the inclusion of fines in the joint and bedding stone during construction, suggesting routine maintenance cannot overcome improper construction. For porous asphalt maintenance, industrial hand-held vacuum cleaning, pressure washing, and milling were increasingly successful at recovering the SIR. Milling to a depth of 2.5 cm nearly restored the SIR for a 21-year old porous asphalt pavement to like-new conditions. For PICP, street sweepers employing suction were shown to be preferable to mechanical sweepers; additionally, maintenance efforts may become more intensive over time to maintain a threshold SIR, as maintenance was not 100% effective at removing clogging material.

  5. A New Presentation and Exploration of Human Cerebral Vasculature Correlated with Surface and Sectional Neuroanatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Thirunavuukarasuu, Arumugam; Volkau, Ihar; Marchenko, Yevgen; Aminah, Bivi; Gelas, Arnaud; Huang, Su; Lee, Looi Chow; Liu, Jimin; Ng, Ting Ting; Nowinska, Natalia G.; Qian, Guoyu Yu; Puspitasari, Fiftarina; Runge, Val M.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing complexity of human body models enabled by advances in diagnostic imaging, computing, and growing knowledge calls for the development of a new generation of systems for intelligent exploration of these models. Here, we introduce a novel paradigm for the exploration of digital body models illustrating cerebral vasculature. It enables…

  6. Computerized mappings of the cerebral cortex: a multiresolution flattening method and a surface-based coordinate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, H. A.; Van Essen, D. C.; Anderson, C. H.; Lee, C. W.; Coogan, T. A.; Lewis, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a new method for generating two-dimensional maps of the cerebral cortex. Our computerized, two-stage flattening method takes as its input any well-defined representation of a surface within the three-dimensional cortex. The first stage rapidly converts this surface to a topologically correct two-dimensional map, without regard for the amount of distortion introduced. The second stage reduces distortions using a multiresolution strategy that makes gross shape changes on a coarsely sampled map and further shape refinements on progressively finer resolution maps. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by creating flat maps of the entire cerebral cortex in the macaque monkey and by displaying various types of experimental data on such maps. We also introduce a surface-based coordinate system that has advantages over conventional stereotaxic coordinates and is relevant to studies of cortical organization in humans as well as non-human primates. Together, these methods provide an improved basis for quantitative studies of individual variability in cortical organization.

  7. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  8. Moisture permeability of the total surface bearing prosthetic socket with a silicone liner: is it superior to the patella-tendon bearing prosthetic socket?

    PubMed

    Hachisuka, K; Matsushima, Y; Ohmine, S; Shitama, H; Shinkoda, K

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the moisture permeability properties of materials used for total surface bearing (TSB) socket with a silicone liner, a combination of Silicone Suction Socket or Icelandic Roll-On Silicone Socket (ICEROSS) and an acrylic plastic sheet (Degaplast), patella-tendon bearing (PTB) socket, a combination of Pe-Lite and Degaplast, and wooden socket made of poplar. Moisture permeability of the socket materials was measured as the diminution of water in a container after 12 hours in a climatic chamber. Eight containers with their open, top side were uncovered (no material) or sealed with one of the socket materials; the experiment was repeated four times. One-way analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni's test was applied to examine the differences in moisture permeability. Moisture permeability levels were as follows: no material, 85.9 +/- 1.3 g; poplar, 4.3 +/- 0.4 g; Silicone Suction Socket, 1.1 +/- 0.2 g; ICEROSS, 1.0 +/- 0.2 g; Pe-Lite, 0.8 +/- 0.1 g; 3S + Degaplast, 0.8 +/- 0.1 g; ICEROSS + Degaplast, 0.8 +/- 0.2 g; and Pe-Lite + Degaplast, 0.8 +/- 0.1 g. There were significant differences between the uncovered container and the others, and between poplar and the others (P < 0.05). We concluded that the TSB socket with a silicone liner is not superior to the PTB socket with regard to moisture permeability, and that it is necessary to develop a new prosthetic socket that allows heat release and drainage of sweat.

  9. Permeability of stylolite-bearing chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, I.; Nykjaer, O.; Priisholm, S. ); Springer, N.

    1994-11-01

    Permeabilities were measured on core plugs from stylolite-bearing chalk of the Gorm field in the Danish North Sea. Air and liquid permeabilities were measured in directions parallel to and perpendicular to the stylolite surface. Permeability was measured with sleeve pressure equal to in-situ reservoir stress. Permeabilities of plugs with stylolites but without stylolite-associated fractures were equal in the two directions. The permeability is equal to the matrix permeability of non-stylolite-bearing chalk. In contrast, when fractures were associated with the stylolites, permeability was enhanced. The enhancement was most significant in the horizontal direction parallel to the stylolites.

  10. Antidepressants Alter Cerebrovascular Permeability and Metabolic Rate in Primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Hartman, Boyd K.

    1982-07-01

    External detection of the annihilation radiation produced by water labeled with oxygen-15 was used to measure cerebrovascular permeability and cerebral blood flow in six rhesus monkeys. Use of oxygen-15 also permitted assessment of cerebral metabolic rate in two of the monkeys. Amitriptyline produced a dose-dependent, reversible increase in permeability at plasma drug concentrations which are therapeutic for depressed patients. At the same concentrations the drug also produced a 20 to 30 percent reduction in cerebral metabolic rate. At higher doses normal autoregulation of cerebral blood flow was suspended, but responsivity to arterial carbon dioxide was normal.

  11. Diabetes aggravates nanoparticles induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier permeability, brain edema formation, alterations in cerebral blood flow and neuronal injury. An experimental study using physiological and morphological investigations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2010-12-01

    The possibility that diabetes aggravates nanoparticles induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, edema formation and brain pathology was examined in a rat model. Engineered nanoparticles from metals Ag and Cu (50-60 mn) were administered (50 mg/kg, i.p.) once daily for 7 days in normal and streptozotocine induced diabetic rats. On the 8th day, BBB permeability to Evans blue and radioactive iodine (131I-sodium) was examined in 16 brain regions. In these brain regions alterations in regional CBF was also evaluated using radiolabelled (125I) carbonized microspheres (o.d. 15 +/- 6 microm). Regional brain edema and Na+, K+ and Cl- ion analysis were done in 8 selected brain regions. Histopathology was used to detect neuronal damage employing Nissl staining. Nanoparticles treatment in diabetic rats showed much more profound disruption of the BBB to Evans blue albumin (EBA) and radioiodine in almost all the 16 regions examined as compared to the normal animals. In these diabetic animals reduction in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was more pronounced than in normal rats. Edema development as seen using water content and increase in Na+ and a decrease in K+ ion were most marked in diabetic rats as compared to normal rats after nanoparticles treatment. Cell changes in the regions of BBB disruptions were also exacerbated in diabetic rats compared to normal group after nanoparticles treatment. Taken together, these observations are the first to show that diabetic rats are more susceptible to nanoparticles induced cerebrovascular reactions in the brain and neuronal damage. The possible mechanisms and significance of the present findings are discussed. PMID:21121280

  12. Comparative study of dentine permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 microm TEA CO2 and Er:YAG laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gouw-Soares, S; Stabholz, A; Lage-Marques, J L; Zezell, D M; Groth, E B; Eduardo, C P

    2004-04-01

    Failure of apicectomies is generally attributed to dentine surface permeability as well as to the lack of an adequate marginal sealing of the retrofilling material, which allows the percolation of microorganisms and their products from the root canal system to the periodontal region, thus compromising periapical healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentine and the marginal permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 micro m TEA CO(2) or Er:YAG 2.94 micro m laser irradiation. Sixty-five single rooted human endodontically treated teeth were divided into five experimental groups: group I (control), apicectomy with high speed bur; group II, similar procedure to that of group I, followed by dentinal surface treatment with 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser; group III, similar procedure to group I followed by dentinal surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m; group IV, apicectomy and surface treatment with CO(2) 9.6 micro m laser; and group V, apicectomy and surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m. The analysis of methylene blue dye infiltration through the dentinal surface and the retrofilling material demonstrated that the samples from the groups that were irradiated with the lasers showed significantly lower infiltration indexes than the ones from the control group. These results were compatible with the structural morphological changes evidenced through SEM analysis. Samples from groups II and IV (9.6 micro m CO(2)) showed clean smooth surfaces, fusion, and recrystallized dentine distributed homogeneously throughout the irradiated area sealing the dentinal tubules. Samples from groups III and V (Er:YAG 2.94 micro m) also presented clean surfaces, without smear layer, but roughly compatible to the ablationed dentine and without evidence of dentinal tubules. Through the conditions of this study, the Er:YAG 2.94 micro m and the 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser used for root canal resection and dentine surface treatment showed a reduction of

  13. Comparative study of dentine permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 microm TEA CO2 and Er:YAG laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gouw-Soares, S; Stabholz, A; Lage-Marques, J L; Zezell, D M; Groth, E B; Eduardo, C P

    2004-04-01

    Failure of apicectomies is generally attributed to dentine surface permeability as well as to the lack of an adequate marginal sealing of the retrofilling material, which allows the percolation of microorganisms and their products from the root canal system to the periodontal region, thus compromising periapical healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentine and the marginal permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 micro m TEA CO(2) or Er:YAG 2.94 micro m laser irradiation. Sixty-five single rooted human endodontically treated teeth were divided into five experimental groups: group I (control), apicectomy with high speed bur; group II, similar procedure to that of group I, followed by dentinal surface treatment with 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser; group III, similar procedure to group I followed by dentinal surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m; group IV, apicectomy and surface treatment with CO(2) 9.6 micro m laser; and group V, apicectomy and surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m. The analysis of methylene blue dye infiltration through the dentinal surface and the retrofilling material demonstrated that the samples from the groups that were irradiated with the lasers showed significantly lower infiltration indexes than the ones from the control group. These results were compatible with the structural morphological changes evidenced through SEM analysis. Samples from groups II and IV (9.6 micro m CO(2)) showed clean smooth surfaces, fusion, and recrystallized dentine distributed homogeneously throughout the irradiated area sealing the dentinal tubules. Samples from groups III and V (Er:YAG 2.94 micro m) also presented clean surfaces, without smear layer, but roughly compatible to the ablationed dentine and without evidence of dentinal tubules. Through the conditions of this study, the Er:YAG 2.94 micro m and the 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser used for root canal resection and dentine surface treatment showed a reduction of

  14. Amyloid-β peptide on sialyl-Lewis(X)-selectin-mediated membrane tether mechanics at the cerebral endothelial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Askarova, Sholpan; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Grace Y; Meininger, Gerald A; Lee, James C-M

    2013-01-01

    Increased deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) at the cerebral endothelial cell (CEC) surface has been implicated in enhancement of transmigration of monocytes across the brain blood barrier (BBB) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy (QIM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) with cantilevers biofunctionalized by sialyl-Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) were employed to investigate Aβ-altered mechanics of membrane tethers formed by bonding between sLe(x) and p-selectin at the CEC surface, the initial mechanical step governing the transmigration of monocytes. QIM results indicated the ability for Aβ to increase p-selectin expression at the cell surface and promote actin polymerization in both bEND3 cells (immortalized mouse CECs) and human primary CECs. AFM data also showed the ability for Aβ to increase cell stiffness and adhesion probability in bEND3 cells. On the contrary, Aβ lowered the overall force of membrane tether formation (Fmtf ), and produced a bimodal population of Fmtf , suggesting subcellular mechanical alterations in membrane tethering. The lower Fmtf population was similar to the results obtained from cells treated with an F-actin-disrupting drug, latrunculin A. Indeed, AFM results also showed that both Aβ and latrunculin A decreased membrane stiffness, suggesting a lower membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, a factor resulting in lower Fmtf . In addition, these cerebral endothelial alterations induced by Aβ were abrogated by lovastatin, consistent with its anti-inflammatory effects. In sum, these results demonstrated the ability for Aβ to enhance p-selectin expression at the CEC surface and induce cytoskeleton reorganization, which in turn, resulted in changes in membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion and membrane tethering, mechanical factors important in transmigration of monocytes through the BBB.

  15. Amyloid-β Peptide on Sialyl-LewisX-Selectin-Mediated Membrane Tether Mechanics at the Cerebral Endothelial Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Askarova, Sholpan; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Grace Y.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Lee, James C-M.

    2013-01-01

    Increased deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) at the cerebral endothelial cell (CEC) surface has been implicated in enhancement of transmigration of monocytes across the brain blood barrier (BBB) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy (QIM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) with cantilevers biofunctionalized by sialyl-Lewisx (sLex) were employed to investigate Aβ-altered mechanics of membrane tethers formed by bonding between sLex and p-selectin at the CEC surface, the initial mechanical step governing the transmigration of monocytes. QIM results indicated the ability for Aβ to increase p-selectin expression at the cell surface and promote actin polymerization in both bEND3 cells (immortalized mouse CECs) and human primary CECs. AFM data also showed the ability for Aβ to increase cell stiffness and adhesion probability in bEND3 cells. On the contrary, Aβ lowered the overall force of membrane tether formation (Fmtf), and produced a bimodal population of Fmtf, suggesting subcellular mechanical alterations in membrane tethering. The lower Fmtf population was similar to the results obtained from cells treated with an F-actin-disrupting drug, latrunculin A. Indeed, AFM results also showed that both Aβ and latrunculin A decreased membrane stiffness, suggesting a lower membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, a factor resulting in lower Fmtf. In addition, these cerebral endothelial alterations induced by Aβ were abrogated by lovastatin, consistent with its anti-inflammatory effects. In sum, these results demonstrated the ability for Aβ to enhance p-selectin expression at the CEC surface and induce cytoskeleton reorganization, which in turn, resulted in changes in membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion and membrane tethering, mechanical factors important in transmigration of monocytes through the BBB. PMID:23593361

  16. Amyloid-β peptide on sialyl-Lewis(X)-selectin-mediated membrane tether mechanics at the cerebral endothelial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Askarova, Sholpan; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Grace Y; Meininger, Gerald A; Lee, James C-M

    2013-01-01

    Increased deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) at the cerebral endothelial cell (CEC) surface has been implicated in enhancement of transmigration of monocytes across the brain blood barrier (BBB) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy (QIM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) with cantilevers biofunctionalized by sialyl-Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) were employed to investigate Aβ-altered mechanics of membrane tethers formed by bonding between sLe(x) and p-selectin at the CEC surface, the initial mechanical step governing the transmigration of monocytes. QIM results indicated the ability for Aβ to increase p-selectin expression at the cell surface and promote actin polymerization in both bEND3 cells (immortalized mouse CECs) and human primary CECs. AFM data also showed the ability for Aβ to increase cell stiffness and adhesion probability in bEND3 cells. On the contrary, Aβ lowered the overall force of membrane tether formation (Fmtf ), and produced a bimodal population of Fmtf , suggesting subcellular mechanical alterations in membrane tethering. The lower Fmtf population was similar to the results obtained from cells treated with an F-actin-disrupting drug, latrunculin A. Indeed, AFM results also showed that both Aβ and latrunculin A decreased membrane stiffness, suggesting a lower membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, a factor resulting in lower Fmtf . In addition, these cerebral endothelial alterations induced by Aβ were abrogated by lovastatin, consistent with its anti-inflammatory effects. In sum, these results demonstrated the ability for Aβ to enhance p-selectin expression at the CEC surface and induce cytoskeleton reorganization, which in turn, resulted in changes in membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion and membrane tethering, mechanical factors important in transmigration of monocytes through the BBB. PMID:23593361

  17. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  18. The gyrification of mammalian cerebral cortex: quantitative evidence of anisomorphic surface expansion during phylogenetic and ontogenetic development.

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, T M; Mwamengele, G L; Dantzer, V; Williams, S

    1996-01-01

    Describing the shapes of 3D objects has proved to be as problematical in biology as in other areas. In an attempt to tackle this problem, established stereological methods (the Cavalieri principle and vertical sectioning) have been used to estimate a 3D shape-dependent quantity which can detect anisomorphic changes and is related to the degree of cortical convolution or gyrification. This isomophy factor is employed to assess phylogenetic and ontogenetic changes in the mammalian cerebral cortex. Gross anatomical differences between cerebral hemispheres of adult domestic mammals (horses, oxen, pigs, goats, dogs, cats and rabbits) were tested by paying attention to species, laterality and sex differences. Human fetal brains were also studied. Mean body weights of domestic mammals varied from 4 kg to 460 kg and brain weights from 10 g to 636 g. Fetuses weighed 39-610 g (crown-rump lengths 85-185 mm) and brain volumes were 4-56 cm3. Isomorphy factors were derived from estimates of hemisphere volumes and cortical surface areas. Hemisphere shape varied between species but no lateral or sex differences were detected. It is concluded that these mammalian brains are, in terms of their gross anatomy, symmetric and not sexually dimorphic. Fetal brains became more convoluted during uterine development. The isomorphy factor offers a convenient measure of gyrification which demonstrates that brains become more convoluted as they enlarge. PMID:8655415

  19. Effects of captopril on cerebral blood flow in normotensive and hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, D.I.; Paulson, O.B.; Jarden, J.O.; Juhler, M.; Graham, D.I.; Strandgaard, S.

    1984-05-31

    Cerebrovascular effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril were examined in normotensive and hypertensive rats. Cerebral blood flow was measured with the intracarotid /sup 133/xenon injection method in halothane-anesthetized animals. The blood-brain barrier permeability of captopril (determined with an integral-uptake method) was negligible, the permeability-surface area product in most brain regions being 1 X 10(-5) cm3/g per second, that is, three to four times lower than that of sodium ion. When administered into the cerebral ventricles to bypass the blood-brain barrier, captopril had no effect on cerebral blood flow: furthermore, cerebral blood flow autoregulation (studied by raising and lowering blood pressure) was identical to that in controls. In contrast, when given intravenously, captopril had a marked effect on cerebral blood flow autoregulation--both the lower and upper limits of autoregulation being shifted to a lower pressure (by about 20 to 30 and 50 to 60 mm Hg, respectively), and the autoregulatory range was shortened by about 40 mm Hg. This effect may be ascribed to inhibition of converting enzyme in the cerebral blood vessels rather than within the brain.

  20. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  1. Liquid-permeable electrode

    DOEpatents

    Folser, George R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

  2. A visual description of the dissection of the cerebral surface vasculature and associated meninges and the choroid plexus from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, John F; Thomas, Monzy; Patterson, Tucker A; George, Nysia I; Runnells, Jeffrey A; Levi, Mark S

    2012-11-14

    This video presentation was created to show a method of harvesting the two most important highly vascular structures, not residing within the brain proper, that support forebrain function. They are the cerebral surface (superficial) vasculature along with associated meninges (MAV) and the choroid plexus which are necessary for cerebral blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) homeostasis. The tissue harvested is suitable for biochemical and physiological analysis, and the MAV has been shown to be sensitive to damage produced by amphetamine and hyperthermia. As well, the major and minor cerebral vasculatures harvested in MAV are of potentially high interest when investigating concussive types of head trauma. The MAV dissected in this presentation consists of the pial and some of the arachnoid membrane (less dura) of the meninges and the major and minor cerebral surface vasculature. The choroid plexus dissected is the structure that resides in the lateral ventricles as described by Oldfield and McKinley. The methods used for harvesting these two tissues also facilitate the harvesting of regional cortical tissue devoid of meninges and larger cerebral surface vasculature, and is compatible with harvesting other brain tissues such as striatum, hypothalamus, hippocampus, etc. The dissection of the two tissues takes from 5 to 10 min total. The gene expression levels for the dissected MAV and choroid plexus, as shown and described in this presentation can be found at GSE23093 (MAV) and GSE29733 (choroid plexus) at the NCBI GEO repository. This data has been, and is being, used to help further understand the functioning of the MAV and choroid plexus and how neurotoxic events such as severe hyperthermia and AMPH adversely affect their function.

  3. Mathematical Analysis of Hall Effect on Transient Hartman Flow about a Rotating Horizontal Permeable Surface in a Porous Medium under Inclined Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Suresh, M; Manglik, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the exact solution for unsteady flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past a impulsively started infinite horizontal surface which is rotating with an angular velocity embedded in a saturated porous medium under the influence of strong magnetic field with hall effect. Our study focuses on the change of direction of the external magnetic field on the flow system which leads to change in the flow behavior and skin frictional forces at the boundary. Systems of flow equations are solved using Laplace transform technique. The impacts of control parameters Hartman number, rotation of the system, hall effect, inclination of the magnetic field, and Darcy number on primary and secondary velocities are shown graphically, skin friction at horizontal boundary in tabular form. For validating our results, in the absence of permeability of the porous medium and inclination of the magnetic field the results are in good agreement with the published results.

  4. A framework to analyze cerebral mean diffusivity using surface guided diffusion mapping in diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Sang-Won; Na, Duk L.; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    The mean diffusivity (MD) value has been used to describe microstructural properties in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) in cortical gray matter (GM). Recently, researchers have applied a cortical surface generated from the T1-weighted volume. When the DTI data are analyzed using the cortical surface, it is important to assign an accurate MD value from the volume space to the vertex of the cortical surface, considering the anatomical correspondence between the DTI and the T1-weighted image. Previous studies usually sampled the MD value using the nearest-neighbor (NN) method or Linear method, even though there are geometric distortions in diffusion-weighted volumes. Here we introduce a Surface Guided Diffusion Mapping (SGDM) method to compensate for such geometric distortions. We compared our SGDM method with results using NN and Linear methods by investigating differences in the sampled MD value. We also projected the tissue classification results of non-diffusion-weighted volumes to the cortical midsurface. The CSF probability values provided by the SGDM method were lower than those produced by the NN and Linear methods. The MD values provided by the NN and Linear methods were significantly greater than those of the SGDM method in regions suffering from geometric distortion. These results indicate that the NN and Linear methods assigned the MD value in the CSF region to the cortical midsurface (GM region). Our results suggest that the SGDM method is an effective way to correct such mapping errors. PMID:26236180

  5. MHD boundary layer flow of Casson fluid passing through an exponentially stretching permeable surface with thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swati, Mukhopadhyay; Iswar, Chandra Moindal; Tasawar, Hayat

    2014-10-01

    This article numerically examines the boundary layer flow due to an exponentially stretching surface in the presence of an applied magnetic field. Casson fluid model is used to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. The flow is subjected to suction/blowing at the surface. Analysis is carried out in presence of thermal radiation and prescribed surface heat flux. In this study, an exponential order stretching velocity and prescribed exponential order surface heat flux are accorded with each other. The governing partial differential equations are first converted into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using appropriate transformations and then solved numerically. The effect of increasing values of the Casson parameter is to suppress the velocity field. However the temperature is enhanced when Casson parameter increases. It is found that the skin-friction coefficient increases with increasing values of suction parameter. Temperature also increases for large values of power index n in both suction and blowing cases at the boundary. It is observed that the thermal radiation enhances the effective thermal diffusivity and hence the temperature rises.

  6. Effects of increased surface coverage of polyvinylpyrrolidone over a polysulfone hemofilter membrane on permeability and cell adhesion during continuous hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Kenichi; Kurihara, Yoshitaka; Tsukao, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Naoko; Kobayashi, Kozue; Shinbo, Toshihiro; Hirose, Minoru; Kobayashi, Hirosuke

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the adhesiveness of blood cells and the solute removal performance change of modified polysulfone membranes which have increased polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coverage over their surface. Continuous hemofiltration (CHF) experiments for 24 h were carried out using an ex vivo hemofilter evaluation system to compare a modified polysulfone hemofilter (SHG) with the conventional polysulfone hemofilter (SH). The 25 and 50 % cutoff values of the sieving coefficient of dextran after CHF and the protein concentration in the filtrate was higher in SHG, indicating that less fouling occurred in the SHG membrane. Adhesion of blood cells after 24 h of CHF was significantly higher in the case of SH than in the case of SHG. Blood cell adhesion and membrane fouling were reduced with the use of a polysulfone membrane modified with increased PVP coverage over the surface.

  7. Kinetic modeling in the context of cerebral blood flow quantification by H2(15)O positron emission tomography: the meaning of the permeability coefficient in Renkin-Crone׳s model revisited at capillary scale.

    PubMed

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Duru, Paul; Billanou, Ian; Quintard, Michel; Celsis, Pierre

    2014-07-21

    One the one hand, capillary permeability to water is a well-defined concept in microvascular physiology, and linearly relates the net convective or diffusive mass fluxes (by unit area) to the differences in pressure or concentration, respectively, that drive them through the vessel wall. On the other hand, the permeability coefficient is a central parameter introduced when modeling diffusible tracers transfer from blood vessels to tissue in the framework of compartmental models, in such a way that it is implicitly considered as being identical to the capillary permeability. Despite their simplifying assumptions, such models are at the basis of blood flow quantification by H2(15)O Positron Emission Tomgraphy. In the present paper, we use fluid dynamic modeling to compute the transfers of H2(15)O between the blood and brain parenchyma at capillary scale. The analysis of the so-obtained kinetic data by the Renkin-Crone model, the archetypal compartmental model, demonstrates that, in this framework, the permeability coefficient is highly dependent on both flow rate and capillary radius, contrarily to the central hypothesis of the model which states that it is a physiological constant. Thus, the permeability coefficient in Renkin-Crone׳s model is not conceptually identical to the physiologic permeability as implicitly stated in the model. If a permeability coefficient is nevertheless arbitrarily chosen in the computed range, the flow rate determined by the Renkin-Crone model can take highly inaccurate quantitative values. The reasons for this failure of compartmental approaches in the framework of brain blood flow quantification are discussed, highlighting the need for a novel approach enabling to fully exploit the wealth of information available from PET data. PMID:24637002

  8. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  9. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... movement problems a child has. What is spastic CP? Spastic means tight or stiff muscles, or muscles ...

  10. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  11. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  12. In-situ monitoring of flow-permeable surface area of high explosive powder using small sample masses

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Amitesh; Han, Yong; Zaka, Fowzia; Gee, Richard H.

    2015-02-17

    To ensure good performance of high explosive devices over long periods of time, initiating powders need to maintain their specific surface area within allowed margins during the entire duration of deployment. A common diagnostic used in this context is the Fisher sub-sieve surface area (FSSA). Furthermore, commercial permeametry instruments measuring the FSSA requires the utilization of a sample mass equal to the crystal density of the sample material, an amount that is often one or two orders of magnitude larger than the typical masses found in standard detonator applications. Here we develop a customization of the standard device that can utilize just tens of milligram samples, and with simple calibration yield FSSA values at ac curacy levels comparable to the standard apparatus. This necessitated a newly designed sample holder, made from a material of low coefficient of thermal expansion, which is conveniently transferred between an aging chamber and a re-designed permeametry tube. This improves the fidelity of accelerated aging studies by allowing measurement on the same physical sample at various time - instants during the aging process, and by obviating the need for a potentially FSSA-altering powder re-compaction step. We used the customized apparatus to monitor the FSSA evolution of a number of undoped and homolog-doped PETN powder samples that were subjected to artificial aging for several months at elevated temperatures. These results, in conjunction with an Arrhenius-based aging model were used to assess powder-coarsening - rates under long-term storage.

  13. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Palsy Information Page Clinical Trials Trial of Erythropoietin Neuroprotection ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Palsy? The term cerebral palsy refers to a group ...

  14. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  15. Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Identifiability of the Land Surface Model JULES at the point scale in permeable catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakopoulou, C.; Bulygina, N.; Butler, A. P.; McIntyre, N. R.

    2012-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are recognised as important components of Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Simulating exchanges of the moisture, carbon and energy between land surface and atmosphere in a consistent manner requires physics-based LSMs of high complexity, fine vertical resolution and a large number of parameters that need to be estimated. The "physics" that is incorporated in such models is generally based on our knowledge of point (or very small) scale hydrological processes. Therefore, while larger GCM grid-scale performance may be the ultimate goal, the ability of the model to simulate the point-scale processes is, intuitively, a pre-requisite for its reliable use at larger scales. Critical evaluation of model performance and parameter uncertainty at point scales is therefore a rational starting point for critical evaluation of LSMs; and identification of optimal parameter sets at the point scale is a significant stage of the model evaluation at larger scales. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is a complex LSM, which is used to represent surface exchanges in the UK Met Office's forecast and climate change models. This complexity necessitates a large number of model parameters (in total 108) some of which are incapable of being measured directly at large (i.e. kilometer) scales. For this reason, a parameter sensitivity analysis is a vital confidence building process within the framework of every LSM, and as a part of the calibration strategy. The problem of JULES parameter estimation and uncertainty at the point scale with a view to assessing the accuracy and the uncertainty in the default parameter values is addressed. The sensitivity of the JULES output of soil moisture is examined using parameter response surface analysis. The implemented technique is based on the Regional Sensitivity Analysis method (RSA), which evaluates the model response surface over a region of parameter space using Monte Carlo sampling. The modified version of RSA

  16. In-situ monitoring of flow-permeable surface area of high explosive powder using small sample masses

    DOE PAGES

    Maiti, Amitesh; Han, Yong; Zaka, Fowzia; Gee, Richard H.

    2015-02-17

    To ensure good performance of high explosive devices over long periods of time, initiating powders need to maintain their specific surface area within allowed margins during the entire duration of deployment. A common diagnostic used in this context is the Fisher sub-sieve surface area (FSSA). Furthermore, commercial permeametry instruments measuring the FSSA requires the utilization of a sample mass equal to the crystal density of the sample material, an amount that is often one or two orders of magnitude larger than the typical masses found in standard detonator applications. Here we develop a customization of the standard device that canmore » utilize just tens of milligram samples, and with simple calibration yield FSSA values at ac curacy levels comparable to the standard apparatus. This necessitated a newly designed sample holder, made from a material of low coefficient of thermal expansion, which is conveniently transferred between an aging chamber and a re-designed permeametry tube. This improves the fidelity of accelerated aging studies by allowing measurement on the same physical sample at various time - instants during the aging process, and by obviating the need for a potentially FSSA-altering powder re-compaction step. We used the customized apparatus to monitor the FSSA evolution of a number of undoped and homolog-doped PETN powder samples that were subjected to artificial aging for several months at elevated temperatures. These results, in conjunction with an Arrhenius-based aging model were used to assess powder-coarsening - rates under long-term storage.« less

  17. Incorporating surface indicators of reservoir permeability into reservoir volume calculations: Application to the Colli Albani caldera and the Central Italy Geothermal Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido; De Benedetti, Arnaldo Angelo; Bonamico, Andrea; Ramazzotti, Paolo; Mattei, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The Quaternary Roman Volcanic Province extends for over 200 km along the Tyrrhenian margin of the Italian peninsula and is composed of several caldera complexes with significant associated geothermal potential. In spite of the massive programs of explorations conducted by the then state-owned ENEL and AGIP companies between the 1970s and 1990s, and the identification of several high enthalpy fields, this resource remains so far unexploited, although it occurs right below the densely populated metropolitan area of Roma capital city. The main reason for this failure is that deep geothermal reservoirs are associated with fractured rocks, the secondary permeability of which has been difficult to predict making the identification of the most productive volumes of the reservoirs and the localisation of productive wells uncertain. As a consequence, almost half of the many exploration deep bore-holes drilled in the area reached a dry target. This work reviews available data and re-assesses the geothermal potential of caldera-related systems in Central Italy, by analysing in detail the case of the Colli Albani caldera system, the closest to Roma capital city. A GIS based approach identifies the most promising reservoir volumes for geothermal exploitation and uses an improved volume method approach for the evaluation of geothermal potential. The approach is based on a three dimensional matrix of georeferenced spatial data; the A axis accounts for the modelling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data; the B axis accounts for the thermal modelling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are necessary but not sufficient to identify rock volumes actually permeated by geothermal fluids in fractured reservoirs. We discuss the implementation of a C axis that evaluates all surface data indicating permeability in the reservoir and actual geothermal fluid circulation. We consider datasets on: i

  18. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  19. Adhesion of malignant mammary tumor cells MDA-MB-231 to microvessel wall increases microvascular permeability via degradation of endothelial surface glycocalyx

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of tumor cell adhesion on microvascular permeability (P) in intact microvessels, we measured the adhesion rate of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231, the hydraulic conductivity (Lp), the P, and reflection coefficient (σ) to albumin of the microvessels at the initial tumor cell adhesion and after ∼45 min cell perfusion in the postcapillary venules of rat mesentery in vivo. Rats (Sprague-Dawley, 250–300 g) were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium given subcutaneously. A midline incision was made in the abdominal wall, and the mesentery was gently taken out and arranged on the surface of a glass coverslip for the measurement. An individual postcapillary venule was perfused with cells at a rate of ∼1 mm/s, which is the mean blood flow velocity in this type of microvessels. At the initial tumor cell adhesion, which was defined as one adherent cell in ∼100- to 145-μm vessel segment, Lp was 1.5-fold and P was 2.3-fold of their controls, and σ decreased from 0.92 to 0.64; after ∼45-min perfusion, the adhesion increased to ∼5 adherent cells in ∼100- to 145-μm vessel segment, while Lp increased to 2.8-fold, P to 5.7-fold of their controls, and σ decreased from 0.92 to 0.42. Combining these measured data with the predictions from a mathematical model for the interendothelial transport suggests that tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall degrades the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) layer. This suggestion was confirmed by immunostaining of heparan sulfate of the ESG on the microvessel wall. Preserving of the ESG by a plasma glycoprotein orosomucoid decreased the P to albumin and reduced the tumor cell adhesion. PMID:22858626

  20. Effects of isoflurane, fentanyl, or thiopental anesthesia on regional cerebral blood flow and brain surface PO2 in the presence of a focal lesion in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Murr, R; Schürer, L; Berger, S; Enzenbach, R; Peter, K; Baethmann, A

    1993-11-01

    These studies were conducted to determine the effect of anesthetic drugs on tissue perfusion and O2 supply in the brain with focal cerebral edema. Using an open cranium preparation, we studied the effects of isoflurane (I; 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration), of fentanyl (F; 0.5-1 microgram.kg-1 x min-1), or of thiopental (T; 32.5 mg.kg-1 x h-1) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional brain tissue PO2 in albino rabbits (n = 6 per group) with a focal brain lesion (cold injury). The doses of anesthetics were sufficient to suppress nociception. rCBF (H2 clearance) and tissue PO2 (multiwire surface electrode) were studied adjacent to and distant from the lesion. Cerebral hyperemia developed immediately after trauma in all groups, although the flow increase did not attain statistical significance. rCBF was subsequently reduced by about 25% in the vicinity of the lesion. Distant from the trauma, a continuing hyperemia (+30%) was later observed in animals with isoflurane, whereas rCBF was decreased then by 10%-20% in animals with fentanyl, or was unchanged with thiopental. Brain tissue PO2 was increased with isoflurane in areas distant from the lesion, but decreased with fentanyl. However, with thiopental, the PO2 level had already been lowered before trauma with a subsequent tendency toward normalization. The heterogeneity of the tissue PO2 in fentanyl anesthesia, as well as the increased frequency of hypoxic PO2 values with thiopental, might have resulted from microcirculatory disturbances. Thus, although isoflurane seemed to facilitate hyperemia with an increased O2 supply to the brain, fentanyl tended to induce the opposite response. Although these properties suggest the potential to manipulate perfusion and O2 supply in cerebral ischemia or hyperemia after head injury, the effects of such measures on intracranial pressure, neurologic status, and outcome have yet to be proven.

  1. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wimalasundera, Neil; Stevenson, Valerie L

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral palsy has always been known as a disorder of movement and posture resulting from a non-progressive injury to the developing brain; however, more recent definitions allow clinicians to appreciate more than just the movement disorder. Accurate classification of cerebral palsy into distribution, motor type and functional level has advanced research. It also facilitates appropriate targeting of interventions to functional level and more accurate prognosis prediction. The prevalence of cerebral palsy remains fairly static at 2-3 per 1000 live births but there have been some changes in trends for specific causal groups. Interventions for cerebral palsy have historically been medical and physically focused, often with limited evidence to support their efficacy. The use of more appropriate outcome measures encompassing quality of life and participation is helping to deliver treatments which are more meaningful for people with cerebral palsy and their carers.

  2. Fluoxetine ameliorates cognitive impairments induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via down-regulation of HCN2 surface expression in the hippocampal CA1 area in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pan; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Lu, Yun; Chen, Cheng; Li, Changjun; Zhou, Mei; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Shen, Guanxin; Guo, Lianjun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes cognitive impairments and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways, yet the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), could play a neuroprotective role against chronic cerebral hypoperfusion injury and to clarify underlying mechanisms of its efficacy. Rats were subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO). Two weeks later, rats were treated with 30 mg/kg fluoxetine (intragastric injection, i.g.) for 6 weeks. Cognitive function was evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) and novel objects recognition (NOR) test. Long-term potentiation (LTP) was used to address the underlying synaptic mechanisms. Western blotting was used to quantify the protein levels. Our results showed that fluoxetine treatment significantly improved the cognitive impairments caused by 2VO, accompanied with a reversion of 2VO-induced inhibitory of LTP. Furthermore, 2VO caused an up-regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 (HCN2) surface expressions in the hippocampal CA1 area and fluoxetine also effectively recovered the disorder of HCN2 surface expressions, which may be a possible mechanism that fluoxetine treatment ameliorates cognitive impairments in rats with CCH. PMID:26549214

  3. Stress does not increase blood-brain barrier permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Roszkowski, Martin; Bohacek, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have reported that exposure to acute psychophysiological stressors can lead to an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability, but these findings remain controversial and disputed. We thoroughly examined this issue by assessing the effect of several well-established paradigms of acute stress and chronic stress on blood-brain barrier permeability in several brain areas of adult mice. Using cerebral extraction ratio for the small molecule tracer sodium fluorescein (NaF, 376 Da) as a sensitive measure of blood-brain barrier permeability, we find that neither acute swim nor restraint stress lead to increased cerebral extraction ratio. Daily 6-h restraint stress for 21 days, a model for the severe detrimental impact of chronic stress on brain function, also does not alter cerebral extraction ratio. In contrast, we find that cold forced swim and cold restraint stress both lead to a transient, pronounced decrease of cerebral extraction ratio in hippocampus and cortex, suggesting that body temperature can be an important confounding factor in studies of blood-brain barrier permeability. To additionally assess if stress could change blood-brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, we measured cerebral extraction ratio for fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (70 kDa). We find that neither acute restraint nor cold swim stress affected blood-brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, thus corroborating our findings that various stressors do not increase blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:27146513

  4. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-07

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging.

  5. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  6. Enhanced In Vitro Biocompatibility of Chemically Modified Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Surfaces for Stable Adhesion and Long-term Investigation of Brain Cerebral Cortex Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuddannaya, Shreyas; Bao, Jingnan; Zhang, Yilei

    2015-11-18

    Studies on the mammalian brain cerebral cortex have gained increasing importance due to the relevance of the region in controlling critical higher brain functions. Interactions between the cortical cells and surface extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins play a pivotal role in promoting stable cell adhesion, growth, and function. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) based platforms have been increasingly used for on-chip in vitro cellular system analysis. However, the inherent hydrophobicity of the PDMS surface has been unfavorable for any long-term cell system investigations due to transitory physical adsorption of ECM proteins on PDMS surfaces followed by eventual cell dislodgement due to poor anchorage and viability. To address this critical issue, we employed the (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) based cross-linking strategy to stabilize ECM protein immobilization on PDMS. The efficiency of surface modification in supporting adhesion and long-term viability of neuronal and glial cells was analyzed. The chemically modified surfaces showed a relatively higher cell survival with an increased neurite length and neurite branching. These changes were understood in terms of an increase in surface hydrophilicity, protein stability, and cell-ECM protein interactions. The modification strategy could be successfully applied for stable cortical cell culture on the PDMS microchip for up to 3 weeks in vitro. PMID:26506436

  7. Systematization, description, and territory of the caudal cerebral artery in surface of the brain of the ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Nazer, Manoel; Campos, Rui

    2014-08-01

    Brain specimens from 30 ostriches were injected with red-dyed latex via the internal carotid arteries, and the caudal cerebral arteries and their branches were systematically described. On the right side, the caudal cerebral artery was double-, triple-, quadruple-, and single-branched in 73.5%, 23.3%, 3.3%, and 3.3% of cases, respectively; on the left side, it was double-, triple-, quadruple-, and single-branched in 76.7%, 20%, 3.3%, and 3.3% of cases, respectively. The dorsal tectal mesencephalic artery appeared as a single vessel in 96.7% of cases, emerging as a collateral branch of the caudal cerebral artery. The dorsal mesencephalic tectal artery originated from the right dorsal cerebellar artery in 40% of cases and from the left side in 63.3% of cases. On the right side, there were four and three medial occipital hemispheric branches in 46.7% and 20% of cases, respectively; on the left side, there were four and three branches in 30% and 26.7% of cases. On the right side, the pineal artery was double-, single-, triple-, and quadruple-branched in 50%, 23.3%, 20%, and 6.7% of cases, respectively; on the left side, this artery was double-, single-, triple-, and quadruple-branched in 50%, 23.3%, 16.7%, and 10% of cases, respectively. The diencephalic artery was on the right side in 43.3% of cases and on the left side in 56.7% of cases. The interhemispheric artery was on the right side in 56.7% of cases and on the left side in 43.3% of cases; four, three, two, five, and one dorsal hemispheric trunks branched off of the interhemispheric artery in 40%, 40%, 10%, 6.7%, and 26.7% of cases, respectively. The caudal cerebral artery was classified as Type I in 56.7% of cases (subtype IA in 33.3% of cases and IB in 23.3% of cases), Type II in 40% of cases (subtype IIA in 20% of cases and IIB in 20% of cases), and Type III in 3.3% of cases. PMID:24890607

  8. Systematization, description, and territory of the caudal cerebral artery in surface of the brain of the ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Nazer, Manoel; Campos, Rui

    2014-08-01

    Brain specimens from 30 ostriches were injected with red-dyed latex via the internal carotid arteries, and the caudal cerebral arteries and their branches were systematically described. On the right side, the caudal cerebral artery was double-, triple-, quadruple-, and single-branched in 73.5%, 23.3%, 3.3%, and 3.3% of cases, respectively; on the left side, it was double-, triple-, quadruple-, and single-branched in 76.7%, 20%, 3.3%, and 3.3% of cases, respectively. The dorsal tectal mesencephalic artery appeared as a single vessel in 96.7% of cases, emerging as a collateral branch of the caudal cerebral artery. The dorsal mesencephalic tectal artery originated from the right dorsal cerebellar artery in 40% of cases and from the left side in 63.3% of cases. On the right side, there were four and three medial occipital hemispheric branches in 46.7% and 20% of cases, respectively; on the left side, there were four and three branches in 30% and 26.7% of cases. On the right side, the pineal artery was double-, single-, triple-, and quadruple-branched in 50%, 23.3%, 20%, and 6.7% of cases, respectively; on the left side, this artery was double-, single-, triple-, and quadruple-branched in 50%, 23.3%, 16.7%, and 10% of cases, respectively. The diencephalic artery was on the right side in 43.3% of cases and on the left side in 56.7% of cases. The interhemispheric artery was on the right side in 56.7% of cases and on the left side in 43.3% of cases; four, three, two, five, and one dorsal hemispheric trunks branched off of the interhemispheric artery in 40%, 40%, 10%, 6.7%, and 26.7% of cases, respectively. The caudal cerebral artery was classified as Type I in 56.7% of cases (subtype IA in 33.3% of cases and IB in 23.3% of cases), Type II in 40% of cases (subtype IIA in 20% of cases and IIB in 20% of cases), and Type III in 3.3% of cases.

