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Sample records for perna perna bivalvia

  1. Influence of salinity on the physiological conditions in mussels, Perna perna and Perna viridis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae).

    PubMed

    Segnini de Bravo, Mary Isabel

    2003-06-01

    Perna genus was introduced to Venezuela, but nowadays, Perna perna and Perna viridis coexist and are commercially exploited from their natural beds. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of salinity on the physiological conditions of these species by studying RNA/DNA and Protein/DNA ratios. The organisms were collected from natural beds at La Esmeralda, Sucre State, Venezuela, and acclimatized for 15 days under laboratory conditions at 25 degrees C, 36 per thousand salinity, pH between 7 and 8 and more than 90% of oxygen saturation. Later, they were divided in two groups: for one group, the salinity concentration was increased (36 to 45 per thousand), and for the other, the salinity was decreased (36 to 15 per thousand). The rate of change was 1 per thousand every day. Ten organisms per group of both species were taken at each of 15, 20, 25, 30, 36, 40 y 45 per thousand salinity concentrations. Protein (colorimetric method) and nucleic acids (RNA and DNA by fluorometric method) concentrations were measured in the digestive gland, gills and adductor muscle tissues. Results indicate that P. perna can physiologically compensate the increase in salinity, but not when the salinity decreased, when proteins are the most needed macromolecules. The Protein/DNA index is directly related to salinity changes in both cases. P. viridis shows physiological compensation to salinity increases and decreases. The RNA/DNA index value in both cases supports this. Digestive gland and muscle tissues are the regulating tissues in both species. These results show that P. viridis has a higher degree of adaptability to salinity changes and, therefore, a greater potential for aquaculture than P. perna.

  2. Hypoxia effects on oxidative stress and immunocompetence biomarkers in the mussel Perna perna (Mytilidae, Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Lílian; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Trevisan, Rafael; Garcia, Danielly; da Silva Acosta, Daiane; Dafre, Alcir Luiz; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of hypoxia on oxidative stress response and immune function in mussels Perna perna exposed to air for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. In air-exposed mussels, the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione reductase (GR) activities were lower in gill tissues (24-48 h) and digestive gland (12 h), while the glutathione peroxidase and GR activities were increased in the digestive gland (48 h). In both tissues, aerial exposure promoted a rapid (6 h) and persistent (up to 48 h) increase of glutathione levels. Decreased hemocyte count and viability, as well as increased phagocytic activity and cellular adhesion capacity were detected after prolonged aerial exposure (>12 h). In summary, induction of thiol pools, altered antioxidant enzyme activities, and activation of immune responses were detected in hypoxia exposed brown mussels, indicating hypoxia induced tissue-specific responses in both antioxidant and immune systems.

  3. Pollution monitoring in Southeast Asia using biomarkers in the mytilid mussel Perna viridis (Mytilidae: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Nicholson, S; Lam, P K S

    2005-01-01

    Mytilid mussels have been extensively used in marine pollution monitoring programmes in temperate regions of the world although widespread subtropical representatives such as Perna viridis have only comparatively recently been utilised to monitor the sublethal effects of pollution in Southeast Asia. P. viridis is considered a subtropical equivalent of the temperate Mytilus sp. and has considerable potential for pollution monitoring throughout its geographical range. This paper reviews the current status of biomarkers in P. viridis and provides some recommendations on biological-effects monitoring to facilitate the assessment of coastal pollution in Southeast Asia.

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Asian green mussel Perna viridis (Bivalvia, Mytilidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Wu, Xiangyun; Yu, Ziniu

    2012-10-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of the Asian green mussel Perna viridis (16,627 bp), an economically important bivalve, was newly sequenced and annotated. P. viridis is the shortest and has a comparatively highest overall A+T content (68%) among six available genomes of marine mussels to date. The atp8 gene's length (49 a.a.) of the green mussel is unexpectedly greatly shorter than that of other marine mussels (87 a.a.). Comparison of the gene order demonstrated that the six marine mussels share no identical gene blocks although they belong to the same family, which indicates that this group should be a good model to study mtDNA evolution and mitochondria inheritance.

  5. A molecular phylogeny of the marine mussel genus Perna (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) based on nuclear (ITS1&2) and mitochondrial (COI) DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ann R; Apte, Smita; MacAvoy, Elizabeth S; Gardner, Jonathan P A

    2007-08-01

    A molecular phylogeny is presented for marine mussels of the genus Perna, based on nuclear (ITS1,ITS2) and mitochondrial (COI) DNA sequence data. The three generally recognised species (Perna viridis, Perna perna and Perna canaliculus) and one putative species (Perna picta) were each sampled from several locations within their known geographic distributions. A range of phylogenetic analyses was used to investigate the current taxonomic assignments, evolutionary relationships and the biogeographical history of the genus. The different analyses produced similar, well supported topologies and verified the monophyly of the genus with respect to five mytilid outgroup species. P. perna (Atlantic), P. viridis (Indo-West Pacific), and P. canaliculus (New Zealand) each formed distinct clades, confirming their specific status. Putative P. picta from North Africa clustered within the P. perna clade and is not regarded as a separate species. P. perna and P. canaliculus were the most closely related of the three species. Possible biogeographic explanations for the present species distributions are evaluated.

  6. Feeding rhythms of the green-lipped mussel, Perna viridis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) during spring and neap tidal cycles.

    PubMed

    Wong, W H.; Cheung, S G.

    2001-02-20

    Food availability and feeding responses of the green mussel Perna viridis were investigated for two complete tidal cycles during both spring and neap tides. Temporal changes in total particulate matter (TPM), particulate inorganic matter (PIM) and particulate organic matter (POM), were smaller during neap than spring tides. Seston characteristics at different times of a tidal cycle were compared for both spring and neap tides. Only during spring tides were TPM and PIM significantly higher at high tides while POM remained relatively constant (P>0.05). The clearance rate of the mussels underwent temporal variations with tides, and was a negative power function of TPM and a positive linear function of f (organic content), during both spring and neap tides. f was the key factor influencing filtration rate, organic ingestion rate, absorption rate and absorption efficiency. All feeding rates increased linearly with increases in organic content. Pseudofaeces were produced only during spring but not neap tides. Feeding rates and absorption efficiency were highest at low and lowest at high tides (P<0.01). There was no significant temporal change in the wet weight and protein content of the crystalline style with the tidal regime. For the digestive gland, alpha-amylase activity was higher at spring than at neap tides, and higher during high tides in a tidal cycle. The digestive gland cellulase activity did not change significantly with the tides. For the crystalline style, both the activity of cellulase and alpha-amylase were not significantly different (P>0.05) between spring and neap tides. Tidal rhythms in feeding and digestion in this species were likely controlled by temporal variations in food availability in the seawater. By adjusting feeding rates and enzymatic activities, absorption in Perna viridis remained constant, irrespective of the changes in food availability.

  7. Biokinetics of cesium in Perna viridis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P.K.N.; Lam, P.K.S.; Ng, B.K.P.; Li, A.M.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The biokinetics of Cs in four compartments in the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis, namely, gill, viscera, adductor muscle, and foot, were studied. First-order linear differential equations were set up for these four compartments, and their solutions were used to fit the experimental data. The parameters governing the biokinetics, which depend on the elimination rate from each compartment and the transfer coefficient between compartments, were found. These are useful in understanding the physiology of Perna viridis, in predicting the activity of cesium in each compartment of Perna viridis from a contamination history, or in using Perna viridis as a sentinel organism for surveying and monitoring radioactive contamination. The results showed that the viscera should be represented by more than one compartment. Concentration factors for the four compartments and for Perna viridis were also determined, and these agreed well with reported values in the literature.

  8. [Food effect on the physiological condition of the mussel Perna viridis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae), using the RNA/DNA ratio].

    PubMed

    Bracho, M A; Segnini de Bravo, M I; Viñoles, I; Chung, K S

    2000-12-01

    The green mussel, Perna viridis, became widespread in the northern coast of Sucre State since its arrival to Venezuela in 1993. RNA/DNA and Protein/DNA ratios were used to study the effect of starvation on its instantaneous growth. The mussels were collected in La Esmeralda and Chacopata, acclimatized in the laboratory for four weeks and maintained for another six weeks in two groups: one fed ad libitum and another without food (this later group was later fed for two additional weeks). Protein (colorimetric method), and nucleic acid concentrations (RNA and DNA, fluorometric method with ethidium bromide) were measured in adductor muscle, digestive gland and gills. The instantaneous growth was assessed using RNA/DNA and Protein/DNA rations. These indexes were always higher in the fed organisms. Animals from Chacopata were in better physiological condition that those from La Esmeralda during the abstinence time (six weeks). Muscle was the best tissue to determine instantaneous growth. The RNA/DNA ratio is a reliable index to determine the physiological condition and instantaneous growth of this species.