  9. Permeability relation for periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Dunn, K J; LaTorraca, G A; Bergman, D J

    1998-01-01

    The permeability relation for periodic porous media is studied with respect to other petrophysical parameters such as formation factor, porosity, surface-to-volume ratio, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time. All these quantities were computed for periodic structures of simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic arrays of touching and overlapping spheres. The formation factors were calculated by using a method which is based on a Fourier-space representation of an integral equation for the electric potential in a two-component composite. The nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time for the case where surface-enchanced relaxation plays a dominant role is known to be V P/rho S (VP is the pore volume, S is the pore surface, is the surface relaxation strength) when rho is not too large. Previously calculated permeabilities for these structures from the literature were used for correlation studies with other petrophysical parameters. Various correlation schemes among these quantities, such as k = aTbFc, and k = aTb phi c, were investigated, where k is permeability, T is the NMR relaxation time, phi is the porosity, and F is the formation factor. PMID:9803908

  10. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with pain and spasticity Place feeding tubes Release joint contractures ... the hip joint Injuries from falls Pressure sores Joint ... of the people who are affected by cerebral palsy) Social stigma

  11. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  12. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  13. Cerebral hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... death. Treatment depends on the cause of the hypoxia. Basic life support is most important. Treatment involves: Breathing ... Complications of cerebral hypoxia include a prolonged vegetative ... sleep-wake cycle, and eye opening, but the person is not alert ...

  14. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  15. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan. PMID:1095292

  16. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability.

  17. Permeable membrane experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Thomas J.; Cao, Tuan Q.; Kliss, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Permeable Membrane Experiment is to gather flight data on three areas of membrane performance that are influenced by the presence of gravity. These areas are: (1) Liquid/gas phase separation, (2) gas bubble interference with diffusion through porous membranes and (3) wetting characteristics of hydrophilic membrane surfaces. These data are important in understaning the behavior of membrane/liquid/gas interfaces where surface tension forces predominate. The data will be compared with 1-g data already obtained and with predicted micrograviity behavior. The data will be used to develop designs for phase separation and plant nutrient delivery systems and will be available to the life support community for use in developing technologies which employ membranes. A conceptual design has been developed to conduct three membrane experiments, in sequence, aboard a single Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) carrier to be carried in the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. One experiment is conducted for each of the three membrane performance areas under study. These experiments are discussed in this paper.

  18. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  19. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  20. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-01

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention.

  1. Relationship between in vitro transendothelial permeability and in vivo single-pass brain extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Pirro, J.P.; Di Rocco, R.J.; Narra, R.K.

    1994-09-01

    In vitro transendothelial permeability was compared to in vivo rat single-pass cerebral extractions to evaluate which method would best estimate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of several SPECT imaging agents. Six {sup 99m}Tc complexes and seven non-Tc complexes were tested in vitro using monolayers of primary bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells and in vivo using the rat single-pass cerebral extraction model. In vitro transendothelial permeability indices (PI) were determined by measuring the average percent of radioactivity traversing the monolayers as a function of time. In vivo single-pass cerebral extractions were determined using an indicator fractionation method. A positive correlation between extraction and PI was found for the non-TC complexes (r{sup 2} = 0.96). The CBF imaging agents {sup 99m}Tc-ECD and {sup 99m}Tc-PnAO have high values for E and PI, demonstrating that these agents penetrate the BBB and have a high membrane permeability, while the heart imaging agent {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi had low values for both E and PI. The low PI and E values for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi are consistent with a low brain uptake for this agent, except in cases of disruption of the BBB. In contrast to {sup 99m}Tc-ECD, {sup 99m}Tc-PnAO and {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, which had concordant values for E and PI, two highly lipophilic boronic acid adducts of technetium dioxime (BATOs), {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime and {sup 99m}Tc-ECD, {sup 99m}Tc-Cl(DMG){sub 3}2MP, had low negative values for PI, but high values for E. In addition, after 3 hr of incubation, the monolayer-to-medium concentration ratio of the BATOs was 642:1 and 744:1, respectively. This compares with values of 89:1 ({sup 99m}Tc-PnAO), 25:1 ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) and 34:1 ({sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi). These data suggest that the high in vivo single-pass extraction of the BATOs may be explained by a hydrophobic interaction with the luminal surface of the capillary endothelial cell plasma membrane.

  2. Fluid permeability of deformable fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of defining the fracture permeability tensor for each grid lock in a rock mass from maps of natural fractures. For this purpose they implement a statistical model of cracked rock due to M. Oda [1985], where the permeability tensor is related to the crack geometry via a volume average of the contribution from each crack in the population. In this model tectonic stress is implicitly coupled to fluid flow through an assumed relationship between crack aperture and normal stress across the crack. The authors have included the following enhancements to the basic model: (1) a realistic model of crack closure under stress has been added along with the provision to apply tectonic stresses to the fracture system in any orientation, the application of stress results in fracture closure and consequently a reduction in permeability; (2) the fracture permeability can be superimposed onto an arbitrary anisotropic matrix permeability; (3) the fracture surfaces are allowed to slide under the application of shear stress, causing fractures to dilate and result in a permeability increase. Through an example, the authors demonstrate that significant changes in permeability magnitudes and orientations are possible when tectonic stress is applied to a fracture system.

  3. Permeability of edible coatings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Khatkar, B S; Garg, M K; Wilson, L A

    2010-01-01

    The permeabilities of water vapour, O2 and CO2 were determined for 18 coating formulations. Water vapour transmission rate ranged from 98.8 g/m(2).day (6% beeswax) to 758.0 g/m(2).day (1.5% carboxymethyl cellulose with glycerol). O2 permeability at 14 ± 1°C and 55 ± 5% RH ranged from 1.50 to 7.95 cm(3)cm cm(-2)s(-1)Pa(-1), with CO2 permeability 2 to 6 times as high. Permeability to noncondensable gases (O2 and CO2) was higher for hydrophobic (peanut oil followed by beeswax) coatings as compared to hydrophilic (whey protein concentrate and carboxymethyl cellulose).

  4. Use of semi-permeable membrane devices and solid-phase extraction for the wide-range screening of microcontaminants in surface water by GC-AED/MS.

    PubMed

    van Stee, Leo L P; Leonards, Pim E G; van Loon, Willem M G M; Hendriks, A Jan; Maas, Johanna L; Struijs, Jaap; Brinkman, Udo A Th

    2002-11-01

    An automated GC-MS-based screening method was developed for over 400 industrial, agrochemical and household chemicals. Extracted ion chromatograms were used and the method was aimed at creating a minimum number of false positives. The compound polarity range usually associated with solid-phase extraction was extended to include very apolar, bioaccumulative, compounds by using the complementary semi-permeable membrane device technique. Real-life samples were taken at four locations in the main Dutch river systems and one in an agricultural area. Some 150 compounds were detected in the low-ng/l to low-microg/l range. Next to the target compounds, several brominated and chlorinated non-target compounds were detected by means of GC with atomic emission detection and tentatively identified using mass spectral library searching.

  5. Brine network structural metamorphosis and sea ice bottom layer permeability change induced by sea water penetration under a surface pressure field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Sea ice presents two roughness scales: one in the millimetre range and the other up to several meters due to ridging. The larger roughness elements are the result of compression and sheer, causing ice blocks to pile up and down at the line of contact between converging ice floes. In terms of boundary limit dynamic, they create obstacles that induce, in their wake, a pressure gradient at the ice water interface. Sea ice is a porous medium and as such, is permeable when subject to pressure gradients. Models have shown that, at spring, when ice permeability increases, sea water can be forced through the ice water interface into the bottom ice layer while brine is pumped out of it under obstacle induced pressure gradients. These results suggest that ice ocean heat budgets have to include a porous flow component and its associated latent heat import/export caused by through volume melting/thawing inside the bottom ice layer subject to sea water infiltration. With the initiation of a melt/thaw dynamic within the porous bottom ice layer, the porous network restructures. Our research show an enlargement of the larger brine channels while smaller ones close due ice growth. Similarly, ice volume of smaller cross size tend to disappear while larger ones evolve slowly. As heat fluxes due to latent heat exchanges become several orders of magnitude larger than any other exterior forcing, such as radiation, heat budgets within ice individual volumes balance fluxes in and out caused by melting/thaw on channel walls. Our simulations were run from an early spring C shape temperature profile to an isothermal state showing that structural change becomes significant only after the temperature profile becomes positive upward.

  6. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults.

  7. Surface-Based fMRI-Driven Diffusion Tractography in the Presence of Significant Brain Pathology: A Study Linking Structure and Function in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Cunnington, Ross; Boyd, Roslyn N.; Rose, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography analyses are difficult to perform in the presence of brain pathology. Automated methods that rely on cortical parcellation for structural connectivity studies often fail, while manually defining regions is extremely time consuming and can introduce human error. Both methods also make assumptions about structure-function relationships that may not hold after cortical reorganisation. Seeding tractography with functional-MRI (fMRI) activation is an emerging method that reduces these confounds, but inherent smoothing of fMRI signal may result in the inclusion of irrelevant pathways. This paper describes a novel fMRI-seeded dMRI-analysis pipeline based on surface-meshes that reduces these issues and utilises machine-learning to generate task specific white matter pathways, minimising the requirement for manually-drawn ROIs. We directly compared this new strategy to a standard voxelwise fMRI-dMRI approach, by investigating correlations between clinical scores and dMRI metrics of thalamocortical and corticomotor tracts in 31 children with unilateral cerebral palsy. The surface-based approach successfully processed more participants (87%) than the voxel-based approach (65%), and provided significantly more-coherent tractography. Significant correlations between dMRI metrics and five clinical scores of function were found for the more superior regions of these tracts. These significant correlations were stronger and more frequently found with the surface-based method (15/20 investigated were significant; R2 = 0.43–0.73) than the voxelwise analysis (2 sig. correlations; 0.38 & 0.49). More restricted fMRI signal, better-constrained tractography, and the novel track-classification method all appeared to contribute toward these differences. PMID:27487011

  8. Surface-Based fMRI-Driven Diffusion Tractography in the Presence of Significant Brain Pathology: A Study Linking Structure and Function in Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lee B; Cunnington, Ross; Boyd, Roslyn N; Rose, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography analyses are difficult to perform in the presence of brain pathology. Automated methods that rely on cortical parcellation for structural connectivity studies often fail, while manually defining regions is extremely time consuming and can introduce human error. Both methods also make assumptions about structure-function relationships that may not hold after cortical reorganisation. Seeding tractography with functional-MRI (fMRI) activation is an emerging method that reduces these confounds, but inherent smoothing of fMRI signal may result in the inclusion of irrelevant pathways. This paper describes a novel fMRI-seeded dMRI-analysis pipeline based on surface-meshes that reduces these issues and utilises machine-learning to generate task specific white matter pathways, minimising the requirement for manually-drawn ROIs. We directly compared this new strategy to a standard voxelwise fMRI-dMRI approach, by investigating correlations between clinical scores and dMRI metrics of thalamocortical and corticomotor tracts in 31 children with unilateral cerebral palsy. The surface-based approach successfully processed more participants (87%) than the voxel-based approach (65%), and provided significantly more-coherent tractography. Significant correlations between dMRI metrics and five clinical scores of function were found for the more superior regions of these tracts. These significant correlations were stronger and more frequently found with the surface-based method (15/20 investigated were significant; R2 = 0.43-0.73) than the voxelwise analysis (2 sig. correlations; 0.38 & 0.49). More restricted fMRI signal, better-constrained tractography, and the novel track-classification method all appeared to contribute toward these differences. PMID:27487011

  9. Studies on water transport through the sweet cherry fruit surface. 11. FeCl3 decreases water permeability of polar pathways.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Holger; Knoche, Moritz

    2006-08-23

    The effect of FeCl3 (10 mM) on osmotic water uptake into detached sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium L.) and on the (3)H2O permeability (P(d)) of excised exocarp segments (ES) or enzymatically isolated cuticular membranes (CM) was investigated. ES or CM were mounted in an infinite dose diffusion system, where diffusion is monitored from a dilute donor solution through an interfacing ES or CM into a receiver solution under quasi steady-state conditions. In the absence of FeCl3, (3)H2O diffusion through stomatous ES was linear over time, indicating that P(d) was constant. Adding FeCl3 to the donor decreased P(d) by about 60%. P(d) remained at a decreased level when replacing the FeCl3 donor again by deionized water. The decrease in P(d) was positively and linearly related to the stomatal density of the ES. There was no effect of FeCl3 on the P(d) of astomatous sweet cherry fruit ES or CM regardless of the presence of wax (epicuticular or cuticular). FeCl3 decreased P(d) when added to the donor (-63%) or receiver (-16%), but there was no effect when it was added to donor and receiver solutions simultaneously. The decrease in P(d) depended on the pH of the receiver and the presence of citrate buffer. There was no effect of FeCl3 with citrate buffer as a receiver regardless of pH (range 2.0-6.0). When using nonbuffered receiver solutions with pH adjusted to pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.5, or 6.0, FeCl3 markedly decreased (3)H2O diffusion at pH > or = 3 but had no effect at pH 2.0. FeCl3 increased the energy of activation (E(a)) for (3)H2O diffusion (range 15-45 degrees C) through stomatous ES but had no significant effect in astomatous CM. The increase in E(a) by FeCl3 was positively related to stomatal density. FeCl3 decreased the P(d) for 2-(1-naphthyl)[1-(14)C]acetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-dichloro[U-(14)C]phenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in stomatous ES. The magnitude of the effect depended on the degree of dissociation and was larger for the dissociated acids (pH 6.2) than for the

  10. Studies on water transport through the sweet cherry fruit surface. 11. FeCl3 decreases water permeability of polar pathways.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Holger; Knoche, Moritz

    2006-08-23

    The effect of FeCl3 (10 mM) on osmotic water uptake into detached sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium L.) and on the (3)H2O permeability (P(d)) of excised exocarp segments (ES) or enzymatically isolated cuticular membranes (CM) was investigated. ES or CM were mounted in an infinite dose diffusion system, where diffusion is monitored from a dilute donor solution through an interfacing ES or CM into a receiver solution under quasi steady-state conditions. In the absence of FeCl3, (3)H2O diffusion through stomatous ES was linear over time, indicating that P(d) was constant. Adding FeCl3 to the donor decreased P(d) by about 60%. P(d) remained at a decreased level when replacing the FeCl3 donor again by deionized water. The decrease in P(d) was positively and linearly related to the stomatal density of the ES. There was no effect of FeCl3 on the P(d) of astomatous sweet cherry fruit ES or CM regardless of the presence of wax (epicuticular or cuticular). FeCl3 decreased P(d) when added to the donor (-63%) or receiver (-16%), but there was no effect when it was added to donor and receiver solutions simultaneously. The decrease in P(d) depended on the pH of the receiver and the presence of citrate buffer. There was no effect of FeCl3 with citrate buffer as a receiver regardless of pH (range 2.0-6.0). When using nonbuffered receiver solutions with pH adjusted to pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.5, or 6.0, FeCl3 markedly decreased (3)H2O diffusion at pH > or = 3 but had no effect at pH 2.0. FeCl3 increased the energy of activation (E(a)) for (3)H2O diffusion (range 15-45 degrees C) through stomatous ES but had no significant effect in astomatous CM. The increase in E(a) by FeCl3 was positively related to stomatal density. FeCl3 decreased the P(d) for 2-(1-naphthyl)[1-(14)C]acetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-dichloro[U-(14)C]phenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in stomatous ES. The magnitude of the effect depended on the degree of dissociation and was larger for the dissociated acids (pH 6.2) than for the

  11. Nanochannel flow past permeable walls via molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian-Fei; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The nanochannel flow past permeable walls with nanopores is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, including the density distribution, velocity field, molecular penetration mechanism and surface friction coefficient. A low density distribution has been found at the gas-wall interface demonstrating the low pressure region. In addition, there exists a jump of the gas density on the permeable surface, which indicates the discontinuity of the density distribution across the permeable surface. On the other hand, the nanoscale vortices are observed in nanopores of the permeable wall, and the reduced mass flux of the flow in nanopores results in a shifted hydrodynamic boundary above the permeable surface. Particularly the slip length of the gas flow on the permeable surface is pronounced a non-linear function of the molecular mean free path, which produces a large value of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) and a big portion of the diffusive refection. Moreover, the gas-gas interaction and multi-collision among gas molecules may take place in nanopores, which contribute to large values of TMAC. Consequently the boundary friction coefficient on the permeable surface is increased because of the energy dissipation consumed by the nanoscale vortices in nanopores. The molecular boundary condition provides us with a new picture of the nanochannel flow past the permeable wall with nanopores.

  12. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  13. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  14. Blood flow and permeability in microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara-Seki, Masako; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2005-07-01

    The mechanics of blood flow in microvessels and microvessel permeability are reviewed. In the first part, characteristics of blood flow in vivo and in vitro are described from a fluid-mechanical point of view, and mathematical models for blood flow in microvessels are presented. Possible causes of the increased flow resistance obtained in vivo compared to in vitro are examined, including the effects of irregularities of vessel lumen, the presence of endothelial surface glycocalyx and white blood cells. In the second part, the ultrastructural pathways and mechanisms whereby endothelial cells and the clefts between the cells modulate microvessel permeability to water and solutes are introduced. Previous and current models for microvessel permeability to water and solutes are reviewed. These models examine the role of structural components of interendothelial cleft, such as junction strands and surface glycocalyx, in the determination of water and solute transport across the microvessel walls. Transport models in the tissue space surrounding the microvessel are also described.

  15. Mechanism of dexamethasone suppression of brain tumor-associated vascular permeability in rats. Involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor and vascular permeability factor.

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, J D; Papavassiliou, E; Merrill, M J; Nieman, L; Knightly, J J; Walbridge, S; Edwards, N A; Oldfield, E H

    1996-01-01

    Brain tumor-associated cerebral edema arises because tumor capillaries lack normal blood-brain barrier function; vascular permeability factor (VPF, also known as vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) is a likely mediator of this phenomenon. Clinically, dexamethasone reduces brain tumor-associated vascular permeability through poorly understood mechanisms. Our goals were to determine if suppression of permeability by dexamethasone might involve inhibition of VPF action or expression, and if dexamethasone effects in this setting are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In two rat models of permeability (peripheral vascular permeability induced by intradermal injection of 9L glioma cell-conditioned medium or purified VPF, and intracerebral vascular permeability induced by implanted 9L glioma), dexamethasone suppressed permeability in a dose-dependent manner. Since 80% of the permeability-inducing activity in 9L-conditioned medium was removed by anti-VPF antibodies, we examined dexamethasone effects of VPF expression in 9L cells. Dexamethasone inhibited FCS- and PDGF-dependent induction of VPF expression. At all levels (intradermal, intracranial, and cell culture), dexamethasone effects were reversed by the GR antagonist mifepristone (RU486). Dexamethasone may decrease brain tumor-associated vascular permeability by two GR-dependent mechanisms: reduction of the response of the vasculature to tumor-derived permeability factors (including VPF), and reduction of VPF expression by tumor cells. PMID:8823305

  16. Cerebral Microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Bethany; Kalanuria, Atul; Kumar, Monisha; Burke, Kathryn; Balu, Ramani; Amendolia, Olivia; McNulty, Kyle; Marion, BethAnn; Beckmann, Brittany; Ciocco, Lauren; Miller, Kimberly; Schuele, Donnamarie; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Frangos, Suzanne; Wright, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    A variety of neuromonitoring techniques are available to aid in the care of neurocritically ill patients. However, traditional monitors lack the ability to measure brain biochemistry and may provide inadequate warning of potentially reversible deleterious conditions. Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) is a safe, novel method of monitoring regional brain biochemistry. Analysis of CMD analytes as part of a multimodal approach may help inform clinical decision making, guide medical treatments, and aid in prognostication of patient outcome. Its use is most frequently documented in traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Incorporating CMD into clinical practice is a multidisciplinary effort.

  17. The Permeable Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandy, Leo R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the concept of permeability as knowledge flow into and out of the classroom and applies it to three college courses taught by the author at Plymouth State College (New Hampshire). Experiential knowledge comes into the classroom through interviews, guest speakers, and panel presentations, and flows out through service-learning students…

  18. Reduced hydrogen permeability at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Klopp, W. D.; Misencik, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    CO and CO2 reduce hydrogen loss through iron, nickel, and cobalt based alloy tubes. Method is based on concept that oxide film on metal surface reduces hydrogen permeability through metal; adding CO or CO2 forms oxide films continuously during operation, and hydrogen containment is improved. Innovation enhances prospects for Stirling engine system utilization.

  19. Scales of rock permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, Y.; Gavrilenko, P.; Le Ravalec, M.

    1996-05-01

    Permeability is a transport property which is currently measured in Darcy units. Although this unit is very convenient for most purposes, its use prevents from recognizing that permeability has units of length squared. Physically, the square root of permeability can thus be seen as a characteristic length or a characteristic pore size. At the laboratory scale, the identification of this characteristic length is a good example of how experimental measurements and theoretical modelling can be integrated. Three distinct identifications are of current use, relying on three different techniques: image analysis of thin sections, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. In each case, one or several theoretical models allow us to derive permeability from the experimental data (equivalent channel models, statistical models, effective media models, percolation and network models). Permeability varies with pressure and temperature and this is a decisive point for any extrapolation to crustal conditions. As far as pressure is concerned, most of the effect is due to cracks and a model which does not incorporate this fact will miss its goal. Temperature induced modifications can be the result of several processes: thermal cracking (due to thermal expansion mismatch and anisotropy, or to fluid pressure build up), and pressure solution are the two main ones. Experimental data on pressure and temperature effects are difficult to obtain but they are urgently needed. Finally, an important issue is: up to which point are these small scale data and models relevant when considering formations at the oil reservoir scale, or at the crust scale? At larger scales the identification of the characteristic scale is also a major goal which is examined.

  20. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  1. Permeability reduction in granite under hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of impermeable fault seals between earthquake events is a feature of many models of earthquake generation, suggesting that earthquake recurrence may depend in part on the rate of permeability reduction of fault zone materials under hydrothermal conditions. In this study, permeability measurements were conducted on intact, fractured, and gouge-bearing Westerly granite at an effective pressure of 50 MPa and at temperatures from 150?? to 500??C, simulating conditions in the earthquake-generating portions of fault zones. Pore fluids were cycled back and forth under a 2 MPa pressure differential for periods of up to 40 days. Permeability of the granite decreased with time t, following the exponential relation k = c(10-rt). For intact samples run between 250?? and 500??C the time constant for permeability decrease r was proportional to temperature and ranged between 0.001 and 0.1 days-1 (i.e., between 0.4 and 40 decades year-1 loss of permeability). Values of r for the lower-temperature experiments differed little from the 250??C runs. In contrast, prefractured samples showed higher rates of permeability decrease at a given temperature. The surfaces of the fractured samples showed evidence of dissolution and mineral growth that increased in abundance with both temperature and time. The experimentally grown mineral assemblages varied with temperature and were consistent with a rock-dominated hydrothermal system. As such mineral deposits progressively seal the fractured samples, their rates of permeability decrease approach the rates for intact rocks at the same temperature. These results place constraints on models of precipitation sealing and suggest that fault rocks may seal at a rate consistent with earthquake recurrence intervals of typical fault zones.

  2. Cerebral Vascular Control and Metabolism in Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Bain, Anthony R; Nybo, Lars; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-07-01

    This review provides an in-depth update on the impact of heat stress on cerebrovascular functioning. The regulation of cerebral temperature, blood flow, and metabolism are discussed. We further provide an overview of vascular permeability, the neurocognitive changes, and the key clinical implications and pathologies known to confound cerebral functioning during hyperthermia. A reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), derived primarily from a respiratory-induced alkalosis, underscores the cerebrovascular changes to hyperthermia. Arterial pressures may also become compromised because of reduced peripheral resistance secondary to skin vasodilatation. Therefore, when hyperthermia is combined with conditions that increase cardiovascular strain, for example, orthostasis or dehydration, the inability to preserve cerebral perfusion pressure further reduces CBF. A reduced cerebral perfusion pressure is in turn the primary mechanism for impaired tolerance to orthostatic challenges. Any reduction in CBF attenuates the brain's convective heat loss, while the hyperthermic-induced increase in metabolic rate increases the cerebral heat gain. This paradoxical uncoupling of CBF to metabolism increases brain temperature, and potentiates a condition whereby cerebral oxygenation may be compromised. With levels of experimentally viable passive hyperthermia (up to 39.5-40.0 °C core temperature), the associated reduction in CBF (∼ 30%) and increase in cerebral metabolic demand (∼ 10%) is likely compensated by increases in cerebral oxygen extraction. However, severe increases in whole-body and brain temperature may increase blood-brain barrier permeability, potentially leading to cerebral vasogenic edema. The cerebrovascular challenges associated with hyperthermia are of paramount importance for populations with compromised thermoregulatory control--for example, spinal cord injury, elderly, and those with preexisting cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26140721

  3. [Venoruton and capillary permeability].

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Laurora, G; Gabini, M; Errichi, B M; Candiani, C; Belcaro, G

    1989-05-01

    A new system to evaluate capillary permeability, the vacuum suction chamber (VSC) device, was used to assess the effects of Venoruton in patients with venous hypertension. A temporary, superficial skin lesion (wheal) was produced with the VSC device by negative pressure (30 mmHg) applied for 10 minutes on the internal, perimalleolar region. Wheals disappear in less than 60 minutes in normals while in patients with venous hypertension the wheal is more persistent, requiring a significantly longer time to disappear. This new technique was used in association with laser-Doppler flowmetry to evaluate the efficacy of Venoruton (1000 mgs t.i.d.) administered for 2 weeks on venous hypertension. Results indicate a positive effect of Venoruton in reducing the abnormally increased capillary permeability in venous hypertension and are proportional to the changes observed in signs and symptoms after treatment.

  4. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations. PMID:18422084

  5. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil and surface marine sediment near Jubany Station (Antarctica). Role of permafrost as a low-permeability barrier.

    PubMed

    Curtosi, Antonio; Pelletier, Emilien; Vodopivez, Cristian L; Mac Cormack, Walter P

    2007-09-20

    Although Antarctica is still considered as one of the most pristine areas of the world, the growing tourist and fisheries activities as well as scientific operations and their related logistic support are responsible for an increasing level of pollutants in this fragile environment. Soils and coastal sediments are significantly affected near scientific stations particularly by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this work sediment and soil were sampled in two consecutive summer Antarctic expeditions at Potter Cove and peninsula, in the vicinity of Jubany Station (South Shetland Islands). Two- and 3-ring PAHs (methylnaphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene and anthracene) were the main compounds found in most sites, although total PAH concentrations showed relatively low levels compared with other human-impacted areas in Antarctica. Pattern distribution of PAHs observed in samples suggested that low-temperature combustion processes such as diesel motor combustion and open-field garbage burning are the main sources of these compounds. An increase in PAH concentrations was observed from surface to depth into the active soil layer except for a unique sampling site where a fuel spill had been recently reported and where an inverted PAH concentration gradient was observed. The highest level was detected in the upper layer of permafrost followed by a sharp decrease in depth, showing this layer is acting as a barrier for downward PAH migration. When PAH levels in soil from both sampling programs were compared a significant decrease (p<0.01) was observed in summer 2005 (range at 75-cm depth: 12+/-1-153+/-22 ng/g) compared to summer 2004 (range at 75-cm depth: 162+/-15-1182+/-113 ng/g) whereas concentrations in surface sediment collected nearby the station PAHs increased drastically in 2005 (range: 36+/-3-1908+/-114 ng/g) compared to 2004 (range: 28+/-3-312+/-24 ng/g). Precipitation regime and water run off suggest that an important wash out of soil-PAHs occurred during

  7. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  8. Permeability-porosity relationships in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1994-01-01

    In many consolidated sandstone and carbonate formations, plots of core data show that the logarithm of permeability (k) is often linearly proportional to porosity (??). The slope, intercept, and degree of scatter of these log(k)-?? trends vary from formation to formation, and these variations are attributed to differences in initial grain size and sorting, diagenetic history, and compaction history. In unconsolidated sands, better sorting systematically increases both permeability and porosity. In sands and sandstones, an increase in gravel and coarse grain size content causes k to increase even while decreasing ??. Diagenetic minerals in the pore space of sandstones, such as cement and some clay types, tend to decrease log(k) proportionately as ?? decreases. Models to predict permeability from porosity and other measurable rock parameters fall into three classes based on either grain, surface area, or pore dimension considerations. (Models that directly incorporate well log measurements but have no particular theoretical underpinnings from a fourth class.) Grain-based models show permeability proportional to the square of grain size times porosity raised to (roughly) the fifth power, with grain sorting as an additional parameter. Surface-area models show permeability proportional to the inverse square of pore surface area times porosity raised to (roughly) the fourth power; measures of surface area include irreducible water saturation and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pore-dimension models show permeability proportional to the square of a pore dimension times porosity raised to a power of (roughly) two and produce curves of constant pore size that transgress the linear data trends on a log(k)-?? plot. The pore dimension is obtained from mercury injection measurements and is interpreted as the pore opening size of some interconnected fraction of the pore system. The linear log(k)-?? data trends cut the curves of constant pore size from the pore-dimension models

  9. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Additional Content Medical News Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations By James E. Wilberger, MD, Derrick A. Dupre, ... a direct, strong blow to the head. Cerebral lacerations are tears in brain tissue, caused by a ...

  10. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... area within the vessel wall. If a cerebral (brain) aneurysm ruptures, the escaping blood within the brain may cause severe neurologic complications or death. A person who has a ruptured cerebral aneurysm may complain of the sudden onset of "the ...

  11. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter . United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  12. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  13. Crucial Role of Rapgef2 and Rapgef6, a Family of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors for Rap1 Small GTPase, in Formation of Apical Surface Adherens Junctions and Neural Progenitor Development in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Maeta, Kazuhiro; Edamatsu, Hironori; Nishihara, Kaori; Ikutomo, Junji; Bilasy, Shymaa E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral neocortex development in mammals requires highly orchestrated events involving proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural progenitors and neurons. Rapgef2 and Rapgef6 constitute a unique family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rap1 small GTPase, which is known to play crucial roles in migration of postmitotic neurons. We previously reported that conditional knockout of Rapgef2 in dorsal telencephalon (Rapgef2-cKO) resulted in the formation of an ectopic cortical mass (ECM) resembling that of subcortical band heterotopia. Here we show that double knockout of Rapgef6 in Rapgef2-cKO mice (Rapgef2/6-dKO) results in marked enlargement of the ECM. While Rapgef2-cKO affects late-born neurons only, Rapgef2/6-dKO affects both early-born and late-born neurons. The Rapgef2-cKO cortex at embryonic day (E) 15.5, and the Rapgef2/6-dKO cortex at E13.5 and E15.5 show disruption of the adherens junctions (AJs) on the apical surface, detachment of radial glial cells (RGCs) from the apical surface and disorganization of the radial glial fiber system, which are accompanied by aberrant distribution of RGCs and intermediate progenitors, normally located in the ventricular zone and the subventricular zone, respectively, over the entire cerebral cortex. Moreover, intrauterine transduction of Cre recombinase into the Rapgef2flox/flox brains also results in the apical surface AJ disruption and the RGC detachment from the apical surface, both of which are effectively suppressed by cotransduction of the constitutively active Rap1 mutant Rap1G12V. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous role of the Rapgef2/6-Rap1 pathway in maintaining the apical surface AJ structures, which is necessary for the proper development of neural progenitor cells. PMID:27390776

  14. Patterns of effective permeability of leaf cuticles to acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, H.D.; Walters, K.D.; Berg, V.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Plants in the field are frequently exposed to anthropogenic acid precipitation with pH values of 4 and below. For the acid to directly affect leaf tissues, it must pass through the leaf cuticle, but little is known about the permeability of cuticles to protons, of about the effect of different anions on this permeability. We investigated the movement of protons through isolated astomatous leaf cuticles of grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi Macfady.), rough lemon (Citrus limon [L.] Burm. fils cv Ponderosa), and pear (Pyrus communis L.) using hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids. Cuticles were enzymically isolated from leaves and placed in a diffusion apparatus with pH 4 acid on the morphological outer surface of the cuticle and degassed distilled water on the inner surface. Changes in pH of the solution on the inner surface were used to determine rates of effective permeability of the cuticles to the protons of these acids. Most cuticles exhibited an initial low permeability, lasting hours to days, then after a short transition displayed a significant higher permeability, which persisted until equilibrium was approached. The change in effective permeability appears to be reversible. Effective permeabilities were higher for sulfuric acid than for the others. A model of the movement of protons through the cuticle is presented, proposing that dissociated acid groups in channels within the cutin are first protonated by the acid, accounting for the low initial effective permeability; then protons pass freely through the channels, resulting in a higher effective permeability. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mitochondrial Permeability Transition: New Findings and Persisting Uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Valentina; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Sica, Valentina; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Several insults cause the inner mitochondrial membrane to abruptly lose osmotic homeostasis, hence initiating a regulated variant of cell death known as 'mitochondrial permeability transition' (MPT)-driven necrosis. MPT provides an etiological contribution to several human disorders characterized by the acute loss of post-mitotic cells, including cardiac and cerebral ischemia. Nevertheless, the precise molecular determinants of MPT remain elusive, which considerably hampers the development of clinically implementable cardio- or neuroprotective strategies targeting this process. We summarize recent findings shedding new light on the supramolecular entity that mediates MPT, the so-called 'permeability transition pore complex' (PTPC). Moreover, we discuss hitherto unresolved controversies on MPT and analyze the major obstacles that still preclude the complete understanding and therapeutic targeting of this process.

  16. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G. Berryman, James

    2003-10-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery.

  17. Effect of water on hydrogen permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulligan, David; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    Doping of hydrogen with CO and CO2 was developed to reduce hydrogen permeation in Stirling engines by forming a low permeability oxide coating on the inner surface of the heater head tubes. Although doping worked well, under certain circumstances the protective oxide could be chemically reduced by the hydrogen in the engine. Some oxygen is required in the hydrogen to prevent reduction. Eventually, all the oxygen in the hydrogen gas - whatever its source - shows up as water. This is the result of hydrogen reducing the CO, CO2, or the protective inner surface oxides. This water can condense in the engine system under the right conditions. If the concentration of water vapor is reduced to a low enough level, the hydrogen can chemically reduce the oxide coating, resulting in an increase in permeability. This work was done to define the minimum water content required to avoid this reduction in the oxide coating. The results of this testing show that a minimum of approximately 750 ppm water is required to prevent an increase in permeability of CG-27, a high temperature metal alloy selected for Stirling engine heater tubes.

  18. Hybrid green permeable pave with hexagonal modular pavement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, M. A.; Abustan, I.; Hamzah, M. O.

    2013-06-01

    Modular permeable pavements are alternatives to the traditional impervious asphalt and concrete pavements. Pervious pore spaces in the surface allow for water to infiltrate into the pavement during rainfall events. As of their ability to allow water to quickly infiltrate through the surface, modular permeable pavements allow for reductions in runoff quantity and peak runoff rates. Even in areas where the underlying soil is not ideal for modular permeable pavements, the installation of under drains has still been shown to reflect these reductions. Modular permeable pavements have been regarded as an effective tool in helping with stormwater control. It also affects the water quality of stormwater runoff. Places using modular permeable pavement has been shown to cause a significant decrease in several heavy metal concentrations as well as suspended solids. Removal rates are dependent upon the material used for the pavers and sub-base material, as well as the surface void space. Most heavy metals are captured in the top layers of the void space fill media. Permeable pavements are now considered an effective BMP for reducing stormwater runoff volume and peak flow. This study examines the extent to which such combined pavement systems are capable of handling load from the vehicles. Experimental investigation were undertaken to quantify the compressive characteristics of the modular. Results shows impressive results of achieving high safety factor for daily life vehicles.

  19. Inflammatory mediators and modulation of blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Abbott, N J

    2000-04-01

    1. Unlike some interfaces between the blood and the nervous system (e.g., nerve perineurium), the brain endothelium forming the blood-brain barrier can be modulated by a range of inflammatory mediators. The mechanisms underlying this modulation are reviewed, and the implications for therapy of the brain discussed. 2. Methods for measuring blood-brain barrier permeability in situ include the use of radiolabeled tracers in parenchymal vessels and measurements of transendothelial resistance and rate of loss of fluorescent dye in single pial microvessels. In vitro studies on culture models provide details of the signal transduction mechanisms involved. 3. Routes for penetration of polar solutes across the brain endothelium include the paracellular tight junctional pathway (usually very tight) and vesicular mechanisms. Inflammatory mediators have been reported to influence both pathways, but the clearest evidence is for modulation of tight junctions. 4. In addition to the brain endothelium, cell types involved in inflammatory reactions include several closely associated cells including pericytes, astrocytes, smooth muscle, microglia, mast cells, and neurons. In situ it is often difficult to identify the site of action of a vasoactive agent. In vitro models of brain endothelium are experimentally simpler but may also lack important features generated in situ by cell:cell interaction (e.g. induction, signaling). 5. Many inflammatory agents increase both endothelial permeability and vessel diameter, together contributing to significant leak across the blood-brain barrier and cerebral edema. This review concentrates on changes in endothelial permeability by focusing on studies in which changes in vessel diameter are minimized. 6. Bradykinin (Bk) increases blood-brain barrier permeability by acting on B2 receptors. The downstream events reported include elevation of [Ca2+]i, activation of phospholipase A2, release of arachidonic acid, and production of free radicals, with

  20. Absolute quantitation of phosphorus metabolites in the cerebral cortex of the newborn human infant and in the forearm muscles of young adults using a double-tuned surface coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Ernest B.

    The application of a double-tuned surface coil with strong coupling for both 31P and 1H to the in vivo measurement of metabolite concentrations by NMR spectroscopy is demonstrated. It is shown that sample loading, although important for a coil tuned to a single frequency, does not necessarily have a significant effect on absolute quantitation results if the coil is strongly coupled to the sample for both nuclei. For the coil used in the present study, the spectrometer calibration coefficient is almost independent of loading and the 1H and 31P flip angles at the coil center produced by fixed length pulses could be arranged to be nearly equal over a range of loading conditions. In seven normal infants, of gestational plus postnatal age 35 to 37 weeks, the cerebral cortex nucleotide triphosphate concentration was 3.7 ± 0.6 m M/liter wet (mean ± SD). Metabolite concentrations were low in the cerebral cortex of a severely birth asphyxiated infant. The adenosine triphosphate concentration in the resting, fresh forearm muscles of six young adults was 6.3 ± 0.8 m M/liter wet.

  1. Ultracytochemical distribution of myelin basic protein after injection into the cerebrospinal fluid. Evidence for transport through the blood-brain barrier and binding to the luminal surface of cerebral veins.