  9. [Effects of acclimation temperature on the growth of Perna viridis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae), using the RNA/DNA ratio].

    PubMed

    Viñoles, I del V; Segini de Bravo, M I; Bracho, M A; Chung, K S

    2000-12-01

    Temperature affects growth rate in aquatic organisms. This can be evaluated in short term using biochemical indexes (RNA/DNA and Protein/DNA). The effect of acclimatization temperature on the instantaneous growth and physiological condition of Perna viridis was studied in organisms collected in La Esmeralda, Sucre State (Venezuela) and taken to the laboratory, where groups of 100 organisms (size 3.0 - 3.5 cm, anteroposterior measurement) were acclimatized at 15, 20, 26 or 28 degrees C during four weeks. Later they were kept in a 60 liters aquarium for another six weeks under the same conditions. Each week, ten organisms per group were extracted to measure concentrations of RNA, DNA (by a fluorometric method with ethidium bromide) and proteins (by a colorimetric method), in tissues (digestive gland, adductor muscle and gills). Protein concentration was greater and highly significant at 15 degrees C for all studied tissues. The opposite was obtained with the RNA/DNA and Protein/DNA ratios: the greatest increase was observed at the highest temperature (28 degrees C) for all tissues. At the lowest temperature there was a tendency to reduce both indexes with time. Greater instantaneous growth can be expected at higher temperatures and 28 degrees C was optimal for growth in these specimens.

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of the brown mussel Perna perna (Bivalve, Mytilidae).

    PubMed

    Uliano-Silva, Marcela; Americo, Juliana; Bastos, Alex Schomaker; Furtado, Carolina; Rebelo, Mauro de Freitas; Prosdocimi, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    The complete sequence of the brown mussel Perna perna mitochondrial genome is described in this article. It was sequenced in 1/11 of an Illumina HiSeq lane using Nextera multiplexing kit. The mitogenome was assembled using both (i) de novo assembly and (ii) referenced-based strategies with mitoMaker software. Perna perna mitogenome is a circular molecule of 18,415 bp in size, containing 12 protein-coding genes, 23 transfer RNAs, 2 ribossomal RNAs and several non-coding regions. As shown in the previous studies, Perna perna does not present the doubly uniparental inheritance system (DUI) of mitochondria and does not encode the ATPase8 gene, in accordance with other Mytilidae data.

  11. A baseline study of metal contamination along the Namibian coastline for Perna perna and Choromytilus meridionalis.

    PubMed

    Dahms, S; van der Bank, F H; Greenfield, R

    2014-08-15

    The use of bivalves such as the brown mussel (Perna perna) and the black mussel (Choromytilus meridionalis) is common in the study of marine pollution and the effect of these pollutants on ecosystems and are important in both economic and ecological roles. Namibian marine ecosystems are threatened by pollution from mining, commercial fishing and population growth. The aims of this study were to determine baseline metal concentrations, spatial variation and variation between species. Metal levels in C. meridionalis from Guano Platform (GP) are the lowest of all the sites. The most polluted sites are Rocky Point (RP), Halifax Island (HIL) and between Walvis Bay and Swakopmund (WS). The bioaccumulation of metals between P. perna and C. meridionalis were not uniform for all metals. Overall the study indicates the condition of the coastline to be mostly normal, with Cd and Pb levels being of concern.

  12. Lysosomal membrane stability, phagocytosis and tolerance to emersion in the mussel Perna viridis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) following exposure to acute, sublethal, copper.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, S

    2003-08-01

    The mytilid mussel Perna viridis is distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific region and is potentially a suitable candidate for biological effects (biomarker) monitoring in the subtropics. A suite of cytological and physiological responses to acute (48-72 h) copper exposures of 50-200 microgl(-1) were assessed in order to determine the suitability of P. viridis for marine pollution monitoring. Copper elicited significant destabilisation of the haemocyte lysosomal membranes and also impaired phagocytosis. Survival during emersion following exposure to copper was not related to the experimental copper exposures suggesting that higher metal concentrations may be required to interfere with anaerobic enzymes responsible for suppression of metabolism. Based on this preliminary study, cytological biomarkers evaluated in the haemocytes extracted from P. viridis should prove an effective non-destructive means of assessing metal pollution throughout the mussels subtropical range.

  13. Paralytic shellfish poisoning toxin profile of mussels Perna perna from southern Atlantic coasts of Morocco.

    PubMed

    Abouabdellah, Rachid; Taleb, Hamid; Bennouna, Asmae; Erler, Katrin; Chafik, Abdeghani; Moukrim, Abdelatif

    2008-04-01

    During the monitoring programme of harmful algal blooms established along the south Atlantic coast of Morocco, a bimonthly determination of harmful algae and phycotoxins analysis in Perna perna was carried out from May 2003 to December 2004. Results of mouse bioassay (in organs and whole flesh) showed a seasonal evolution of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin. The mussel's contamination was associated with the occurrence in water of Alexandrium minutum. The PSP toxin profile obtained with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC/FD) revealed the dominance of gonyautoxins GTX2 and GTX3 and a minority of GTX1, GTX4 and saxitoxin (STX). This profile explains that the toxicity was mainly associated with A. minutum.

  14. Biochemical biomarkers and metals in Perna perna mussels from mariculture zones of Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, Luis Alberto; Seibert, Edson Luiz; Zanette, Juliano; Fiedler, Haidi Dalida; Curtius, Adilson José; Ferreira, Jaime Fernando; Alves de Almeida, Eduardo; Marques, Maria Risoleta Freire; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias

    2010-07-01

    The activity of cholinesterase (ChE), glutathione-S transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and catalase (CAT) was evaluated in the gill and digestive glands of the Perna perna mussel transplanted to three non-contaminated mariculture zones under the influence of distinct physical-chemical characteristics. Differences among sites for ChE, GST and CAT activities in gill, as well as ChE, GST and G6PDH activity in digestive gland of mussels, were found and possibly related to differences in physicochemical characteristics of the sites and/or biological status of the mussels. Mussels that were transplanted to another, more urbanized site (Ponta do Lessa) with similar physicochemical characteristics to one of the farming sites (Sambaqui), was also chosen to evaluate biomarker responses to pollution. Activities of ChE, GST and GR in the digestive glands and CAT in the gills were higher in the polluted site. GR was the only biomarker to be unaltered in different farming sites, but induced in the pollution site. The trace metal concentrations in the mussels were low and unlikely to cause the changes observed in the biomarker levels. The present study strongly suggests that monitoring programs should compare sites with similar physicochemical characteristics when using a complementary biomarker approach. In addition, the baselines for the biomarkers and metal used in the present study can serve as a reference for the monitoring of these mariculture zones in future monitoring programs employing P. perna.

  15. [Lipid and fatty acid profile of Perna viridis, green mussel (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in different areas of the Eastern Venezuela and the West Coast of Trinidad].

    PubMed

    Koftayan, Tamar; Milano, Jahiro; D'Armas, Haydelba; Salazar, Gabriel

    2011-03-01

    The species Perna viridis is a highly consumed species, which fast growth makes it an interesting aquaculture alternative for Venezuelan and Trinidad coasts. With the aim to contribute with its nutritional value information, this study analyzed lipid and fatty acid contents from samples taken in five locations from Eastern Venezuela and three from Trinidad West Coast. Total lipids were extracted and quantified, from a pooled sample of 100 organisms per location, by standard gravimetric methods, and their identification and quantification was done by TLC/FID (Iatroscan system). Furthermore, the esterified fatty acids of total lipid, phospholipids and triacylglycerols were identified and quantified by gas chromatography. Eastern Venezuela samples from Los Cedros, La Brea and Chaguaramas showed the highest total lipid values of 7.92, 7.74 and 7.53, respectively, and the minimum values were obtained for La Restinga (6.08%). Among lipid composition, Chacopata samples showed the lowest phospholipid concentration (48.86%) and the maximum values for cholesterol (38.87%) and triacylglycerols (12.26%); besides, La Esmeralda and Rio Caribe samples exhibited maximum phospholipids (88.71 and 84.93 respectively) and minimum cholesterol (6.50 and 4.42%) concentrations. Saturated fatty acids represented between 15.04% and 65.55% within total lipid extracts, with maximum and minimum values for La Esmeralda and Chacopata, respectively. Polyunsaturated results resulted between 7.80 and 37.18%, with higher values in La Brea and lower values in La Esmeralda. For phospholipids, saturated fatty acids concentrations varied between 38.81 and 48.68% for Chaguaramas and Chacopata samples, respectively. In the case of polyunsaturated fatty acids, these varied between non detected and 34.51%, with high concentrations in Los Cedros (27.97%) and Chaguaramas (34.51%) samples. For the triacylglycerols, the saturated fatty acids composition oscillated between 14.27 and 53.80% with low

  16. Mercury in the bivalves Anadara (Senilia) senilis, Perna perna and Crassostrea tulipa from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Otchere, Fred A; Joiris, Claude R; Holsbeek, Ludo

    2003-03-20

    Three bivalves: Anadara (Senilia) senilis (n=220), Crassostrea tulipa (n=260) from two 'open' lagoons (Benya and Ningo) and a 'closed' lagoon (Sakumo), and Perna perna (n=170) from rocky shores adjacent to Benya and Sakumo, were analyzed for their total and organic Hg concentrations and total body burden. Median concentrations for cockles were 0.20 micro/gdw for the wet season and 0.36 microg/gdw for the dry season. Total mercury concentration for both mussels and oysters ranged from 0.04 to 0.84 microg/gdw. Seasonal variations and age effect were detected in all the species but no significant spatial variation was found along the coast. Organic (methyl) mercury concentration ranged from 0.03 to 0.55 microg/gdw was stable without age effect. The median relative organic mercury varied between 30 and 80% depending on the season, location, species and the type of lagoon. The lower concentrations in the wet season were due to primary production and dilution effect. Log-transformed regression relationships between body burden and size were used to compare the species.

  17. Determination and speciation of cadmium in microcosms with Bunodosoma caissarum and Perna perna using isotopically enriched (116)Cd.

    PubMed

    Rizzini Ansari, Nafisa; Fernández Iglesias, Nerea; Cordeiro, Renato Campello; Fernandez, Marcos Antônio; Bettmer, Jörg

    2017-02-15

    The study of the uptake and distribution of elements in marine environments is of great interest for understanding their pathways and accumulation. Here, we investigated in laboratory experiments the accumulation behavior of Cd in the sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum and the mussel Perna perna. Specimens were incubated with isotopically enriched (116)Cd in aquariums. Cd concentrations in the seawater and in the tissues of B. caissarum and P. perna were followed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) by means of isotope dilution analysis. Bioconcentration factors for B. caissarum and P. perna exposed to 0.9μg·L(-1) of (116)Cd were determined to be 80.5 and 850, respectively. P. perna specimens exposed to 4.5μg·L(-1) of (116)Cd reached 530. Cytosolic proteins associated with Cd from the tissues were extracted and further analyzed by size-exclusion chromatography coupled to ICP-MS. Cd accumulation could be detected in both organisms ranging from high-molecular to low-molecular species.

  18. Assessing mercury contamination in a tropical coastal system using the mussel Perna perna and the sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum.

    PubMed

    Rizzini Ansari, Nafisa; Fernandez, Marcos Antônio; Brito, José Lailson; Vidal, Lara Gama; de Andrade Costa, Erika Silva; Malm, Olaf

    2016-12-01

    Total mercury concentrations in the mussel Perna perna and the sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum were determined to assess Hg contamination in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and an adjacent sea area. Concentrations in the tissues of these species were compared. Average total mercury concentrations ranged from 3.54 to 21.01 μg kg(-1) (wet wt.) in P. perna and from 4.51 to 23.19 μg kg(-1) (wet wt.) for B. caissarum. Concentrations varied according to the sampling stations. Distribution of concentrations for both species was similar along the sampling stations, and a significant correlation was observed. Results suggest that B. caissarum could be a suitable biomonitor species for mercury contamination in the study area and could be used as a complementary species for monitoring studies. Further research is, however, needed to assess how environmental conditions and other variables affect Hg concentrations in B. caissarum.

  19. Mussels (Perna perna) as bioindicator of environmental contamination by Cryptosporidium species with zoonotic potential

    PubMed Central

    Mariné Oliveira, Geisi Ferreira; do Couto, Melissa Carvalho Machado; de Freitas Lima, Marcelo; do Bomfim, Teresa Cristina Bergamo

    2016-01-01

    Sources of contamination such as animal feces runoff, organic fertilizer application, and the release of partially treated or untreated sewage can lead to the contamination of aquatic environments by Cryptosporidium spp. The quality of mussels as food is closely related to the sanitary conditions of the marine environment where these bivalves are found. Marine mollusks are filter feeders that are able to retain Cryptosporidium oocysts in their tissue, thus functioning as bioindicators. A total of 72 pooled mussel samples of the species Perna perna were collected at two sites (A and B) in the municipality of Mangaratiba, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Sampling involved removal of 30 mussels, from each collection site every month for one year. The 30 mussels from each sampling were then allocated into three groups of 10. Two Cryptosporidium spp. genes (18S and GP60) were targeted for DNA amplification from the samples obtained. After purification, all of the products obtained were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were performed. Of the 72 samples analyzed using the nested-PCR for the 18S gene target, 29.2% were positive for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. Of these samples, 52.4% were collected at site A (ie 11/21) and 47.6% at site B (ie 10/21). The 18S genes of all the samples considered positive for Cryptosporidium spp. were sequenced, and the following three species were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum, C. meleagridis, and C. andersoni. Three distinct C. parvum subtypes (IIaA19G2R2; IIaA20G2R2; IIaA20G3R2) were identified using the GP60 gene. More studies to evaluate the zoonotic potential of this species should be performed as both sampling locations contain human and/or animal fecal contaminants. PMID:26977402

  20. Differential metallothionein, reduced glutathione and metal levels in Perna perna mussels in two environmentally impacted tropical bays in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lavradas, Raquel T; Rocha, Rafael C C; Bordon, Isabella C A C; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Godoy, José M; Hauser-Davis, Rachel A

    2016-07-01

    Mussel farming is an important economic activity in Brazil, and these organisms are consumed by the majority of the population in most coastal zones in the country. However, despite the increasing pollution of aquatic ecosystems in Brazil, little is known about the biochemical activity in mussels in response to metal exposure. In this context, the aim of the present study was to investigate metal and metalloid exposure effects in Perna perna mussels, by determining metal levels, the induction of metallothionein (MT) synthesis, and oxidative stress, in the form of reduced glutathione (GSH) in 3 contaminated areas from the Guanabara Bay in comparison to a reference site, Ilha Grande Bay, both in summer and winter. Metal and metalloid concentrations were also compared to Brazilian and international guidelines, to verify potential health risks to human consumers. Mussels from all sampling sites were shown to be improper for human consumption due to metal contamination, including Ilha Grande Bay, which has previously been considered a reference site. Several statistically significant correlations and seasonal differences were observed between MT, GSH and metals and metalloids in both analyzed tissues. A Discriminant Canonical Analysis indicated that the digestive gland is a better bioindicator for environmental contamination by metals and metalloids in this species and offers further proof that MT variations observed are due to metal exposure and not oxidative stress, since GSH influence for both muscle tissue and the digestive glands was non-significant in this analysis. These results show that P. perna mussels are an adequate sentinel species for metal contamination with significant effects on oxidative stress and metal exposure biomarkers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report metals, metalloids, MT and GSH levels in the muscle tissue of this species.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in inter-tidal mussel Perna perna: space-time observations, source investigation and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Francioni, E; Wagener, A de L R; Scofield, A de L; Depledge, M H; Cavalier, B; Sette, C B; Carvalhosa, L; Lozinsky, C; Mariath, R

    2007-01-01

    The investigation aimed primarily at understanding the PAH record in inter-tidal mussel tissues and evaluating the bivalve performance as a bioindicator for oil contamination. The species Perna perna was used as test organism since it is abundantly distributed in coastal areas of the Americas, Africa and elsewhere. The study was carried out in Guanabara Bay and comprised two observation phases: phase one included seasonal sampling in 8 sites, whereas in phase two 4 sites were examined over 4 years. Among the 35 determined PAH (60-90 microg kg(-1) up to 4000-6000 microg kg(-1)) alkylated homologues predominated by more than 80%. The PAH profile in inter-tidal mussels is largely petrogenic with high contribution of dibenzothiophenes (DBT) and phenanthrenes (Ph). The prevailing petrogenic fingerprint, confirmed by diagnostic ratios, is linked to the properties of the inter-tidal habitat, which favors exposure to oil films. C2DBT/C2Ph and C3DBT/C3Ph ratios, however, show a wide range of values uncorrelated to specific oils. Micronucleus frequencies are significantly related to PAH concentrations, especially to those of alkylated homologues. Genotoxic expression appears at concentrations as low as 300 microg kg(-1) summation operator 35 PAH.