    PubMed

    Vass, K; Lassmann, H; Wisniewski, H M; Iqbal, K

    1984-03-01

    Distribution of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the central nervous system (CNS) following injection into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was studied by different qualitative and quantitative immunelectron -microscopic techniques. Endogenous MBP was present in myelin sheaths in injected as well as in control animals. After injection of exogenous MBP into CSF this protein was present in the subarachnoid space, on the surface of meningeal cells, on the surface of collagen fibers, in the basement membrane of the glia limitans, in vessel walls, and in the extracellular space of spinal roots. In meningeal veins, endothelial vesicles filled with peroxidase reaction product were found on the abluminal side of endothelial cells, in the endothelial cytoplasm and sometimes opening into the vascularllumen . In addition patchy staining of the luminal surface of endothelial cells was noted, indicating binding of antigen at this location. Quantitative immunelectron microscopy (an indirect technique with rabbit anti-MBP serum as primary layer and gold-labeled anti-rabbit IgG as secondary layer) revealed highly significant MBP binding on the luminal surface of endothelial cells after injection of this antigen into the CSF. The present results indicate that MBP, when liberated in CNS is transported through the blood-brain barrier and presented on the luminal surface of endothelial cells of the cerebral and meningeal veins. This observation may be important in interpretation of pathogenesis of initial inflammatory infiltrates in experimental allergic encephalitis (EAE).

  2. Monitoring Strategies in Permeable Pavement Systems to Optimize Maintenance Scheduling

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the surface in a permeable pavement system clogs and performance decreases, maintenance is required to preserve the design function. Currently, guidance is limited for scheduling maintenance on an as needed basis. Previous research has shown that surface clogging in a permea...

  3. Measuring Clogging with Pressure Transducers in Permeable Pavement Strips

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two issues that have a negative affect on the long term hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems are surface clogging and clogging at the interface with the underlying soil. Surface clogging limits infiltration capacity and results in bypass if runoff rate exceeds in...

  4. Mitigating methane emissions and air intrusion in heterogeneous landfills with a high permeability layer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yoojin; Imhoff, Paul T; Augenstein, Don; Yazdani, Ramin

    2011-05-01

    Spatially variable refuse gas permeability and landfill gas (LFG) generation rate, cracking of the soil cover, and reduced refuse gas permeability because of liquid addition can all affect CH(4) collection efficiency when intermediate landfill covers are installed. A new gas collection system that includes a near-surface high permeability layer beneath the landfill cover was evaluated for enhancing capture of LFG and mitigating CH(4) emissions. Simulations of gas transport in two-dimensional domains demonstrated that the permeable layer reduces CH(4) emissions up to a factor of 2 for particular spatially variable gas permeability fields. When individual macrocracks formed in the cover soil and the permeable layer was absent, CH(4) emissions increased to as much as 24% of the total CH(4) generated, double the emissions when the permeable layer was installed. CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil was also much more uniform when the permeable layer was present: local percentages of CH(4) oxidized varied between 94% and 100% across the soil cover with the permeable layer, but ranged from 10% to 100% without this layer for some test cases. However, the permeable layer had a minor effect on CH(4) emissions and CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil when the ratio of the gas permeability of the cover soil to the mean refuse gas permeability ≤ 0.05. The modeling approach employed in this study may be used to assess the utility of other LFG collection systems and management practices.

  5. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  6. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  7. Impermeability of newt cerebral and pial capillaries to exogenous peroxidase. A light and electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Ciani, F; Del Grande, P; Franceschini, V; Caniato, G; Minelli, G

    1983-01-01

    The permeability of cerebral vessels to exogenous peroxidase was studied in the newt. The reaction product was found only inside the cerebral or pial blood vessels. Electron microscope investigations revealed the presence of reaction product along the luminal area of vessels and in some parts of the intercellular spaces at the level of tight junctions joining endothelial cells. On the basis of the ultrastructural peroxidase localization, the presence of a brain-blood barrier in Triturus is discussed.

  8. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  9. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  10. Blood brain barrier is impermeable to solutes and permeable to water after experimental pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Tress, Erika E; Clark, Robert S B; Foley, Lesley M; Alexander, Henry; Hickey, Robert W; Drabek, Tomas; Kochanek, Patrick M; Manole, Mioara D

    2014-08-22

    Pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) results in unfavorable neurological outcome in most survivors. Development of neuroprotective therapies is contingent upon understanding the permeability of intravenously delivered medications through the blood brain barrier (BBB). In a model of pediatric CA we sought to characterize BBB permeability to small and large molecular weight substances. Additionally, we measured the percent brain water after CA. Asphyxia of 9 min was induced in 16-18 day-old rats. The rats were resuscitated and the BBB permeability to small (sodium fluorescein and gadoteridol) and large (immunoglobulin G, IgG) molecules was assessed at 1, 4, and 24 h after asphyxial CA or sham surgery. Percent brain water was measured post-CA and in shams using wet-to-dry brain weight. Fluorescence, gadoteridol uptake, or IgG staining at 1, 4h and over the entire 24 h post-CA did not differ from shams, suggesting absence of BBB permeability to these solutes. Cerebral water content was increased at 3h post-CA vs. sham. In conclusion, after 9 min of asphyxial CA there is no BBB permeability over 24h to conventional small or large molecule tracers despite the fact that cerebral water content is increased early post-CA indicating the development of brain edema. Evaluation of novel therapies targeting neuronal death after pediatric CA should include their capacity to cross the BBB.

  11. The geometric mean concept for interpreting the permeability of heterogeneous geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, Patrick; Selvadurai, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Naturally occurring geomaterials are heterogeneous and the estimation of the effective permeability characteristics of such geomaterials presents a challenge not only in terms of the experimental procedures that should be used to ensure flow through the porous medium but also in the correct use of the theoretical concepts needed to accurately interpret the data. The general consensus is that the flow path in a test needs to be drastically reduced if steady state tests are considered as a suitable experimental technique. The disadvantage of flow path reduction is that the tested volume may not be altogether representative of the rock, particularly if it displays heterogeneity in the scale of the sample being tested. Also, if the sample is not correctly restrained, the differential pressures needed to initiate steady flow can introduce damage in the sample leading to erroneous estimates of permeability. The alternative approach is to use large enough samples that can capture the spatial heterogeneity but develop testing procedures that can test examine the steady state flow process as a problem in three-dimensional fluid flow that can capture the spatial distribution of permeability. The paper discusses theoretical and computational approaches that have been developed for the estimation of the spatial distribution of permeability in a cuboidal Indiana Limestone sample measuring 450 mm. The "Patch Permeability Test" developed in connection with the research allows the measurements of the surface permeability of the block and through kriging techniques estimate the permeability within the block sample. The research promotes the use of the "Geometric Mean" concept for the description of the effective permeability of the heterogeneous porous medium where the spatial distribution conforms to a lognormal pattern. The effectiveness of the approach is that the techniques can be applied to examine the effective permeability of heterogeneous low permeability materials such as

  12. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  13. Hemihyperhidrosis in cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, Shoaib; Redmond, Gemma; Ram, Pusbar; Owens, Val B; Sangster, Graeme; Barrett, James A

    2004-09-01

    Increased sweating on the hemiparetic side in cerebral infarcts is not a common clinical finding. The onset, severity and duration of symptoms can vary. The structural lesion responsible for this is a subject of conjecture. We present the case of a 66-year-old man who developed hemihyperhidrosis secondary to a cerebral infarct. PMID:15315923

  14. Techniques to Determine Maintenace Frequency of Permeable Pavement Systems with Time Domain Reflectometers (TDRs

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the surface clogs in permeable pavement systems, they lose effectiveness and require maintenance. There is limited direct guidance for determining when maintenance is needed to prevent surface runoff bypass. Research is being conducted using multiple time domain reflectomete...

  15. Use of Time Domain Reflectometers (TDRs) in Permeable Pavement Systems to Predict Maintenance Needs and Effectiveness

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the surface in permeable pavement systems clogs, infiltration capacity decreases, so maintenance is required to maintain hydrologic performance. There is limited direct guidance for determining when maintenance is needed to prevent surface runoff bypass. Research is being co...

  16. Timescales for permeability reduction and strength recovery in densifying magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Farquharson, J. I.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    likely persistently re-fracture and keep the conduit margin permeable. The modelling therefore supports the notion that repeated fracture-healing cycles are responsible for the successive low-magnitude earthquakes associated with silicic dome extrusion. Taken together, our results indicate that the transition from effusive to explosive behaviour may rest on the competition between permeability reduction within the conduit and outgassing through fractures at the conduit margin. If the conditions for explosive behaviour are satisfied, the magma densification clock will be reset and the process will start again. The timescales of permeability reduction and strength recovery presented in this study may aid our understanding of the permeability evolution of conduit margin fractures, magma fracture-healing cycles, surface outgassing cycles, and the timescales required for pore pressure augmentation and the initiation of explosive eruptions.

  17. Permeability Asymmetry in Composite Porous Ceramic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurcharov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Uvarov, V. I.; Kurchatova, O. V.

    The results from the investigation of transport characteristics and gas transport asymmetry in bilayer composite membranes are submitted. These membranes are produced by SHS method. Asymmetric effect and hysteresis of permeability in nanoporous membranes are detected. It's shown, that permeability ratio (asymmetry value of permeability) increases up to several times. The asymmetry of permeability usually decreases monotonically with the pressure decrease.

  18. Permeability extraction: A sonic log inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Kim, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors provide the missing important link between permeability and acoustic velocities by generating a permeability-dependent synthetic sonic log in a carbonate reservoir. The computations are based on Akbar`s theory that relates wave velocity to frequency, rock properties (e.g., lithology, permeability, and porosity), and fluid saturation and properties (viscosity, density, and compressibility). An inverted analytical expression of the theory is used to extract permeability from sonic velocity. The synthetic sonic and the computed permeability are compared with the observed sonic log and with plug permeability, respectively. The results demonstrate, as predicted by theory, that permeability can be related directly to acoustic velocities.

  19. Paranodal permeability in `myelin mutants'

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, S.; Mierzwa, A.; Scherer, S.S.; Peles, E.; Arevalo, J.C.; Chao, M.V.; Rosenbluth, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three `myelin mutant' mice, Caspr-null, cst-null and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3kDa, 10kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40kDa, 70kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of transverse bands in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of transverse bands. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of transverse bands but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of `pathway 3', the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  20. Paranodal permeability in "myelin mutants".

    PubMed

    Shroff, Seema; Mierzwa, Amanda; Scherer, Steven S; Peles, Elior; Arevalo, Juan C; Chao, Moses V; Rosenbluth, Jack

    2011-10-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three "myelin mutant" mice, Caspr-null, cst-null, and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3 kDa and 10 kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40 kDa and 70 kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands (TBs) in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of TBs in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of TBs. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of TBs but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of "pathway 3," the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  1. CD8 T Cell-Initiated Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Promotes Central Nervous System Vascular Permeability under Neuroinflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Dickerson, Jonathan W.; Chen, Yi; McDole, Jeremiah R.; Tripathi, Pulak; Pirko, Istvan; Seroogy, Kim B.; Johnson, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark feature of numerous neurologic disorders as diverse as multiple sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, viral hemorrhagic fevers, cerebral malaria, and acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis. CD8 T cells are one immune cell type that have been implicated in promoting vascular permeability in these conditions. Our laboratory has created a murine model of CD8 T cell-mediated CNS vascular permeability using a variation of the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus system traditionally used to study multiple sclerosis. Previously, we demonstrated that CD8 T cells have the capacity to initiate astrocyte activation, cerebral endothelial cell tight junction protein alterations and CNS vascular permeability through a perforin-dependent process. To address the downstream mechanism by which CD8 T cells promote BBB dysregulation, in this study, we assess the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in this model. We demonstrate that neuronal expression of VEGF is significantly upregulated prior to, and coinciding with, CNS vascular permeability. Phosphorylation of fetal liver kinase-1 is significantly increased early in this process indicating activation of this receptor. Specific inhibition of neuropilin-1 significantly reduced CNS vascular permeability and fetal liver kinase-1 activation, and preserved levels of the cerebral endothelial cell tight junction protein occludin. Our data demonstrate that CD8 T cells initiate neuronal expression of VEGF in the CNS under neuroinflammatory conditions, and that VEGF may be a viable therapeutic target in neurologic disease characterized by inflammation-induced BBB disruption. PMID:20008293

  2. Permeability parameter as a function of population density in classical infiltration equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Nor Hafizah; Ahmad, Rohanin; Nordin, Syarifah Zyurina

    2014-12-01

    Rapid development of urban areas has caused many problems especially related to water issues. The increase in urban development also means the increase in impervious surfaces due to expansion of buildings, roads, parking lots to name a few. Impervious surfaces have low water permeability compared to pervious surfaces. Also, infiltration capacity is dependent on the permeability of the area and subsequently permeability is dependent on the surface conditions. In this paper, we study the infiltration capacity with the assumption that permeability parameter can be described in the term of the population density of the area. The modified model is based on the original form of Green-Ampt equation. The new model with population density is able to describe permeability, hence the infiltration capacity of an area.

  3. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  4. Comparison of histamine and hyperosmotic arabinose infusion on brain capillary permeability to hydrophilic solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of bilateral intracarotid infusion of histamine (HA) on capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of two metabolically inert tracers was determined and compared to that of L(+)arabinose (ARAB) in rat brain. Ringer's solution alone, or with 1 mg/kg HA diphosphate or 1.6M ARAB added, was infused (0.9 ml over 0.5 min) into each external carotid artery (CA). Five minutes later, a bolus of /sup 14/C-sucrose and /sup 3/H-L-glucose was injected i.v. Estimates of PS for both tracers were computed by the method of Ohno et al after brain concentration was corrected for tracer within cerebral blood vessels. Brain blood volume, based on the /sup 14/C-dextran space, was the same (.016 ml/g) in discrete cortical and midbrain regions of all rats except those treated with ARAB. The latter yielded .033 ml/g, presumably due to dextran extravasation. Infusion of ARAB, HA and Ringer's increased the PS's of sucrose and L-glucose by 10x, 8x, and 3x in brain regions perfused by the internal CA's. The ratio, PS-sucrose/PS-L-glucose was unchanged by any treatment. Both ARAB and HA caused transient falls in arterial pressure, but only ARAB caused deaths (3 of 9 rats). While as effective as ARAB in opening the blood-brain barrier, HA may be safer than hyperosmotic shock to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to brain tumors.

  5. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  6. Trench infiltration for managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; Watt, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock is increasingly being utilized to enhance resources and maintain sustainable groundwater development practices. One such target is the Navajo Sandstone, an extensive regional aquifer located throughout the Colorado Plateau of the western United States. Spreading-basin and bank-filtration projects along the sandstone outcrop's western edge in southwestern Utah have recently been implemented to meet growth-related water demands. This paper reports on a new cost-effective surface-infiltration technique utilizing trenches for enhancing managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock. A 48-day infiltration trench experiment on outcropping Navajo Sandstone was conducted to evaluate this alternative surface-spreading artificial recharge method. Final infiltration rates through the bottom of the trench were about 0.5 m/day. These infiltration rates were an order of magnitude higher than rates from a previous surface-spreading experiment at the same site. The higher rates were likely caused by a combination of factors including the removal of lower permeability soil and surficial caliche deposits, access to open vertical sandstone fractures, a reduction in physical clogging associated with silt and biofilm layers, minimizing viscosity effects by maintaining isothermal conditions, minimizing chemical clogging caused by carbonate mineral precipitation associated with algal photosynthesis, and diminished gas clogging associated with trapped air and biogenic gases. This pilot study illustrates the viability of trench infiltration for enhancing surface spreading of managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock. ?? 2010.

  7. High membrane permeability for melatonin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be "secreted" from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  8. High membrane permeability for melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be “secreted” from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  9. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed.

  10. Scale Dependence of Soil Permeability to Air: Measurement Method and Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, K.; Sextro, R.G.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Wooley, J.D.; Owens, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1995-11-01

    This work investigates the dependence soil air-permeability on sampling scale in near-surface unsaturated soils. A new dual-probe dynamic pressure technique was developed to measure permeability in situ over different length scales and different spatial orientations in the soil. Soils at three sites were studied using the new technique. Each soil was found to have higher horizontal than vertical permeability. Significant scale dependence of permeability was also observed at each site. Permeability increased by a factor of 20 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 2 m in a sand soil vegetated with dry grass, and by a factor of 15 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 3.5 m in a sandy loam with mature Coast Live Oak trees (Quercus agrifolia). The results indicate that standard methods of permeability assessment can grossly underestimate advective transport of gas-phase contaminants through soils.

  11. Some Recent Laboratory Measurements of Fault Zone Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Lockner, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    The permeability of fault zone material is key to understanding fluid circulation and the role of pore fluids in earthquake generation and rupture dynamics. Permeability results of core samples from several scientific drillholes are presented, including new results from the SAFOD drillsite in California and the Chelungpu Fault in Taiwan. Permeability values at simulated in situ pressures range from 10-18 to 10-23 m2, a broad range reflecting differences in rock type, proximity to the fault (i.e., fault core, damage zone or country rock), and degree of interseismic healing and sealing. In addition to these natural characteristics, stress-relief and thermal cracking damage resulting from core retrieval will tend to increase the permeability of some of the deepest crystalline rock samples, although testing under in situ conditions can reduce these errors. Recently active fault rocks, with an interconnected network of fractures, tend toward the higher end of the permeability range, whereas fault rocks that have had time to heal through hydrothermal processes tend to have lower permeabilities. In addition, the permeability of borehole-derived core samples was found to be more sensitive to applied pressure than equivalent rocks obtained from surface outcrops because of weathering and other processes. Thus, permeability values of surface samples can not be adequately extrapolated to depth, highlighting the importance of deep drilling studies in determining in situ transport properties. Permeability studies also reveal the storage capacity of the fault rocks, an important parameter in the determination of excess fluid pressure potential. Storage capacity was found to be 10-10 to 10-11/Pa in the Chelungpu Fault cores. Typical down-hole permeability measurements are generally 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than laboratory-derived values because they sample joints and fractures in the damage zone that are larger in scale than the core samples. Consequently, most fluid flow at

  12. Urban land use: Remote sensing of ground-basin permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinney, L. R.; Jensen, J. R.; Estes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A remote sensing analysis of the amount and type of permeable and impermeable surfaces overlying an urban recharge basin is discussed. An effective methodology for accurately generating this data as input to a safe yield study is detailed and compared to more conventional alternative approaches. The amount of area inventoried, approximately 10 sq. miles, should provide a reliable base against which automatic pattern recognition algorithms, currently under investigation for this task, can be evaluated. If successful, such approaches can significantly reduce the time and effort involved in obtaining permeability data, an important aspect of urban hydrology dynamics.

  13. Permeability and structure of resorcinol-formaldehyde gels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.; Alviso, C.; Pekala, R.; Gross, J.

    1996-12-31

    The permeability (D) of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gels was measured using a beam-bending technique. For gels made at various solids contents and with different catalyst contents, the permeabilities ranged over a factor of {approximately} 50; the pore radii inferred from D varied from {approximately}3 to 30 nm. Pore radii obtained on RF aerogels using nitrogen desorption were severely affected by compression of the aerogel by capillary forces (resulting from the surface tension of liquid nitrogen). After correction for that effect, the desorption data were found to be in very good agreement with the pore sizes calculated from D.

  14. Influence of wall permeability on turbulent boundary-layer properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental boundary-layer studies of a series of low pressure drop, permeable surfaces have been conducted to characterize their surface interaction with a turbulent boundary layer. The models were flat and tested at nominally zero pressure gradient in low speed air. The surfaces were thin metal sheets with discrete perforations. Direct drag balance measurements of skin friction indicate that the general effect of surface permeability is to increase drag above that of a smooth plate reference level. Heuristic arguments are presented to show that this type of behavior is to be expected. Other boundary-layer data are also presented including mean velocity profiles and conditionally sampled streamwise velocity fluctuations (hot wire) for selected models.

  15. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  16. A Large Block Experiment for Measurement of the Effective Permeability of Indiana Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Selvadurai, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    The measurement of permeability of large specimens of a rock specimen is bound to provide a clearer picture of the distribution of permeability of predominantly sedimentary rocks. Such distributions can be the basis for evaluating the effective permeability of the rock specimen in the presence of permeability inhomogeneity. This paper discusses the development of a patch permeability test that can be used to measure the near surface permeability characteristics of a large cuboidal block of Indiana Limestone measuring 508 mm. The test is used to generate the near surface permeability of six faces of the cuboid and these estimates are used to generate, via a kriging procedure, the interior permeability distributions of permeability. These permeability distributions are used to examine the validity of theoretical estimates that have been developed in the literature to determine the effective permeability of the material. The classical Wiener (1912) bounds, the estimates provided by Matheron (1967) and Journel et al. (1993) are developed using the experimentally derived data. The procedure is also validated by conducting computational experiments involving one-dimensional flow along three orthogonal directions. References: Wiener, O. (1912) Die Theorie des Mischkörpers für das Feld des stationaären Strömung. Erste Abhandlung die Mittelswertesätsze für Kraft, Polarisation und Energie. Abh. Math.-Physischen Klasse Königl. Säcsh Gesell. Wissen, 32: 509-604. Matheron, G. (1967) Eléments pour une Théorie des Milieux Poroeux, Masson, Paris. Journel, A.G, Deutsch, C.V. and Desbrats, A.J. (1986) Power averaging for block effective permeability, SPE 15128, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

  17. Turbulent Hyporheic Exchange in Permeable Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, K. R.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Li, A.; Packman, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Solute delivery from the water column into a streambed strongly influences metabolism in rivers. Current hydrological models simplify surface-subsurface (hyporheic) exchange by treating each domain separately, constraining turbulent flows to the water column. Studies have shown, however, that turbulence penetrates into permeable sediments. Evidence is lacking for how this highly coupled flow regime influences hyporheic exchange. We characterized the dynamics of turbulent exchange between surface and porewaters in a 2.5 m recirculating flume. The channel was packed with 3.8 cm PVC spheres to form a coarse gravel bed, with a total depth of 21 cm. We implanted microsensors onto an array of spheres to measure in situsalt concentrations within the streambed. Water was recirculated in the channel, and concentrated salt solution was continuously injected upstream of the sensor array. We observed solute exchange increased with free-stream Reynolds number and decreased with depth in the sediment bed. Mass of injected solute remaining in the bed decreased rapidly in all cases, with only 10-30% of mass recovered 50 cm downstream of the injection point at Re = 25,000. We observed high-frequency (1-10 Hz) concentration fluctuations at bed depths of at least 4.75 cm, and sporadic low-frequency fluctuations at depths of 12.5 cm. Spectral analysis revealed increased filtering of high frequencies with depth. We used particle-tracking simulations to fit depth-dependent turbulent diffusion profiles to experimental results. These results demonstrate that free-stream turbulence impacts hyporheic mixing deep into permeable streambeds, and mixing is strongly influenced by the coupled surface-subsurface flow field.

  18. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  19. Structure/Permeability Relationships Of Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Mi, Y.; Stern, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of permeabilities, by each of five gases, of membranes made of four different polyimides. Conducted to gain understanding of effects of molecular structures of membranes on permeabilities and to assess potential for exploitation of selective permeability in gas-separation processes. Gases used: H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4.

  20. Novel additives to retard permeable flow

    SciTech Connect

    Golombok, Michael; Crane, Carel; Ineke, Erik; Welling, Marco; Harris, Jon

    2008-09-15

    Low concentrations of surfactant and cosolute in water, can selectively retard permeable flow in high permeability rocks compared to low permeability ones. This represents a way forward for more efficient areal sweep efficiency when water flooding a reservoir during improved oil recovery. (author)

  1. Acetazolamide inhibits osmotic water permeability by interaction with aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junwei; Wang, Xiaohua; Chang, Yongjie; Zhang, Jianzhao; Song, Qianliu; Yu, Heming; Li, Xuejun

    2006-03-15

    Water channel proteins, known as aquaporins, are transmembrane proteins that mediate osmotic water permeability. In a previous study, we found that acetazolamide could inhibit osmotic water transportation across Xenopus oocytes by blocking the function of aquaporin-1 (AQP1). The purpose of the current study was to confirm the effect of acetazolamide on water osmotic permeability using the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1 and to investigate the interaction between acetazolamide and AQP1. The fluorescence intensity of HEK293 cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1, which corresponds to the cell volume when the cells swell in a hyposmotic solution, was recorded under confocal laser fluorescence microscopy. The osmotic water permeability was assessed by the change in the ratio of cell fluorescence to certain cell area. Acetazolamide, at concentrations of 1 and 10muM, inhibited the osmotic water permeability in HEK293 cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1. The direct binding between acetazolamide and AQP1 was detected by surface plasmon resonance. AQP1 was prepared from rat red blood cells and immobilized on a CM5 chip. The binding assay showed that acetazolamide could directly interact with AQP1. This study demonstrated that acetazolamide inhibited osmotic water permeability through interaction with AQP1. PMID:16480680

  2. Simulating bioclogging effects on dynamic riverbed permeability and infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomer, Michelle E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Maier, Ulrich; Schmidt, Christian; Thullner, Martin; Ulrich, Craig; Flipo, Nicolas; Rubin, Yoram

    2016-04-01

    Bioclogging in rivers can detrimentally impact aquifer recharge. This is particularly so in dry regions, where losing rivers are common, and where disconnection between surface water and groundwater (leading to the development of an unsaturated zone) can occur. Reduction in riverbed permeability due to biomass growth is a time-variable parameter that is often neglected, yet permeability reduction from bioclogging can introduce order of magnitude changes in seepage fluxes from rivers over short (i.e., monthly) timescales. To address the combined effects of bioclogging and disconnection on infiltration, we developed numerical representations of bioclogging processes within a one-dimensional, variably saturated flow model representing losing-connected and losing-disconnected rivers. We tested these formulations using a synthetic case study informed with biological data obtained from the Russian River, California, USA. Our findings show that modeled biomass growth reduced seepage for losing-connected and losing-disconnected rivers. However, for rivers undergoing disconnection, infiltration declines occurred only after the system was fully disconnected. Before full disconnection, biologically induced permeability declines were not significant enough to offset the infiltration gains introduced by disconnection. The two effects combine to lead to a characteristic infiltration curve where peak infiltration magnitude and timing is controlled by permeability declines relative to hydraulic gradient gains. Biomass growth was found to hasten the onset of full disconnection; a condition we term `effective disconnection'. Our results show that river infiltration can respond dynamically to bioclogging and subsequent permeability declines that are highly dependent on river connection status.

  3. Determination of hydrogen permeability in commercial and modified superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The results of hydrogen permeability measurements on several iron- and cobalt-base alloys as well as on two long-ranged ordered alloys over the range of 705 to 870 C (1300 to 1600 F) are summarized. The test alloys included wrought alloys N-155, IN 800, A-286, 19-9DL, and 19-9DL modifications with aluminum, niobium, and misch metal. In addition, XF-818, CRM-6D, SA-F11, and HS-31 were evaluated. Two wrought long-range ordered alloys, Ni3Al and (Fe,Ni)3(V,Al) were also evaluated. All tests were conducted at 20.7 MPa pressure in either pure and/or 1% CO2-doped H2 for test periods as long as 133 h. Detailed analyses were conducted to determine the relative permeability rankings of these alloys and the effect of doping, exit surface oxidation, specimen design variations, and test duration on permeability coefficient, and permeation activation energies were determined. The two long-range ordered alloys had the lowest permeability coefficients in pure H2 when compared with the eight commercial alloys and their modifications. With CO2 doping, significant decrease in permeability was observed in commercial alloys--no doped tests were conducted with the long-range ordered alloys.

  4. Pore-structure models of hydraulic conductivity for permeable pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, X.; Sansalone, J.; Ying, G.; Ranieri, V.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryPermeable pavement functions as a porous infrastructure interface allowing the infiltration and evaporation of rainfall-runoff while functioning as a relatively smooth load-bearing surface for vehicular transport. Hydraulic conductivity ( k) of permeable pavement is an important hydraulic property and is a function of the pore structure. This study examines k for a cementitious permeable pavement (CPP) through a series of pore-structure models. Measurements utilized include hydraulic head as well as total porosity, ( ϕ t), effective porosity ( ϕ e), tortuosity ( L e/ L) and pore size distribution (PSD) indices generated through X-ray tomography (XRT). XRT results indicate that the permeable pavement pore matrix is hetero-disperse, with high tortuosity and ϕ t ≠ ϕ e. Power law models of k- ϕ t and k- ϕ e relationships are developed for a CPP mix design. Results indicate that the Krüger, Fair-Hatch, Hazen, Slichter, Beyer and Terzaghi models based on simple pore-structure indices do not reproduce measured k values. The conventional Kozeny-Carman model (KCM), a more parameterized pore-structure model, did not reproduce measured k values. This study proposes a modified KCM utilizing ϕ e, specific surface area (SSA) pe and weighted tortuosity ( L e/ L) w. Results demonstrate that such permeable pavement pore-structure parameters with the modified KCM can predict k. The k results are combined with continuous simulation modeling using historical rainfall to provide nomographs examining permeable pavement as a low impact development (LID) infrastructure component.

  5. Long-term stormwater quantity and quality performance of permeable pavement systems.

    PubMed

    Brattebo, Benjamin O; Booth, Derek B

    2003-11-01

    This study examined the long-term effectiveness of permeable pavement as an alternative to traditional impervious asphalt pavement in a parking area. Four commercially available permeable pavement systems were evaluated after 6 years of daily parking usage for structural durability, ability to infiltrate precipitation, and impacts on infiltrate water quality. All four permeable pavement systems showed no major signs of wear. Virtually all rainwater infiltrated through the permeable pavements, with almost no surface runoff. The infiltrated water had significantly lower levels of copper and zinc than the direct surface runoff from the asphalt area. Motor oil was detected in 89% of samples from the asphalt runoff but not in any water sample infiltrated through the permeable pavement. Neither lead nor diesel fuel were detected in any sample. Infiltrate measured 5 years earlier displayed significantly higher concentrations of zinc and significantly lower concentrations of copper and lead.

  6. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  7. Cerebral Oedema, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and the Decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in the Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus are Prevented by Dexamethasone in an Animal Model of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luciana; Galant, Leticia S; Dall'Igna, Dhébora M; Kolling, Janaina; Siebert, Cassiana; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Wyse, Angela T S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-08-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder associated with acute and chronic brain dysfunction. This condition has been shown to lead to macroscopic cerebral alterations that are visible on imaging studies. Cerebral oedema is widely considered to be detrimental for MSUD patients; however, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether acute administration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) causes cerebral oedema, modifies the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, affects the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and alters the levels of cytokines in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 10-day-old rats. Additionally, we investigated the influence of concomitant administration of dexamethasone on the alterations caused by BCAA. Our results showed that the animals submitted to the model of MSUD exhibited an increase in the brain water content, both in the cerebral cortex and in the hippocampus. By investigating the mechanism of cerebral oedema, we discovered an association between H-BCAA and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and the permeability of the BBB to small molecules. Moreover, the H-BCAA administration increases Il-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, whereas IL-10 levels were decreased in the hippocampus. Interestingly, we showed that the administration of dexamethasone successfully reduced cerebral oedema, preventing the inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, BBB breakdown and the increase in the cytokines levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dexamethasone can improve the acute cerebral oedema and brain injury associated with high levels of BCAA, either through a direct effect on brain capillary Na(+),K(+)-ATPase or through a generalized effect on the permeability of the BBB to all compounds. PMID:26133302

  8. Cerebral Oedema, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and the Decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in the Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus are Prevented by Dexamethasone in an Animal Model of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luciana; Galant, Leticia S; Dall'Igna, Dhébora M; Kolling, Janaina; Siebert, Cassiana; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Wyse, Angela T S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-08-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder associated with acute and chronic brain dysfunction. This condition has been shown to lead to macroscopic cerebral alterations that are visible on imaging studies. Cerebral oedema is widely considered to be detrimental for MSUD patients; however, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether acute administration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) causes cerebral oedema, modifies the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, affects the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and alters the levels of cytokines in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 10-day-old rats. Additionally, we investigated the influence of concomitant administration of dexamethasone on the alterations caused by BCAA. Our results showed that the animals submitted to the model of MSUD exhibited an increase in the brain water content, both in the cerebral cortex and in the hippocampus. By investigating the mechanism of cerebral oedema, we discovered an association between H-BCAA and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and the permeability of the BBB to small molecules. Moreover, the H-BCAA administration increases Il-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, whereas IL-10 levels were decreased in the hippocampus. Interestingly, we showed that the administration of dexamethasone successfully reduced cerebral oedema, preventing the inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, BBB breakdown and the increase in the cytokines levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dexamethasone can improve the acute cerebral oedema and brain injury associated with high levels of BCAA, either through a direct effect on brain capillary Na(+),K(+)-ATPase or through a generalized effect on the permeability of the BBB to all compounds.

  9. Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis by Exophiala dermatitidis.

    PubMed

    Sood, S; Vaid, V K; Sharma, M; Bhartiya, H

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis is a rare and frequently fatal disease. We report a case of cerebral phaeohyphomycosis caused by Exophiala dermatitidis in a young immuno competent male presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Jaipur. PMID:24713913

  10. Osmotic Flow through Fully Permeable Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Cottin-Bizonne, C.; Biance, A.-L.; Joseph, P.; Bocquet, L.; Ybert, C.

    2014-06-01

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes.

  11. Osmotic flow through fully permeable nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Cottin-Bizonne, C; Biance, A-L; Joseph, P; Bocquet, L; Ybert, C

    2014-06-20

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes. PMID:24996091

  12. Composite binders for concrete with reduced permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R.; Yushin, A.

    2016-02-01

    Composite binder consisting of cement (55%), acid fly ash (40%) and limestone (5%) has been designed. It is obtained by co-milling to a specific surface of 550 kg/m2, it has an activity of 77.3 MPa and can produce a more dense cement stone structure. Integrated study revealed that the concrete on the composite binder basis provides an effective diffusion coefficient D. So we can conclude that the concrete layer protects buildings from toxic effects of expanded polystyrene. Low water absorption of the material (2.5% by weight) is due to the structure of its cement stone pore space. Besides lime powder prevents the penetration of moisture, reduces water saturation of the coverage that has a positive effect on useful life period. It also explains rather low water vapor permeability of the material - 0.021 mg/(m- hour-Pa).

  13. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  14. Experimental investigation of turbulent flow over a permeable rough wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Permeable walls are encountered in a variety of geophysical flows, including alluvial river beds, canopies and urban environments. Permeable walls possess very different boundary conditions as compared to classic impermeable walls (i.e. the slip condition and penetration of flow into the bed). Permeability allows flow interactions across the wall interface, resulting in notable mass, momentum and energy exchange. Such exchange takes place in the so-called transition layer and often occurs through turbulent flow mechanisms. It is increasingly recognized that turbulence plays a key role in a number of important natural functions, including biogeochemical as well as geomorphological processes. However, the flow physics of the transition layer are still poorly understood due to a lack of quantitative investigation of these permeable systems within which physical and optical access are severely compromised. This is particularly true for state-of-the-art flow measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) that require unaberrated optical access to the measurement locations. To overcome optical limitations, a refractive index matching (RIM) technique was employed herein to gain full optical access to the transition layer. Sodium Iodide aqueous solution (63% by weight and RI ~ 1.496 at 20°C) served as a working fluid, and an acrylic resin (RI ~ 1.499) was chosen for fabricating wall models. Measurements were performed using high-resolution planar PIV in different configurations to characterize the turbulent boundary layer and the transition layer. The wall models comprised uniform spheres packed in a cubic arrangement, and two cases were modeled - impermeable and permeable walls that were both rough. To eliminate the effect of roughness, and thus isolate the effect of permeability, the surface roughness of the two wall models was kept identical. This allowed us to obtain a more meaningful comparison and highlight the impact of wall permeability in natural

  15. Generating enhanced site topography data to improve permeable pavement performance assessment methods - presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable pavement surfaces are infiltration based stormwater control measures (SCM) commonly applied in parking lots to decrease impervious area and reduce runoff volume. Many are not optimally designed however, as little attention is given to draining a large enough contributin...

  16. Design/Construction of a Permeable Pavement Demonstration Site at the Edison Environmental Center (EEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will provide a scientifically defensible estimate of the performance of the three permeable surfaces: porous concrete, porous asphalt, and interlocking concrete pavers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can provide the results to municipalities enabling...

  17. The basic nonuniformity of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Collins, Christine E.; Wong, Peiyan; Kaas, Jon H.; Lent, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary changes in the size of the cerebral cortex, a columnar structure, often occur through the addition or subtraction of columnar modules with the same number of neurons underneath a unit area of cortical surface. This view is based on the work of Rockel et al. [Rockel AJ, Hiorns RW, Powell TP (1980) The basic uniformity in structure of the neocortex. Brain 103:221–244], who found a steady number of approximately 110 neurons underneath a surface area of 750 μm2 (147,000 underneath 1 mm2) of the cerebral cortex of five species from different mammalian orders. These results have since been either corroborated or disputed by different groups. Here, we show that the number of neurons underneath 1 mm2 of the cerebral cortical surface of nine primate species and the closely related Tupaia sp. is not constant and varies by three times across species. We found that cortical thickness is not inversely proportional to neuronal density across species and that total cortical surface area increases more slowly than, rather than linearly with, the number of neurons underneath it. The number of neurons beneath a unit area of cortical surface varies linearly with neuronal density, a parameter that is neither related to cortical size nor total number of neurons. Our finding of a variable number of neurons underneath a unit area of the cerebral cortex across primate species indicates that models of cortical organization cannot assume that cortical columns in different primates consist of invariant numbers of neurons. PMID:18689685

  18. Unusual Cerebral Emboli.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Nader; Castillo, Mauricio; Torres, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The heart and the carotid arteries are the most common sites of origin of embolic disease to the brain. Clots arising from these locations are the most common types of brain emboli. Less common cerebral emboli include air, fat, calcium, infected vegetations, and tumor cells as well as emboli originating in the venous system. Although infarcts can be the final result of any type of embolism, described herein are the ancillary and sometimes unique imaging features of less common types of cerebral emboli that may allow for a specific diagnosis to be made or at least suspected in many patients.

  19. Laboratory evidence for particle mobilization as a mechanism for permeability enhancement via dynamic stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Thibault; Brodsky, Emily E.; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that seismic waves can increase the permeability in natural systems, yet the mechanism remains poorly understood. We investigate the underlying mechanics by generating well-controlled, repeatable permeability enhancement in laboratory experiments. Pore pressure oscillations, simulating dynamic stresses, were applied to intact and fractured Berea sandstone samples under confining stresses of tens of MPa. Dynamic stressing produces an immediate permeability enhancement ranging from 1 to 60%, which scales with the amplitude of the dynamic strain (7×10-7 to 7×10-6) followed by a gradual permeability recovery. We investigated the mechanism by: (1) recording deformation of samples both before and after fracturing during the experiment, (2) varying the chemistry of the water and therefore particle mobility, (3) evaluating the dependence of permeability enhancement and recovery on dynamic stress amplitude, and (4) examining micro-scale pore textures of the rock samples before and after experiments. We find that dynamic stressing does not produce permanent deformation in our samples. Water chemistry has a pronounced effect on the sensitivity to dynamic stressing, with the magnitude of permeability enhancement and the rate of permeability recovery varying with ionic strength of the pore fluid. Permeability recovery rates generally correlate with the permeability enhancement sensitivity. Microstructural observations of our samples show clearing of clay particulates from fracture surfaces during the experiment. From these four lines of evidence, we conclude that a flow-dependent mechanism associated with mobilization of fines controls both the magnitude of the permeability enhancement and the recovery rate in our experiments. We also find that permeability sensitivity to dynamic stressing increases after fracturing, which is a process that generates abundant particulate matter in situ. Our results suggest that fluid permeability in many areas of the

  20. Permeability of the San Andreas Fault Zone at Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, A. P.; Song, I.; Saffer, D.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying fault rock permeability is important toward understanding both the regional hydrologic behavior of fault zones, and poro-elastic processes that affect fault mechanics by mediating effective stress. These include long-term fault strength as well as dynamic processes that may occur during earthquake slip, including thermal pressurization and dilatancy hardening. Despite its importance, measurements of fault zone permeability for relevant natural materials are scarce, owing to the difficulty of coring through active fault zones seismogenic depths. Most existing measurements of fault zone permeability are from altered surface samples or from thinner, lower displacement faults than the SAF. Here, we report on permeability measurements conducted on gouge from the actively creeping Central Deformation Zone (CDZ) of the San Andreas Fault, sampled in the SAFOD borehole at a depth of ~2.7 km (Hole G, Run 4, sections 4,5). The matrix of the gouge in this interval is predominantly composed of particles <10 µm, with ~5 vol% clasts of serpentinite, very fine-grained sandstone, and siltstone. The 2.6 m-thick CDZ represents the main fault trace and hosts ~90% of the active slip on the SAF at this location, as documented by repeated casing deformation surveys. We measured permeability in two different configurations: (1) in a uniaxial pressure cell, in which a sample is placed into a rigid steel ring which imposes a zero lateral strain condition and subjected to axial load, and (2) in a standard triaxial system under isostatic stress conditions. In the uniaxial configuration, we obtained permeabilities at axial effective stresses up to 90 MPa, and in the triaxial system up to 10 MPa. All experiments were conducted on cylindrical subsamples of the SAFOD core 25 mm in diameter, with lengths ranging from 18mm to 40mm, oriented for flow approximately perpendicular to the fault. In uniaxial tests, permeability is determined by running constant rate of strain (CRS) tests up

  1. Plasma From Patients With HELLP Syndrome Increases Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tremble, Sarah M.; Owens, Michelle Y.; Morris, Rachael; Cipolla, Marilyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating inflammatory factors and endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to contribute to the pathophysiology of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. To date, the occurrence of neurological complications in these women has been reported, but few studies have examined whether impairment in blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability or cerebrovascular reactivity is present in women having HELLP syndrome. We hypothesized that plasma from women with HELLP syndrome causes increased BBB permeability and cerebrovascular dysfunction. Posterior cerebral arteries from female nonpregnant rats were perfused with 20% serum from women with normal pregnancies (n = 5) or women with HELLP syndrome (n = 5), and BBB permeability and vascular reactivity were compared. Plasma from women with HELLP syndrome increased BBB permeability while not changing myogenic tone and reactivity to pressure. Addition of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester caused constriction of arteries that was not different with the different plasmas nor was dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside different between the 2 groups. However, dilation to the small- and intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel activator NS309 was decreased in vessels exposed to HELLP plasma. Thus, increased BBB permeability in response to HELLP plasma was associated with selective endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25194151

  2. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  3. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  4. Steam-water relative permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  5. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  6. Effect of vasopressin on ependymal and capillary permeability to tritiated water in cat

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, G.A.; Kyner, W.T.; Fenstermacher, J.D.; Patlak, C.S.

    1986-09-01

    Ependymal cells line the cerebral ventricles forming the interface that separates the cerebrospinal (CSF) and interstitial fluids (ISF). Extracellular molecules move between ependymal cells, whereas lipid soluble molecules pass both between and through cells. We measured the transfer of tritiated water (TOH) from CSF to blood across the ependymal and capillary interfaces by ventriculocisternal (VC) steady-state tissue clearance. Adult cats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium underwent VC perfusion with the extracellular marker (/sup 14/C)sucrose and TOH added to the artificial CSF. Brain tissue was analyzed for depth of penetration of the isotopes into periventricular gray matter. We found that TOH distribution space was lower than expected from water content measurements, whereas sucrose space was normal. Using VC steady-state equations we calculated an ependymal permeability that was similar to the permeability of the cerebral capillary. When arginine vasopressin (AVP) was added to the perfusate in different amounts, both capillary transfer times and ependymal permeability increased. Our results show that the ependyma may be important in water movement in the brain and support the suggestion that AVP influences water exchange in mammalian brain tissue.

  7. Endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction in disease: albuminuria and increased microvascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Andrew H J; Satchell, Simon C

    2012-03-01

    Appreciation of the glomerular microcirculation as a specialized microcirculatory bed, rather than as an entirely separate entity, affords important insights into both glomerular and systemic microvascular pathophysiology. In this review we compare regulation of permeability in systemic and glomerular microcirculations, focusing particularly on the role of the endothelial glycocalyx, and consider the implications for disease processes. The luminal surface of vascular endothelium throughout the body is covered with endothelial glycocalyx, comprising surface-anchored proteoglycans, supplemented with adsorbed soluble proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and plasma constituents. In both continuous and fenestrated microvessels, this endothelial glycocalyx provides resistance to the transcapillary escape of water and macromolecules, acting as an integral component of the multilayered barrier provided by the walls of these microvessels (ie acting in concert with clefts or fenestrae across endothelial cell layers, basement membranes and pericytes). Dysfunction of any of these capillary wall components, including the endothelial glycocalyx, can disrupt normal microvascular permeability. Because of its ubiquitous nature, damage to the endothelial glycocalyx alters the permeability of multiple capillary beds: in the glomerulus this is clinically apparent as albuminuria. Generalized damage to the endothelial glycocalyx can therefore manifest as both albuminuria and increased systemic microvascular permeability. This triad of altered endothelial glycocalyx, albuminuria and increased systemic microvascular permeability occurs in a number of important diseases, such as diabetes, with accumulating evidence for a similar phenomenon in ischaemia-reperfusion injury and infectious disease. The detection of albuminuria therefore has implications for the function of the microcirculation as a whole. The importance of the endothelial glycocalyx for other aspects of vascular function

  8. Tubular hydrogen permeable metal foil membrane and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Paglieri, Stephen N.; Birdsell, Stephen A.; Barbero, Robert S.; Snow, Ronny C.; Smith, Frank M.

    2006-04-04

    A tubular hydrogen permeable metal membrane and fabrication process comprises obtaining a metal alloy foil having two surfaces, coating the surfaces with a metal or metal alloy catalytic layer to produce a hydrogen permeable metal membrane, sizing the membrane into a sheet with two long edges, wrapping the membrane around an elongated expandable rod with the two long edges aligned and overlapping to facilitate welding of the two together, placing the foil wrapped rod into a surrounding fixture housing with the two aligned and overlapping foil edges accessible through an elongated aperture in the surrounding fixture housing, expanding the elongated expandable rod within the surrounding fixture housing to tighten the foil about the expanded rod, welding the two long overlapping foil edges to one another generating a tubular membrane, and removing the tubular membrane from within the surrounding fixture housing and the expandable rod from with the tubular membrane.

  9. Combining SIP and NMR Measurements to Develop Improved Estimates of Permeability in Sandstone Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, K.; Binley, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Permeability is traditionally measured in-situ by inducing groundwater flow using pumping, slug, or packer tests; however, these methods require the existence of wells, can be labor intensive and can be constrained by measurement support volumes. Indirect estimates of permeability based on geophysical techniques benefit from relatively short measurement times, do not require fluid extraction, and are non-invasive when made from the surface (or minimally invasive when made in a borehole). However, estimates of permeability based on a single geophysical method often require calibration for rock type, and cannot be used to uniquely determine all of the physical properties required to accurately determine permeability. In this laboratory study we present the first critical step towards developing a method for estimating permeability based on the synergistic coupling of two complementary geophysical methods: spectral induced polarization (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). To develop an improved model for estimating permeability, laboratory SIP and NMR measurements were collected on a series of sandstone cores, covering a wide range of permeabilities. Current models for estimating permeability from each individual geophysical measurement were compared to independently obtained estimates of permeability. The comparison confirmed previous research showing that estimates from SIP or NMR alone only yield the permeability within order of magnitude accuracy and must be calibrated for rock type. Next, the geophysical parameters determined from SIP and NMR were compared to independent measurements the physical properties of the sandstone cores including gravimetric porosity and pores-size distributions (obtained from mercury injection porosimetry); this comparison was used to evaluate which geophysical parameter more consistently and accurately predicted each physical property. Finally, we present an improved method for estimating permeability in sandstone cores based

  10. Photoresponsive vesicle permeability based on intramolecular host-guest inclusion.

    PubMed

    Kauscher, Ulrike; Samanta, Avik; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-28

    This article describes light-responsive vesicles that can release their contents in response to a light-sensitive molecular trigger. To this end, liposomes were equipped with amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin that was covalently labeled with azobenzene. Using dye encapsulation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that the permeability of these vesicles strongly increases upon UV irradiation (λ = 350 nm) with concomitant isomerization of apolar trans-azobenzene to polar cis-azobenzene on the liposome surface. PMID:24287588

  11. Iron abundance and magnetic permeability of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.; Dyal, P.

    1974-01-01

    A larger set of simultaneous data from the Apollo 12 lunar surface magnetometer and the Explorer 35 Ames magnetometer are used to construct a whole-moon hysteresis curve, from which a new value of global lunar permeability is determined to be mu = 1.012 + or - 0.006. The corresponding global induced dipole moment is 2.1 times ten to the eighteenth power gauss-cu cm for typical inducing fields of one ten-thousandth gauss in the lunar environment. From the permeability measurement, lunar free iron abundance is determined to be 2.5 + or - 2.0 wt %. Total iron abundance (sum of iron in the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states) is calculated for two assumed compositional models of the lunar interior: a free iron/orthopyroxene lunar composition and a free iron/olivine composition. The overall lunar total iron abundance is determined to be 9.0 + or - 4.7 wt %. Other lunar models with a small iron core and with a shallow iron-rich layer are discussed in light of the measured global permeability. Effects on permeability and iron content calculations due to a possible lunar ionosphere are also considered.

  12. Iron abundance and magnetic permeability of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.; Dyal, P.

    1974-01-01

    A set of simultaneous data from the Apollo 12 lunar surface magnetometer and the Explorer 35 Ames magnetometer are used to construct a whole-moon hysteresis curve, from which a new value of global lunar permeability is determined to be mu = 1.012 + or - 0.006. The corresponding global induced dipole moment is 2.1 x 10 to the 18th power gauss-cucm for typical inducing fields of .1000 gauss in the lunar environment. From the permeability measurement, lunar free iron abundance is determined to be 2.5 + or - 2.0 wt. %. Total iron abundance is calculated for two assumed compositional models of the lunar interior: a free iron/orthopyroxene lunar composition and a free iron/olivine composition. The overall lunar total iron abundance is determined to be 9.0 + or - 4.7 wt. %. Other lunar models with a small iron core and with a shallow iron-rich layer are discussed in light of the measured global permeability. Effects on permeability and iron content calculations due to a possible lunar ionosphere are also considered.

  13. Drainage hydraulics of permeable friction courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbeneau, Randall J.; Barrett, Michael E.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes solutions to the hydraulic equations that govern flow in permeable friction courses (PFC). PFC is a layer of porous asphalt approximately 50 mm thick that is placed as an overlay on top of an existing conventional concrete or asphalt road surface to help control splash and hydroplaning, reduce noise, and enhance quality of storm water runoff. The primary objective of this manuscript is to present an analytical system of equations that can be used in design and analysis of PFC systems. The primary assumptions used in this analysis are that the flow can be modeled as one-dimensional, steady state Darcy-type flow and that slopes are sufficiently small so that the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumptions apply. Solutions are derived for cases where storm water drainage is confined to the PFC bed and for conditions where the PFC drainage capacity is exceeded and ponded sheet flow occurs across the pavement surface. The mathematical solutions provide the drainage characteristics (depth and residence time) as a function of rainfall intensity, PFC hydraulic conductivity, pavement slope, and maximum drainage path length.

  14. Cerebral and Tissue Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Hogue, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been increasingly adopted in cardiac surgery to measure regional cerebral oxygen saturation. This method takes advantage of the fact that light in the near-infrared spectrum penetrates tissue, including bone and muscle. Sensors are placed at fixed distances from a light emitter, and algorithms subtract superficial light absorption from deep absorption to provide an index of tissue oxygenation. Although the popularity of NIRS monitoring is growing, definitive data that prove outcome benefits with its use remain sparse. Therefore, widespread, routine use of NIRS as a standard-of-care monitor cannot be recommended at present. Recent investigations have focused on the use of NIRS in subgroups that may benefit from NIRS monitoring, such as pediatric patients. Furthermore, a novel application of processed NIRS information for monitoring cerebral autoregulation and tissue oxygenation (e.g., kidneys and the gut) is promising. PMID:25480772

  15. Music and cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, M; Grassi, E; Latorraca, S; Caruso, A; Sorbi, S

    2000-09-01

    Previous studies performed by positron emission tomography and Transcranial Doppler (TCD) found a different cerebral activation during musical stimuli in musicians compared to non-musicians. The aim of our study is to evaluate by means of TCD, possible different pattern of cerebral activation during the performance of different musical tasks in musicians, non-musicians and lyrical singers. Our findings show a left hemispheric activation in musicians and a right one in non-musicians. Preliminary data on lyrical singers' activation patterns need further confirmation with a larger population. These data could be related to a different approach to music listening in musicians (analytical) and non-musicians who are supposed to have an emotional approach to music. PMID:10942664

  16. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    PubMed

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists. PMID:20183203

  17. Extreme Rainfall Impacts in Fractured Permeable Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    Serious groundwater flooding events have occurred on Chalk catchments in both the UK and north west Europe in the last decade, causing substantial amounts of disruption and economic damage. These fractured, permeable catchments are characterized by low surface runoff, high baseflow indices and strongly attenuated streamflow hydrographs. They have a general resilience to drought and pluvial/fluvial flooding. The small pore size of the Chalk matrix (~ 1 µm) exerts a high suction, such that dynamic storage is primarily due to the fractures, and amounts to ~ 1% of the total volume. As a result, under sustained rainfall the water table can rise up to exceptional levels leading to surface water emergence from springs and valleys. Floodwater may slowly drain with the topography, or, in localized depressions, it may simply pond until the groundwater levels decline. In winter 2000/1, a sequence of individually unexceptional rainfall events over several months led to large scale flooding in the Pang catchment, Berkshire, UK. By contrast, an extreme rainfall event on 20th July 2007 in the same catchment caused a very rapid response at the water table, but due to the antecedent conditions did not lead to flooding. The objective of this study is to quantify how the water table in a fractured permeable catchment responds to different types of rainfall, and the implications of this for groundwater flooding. We make use of measurements from the Pang catchment, including: rainfall (tipping bucket gauges); actual evaporation (eddy flux correlation); soil water content (profile probes and neutron probes); near surface matric potential (tensiometers and equitensiometers); deep (>10m) matric potential (deep jacking tensiometers); and water table elevation (piezometers). Conventional treatment of recharge in Chalk aquifers considers a fixed bypass component of rainfall, normally 15%, to account for the role of the fractures. However, interpretation of the field data suggest three modes

  18. Variation of Permeability with Porosity in Sandstone Diagenesis Interpreted with a Fractal Pore Space Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, H.; Clauser, C.; Iffland, J.

    Permeability is one of the key rock properties for the management of hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs as well as for aquifers. The fundamental equation for estimating permeability is the Kozeny-Carman equation. It is based on a capillary bundle model and relates permeability to porosity, tortuosity and an effective hydraulic pore radius which is defined by this equation. Whereas in clean sands the effective pore radius can be replaced by the specific surface or by the grain radius in a simple way, the resulting equations for permeability cannot be applied to consolidated rocks. Based on a fractal model for porous media, equations were therefore developed which adjust the measure of the specific surface and of the grain radius to the resolution length appropriate for the hydraulic process. These equations are calibrated by a large data set for permeability, formation factor, and porosity determined on sedimentary rocks. This fractal model yields tortuosity and effective pore radius as functions of porosity as well as a general permeability-porosity relationship, the coefficients of which are characteristic for different rock types. It can be applied to interpret the diagenetic evolution of the pore space of sedimentary rocks due to mechanical and chemical compaction with respect to porosity and permeability.

  19. A primate model for human cerebral malaria: Plasmodium coatneyi-infected rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, M; Brown, A; Smith, C D; Tegoshi, T; Howard, R J; Hasler, T H; Ito, Y; Perry, G; Collins, W E; Webster, K

    1992-04-01

    A major factor in the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria is blockage of cerebral microvessels by the sequestration of parasitized human red blood cells (PRBC). In vitro studies indicate that sequestration of PRBC in the microvessels is mediated by the attachment of knobs on PRBC to receptors on the endothelial cell surface such as CD36, thrombospondin (TSP), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). However, it is difficult to test this theory in vivo because fresh human brain tissues from cerebral malarial autopsy cases are not easy to obtain. Although several animal models for human cerebral malaria have been proposed, none have shown pathologic findings that are similar to those seen in humans. In order to develop an animal model for human cerebral malaria, we studied brains of rhesus monkeys infected with the primate malaria parasite, Plasmodium coatneyi. Our study demonstrated PRBC sequestration and cytoadherence of knobs on PRBC to endothelial cells in the cerebral microvessels of these monkeys. Cerebral microvessels with sequestered PRBC were shown by immunohistochemical analysis to possess CD36, TSP, and ICAM-1. These proteins were not evident in the cerebral microvessels of uninfected control monkeys. Thus, our study indicates, for the first time, that rhesus monkeys infected with P. coatneyi can be used as a primate model to study human cerebral malaria. By using this animal model, we may be able to evaluate strategies for the development of vaccines to prevent human cerebral malaria. PMID:1374220

  20. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  1. Effect of permeability on cooling of magmatic intrusion in a goethermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K.H.

    1980-09-01

    Transient cooling of magmatic intrusion in a geothermal reservoir due to conduction and convection is studied. The effects of overlying cap rock and different horizontal and vertical permeability of the reservoir are considered. Results are compared to the data from Salton Sea Geothermal Field. It is also observed that multiple layers of convection cells exist when horizontal permeability is much larger than the vertical permeability. The sharp dropoff of surface heat flow observed at Salton Sea Geothermal Field is confirmed by numerical results. Based on these numerical results, it is possible to speculate that the age of the intrusive body is about 8000 to 12,000 years.

  2. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  3. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  4. A method of determination of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S.V.; Trofimov, V.A.

    2007-11-15

    A method is proposed for determining permeability of coals under conditions of steady-state deformation and stationary filtration mode by employing a reference core made of gas-non-sorbing material with a known permeability. The approach has been developed to assess the time of transition to the stable filtration.

  5. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  6. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  7. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  8. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  9. Permeability changes in layered sediments: impact of particle release.

    PubMed

    Blume, Theresa; Weisbrod, Noam; Selker, John S

    2002-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of sudden particle release from grain surfaces in natural porous media is a decrease in salt concentration of the permeating fluid to below the critical salt concentration. Particle release can cause a change in hydraulic conductivity of the matrix, either by washing out the fines and thus increasing the pore sizes or by the plugging of pore constrictions. The phenomenon of permeability changes as a result of particle detachment was investigated in a series of column experiments. Coarse and fine sediments from the Hanford Formation in southeast Washington were tested. Columns were subject to a pulse of highly saline solution (NaNO3) followed by a fresh water shock causing particle release. Outflow rates and changes in hydraulic head as well as electric conductivity and pH were monitored over time. No permeability decrease occurred within the coarse matrix alone. However, when a thin layer of fine sediment was embedded within the coarse material (mimicking field conditions at the Hanford site), permeability irreversibly decreased to 10% to 20% of the initial value. Evidence suggests that most of this permeability decrease was a result of particles detached within the fine layer and its subsequent clogging. An additional observation was a sudden increase in pH in the outflow solution, generated in situ during the fresh water shock. Because layered systems are common in natural settings, our results suggest that alteration between sodium solution and fresh water can lead to particle release and subsequently reduce the overall permeability of the matrix. PMID:12236259

  10. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2011-09-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm) - three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  11. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2012-07-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950°C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm)—three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  12. Permeability & Grain Size Distribution of Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Chen, J.; Ma, S.

    2010-12-01

    Permeability and grain size distribution of fault rocks from two outcrops of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone were measured. The results show that the permeability (at 40MPa) varies obviously across the fault zone, from 10-13 m2 -10-15 m2 for fractured and shattered breccias, ~ 10-17 m2 for crushed breccias to 10-18 m2 - <10-19 m2 for fresh gouges and country rocks. Particle sizes dominate the permeability of the fault rocks. The more the percentage of fine particles is, the lower the permeability is. Due to the impermeable gouges and permeable fractured breccias, seismic fault zone is characterized by anisotropy for fluid flowing. Fluids cycle along fault zone easily if breccias are not cemented. Two methods, sieve weighting and laser analyzer, were combined to analyze the grain size distribution of the fault rocks. The measurements indicate that the slope of log(N) ~ log(d) changes at a critical diameter dc with 1 - 2 mm, which corresponds to grinding limit of rocks and may represent a change from grinding process to attrition one. The fractal dimension (D), calculated based on the grains with size larger than dc, of gouges is higher than 3.0 with the fresh gouges having the highest value (≥ 3.4), of crushed breccias ranges from 2.56 to 2.99, and of fractured and shattered breccias has the lowest value, about 2.63 in average. However, the fractal dimension matching smaller grains (> 2 mm) becomes much lower, ranging from 1.7 to 2.2. It is expected that the estimation of surface fracture energy associated with faulting is less than that we thought if the grain size distribution is considered.

  13. Effects of ozone on airway epithelial permeability and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, P A; Ranga, V; Stutts, M J

    1991-12-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive form of oxygen produced in the atmosphere by photochemical reactions involving substrates emitted from automobile engines. Outdoor air concentrations as high as 0.4 parts per million (ppm) occur. The respiratory tract extracts about 90% of inhaled ozone. From the chemical reactivity of ozone, it is expected to attack organic molecules located on or near the respiratory surfaces. The airways are covered with a cohesive layer of epithelial cells that forms the boundary between the external environment and the respiratory tissues. One important role of this epithelial layer is its barrier function. Airborne particles that deposit (and dissolve) in the airway surface liquid are not readily absorbed, and soluble tissue components are excluded from the surface liquid. The epithelium also controls the volume and composition of the surface liquid. One important process in this regard is the absorption and secretion of ions and water. We have studied the effects of inhalation of ozone on the barrier function (permeability to dissolved molecules) and the ion transport activity of epithelium using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. All our experiments were performed with male Hartley strain guinea pigs. Conscious, unrestrained animals were exposed to a concentration of ozone of 1 ppm for three hours in controlled environmental chambers in the Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, NC. Such exposures caused a marked increase in the rate of appearance in blood of various water-soluble compounds instilled onto the surface of the trachea, indicating increased permeability of the airway epithelium. This interpretation was supported by electron microscopy, which showed that the tracer molecule horseradish peroxidase was present in the intercellular spaces of tracheal epithelium from ozone-exposed, but not air-exposed (control), animals. However, when the tracheas were excised after ozone

  14. Permeability-Porosity Relationships in Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gittings, H.; Tivey, M. K.

    2003-12-01

    To map out the thermal and chemical regimes within vent deposits where micro-and macro-organisms reside requires accurate modeling of mixing and reaction between hydrothermal fluid and seawater within the vent structures. However, a critical piece of information, quantitative knowledge of the permeability of vent deposits, and how it relates to porosity and pore geometry, is still missing. To address this, systematic laboratory measurements of permeability and porosity were conducted on 3 large vent structures from the Mothra Hydrothermal vent field on the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Twenty-five cylindrical cores with diameters of 2.54 cm and various lengths were taken from Phang (a tall sulfide-dominated spire that was not actively venting when sampled), Roane (a lower temperature spire with dense macrofaunal communities growing on its sides that was venting diffuse fluid of < 300° C) and Finn (an active black smoker with a well-defined inner conduit that was venting 302° C fluids prior to recovery (Delaney et al., 2000; Kelley et al, 2000)). Measurements were made to obtain porosity and permeability of these drill cores using a helium porosimeter (UltraPoreTM300) and a nitrogen permeameter (UltrapermTM400) from Core Laboratories Instruments. The porosimeter uses Boyle's law to determine pore volume from the expansion of a know mass of helium into a calibrated sample holder, whereas the permeameter uses Darcy's law to determine permeability by measuring the steady-state flow rate through the sample under a given pressure gradient. A moderate confining pressure of 1.38 MPa was applied during the measurements to prevent leakage between the sample surface and the sample holder. The permeability and porosity relationship is best described by two different power law relationships with exponents of ˜9 (group I) and ˜3 (group II), respectively. Microstructural observations suggest that the difference in the two permeability-porosity relationships

  15. Three Permeable Pavements Performances for Priority Metal Pollutants and Metals associated with Deicing Chemicals from Edison Parking Lot, NJ - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency constructed a 4000-m2 parking lot in Edison, New Jersey in 2009. The parking lot is surfaced with three permeable pavements [permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA)]. Samples of each p...

  16. Three Permeable Pavements Performances for Priority Metal Pollutants and Metals Associated with Deicing Chemicals from Edison Parking Lot, NJ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency constructed a 4000-m2 parking lot in Edison, New Jersey in 2009. The parking lot is surfaced with three permeable pavements [permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA)]. Samples of each p...

  17. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO2, shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10-19 m2; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10-17 m2; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens' permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  18. The role of water in protoplasmic permeability and in antagonism.

    PubMed

    OSTERHOUT, W J

    1956-07-20

    The behavior of the cell depends to a large extent on the permeability of the outer non-aqueous surface layer of the protoplasm. This layer is immiscible with water but may be quite permeable to it. It seems possible that a reversible increase or decrease in permeability may be due to a corresponding increase or decrease in the water content of the non-aqueous surface layer. Irreversible increase in permeability need not be due primarily to increase in the water content of the surface layer but may be caused chiefly by changes in the protoplasm on which the surface layer rests. It may include desiccation, precipitation, and other alterations. An artificial cell is described in which the outer protoplasmic surface layer is represented by a layer of guaiacol on one side of which is a solution of KOH + KCl representing the external medium and on the other side is a solution of CO(2) representing the protoplasm. The K(+) unites with guaiacol and diffuses across to the artificial protoplasm where its concentration becomes higher than in the external solution. The guaiacol molecule thus acts as a carrier molecule which transports K(+) from the external medium across the protoplasmic surface. The outer part of the protoplasm may contain relatively few potassium ions so that the outwardly directed potential at the outer protoplasmic surface may be small but the inner part of the protoplasm may contain more potassium ions. This may happen when potassium enters in combination with carrier molecules which do not completely dissociate until they reach the vacuole. Injury and recovery from injury may be studied by measuring the movements of water into and out of the cell. Metabolism by producing CO(2) and other acids may lower the pH and cause local shrinkage of the protoplasm which may lead to protoplasmic motion. Antagonism between Na(+) and Ca(++) appears to be due to the fact that in solutions of NaCl the surface layer takes up an excessive amount of water and this may be

  19. Cracks in the Palisade Cuticle of Soybean Seed Coats Correlate with their Permeability to Water

    PubMed Central

    MA, FENGSHAN; CHOLEWA, EWA; MOHAMED, TASNEEM; PETERSON, CAROL A.; GIJZEN, MARK

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Soybean (Glycine max) is among the many legumes that are well known for ‘hardseededness’. This feature can be beneficial for long-term seed survival, but is undesirable for the food processing industry. There is substantial disagreement concerning the mechanisms and related structures that control the permeability properties of soybean seed coats. In this work, the structural component that controls water entry into the seed is identified. • Methods Six soybean cultivars were tested for their seed coat permeabilities to water. To identify the structural feature(s) that may contribute to the determination of these permeabilities, fluorescent tracer dyes, and light and electron microscopic techniques were used. • Key Results The cultivar ‘Tachanagaha’ has the most permeable seed coat, ‘OX 951’ the least permeable seed coat, and the permeabilities of the rest (‘Harovinton’, ‘Williams’, ‘Clark L 67-3469’, and ‘Harosoy 63’) are intermediate. All seeds have surface deposits, depressions, a light line, and a cuticle about 0·2 µm thick overlaying the palisade layer. In permeable cultivars the cuticle tends to break, whereas in impermeable seeds of ‘OX 951’ it remains intact. In the case of permeable seed coats, the majority of the cracks are from 1 to 5 µm wide and from 20 to 200 µm long, and occur more frequently on the dorsal side than in other regions of the seed coat, a position that correlates with the site of initial water uptake. • Conclusions The cuticle of the palisade layer is the key factor that determines the permeability property of a soybean seed coat. The cuticle of a permeable seed coat is mechanically weak and develops small cracks through which water can pass. The cuticle of an impermeable seed coat is mechanically strong and does not crack under normal circumstances. PMID:15217785

  20. Seasonal evolution of snow permeability under equi-temperature and temperature-gradient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domine, F.; Morin, S.; Brun, E.; Lafaysse, M.; Carmagnola, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The permeability (K) of snow to air flow affects the transfer of energy, water vapor and chemical species between the snow and the atmosphere. Yet today little is known about the temporal evolution of snow permeability as a function of metamorphic regime. Furthermore, our ability to simulate snow permeability over the seasonal evolution of a snowpack has not been tested. Here we have measured the evolution of snow permeability in a subarctic snowpack subject to high temperature-gradient (TG) metamorphism. We have also measured the evolution of the same snowpack deposited over tables so that it evolved in the equi-temperature (ET) regime. Permeability varies in the range 31 × 10-10 (ET regime) to 650 × 10-10 m2 (TG regime). Permeability increases over time in TG conditions and decreases under ET conditions. Using measurements of density ρ and of specific surface area (SSA), from which the equivalent sphere radius r is determined, we show that the equation linking SSA, density ρ and permeability, K = 3.0 r2 e(-0.013 ρ) (with K in m2, r in m and ρ in kg m-3) obtained in a previous study adequately predicts permeability values. The detailed snowpack model Crocus is used to simulate the physical properties of the TG and ET snowpacks. For the most part, all variables are well reproduced. Simulated permeabilities are up to a factor of two greater than measurements for depth hoar layers, which we attribute to snow microstructure and its aerodynamic properties. Finally, the large difference in permeabilities between ET and TG metamorphic regimes will impact atmosphere-snow energy and mass exchanges. These effects deserve consideration in predicting the effect of climate change on snow properties and snow-atmosphere interactions.

  1. Permittivity and permeability of semi-infinite metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porvatkina, O. V.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    In our work we investigate dielectric and magnetic properties of semi-infinite metamaterial consisting of particles of different possible nature: atoms, molecules, nanoparticles, etc. It is important that these particles would have magnetic properties. Polarization of a near-surface layer is known to differ from its bulk value for non-magnetic materials; for magnetic materials, including metamaterials, the situation should be similar, which is the subject of our research. We obtain analogues of the Clausius-Mossotti relation both for permittivity and permeability taking into account the local field effects in the longwave approximation for semi-infinite metamaterial. These relations describe the connection between macroscopic characteristics of the semi-infinite metamaterial (permittivity and permeability) and characteristics of constituent particles (dielectric polarizability and magnetic polarizability), which is a bright example of multi-scale approach - method very popular today in physical and computer simulating.

  2. Changes in Permeability Produced By Distant Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, M.; Wang, C. Y.; Shi, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Oscillations in stress, such as those created by earthquakes, can increase permeability and fluid mobility in geologic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes as small as 10-6 can increase discharge in streams and springs, change the water level of wells, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to pre-stimulated values over a period of months to years. This presentation will review some of the observations that indicate that dynamic stresses produced by seismic waves change permeability. We use the response of a set of wells distributed throughout China to multiple large earthquakes to probe the relationship between earthquake-generated stresses and water-level changes in wells. We find that dynamic stresses dominate the responses at distances more than 1 fault length from the earthquake and that permeability changes may explain the water level changes. Regions with high deformation rates are most sensitive to seismic waves. We also consider the response of a large alluvial fan in Taiwan to the 1999 M7.5 Chi-Chi earthquake where there were sustained changes in groundwater temperature after the earthquake. Using groundwater flow models, we infer that permeability increased by an order of magnitude over horizontal scales of tens of km, and vertical scales of several km. Permeability returned to the pre-earthquake value over many months. As much as half the total transport in the fan occurs during the short time periods with enhanced permeability.

  3. Using magnetic permeability bits to store information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerwilke, John; Petrie, J. R.; Wieland, K. A.; Mencia, Raymond; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Cress, C. D.; Newburgh, G. A.; Edelstein, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    Steps are described in the development of a new magnetic memory technology, based on states with different magnetic permeability, with the capability to reliably store large amounts of information in a high-density form for decades. The advantages of using the permeability to store information include an insensitivity to accidental exposure to magnetic fields or temperature changes, both of which are known to corrupt memory approaches that rely on remanent magnetization. The high permeability media investigated consists of either films of Metglas 2826 MB (Fe40Ni38Mo4B18) or bilayers of permalloy (Ni78Fe22)/Cu. Regions of films of the high permeability media were converted thermally to low permeability regions by laser or ohmic heating. The permeability of the bits was read by detecting changes of an external 32 Oe probe field using a magnetic tunnel junction 10 μm away from the media. Metglas bits were written with 100 μs laser pulses and arrays of 300 nm diameter bits were read. The high and low permeability bits written using bilayers of permalloy/Cu are not affected by 10 Mrad(Si) of gamma radiation from a 60Co source. An economical route for writing and reading bits as small at 20 nm using a variation of heat assisted magnetic recording is discussed.

  4. The adaptation of the cerebral circulation to pregnancy: mechanisms and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of the cerebral circulation to pregnancy is unique from other vascular beds. Most notably, the growth and vasodilatory response to high levels of circulating growth factors and cytokines that promote substantial hemodynamic changes in other vascular beds is limited in the cerebral circulation. This is accomplished through several mechanisms, including downregulation of key receptors and transcription factors, and production of circulating factors that counteract the vasodilatory effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor. Pregnancy both prevents and reverses hypertensive inward remodeling of cerebral arteries, possibly through downregulation of the angiotensin type 1 receptor. The blood–brain barrier (BBB) importantly adapts to pregnancy by preventing the passage of seizure provoking serum into the brain and limiting the permeability effects of VEGF that is more highly expressed in cerebral vasculature during pregnancy. While the adaptation of the cerebral circulation to pregnancy provides for relatively normal cerebral blood flow and BBB properties in the face of substantial cardiovascular changes and high levels of circulating factors, under pathologic conditions, these adaptations appear to promote greater brain injury, including edema formation during acute hypertension, and greater sensitivity to bacterial endotoxin. PMID:23321787

  5. Middle Cerebral Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Calcification of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is uncommon in the healthy elderly. Whether calcification of the MCA is associated with cerebral ischemic stroke remains undetermined. We intended to investigate the association using Agatston calcium scoring of the MCA. This study retrospectively included 354 subjects with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory and 1518 control subjects who underwent computed tomography (CT) of the brain. We recorded major known risk factors for ischemic stroke, including age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and obesity, along with the MCA calcium burden, measured with the Agatston calcium scoring method. Univariate and modified logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between the MCA calcification and ischemic stroke. The univariate analyses showed significant associations of ischemic stroke with age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, total MCA Agatston score, and the presence of calcification on both or either side of the MCA. Subjects with the presence of MCA calcification on both or either side of the MCA were 8.46 times (95% confidence interval, 4.93–14.53; P < 0.001) more likely to have a cerebral infarct than subjects without MCA calcification after adjustment for the major known risk factors, including age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. However, a higher degree of MCA calcification reflected by the Agatston score was not associated with higher risk of MCA ischemic stroke after adjustment for the confounding factors and presence of MCA calcification. These results suggest that MCA calcification is associated with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory. Further prospective studies are required to verify the clinical implications of the MCA calcification. PMID:26683969

  6. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  7. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uygun, M A; Ozkal, E; Acar, O; Erongun, U

    1996-01-01

    Hyponatremia following acute or chronic central nervous system injury which is due to excessive Na+ loss in the urine without an increase in the body fluid, has been described as Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS). This syndrome is often confused with dilutional hyponatremia secondary to inappropriate ADH secretion. Accurate diagnosis and management are mandatory for to improve the course of the disease. In this study a patient with CSW Syndrome is presented and the treatment and diagnosis of this syndrome are discussed in view of the literature.

  8. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  9. Fault Zone Architecture and Permeability-Structure Evolution in Basalts: the Generation of Fluid-Flow Pathways in low Permeability Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. J.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Armitage, P. J.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding fluid flow and sealing potential in basaltic sequences is becoming increasingly important with the rising economic significance of intra- and sub-volcanic hydrocarbon plays. Fluid flow in upper-crustal brittle fault zones is dependent on the permeability of the fault rock assemblage and its architecture. Models for clastic sedimentary sequences typically involve a low-permeability fault core surrounded by a high-permeability damage zone, relative to the intermediate permeability of the undeformed host rock. Here we present a combined field, microstructural and experimental characterization of basalt-hosted fault zones from the Faroe Islands. Samples that are representative of the various fault zone components, and of early to late stage fault development, were used for experimental determination of the permeability structure of faults in basalts. Fault rock characterization reveals that the intensity of fault-associated brittle deformation increases towards the principal slip surface, from crackle and mosaic breccias, to chaotic breccias and cataclasite along the principal slip zone. Identified breccia styles involve collapse/infill, wear/abrasion, and implosion processes, which respectively indicate increasingly short-lived syn-kinematic permeability. Collapse/infill breccias indicate sustained fluid-migration pathways, as they require open, subterranean cavities that are formed faster than mineral precipitation can seal them. Wear/abrasion and implosion breccias record crack-seal behaviour during successive slip events. Experimental permeability measurements were performed with argon gas, at a range of confining pressures (20-200 MPa) and constant fluid pressure (10 MPa) using the Transient Pulse Decay technique. Results indicate that, within the depth range of ~0.3 to ~3.0 km, basalt-hosted faults evolve from relatively low-permeability mm-cm-scale displacement structures (e.g. ~9.47x10-18 to 3.40x10-19 m2), to relatively high-permeability metre

  10. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  11. Cocrystals of Hydrochlorothiazide: Solubility and Diffusion/Permeability Enhancements through Drug-Coformer Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sanphui, Palash; Devi, V Kusum; Clara, Deepa; Malviya, Nidhi; Ganguly, Somnath; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-05-01

    Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) is a diuretic and a BCS class IV drug with low solubility and low permeability, exhibiting poor oral absorption. The present study attempts to improve the physicochemical properties of the drug using a crystal engineering approach with cocrystals. Such multicomponent crystals of HCT with nicotinic acid (NIC), nicotinamide (NCT), 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), succinamide (SAM), and resorcinol (RES) were prepared using liquid-assisted grinding, and their solubilities in pH 7.4 buffer were evaluated. Diffusion and membrane permeability were studied using a Franz diffusion cell. Except for the SAM and NIC cocrystals, all other binary systems exhibited improved solubility. All of the cocrystals showed improved diffusion/membrane permeability compared to that of HCT with the exception of the SAM cocrystal. When the solubility was high, as in the case of PABA, NCT, and RES cocrystals, the flux/permeability dropped slightly. This is in agreement with the expected interplay between solubility and permeability. Improved solubility/permeability is attributed to new drug-coformer interactions. Cocrystals of SAM, however, showed poor solubility and flux. This cocrystal contains a primary sulfonamide dimer synthon similar to that of HCT polymorphs, which may be a reason for its unusual behavior. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out in all cases to determine whether a correlation exists between cocrystal permeability and drug-coformer interactions. PMID:25800383

  12. Cocrystals of Hydrochlorothiazide: Solubility and Diffusion/Permeability Enhancements through Drug-Coformer Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sanphui, Palash; Devi, V Kusum; Clara, Deepa; Malviya, Nidhi; Ganguly, Somnath; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-05-01

    Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) is a diuretic and a BCS class IV drug with low solubility and low permeability, exhibiting poor oral absorption. The present study attempts to improve the physicochemical properties of the drug using a crystal engineering approach with cocrystals. Such multicomponent crystals of HCT with nicotinic acid (NIC), nicotinamide (NCT), 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), succinamide (SAM), and resorcinol (RES) were prepared using liquid-assisted grinding, and their solubilities in pH 7.4 buffer were evaluated. Diffusion and membrane permeability were studied using a Franz diffusion cell. Except for the SAM and NIC cocrystals, all other binary systems exhibited improved solubility. All of the cocrystals showed improved diffusion/membrane permeability compared to that of HCT with the exception of the SAM cocrystal. When the solubility was high, as in the case of PABA, NCT, and RES cocrystals, the flux/permeability dropped slightly. This is in agreement with the expected interplay between solubility and permeability. Improved solubility/permeability is attributed to new drug-coformer interactions. Cocrystals of SAM, however, showed poor solubility and flux. This cocrystal contains a primary sulfonamide dimer synthon similar to that of HCT polymorphs, which may be a reason for its unusual behavior. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out in all cases to determine whether a correlation exists between cocrystal permeability and drug-coformer interactions.

  13. Decision trees to characterise the roles of permeability and solubility on the prediction of oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Newby, Danielle; Freitas, Alex A; Ghafourian, Taravat

    2015-01-27

    Oral absorption of compounds depends on many physiological, physiochemical and formulation factors. Two important properties that govern oral absorption are in vitro permeability and solubility, which are commonly used as indicators of human intestinal absorption. Despite this, the nature and exact characteristics of the relationship between these parameters are not well understood. In this study a large dataset of human intestinal absorption was collated along with in vitro permeability, aqueous solubility, melting point, and maximum dose for the same compounds. The dataset allowed a permeability threshold to be established objectively to predict high or low intestinal absorption. Using this permeability threshold, classification decision trees incorporating a solubility-related parameter such as experimental or predicted solubility, or the melting point based absorption potential (MPbAP), along with structural molecular descriptors were developed and validated to predict oral absorption class. The decision trees were able to determine the individual roles of permeability and solubility in oral absorption process. Poorly permeable compounds with high solubility show low intestinal absorption, whereas poorly water soluble compounds with high or low permeability may have high intestinal absorption provided that they have certain molecular characteristics such as a small polar surface or specific topology.

  14. Diabetic microangiopathy: impact of impaired cerebral vasoreactivity and delayed angiogenesis after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion on stroke damage and cerebral repair in mice.