  2. Induction of attachment of the Mussel Perna perna by natural products from the brown seaweed Stypopodium zonale.

    PubMed

    Soares, Angélica R; da Gama, Bernardo A P; da Cunha, Andrea P; Teixeira, Valéria L; Pereira, Renato C

    2008-01-01

    Marine invertebrates settle, attach, and/or metamorphose in response to signals from several sources, including seaweeds. In response to the aquaculture challenge of producing constant numbers of juveniles from cultured species, natural inducers have been screened for their ability to improve those processes. However, few chemical inducers of attachment of invertebrates have been identified, and even less of these were secondary metabolites. The goal of this work was to isolate the natural products responsible for induction activity using bioassay-guided fractionation of the organic extract of the brown seaweed Stypopodium zonale and the attachment of juveniles of the common brown mussel, Perna perna, as a model. The meroditerpene epitaondiol, identified by comparison of spectral data with the literature, promoted as much as 4.7 times more mussel attachment compared to controls at the natural concentration found in this alga (0.041% of the crude extract or 0.012% of algal dry weight). This is the first report showing that a seaweed produces terpenoid compounds as cues for invertebrate attachment, and future studies evaluating this action on settlement of mussels in the field are expected to improve aquaculture technology by increasing mussel spat production.

  3. Monoamine content during the reproductive cycle of Perna perna depends on site of origin on the Atlantic Coast of Morocco.

    PubMed

    Klouche, Mounia S; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Dellu-Hagedorn, Françoise; Lakhdar-Ghazal, Nouria; Benomar, Soumaya

    2015-09-09

    Bivalve molluscs such as Perna perna display temporal cycles of reproduction that result from the complex interplay between endogenous and exogenous signals. The monoamines serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline represent possible endocrine and neuronal links between these signals allowing the molluscs to modulate reproductive functions in conjunction with environmental constraints. Here, we report a disruption of the reproductive cycle of mussels collected from two of three sites along the Moroccan atlantic coast soiled by industrial or domestic waste. Using high pressure liquid chromatography, we show that the temporal pattern of monoamine content in the gonads, pedal and cerebroid ganglia varied throughout the reproductive cycle (resting, developing, maturing, egg-laying) of mussels from the unpolluted site. Marked modification of monoamine tissue content was found between sites, notably in noradrenaline content of the gonads. Discriminant statistics revealed a specific impact of mussel location on the temporal variations of noradrenaline and serotonin levels in gonads and cerebroid ganglia. Correlation analyses showed profound and temporal changes in the monoamine content between organs and ganglia, at the two sites where the reproduction was disrupted. We suggest that environmental constraints lead to profound changes of monoaminergic systems, which thereby compromises the entry of mussels into their reproductive cycle.

  4. Monoamine content during the reproductive cycle of Perna perna depends on site of origin on the Atlantic Coast of Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Klouche, Mounia S.; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Dellu-Hagedorn, Françoise; Lakhdar-Ghazal, Nouria; Benomar, Soumaya

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs such as Perna perna display temporal cycles of reproduction that result from the complex interplay between endogenous and exogenous signals. The monoamines serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline represent possible endocrine and neuronal links between these signals allowing the molluscs to modulate reproductive functions in conjunction with environmental constraints. Here, we report a disruption of the reproductive cycle of mussels collected from two of three sites along the Moroccan atlantic coast soiled by industrial or domestic waste. Using high pressure liquid chromatography, we show that the temporal pattern of monoamine content in the gonads, pedal and cerebroid ganglia varied throughout the reproductive cycle (resting, developing, maturing, egg-laying) of mussels from the unpolluted site. Marked modification of monoamine tissue content was found between sites, notably in noradrenaline content of the gonads. Discriminant statistics revealed a specific impact of mussel location on the temporal variations of noradrenaline and serotonin levels in gonads and cerebroid ganglia. Correlation analyses showed profound and temporal changes in the monoamine content between organs and ganglia, at the two sites where the reproduction was disrupted. We suggest that environmental constraints lead to profound changes of monoaminergic systems, which thereby compromises the entry of mussels into their reproductive cycle. PMID:26349428

  5. Zinc causes acute impairment of glutathione metabolism followed by coordinated antioxidant defenses amplification in gills of brown mussels Perna perna.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Flesch, Samira; Mattos, Jacó Joaquim; Milani, Márcio Raimundo; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Zinc demonstrates protective and antioxidant properties at physiological levels, although these characteristics are not attributed at moderate or high concentrations. Zinc toxicity has been related to a number of factors, including interference with antioxidant defenses. In particular, the inhibition of glutathione reductase (GR) has been suggested as a possible mechanism for acute zinc toxicity in bivalves. The present work investigates the biochemical effects of a non-lethal zinc concentration on antioxidant-related parameters in gills of brown mussels Perna perna exposed for 21 days to 2.6 μM zinc chloride. After 2 days of exposure, zinc caused impairment of the antioxidant system, decreasing GR activity and glutathione levels. An increase in antioxidant defenses became evident at 7 and 21 days of exposure, as an increase in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity along with restoration of glutathione levels and GR activity. After 7 and 21 days, an increase in cellular peroxides and lipid peroxidation end products were also detected, which are indicative of oxidative damage. Changes in GR activity contrasts with protein immunoblotting data, suggesting that zinc produces a long lasting inhibition of GR. Contrary to the general trend in antioxidants, levels of peroxiredoxin 6 decreased after 21 days of exposure. The data presented here support the hypothesis that zinc can impair thiol homeostasis, causes an increase in lipid peroxidation and inhibits GR, imposing a pro-oxidant status, which seems to trigger homeostatic mechanisms leading to a subsequent increase on antioxidant-related defenses.

  6. Organochlorines (PCBs and pesticides) in the bivalves Anadara (Senilis) senilis, Crassostrea tulipa and Perna perna from the lagoons of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Otchere, Fred A

    2005-09-15

    The bivalves, Anadara (Senilia) senilis (n=95), Crassostrea tulipa (n=75) and Perna perna (n=30) from Ghana, were analyzed for their organochlorines (pesticides and PCBs) concentrations and the body burden. A comparison was done based on two different standard PCB mixtures (Aroclor 1254 and 1260) with the percentage individual congener contribution and that of the sample. From these comparisons, it appeared that the pattern of PCB residues in the samples was neither Aroclor 1254 nor 1260. On the other hand, there was seasonal qualitative difference in the pattern that is purely marine (in the dry season) versus terrestrial input (in the wet season). SigmaPCB was 0.10 microg/g dw or 2.2 microg/g lw (median values). There was no correlation between PCB concentration and lipid content reflecting the importance of indirect contamination of the bivalves. The pesticides, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, lindane, DDTs, HCH, HCB, endosulfan, heptachlor epoxide and heptachlor, were detected. The most abundant pesticides were the SigmaDDT: 73 and SigmaHCH: 29 ng/g dw. DDT/DDE and hept./heptachlor epoxide ratios reflect their recent applications, while the ratio for aldrin/dieldrin suggests that the use of aldrin has been discontinued, at least on the coast of Ghana.

  7. Hypoosmotic stress in the mussel Perna perna (Linnaeus, 1758): Is ecological history a determinant for organismal responses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rola, Regina Coimbra; Souza, Marta Marques; Sandrini, Juliana Zomer

    2017-04-01

    Ecological history of organisms may be related to different responses and adaptations to stressors. This study aims to evaluate whether marine brown mussels (Perna perna Linnaeus, 1758) collected from sites with distinct histories of fluctuations in abiotic parameters, including salinity, respond differently to hypoosmotic stress. Mussels were collected at different sites (a marine site, with no history of salinity variation, and an estuarine site, with usual salinity variations) and exposed in laboratory for 14 days to hypoosmotic stress (salinities 25 and 20). It was observed that mussels collected at the marine site showed increased oxygen consumption (VO2), reduced haemolymph osmolality and concentrations of Na+, Cl-, and K+; increased levels of ninhydrin-positive substances in the haemolymph, and no changes in gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity, as expected for osmoconforming organisms. For animals collected at the estuarine site, except for VO2, this same pattern was only observed on day 1 of hypoosmotic stress. Unexpectedly, on days 4 and 14, VO2 decreased, the osmolality and ionic concentration returned to near baseline values, and mussels gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity increased at day 4. This long-term response detected for estuarine mussels is similar to that observed for osmoregulating organisms, which is very unexpected for marine bivalves. Despite being novel in the relevant literature, these results suggest that in some situations mussels could adopt osmoregulating behavior, such as increasing Na+/K+-ATPase activity and thereby probably reducing water circulating inside valves. In conclusion, these results indicate that ecological history, shown here by differences in organismal origin, influence physiological parameters of mussels in response to a stressful situation.