    PubMed

    Poittevin, Marine; Bonnin, Philippe; Pimpie, Cynthia; Rivière, Léa; Sebrié, Catherine; Dohan, Anthony; Pocard, Marc; Charriaut-Marlangue, Christiane; Kubis, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of stroke by three, increases related mortality, and delays recovery. We aimed to characterize functional and structural alterations in cerebral microvasculature before and after experimental cerebral ischemia in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that preexisting brain microvascular disease in patients with diabetes might partly explain increased stroke severity and impact on outcome. Diabetes was induced in 4-week-old C57Bl/6J mice by intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). After 8 weeks of diabetes, the vasoreactivity of the neurovascular network to CO2 was abolished and was not reversed by nitric oxide (NO) donor administration; endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) mRNA, phospho-eNOS protein, nNOS, and phospho-nNOS protein were significantly decreased; angiogenic and vessel maturation factors (vascular endothelial growth factor a [VEGFa], angiopoietin 1 (Ang1), Ang2, transforming growth factor-β [TGF-β], and platelet-derived growth factor-β [PDGF-β]) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) occludin and zona occludens 1 (ZO-1) expression were significantly decreased; and microvessel density was increased without changes in ultrastructural imaging. After permanent focal cerebral ischemia induction, infarct volume and neurological deficit were significantly increased at D1 and D7, and neuronal death (TUNEL+ / NeuN+ cells) and BBB permeability (extravasation of Evans blue) at D1. At D7, CD31+ / Ki67+ double-immunolabeled cells and VEGFa and Ang2 expression were significantly increased, indicating delayed angiogenesis. We show that cerebral microangiopathy thus partly explains stroke severity in diabetes. PMID:25288671

  15. Angiotensin II increases the permeability and PV-1 expression of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Csaba; Nagy, János Péter; Végh, Borbála; Németh, Adrienn; Jenei, Attila; MirzaHosseini, Shahrokh; Sebe, Attila; Rosivall, László

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II), the major effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), is a powerful vasoactive mediator associated with hypertension and renal failure. In this study the permeability changes and its morphological attributes in endothelial cells of human umbilical vein (HUVECs) were studied considering the potential regulatory role of ANG II. The effects of ANG II were compared with those of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Permeability was determined by 40 kDa FITC-Dextran and electrical impedance measurements. Plasmalemmal vesicle-1 (PV-1) mRNA levels were measured by PCR. Endothelial cell surface was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and caveolae were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in HUVEC monolayers. ANG II (10(-7) M), similarly to VEGF (100 ng/ml), increased the endothelial permeability parallel with an increase in the number of cell surface openings and caveolae. AT1 and VEGF-R2 receptor blockers (candesartan and ZM-323881, respectively) blunted these effects. ANG II and VEGF increased the expression of PV-1, which could be blocked by candesartan or ZM-323881 pretreatments and by the p38 mitogem-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitor SB-203580. Additionally, SB-203580 blocked the increase in endothelial permeability and the number of surface openings and caveolae. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that ANG II plays a role in regulation of permeability and formation of cell surface openings through AT1 receptor and PV-1 protein synthesis in a p38 MAP kinase-dependent manner in endothelial cells. The surface openings that increase in parallel with permeability may represent transcellular channels, caveolae, or both. These morphological and permeability changes may be involved in (patho-) physiological effects of ANG II. PMID:22012329

  16. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Heye, Anna K; Thrippleton, Michael J; Armitage, Paul A; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C; Makin, Stephen D; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-01-15

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n=201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a "sham" DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and K(Trans) estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model in low-permeability

  17. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood–brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Heye, Anna K.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Armitage, Paul A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Makin, Stephen D.; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n = 201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a “sham” DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and KTrans estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model

  18. Monitoring Strategies in Permeable Pavement Systems to Optimize Maintenance Scheduling - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the surface in a permeable pavement system clogs and performance decreases, maintenance is required to preserve the design function. Currently, guidance is limited for scheduling maintenance on an as needed basis. Previous research has shown that surface clogging in a permea...

  19. Cerebral blood flow velocity in two patients with neonatal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, S; Seki, K; Yokota, S

    2001-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery of two patients who exhibited unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction during the neonatal period. Doppler studies demonstrated increases in cerebral blood flow velocity but decreases in the resistance index on the affected side of the middle cerebral artery in the neonate who developed hemiplegia with cystic encephalomalacia, although the neonate with normal neurologic outcome exhibited symmetric cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance index. The asymmetry in cerebral blood flow velocity measurements of both middle cerebral arteries may be useful to evaluate the severity of brain damage and predict the neurodevelopmental prognosis of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction. PMID:11377112

  20. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics.

  1. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders. PMID:1864252

  2. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  3. What constitutes cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Badawi, N; Watson, L; Petterson, B; Blair, E; Slee, J; Haan, E; Stanley, F

    1998-08-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term of convenience applied to a group of motor disorders of central origin defined by clinical description. It is not a diagnosis in that its application infers nothing about pathology, aetiology, or prognosis. It is an umbrella term covering a wide range of cerebral disorders which result in childhood motor impairment. The precise inclusion criteria vary with the objectives for using the term. For meaningful comparison of rates of CP, as performed by and between CP registers, it is important that the rates should be generated using the same criteria. As generally understood there must be motor impairment, and this impairment must stem from a malfunction of the brain (rather than spinal cord or muscles). Furthermore, the brain malfunction must be non-progressive and it must be manifest early in life. For the purposes of comparisons of rates across time even when the condition meets all the above criteria, it must not historically have been excluded from the category of CP. This paper addresses the problem of standardizing the inclusion criteria for selecting people included on CP registers with particular reference to this last criterion. PMID:9746004

  4. Measuring Permeability of Composite Cryotank Laminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Stanley T.; Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a test method developed to identify whether certain materials and material systems are suitable candidates for large pressurized reusable cryogenic tanks intended for use in current and future manned launch systems. It provides a quick way to screen numerous candidate materials for permeability under anticipated loading environments consistent with flight conditions, as well as addressing reusability issues. cryogenic tank, where the major design issue was hydrogen permeability. It was successfully used to evaluate samples subjected to biaxial loading while maintaining test temperatures near liquid hydrogen. After each sample was thermally preconditioned, a cyclic pressure load was applied to simulate the in-plane strain. First permeability was measured while a sample was under load. Then the sample was unloaded and allowed to return to ambient temperature. The test was repeated to simulate reusability, in order to evaluate its effects on material permeability.

  5. ULTRASTRUCTURE AND PERMEABILITY OF NUCLEAR MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Joseph; Spiro, David; Loewenstein, Werner R.

    1965-01-01

    The fine structures of nuclear envelopes known to have different permeability properties were compared. Membranes of salivary gland cell nuclei of Drosophila (third instar) and Chironomus (prepupae), which are strong barriers to ion diffusion, and membranes of oocyte nuclei (germinal vesicle) of Xenopus and Triturus, which are much more ion-permeable, show no essential difference in size, frequency, and distribution of their membrane gaps ("pores") which could account for the marked disparities in membrane permeability. The gaps are occupied by diffuse electron-opaque material with occasional central regions of strong opacity. This material may possibly account for the high diffusion resistance of Drosophila and Chironomus nuclear envelopes, where the resistance is far too great to allow free diffusion through the gaps. But material of this kind is also present in the more permeable nuclear envelopes of Xenopus and Triturus oocytes, and there are no convincing structural differences discernible with the techniques employed. PMID:5892850

  6. Variability of permeability with diameter of conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, J. A.; Olowofela, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    An entry length is always observed before laminar flow is achieved in fluid flowing in a conduit. This depends on the Reynolds number of the flow and the degree of smoothness of the conduit. This work examined this region and the point where laminar flow commences in the context of flow through conduit packed with porous material like beads, of known porosity. Using some theoretical assumptions, it is demonstrated that permeability varies from zero at wall-fluid boundary to maximum at mid-stream, creating a permeability profile similar to the velocity profile. An equation was obtained to establish this. We also found that peak values of permeability increase with increasing porosity, and therefore entry length increases with increasing porosity with all other parameters kept constant. A plot of peak permeability versus porosity revealed that they are linearly related.

  7. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  8. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  9. The Edison Environmental Center Permeable Pavement Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    This a presentation for a Community Outreach Event called "Chemistry Works and Celebration of International Year of Chemistry." It will review the permeable pavement research project at the Edison Environmental center.

  10. Flexible Sandwich Diaphragms Are Less Permeable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalovic, John G.; Vassallo, Franklin A.

    1993-01-01

    Diaphragms for use in refrigerator compressors made as laminates of commercially available elastomers and metals. Diaphragms flexible, but less permeable by chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant fluids than diaphragms made of homogeneous mixtures of materials.

  11. Regulation of endothelial permeability by second messengers.

    PubMed

    Siflinger-Birnboim, A; Malik, A B

    1996-02-01

    The mechanisms by which mediators such as oxidants released by neutrophil (PMN) activation increase endothelial permeability are poorly understood. The focus of this article is to identify some of these mechanisms. Studies using endothelial cell monolayers in culture have shown that PMN activation increases endothelial permeability both in the presence and absence of PMN-endothelial monolayer contact. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an oxidant released by PMN activation, plays an important role in PMN-induced increases in endothelial permeability. The results of these studies suggest that, as with other mediators of inflammation (e.g., histamine, thrombin) the mechanism of H2O2-induced increase in endothelial permeability involves activation of endothelial protein kinase C (PKC) and increase in endothelial cytosolic Ca2+.

  12. NASA In-step: Permeable Membrane Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Permeable Membrane Experiment are presented. An experiment overview is given. The Membrane Phase Separation Experiment, Membrane Diffusion Interference Experiment, and Membrane Wetting Experiment are described. Finally, summary and conclusions are discussed.

  13. Lunar electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Improved analytical techniques are applied to a large Apollo magnetometer data set to yield values of electroconductivity, temperature, magnetic permeability, and iron abundance. Average bulk electroconductivity of the moon is calculated to be .0007 mho/m; a rapid increase with depth to about .003 mho/m within 250 km is indicated. The temperature profile, obtained from the electroconductivity profile for olivine, indicates high lunar temperatures at relatively shallow depths. Magnetic permeability of the moon relative to its environment is calculated to be 1.008 plus or minus .005; a permeability relative to free space of 1.012 plus 0.011, minus 0.008 is obtained. Lunar iron abundances corresponding to this permeability value are 2.5 plus 2.3, minus 1.7 wt% free iron and 5.0-13.5 wt% total iron for a moon composed of a combination of free iron, olivine, and orthopyroxene.

  14. Permeability of rayon based polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    Several types of anomalous rayon based phenolic behavior have been observed in post-fired nozzles and exit cones. Many of these events have been shown to be related to the development of internal gas pressure within the material. The development of internal gas pressure is a function of the amount of gas produced within the material and the rate at which that gas is allowed to escape. The latter property of the material is referred to as the material's permeability. The permeability of two dimensional carbonized rayon based phenolic composites is a function of material direction, temperature, and stress/strain state. Recently significant differences in the permeability of these materials has been uncovered which may explain their inconsistent performance. This paper summarizes what is known about the permeability of these materials to date and gives possible implications of these finding to the performance of these materials in an ablative environment.

  15. Pneumatic fracturing of low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Schuring, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    Pneumatic fracturing of soils to enhance the removal and treatment of dense nonaqueous phase liquids is described. The process involves gas injection at a pressure exceeding the natural stresses and at a flow rate exceeding the permeability of the formation. The paper outlines geologic considerations, advantages and disadvantages, general technology considerations, low permeability media considerations, commercial availability, efficiency, and costs. Five case histories of remediation using pneumatic fracturing are briefly summarized. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Heavy Cigarette Smokers in a Chinese Population Display a Compromised Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shujun; Ye, Li; Lv, Chengzhi; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with various cutaneous disorders with defective permeability. Yet, whether cigarette smoking influences epidermal permeability barrier function is largely unknown. Here, we measured skin biophysical properties, including permeability barrier homeostasis, stratum corneum (SC) integrity, SC hydration, skin surface pH, and skin melanin/erythema index, in cigarette smokers. A total of 99 male volunteers were enrolled in this study. Smokers were categorized as light-to-moderate (<20 cigarettes/day) or heavy smokers (≥20 cigarettes/day). An MPA5 was used to measure SC hydration and skin melanin/erythema index on the dorsal hand, forehead, and cheek. Basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and barrier recovery rates were assessed on the forearm. A Skin-pH-Meter pH900 was used to measure skin surface pH. Our results showed that heavy cigarette smokers exhibited delayed barrier recovery after acute abrogation (1.02% ± 13.06 versus 16.48% ± 6.07), and barrier recovery rates correlated negatively with the number of daily cigarettes consumption (p = 0.0087). Changes in biophysical parameters in cigarette smokers varied with body sites. In conclusion, heavy cigarette smokers display compromised permeability barrier homeostasis, which could contribute, in part, to the increased prevalence of certain cutaneous disorders characterized by defective permeability. Thus, improving epidermal permeability barrier should be considered for heavy cigarette smokers. PMID:27437403

  17. Stereochemistry Balances Cell Permeability and Solubility in the Naturally Derived Phepropeptin Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Schwochert, Joshua; Lao, Yongtong; Pye, Cameron R; Naylor, Matthew R; Desai, Prashant V; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C; Barrett, Jaclyn A; Sawada, Geri; Blanco, Maria-Jesus; Lokey, R Scott

    2016-08-11

    Cyclic peptide (CP) natural products provide useful model systems for mapping "beyond-Rule-of-5" (bRo5) space. We identified the phepropeptins as natural product CPs with potential cell permeability. Synthesis of the phepropeptins and epimeric analogues revealed much more rapid cellular permeability for the natural stereochemical pattern. Despite being more cell permeable, the natural compounds exhibited similar aqueous solubility as the corresponding epimers, a phenomenon explained by solvent-dependent conformational flexibility among the natural compounds. When analyzing the polarity of the solution structures we found that neither the number of hydrogen bonds nor the total polar surface area accurately represents the solvation energies of the high and low dielectric conformations. This work adds to a growing number of natural CPs whose solvent-dependent conformational behavior allows for a balance between aqueous solubility and cell permeability, highlighting structural flexibility as an important consideration in the design of molecules in bRo5 chemical space.

  18. Ion permeability of polydopamine films revealed using a Prussian blue-based electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bowen; Su, Lei; Tong, Ying; Guan, Miao; Zhang, Xueji

    2014-11-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) is fast becoming a popular surface modification technique. Detailed understanding of the ion permeability properties of PDA films will improve their applications. Herein, we report for the first time the thickness-independent ion permeability of PDA films using a Prussian blue (PB)-based electrochemical method. In this method, PDA films are deposited via ammonium persulfate-induced dopamine polymerization onto a PB electrode. The ion permeability of the PDA films can thus be detected by observing the changes in electrochemical behaviors of the PB coated by PDA films. On the basis of this method, it was unexpectedly found that the PDA films with thickness greater than 45 nm (e.g., ~60 and ~113 nm) can exhibit pH-switchable but thickness-insensitive permeability to monovalent cations such as potassium and sodium ions. These observations clearly indicate the presence of a continuous network of interconnected intermolecular voids within PDA films, regardless of film thickness. PMID:25317484

  19. Stereochemistry Balances Cell Permeability and Solubility in the Naturally Derived Phepropeptin Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Schwochert, Joshua; Lao, Yongtong; Pye, Cameron R; Naylor, Matthew R; Desai, Prashant V; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C; Barrett, Jaclyn A; Sawada, Geri; Blanco, Maria-Jesus; Lokey, R Scott

    2016-08-11

    Cyclic peptide (CP) natural products provide useful model systems for mapping "beyond-Rule-of-5" (bRo5) space. We identified the phepropeptins as natural product CPs with potential cell permeability. Synthesis of the phepropeptins and epimeric analogues revealed much more rapid cellular permeability for the natural stereochemical pattern. Despite being more cell permeable, the natural compounds exhibited similar aqueous solubility as the corresponding epimers, a phenomenon explained by solvent-dependent conformational flexibility among the natural compounds. When analyzing the polarity of the solution structures we found that neither the number of hydrogen bonds nor the total polar surface area accurately represents the solvation energies of the high and low dielectric conformations. This work adds to a growing number of natural CPs whose solvent-dependent conformational behavior allows for a balance between aqueous solubility and cell permeability, highlighting structural flexibility as an important consideration in the design of molecules in bRo5 chemical space. PMID:27563399

  20. Interendothelial claudin-5 expression depends on cerebral endothelial cell–matrix adhesion by β1-integrins

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Takashi; Gu, Yu-Huan; Kanazawa, Masato; Tsubota, Yoshiaki; Hawkins, Brian T; Spatz, Maria; Milner, Richard; del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis tested by these studies states that in addition to interendothelial cell tight junction proteins, matrix adhesion by β1-integrin receptors expressed by endothelial cells have an important role in maintaining the cerebral microvessel permeability barrier. Primary brain endothelial cells from C57 BL/6 mice were incubated with β1-integrin function-blocking antibody (Ha2/5) or isotype control and the impacts on claudin-5 expression and microvessel permeability were quantified. Both flow cytometry and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the interendothelial claudin-5 expression by confluent endothelial cells was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner by Ha2/5 exposure relative to isotype. Furthermore, to assess the barrier properties, transendothelial electrical resistance and permeability measurements of the monolayer, and stereotaxic injection into the striatum of mice were performed. Ha2/5 incubation reduced the resistance of endothelial cell monolayers significantly, and significantly increased permeability to 40 and 150 kDa dextrans. Ha2/5 injection into mouse striatum produced significantly greater IgG extravasation than the isotype or the control injections. This study demonstrates that blockade of β1-integrin function changes interendothelial claudin-5 expression and increases microvessel permeability. Hence, endothelial cell–matrix interactions via β1-integrin directly affect interendothelial cell tight junction claudin-5 expression and brain microvascular permeability. PMID:21772312

  1. Computation of streaming potential in porous media: Modified permeability tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; DasGupta, Debabrata; Mitra, Sushanta K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-11-01

    We quantify the pressure-driven electrokinetic transport of electrolytes in porous media through a matched asymptotic expansion based method to obtain a homogenized description of the upscaled transport. The pressure driven flow of aqueous electrolytes over charged surfaces leads to the generation of an induced electric potential, commonly termed as the streaming potential. We derive an expression for the modified permeability tensor, K↔eff, which is analogous to the Darcy permeability tensor with due accounting for the induced streaming potential. The porous media herein are modeled as spatially periodic. The modified permeability tensor is obtained for both topographically simple and complex domains by enforcing a zero net global current. Towards resolving the complicated details of the porous medium in a computationally efficient framework, the domain identification and reconstruction of the geometries are performed using adaptive quadtree (in 2D) and octree (in 3D) algorithms, which allows one to resolve the solid-liquid interface as per the desired level of resolution. We discuss the influence of the induced streaming potential on the modification of the Darcy law in connection to transport processes through porous plugs, clays and soils by considering a case-study on Berea sandstone.

  2. Microfluidic Fabrication of Pluronic Vesicles with Controlled Permeability.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Débora F; Arriaga, Laura R; Eggersdorfer, Max; Ziblat, Roy; Marques, Maria de Fátima V; Reynaud, Franceline; Koehler, Stephan A; Weitz, David A

    2016-05-31

    Block copolymers with a low hydrophilic-to-lipophilic balance form membranes that are highly permeable to hydrophilic molecules. Polymersomes with this type of membrane enable the controllable release of molecules without membrane rupture. However, these polymersomes are difficult to assemble because of their low hydrophobicity. Here, we report a microfluidic approach to the production of these polymersomes using double-emulsion drops with ultrathin shells as templates. The small thickness of the middle oil phase enables the attraction of the hydrophobic blocks of the polymers adsorbed at each of the oil/water interfaces of the double emulsions; this results in the dewetting of the oil from the surface of the innermost water drops of the double emulsions and the ultimate formation of the polymersome. This approach to polymersome fabrication enables control of the vesicle size and results in the efficient encapsulation of hydrophilic ingredients that can be released through the polymer membrane without membrane rupture. We apply our approach to the fabrication of Pluronic L121 vesicles and characterize the permeability of their membranes. Furthermore, we show that membrane permeability can be tuned by blending different Pluronic polymers. Our work thus describes a route to producing Pluronic vesicles that are useful for the controlled release of hydrophilic ingredients. PMID:27192611

  3. Iron abundance and magnetic permeability of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.; Dyal, P.

    1974-01-01

    A larger set of simultaneous data from the Apollo 12 lunar surface magnetometer and the Explorer 35 Ames magnetometer are used to construct a whole-moon hysteresis curve, from which a new value of global lunar permeability is determined to be mu = 1.012 + or - 0.006. The corresponding global induced dipole moment is 2.1 x 10 to the 18th power gauss-cu cm for typical inducing fields of .0001 gauss in the lunar environment. From the permeability measurement, lunar free iron abundance is determined to be 2.5 + or - 2.0 wt. %. Total iron abundance (sum of iron in the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states) is calculated for two assumed compositional models of the lunar interior: a free iron/orthopyroxene lunar composition and a free iron/olivine composition. The overall lunar total iron abundance is determined to be 9.0 + or - 4.7 wt. %. Other lunar models with a small iron core and with a shallow iron-rich layer are discussed in light of the measured global permeability.

  4. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition to the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.

  5. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    DOE PAGES

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition tomore » the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.« less

  6. Cilostazol reduces blood brain barrier dysfunction, white matter lesion formation and motor deficits following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Edrissi, Hamidreza; Schock, Sarah C; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine M; Thompson, Charlie S

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a pathological process leading to lacunar infarcts, leukoaraiosis and cerebral microbleeds. Dysfunction of the blood brain barrier (BBB) has been proposed as a mechanism in the progression cerebral small vessel disease. A rodent model commonly used to study some aspects of CSVD is bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in the rat. In the present study it was determined that gait impairment, as determined by a tapered beam test, and BBB permeability increased following BCCAO. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to have anti-apoptotic effects and prevent white matter vacuolation and rarefaction induced by BCCAO in rats. In this study the protective effect of cilostazol administration on the increase BBB permeability following BCCAO was determined as well as the effect on plasma levels of circulating microparticles (MPs), cerebral white matter rarefaction, glial activation and gait disturbance. The effect of cilostazol on in vitro endothelial barriers was also evaluated. Cilostazol treatment improved BBB permeability and reduced gait disturbance, visual impairment and microglial activation in optic tract following BCCAO in vivo. It also reduced the degree of cell death and the reduction in trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in artificial endothelial barriers in vitro induced by MP treatment of in vitro barriers. PMID:27350079

  7. Bathing Techniques for Children Who Have Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunaway, Avtar; Klein, Marsha Dunn

    Helpful techniques are offered for making bathtime easier, safer, and more fun for children who have cerebral palsy. Safety in the bathtub is stressed, both for the child who needs protection from slippery surfaces and extreme water temperature, and for the caregiver who must lift and carry the child without causing injury to the lower back.…

  8. Simplified, noninvasive PET measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Iannotti, F.; Fieschi, C.; Alfano, B.; Picozzi, P.; Mansi, L.; Pozzilli, C.; Punzo, A.; Del Vecchio, G.; Lenzi, G.L.; Salvatore, M.

    1987-05-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to (/sup 68/Ga)EDTA was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in four normal volunteers and in 11 patients with brain tumors. A unidirectional transfer constant, Ki, was calculated applying multiple-time graphical analysis (MTGA). This method allows the detection of backflux from brain to blood and, by generalization, the measurement of the constant Kb (brain to blood). Furthermore, the need for an independent measurement of the intravascular tracer is obviated: MTGA itself provides an estimate of the cerebral plasma volume (Vp). In the four normal volunteers the Ki was 3.0 +/- 0.8 X 10(-4) ml g-1 min-1 (mean +/- SD) and the Vp 0.034 +/- 0.007 ml g-1. A net increase in Ki up to a maximum of 121.0 X 10(-4) ml g-1 min-1 (correspondent value of Kb = 0.025 min-1) as well as an increase of Vp was observed in malignant tumors. The input function was calculated using both the (/sup 68/Ga)EDTA concentration in sequential arterial blood samples and, noninvasively, the activity derived from the superior sagittal sinus image. The values of Ki and Vp from these two calculations were in good agreement. The application of MTGA to PET permits the evaluation of passage of substances across the BBB without making assumptions about the compartments in which the tracer distributes.

  9. Tumor vascular permeability factor stimulates endothelial cell growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, D T; Heuvelman, D M; Nelson, R; Olander, J V; Eppley, B L; Delfino, J J; Siegel, N R; Leimgruber, R M; Feder, J

    1989-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor (VPF) is an Mr 40-kD protein that has been purified from the conditioned medium of guinea pig line 10 tumor cells grown in vitro, and increases fluid permeability from blood vessels when injected intradermally. Addition of VPF to cultures of vascular endothelial cells in vitro unexpectedly stimulated cellular proliferation. VPF promoted the growth of new blood vessels when administered into healing rabbit bone grafts or rat corneas. The identity of the growth factor activity with VPF was established in four ways: (a) the molecular weight of the activity in preparative SDS-PAGE was the same as VPF (Mr approximately 40 kD); (b) multiple isoforms (pI greater than or equal to 8) for both VPF and the growth-promoting activity were observed; (c) a single, unique NH2-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained; (d) both growth factor and permeability-enhancing activities were immunoadsorbed using antipeptide IgG that recognized the amino terminus of VPF. Furthermore, 125I-VPF was shown to bind specifically and with high affinity to endothelial cells in vitro and could be chemically cross-linked to a high-molecular weight cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating a mechanism whereby VPF can interact directly with endothelial cells. Unlike other endothelial cell growth factors, VPF did not stimulate [3H]thymidine incorporation or promote growth of other cell types including mouse 3T3 fibroblasts or bovine smooth muscle cells. VPF, therefore, appears to be unique in its ability to specifically promote increased vascular permeability, endothelial cell growth, and angio-genesis. Images PMID:2478587

  10. A study of the relationship between permeability distributions and small scale sedimentary features in a fluvial formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gotkowitz, M.

    1993-10-01

    This study focuses on styles of small-scale heterogeneity found in fluvial sand and soil bodies. Over 1,700 in situ measurements of air permeability were taken in an outcrop-based study which joins observations of sedimentary features with their associated permeability distributions. The relationship between sedimentology and hydrologic parameters provides a geologic framework to assess geostatistical hypotheses. The soils in the study area are found to have a significantly lower permeability than the channel sand deposits. The soil deposits showed a significant lack of observable small scale sedimentary structures, which is reflected in the experimental variograms. The permeability distribution in these study sites appears to be adequately represented by a continuous gaussian random field model. The presence of calcium carbonate nodules in the soils is related to the permeability distribution. Correlation lengths in the channel sands perpendicular to stratigraphy are significantly shorter than those observed parallel to stratigraphy. A sedimentological, bounding surfaces model is evaluated with regard to permeability distributions. In deposits of little sedimentary structure, the mean and variance may adequately characterize the permeability distribution. Where significant sedimentary structure exists, the bounding surfaces model can be used to determine the scales of variability present in the permeability distribution and may also be used to infer an appropriate choice of random field model.

  11. Effects of pore-scale precipitation on permeability and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noiriel, Catherine; Steefel, Carl I.; Yang, Li; Bernard, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    The effects of calcite precipitation on porous media permeability and flow were evaluated with a combined experimental and modeling approach. X-ray microtomography images of two columns packed with glass beads and calcite (spar crystals) or aragonite (Bahamas ooids) injected with a supersaturated solution (log Ω = 1.42) were processed in order to calculate rates of calcite precipitation with a spatial resolution of 4.46 μm. Identification and localization of the newly precipitated crystals on the 3D images was performed and results used to calculate the crystal growth rates and velocities. The effects of carbonate precipitation were also evaluated in terms of the integrated precipitation rate over the length of the column, crystal shape, surface area and pore roughness changes. While growth was epitaxial on calcite spar, calcite rhombohedra formed on glass beads and clusters of polyhedrons formed on aragonite ooids. Near the column inlet, calcite precipitation occurred preferentially on carbonate grains compared to glass beads, with almost 100% of calcite spar surface area covered by new crystals versus 92% in the case of aragonite and 11% in the case of glass beads. Although the experimental chemistry and flow boundary conditions in the two columns were similar, their porosity-permeability evolution was different because the nucleation and subsequent crystal growth on the two substrates (i.e., calcite spar and aragonite ooids) was very different. The impact of mineral precipitation on pore-scale flow and permeability was evaluated using a pore-scale Stokes solver that accounted for the changes in pore geometry. For similar magnitude reductions in porosity, the decrease in permeability was highest within the sample that experienced the greatest increase in pore roughness. Various porous media models were generated to show the impact of different crystal growth patterns and pore roughness changes on flow and permeability-porosity relationship. Under constant flow

  12. Maturation of rat proximal tubule chloride permeability.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michel; Quigley, Raymond

    2005-12-01

    We have previously shown that neonate rabbit tubules have a lower chloride permeability but comparable mannitol permeability compared with adult proximal tubules. The surprising finding of lower chloride permeability in neonate proximals compared with adults impacts net chloride transport in this segment, which reabsorbs 60% of the filtered chloride in adults. However, this maturational difference in chloride permeability may not be applicable to other species. The present in vitro microperfusion study directly examined the chloride and mannitol permeability using in vitro perfused rat proximal tubules during postnatal maturation. Whereas there was no maturational change in mannitol permeability, chloride permeability was 6.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in neonate rat proximal convoluted tubule and 16.1 +/- 2.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in adult rat proximal convoluted tubule (P < 0.01). There was also a maturational increase in chloride permeability in the rat proximal straight tubule (5.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s vs. 9.3 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s, P < 0.01). There was no maturational change in bicarbonate-to-chloride permeabilities (P(HCO3)/P(Cl)) in the rat proximal straight tubules (PST) and proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) or in the sodium-to-chloride permeability (P(Na)/P(Cl)) in the proximal straight tubule; however, there was a significant maturational decrease in proximal convoluted tubule P(Na)/P(Cl) with postnatal development (1.31 +/- 0.12 in neonates vs. 0.75 +/- 0.06 in adults, P < 0.001). There was no difference in the transepithelial resistance measured by current injection and cable analysis in the PCT, but there was a maturational decrease in the PST (7.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 4.6 +/- 0.1 ohms x cm2, P < 0.05). These studies demonstrate there are maturational changes in the rat paracellular pathway that impact net NaCl transport during development. PMID:16051720

  13. Anesthesia and cerebral apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brée, B; Gourdin, M; De Kock, M

    2008-01-01

    General anesthetics interact with targets at the cellular and molecular levels. They have the potential to induce changes in the body and the brain. Usually, these interactions are thought to be short lasting. In contrast, recent evidences suggest that alcohol, a toxic sharing many mechanisms with general anesthetics, induces long term effect at these levels. This is particularly evident in the period of synaptogenesis during which alcohol can induce excessive cerebral apoptosis (histopathologic changes) in juvenile animal models. Even if the vast majority of our patients seems to completely restore homeostasis after general anesthesia, we don't know if the changes induced at the brain level in animal models exist in human. This article intends to supply biological, pharmacological and experimental basis for a possible long term effect of general anesthetics on the human developing brain. PMID:19051443

  14. The permeability of a keratinizing squamous epithelium in culture.

    PubMed

    Squier, C A; Fejerskov, O; Jepsen, A

    1978-05-01

    Horseradish peroxidase or lanthanum was applied to the surface of keratinized oral epithelium growing in tissue culture and the extent of penetration of these substances examined with the electron microscope. Both tracer substances penetrated between the superficial keratinized squames of the tissue, the lanthanum reaching the basal cell layer and the peroxidase diffusing to within 3--8 cells of the basal layer. The permeability of the keratinized layer in this epithelium is in contrast to the situation in vivo where an intercellular barrier is found in the superficial layer. This difference might be related to the absence of membrane-coating granules from the tissue maintained in culture.

  15. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  16. Biomechanical bases of rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davlet'yarova, K. V.; Korshunov, S. D.; Kapilevich, L. V.

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis and the study results of children's with cerebral palsy (CP) muscles bioelectrical activity while walking on a flat surface are represented. Increased flexion in the hip and shoulder joints and extension in the elbow joint in children with cerebral palsy were observed, with the movement of the lower limbs had less smooth character in comparison with the control group. Herewith, the oscillation amplitude was significantly increased, and the frequency in the m. gastrocnemius and m. lateralis was decreased. It was shown, that the dynamic stereotype of walking in children with cerebral palsy was characterized by excessive involvement of m. gastrocnemius and m.latissimus dorsi in locomotion. Thus, resulting biomechanical and bioelectrical parameters of walking should be considered in the rehabilitation programs development.

  17. Near-infrared fluorescent imaging of cerebral thrombi and blood-brain barrier disruption in a mouse model of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Eog; Schellingerhout, Dawid; Jaffer, Farouc A; Weissleder, Ralph; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2005-02-01

    An intravital microscopy imaging method was developed to visualize active cerebral thrombus and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption using Near Infrared Fluorescent (NIRF) probes. A circular craniotomy was made in CD-1 mice. Thrombi were formed by applying 10%-FeCl3 to the entire exposed superior sagittal sinus (SSS, 5 mm), or to the posterior 2.5 mm of the SSS for 5 mins. Control animals were pretreated with heparin (50 U/kg) before thrombus induction. Three hours after thrombus formation, a FXIIIa-targeted NIRF imaging probe (A15) was intravenously injected, and the SSS was imaged by intravital microscopy. This was followed by injection of indocyanine green (ICG) to assess BBB permeability. The A15 optical probe bound to thrombus, and the fluorescent signal emitted by the bound agent corresponded well with histologically confirmed thrombus. A15 initially remained intravascular, followed by excretion and subsequent decrease in all tissues except for thrombus, where it was retained. The subsequent ICG was also intravascular immediately after injection, but then began to leak into the cerebral parenchyma at 3 to 5 mins. The sites of leakage were adjacent to thrombosed areas. Heparin pretreatment prevented thrombus formation and reduced ICG leakage significantly. This demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous in vivo monitoring of thrombus and BBB permeability in an animal model of cerebral venous thrombosis.

  18. Heat Transfer Within a Fluid Filled Deformable Permeable Spherical Shell in Slow Viscous Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohais, R.

    2006-12-01

    Forced convective heat transfer is studied in a system of a fluid filled hollow permeable spherical shell set within a slow viscous flow of small Reynolds number, Re. The free fluid regions within and outside of the shell obey Stokesian flow theory while the fluid filled permeable region is governed by Darcy's law. The external surface of the shell is made deformable so that solutions can also be obtained for systems whose surfaces approach real bodies not possessing a spherical external surface. The well-known Beavers-Joseph slip boundary conditions are applied both to the internal and external surfaces of the shell to determine the analytical solutions for the fluid flow within the three regions. The further application of the energy equation to the system and the use of inhomogeneous mixed thermal boundary conditions on the two surfaces allow for analytic expressions to be obtained for the heat transfer up to O(PrRe), for small Re and Prandtl number, Pr of O(1). This study allows for the investigation of geothermal transport systems such as exists in certain ignimbrite terrains where ground water of meteoric origin is trapped and becomes superheated in underground systems. This water travels via cracks and faults to neighboring permeable structures with deformable surface layers and filters to a hollow core. Heat is transported not only by thermal conduction but by the convecting liquid as well. Analytic solutions such as the one presented here attest to the enhancement of heat transfer by permeable bodies.

  19. An improved technique for computing permeability from NMR measurements in mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Dugan, Brandon

    2011-08-01

    We develop a technique for extending nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) permeability estimation to clay-rich sediments. Our technique builds on the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) equation by using porosity, grain size, specific surface, and magnetic susceptibility data to yield more accurate permeability estimation in mudstones with large pore surface areas and complex mineralogies. Based on measurements of natural sediments as well as resedimented laboratory mixtures of silica, bentonite, and kaolinite powders, we find that our method predicts permeability values that match measured values over four orders of magnitude and among lithologies that vary widely in grain size, mineralogy, and surface area. Our results show that the relationship between NMR data and permeability is a function of mineralogy and grain geometry, and that permeability predictions in clay-rich sediments can be improved with insights regarding the nature of the pore system made by the Kozeny theory. This technique extends the utility of NMR measurements beyond typical reservoir-quality rocks to a wide range of lithologies.

  20. Strain-dependent permeability of volcanic rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    We explore permeability evolution during deformation of volcanic materials using a suite of rocks with varying compositions and physical properties (such as porosity ϕ). 40 mm × 20 mm cylindrical samples were made from a range of extrusive rocks, including andesites from Colima, Mexico (ϕ˜0.08; 0.18; 0.21), Kumamoto, Japan (ϕ˜0.13), and Ruapehu, New Zealand (ϕ˜0.15), and basalt from Mt Etna, Italy (ϕ˜0.04). Gas permeability of each sample was measured before and after triaxial deformation using a steady-state benchtop permeameter. To study the strain-dependence of permeability in volcanic rocks, we deformed samples to 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 % axial strain at a constant strain rate of 10‑5 s‑1. Further, the influence of failure mode - dilatant or compactant - on permeability was assessed by repeating experiments at different confining pressures. During triaxial deformation, porosity change of the samples was monitored by a servo-controlled pore fluid pump. Below an initial porosity of ˜0.18, and at low confining pressures (≤ 20 MPa), we observe a dilatant failure mode (shear fracture formation). With increasing axial strain, stress is accommodated by fault sliding and the generation of ash-sized gouge between the fracture planes. In higher-porosity samples, or at relatively higher confining pressures (≥ 60 MPa), we observe compactant deformation characterised by a monotonous decrease in porosity with increasing axial strain. The relative permeability k' is given by the change in permeability divided by the initial reference state. When behaviour is dilatant, k' tends to be positive: permeability increases with progressive deformation. However, results suggest that after a threshold amount of strain, k' can decrease. k' always is negative (permeability decreases during deformation) when compaction is the dominant behaviour. Our results show that - in the absence of a sealing or healing process - the efficiency of a fault to transmit fluids is

  1. Gastrointestinal permeability in patients with irritable bowel syndrome assessed using a four probe permeability solution

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y.; Van Deventer, Hendrick E.; Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Martino, Angela C.; Patel, Nayan S.; Remaley, Alan T.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Abnormal gastrointestinal permeability has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The lactulose-to-mannitol ratio is traditionally used to assess small intestine permeability while sucralose and sucrose are used to assess colonic and gastric permeability respectively. We used a single 4-probe test solution to assess permeability throughout the gastrointestinal tract in IBS patients and healthy controls by measuring the recovery of the probes in urine after ingestion using a modified liquid chromatography mass spectrometry protocol. Methods Fasting participants (N = 59) drank a permeability test solution (100 ml: sucralose, sucrose, mannitol, and lactulose). Urine was collected over a 5-h period and kept frozen until analysis. Urinary sugar concentrations were measured using an liquid chromatography/triple quadruple mass spectrometer. Results Colonic permeability was significantly lower in IBS patients when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.011). Gastric and small intestinal permeability did not significantly differ between the groups. Conclusions The study demonstrates the clinical potential of this non-invasive method for assessing alterations in gastrointestinal permeability in patients with IBS. PMID:23328210

  2. Changes in permeability caused by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, Michael; Wang, Chi-Yuen; Shi, Zheming

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes induce a range of hydrological responses, including changes in streamflow and changes in the water level in wells. Here we show that many of these responses are caused the changes in permeability produced by the passage of seismic waves. First we analyze streams that were dry or nearly dry before the 2014 M6 Napa, California, earthquake butstarted to flow after the earthquake. We show that the new flows were meteoric in origin and originate in the nearby mountains. Responses are not correlated with the sign of static strains implying seismic waves liberated this water, presumably by changing permeability. We also analyze a large network of wells in China that responded to 4 large earthquakes. We monitor permeability changes through their effect on the water level response to solid Earth tides. We find that when earthquakes produce sustained changes in water level, permeability also changes. Wells with water level changes that last for only days show no evidence for changes in aquifer permeability.

  3. Honeycomb Core Permeability Under Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Raman, V. V.; Venkat, Venki S.; Sankaran, Sankara N.

    1997-01-01

    A method for characterizing the air permeability of sandwich core materials as a function of applied shear stress was developed. The core material for the test specimens was either Hexcel HRP-3/16-8.0 and or DuPont Korex-1/8-4.5 and was nominally one-half inch thick and six inches square. The facesheets where made of Hercules' AS4/8552 graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) composites and were nominally 0.059-in. thick. Cytec's Metalbond 1515-3M epoxy film adhesive was used for co-curing the facesheets to the core. The permeability of the specimens during both static (tension) and dynamic (reversed and non-reversed) shear loads were measured. The permeability was measured as the rate of air flow through the core from a circular 1-in2 area of the core exposed to an air pressure of 10.0 psig. In both the static and dynamic testing, the Korex core experienced sudden increases in core permeability corresponding to a core catastrophic failure, while the URP core experienced a gradual increase in the permeability prior to core failure. The Korex core failed at lower loads than the HRP core both in the transverse and ribbon directions.

  4. Permeability of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marschall, J.; Milos, F. S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Rigid fibrous refractory insulations (TPS tiles) are integral components of many spacecraft thermal protection systems. These materials are composed of refractory fibers With diameters on the order of 1 to 15 micrometers. They are lightweight and have an open, highly porous microstructure. Typical densities are less than 500 kilograms per cubic meters, and porosities generally exceed 0.8. Because of their open porosity, these materials are permeable to gas glow. There are numerous instances in which internal gas transport in a thermal protection system could be important; examples include the penetration of hot boundary-layer gases into the insulation, the flow of decomposition (pyrolysis) products from the interior, the use of convective flows to mitigate ice formation caused by cryopumping, and the design of refractory vents for pressure equilibration during atmospheric entry. Computational analysis of gas flow through porous media requires values of permeability which have not previously been available for the rigid fibrous insulations used in thermal protection systems. This paper will document measurements of permeability for a variety of insulations from NASA's LI, FRCI, and AETB families of lightweight ceramic ablators. The directional anisotropy of permeability and its dependence on gas pressure and material density will be presented. It will be shown that rarified-flow effects are significant in the flow through such materials. Connections will be drawn between the insulation microstructure and permeability. The paper will also include representative computations of flow through rigid fibrous insulations.

  5. Permeability evolution in sandstone: Digital rock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Ayako

    Permeability is perhaps one of the most important yet elusive reservoir properties, since it poorly correlates with elastic properties, and as a result, cannot be mapped remotely. Physical permeability measurements may be augmented or even partially replaced by numerical experiments, provided that a numerical simulation accurately mimics the physical process. Numerical simulation of laboratory experiments on rocks, or digital rock physics, is an emerging field that may benefit the petroleum industry. For numerical experimentation to find its way into the mainstream, it has to be practical and easily repeatable, i.e., implemented on standard hardware and in real time. This condition reduces the feasible size of a digital sample to just a few grains across. Will the results be meaningful for a larger rock volume? The answer is that small fragments of medium- to high-porosity sandstone, such as cuttings, which are not statistically representative of a larger sample, cannot be used to numerically calculate the exact porosity and permeability of the sample. However, by using a significant number of such small fragments, it may be possible to establish a site-specific permeability-porosity trend, which can be used to estimate the absolute permeability from independent porosity data, obtained in the well or inferred from seismic measurements.