  8. Brown mussels (Perna perna) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as indicators of organic pollutants in the South African marine environment.

    PubMed

    Degger, N; Wepener, V; Richardson, B J; Wu, R S S

    2011-01-01

    A distinct lack of historical and current data on the status of organic pollutant contaminants within the South African marine environment is evident. This has highlighted the need for more current organic pollutant assessments. Reference mussels and SPMDs were transplanted at five South African harbour sites to assess organic bioaccumulation in brown mussels (Perna perna) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs). Spatial patterns of PAH and PCB contaminants were determined by GC-MS and GC-ECD after appropriate sample preparation. Significant (p<0.05) spatial differences were observed between the sites. Results indicate no correlations between the passive device and the transplanted mussels; however the SPMDs provided complementary information on the presence of dioxin-like PCBs within the environment not detected by the mussel. The results indicate that information provided by both the mussels and SPMDs allow for a more in depth scrutiny of environmental conditions as a result of anthropogenic influence.

  9. MOOCs from the Viewpoint of the Learner: A Response to Perna et al. (2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Eric; Thompson, Isaac; Behrend, Tara

    2015-01-01

    This response to Perna et al. provides an alternate approach to research on massive open online courses (MOOCs). We argue that a student-centered, theory-driven conceptualization and methodological approaches allow us to move beyond descriptive statistics and into a deeper understanding of MOOC learners. Examples using a teacher development MOOC…

  10. DiPerna-Lions Flow for Relativistic Particles in an Electromagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabin, P.-E.; Masmoudi, N.

    2015-09-01

    We show the existence and uniqueness of a DiPerna-Lions flow for relativistic particles subject to a Lorentz force in an electromagnetic field. The electric and magnetic fields solve the linear Maxwell system in the vacuum but for singular initial conditions which are only in the physical energy space. As the corresponding force field is only in L 2, we have to perform a careful analysis of the cancellations over a trajectory.

  11. Transcriptomic responses of Perna viridis embryo to Benzo(a)pyrene exposure elucidated by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiu; Qiu, Liguo; Zhao, Hongwei; Song, Qinqin; Zhou, Hailong; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiaoping

    2016-11-01

    The green mussel Perna viridis is an ideal biomonitor to evaluate marine environmental pollution. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a typical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), which is well known for the mutagenic and carcinogenic characteristics. However, the toxicological effects of BaP on Perna viridis embryo are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the embryo transcriptomic profile of Perna viridis treated with BaP via digital gene expression analysis. A total of 92,362,742 reads were produced from two groups (control and BaP exposure) by whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis were used on all genes to determine the biological functions and processes. Genes involved in various molecular pathways of toxicological effects were enriched further. The differential expression genes (DEGs) were related to stress response, infectious disease and innate immunity. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) measured expressional levels of six genes confirmed through the DGE analysis. This study reveals that RNA-seq for transcriptome profiling of P. viridis embryo can better understand the embryo toxic effects of BaP. Furthermore, it also suggests that RNA-seq is a superior tool for generating novel and valuable information for revealing the toxic effects caused by BaP at transcriptional level.

  12. Bioaccumulation and depuration of some trace metals in the mussel, Perna viridis (Linnaeus)

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshmanan, P.T. ); Nambisan, P.N.K. )

    1989-07-01

    Bivalves are well known for their ability to concentrate heavy metals in their tissue from environmental water. Experimental studies on the accumulation of these pollutants by molluscs have been extensively conducted. The depuration of accumulated metals in a toxicant free medium has also been studied. Bivalve molluscs may form useful tools in monitoring heavy metal pollution. However, such studies are scant in tropical species. This paper reports the bioaccumulation and depuration of Hg, Cu, Zn and Pb by the mussel Perna viridis (Linnaeus) from seawater and explores its suitability as an indicator organism for metal pollution.

  13. Effects of mercury and lead on tissue glutathione of the green mussel, Perna viridis L.

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.; Teo, L.H.; Sin, Y.M.

    1997-05-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major non-protein thiol in animals, and involved in a number of important physiological and detoxification processes. It has been suggested that this tripeptide protects thiol groups in proteins from oxidation, functions as an intracellular redox buffer and serves as a reservoir of cysteine. Tissue GSH is also known to be involved in the metabolism and detoxification of endogenous and exogenous substances, including the binding of inorganic mercury ions. Therefore, a change in the amount of GSH in tissues may be considered to reflect the effects of deposited mercury on tissue function. The functions of the tripeptide have been studied less thoroughly in invertebrates than in vertebrates. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were changes in the amounts of tissue GSH in the green mussel, Perna viridis, at various time intervals after metal exposure. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Dioxin and phthalate uptake and assimilation by the green mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xiong; Zhang, Qiong

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the aqueous uptake and dietary assimilation (trophic transfer) of two endocrine disrupting compounds (dioxin and phathalic acid) in the green mussel Perna viridis were quantified. During short-term exposure period, dioxin rapidly sorbed onto phytoplankton and its accumulation was much higher than that of phthalate. The uptake of these two compounds by the mussels increased with increasing temperature and salinity (for dioxin only). The dietary assimilation of the two contaminants was rather modest (10-64% for dioxin and 20-47% for phthalate), and was greatly dependent on the food species and concentration. Interestingly, dietary assimilation increased with increasing diatom food concentration. Gut passage time was partially responsible for the variable dietary assimilation. Given the high dissolved uptake rate and the modest dietary assimilation, aqueous exposure was predicted to be the dominant bioaccumulation source for both dioxin and phthalate in the green mussels under most conditions.

  15. Proteomic profile in Perna viridis after exposed to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Zou, Ying; Weng, Hui-wen; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we compared protein profiles in gills of Perna viridis after exposure to Prorocentrumlima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins, and identified the differential abundances of protein spots using 2D-electrophoresis. After exposure to P. lima, the level of okadaic acid (a main component of DSP toxins) in gills of P. viridis significantly increased at 6 h, but mussels were all apparently healthy without death. Among the 28 identified protein spots by MALDI TOF/TOF-MS, 12 proteins were up-regulated and 16 were down-regulated in the P. lima-exposed mussels. These identified proteins were involved in various biological activities, such as metabolism, cytoskeleton, signal transduction, response to oxidative stress and detoxification. Taken together, our results indicated that the presence of P. lima caused DSP toxins accumulation in mussel gill, and might consequently induce cytoskeletonal disorganization,oxidative stress, a dysfunction in metabolism and ubiquitination/proteasome activity.

  16. Establishing the thermal threshold of the tropical mussel Perna viridis in the face of global warming.

    PubMed

    Goh, B P L; Lai, C H

    2014-08-30

    With increasing recognition that maximum oxygen demand is the unifying limit in tolerance, the first line of thermal sensitivity is, as a corollary, due to capacity limitations at a high level of organisational complexity before individual, molecular or membrane functions become disturbed. In this study the tropical mussel Perna viridis were subjected to temperature change of 0.4 °C per hour from ambient to 8-36 °C. By comparing thermal mortality against biochemical indices (hsp70, gluthathione), physiological indices (glycogen, FRAP, NRRT) and behavioural indices (clearance rate), a hierarchy of thermal tolerance was therein elucidated, ranging from systemic to cellular to molecular levels. Generally, while biochemical indices indicated a stress signal much earlier than the more integrated behavioural indices, failure of the latter (indicating a tolerance limit and transition to pejus state) occurred much earlier than the other indices tending towards thermal extremities at both ends of the thermal spectrum.

  17. [Metal accumulation and MTLP induction in the digestive glands of Perna viridis exposed to Cu].

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Di; Yan, Wen; Long, Ai-Min; Ma, Fu-Jun; Chen, Shao-Yong

    2007-08-01

    Mussels have been proposed as appropriate biomonitors of marine pollution, especially for monitoring metallic pollution based on variations of metallothionein as biomarkers. Under 2 exposure levels (12.7 microg/L, 63.5 microg/L), Cu accumulation and metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) induction by mussel (Perna viridis) digestive glands were investigated and simulated into dynamic models in the present work, and the soluble and total Cu burden of digestive glands were also determined. Calculated mean Cu uptake rates by mussel target organ were 2.045 and 7.028 microg x (g x d)(-1) respectively, and the theoretical equilibrium kinetic BCFs of Cu were 2074 and 1619 correspondingly. And within the exposure duration, different changing trends of ratio of soluble Cu to total Cu in digestive glands were observed in the two groups. The MTLP level of control samples was (0.551 +/- 0.037) mg/g, and the counterparts are 0.407 - 0.699 mg/g, 0.826 - 0.942 mg/g respectively when mussels were exposed to 12.7 microg/L and 63.5 microg/L Cu solutions. Statistically significant MTLP induction (p < 0.001) was observed under higher exposure level. MTLP contents in digestive glands increased with the exposure Cu concentration and body accumulation of metal. There is a significantly negative exponential rise relationship (p < 0.000 1) between MTLP and Cu concentrations accumulated in the digestive glands of mussels.

  18. Uptake, depuration and subcellular distribution of cadmium in various tissues of Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Yang, M S; Chiu, S T; Wong, M H

    1995-06-01

    Green-lipped mussels (Perna viridis) were collected from a local mariculture site and placed in pre-cleaned sea water tanks containing 0, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.3 micrograms/ml CdCl2. The level of Cd in the gill, viscera and gonad was measured. The concentration of Cd in the 3 tissues increased linearly over 4 days' of exposure. The rate of uptake depends on the concentration of Cd in the water. In the 3 tissues studied, the maximum rate of uptake (Vmax) was highest in the gill (500 micrograms/g dry weight/day), followed by viscera (100 micrograms/g dry weight/day) and gonad (56.8 micrograms/g dry weight/day). The majority of the Cd taken up was bound to a fraction of the heat-stable proteins similar to metallothioneins. The rate of Cd depuration from the tissues was poor. There was no change in Cd concentration over 8 days' depuration in clean water.

  19. Detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in green mussels (Perna viridis) from shell-fish markets of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srisuphanunt, M; Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Saksirisampant, W; Karanis, P

    2009-09-01

    Mussels filter large volumes of water and can concentrate pathogenic organisms, which may act as potential vehicles of transmission to the consumer. A survey study was carried out to investigate the presence of Cryptosporidium protozoan parasites in green mussels (Perna viridis), the smussles pecies most destined for consumption in Thailand. In total, 56 samples were examined from Bangkok (n = 24) and Samut Prakan (n = 32) a wholesale shell-fish markets located at the mouth of the Chao Phraya River. The market for green mussels was closed to the mussel culture placed along the coastal line and this localization may have significant economical impact if the mussels' cultures are found contaminated. Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected by the immunofluorescence antibody method (IFA) in 12.5% of the samples examined. The detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in green mussels' population of Samut Prakan was higher (15.6%) than in Bangkok market (8.3%). These differences in positive samples from the two locations may be caused by physical, ecological and anthropogenic conditions. This could relay to different contamination levels of marine water by Cryptosporidium oocysts and consequently to contamination of harvested shellfish populations. The results demonstrate that the Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were found indigenous in mussels from the coastal line of Thailand, indicating that mussels may act as a reservoir of Cryptosporidium foodborne infections for humans.

  20. Toxicity Profile of a Nutraceutical Formulation Derived from Green Mussel Perna viridis

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Deepu; Chakkalakal, Selsa J.

    2014-01-01

    The short-term (acute) and long-term (subchronic) toxicity profile, mean lethal dose 50 (LD50), and no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of a nutraceutical formulation developed from green mussel Perna viridis, which showed in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties, were evaluated in the present study. The formulation was administered to the male and female Wistar rats at graded doses (0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 g/kg body weight) for two weeks of acute toxicity study and 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg body weight for 90 days in subchronic toxicity study. The LD50, variations in clinical signs, changes in body weight, body weight, food/water consumption, organ weight (liver, kidney, spleen, and brain), hematology, serum chemistry, and histopathological changes were evaluated. The LD50 of the formulation was 5,000 mg/kg BW. No test article related mortalities as well as change in body weight, and food and water consumption were observed. No toxicity related significant changes were noted in renal/hepatic function, hematological indices, and serum biochemical parameters between the control and treated groups. Histopathological alterations were not observed in the vital organs of rats. The subchronic NOAEL for the formulation in rats is greater than 2000 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that the green mussel formulation is safe to consume without any adverse effects in the body. PMID:24995298

  1. Polycyclic musks in green-lipped mussels (Perna viridis) from Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Shek, W M; Murphy, M B; Lam, James C W; Lam, Paul K S

    2008-01-01

    Six polycyclic musk compounds [Cashmeran (DPMI), Celestolide (ADBI), Phantolide (AHMI), Traseolide (ATII), Tonalide (AHTN), and Galaxolide (HHCB)] were analysed in marine green-lipped mussels (Perna viridis) from Hong Kong. ADBI, HHCB and AHTN were detected in almost all samples, while AHMI, ATII and DPMI were not detected. Concentrations of ADBI, HHCB and AHTN in mussels ranged from below detection limit-0.0743 (mean: 0.0246), 0.247-6.08 (mean: 1.15) and 0.0591-0.738 (mean: 0.190)mg/kg lipid weight, respectively. Mussels from two sampling sites in central Victoria Harbour contained the highest total polycyclic musk levels, suggesting that these waters are heavily influenced by domestic sewage. Concentrations of HHCB and AHTN detected in the mussel samples were the second highest and the highest levels, respectively, compared to global concentrations. A preliminary risk assessment indicated that HHCB and AHTN in mussels pose little or no threat to the health of shellfish consumers. Nevertheless, more comprehensive studies are required to further assess the ecological and human health risks associated with polycyclic musks.

  2. Optimizing deacetylation process for chitosan production from green mussel (perna viridis) shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danarto, Y. C.; Distantina, Sperisa

    2016-02-01

    The green mussel (perna viridis) shell waste could be utilized for chitosan production because it contained chitin. Chitin can be derived into chitosan through the deacetylation process. Chitosan is a polysaccharides polymer that is readily soluble in dilute acid solution and easily modified into other useful compounds. This research aimed to study the chitosan production from green mussel shells. This experiment had the following stages, deproteinization process aimed to eliminate the protein content using 1N NaOH solution, demineralization process aimed to remove minerals in green mussel shells as CaCO3 using 1 N HCl solution and decolorization process aimed to eliminate the color pigments and other impurities using ethanol solvent. All process above resulted chitin. Furthermore, chemical modification of chitin into chitosan by deacetylation process. This stage was very important because it greatly affected the chitosan properties. This research studied two different treatment for deacetylation process. The first treatment was the deacetylation process using concentrated NaOH solution (50% w), at high temperatures (90 - 100 °C) for 2 hours extraction, whilw the second treatment was deacetylation process using a low concentration of NaOH solution (15% w), at room temperature for 24 hours. The results showed that deproteinization, demineralization, and decolorizaton was capable of removing protein, mineral, and pigment. This experiment yield chitin 41.6 %wt. Chitosan yield from second treatment was 39.5%w and it was better than first treatment. Chitosan from first treatment had 79.8% degree of deacetylation and 16.5 kDa molecular weight. It was better than first treatment.

  3. Energetics of byssus attachment and feeding in the green-lipped mussel Perna canaliculus.

    PubMed

    Lurman, Glenn J; Hilton, Zoë; Ragg, Norman L C

    2013-04-01

    In most animals, significant increases in metabolic rate are due to activity and to feeding (known as apparent specific dynamic action). We determined the energetic costs of activity and feeding in adult green-lipped mussels (Perna canaliculus). Maximal metabolic rate was determined, using closed-chamber respirometry, during byssus re-attachment, during specific dynamic action after 16 h of feeding with Isochrysis galbana, and for the two activities combined, in 23 mussels. Metabolic rate was significantly elevated above rest by about 1.9-fold during byssus attachment (17.1 ± 1.53 μg O(2) h(-1) g(-1) whole mussel wet weight at rest, increased to 27.9 ± 0.91 μg O(2) h(-1) g(-1)), and by 2.2-fold after feeding (31.4 ± 1.20 μg O(2) h(-1) g(-1)). Combined feeding and byssus attachment led to a still higher metabolic rate (34.0 ± 1.23 μg O(2) h(-1) g(-1)). Behavior was also significantly altered, with mussels being almost continuously open during attachment and after feeding (90%-99% of the time); however, the time spent open during the day decreased, reaching a minimum of 52% ± 9% 3 days after feeding, and remained low (67%-82%) for the following 45-day starvation period. Significant diurnal differences were observed, with mussels continuously (92%-100%) open at night. The key findings from this study are that green-lipped mussels (1) have an aerobic scope of approximately 2-fold; (2) reach a higher metabolic rate during feeding than during activity, and the two combined can raise the metabolic rate higher still; (3) display a marked diurnal behavior.