  6. Gas Permeability in Rubbery Polyphosphazene Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme; John R. Klaehn; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson

    2006-09-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and gas permeability of ten new polyphosphazenes has been studied. Additionally, the first gas permeation data has been collected on hydrolytically unstable poly[bis-(chloro)phosphazene]. Gases used in this study include CO2, CH4, O2, N2, H2, and Ar. CO2 was the most permeable gas through any of the phosphazenes and a direct correlation between the Tg of the polymer and CO2 transport was noted with permeability increasing with decreasing polymer Tg. To a lesser degree, permeability of all the other gases studied also yielded increases with decreasing polymer Tg. The trend observed for these new polymers was further supported by published data for other phosphazenes. Furthermore, permeability data for all gases were found to correlate to the gas condensability and the gas critical pressures, except for hydrogen, suggesting that the nature of the gas is also a significant factor for permeation through rubbery phosphazene membranes. Ideal separation factors (á) for the CO2/H2 and CO2/CH4 gas pairs were calculated. For CO2/CH4, no increase in á was observed with decreasing Tg, however increases in á were noted for the CO2/H2 pair.

  7. Net proton-hydroxyl permeability of large unilamellar liposomes measured by an acid-base titration technique.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J W; Deamer, D W

    1980-04-01

    The net proton-hydroxyl permeability of large unilamellar liposomes has been measured by an acid-base pulse titration technique and has been determined to be several orders of magnitude greater than that measured for other monovalent ions. This permeability is relatively insensitive to variations in lipid composition. Proton permeability and hydroxyl permeability vary with pH 6 to 8, and this variation can occur in the absence of alterations in surface charge density resulting from titrations of acidic and basic groups on the lipids. In order to account for the exceptionally high proton-hydroxyl permeability with respect to other monovalent ions, we propose that protons or hydroxyls or both interact with clusters of hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the lipid bilayer, such that they are transferred across the bilayer by rearrangement of hydrogen bonds in a manner similar to their transport in water and ice.

  8. Dual role of cerebral blood flow in regional brain temperature control in the healthy newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Sachiko; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Takashima, Sachio; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Robertson, Nicola J; Iwata, Osuke

    2014-10-01

    Small shifts in brain temperature after hypoxia-ischaemia affect cell viability. The main determinants of brain temperature are cerebral metabolism, which contributes to local heat production, and brain perfusion, which removes heat. However, few studies have addressed the effect of cerebral metabolism and perfusion on regional brain temperature in human neonates because of the lack of non-invasive cot-side monitors. This study aimed (i) to determine non-invasive monitoring tools of cerebral metabolism and perfusion by combining near-infrared spectroscopy and echocardiography, and (ii) to investigate the dependence of brain temperature on cerebral metabolism and perfusion in unsedated newborn infants. Thirty-two healthy newborn infants were recruited. They were studied with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy, echocardiography, and a zero-heat flux tissue thermometer. A surrogate of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using superior vena cava flow adjusted for cerebral volume (rSVC flow). The tissue oxygenation index, fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen relative to rSVC flow (CMRO₂ index) were also estimated. A greater rSVC flow was positively associated with higher brain temperatures, particularly for superficial structures. The CMRO₂ index and rSVC flow were positively coupled. However, brain temperature was independent of FOE and the CMRO₂ index. A cooler ambient temperature was associated with a greater temperature gradient between the scalp surface and the body core. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and perfusion were monitored in newborn infants without using tracers. In these healthy newborn infants, cerebral perfusion and ambient temperature were significant independent variables of brain temperature. CBF has primarily been associated with heat removal from the brain. However, our results suggest that CBF is likely to deliver heat specifically to the superficial brain. Further studies are required to assess the

  9. Effect of hydrate nucleation mechanisms and capillarity on permeability reduction in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong Hun; Yun, Tae Sup; Kim, Kwang Yeom; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-09-01

    A model for water permeability reduction in hydrate-bearing sediments is presented by considering capillary effect in hydrate nucleation. Both grain-coating and pore-filling cases are considered. The model is developed from a series of lattice Boltzmann flow simulations. Results show that the permeability decreases quasi-linearly with increasing hydrate saturation during grain-coating nucleation and that the permeability tends to be higher than predicted by previous analytical models, in which capillarity is not taken into account. The permeability follows unique reduction curve and is not so sensitive to initial sediment bulk density and grain size distribution. Simulations further show that there is a transition zone at Shyd = 0.3~0.4, where permeability reduction trend switches from grain-coating model to pore-filling model. Analyses of tortuosity and surface area confirm that the permeability reduction mechanisms result from pore-channel blocking in grain-coating case and pore size reduction in pore-filling case.

  10. GROUNDWATER FLOW IN LOW-PERMEABILITY ENVIRONMENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Certain geologic media are known to have small permeability; subsurface environments composed of these media and lacking well developed secondary permeability have groundwater flow systems with many distinctive characteristics. Moreover, groundwater flow in these environments appears to influence the evolution of certain hydrologic, geologic, and geochemical systems, may affect the accumulation of petroleum and ores, and probably has a role in the structural evolution of parts of the crust. Such environments are also important in the context of waste disposal. This review attempts to synthesize the diverse contributions of various disciplines to the problem of flow in low-permeability environments. Problems hindering analysis are enumerated together with suggested approaches to overcoming them. A common thread running through the discussion is the significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make measurements of parameters.

  11. Virtual screening of intestinal drug permeability.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, P; Luthman, K; Artursson, P

    2000-03-01

    Lead compounds generated in high throughput drug discovery programmes often have unfavorable biopharmaceutical properties, resulting in a low success rate of such drug candidates in clinical development. Drug companies and researchers would thus like to have methods of predicting biopharmaceutical properties accurately. The intestinal permeability to a lead compound is one such property which is particularly important. Therefore, access to methods to accurately predict biopharmaceutical properties, such as the intestinal permeability of a large series of compounds, is of particular importance. This review deals with new theoretical methods used to predict intestinal drug permeability. There are several possible transport routes across the intestine, but theoretical methods generally deal with only one of them, the passive transcellular route. Therefore, this review will also discuss the relative importance of passive and active drug transport and efflux routes using recent data generated in cell cultures, animal models and human subjects.

  12. Permeability of membranes to amino acids and modified amino acids: mechanisms involved in translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid permeability of membranes is of interest because they are one of the key solutes involved in cell function. Membrane permeability coefficients (P) for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, have been measured and compared using a variety of techniques. Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly (5-fold), while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested in liposomes. Increasing the membrane surface charge increased the permeability of amino acids of the opposite charge, while increasing the cholesterol content decreased membrane permeability. The permeability coefficients for most amino acids tested were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium (approximately 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1). This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. Hydrophobic amino acids were 10(2) more permeable than the hydrophilic forms, reflecting their increased partition coefficient values. External pH had dramatic effects on the permeation rates for the modified amino acid lysine methyl ester in response to transmembrane pH gradients. It was established that lysine methyl ester and other modified short peptides permeate rapidly (P = 10(-2) cm s-1) as neutral (deprotonated) molecules. It was also shown that charge distributions dramatically alter permeation rates for modified di-peptides. These results may relate to the movement of peptides through membranes during protein translocation and to the origin of cellular membrane transport on the early Earth.

  13. Inference of permeability heterogeneity from joint inversion of transient flow and temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhishuai; Jafarpour, Behnam; Li, Lianlin

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of the rock permeability distribution in compartmentalized deep aquifers, enhanced geothermal systems, and hydrocarbon reservoirs is important for predicting the flow and transport behavior in these formations. Reliable prediction of the fluid flow and transport processes can, in turn, lead to effective development of the subsurface energy and environmental resources. In deep formations where thermal gradients are significant, the transient temperature data can provide valuable information about the permeability distribution with depth and about the vertical fluid displacement. This paper examines the importance of temperature data in resolving the distribution of permeability with depth by jointly, and individually, integrating the transient temperature and flow data. We demonstrate that when estimating permeability distributions in deep geothermal reservoirs, incorporating temperature data can increase the resolution of the permeability distribution profile with depth. To illustrate the importance of temperature measurements, we adopt a coupled transient heat and fluid flow as a forward model to predict the heat and fluid transport in a geothermal reservoir and develop an adjoint model for efficient computation of the gradient information for model calibration. We perform a series of numerical experiments for integration of flow and pressure data alone, temperature data alone, and flow and pressure jointly with temperature data. In each case, we apply the maximum A-posteriori (MAP) method and the randomized maximum likelihood (RML) method for inversion and uncertainty quantification. Analysis of the sensitivity of temperature and production data to heterogeneous permeability distributions reveals that the temperature of fluid, even when measured at the surface, is sensitive to the permeability distribution in the vertical extent of the reservoir. Hence, temperature measurements can be augmented with flow-related data to enhance the resolution of

  14. In situ permeability testing of rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Broce, R.D.; Lie, K.

    1981-04-01

    Storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in bedded salt formations requires a knowledge of the in situ permeability of SENM rock salt. Since assumptions for safety assessments have been made in which these wastes could generate gas pressures on the order of the lithostatic pressure over geologic time scales, the permeability of the surrounding formation becomes an important parameter for determining the manner in which the gases will be contained or dispersed. This report describes the series of tests conducted in the AEC-7 borehole, located near the WIPP site, to determine the in situ gas flow characteristics of the bedded salt. In these tests, compressed air was injected into the borehole and flow into the surrounding formation measured. These measured flow rates were interpreted in terms of formation permeabilities and porosities which were, in turn, used as modeling parameters for the repository response analysis. Two series of field tests were performed. The first series consisted of a number of whole-hole flow tests conducted to provide preliminary design information required for future operation of a guarded straddle packer system capable of measuring permeabilities > or = 0.1 ..mu..darcy. The second series of tests were conducted using the Systems, Science and Software (S-Cubed) designed guarded straddle packer system. In these interval permeability tests, 100-foot lengths of borehole were isolated and the flow characteristics of the surrounding formation examined. In this report, a complete description of the test procedures, instrumentation, and measurement techniques is first given. The analytical/numerical methods used for data interpretation are then presented, followed by results of the interval and permeability tests. (The whole-hole tests are summarized in Appendix A.) Conclusions are presented in the final section.

  15. Lunar magnetic permeability studies and magnetometer sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    A regression of quiet magnetic field components simultaneously measured by the two Explorer 35 magnetometers reveals uncertainties in effective sensitivity factors of up to a few percent in one or both of these instruments. Given this, the validity of previous lunar permeability studies based on Explorer 35/ALSEP regressions, wherein inferences are drawn from regression line slopes differing from unity by the order of one percent, is called into question. We emphasize the need to critically address the question of small deviations in magnetometer sensitivity factors from nominal values as a part of any two-magnetometer lunar permeability study.

  16. Magnetic permeability measurements and a lunar core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field induced in the moon while it is in the geomagnetic tail lobes have been interpreted in terms of lunar magnetic permeability due to free iron content; such studies ignored the possibility that a highly conducting lunar core (Fe or FeS) would exclude magnetic fields with an apparent diamagnetic effect. Using lunar chemical and thermal models to determine plausible limits of magnetic permeability, we interpret measurements of the induced moment. The maximum likely radius of a lunar core is 580 km. Subsatellite and ALSEP measurements of the induced field are in disagreement. Resolving the differences is critical to determining whether a core could or does exist.

  17. Development of an Improved Permeability Modification Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.W.; Elphnick, J.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the development of an improved permeability modification simulator performed jointly by BDM Petroleum Technologies and Schlumberger Dowell under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the US Department of Energy. The improved simulator was developed by modifying NIPER's PC-GEL permeability modification simulator to include a radial model, a thermal energy equation, a wellbore simulator, and a fully implicit time-stepping option. The temperature-dependent gelation kinetics of a delayed gel system (DGS) is also included in the simulator.

  18. Influence of Three Permeable Pavement Surfaces on Nitrogen Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is a stressor of concern in many nutrient sensitive watersheds often associated with algal blooms and resulting fish kills. Communities are increasingly installing green infrastructure stormwater control measures (SCMs) to reduce pollutant loads associated with stormwat...

  19. Effects of ozone on airway epithelial permeability and ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, P.A.; Ranga, V.; Stutts, M.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive form of oxygen produced in the atmosphere by photochemical reactions involving substrates emitted from automobile engines. Outdoor air concentrations as high as 0.4 parts per million (ppm) occur. The respiratory tract extracts about 90% of inhaled ozone. From the chemical reactivity of ozone, it is expected to attack organic molecules located on or near the respiratory surfaces. The airways are covered with a cohesive layer of epithelial cells that forms the boundary between the external environment and the respiratory tissues. One important role of this epithelial layer is its barrier function. Airborne particles that deposit (and dissolve) in the airway surface liquid are not readily absorbed, and soluble tissue components are excluded from the surface liquid. The epithelium also controls the volume and composition of the surface liquid. One important process in this regard is the absorption and secretion of ions and water. We have studied the effects of inhalation of ozone on the barrier function (permeability to dissolved molecules) and the ion transport activity of epithelium using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. All our experiments were performed with male Hartley strain guinea pigs. Conscious, unrestrained animals were exposed to a concentration of ozone of 1 ppm for three hours in controlled environmental chambers in the Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, NC. Such exposures caused a marked increase in the rate of appearance in blood of various water-soluble compounds instilled onto the surface of the trachea, indicating increased permeability of the airway epithelium.

  20. Evolution of faults in sandstone and their permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Antonellini, M.; Du, Yijun; Aydin, At.; Pollard, D.D. )

    1992-01-01

    In many porous sandstones world over, major fault types initiate and propagate as localized bands of deformation. Individual bands have shear displacements up to a few cm, and compaction perpendicular to the bands. Although the initiation and propagation of faults are problematic, the authors here propose that the maximum distortional strain energy density (D-criterion) can be used successfully to simulate a band fault propagation as well as the interaction and linkage of the adjacent segments. Deformation bands tend to localize into zones that have distinct patterns repeating in a broad range of scale. Some zones are associated with slip surfaces that mark the loss of cohesion between two surfaces. The authors demonstrate the particulars of individual zones and slip surfaces including their patterns and distribution for several well-known sandstones in extensional and compressional settings within Colorado Plateau. They investigate also the relationship between mappable fault patterns and the geometry and kinematics of a major detachment at Cache Valley in Arches National Park, southeastern Utah, using a Discrete Element Model. Zones of bands have permeabilities 3 to 5 order of magnitude smaller than that of parent rocks making them highly effective barriers against fluid flow. In contrast, slip surfaces are likely to be conduits with high permeability along the surface. In light of the fact that a majority of energy resources are in sandstones and that the structures described above occur also in unconsolidated sediments as potential aquifers and contamination sites, these structures and their geometries as well as the deformation processes responsible for their formation have significant implications for societal problems.

  1. Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Tsang, Y.W.; Min, K.B.; Elsworth, D.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents results from a coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical analysis of thermally-induced permeability changes during heating and cooling of fractured volcanic rock at the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis extends the previous analysis of the four-year heating phase to include newly available data from the subsequent four year cooling phase. The new analysis of the cooling phase shows that the measured changes in fracture permeability follows that of a thermo-hydro-elastic model on average, but at several locations the measured permeability indicates (inelastic) irreversible behavior. At the end of the cooling phase, the air-permeability had decreased at some locations (to as low as 0.2 of initial), whereas it had increased at other locations (to as high as 1.8 of initial). Our analysis shows that such irreversible changes in fracture permeability are consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). These data are important for bounding model predictions of potential thermally-induced changes in rock-mass permeability at a future repository at Yucca Mountain.

  2. Fracture Permeability Evolution in Desert Peak Quartz Monzonite

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, S R; Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Viani, B E; Roberts, S K

    2005-05-10

    Fracture flow experiments are being conducted on quartz monzonite core from the Desert Peak East EGS site, Churchill County, Nevada. The flow experiments are conducted at temperatures of 167-169 C and 5.5 MPa confining pressure through artificial fractures. Two injection fluids, a saline solution and a silica-bearing solution, have been used to date. Flow rates are typically 0.02 mL/min, but other rates have been used. The fracture surfaces are characterized with a contact profilometer. The profilometry data demonstrate that it is possible to fabricate statistically similar fracture surfaces and enable us to map aperture variations, which we use in numerical simulations. Effluent samples are collected for chemical analysis. The fluid pressure gradient is measured across the specimen and effective hydraulic apertures are calculated. The experiments show a reduction in permeability over time for both injection fluids, but a more rapid loss of permeability was observed for the silica-bearing solution. The calculated hydraulic aperture is observed to decrease by 17% for the saline solution and 75% for the silica-bearing fluid, respectively. Electrical resistivity measurements, which are sensitive to the ionic content of the pore fluid, provide additional evidence of fluid-rock interactions.

  3. The permeability of endplate channels to monovalent and divalent metal cations

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The relative permeability of endplate channels to monovalent and divalent metal ions was determined from reversal potentials. Thallium is the most permeant ion with a permeability ratio relative to Na+ of 2.5. The selectivity among alkali metals is weak with a sequence, Cs+ greater than Rb+ greater than K+ greater than Na+ greater than Li+, and permeability ratios of 1.4, 1.3, 1.1, 1.0, and 0.9. The selectivity among divalent ions is also weak, with a sequence for alkaline earths of Mg++ greater than Ca++ greater than Ba++ greater than Sr++. The transition metal ions Mn++, Co++, Ni++, Zn++, and Cd++ are also permeant. Permeability ratios for divalent ions decreased as the concentration of divalent ion was increased in a manner consistent with the negative surface potential theory of Lewis (1979 J. Physiol. (Lond.). 286: 417--445). With 20 mM XCl2 and 85.5 mM glucosamine.HCl in the external solution, the apparent permeability ratios for the alkaline earth cations (X++) are in the range 0.18--0.25. Alkali metal ions see the endplate channel as a water-filled, neutral pore without high-field-strength sites inside. Their permeability sequence is the same as their aqueous mobility sequence. Divalent ions, however, have a permeability sequence almost opposite from their mobility sequence and must experience some interaction with groups in the channel. In addition, the concentrations of monovalent and divalent ions are increased near the channel mouth by a weak negative surface potential. PMID:6247423

  4. Predicting the permeability of sediments entering subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Screaton, Elizabeth J.

    2015-07-01

    Using end-member permeabilities defined by a worldwide compilation of sediment permeabilities at convergent margins, we compare permeability predictions using a geometric mean and a two-component effective medium theory (EMT). Our implementation of EMT includes a threshold fraction of the high-permeability component that determines whether flow occurs dominantly in the high- or low-permeability component. We find that this threshold fraction in most cases is equal to the silt + sand-sized fraction of the sediment. This suggests that sediments undergoing primary consolidation tend to exhibit flow equally distributed between the high- and low-permeability components. We show that the EMT method predicts permeability better than the weighted geometric mean of the end-member values for clay fractions <0.6. This work provides insight into the microstructural controls on permeability in subducting sediments and valuable guidance for locations which lack site-specific permeability results but have available grain-size information.

  5. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

    PubMed

    Olson, M S; Tillman, F D; Choi, J W; Smith, J A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10(-14) to 10(-9) m2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3 x 10(-13) m2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8 x 10(-10) m2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2 x 10(-9) to 1.5 x 10(-9) m2, and ranged from 3.6 x 10(-9) to 6.8 x 10(-9) m2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0 x 10(-14) m2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3 x 10(-14) m2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit

  6. The human cerebral cortex flattens during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Janssen, Joost; Schnack, Hugo; Balaban, Evan; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Alfaro-Almagro, Fidel; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Otero, Soraya; Baeza, Immaculada; Moreno, Dolores; Bargalló, Nuria; Parellada, Mara; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2013-09-18

    The human cerebral cortex appears to shrink during adolescence. To delineate the dynamic morphological changes involved in this process, 52 healthy male and female adolescents (11-17 years old) were neuroimaged twice using magnetic resonance imaging, approximately 2 years apart. Using a novel morphometric analysis procedure combining the FreeSurfer and BrainVisa image software suites, we quantified global and lobar change in cortical thickness, outer surface area, the gyrification index, the average Euclidean distance between opposing sides of the white matter surface (gyral white matter thickness), the convex ("exposed") part of the outer cortical surface (hull surface area), sulcal length, depth, and width. We found that the cortical surface flattens during adolescence. Flattening was strongest in the frontal and occipital cortices, in which significant sulcal widening and decreased sulcal depth co-occurred. Globally, sulcal widening was associated with cortical thinning and, for the frontal cortex, with loss of surface area. For the other cortical lobes, thinning was related to gyral white matter expansion. The overall flattening of the macrostructural three-dimensional architecture of the human cortex during adolescence thus involves changes in gray matter and effects of the maturation of white matter.

  7. The human cerebral cortex flattens during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Janssen, Joost; Schnack, Hugo; Balaban, Evan; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Alfaro-Almagro, Fidel; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Otero, Soraya; Baeza, Immaculada; Moreno, Dolores; Bargalló, Nuria; Parellada, Mara; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2013-09-18

    The human cerebral cortex appears to shrink during adolescence. To delineate the dynamic morphological changes involved in this process, 52 healthy male and female adolescents (11-17 years old) were neuroimaged twice using magnetic resonance imaging, approximately 2 years apart. Using a novel morphometric analysis procedure combining the FreeSurfer and BrainVisa image software suites, we quantified global and lobar change in cortical thickness, outer surface area, the gyrification index, the average Euclidean distance between opposing sides of the white matter surface (gyral white matter thickness), the convex ("exposed") part of the outer cortical surface (hull surface area), sulcal length, depth, and width. We found that the cortical surface flattens during adolescence. Flattening was strongest in the frontal and occipital cortices, in which significant sulcal widening and decreased sulcal depth co-occurred. Globally, sulcal widening was associated with cortical thinning and, for the frontal cortex, with loss of surface area. For the other cortical lobes, thinning was related to gyral white matter expansion. The overall flattening of the macrostructural three-dimensional architecture of the human cortex during adolescence thus involves changes in gray matter and effects of the maturation of white matter. PMID:24048830

  8. Blood-brain barrier permeability of Gualou Guizhi granules and neuroprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Huang; Ye, Miao; Zhang, Yuqin; Huang, Mingqing; Xu, Wei; Chu, Kedan; Chen, Lidian; Que, Jinhua

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to estimate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of Gualou Guizhi granules (GLGZG) in normal rats and in rat models of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and to examine the neuroprotective effects of GLGZG. A sensitive high‑performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry analytical method was developed to determinate the components of GLGZG in the plasma and brain tissue. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats served as a model of in vivo I/R. Citrulline, gallic acid, albiflorin, peoniflorin, liquiritin apioside, liquiritin, isoliquiritin apioside, isoliquiritin, liquiritigenin, isoliquiritigenin and glycyrrhizinic acid rapidly passed into the bloodstream. Citrulline, albiflorin, peoniflorin, liquiritin apioside, liquiritin, liquiritigenin, isoliquiritigenin and glycyrrhizinic acid also passed the BBB and reached the brain tissue of MCAO rats, while isoliquiritigenin and glycyrrhizinic acid were not detected in the brain tissue of the normal rats. The potential neuroprotective effect of GLGZG was determined in MCAO rats. The intragastric administration of GLGZG following reperfusion of rats for 2 h decreased the neurological defects and infarction volume, attenuated pathological changes of brain tissue and exerted a significant protective effect in cerebral ischemia injury. In conclusion, certain components of GLGZG passed through the BBB, particularly following cerebral ischemia injury, and this may be therapeutically effective for the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury in the human brain.

  9. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  10. Vascular Permeability and Drug Delivery in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Hebda, Jagoda K.; Gavard, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial barrier strictly maintains vascular and tissue homeostasis, and therefore modulates many physiological processes such as angiogenesis, immune responses, and dynamic exchanges throughout organs. Consequently, alteration of this finely tuned function may have devastating consequences for the organism. This is particularly obvious in cancers, where a disorganized and leaky blood vessel network irrigates solid tumors. In this context, vascular permeability drives tumor-induced angiogenesis, blood flow disturbances, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tumor cell extravasation. This can directly restrain the efficacy of conventional therapies by limiting intravenous drug delivery. Indeed, for more effective anti-angiogenic therapies, it is now accepted that not only should excessive angiogenesis be alleviated, but also that the tumor vasculature needs to be normalized. Recovery of normal state vasculature requires diminishing hyperpermeability, increasing pericyte coverage, and restoring the basement membrane, to subsequently reduce hypoxia, and interstitial fluid pressure. In this review, we will introduce how vascular permeability accompanies tumor progression and, as a collateral damage, impacts on efficient drug delivery. The molecular mechanisms involved in tumor-driven vascular permeability will next be detailed, with a particular focus on the main factors produced by tumor cells, especially the emblematic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, new perspectives in cancer therapy will be presented, centered on the use of anti-permeability factors and normalization agents. PMID:23967403

  11. Tailoring wall permeabilities for enhanced filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herterich, J. G.; Vella, D.; Field, R. W.; Hankins, N. P.; Griffiths, I. M.

    2015-05-01

    The build-up of contaminants at the wall of cross-flow membrane filtration systems can be detrimental to the operation of such systems because of, amongst other things, the osmotic backflow it may induce. In this paper, we propose a strategy to avoid the negative effects of backflow due to osmosis by using 2D channels bounded by walls with a combination of permeable and impermeable segments. We show that preventing flow through the final portion of the channel can increase the efficiency of filtration and we determine the optimal fraction occupied by the permeable wall that maximizes efficiency. Our analysis uses a combination of numerical techniques and asymptotic analysis in the limit of low wall permeabilities. Finally, we consider how the energy cost of filtration depends on the Péclet number and show that the energy cost per unit of filtered water may be minimized by appropriately choosing both the Péclet number and the permeable-region fraction.

  12. [Graphic recording of the maxillary ostium permeability].

    PubMed

    Rosique, M; Pastor, A; Hellín, D; García-Ortega, F P

    1993-01-01

    Currently we practise salpingography for evaluating Eustachian tube permeability. In a similar mode, we describe a technique of graphic search, with impedianciometry, of patency in the osteomeatal complex, after puncture and placing Foley's catheter in the maxillary sinus. In several cases without opening, we make topical treatment though catheter. For this technique, we propose the term of infundibulography.

  13. Pump and treat in low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, D.M.

    1996-08-01

    Pump and Treat (P&T) is a commonly applied technology whose primary promise for the low permeability environments of interest to these technology reviews is almost certainly containment of the problem. Conventional P&T would be expected to offer little promise of complete restoration in such environments, unless very long time frames (decades or centuries) are considered. A variety of approaches have been proposed to enhance the efficiency of P&T; some appear to offer little promise in low or mixed permeability environments, while others may offer more promise (e.g. hydro- or pneumatic-fracturing, which are described elsewhere in this document, and application of vacuum to the extraction well(s), which is a proprietary technology whose promise is currently difficult to assess objectively). Understanding the potential advantages and means of optimizing these enhancement approaches requires more understanding of the basic processes limiting P&T performance in low or mixed permeability media. These efforts are probably also necessary to understand the advantages and means of optimizing many of the very different remedial technologies that may be applicable to low or mixed permeability environments. Finally, since a reasonably certain capability of P&T is containment (i.e. prevention of further migration of contaminants), P&T may generally be required as a sort of safety net around sites at which the alternative technologies are being tested or applied. 23 refs.

  14. Permeability Measurements in Carbon-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdenek, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    To determine the permeability of the composite feedline, that is proposed to be used in the X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), three 8 x 8-in. coupons were constructed. Two of the coupons were layed-up with 4 plies of plain weave prepreg [0/90, plus or minus 45, plus or minus 45, 0/90] and the other one layed-up with 4 plies of unidirectional prepreg [0, 90, 90, 0]. The coupons were vacuumed bagged and cured to manufactures specifications. The coupons were then placed in an apparatus to test for permeability. Nitrogen gas was used to permeate through the coupons at a pressure of 5 psig. A manometer was placed on the opposite side of the coupons and was used to measure the height of the fluid with respect to time. From this data the mass flow rate of the gas could be calculated since the area of the manometer and the density of the gas is known. The results of the test are given. The permeability constant was calculated using Darcy's law, which related the pressure drop, flow rate of the permeating gas and resistance to flow through the coupon created. To put the results into prospective the permeability of sand stone and granite is 1E-15 and 1E-20 respectively.

  15. Permeable pavement research – Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    These are the slides for the New York City Concrete Promotional Council Pervious Concrete Seminar presentation. The basis for the project, the monitoring design and some preliminary monitoring data from the permeable pavement parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center are pre...

  16. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  17. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  18. A microdevice for parallelized pulmonary permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Bol, Ludivine; Galas, Jean-Christophe; Hillaireau, Hervé; Le Potier, Isabelle; Nicolas, Valérie; Haghiri-Gosnet, Anne-Marie; Fattal, Elias; Taverna, Myriam

    2014-04-01

    We describe a compartmentalized microdevice specifically designed to perform permeability studies across a model of lung barrier. Epithelial cell barriers were reproduced by culturing Calu-3 cells at the air-liquid interface (AIC) in 1 mm² microwells made from a perforated glass slide with an embedded porous membrane. We created a single basolateral reservoir for all microwells which eliminated the need to renew the growth medium during the culture growth phase. To perform drug permeability studies on confluent cell layers, the cell culture slide was aligned and joined to a collection platform consisting in 35 μL collection reservoirs connected at the top and bottom with microchannels. The integrity and functionality of the cell barriers were demonstrated by measurement of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), confocal imaging and permeability assays of ¹⁴C-sucrose. Micro-cell barriers were able to form confluent layers in 1 week, demonstrating a similar bioelectrical evolution as the Transwell systems used as controls. Tight junctions were observed throughout the cell-cell interfaces, and the low permeability coefficients of ¹⁴C-sucrose confirmed their functional presence, creating a primary barrier to the diffusion of solutes. This microdevice could facilitate the monitoring of biomolecule transport and the screening of formulations promoting their passage across the pulmonary barrier, in order to select candidates for pulmonary administration to patients. PMID:24337430

  19. Hydrogen permeability degradation of Pd-coated Nb-TiNi alloy caused by its interfacial diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsu, Naofumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Kobori, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Pd-coated Nb40Ti30Ni30 (Nb-TiNi) is considered a promising material for hydrogen-permeable membranes because of the low usage of Pd metal. This paper reports the degradation of hydrogen permeability occurring during the permeation experiment above 773 K. Surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that interdiffusion between the Pd coating and the constituent elements of Nb and Ti progressed during the permeation experiment. The diffused Ti was concentrated near the topmost surface and then formed TiO2, which resulted in a decrease in the Pd concentration at the topmost surface. However, the diffused Nb was observed to bind to Pd in the surface and formed a Pd-Nb alloy beneath the topmost surface. We concluded that these changes caused the decline of the hydrogen permeability at high-temperature conditions.

  20. Time-dependent diffusion coefficient as a probe of the permeability of the pore wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Pabitra N.

    2003-11-01

    The time dependence of the mean-square displacement (or equivalently of the diffusion coefficient) in the presence of a permeable barrier can be used as a probe of the surface-to-volume ratio and permeability of a membrane. An exact, universal, short-time asymptotics in a pack of cells, assuming that the surfaces are locally smooth, shows that the effects of nonzero permeability appear as a correction to the diffusion coefficient that is linear in time, whereas the surface-to-volume ratio enters as a square root in time. With κ as the permeability of the membrane, we find, for the particles released inside the cells, DR,eff(t)=DR[1-(SR/VR){4√DR t/(9√π )-κt√DL (√DL +√DR )/(6DR)}]+⋯ . Here DR and DL are free (i.e., bulk) diffusion coefficients inside and outside of the cell, respectively, and SR/VR is the total internal surface divided by the total internal cell volume. The other terms linear in t that add to the right side of above equation are DR(SR/VR)[(1/6)ρt-(1/12)DRt<(1/R1+1/R2)>R], where ρ is a surface relaxation, which is generally negligible in biological samples, and <(1/R1+1/R2)>R is the average of the principal radii of curvatures over the interior surface. An equivalent expression for the particles starting outside the cell is obtained by swapping L↔R. The NMR data on erthrocytes show that the effect of permeability can be significant within the time scales of measurement and hence κ is deducible from the data. The long-time behavior given previously [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 1229 (1994)] is augmented by giving a nonuniversal form that includes the rate of approach to this limit.

  1. Studies on Parylene C-caulked PDMS (pcPDMS) for low permeability required microfluidics applications.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yinhua; Liu, Yaoping; Wang, Wei; Wu, Wengang; Li, Zhihong

    2011-04-01

    This note introduced a complete fabrication strategy of Parylene C-caulked PDMS (pcPDMS) for low permeability required microfluidics applications. The bonding issue enrolled in the pcPDMS fabrication was solved based on careful surface analyses of the Parylene C caulked status in the PDMS matrix.

  2. Two-point correlation functions to characterize microgeometry and estimate permeabilities of synthetic and natural sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    We have developed an image-processing method for characterizing the microstructure of rock and other porous materials, and for providing a quantitative means for understanding the dependence of physical properties on the pore structure. This method is based upon the statistical properties of the microgeometry as observed in scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images of cross sections of porous materials. The method utilizes a simple statistical function, called the spatial correlation function, which can be used to predict bounds on permeability and other physical properties. We obtain estimates of the porosity and specific surface area of the material from the two-point correlation function. The specific surface area can be related to the permeability of porous materials using a Kozeny-Carman relation, and we show that the specific surface area measured on images of sandstones is consistent with the specific surface area used in a simple flow model for computation of permeability. In this paper, we discuss the two-point spatial correlation function and its use in characterizing microstructure features such as pore and grain sizes. We present estimates of permeabilities found using SEM images of several different synthetic and natural sandstones. Comparison of the estimates to laboratory measurements shows good agreement. Finally, we briefly discuss extension of this technique to two-phase flow.

  3. Influence of coating permeability and roughness on supersonic boundary layer stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, V. I.; Gaponov, S. A.; Smorodsky, B. V.; Yermolaev, Yu. G.; Kosinov, A. D.; Semionov, N. V.

    2016-10-01

    Joint theoretical and experimental investigation on the influence of surface permeability and roughness on stability of a supersonic flat-plate boundary layer at free-stream Mach number M=2 has been performed. Artificial disturbances have been introduced in the model's boundary layer by means of a harmonic point glow discharge disturbance generator.

  4. In vivo two-photon imaging measuring the blood-brain barrier permeability during early postnatal brain development in rodent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián.

    2016-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a unique structure between the cerebral blood circulation and the delicate neural environment that is important in regulating the movement of molecules and ions involved in brain development and function. However, little is known about the physiological permeability of molecules and ions across the BBB during brain development. In this study we applied an innovative approach to examine the development of BBB properties quantitatively. Two-photon microscopy was employed to measure BBB permeability in real time in vivo. Vascular growth and specific interactions between astrocyte end feet and microvessels were studied by using a combination of IB4 histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy and 3D analysis.

  5. Permeability during densification of viscous droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Ed; Dobson, Katherine; Schauroth, Jenny; Heap, Michael; Farquharson, Jamie; Scheu, Bettina; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; von Aulock, Felix; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Fragmentation of magma can yield a transiently granular material, which can subsequently weld back to a fluid-continuum. This process results in dramatic changes in the porosity of the material, which impacts its fluid permeability. We collate published data for the porosity and permeability of volcanic and synthetic materials which have undergone this process to different amounts. By discriminating data for which good microstructural information are provided, we use simple scaling arguments to collapse the data in both the still-granular, high porosity region, and the fluid-continuum low porosity region, such that a universal description can be provided. This allows us to describe the microstructural meaning of permeability scaling, and to infer the controls on the position of this transition between dominantly granular (dispersion) and dominantly fluid-continuum materials. Fractures in coherent magmas are thought to be a primary degassing pathway in high viscosity systems. As a specific application, we consider transiently granular magma being transported through and deposited in these fractures. We finally present a physical model for the kinetics of porosity changes in arrays of viscous droplets and compare this with our experimental data. The combination of the physical model for the evolution of porosity with the scaling between porosity and permeability permits us to describe the evolution of permeability during densification. We anticipate that this will be a useful tool for predicting the longevity of degassing pathways in granular filled cracks, both in conduits and shallow lava domes, as well as during the sedimentation of exceptionally hot ignimbrites undergoing compaction and welding.

  6. Characterizing flow in oil reservoir rock using SPH: absolute permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David W.; Williams, John R.; Tilke, Peter; Leonardi, Christopher R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow analysis, including flows related to permeable rock for both groundwater and petroleum reservoir research. While previous approaches to such problems using SPH have involved the use of idealized pore geometries (cylinder/sphere packs etc), in this paper we detail the characterization of flow in models with geometries taken from 3D X-ray microtomographic imaging of actual porous rock; specifically 25.12 % porosity dolomite. This particular rock type has been well characterized experimentally and described in the literature, thus providing a practical `real world' means of verification of SPH that will be key to its acceptance by industry as a viable alternative to traditional reservoir modeling tools. The true advantages of SPH are realized when adding the complexity of multiple fluid phases, however, the accuracy of SPH for single phase flow is, as yet, under developed in the literature and will be the primary focus of this paper. Flow in reservoir rock will typically occur in the range of low Reynolds numbers, making the enforcement of no-slip boundary conditions an important factor in simulation. To this end, we detail the development of a new, robust, and numerically efficient method for implementing no-slip boundary conditions in SPH that can handle the degree of complexity of boundary surfaces, characteristic of an actual permeable rock sample. A study of the effect of particle density is carried out and simulation results for absolute permeability are presented and compared to those from experimentation showing good agreement and validating the method for such applications.

  7. Study of permeability changes induced by external stimuli on chemically modified electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Dingiri Mudiyanselage Neluni T.

    This research was focused on understanding how external stimuli affect the permeability of the chemically modified electrodes, and how the materials used in modifying the working electrodes respond to the changes in the surface charge. We adopted a voltammetric type electrochemical sensor to investigate the permeability effects induced by pH and organic solvents. The working electrodes used in this research were chemically modified with thioctic acid self assembled monolayer (TA SAM), track etched polycarbonate membranes (TEPCM) and PS-b-PMMA nanoporous films (polystyrene-block-polymethylmethacrylate). We studied the permeability behavior of each of the material upon application of external stimuli. In chapter 3, the permeability changes induced by change in surface charge of thioctic acid SAM was investigated. The surface charge of the monolayer was tuned by changing pH of the medium, which resulted in decrease of redox current of a negatively charged marker due to deprotonation of the surface --COOH groups of TA SAM. Decrease in redox current reflected a decrease in the reaction rate, and by using closed form equations the effective rate constants at several pKa values were extracted. In chapter 4, permeability changes induced by pH in TEPCM were investigated. We assessed the surface charge of these membranes via cyclic voltammetry generated for neutral and charged redox molecules. Limiting current of charged markers were affected by the surface charge induced by pH, where as the redox current for the neutral marker was not affected. Experimental redox currents were larger than the theoretical current, indicating that redox molecules preferentially distributed in a surface layer on the nanopore. Organic solvent induced permeability changes of PS-b-PMMA nanoporous films were investigated via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and AFM. Higher response of pore resistance in the presence of organic solvents indicated either swelling of the nanoporous film or

  8. A 3D Model for Gas Transfer, Storage and Resulting Displacement in a Permeable Volcanic Edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, Amy; Neuberg, Jurgen

    2014-05-01

    The total volume of gas in a magma, dissolved and subsequently exsolved, greatly influences the degree of explosiveness of a volcanic system. There is a marked contrast between the behaviour of a volcano in an open system compared to one which is closed. Whilst gas release is evident from surface gas emission measurements, gas storage is also thought to play an important role, as evidenced by large gas emissions after some large dome collapse events, suggesting gas may be stored in large volumes at shallow depths within the dome and edifice. Consequently, it is essential to understand degassing, to appreciate how much gas may be stored and where, and under what conditions it may be transferred or emitted to the atmosphere. We use previous experimental data on permeabilities to create 3D numerical models to investigate gas transport and storage in a permeable volcanic edifice. We combine the continuity equation, Darcy's law and the ideal gas law to derive a partial differential equation which is solved using a finite element method to obtain the gas pressure. The associated pressure gradient is then used within Darcy's law to calculate the gas velocity. In addition, we use the momentum equation to investigate how the presence of gas and variations in permeability influence the rate and degree of deformation in the volcanic edifice. Hence this provides two important surface constraints: gas emissions and surface displacement. Geometries are created to simulate the topography of actual volcanoes and the pressure and permeabilities incorporated into the model as boundary and domain conditions, respectively. This method is applied to investigate a variety of volcanological phenomena affecting gas, for example regions of high permeability due to fractures, or low permeability due to sealing.

  9. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  10. A case of cerebral gigantism and hepatocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, G I; Heuser, E T; Reed, W B

    1977-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy, who had the physical and neurological characteristics of cerebral gigantism (Sotos syndrome), developed hepatocarcinoma. This tumor is rare in children and has never, to our knowledge, been recorded in a patient with cerebral gigantism. An autopsy was performed, the first we are aware of in a patient with cerebral gigantism without increased size in ventricles.

  11. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  12. The effect of a tin barrier layer on the permeability of hydrogen through mild steel and ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, J.; Piercy, G.R.