  4. The effects of ocean acidification and a carbon dioxide capture and storage leak on the early life stages of the marine mussel Perna perna (Linneaus, 1758) and metal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Szalaj, D; De Orte, M R; Goulding, T A; Medeiros, I D; DelValls, T A; Cesar, A

    2017-01-01

    The study assesses the effects of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) leaks and ocean acidification (OA) on the metal bioavailability and reproduction of the mytilid Perna perna. In laboratory-scale experiments, CCS leakage scenarios (pH 7.0, 6.5, 6.0) and one OA (pH 7.6) scenario were tested using metal-contaminated sediment elutriates and seawater from Santos Bay. The OA treatment did not have an effect on fertilisation, while significant effects were observed in larval-development bioassays where only 16 to 27 % of larva developed normally. In treatments that simulated CO2 leaks, when compared with control, fertilisation success gradually decreased and no larva developed to the D-shaped stage. A fall in pH increased the bioavailability of metals to marine mussels. Larva shell size was significantly affected by both elutriates when compared with seawater; moreover, a significant difference occurred at pH 6.5 between elutriates in the fertilisation bioassay.

  5. Benzo[a]pyrene absorption and exposure pathways in the green mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xiong; Chow, Alex T S

    2002-02-01

    The absorption efficiency (AE) of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compound, in the green mussel Perna viridis was measured under different biological and food conditions (body size, food quantity, and food species). Uptake of BaP from the aqueous phase by different species of phytoplankton and green mussels was also experimentally quantified. A bioenergetic-based kinetic model was then used to separate the exposure pathways of BaP accumulation in the green mussels. Our results demonstrated that the AE of BaP in the green mussels ranged between 17 and 47%. Body size did not significantly affect the AE of BaP in the mussels. The AEs increased with a decrease in food availability, largely as a result of lengthening the gut passage of chemicals. The AEs differed by up to 2.3 times (17-39%) among the different food diets tested (four phytoplankton diets and one sediment diet). The BaP associated with the sediment was assimilated least efficiently. The difference in gut passage also appeared to account partially for the difference in AEs observed among different food types. No correlation between the AE and the distribution of BaP in the cytoplasm of phytoplankton cells was found. The concentration factor of BaP measured in four different marine phytoplankton species was in the range of 10(4)-5 x 10(4) (L/kg). The calculated uptake rate constant of BaP in the green mussels was 6.37 L/g/d, and the efficiency of absorption of BaP from the aqueous phase was 6.6 to 8.8%. The model calculation indicated that under most circumstances, >56% of BaP in mussels can indeed be derived from the uptake from the aqueous phase. However, the relative importance of aqueous and dietary exposure can be affected by the variation of AE, mussel's ingestion rate, and concentration of BaP in ingested food particles.

  6. Spermatogenesis of the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis with dual patterns of acrosome and tail development in spermatids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reunov, A. A.; Au, D. W. T.; Wu, R. S. S.

    1999-08-01

    Spermatogenesis in the mussel Perna viridis was studied by electron microscopy. Results demonstrated that cytological development in spermatogonia and spermatocytes was similar to that previously described in other Mytilidae. Acrosome formation began with the arising of proacrosomal vesicles in spermatogonia. The abundance of proacrosomal vesicles increased in spermatocytes, which were flagellated. However, during spermiogenesis, dual patterns of acrosome development as well as flagellum development could be found among spermatids in a male gonad. The two lines of acrosome formation in spermatids ultimately gave rise to morphologically similar acrosomes. The two lines of flagellum development in spermatids resulted in the formation of sperm cells with either a typically posteriorly directed tail or an anteriorly directed tail.

  7. Temporal variations of heavy metals levels in Perna viridis, on the Chacopata-Bocaripo lagoon axis, Sucre State, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rafael; Acosta, Vanessa; Segnini, Mary Isabel; Brito, Leonor; Martínez, Gregorio

    2015-02-28

    Perna viridis was used as biomonitor to assess heavy metal levels in the Chacopata-Bocaripo lagoon axis, Venezuela, during rain and drought seasons. The mussels were weighed and measured. The metal concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. For rain period, the order of bioavailability was: Cu>Ni>Mn>Co>Cd>Pb, and for drought: Cu>Mn>Ni>Co>Pb>Cd. The concentrations of Ni, Co, Cd and Pb showed significant differences (P<0.05) in both periods. There was higher metal accumulation during drought season, possibly related to upwelling, since it produces an increase in primary productivity, which translates more food into organisms, making metals bioavailable for mussels. Only Cu and Mn showed significant relationships between the size and metal concentration, during drought period, it may be because of the organisms need for these essential metals in different physiological processes.

  8. An investigation of oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarkers during Greenshell mussel (Perna canaliculus) oocyte cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Gale, Samantha L; Burritt, David J; Tervit, H Robin; Adams, Serean L; McGowan, Lindsay T

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, the enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants' response, and the fertilization and development capability of Perna canaliculus oocytes were investigated at critical treatment steps in a previously published controlled-rate cryopreservation protocol. The cryoprotectant (CPA) from this protocol comprises 10% ethylene glycol (v:v) and 0.2 M trehalose (wt/vol) final concentration. Critical treatment steps included (1) seawater control, (2) CPA addition, (3) CPA addition followed by cooling to -6 °C, (4) CPA addition and cooling to -10 °C, and (5) CPA addition and cooling to -35 °C and immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN). The percentage of fertilized oocytes was 53.8 ± 13.3% in the seawater control but was reduced to 26.0 ± 15.6% after -35 °C + LN treatment, whereas development to D-larvae was 21.0 ± 6.4% in the seawater control reduced to 4.8 ± 2.9% after cooling to -6 °C, and was zero at all the subsequent cooling steps. All oxidative damage biomarkers, protein carbonyls (PCs) and lipid hydroperoxides (LPs), and antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase, percent reduced glutathione (%GSH), and total glutathione (defined as glutathione; reduced [GSH] plus glutathione disulphide; derived from two molecules of GSH [GSSG]) were measured over all treatments on unfertilized oocytes over a post-treatment recovery period of 0 to 240 minutes in seawater. An ANOVA showed that both treatment and post-treatment periods had significant effects on the concentrations of all biomarkers (P < 0.05). Protein carbonyls and LPs increased very little after CPA addition and cooling treatments, when compared with the seawater control, but large increases up to sixfold occurred between 0 and 240 minutes for the -35 °C + LN treatment. Concentrations of SOD, catalase, total glutathione, and %GSH at 0 minutes decreased by -31.2%, -26.9%, -21.9%, and -25.0%, respectively, between the seawater control and the -35

  9. Efficacy of marinades against Listeria monocytogenes cells in suspension or associated with green shell mussels (Perna canaliculus).

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, P J; Osborne, C M

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the listericidal efficacies of three marinades used in the production of marinated green shell mussels (Perna canaliculus), decimal reduction times (D values) were determined for a mixture of seven strains of Listeria monocytogenes exposed to marinades in the presence and absence of mussels. With an acetic acid (1.5%, wt/vol) marinade, calculated D values in the presence and absence of mussels were 77.3 and 33.3 h, respectively. Likewise, for an acetic acid (0.75%)-lactic acid (0.75%) marinade and an acetic acid (1.5%)-Glucono Delta-Lactone (0.2%)-based marinade, the D values in the presence and absence of mussels were 125.5 and 26.9 h and 86.3 and 19.3 h, respectively. Various increases in decimal reduction times in the presence of mussels indicated that there was no simple relationship between the listericidal natures of these marinades and the presence of mussels. This result suggests that difficulties may occur in trying to relate acid inhibition studies carried out in model broth systems to "real food" systems. PMID:7747968

  10. Effects of metals on {alpha}-amylase activity in the digestive gland of the green mussel, Perna viridis L.

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.; Teo, L.H.; Sin, Y.M.