    1984-11-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the effectiveness of a commercially electroplated tin layer as a barrier to hydrogen, and to see how this altered when the tin layer was converted to FeSn. The authors measured the permeability of hydrogen through AISI 410 ferritic stainless steel and determined the effectiveness of tin as a surface barrier on it. The measured values for the permeability of hydrogen in iron and ferritic stainless steel are shown.

  13. Mechanisms underlying the cerebral microvascular responses to angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vital, Shantel A; Terao, Satoshi; Nagai, Mutsumi; Granger, D Neil

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) and AngII type-1 receptors (AT1r) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and ischemic stroke. The objectives of this study was to determine if/how chronic AngII administration affects blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and blood cell adhesion in the cerebral microvasculature. AngII-loaded osmotic pumps were implanted in wild type (WT) and mutant mice. Leukocyte and platelet adhesion were monitored in cerebral venules by intravital microscopy and BBB permeability detected by Evans blue leakage. AngII (two week) infusion increased blood pressure in WT mice. This was accompanied by an increased BBB permeability and a high density of adherent leukocytes and platelets. AT1r (on the vessel wall, but not on blood cells) was largely responsible for the microvascular responses to AngII. Immunodeficient (Rag-1(-/-) ) mice exhibited blunted blood cell recruitment responses without a change in BBB permeability. A similar protection pattern was noted in RANTES(-/-) and P-selectin(-/-) mice, with bone marrow chimeras (blood cell deficiency only) yielding responses comparable to the respective knockouts. These findings implicate AT1r in the microvascular dysfunction associated with AngII-induced hypertension and suggest that immune cells and blood cell-associated RANTES and P-selectin contribute to the blood cell recruitment, but not the BBB failure, elicited by AngII. PMID:21044218

  14. A relative permeability modifier for water control of gas wells in a low-permeability reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Tielong; Zhao Yong; Peng Kezong; Pu Wanfeng

    1996-08-01

    Water control in gas wells is a major measure to enhance gas recovery. The work is concentrated on finding a highly selective polymer to reduce water production without affecting gas production from gas wells in low-permeability reservoirs. This paper presents the conceptions of residual resistance factors (RRF`s) to both wetting and non-wetting phases and the laboratory experimental and field trial results of relative permeability modifiers for water control in gas wells.

  15. Cerebral cortex structure in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Nopoulos, Peggy C; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Ross, Christopher A; Johnson, Hans J; Magnotta, Vincent A; Juhl, Andrew R; Pierson, Ronald K; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is "spared," despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as "Far from onset," "Midway to onset," "Near onset," and "already diagnosed." MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  16. 2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

    2013-09-03

    Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of

  17. Permeability of fluid-phase phospholipid bilayers: assessment and useful correlations for permeability screening and other applications.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Johannes M; Kasting, Gerald B

    2013-06-01

    Permeability data (P(lip/w) ) for liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers composed of egg lecithin and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) are analyzed in terms of a mathematical model that accounts for free surface area and chain-ordering effects in the bilayer as well as size and lipophilicity of the permeating species. Free surface area and chain ordering are largely determined by temperature and cholesterol content of the membrane, molecular size is represented by molecular weight, and lipophilicity of the barrier region is represented by the 1,9-decadiene/water partition coefficient, following earlier work by Xiang, Anderson, and coworkers. A correlating variable χ = MW(n) σ/(1 -σ) is used to link the results from different membrane systems, where different values of n are tried, and σ denotes a reduced phospholipid density. The group (1 -σ)/σ is a measure of free surface area, but can also be interpreted in terms of free volume. A single exponential function of χ is developed that is able to correlate 39 observations of P(lip/w) for different compounds in egg lecithin at low density, and 22 observations for acetic acid in DMPC at higher densities, spanning nine orders of magnitude to within an rms error for log 10 P(lip/w) of 0.20. The best fit found for n = 0.87 ultimately makes χ much closer to the ratio of molecular to free volumes than surface areas. The results serve as a starting point for estimating passive permeability of cell membranes to nonionized solutes as a function of temperature and cholesterol content of the membrane.

  18. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  19. Cerebral radionecrosis: is surgery necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Woo, E; Lam, K; Yu, Y L; Lee, P W; Huang, C Y

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients with cerebral necrosis after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the nasopharynx are presented. The clinical features included seizures and a varying degree of intellectual impairment. In spite of significant mass effect on CT scan, the patients remained alert, ambulatory and independent. We believe that some cases of cerebral necrosis following radiotherapy for extra-cranial neoplasms present in a more benign fashion than has been portrayed in the literature, and in the absence of clinical evidence of raised intracranial pressure, surgical intervention is unnecessary. The importance of careful fractionation of an optimum radiation dose as a preventive measure is emphasised. Images PMID:3694200

  20. Water permeability of primary mouse keratinocyte cultures grown at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cumpstone, M.B.; Kennedy, A.H.; Harmon, C.S.; Potts, R.O.

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the development of the epidermal permeability barrier in vitro, tritiated water (HTO) flux was measured across murine keratinocytes cultured at the air-liquid interface. Using a micro-diffusion technique, it was shown that air-liquid cultures form areas where the water diffusion is comparable to that of intact neonatal mouse skin. When water permeability is measured over a large area of the culture surface, however, significantly higher flux is obtained. These results show that under the culture conditions used, areas of water barrier comparable to intact neonatal mouse skin coexist with regions of less complete barrier formation.

  1. The role of Cysteine 227 in subcellular localization, water permeability, and multimerization of aquaporin-11.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Saki; Muta, Kanako; Sonoda, Hiroko; Kato, Ayaka; Abdeen, Ahmed; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) is the latest member of the mammalian water channel protein family to be described. Recent in vivo studies have shown that mutation at Cys(227) causes renal failure. However the importance of Cys(227) for the molecular function of AQP11 is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the subcellular localization, water permeability, and multimerization of AQP11 with a mutation at Cys(227). Interestingly, cells expressing the mutants had significantly higher osmotic water permeability. In contrast, the mutation lowered the cell surface expression and multimerization levels. Our observations suggest that Cys(227) is crucial for the proper molecular function of AQP11. PMID:24918044

  2. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... SWS) is the association of a facial port-wine birthmark with abnormal vessels on the surface of ... glaucoma, or both. The presence of a port-wine birthmark involving the forehead or upper eyelid raises ...

  3. Brain barrier properties and cerebral blood flow in neonatal mice exposed to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ek, C Joakim; D'Angelo, Barbara; Baburamani, Ana A; Lehner, Christine; Leverin, Anna-Lena; Smith, Peter L P; Nilsson, Holger; Svedin, Pernilla; Hagberg, Henrik; Mallard, Carina

    2015-05-01

    Insults to the developing brain often result in irreparable damage resulting in long-term deficits in motor and cognitive functions. The only treatment today for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborns is hypothermia, which has limited clinical benefit. We have studied changes to the blood-brain barriers (BBB) as well as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a neonatal model of HIE to further understand the underlying pathologic mechanisms. Nine-day old mice pups, brain roughly equivalent to the near-term human fetus, were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. Hypoxia-ischemia increased BBB permeability to small and large molecules within hours after the insult, which normalized in the following days. The opening of the BBB was associated with changes to BBB protein expression whereas gene transcript levels were increased showing direct molecular damage to the BBB but also suggesting compensatory mechanisms. Brain pathology was closely related to reductions in rCBF during the hypoxia as well as the areas with compromised BBB showing that these are intimately linked. The transient opening of the BBB after the insult is likely to contribute to the pathology but at the same time provides an opportunity for therapeutics to better reach the infarcted areas in the brain.

  4. Brain barrier properties and cerebral blood flow in neonatal mice exposed to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ek, C Joakim; D'Angelo, Barbara; Baburamani, Ana A; Lehner, Christine; Leverin, Anna-Lena; Smith, Peter L P; Nilsson, Holger; Svedin, Pernilla; Hagberg, Henrik; Mallard, Carina

    2015-05-01

    Insults to the developing brain often result in irreparable damage resulting in long-term deficits in motor and cognitive functions. The only treatment today for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborns is hypothermia, which has limited clinical benefit. We have studied changes to the blood-brain barriers (BBB) as well as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a neonatal model of HIE to further understand the underlying pathologic mechanisms. Nine-day old mice pups, brain roughly equivalent to the near-term human fetus, were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. Hypoxia-ischemia increased BBB permeability to small and large molecules within hours after the insult, which normalized in the following days. The opening of the BBB was associated with changes to BBB protein expression whereas gene transcript levels were increased showing direct molecular damage to the BBB but also suggesting compensatory mechanisms. Brain pathology was closely related to reductions in rCBF during the hypoxia as well as the areas with compromised BBB showing that these are intimately linked. The transient opening of the BBB after the insult is likely to contribute to the pathology but at the same time provides an opportunity for therapeutics to better reach the infarcted areas in the brain. PMID:25627141

  5. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  6. Permeability evolution in carbonate fractures: Competing roles of confining stress and fluid pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Takuya; McGuire, Thomas P.; Watanabe, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi; Elsworth, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We explore the permeability evolution of fractures in carbonate rock that results from the effects of mechanical stress and nonequilibrium chemistry (pH of fluid). Core plugs of Capitan limestone are saw cut to form a smooth axial fracture that is subsequently roughened to simulate a natural fracture with controlled surface topography. Aqueous solutions of ammonium chloride (pH 5˜7) transit these plugs at confining stresses of 3-10 MPa, with flow rates and mineral mass fluxes measured to constrain competing mechanisms of permeability evolution. The effluent calcium concentrations are always much lower than equilibrium calcium solubility, resulting in the dissolution-dominant permeability evolution in our experiments. Depending on the combination of confining stress and fluid pH, the fracture apertures either gape (permeability increase) or close (permeability reduction). We quantitatively constrain the transition between gaping (pH < 6.1) and closing (pH > 6.5) with this transition independent of confining stress up to 10 MPa. A transitional regime (6.1 < pH < 6.5) of invariant aperture represents a balance between the two mechanisms of free-face dissolution and pressure solution at the bridging asperities. We employ a lumped-parameter model to interpret the dissolution-dominant evolution of permeability. By considering different dissolution rate constants between noncontacting asperities and the stagnant water film at the contacting asperities, this model replicates the principal characteristics of permeability evolution of the fracture. Observed rates of aperture change are ill matched when the influent pH is 5-6, since wormhole formation is not accommodated in the model. These observations offer a promising pathway to index the switch from aperture gaping to aperture closing for reactive flow as reactivity is reduced and stress effects become more important.

  7. Permeability Changes in Reaction Induced Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Kalia, Rajiv

    2013-04-01

    The process of fracture formation due to a volume increasing chemical reaction has been studied in a variety of different settings, e.g. weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al.[4], serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite by Rudge et al.[3] and replacement reactions in silica-poor igneous rocks by Jamtveit et al.[1]. It is generally assumed that fracture formation will increase the net permeability of the rock, and thus increase the reactant transport rate and subsequently the total reaction rate, as summarised by Kelemen et al.[2]. Røyne et al.[4] have shown that transport in fractures will have an effect on the fracture pattern formed. Understanding the feedback process between fracture formation and permeability changes is essential in assessing industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock, but little is seemingly known about how large the permeability change will be in reaction-induced fracturing under compression, and it remains an open question how sensitive a fracture pattern is to permeability changes. In this work, we study the permeability of fractures formed under compression, and we use a 2D discrete element model to study the fracture patterns and total reaction rates achieved with different permeabilities. We achieve an improved understanding of the feedback processes in reaction-driven fracturing, thus improving our ability to decide whether industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock is a viable option for long-term handling of CO2. References [1] Jamtveit, B, Putnis, C. V., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A., "Reaction induced fracturing during replacement processes," Contrib. Mineral Petrol. 157, 2009, pp. 127 - 133. [2] Kelemen, P., Matter, J., Streit, E. E., Rudge, J. F., Curry, W. B., and Blusztajn, J., "Rates and Mechanisms of Mineral Carbonation in Peridotite: Natural Processes and Recipes for Enhanced, in situ CO2 Capture and Storage," Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 2011. 39:545-76. [3] Rudge, J. F., Kelemen, P. B., and

  8. Effects of fractionated radiation on the brain vasculature in a murine model: Blood-brain barrier permeability, astrocyte proliferation, and ultrastructural changes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Hong; Gaber, M. Waleed . E-mail: wgaber@utmem.edu; Boyd, Kelli; Wilson, Christy M.; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy of CNS tumors damages the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and normal brain tissue. Our aims were to characterize the short- and long-term effects of fractionated radiotherapy (FRT) on cerebral microvasculature in mice and to investigate the mechanism of change in BBB permeability in mice. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy and a cranial window technique were used to measure BBB permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran and leukocyte endothelial interactions before and after cranial irradiation. Daily doses of 2 Gy were delivered 5 days/week (total, 40 Gy). We immunostained the molecules to detect the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and to demonstrate astrocyte activity in brain parenchyma. To relate the permeability changes to endothelial ultrastructural changes, we used electron microscopy. Results: Blood-brain barrier permeability did not increase significantly until 90 days after FRT, at which point it increased continuously until 180 days post-FRT. The number of adherent leukocytes did not increase during the study. The number of astrocytes in the cerebral cortex increased significantly; vesicular activity in endothelial cells increased beginning 90 days after irradiation, and most tight junctions stayed intact, although some were shorter and less dense at 120 and 180 days. Conclusions: The cellular and microvasculature response of the brain to FRT is mediated through astrogliosis and ultrastructural changes, accompanied by an increase in BBB permeability. The response to FRT is delayed as compared with single-dose irradiation treatment, and does not involve leukocyte adhesion. However, FRT induces an increase in the BBB permeability, as in the case of single-dose irradiation.

  9. Exposure to vehicle emissions results in altered blood brain barrier permeability and expression of matrix metalloproteinases and tight junction proteins in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traffic-generated air pollution-exposure is associated with adverse effects in the central nervous system (CNS) in both human exposures and animal models, including neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. While alterations in the blood brain barrier (BBB) have been implicated as a potential mechanism of air pollution-induced CNS pathologies, pathways involved have not been elucidated. Objectives To determine whether inhalation exposure to mixed vehicle exhaust (MVE) mediates alterations in BBB permeability, activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) -2 and −9, and altered tight junction (TJ) protein expression. Methods Apolipoprotein (Apo) E−/− and C57Bl6 mice were exposed to either MVE (100 μg/m3 PM) or filtered air (FA) for 6 hr/day for 30 days and resulting BBB permeability, expression of ROS, TJ proteins, markers of neuroinflammation, and MMP activity were assessed. Serum from study mice was applied to an in vitro BBB co-culture model and resulting alterations in transport and permeability were quantified. Results MVE-exposed Apo E−/− mice showed increased BBB permeability, elevated ROS and increased MMP-2 and −9 activity, compared to FA controls. Additionally, cerebral vessels from MVE-exposed mice expressed decreased levels of TJ proteins, occludin and claudin-5, and increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin (IL)-1β in the parenchyma. Serum from MVE-exposed animals also resulted in increased in vitro BBB permeability and altered P-glycoprotein transport activity. Conclusions These data indicate that inhalation exposure to traffic-generated air pollutants promotes increased MMP activity and degradation of TJ proteins in the cerebral vasculature, resulting in altered BBB permeability and expression of neuroinflammatory markers. PMID:24344990

  10. Plasmodium falciparum Histidine-Rich Protein II Compromises Brain Endothelial Barriers and May Promote Cerebral Malaria Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Priya; Daniels, Brian P.; Oskman, Anna; Diamond, Michael S.; Klein, Robyn S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral malaria (CM) is a disease of the vascular endothelium caused by Plasmodium falciparum. It is characterized by parasite sequestration, inflammatory cytokine production, and vascular leakage. A distinguishing feature of P. falciparum infection is parasite production and secretion of histidine-rich protein II (HRPII). Plasma HRPII is a diagnostic and prognostic marker for falciparum malaria. We demonstrate that disruption of a human cerebral microvascular endothelial barrier by P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes depends on expression of HRPII. Purified recombinant or native HRPII can recapitulate these effects. HRPII action occurs via activation of the inflammasome, resulting in decreased integrity of tight junctions and increased endothelial permeability. We propose that HRPII is a virulence factor that may contribute to cerebral malaria by compromising endothelial barrier integrity within the central nervous system. PMID:27273825

  11. How much information on permeability can we expect from induced polarization methods? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A. M.; Slater, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    Recognizing the significance of permeability heterogeneity on solute transport in groundwater, the determination of qualitative and quantitative information on permeability has been a major focus in the field of hydrogeophysics for some time. This drive has been particularly encouraged due to the minimal invasive method of most geophysical techniques, and the ability to produce spatially dense datasets of geophysical properties. Whilst DC resistivity, as a method, has matured into an extremely robust and flexible technique, and despite its wide use for mapping lithologies, translation of DC resistivity, as a property, to permeability is extremely limited, principally because of the sensitivity to pore fluid states (e.g. salinity) and grain surface electrical conductivity. Induced polarization (IP), in contrast, is sensitive to properties related to the grain surface and/or pore throat geometry, and thus it is intuitive to assume that the permeability and induced polarization response may be closely linked. Spectral IP (SIP) potentially adds further valuable information, given the measure of distribution of polarization length scales. In fact, IP as a tool for hydrogeological studies has been recognized for over 50 years, although it is only over the past two decades that significant advances have been made in both methodology (e.g. instruments, data inversion, etc.) and hydrogeological interpretation. Attempts to link IP (including SIP) and permeability have been explored through laboratory, field and model studies. Mechanistic models have been proposed, along with several empirical relationships. Despite these efforts, the ability to link permeability to IP measurements remains challenging. Formation-specific relationships have been demonstrated, and yet a universal link continues to be elusive. Here, we discuss the principal constraints, illustrated using laboratory and field datasets from a number of studies. We highlight specific challenges, including

  12. Changes in lung vascular permeability after heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mancini, M C; Borovetz, H S; Griffith, B P; Hardesty, R L

    1985-10-01

    We have employed multiple indicator dilution techniques (MID) in six patients after heart-lung transplantation to assess changes in the lung vascular permeability-surface area product for urea (PS). Serial PS values for the patients when normalized to the predicted total lung capacity (TLC) in liters, ranged between 1.04 and 6.27 ml/sec/TLC (patient 1), 0 and 2.76 ml/sec/TLC (patient 2), 0.59 and 2.88 ml/sec/TLC (patient 3), 0.13 and 1.23 ml/sec/TLC (patient 4). The elevated values for PS in patient 1 exceed the lethal range described by K.L. Brigham et al. (J. Clin. Invest. 72:339, 1983) for severe ARDS. This strongly suggests a severely increased lung microvascular permeability in this patient possibly secondary to rejection as indicated by endomyocardial biopsy. PS values for surviving patients 2-6 fell well below the corresponding lethal value for ARDS patients. We conclude that PS urea derived from MID provides an indicator of the status of lung microvascular integrity in heart-lung transplant recipients.

  13. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N.; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  14. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Olga I; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-21

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  15. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  16. Relation between first arrival time and permeability in self-affine fractures with areas in contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talon, L.; Auradou, H.; Hansen, A.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate that the first arrival times in dispersive processes in self-affine fractures are governed by the same length scale characterizing the fractures as that which controls their permeability. In one-dimensional channel flow this length scale is the aperture of the bottle neck, i.e., the region having the smallest aperture. In two dimensions, the concept of a bottle neck is generalized to that of a minimal path normal to the flow. The length scale is then the average aperture along this path. There is a linear relationship between the first arrival time and this length scale, even when there is strong overlap between the fracture surfaces creating areas with zero permeability. We express the first arrival time directly in terms of the permeability.

  17. Estimating large-scale fracture permeability of unsaturatedrockusing barometric pressure data

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2005-05-17

    We present a three-dimensional modeling study of gas flow inthe unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain. Our objective is toestimate large-scale fracture permeability, using the changes insubsurface pneumatic pressure in response to barometric pressure changesat the land surface. We incorporate the field-measured pneumatic datainto a multiphase flow model for describing the coupled processes ofliquid and gas flow under ambient geothermal conditions. Comparison offield-measured pneumatic data with model-predicted gas pressures is foundto be a powerful technique for estimating the fracture permeability ofthe unsaturated fractured rock, which is otherwise extremely difficult todetermine on the large scales of interest. In addition, this studydemonstrates that the multi-dimensional-flow effect on estimatedpermeability values is significant and should be included whendetermining fracture permeability in heterogeneous fracturedmedia.

  18. Quantitative Perfusion and Permeability Biomarkers in Brain Cancer from Tomographic CT and MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Eilaghi, Armin; Yeung, Timothy; d’Esterre, Christopher; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Easaw, Jay; Fainardi, Enrico; Lee, Ting-Yim; Frayne, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging, using computed tomography and magnetic resonance systems, are important techniques for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of healthy brain parenchyma and tumors. These techniques can measure blood flow, blood volume, and blood–brain barrier permeability surface area product and, thus, may provide information complementary to clinical and pathological assessments. These have been used as biomarkers to enhance the treatment planning process, to optimize treatment decision-making, and to enable monitoring of the treatment noninvasively. In this review, the principles of magnetic resonance and computed tomography dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging are described (with an emphasis on their commonalities), and the potential values of these techniques for differentiating high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, distinguishing true progression from posttreatment effects, and predicting survival after radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic treatments are presented. PMID:27398030

  19. Exploring the scale-dependent permeability of fractured andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.

    2016-08-01

    Extension fractures in volcanic systems exist on all scales, from microscopic fractures to large fissures. They play a fundamental role in the movement of fluids and distribution of pore pressure, and therefore exert considerable influence over volcanic eruption recurrence. We present here laboratory permeability measurements for porous (porosity = 0.03-0.6) andesites before (i.e., intact) and after failure in tension (i.e., the samples host a throughgoing tensile fracture). The permeability of the intact andesites increases with increasing porosity, from 2 ×10-17 to 5 ×10-11 m2. Following fracture formation, the permeability of the samples (the equivalent permeability) falls within a narrow range, 2- 6 ×10-11 m2, regardless of their initial porosity. However, laboratory measurements on fractured samples likely overestimate the equivalent permeability due to the inherent scale-dependence of permeability. To explore this scale-dependence, we first determined the permeability of the tensile fractures using a two-dimensional model that considers flow in parallel layers. Our calculations highlight that tensile fractures in low-porosity samples are more permeable (as high as 3.5 ×10-9 m2) than those in high-porosity samples (as low as 4.1 ×10-10 m2), a difference that can be explained by an increase in fracture tortuosity with porosity. We then use our fracture permeability data to model the equivalent permeability of fractured rock (with different host rock permeabilities, from 10-17 to 10-11 m2) with increasing lengthscale. We highlight that our modelling approach can be used to estimate the equivalent permeability of numerous scenarios at andesitic stratovolcanoes in which the fracture density and width and host rock porosity or permeability are known. The model shows that the equivalent permeability of fractured andesite depends heavily on the initial host rock permeability and the scale of interest. At a given lengthscale, the equivalent permeability of high-permeability

  20. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  1. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  2. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  3. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  4. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5916 Rigid gas permeable contact lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  5. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5916 Rigid gas permeable contact lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  6. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  7. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  8. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  9. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  10. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  11. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  12. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  13. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  14. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  15. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  16. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  17. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  18. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  19. Permeability of cork for water and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Luisa; Brazinha, Carla; Pereira, Helena; Crespo, Joao G; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2013-10-01

    Transport properties of natural (noncompressed) cork were evaluated for water and ethanol in both vapor and liquid phases. The permeability for these permeants has been measured, as well as the sorption and diffusion coefficients. This paper focuses on the differences between the transport of gases' relevant vapors and their liquids (water and ethanol) through cork. A transport mechanism of vapors and liquids is proposed. Experimental evidence shows that both vapors and liquids permeate not only through the small channels across the cells (plasmodesmata), as in the permeation of gases, but also through the walls of cork cells by sorption and diffusion as in dense membranes. The present study also shows that cork permeability for gases was irreversibly and drastically decreased after cork samples were exposed to ethanol or water in liquid phase.

  20. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules

    PubMed Central

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2014-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  1. Electrostatically gated membrane permeability in inorganic protocells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Harbron, Rachel L; Weaver, Jonathan V M; Binks, Bernard P; Mann, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Although several strategies are now available to produce functional microcompartments analogous to primitive cell-like structures, little progress has been made in generating protocell constructs with self-controlled membrane permeability. Here we describe the preparation of water-dispersible colloidosomes based on silica nanoparticles and delineated by a continuous semipermeable inorganic membrane capable of self-activated, electrostatically gated permeability. We use crosslinking and covalent grafting of a pH-responsive copolymer to generate an ultrathin elastic membrane that exhibits selective release and uptake of small molecules. This behaviour, which depends on the charge of the copolymer coronal layer, serves to trigger enzymatic dephosphorylation reactions specifically within the protocell aqueous interior. This system represents a step towards the design and construction of alternative types of artificial chemical cells and protocell models based on spontaneous processes of inorganic self-organization. PMID:23695636

  2. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  3. Electrostatically gated membrane permeability in inorganic protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Harbron, Rachel L.; Weaver, Jonathan V. M.; Binks, Bernard P.; Mann, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Although several strategies are now available to produce functional microcompartments analogous to primitive cell-like structures, little progress has been made in generating protocell constructs with self-controlled membrane permeability. Here we describe the preparation of water-dispersible colloidosomes based on silica nanoparticles and delineated by a continuous semipermeable inorganic membrane capable of self-activated, electrostatically gated permeability. We use crosslinking and covalent grafting of a pH-responsive copolymer to generate an ultrathin elastic membrane that exhibits selective release and uptake of small molecules. This behaviour, which depends on the charge of the copolymer coronal layer, serves to trigger enzymatic dephosphorylation reactions specifically within the protocell aqueous interior. This system represents a step towards the design and construction of alternative types of artificial chemical cells and protocell models based on spontaneous processes of inorganic self-organization.

  4. Hydrogeologic modeling for permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N; Fox, T C

    1999-08-12

    The permeable reactive barrier technology for in situ treatment of chlorinated solvents and other groundwater contaminants is becoming increasingly popular. Field scale implementation of this and other in situ technologies requires careful design based on the site-specific hydrogeology and contaminant plume characteristics. Groundwater flow modeling is an important tool in understanding the hydraulic behavior of the site and optimizing the reactive barrier design. A combination of groundwater flow modeling and particle tracking techniques was used to illustrate the effect of hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer and reactive media on key permeable barrier design parameters, such as the capture zone width, residence time, flow velocity, and discharge. Similar techniques were used to illustrate the modeling approach for design of different configurations of reactive barriers in homogeneous and heterogeneous settings.

  5. Experimental determination of the relationship between permeability and microfracture-induced damage in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifle, T.W.

    1998-03-01

    The development of deep underground structures (e.g., shafts, mines, storage and disposal caverns) significantly alters the stress state in the rock near the structure or opening. The effect of such an opening is to concentrate the far-field stress near the free surface. For soft rock such as salt, the concentrating effect of the opening induces deviatoric stresses in the salt that may be large enough to initiate microcracks which then propagate with time. The volume of rock susceptible to damage by microfracturing is often referred to as the disturbed rock zone and, by its nature, is expected to exhibit high permeability relative to that of the native, far-field rock. This paper presents laboratory data that characterize microfracture-induced damage and the effect this damage has on permeability for bedded salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant located in southeastern New Mexico. Damage is induced in the salt through a series of tertiary creep experiments and quantified in terms of dilatant volumetric strain. The permeability of damaged specimens is then measured using nitrogen gas as the permeant. The range in damage investigated included dilatant volumetric strains from less than 0.03 percent to nearly 4.0 percent. Permeability values corresponding to these damage levels ranged from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2}. Two simple models were fitted to the data for use in predicting permeability from dilatant volumetric strain.

  6. Laboratory determination of effective stress laws for deformation and permeability of chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L W; Warpinski, N R

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory deformation and permeability measurements have been made on chalk samples from Ekofisk area fields as a function of confining stress and pore pressure to determine the effective stress laws for chalk. An understanding of the effective stress law is essential to obtain correct reservoir-property data from core analysis and is critical for reservoir management studies and reservoir compaction models. A powerful statistical technique known as the response surface method has been used to analyze our laboratory data determine the form of the effective stress law for deformation and permeability. Experiments were conducted on chalk samples that had a range of porosities from 15% to 36%, because porosity is the dominant intrinsic property that effects deformation and permeability behavior of chalk. Deformation of a 36% porosity chalk was highly nonlinear, but the effective stress law was linear, with {alpha} equal to about unity. Lower-porosity samples showed linear strain behavior and a linear effective stress law with {alpha} as low as 0.74. Analysis of the effective stress law for permeability is presented only for the lowest porosity chalk sample because changes in permeability in the higher-porosity chalk samples due to increasing confining stress or pore pressure were not were large enough, to deduce meaningful effective stress relationships. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Interleukin-1beta induced vascular permeability is dependent on induction of endothelial tissue factor (TF) activity.

    PubMed

    Puhlmann, Markus; Weinreich, David M; Farma, Jeffrey M; Carroll, Nancy M; Turner, Ewa M; Alexander, H Richard

    2005-09-30

    IL-1beta is a pleotropic cytokine that may mediate increased procoagulant activity and permeability in endothelial tissue during inflammatory conditions. The procoagulant effects of IL-1beta are mediated through induction of tissue factor (TF) but its alterations on vascular permeability are not well characterized. We found that IL-1beta induced a rapid and dose-dependent increase in TF activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs) under routine culture conditions. However, IL-1beta caused a rapid and marked increase in permeability across confluent EC monolayers using a two-compartment in vitro model only in the presence of factor VIII-deficient plasma that was completely abrogated by neutralizing anti-TF antibody pre-treatment. In vitro permeability was associated with loss of EC surface expression of VE-cadherin and contraction of F-actin cytoskeletal elements that resulted in EC intercellular gap formation. These data demonstrate that IL-1beta induces marked changes in permeability across activated endothelium via a TF dependent mechanism and suggest that modulation of TF activity may represent a strategy to treat various acute and chronic inflammatory conditions mediated by this cytokine.

  8. Portable device and method for determining permeability characteristics of earth formations

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1977-01-01

    The invention is directed to a device which is used for determining permeability characteristics of earth formations at the surface thereof. The determination of the maximum permeability direction and the magnitude of permeability are achieved by employing a device comprising a housing having a central fluid-injection port surrounded by a plurality of spaced-apart fluid flow and pressure monitoring ports radially extending from the central injection port. With the housing resting on the earth formation in a relatively fluid-tight manner as provided by an elastomeric pad disposed therebetween, fluid is injected through the central port into the earth formation and into registry with the fluid-monitoring ports disposed about the injection port. The fluid-monitoring ports are selectively opened and the flow of the fluid through the various fluid ports is measured so as to provide a measurement of flow rates and pressure distribution about the center hole which is indicative on the earth formation permeability direction and magnitude. For example, the azimuthal direction of the fluid-monitoring ports in the direction through which the greatest amount of injected fluid flows as determined by the lowest pressure distribution corresponds to the direction of maximum permeability in the earth formation.

  9. Chemotherapy-Induced Changes in Cardiac Capillary Permeability Measured by Fluorescent Multiple Indicator Dilution

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Alicia; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lei, Tingjun; McGoron, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Anthracyclines cause severe irreversible cardiac toxicity. The study of changes in cardiac permeability with chemotherapy could enhance the understanding of mechanisms behind cardiac damage, and provide useful information to evaluate anthracycline cardiotoxicity. Thirty-six rats (12 Sprague-Dawley, 12 Wistar, 12 Fischer-344) were randomly assigned to control (n= 21) or doxorubicin (n = 15), and injected i.p. with a cumulative dose of 18 mg/kg doxorubicin in saline (vehicle) or vehicle over 12 days. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and on day 11. An isolated heart experiment was done on day 12 to obtain perfused heart pressure values, and to measure cardiac capillary permeability using a Texas Red/sodium fluorescein multiple indicator dilution method. Control animals had significantly lower average permeability-surface-area-products (0.035±0.013 cm3/s) than doxorubicin animals (0.066±0.023 cm3/s), PSP±SD, p<0.001. These permeability changes correlated with significant functional changes. There was a significant decline in cardiac function with a deleterious effect of chemotherapy on fractional shortening (p<0.001), left ventricular developed pressure (p<0.001), contractility (p<0.001), and relaxation (p=0.02). Based on our results, cardiac capillary permeability changes can be detected after in vivo chemotherapy treatment using our fluorescent multiple indicator dilution technique, and may provide valuable information in evaluating cardiotoxicity of novel drugs. PMID:25224075

  10. Extending Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data for Permeability Estimation in Fine-Grained Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, H.; Dugan, B.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a method for using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 data and gamma ray data to estimate lithology-dependent permeability in silt- and clay-rich sediments. This model, based on the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) model, allows for high resolution (<1 m) permeability estimates throughout a logged interval. Our model was calibrated using direct measurements on core samples from Keathley Canyon Lease Block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. From NMR and gamma ray data we are able to determine permeability from 10-18 to 10-14 m2 (0.001 to 10 millidarcies). Thus from discrete core samples and log data we were able to develop a permeability model for the entire sedimentary column (425 m). Lithologic variation was incorporated into the model by varying the A coefficient based on the gamma ray response. This provides a more accurate permeability model than assigning a constant value to A as is typically done. The relationship between A and intrinsic lithologic properties is unclear; simple pore system models suggest that A may be related to specific surface, tortuosity, and pore structure; we investigate simple models to quantify how these properties vary with sediment consolidation and what their relationship is to A. A comprehensive understanding that links NMR data and A to pore-scale properties will provide new constraints on deformation and flow in porous systems, and will contribute to our understanding of sediment properties for fluid flow modeling at local and regional scales.

  11. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model).

  12. Confusional state and cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed Central

    García-Albea, E.

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen patients with confusional state and cerebral infarction were studied. Seven patients had optic pathway alterations. On computed tomographic scan, 2 patients had multiple infarctions and 10 had single infarctions, predominantly located in the temporo-occipital associative cortex. One patient had a normal scan. Reduction of 'selective attention', 'release' hallucinations, amnesic syndrome and secondary individual adjustment could explain the confusional state. PMID:2608563

  13. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  14. Enhancement of scleral macromolecular permeability with prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, R N

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is proposed that the sclera is a metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive tissue. These studies were undertaken to determine whether prostaglandin exposure can enhance scleral permeability to high-molecular-weight substances. METHODS: Topical prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) was administered to monkeys to determine if this altered the amount of scleral matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Experiments also were performed to determine whether the prostaglandin F (FP) receptor and gene transcripts are expressed in normal human sclera. Permeability of organ-cultured human sclera following prostaglandin exposure then was studied and the amount of MMP released into the medium measured. Finally, the permeability of human sclera to basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) was determined following prostaglandin exposure. RESULTS: Topical prostaglandin administration that reduced scleral collagen also increased scleral MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 by 63 +/- 35%, 267 +/- 210%, and 729 +/- 500%, respectively. FP receptor protein was localized in scleral fibroblasts, and FP receptor gene transcript was identified in sclera. Exposure to prostaglandin F2 alpha, 17-phenyltrinor, PGF2 alpha, or latanoprost acid increased scleral permeability by up to 124%, 183%, or 213%, respectively. In these cultures, MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 were increased by up to 37%, 267%, and 96%, respectively. Finally, transscleral absorption of FGF-2 was increased by up to 126% with scleral exposure to latanoprost. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that the sclera is metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive to prostaglandins. Further, they demonstrate the feasibility of cotreatment with prostaglandin to enhance transscleral delivery of peptides, such as growth factors and high-molecular-weight substances, to the posterior segment of the eye. PMID:11797317

  15. Permeability of self-affine rough fractures

    PubMed

    Drazer; Koplik

    2000-12-01

    The permeability of two-dimensional fractures with self-affine fractal roughness is studied via analytic arguments and numerical simulations. The limit where the roughness amplitude is small compared with average fracture aperture is analyzed by a perturbation method, while in the opposite case of narrow aperture, we use heuristic arguments based on lubrication theory. Numerical simulations, using the lattice Boltzmann method, are used to examine the complete range of aperture sizes, and confirm the analytic arguments. PMID:11138092

  16. Methods of determining permeability, transmissibility and drawdown

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentall, Ray

    1964-01-01

    If the Theis graphical method is used for determining the hydraulic constants of an aquifer under water-table conditions, the observed drawdowns should be corrected for the decrease in saturated thickness. This is especially true if the drawdown is a large fraction of the original saturated thickness, for then the computed coefficient of permeability is highly inaccurate if based on observed, rather than corrected, water levels. Wenzel's limiting formula, a modification of the Theis graphical method, is useful where u=r2s/4Tt is less than about 0.01. However, a shorter procedure for determination of the coefficient of transmissibility, as well as the coefficient of storage, consists of plotting the values of the corrected drawdowns against the values of the logarithm of r. Wenzel (1942) suggested that observation wells be situated on lines that extend upgradient and downgradient from the pumped well. However, a detailed analysis of aquifer-test results indicates that such a restriction is unnecessary. The gradient method for determining permeability should yield the same results as the Thies method. The former, when applied for a distance within the range of applicability of the latter, is merely a duplication of effort or, at best, a crude check. Because of the limitations of accuracy in plotting, the gradient method is much less satisfactory. That Wenzel (1942) obtained identical results from the two methods is regarded as a coincidence. Failure to take into consideration the fact that the pumped well does not tap the full thickness of the aquifer leads to an apparent coefficient of permeability that is much too low, especially if the aquifer consists of stratified sediments. The average coefficient of permeability computed from uncorrected drawdowns may be only a little more than half of the true value.

  17. Nonlinear effective pressure law for permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Xiao, W.-L.; Bernabé, Y.; Zhao, J.-Z.

    2014-01-01

    The permeability k of porous rocks is known to vary with confining pressure pc and pore fluid pressure pf. But it is, in principle, possible to replace the two-variable function k(pf, pc) by a function k(peff) of a single variable, peff(pf, pc), called the effective pressure. Our goal in this paper is to establish an experimental method for determining a possibly nonlinear, effective pressure law (EPL) for permeability, i.e., find the function κs(pf, pc) such that the effective pressure is given by peff = pc - κs(pf, pc) pf. We applied this method to a set of 26 sandstone cores from various hydrocarbon reservoirs in China. We found that κs greatly varied, from sample to sample, in magnitude and range, sometimes even reaching theoretically prohibited values (i.e., greater than 1 or lower than porosity). One interesting feature of κs(pf, pc) is that it could be approximately described in all rocks but one as a decreasing function κs(pc - pf) of Terzaghi's differential pressure. We also investigated the dependence of permeability on peff for each of our samples. Three models from the literature, i.e., exponential (E), power law (P), and the Walsh model (W), were tested. The (W) model was more likely to fit the experimental data of cores with a high pressure dependence of permeability whereas (E) occurred more frequently in low-pressure-sensitive rocks. Finally, we made various types of two- and three-dimensional microstructural observations that generally supported the trend mentioned above.

  18. Nonequilibrium gas absorption in rotating permeable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, V. K.; Bazhaikin, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    The absorption of ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide by water and aqueous solutions in rotating permeable media, a cellular porous disk, and a set of spaced-apart thin disks has been considered. The efficiency of cleaning air to remove these impurities is determined, and their anomalously high solubility (higher than equilibrium value) has been discovered. The results demonstrate the feasibility of designing cheap efficient rotor-type absorbers to clean gases of harmful impurities.

  19. Permeability measurement and scan imaging to assess clogging of pervious concrete pavements in parking lots.

    PubMed

    Kayhanian, Masoud; Anderson, Dane; Harvey, John T; Jones, David; Muhunthan, Balasingam

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a study that used permeability measurement along with physical and hydrological characteristics of 20 pervious concrete pavements in parking lots throughout California. The permeability was measured at five locations: the main entrance, an area with no traffic, and three separate measurements within a parking space at each parking lot. Hydrological and physical site characteristics such as traffic flow, erosion, vegetation cover, sediments accumulation, maintenance practice, presence of cracking, rainfall, and temperature data were also collected for each parking lot. These data were used to perform detailed statistical analysis to determine factors influencing changes in permeability and hence assessing possible cause of clogging. In addition, seven representative core samples were obtained from four different parking lots with permeability ranging from very low to very high. Porosity profiles produced from CT scanning were used to assess the possible nature and extent of clogging. Results showed that there is a large variation in permeability within each parking lot and between different parking lots. In general, the age of the parking lot is the predominant factor influencing the permeability. Statistical analysis revealed that fine sediment (particles less than 38 μm) mass is also an important influencing factor. Other influencing factors with lower significance included number of days with a temperature greater than 30°C and the amount of vegetation next to the parking lot. The combined scanned image analysis and porosity profile of the cores showed that most clogging occurs near the surface of the pavement. While lower porosity generally appeared to be limited to the upper 25 mm, in some core samples evidence of lower porosity was found up to 100mm below the surface.

  20. The influence of few-layer graphene on the gas permeability of the high-free-volume polymer PIM-1

    PubMed Central

    Althumayri, Khalid; Harrison, Wayne J.; Shin, Yuyoung; Gardiner, John M.; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Bernardo, Paola; Clarizia, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Gas permeability data are presented for mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) of few-layer graphene in the polymer of intrinsic microporosity PIM-1, and the results compared with previously reported data for two other nanofillers in PIM-1: multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (f-MWCNTs) and fused silica. For few-layer graphene, a significant enhancement in permeability is observed at very low graphene content (0.05 vol.%), which may be attributed to the effect of the nanofiller on the packing of the polymer chains. At higher graphene content permeability decreases, as expected for the addition of an impermeable filler. Other nanofillers, reported in the literature, also give rise to enhancements in permeability, but at substantially higher loadings, the highest measured permeabilities being at 1 vol.% for f-MWCNTs and 24 vol.% for fused silica. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that packing of the polymer chains is influenced by the curvature of the nanofiller surface at the nanoscale, with an increasingly pronounced effect on moving from a more-or-less spherical nanoparticle morphology (fused silica) to a cylindrical morphology (f-MWCNT) to a planar morphology (graphene). While the permeability of a high-free-volume polymer such as PIM-1 decreases over time through physical ageing, for the PIM-1/graphene MMMs a significant permeability enhancement was retained after eight months storage. PMID:26712643

  1. The influence of few-layer graphene on the gas permeability of the high-free-volume polymer PIM-1.

    PubMed

    Althumayri, Khalid; Harrison, Wayne J; Shin, Yuyoung; Gardiner, John M; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Budd, Peter M; Bernardo, Paola; Clarizia, Gabriele; Jansen, Johannes C

    2016-02-13

    Gas permeability data are presented for mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) of few-layer graphene in the polymer of intrinsic microporosity PIM-1, and the results compared with previously reported data for two other nanofillers in PIM-1: multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (f-MWCNTs) and fused silica. For few-layer graphene, a significant enhancement in permeability is observed at very low graphene content (0.05 vol.%), which may be attributed to the effect of the nanofiller on the packing of the polymer chains. At higher graphene content permeability decreases, as expected for the addition of an impermeable filler. Other nanofillers, reported in the literature, also give rise to enhancements in permeability, but at substantially higher loadings, the highest measured permeabilities being at 1 vol.% for f-MWCNTs and 24 vol.% for fused silica. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that packing of the polymer chains is influenced by the curvature of the nanofiller surface at the nanoscale, with an increasingly pronounced effect on moving from a more-or-less spherical nanoparticle morphology (fused silica) to a cylindrical morphology (f-MWCNT) to a planar morphology (graphene). While the permeability of a high-free-volume polymer such as PIM-1 decreases over time through physical ageing, for the PIM-1/graphene MMMs a significant permeability enhancement was retained after eight months storage. PMID:26712643

  2. A multiphase microscopic diffusion model for stratum corneum permeability. I. Formulation, solution, and illustrative results for representative compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsuo-Feng; Kasting, Gerald B; Nitsche, Johannes M

    2006-03-01

    A two-dimensional microscopic transport model of the stratum corneum (SC) incorporating corneocytes of varying hydration and permeability embedded in an anisotropic lipid matrix is presented. Results are expressed in terms of a dimensionless permeability (P(SC/w)(comp), which is a function of two dimensionless parameters, R and sigma. R is a ratio of transbilayer to lateral molecular flows within a lipid bilayer and sigma is the ratio of (lateral) permeability in the lipid phase, D(lip)K(lip/w), to that in the corneocyte phase, D(cor)K(cor/w.) The shape of the dimensionless permeability surface is also governed by the arrangement of the SC lipids, where Model 1 represents the extreme in which lipid-phase transport can occur with no transbilayer transport, whereas Model 2 entails maximum transbilayer transport. Model calculations are exemplified by characterizing the skin permeability of four representative permeants: water, ethanol, nicotinamide, and testosterone. A comparison with experimental steady state permeability and partition data supports that the transport properties of the SC lipids are highly anisotropic, with lateral diffusivities several orders of magnitude higher than the equivalent diffusivity calculated from transbilayer hopping. Nevertheless, the calculations suggest that corneocyte-phase transport plays a major role for all four permeants. These results confirm our previous calculations on water permeability and present a marked contrast to the commonly stated doctrine that the SC transport pathway is primarily intercellular.

  3. Anisotropic Hydraulic Permeability Under Finite Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    The structural organization of biological tissues and cells often produces anisotropic transport properties. These tissues may also undergo large deformations under normal function, potentially inducing further anisotropy. A general framework for formulating constitutive relations for anisotropic transport properties under finite deformation is lacking in the literature. This study presents an approach based on representation theorems for symmetric tensor-valued functions and provides conditions to enforce positive semi-definiteness of the permeability or diffusivity tensor. Formulations are presented which describe materials that are orthotropic, transversely isotropic, or isotropic in the reference state, and where large strains induce greater anisotropy. Strain-induced anisotropy of the permeability of a solid-fluid mixture is illustrated for finite torsion of a cylinder subjected to axial permeation. It is shown that, in general, torsion can produce a helical flow pattern, rather than the rectilinear pattern observed when adopting a more specialized, unconditionally isotropic spatial permeability tensor commonly used in biomechanics. The general formulation presented in this study can produce both affine and non-affine reorientation of the preferred directions of material symmetry with strain, depending on the choice of material functions. This study addresses a need in the biomechanics literature by providing guidelines and formulations for anisotropic strain-dependent transport properties in porous-deformable media undergoing large deformations. PMID:21034145

  4. Porosity and Permeability of Chondritic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; Dahl, Jason; Long, Michael

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the porosity of a large number of chondritic interplanetary dust particles and meteorites by three techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, a new, non-invasive ultrasonic technique, and image processing of backscattered images . The latter technique is obviously best suited to sub-kg sized samples. We have also measured the gas and liquid permeabilities of some chondrites by two techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, and a new, non-destructive pressure release technique. We find that chondritic IDP's have a somewhat bimodal porosity distribution. Peaks are present at 0 and 4% porosity; a tail then extends to 53%. These values suggest IDP bulk densities of 1.1 to 3.3 g/cc. Type 1-3 chondrite matrix porosities range up to 30%, with a peak at 2%. The bulk porosities for type 1-3 chondrites have the same approximate range as exhibited by matrix, indicating that other components of the bulk meteorites (including chondrules and aggregates) have the same average porosity as matrix. These results reveal that the porosity of primitive materials at scales ranging from nanogram to kilogram are similar, implying similar accretion dynamics operated through 12 orders of size magnitude. Permeabilities of the investigated chondrites vary by several orders of magnitude, and there appears to be no simple dependence of permeability with degree of aqueous alteration, or chondrite type.

  5. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockette, Warren; Brennaman, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). In this study, it was determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of (I-125)-albumin and (C-14)-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored, and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 microg/kg per min ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of (I-125)-albumin, but not (C-14)-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  6. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B. )

    1990-12-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  7. Gravity filtration of suspensions: permeability effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soori, Tejaswi; Wang, Mengyu; Ward, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines the filtration rates of mono-modal suspensions as a function of time and a cake layer builds up through theory and experimentation. Darcy's Law, which describes fluid flow through porous media, was applied along with the Kynch theory of sedimentation, which provides the basis for analyzing low concentration (ϕ <=20%) cake formation. Experiments were performed to study the effects of varying particle sizes (45 μm <= d <= 1400 μm) and total solid concentration ϕ on both the formation rate of the cake layer and its flow permeability (k) in conjunction with the filter media. A CCD camera was used to capture images of the cake formation and fluid drainage processes, and subsequent image and theoretical analysis found the fluid flow experienced a constant pressure loss due to the permeability of the filter media, whereas the experienced pressure loss due to the cake formation varies as a function of time, ϕ and d. The rate of cake formation was also found to be independent of ϕ but dependent on d which can be attributed to a change in porosity affecting permeability. Studies on similar systems with multi-modal suspensions are in-progress.

  8. Endothelial cell permeability to water and antipyrine

    SciTech Connect

    Garrick, R.A.

    1986-03-05

    The endothelium provides a structural barrier between plasma constituents and the tissues. The permeability characteristics of the the endothelial cells regulate the transcellular movement of materials across this barrier while other movement is paracellular. In this study the permeability of the endothelial cells to tritiated water (/sup 3/HHO) and /sup 14/C-labeled antipyrine (AP) was investigated. The cells were isolated non-enzymatically from calf pulmonary artery and were maintained in culture and used between the seventh and fifteenth passage. The cells were removed from the T-flasks with a rubber policeman, titurated with a 22g needle and centrifuged. The cells were mixed with an extracellular marker, drawn into polyethylene tubing and packed by centrifugation for use in the linear diffusion technique. All measurements were made at 37 C. The diffusion coefficients for /sup 3/HHO through the packed cells (D), the intracellular material (D/sub 2/), and the extracellular material (D/sub 1/) were 0.682, 0.932 and 2.45 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ and for AP were 0.273, 0.355 and 1.13 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ respectively. The permeability coefficient calculated by the series-parallel pathway model for /sup 3/HHO was higher than that for AP and for both /sup 3/HHO and AP were lower than those calculated for isolated lung cells and erythrocytes.

  9. A multiphase microscopic diffusion model for stratum corneum permeability. II. Estimation of physicochemical parameters, and application to a large permeability database.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsuo-Feng; Kasting, Gerald B; Nitsche, Johannes M

    2007-11-01

    The full parameterization for the stratum corneum biphasic microtransport model presented previously in this Journal [95:620-648 (2006)] is developed through a combination of fundamental transport theory and calibration with existing data. Of the five microscopic transport properties, four (D(cor), K(cor/w), D(lip), K(lip/w)) are developed from sources independent of the existing steady-state permeability database. The fifth parameter, k(trans) (the mass transfer coefficient for transbilayer hopping), is derived from a fit of the model to the permeability data according to a modified free surface area function of the form log(10) k(trans) = A-B x (MW)(1/3). Examination of the experimental data in terms of the two dimensionless groups, R and sigma, arising from the analysis leads to the conclusion that SC permeation for most compounds is dominated by the transcellular pathway regardless of their lipophilicity, a striking departure from recent skin permeability models. Overall fit of the developed model(s) to the permeability data is somewhat better than for the Potts-Guy equation and variants thereof; however, marked improvement is seen in the estimation of lag times and the related potential for predicting skin hydration effects and transient skin permeation profiles. Simple approximations to the full numerical solution are presented that allow the developed model(s) to be implemented on a spreadsheet.

  10. Cerebral circulation, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier of rats in hypocapnic hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, T.; Krieglstein, J.

    1987-03-01

    The effects of hypoxic hypoxia on physiological variables, cerebral circulation, cerebral metabolism, and blood-brain barrier were investigated in conscious, spontaneously breathing rats by exposing them to an atmosphere containing 7% O/sub 2/. Hypoxia affected a marked hypotension, hypocapnia and alkalosis. Cortical tissue high-energy phosphates and glucose content were not affected by hypoxia, glucose 6-phosphate lactate, and pyruvate levels were significantly increased. Blood-brain barrier permeability, regional brain glucose content and lumped constant were not changed by hypoxia. Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rose by 40-70% of control values in gray matter and by 80-90% in white matter. Under hypoxia, columns of increased and decreased LCGU and were detectable in cortical gray matter. Color-coded (/sup 14/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiograms of rat brain are shown. Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) increased by 50-90% in gray matter and by up to 180% in white matter. Coupling between LCGU and LCBF in hypoxia remained unchanged. The data suggests a stimulation of glycolysis, increased glucose transport into the cell, and increased hexokinase activity. The physiological response of gray and white matter to hypoxia obviously differs. Uncoupling of the relation between LCGU and LCBF does not occur.

  11. Enhancement of polycarbonate membrane permeability due to plasma polymerization precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çökeliler, Dilek

    2013-03-01

    The diffusivity of different species through a membrane depends on several factors to illustrate the structure of the matrix, molecular size and concentration of the species and temperature. This study concerns the use of the low-pressure plasma process with different monomers to confer surface chemical character to polycarbonate membranes without altering their bulk properties for change membrane permeability. Track-etched polycarbonate membranes with 0.03 μm pore sizes were modified by plasma polymerization technique with two precursors; acrylic acid and allylamine in radio frequency discharge at certain plasma process conditions (discharge power: 20 W, exposure time: 10 min, frequency: 13.56 MHz). The transport properties of model organic acid (citric acid) was studied through unmodified and modified polycarbonate membranes by using diffusion cell system. Such plasma treated membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface energy changes were studied by static contact angle measurements. These results showed that the change of surface properties could be used to improve the transport properties of the target substrates. The diffusion of citric acid through plasma treated polycarbonate membrane was increased about 54.1 ± 3.5% with precursor: allylamine while it was decreased 48.7 ± 2.5% with precursor acrylic acid. It was observed that the presences of proper functional group (like amino) in surfaces of pores can raise the affinity to citric acid and improve its transport rate.

  12. Changes in rock salt permeability due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J C; Howard, C L

    1991-07-01

    Changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation (mine-by) have been measured from the underground workings of the WIPP facility. Prior to the mine-by, the formation responds as a porous medium with a very low brine permeability, a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The mine-by excavation creates a dilated, partially saturated zone in the immediate vicinity of the excavation with an increased permeability to brine and a measurable permeability to gas. The changes in hydrologic properties are discussed in the context of pore structure changes.

  13. Exploration and protection of Europa's biosphere: implications of permeable ice.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Europa has become a high-priority objective for exploration because it may harbor life. Strategic planning for its exploration has been predicated on an extreme model in which the expected oceanic biosphere lies under a thick ice crust, buried too deep to be reached in the foreseeable future, which would beg the question of whether other active satellites might be more realistic objectives. However, Europa's ice may in fact be permeable, with very different implications for the possibilities for life and for mission planning. A biosphere may extend up to near the surface, making life far more readily accessible to exploration while at the same time making it vulnerable to contamination. The chances of finding life on Europa are substantially improved while the need for planetary protection becomes essential. The new National Research Council planetary protection study will need to go beyond its current mandate if meaningful standards are to be put in place. PMID:21417946

  14. Exploration and protection of Europa's biosphere: implications of permeable ice.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Europa has become a high-priority objective for exploration because it may harbor life. Strategic planning for its exploration has been predicated on an extreme model in which the expected oceanic biosphere lies under a thick ice crust, buried too deep to be reached in the foreseeable future, which would beg the question of whether other active satellites might be more realistic objectives. However, Europa's ice may in fact be permeable, with very different implications for the possibilities for life and for mission planning. A biosphere may extend up to near the surface, making life far more readily accessible to exploration while at the same time making it vulnerable to contamination. The chances of finding life on Europa are substantially improved while the need for planetary protection becomes essential. The new National Research Council planetary protection study will need to go beyond its current mandate if meaningful standards are to be put in place.

  15. Lunar magnetic permeability, magnetic fields, and electrical conductivity temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    In the time period 1969-1972 a total of five magnetometers were deployed on the lunar surface during four Apollo missions. Data from these instruments, along with simultaneous measurements from other experiments on the moon and in lunar orbit, were used to study properties of the lunar interior and the lunar environment. The principal scientific results from analyses of the magnetic field data are discussed. The results are presented in the following main categories: (1) lunar electrical conductivity, temperature, and structure; (2) lunar magnetic permeability, iron abundance, and core size limits; (3) the local remnant magnetic fields, their interaction with the solar wind, and a thermoelectric generator model for their origin. Relevant publications and presented papers are listed.

  16. Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2011-11-01

    -sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

  17. Exploration and Protection of Europa's Biosphere: Implications of Permeable Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Europa has become a high-priority objective for exploration because it may harbor life. Strategic planning for its exploration has been predicated on an extreme model in which the expected oceanic biosphere lies under a thick ice crust, buried too deep to be reached in the foreseeable future, which would beg the question of whether other active satellites might be more realistic objectives. However, Europa's ice may in fact be permeable, with very different implications for the possibilities for life and for mission planning. A biosphere may extend up to near the surface, making life far more readily accessible to exploration while at the same time making it vulnerable to contamination. The chances of finding life on Europa are substantially improved while the need for planetary protection becomes essential. The new National Research Council planetary protection study will need to go beyond its current mandate if meaningful standards are to be put in place.

  18. Evaluating Permeability Enchancement Using Electrical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Pritchett

    2008-09-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) development projects involve the artificial stimulation of relatively impermeable high-temperature underground regions (at depths of 2-4 kilometers or more) to create sufficient permeability to permit underground fluid circulation, so that hot water can be withdrawn from production wells and used to generate electric power. Several major research projects of this general type have been undertaken in the past in New Mexico (Fenton Hill), Europe, Japan and Australia. Recent U.S. activities along these lines focus mainly on stimulating peripheral areas of existing operating hydrothermal fields rather than on fresh 'greenfield' sites, but the long-term objective of the Department of Energy's EGS program is the development of large-scale power projects based on EGS technology (MIT, 2006; NREL, 2008). Usually, stimulation is accomplished by injecting water into a well at high pressure, enhancing permeability by the creation and propagation of fractures in the surrounding rock (a process known as 'hydrofracturing'). Beyond just a motivation, low initial system permeability is also an essential prerequisite to hydrofracturing. If the formation permeability is too high, excessive fluid losses will preclude the buildup of sufficient pressure to fracture rock. In practical situations, the actual result of injection is frequently to re-open pre-existing hydrothermally-mineralized fractures, rather than to create completely new fractures by rupturing intact rock. Pre-existing fractures can often be opened using injection pressures in the range 5-20 MPa. Creation of completely new fractures will usually require pressures that are several times higher. It is preferable to undertake development projects of this type in regions where tectonic conditions are conducive to shear failure, so that when pre-existing fractures are pressurized they will fail by shearing laterally. If this happens, the fracture will often stay open afterwards even if

  19. The role of sphingolipid metabolism in cutaneous permeability barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-03-01

    The epidermal permeability barrier of mammalian skin is localized in the stratum corneum. Corneocytes are embedded in an extracellular, highly ordered lipid matrix of hydrophobic lipids consisting of about 50% ceramides, 25% cholesterol and 15% long and very long chain fatty acids. The most important lipids for the epidermal barrier are ceramides. The scaffold of the lipid matrix is built of acylceramides, containing ω-hydroxylated very long chain fatty acids, acylated at the ω-position with linoleic acid. After glucosylation of the acylceramides at Golgi membranes and secretion, the linoleic acid residues are replaced by glutamate residues originating from proteins exposed on the surface of corneocytes. Removal of their glucosyl residues generates a hydrophobic surface on the corneocytes used as a template for the formation of extracellular lipid layers of the water permeability barrier. Misregulation or defects in the formation of extracellular ceramide structures disturb barrier function. Important anabolic steps are the synthesis of ultra long chain fatty acids, their ω-hydroxylation, and formation of ultra long chain ceramides and glucosylceramides. The main probarrier precursor lipids, glucosylceramides and sphingomyelins, are packed in lamellar bodies together with hydrolytic enzymes such as glucosylceramide-β-glucosidase and acid sphingomyelinase and secreted into the intercelullar space between the stratum corneum and stratum granulosum. Inherited defects in the extracellular hydrolytic processing of the probarrier acylglucosylceramides impair epidermal barrier formation and cause fatal diseases: such as prosaposin deficiency resulting in lack of lysosomal lipid binding and transfer proteins, or the symptomatic clinical picture of the "collodion baby" in the absence of glucocerebrosidase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous

  20. Permeability Evolution of Granite Gneiss During Triaxial Creep Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Xu, W. Y.; Wang, H. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, R. B.

    2016-09-01

    Permeability is an important factor for seepage analysis of rock material, and a key factor in ensuring the safety of underground works. In this study, the permeability evolution of granite gneiss during triaxial creep tests was investigated. In the context of an underground oil storage cavern in China, a series of hydro-mechanical coupling creep tests were conducted on rock cores of granite gneiss at three different pore pressures to reveal the effect of pore pressure on the permeability evolution and to investigate the correlation between the permeability and volumetric strain during the creep process. During the creep tests, the permeability decreases in the initial loading phase. At all deviatoric stress levels, the permeability remains stable in the steady creep stage and increases rapidly in the accelerated creep stage. Based on the test data, the initial permeability, steady permeability and peak permeability at various stress levels are defined. The effect of pore pressure on the permeability is captured by a linear model. In addition, the relationship between permeability and volumetric strain can be described as a process divided into three phases, with different functions in each phase.

  1. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  2. Permeability-porosity relationships of subduction zone sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, K.; Screaton, E.; Bekins, B.; Aiello, I.

    2011-01-01

    Permeability-porosity relationships for sediments from the northern Barbados, Costa Rica, Nankai, and Peru subduction zones were examined based on sediment type, grain size distribution, and general mechanical and chemical compaction history. Greater correlation was observed between permeability and porosity in siliciclastic sediments, diatom oozes, and nannofossil chalks than in nannofossil oozes. For siliciclastic sediments, grouping of sediments by percentage of clay-sized material yields relationships that are generally consistent with results from other marine settings and suggests decreasing permeability as percentage of clay-sized material increases. Correction of measured porosities for smectite content improved the correlation of permeability-porosity relationships for siliciclastic sediments and diatom oozes. The relationship between permeability and porosity for diatom oozes is very similar to the relationship in siliciclastic sediments, and permeabilities of both sediment types are related to the amount of clay-size particles. In contrast, nannofossil oozes have higher permeability values by 1.5 orders of magnitude than siliciclastic sediments of the same porosity and show poor correlation between permeability and porosity. More indurated calcareous sediments, nannofossil chalks, overlap siliciclastic permeabilities at the lower end of their measured permeability range, suggesting similar consolidation patterns at depth. Thus, the lack of correlation between permeability and porosity for nannofossil oozes is likely related to variations in mechanical and chemical compaction at shallow depths. This study provides the foundation for a much-needed global database with fundamental properties that relate to permeability in marine settings. Further progress in delineating controls on permeability requires additional carefully documented permeability measurements on well-characterized samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Development and evaluation of an air permeability test device for concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, Dena Lee

    The use of non-destructive testing is increasing as a way to determine the quality of concrete infrastructure. A good concrete should be durable, and low permeability is one indication of durable concrete. This research focused on the development of a device with two concentric chambers capable of measuring the permeability of concrete in a non-destructive manner. The method measures the rate at which pressure in the inner chamber increases as air flows from the outer chamber through the concrete and into the inner chamber. The device is attached to the concrete surface by suction force created by vacuum. The surface around the device is sealed to limit the area from which air may enter the inner chamber. A computer program was developed to model the flow of air through the concrete. The axisymmetric nature of the device was used and an equation modeling steady-state flow was applied at small time increments to estimate the actual condition of non-steady flow. The program produces a family of curves which may be combined with the experimental data to estimate the permeability of the concrete. A parametric study was conducted to correlate the new device to standardized permeability test methods. Age, the use of a pozzolan, and different water-to-cementitious material ratios were the main variables in the test program.

  4. Modeling permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaka, S.; Kelkar, S.; Zyvoloski, G.; Pawar, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of a geothermal reservoir. Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation, while simultaneously increasing the likelihood of premature thermal breakthrough. Hence, the ability to accurately model the fracture-stress interaction in the presence of variations in temperature and fluid pressure is critical in effective reservoir development and management strategies. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical processes during multi-phase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method. The first example studies the role played by thermal and pore-pressure effects in enhancing the permeability in the near-wellbore region. In the second example, we will study permeability enhancement due to shear stresses farther away from the wellbore.

  5. Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Min, K.-B.; Elsworth, D.; Tsang, Y.

    2008-06-01

    We analyzed a data set of thermally induced changes in fractured rock permeability during a four-year heating (up to 200 C) and subsequent four-year cooling of a large volume, partially saturated and highly fractured volcanic tuff at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test, in Nevada, USA. Permeability estimates were derived from about 700 pneumatic (air-injection) tests, taken periodically at 44 packed-off borehole intervals during the heating and cooling cycle from November 1997 through November 2005. We analyzed air-permeability data by numerical modeling of thermally induced stress and moisture movements and their impact on air permeability within the highly fractured rock. Our analysis shows that changes in air permeability during the initial four-year heating period, which were limited to about one order of magnitude, were caused by the combined effects of thermal-mechanically-induced stress on fracture aperture and thermal-hydrologically-induced changes in fracture moisture content. At the end of the subsequent four-year cooling period, air-permeability decreases (to as low as 0.2 of initial) and increases (to as high as 1.8 of initial) were observed. By comparison to the calculated thermo-hydro-elastic model results, we identified these remaining increases or decreases in air permeability as irreversible changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). In this paper, we discuss the possibility that such fracture asperity shortening and associated decrease in fracture permeability might be enhanced by dissolution of highly stressed surface asperities over years of elevated stress and temperature.

  6. Permeability development during compaction of pumiceous dome lavas: testing the permeable foam collapse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; kennedy, B.; Hess, K.; von Aulock, F. W.; Cole, J. W.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution of the porous network during lava dome extrusions is commonly perceived as the key control on the permeability which regulates the pore pressure, thereby challenging the stability of the dome. Here, we present experimental results of porosity and permeability evolution during compaction of aphiric and crystal-bearing rhyolitic, pumiceous (porosity ~60 %) lavas from Tarawera and Ngongotaha volcanoes (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand), respectively. The The Ngongotaha sample is from the crystal-free dome carapace (erupted ~200 ka following caldera collapse at Rotorua Caldera), while the Tarawera sample is a crystalline, pumiceous clast from a dome-collapse generated block and ash flow (at Okataina Caldera ~1314 AD). This study tests the validity of the 'permeable foam' model by comparing properties of the experimentally compacted pumice to denser material seen in the exposed cores of Tarawera and Ngongotaha. Cylindrical samples were deformed under an axial stress of 2.8 MPa at 650-750°C (above their calorimetric glass transition temperature) up a total axial strain of 50 %. The porosity and permeability of the samples were characterized at strain increments of 10 %. The samples exhibit strain hardening during compaction. A rapid reduction in permeability along the primary axis occurs during the initial stage of compression and continues to decrease with increasing strain and densification of the lava. Development of permeability of each lava differs as the crystallinity affects the compaction process. The development of textures and microstructures is characterised using petrographic analysis and neutron computed tomography. The findings from the study are then put into the context of lava dome growth at Tarawera and Ngongotaha volcanoes.

  7. Quantification of porosity and permeability reduction due to calcite cementation using computer-assisted petrographic image analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mowers, T.T.; Budd, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    Calcite cementation is often an important factor in the evolution of reservoir pore systems. Although petrographically obvious, the effect that cementation has had on the petrophysical properties of a pore system may be difficult to evaluate quantitatively. To this end, a computer-assisted petrographic image analysis (PIA) technique was developed to quantify porosity and permeability reduction due to calcite cementation. With this technique, pore area and specific surface of the extant pore system are measured from digital images of core-plug thin sections. Porosity is estimated from the measurements of pore area, and an empirical equation relating pore area and specific surface to core permeability is derived using the Kozeny-Carman expression. In this manner, a permeability model is developed for the pore system in question, thus providing a means of estimating permeability from PIA measurements. To estimate the porosity and permeability of the precalcite pore system, calcite cement is discriminated from the same digital images and analyzed as pore space. This effectively backstrips calcite from the extant pore network to yield the precursor pore network. A comparison of the porosity and permeability of the extant and precalcite pore networks shows the quantitative significance of calcite cementation. This technique is demonstrated using two dolomite reservoirs that exhibit varying amounts of late-stage calcite cements: Little Sand Draw field, Wyoming, and Bindley field, Kansas. Calcite cement was found to be minor and restricted to moldic pores in Little Sand Draw dolomites, resulting in less than a twofold change in permeability. In contrast, late calcite cements are somewhat more abundant in Bindley dolomites, but more importantly, they occupy intercrystalline pores as well as moldic pores. The net effect was a 10- to 1000-fold decrease in permeability and the localized destruction of reservoir-quality rocks in Bindley field.

  8. EXCEPTIONAL AGGRESSIVENESS OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH PDCD10 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiz, Tania; Stockton, Rebecca A.; McDonald, David A.; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Zhang, Lingjiao; Austin, Cecilia; Akers, Amy L.; Gallione, Carol J.; Rorrer, Autumn; Gunel, Murat; Min, Wang; De Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Lee, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The phenotypic manifestations of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease caused by rare PDCD10 mutations have not been systematically examined, and a mechanistic link to Rho kinase (ROCK) mediated hyperpermeability, a potential therapeutic target, has not been established. Methods We analyze PDCD10-siRNA treated endothelial cells for stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability. ROCK activity is assessed in CCM lesions. Brain permeability and CCM lesion burden is quantified, and clinical manifestations are assessed in prospectively enrolled subjects with PDCD10 mutations. Results We determine that PDCD10 protein suppresses endothelial stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability in vitro. Pdcd10 heterozygous mice have greater lesion burden than other Ccm genotypes. We demonstrate robust ROCK activity in murine and human CCM vasculature, and increased brain vascular permeability in humans with PDCD10 mutation. Clinical phenotype is exceptionally aggressive compared to the more common KRIT1 and CCM2 familial and sporadic CCM, with greater lesion burden and more frequent hemorrhages earlier in life. We first report other phenotypic features including scoliosis, cognitive disability and skin lesions, unrelated to lesion burden or bleeding. Conclusion These findings define a unique CCM disease with exceptional aggressiveness, and they inform preclinical therapeutic testing, clinical counseling and the design of trials. PMID:25122144

  9. Global spatial sensitivity of runoff to subsurface permeability using the active subspace method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, James M.; Jefferson, Jennifer L.; Constantine, Paul G.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2016-06-01

    Hillslope scale runoff is generated as a result of interacting factors that include water influx rate, surface and subsurface properties, and antecedent saturation. Heterogeneity of these factors affects the existence and characteristics of runoff. This heterogeneity becomes an increasingly relevant consideration as hydrologic models are extended and employed to capture greater detail in runoff generating processes. We investigate the impact of one type of heterogeneity - subsurface permeability - on runoff using the integrated hydrologic model ParFlow. Specifically, we examine the sensitivity of runoff to variation in three-dimensional subsurface permeability fields for scenarios dominated by either Hortonian or Dunnian runoff mechanisms. Ten thousand statistically consistent subsurface permeability fields are parameterized using a truncated Karhunen-Loéve (KL) series and used as inputs to 48-h simulations of integrated surface-subsurface flow in an idealized 'tilted-v' domain. Coefficients of the spatial modes of the KL permeability fields provide the parameter space for analysis using the active subspace method. The analysis shows that for Dunnian-dominated runoff conditions the cumulative runoff volume is sensitive primarily to the first spatial mode, corresponding to permeability values in the center of the three-dimensional model domain. In the Hortonian case, runoff volume is sensitive to multiple smaller-scale spatial modes and the locus of that sensitivity is in the near-surface zone upslope from the domain outlet. Variation in runoff volume resulting from random heterogeneity configurations can be expressed as an approximately univariate function of the active variable, a weighted combination of spatial parameterization coefficients computed through the active subspace method. However, this relationship between the active variable and runoff volume is more well-defined for Dunnian runoff than for the Hortonian scenario.

  10. The Effect of Shear and Deviatoric Stress on Permeability Evolution in Fractured Diorite and Novaculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faoro, I.; Elsworth, D.; Marone, C.; Niemeijer, A.

    2006-12-01

    The evolution of the permeability in fractured rocks, subject to changing stress conditions is a complex issue. In this contribution, we report on experiments in which rock surfaces were sheared under controlled pore pressure and true-triaxial stress conditions while permeability was monitored via flow parallel to the shear direction. Direct shear tests were performed in a pressure vessel under drained conditions on samples of novaculite and of diorite (Coso Geothermal field, CA). Smoothed-faced, prismatic blocks were roughened by grinding with 60# grit, assembled face-to-face, and jacketed within a sealed membrane. Normal stress was applied by a hydraulic ram, and confining- and pore-pressures were maintained via high precision servo- controlled pressure intensifiers. The sample pairs are sheared to 18 mm of final displacement at 5 μm/sec, at room temperature, and at effective normal stresses ranging from 5 to 20 MPa. Permeability evolution is measured throughout shearing via flow of distilled water from an upstream reservoir at 0.1 MPa and discharged at atmospheric pressure. The permeability of the smooth fracture in novaculite varied only slightly with applied effective normal stress (0.5×10^{-14} m2 at 5 MPa, 10^{-14} m2 at 10 MPa and 10^{-14} m2 at 20 MPa). The corresponding hydraulic apertures were respectively 20 μm, 15 μm and 13 μm. In all three tests, permeability dropped one order of magnitude upon shearing. Steady state values for permeability and shear strength were typically reached after ~ 10 mm of load point displacement. An associated reduction of ~10 μm was observed in the hydraulic apertures. Similar behavior was recorded in the diorite sample but only at the highest effective normal stresses. The initial permeability of ~10^{-13 m2 dropped four orders of magnitude before reaching a steady state value. This corresponds to a reduction in hydraulic aperture of ~23 μm, reaching a steady state magnitude of ~1.5 μm. At lower effective normal

  11. Frog striated muscle is permeable to hydroxide and buffer anions.

    PubMed

    Venosa, R A; Kotsias, B A; Horowicz, P

    1994-04-01

    Hydroxide, bicarbonate and buffer anion permeabilities in semitendinosus muscle fibers of Rana pipiens were measured. In all experiments, the fibers were initially equilibrated in isotonic, high K2SO4 solutions at pHo = 7.2 buffered with phosphate. Two different methods were used to estimate permeabilities: (i) membrane potential changes were recorded in response to changes in external ion concentrations, and (ii) intracellular pH changes were recorded in response to changes in external concentrations of ions that alter intracellular pH. Constant field equations were used to calculate relative or absolute permeabilities. In the first method, to increase the size of the membrane potential change produced by a sudden change in anion entry, external K+ was replaced by Cs+ prior to changes of the anion under study. At constant external Cs+ activity, a hyperpolarization results from increasing external pH from 7.2 to 10.0 or higher, using either CAPS (3-[cyclohexylamino]-1-propanesulfonic acid) or CHES (2-[N-cyclohexylamino]-ethanesulfonic acid) as buffer. For each buffer, the protonated form is a zwitterion of zero net charge and the nonprotonated form is an anion. Using reported values of H+ permeability, calculations show that the reduction in [H+]o cannot account for the hyperpolarizations produced by alkaline solutions. Membrane hyperpolarization increases with increasing total external buffer concentration at constant external pH, and with increasing external pH at constant external buffer anion concentration. Taken together, these observations indicate that both OH- and buffer anions permeate the surface membrane. The following relative permeabilities were obtained at pHo = 10.0 +/- 0.3: (POH/PK) = 890 +/- 150, (PCAPS/PK) = 12 +/- 2, (PCHES/PK) = 5.3 +/- 0.9, and (PNO3/PK) = 4.7 +/- 0.5. PNO3/PK was independent of pHo up to 10.75. At pHo = 9.6, (PHCO3/PK) = 0.49 +/- 0.03; at pHo = 8.9, (PCl/PK) = 18 +/- 2 and at pHo = 7.1, (PHEPES/PK) = 20 +/- 2. In the second

  12. Plasma surface modification of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirotsu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Thin plasma polymerization films are discussed from the viewpoint of simplicity in production stages. The application of selective, absorbent films and films used in selective permeability was tested. The types of surface modification of polymers discussed are: (1) plasma etching, (2) surface coating by plasma polymerized thin films, and (3) plasma activation surface graft polymerization.

  13. Hydraulic tests in highly permeable aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Zhan, X.

    2004-01-01

    A semianalytical solution is presented for a mathematical model describing the flow of groundwater in response to a slug or pumping test in a highly permeable, confined aquifer. This solution, which is appropriate for wells of any degree of penetration and incorporates inertial mechanisms at both the test and observation wells, can be used to gain new insights into hydraulic tests in highly permeable settings. The oscillatory character of slug- and pumping-induced responses will vary considerably across a site, even in an essentially homogeneous formation, when wells of different radii, depths, and screen lengths are used. Thus variations in the oscillatory character of responses do not necessarily indicate variations in hydraulic conductivity (K). Existing models for slug tests in partially penetrating wells in high-K aquifers neglect the storage properties of the media. That assumption, however, appears reasonable for a wide range of common conditions. Unlike in less permeable formations, drawdown at an observation well in a high-K aquifer will be affected by head losses in the pumping well. Those losses, which affect the form of the pumping-induced oscillations, can be difficult to characterize. Thus analyses of observation-well drawdown should utilize data from the period after the oscillations have dissipated whenever possible. Although inertial mechanisms can have a large impact on early-time drawdown, that impact decreases rapidly with duration of pumping and distance to the observation well. Conventional methods that do not consider inertial mechanisms should therefore be viable options for the analysis of drawdown data at moderate to large times.

  14. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abazari, Alireza; Meimetis, Labros G.; Budin, Ghyslain; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Weissleder, Ralph; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre) demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre) and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre). Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants) reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies. PMID:26115179

  15. Evaluation of permeable fractures in rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok Lee, Hang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the practical usefulness and fundamental applicability of a self-potential (SP) method for identifying the permeable fractures were evaluated by a comparison of SP methods with other geophysical logging methods and hydraulic tests. At a 10 m-shallow borehole in the study site, the candidates of permeable fractures crossing the borehole were first determined by conventional geophysical methods such as an acoustic borehole televiwer, temperature, electrical conductivity and gamma-gamma loggings, which was compared to the analysis by the SP method. Constant pressure injection and recovery tests were conducted for verification of the hydraulic properties of the fractures identified by various logging methods. The acoustic borehole televiwer and gamma-gamma loggings detected the open space or weathering zone within the borehole, but they cannot prove the possibility of a groundwater flow through the detected fractures. The temperature and electrical conductivity loggings had limitations to detect the fractured zones where groundwater in the borehole flows out to the surrounding rock aquifers. Comparison of results from different methods showed that there is a best correlation between the distribution of hydraulic conductivity and the variation of the SP signals, and the SP logging can estimate accurately the hydraulic activity as well as the location of permeable fractures. Based on the results, the SP method is recommended for determining the hydraulically-active fractures rather than other conventional geophysical loggings. This self-potential method can be effectively applied in the initial stage of a site investigation which selects the optimal location and evaluates the hydrogeological property of fractures in target sites for the underground structure including the geothermal reservoir and radioactive waste disposal.

  16. The kinetics of denitrification in permeable sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Victor; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2013-04-01

    Permeable sediments comprise the majority of shelf sediments, yet the rates of denitrification remain highly uncertain in these environments. Computational models are increasingly being used to understand the dynamics of denitrification in permeable sediments, which are complex environments to study experimentally. The realistic implementation of such models requires reliable experimentally derived data on the kinetics of denitrification. Here we undertook measurements of denitrification kinetics as a function of nitrate concentration and in the presence and absence of oxygen, in carefully controlled flow through reactor experiments on sediments taken from six shallow coastal sites in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia. The results showed that denitrification commenced rapidly (within 30 min) after the onset of anoxia and the kinetics could be well described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with half saturation constants (apparent Km) ranging between 1.5 and 19.8 μM, and maximum denitrification rate (Vmax) were in the range of 0.9-7.5 nmol mL-1 h-1. The production of N2 through anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) was generally found to be less than 10% that of denitrification. Vmax were in the same range as previously reported in cohesive sediments despite organic carbon contents one order of magnitude lower for the sediments studied here. The ratio of sediment O2 consumption to Vmax was in the range of 0.02-0.09, and was on average much lower than the theoretical ratio of 0.8. The most likely explanation for this is that the microbial community is not able to instantaneously shift or optimally use a particular electron acceptor in the highly dynamic redox environment experienced in permeable sediments. Consistent with this explanation, subsequent longer-term experiments over 5 days showed that denitrification rates increased by a factor of 10 within 3 days of the permanent onset of anoxia. In contrast to previous studies, we did not observe any significant

  17. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  18. [Cerebral syndromes in premature children].

    PubMed

    Edel'shteĭn, E A; Bandarenko, E S

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral disturbances observed in premature infants are analyzed. These disturbances are a consequence of developmental slowdown and are associated with the pathological immaturity of the brain structures. On condition an active pathogenetic therapy is given these disturbances may gradually regress. On the basis of long-term observations of 600 prematurely born infants the authors describe the following clinical syndromes: muscular hypotonicity lasting up to 4-5 months and followed with a rise of the tone; the syndrome of "paretic hands" observed during the first two months of life; a hypertensive-hydrocephalic syndrome combined with a rise of the neuro-reflectory excitability; the syndrome of psychomotor development retardation followed at an age of over 1.5 to 2 years by complete recovery or minimal cerebral insufficiency with belated development of motor speech and neurosis-like reactions. PMID:6880498

  19. Osmotic water permeability of human red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, T.C.; Solomon, A.K.

    1981-05-01

    The osmotic water permeability of human red cells has been reexamined with a stopped-flow device and a new perturbation technique. Small osmotic gradients are used to minimize the systematic error caused by nonlinearities in the relationship between cell volume and light scattering. Corrections are then made for residual systematic error. Our results show that the hydraulic conductivity, Lp, is essentially independent of the direction of water flow and of osmolality in the range 184-365 mosM. the mean value of Lp obtained obtained was 1.8 +/- 0.1 (SEM) X 10-11 cm3 dyne -1 s-1.

  20. Gas permeable electrode for electrochemical system

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Townsend, Carl W.

    1989-01-01

    An electrode apparatus adapted for use in electrochemical systems having an anode compartment and a cathode compartment in which gas and ions are produced and consumed in the compartments during generation of electrical current. The electrode apparatus includes a membrane for separating the anode compartment from the cathode compartment wherein the membrane is permeable to both ions and gas. The cathode and anode for the assembly are provided on opposite sides of the membrane. During use of the membrane-electrode apparatus in electrochemical cells, the gas and ions generated at the cathode or anode migrate through the membrane to provide efficient transfer of gas and ions between the anode and cathode compartments.