    1996-04-01

    A number of digestive enzymes in the green mussel, Perna viridis L., have been reported, and {alpha}-amylase is believed to have a higher activity than the others. Small plankton, on which the green mussel feeds, may supply plenty of starch and glycogen. They may be an important source of nutrients for the green mussel and the ability of the latter to make good use of them depends mainly on the activities of amylase. The effect of heavy metals on amylase activity is also important as the ability of the mussel`s digestive gland to accumulate these metals is well known. High concentrations of heavy metals, especially lead, have been observed in the water around Singapore. The in vitro inhibition of some metals on the activities of digestive enzymes from the green mussel has been observed, but kinetic properties of the inhibition and the in vivo inhibition of the heavy metals on digestive enzymes are little understood. In the present study, in vitro inhibition of four metals (Pb, Cd, Zn and Hg) on the activity of {alpha}-amylase from the digestive gland of the green mussel will be compared. Their effects on the K{sub M} and V{sub max} values of {alpha}-amylase will also be compared. Finally, lead is either added to the food or water, to see how it affects the activity of {alpha}-amylase and how this effect acts in combination with starvation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Predator-labeling effect on byssus production in marine mussels Perna viridis (L.) and Brachidontes variabilis (Krauss).

    PubMed

    Cheung, S G; Luk, K C; Shin, P K S

    2006-07-01

    Mussels Perna viridis and Brachidontes variabilis were exposed to chemical cues from the predatory crab Thalamita danae maintained on different diets, and byssal thread production of the mussels was studied. P. viridis produced the highest number as well as the thickest and longest byssal threads when they were exposed to crabs maintained on a diet of P. viridis as compared with those exposed to crabs maintained on a diet of the top shell Monodonta labio, the rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata, or crabs that were starved. For B. variabilis, results were similar, in that a diet containing B. variabilis elicited the greatest response as compared with other treatments. This indicates that the mussels were able to discriminate chemical cues released from predators maintained on different diets, and respond accordingly to the level of predation risk. By increasing the strength of byssal attachment as a defensive trait, the chance of being dislodged and consumed by crabs is reduced. As energy cost involved in the induction of an antipredatory response is considerable, this defensive trait seems to be an advantage to the mussels in enhancing efficiency. The short response time in byssal thread production allows the mussels to increase resistance against predation by crabs at the time when predation pressure is the highest in a tidal cycle.

  12. Suspended micro-sized PVC particles impair the performance and decrease survival in the Asian green mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Rist, Sinja Elena; Assidqi, Khoirunnisa; Zamani, Neviaty Putri; Appel, Daniel; Perschke, Myriam; Huhn, Mareike; Lenz, Mark

    2016-10-15

    Marine bivalves are known to ingest microplastics, but information on the consequences for their physiological performance is limited. To investigate a potential exposure pathway that has not yet been addressed, we mimicked the resuspension of microplastics from the sediment in a laboratory exposure experiment. For this, we exposed the Asian green mussel Perna viridis to 4 concentrations (0mg/l, 21.6mg/l, 216mg/l, 2160mg/l) of suspended polyvinylchloride (PVC) particles (1-50μm) for two 2-hour-time-periods per day. After 44days, mussel filtration and respiration rates as well as byssus production were found to be a negative function of particle concentration. Furthermore, within 91days of exposure, mussel survival declined with increasing PVC abundance. These negative effects presumably go back to prolonged periods of valve closure as a reaction to particle presence. We suggest that microplastics constitute a new seston component that exerts a stress comparable to natural suspended solids.

  13. Organochlorines and dioxin-like compounds in green-lipped mussels Perna viridis from Hong Kong mariculture zones.

    PubMed

    So, M K; Zhang, X; Giesy, J P; Fung, C N; Fong, H W; Zheng, J; Kramer, M J; Yoo, H; Lam, P K S

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides and dioxin-like compounds were measured in green-lipped mussels, Perna viridis, collected from seven mariculture zones in Hong Kong between September and October in 2002 in order to evaluate the status, spatial distribution and potential sources of pollution in these areas. Concentrations ranged from 300 to 4400 ng/g lipid weight for total OCs and 170-1000 ng/g lipid weight for total PCBs (based on 28 congeners). Relatively smaller DDT concentrations in mussels compared with previous studies suggest reduced discharges of DDTs from nearby regions into Hong Kong waters. Detection of a mixture of HCH isomers in the mussels indicated that Hong Kong waters were predominantly contaminated by technical HCHs rather than lindane. Mussel samples from all sampling locations elicited significant dioxin-like activity in the H4IIE-luc bioassay. The greatest magnitude of dioxin-like response (39 pg TEQ/g wet wt.) was detected in mussels from Ma Wan in the western waters of Hong Kong, which is strongly influenced by the Pearl River discharge. Human health risk assessment was undertaken to evaluate potential risks associated with the consumption of the green-lipped mussels. Risk quotient (RQ) for dioxin-like compounds was greater than unity suggesting that adverse health effects may be associated with high mussel consumption.

  14. Field-to-laboratory transport protocol impacts subsequent physiological biomarker response in the marine mussel, Perna canaliculus.

    PubMed

    Chandurvelan, Rathishri; Marsden, Islay D; Gaw, Sally; Glover, Chris N

    2013-01-01

    The transfer of mussels from field to laboratory, or transplantation between clean and contaminated field settings, is a common protocol in ecotoxicology. However, collection and transport of mussels could lead to stress that may impact biomarker responses, and thus confound interpretation of results. Physiological responses (clearance rate, absorption efficiency, excretion rate, respiration rate and scope-for-growth) of green-lipped mussels (Perna canaliculus) exposed to four different transportation protocols were investigated. These protocols included immersion in site seawater (SSW), immersion in artificial seawater (ASW), and emersion (aerial transport; EMS) at two temperatures (15°C and 5°C). Physiological measurements were conducted after a simulated 24h "transport" phase and a 48h "recovery" phase. Clearance rates were significantly inhibited by the EMS 5°C and ASW protocols relative to SSW treatment, although the clearance rate of the latter recovered after 48h. A similar pattern was observed for excretion and respiration rates for ASW. Decreased excretion rates for EMS 15°C and respiration rates for EMS 5°C were also recorded relative to values for SSW following "recovery". Negative scope-for-growth was observed for all treatments except EMS 15°C. These data suggest transport emersed at ambient air temperatures is the best method to maintain physiological health of green-lipped mussels.

  15. Biogenic nanospheres of amorphous carbonated Ca-Mg phosphate within the periostracum of the green mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Gangsheng

    2014-12-01

    Recently there is increasing evidence that the shell biomineralization proceeds via an amorphous precursor route. Therefore, the search for and investigation of amorphous biominerals in bivalve shells are of great importance and interest. Here, using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), we investigate the microstructure and mineralogy of the periostracum in Perna viridis. We find that: (1) the periostracum has three layers, of which the inner and outer layer are of proteins, while the middle layer is mineralized with nanospheres of amorphous biominerals; (2) the nanospheres are of amorphous carbonated Ca-Mg phosphate (ACCP), where the CO3(2)(-)/PO4(3)(-) weight ratio is estimated to be ∼0.3, and the Ca/P and Ca/Mg atomic ratio is ∼1.4 and 1.6, respectively; (3) the nanospheres, with a diameter of 43-106nm, are found to assemble into spherules with a diameter of 160-500nm, which are further organized into parallel microlayers separated by the proteins; and (4) the nanospheres are assumed to function as the pH stabilizer to facilitate the shell's initial mineralization. Finally, we expect that these findings will advance our understanding of the shell's biomineralization process.

  16. Establishment of the green mussel, Perna viridis (Linnaeus 1758) (Mollusca: Mytilidae) on the West Coast of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, A.J.; Marelli, D.C.; Frischer, M.E.; Danforth, J.M.; Williams, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    In 1999, the green mussel, Perna viridis, was first observed in Tampa Bay, Florida. This was the first reported occurrence of this Indo-Pacific marine bivalve in North America. The mussels found in Tampa Bay were confirmed to be P. viridis based on both morphological and genetic characteristics. Since the initial discovery, surveys in Tampa Bay and on the west coast of Florida have documented the growth, recruitment, and range expansion of P. viridis. From November 1999 to July 2000, the mean shell length of a Tampa Bay population increased from 49.0 mm to 94.1 mm, an increase of 97%. Populations of P. viridis are successfully reproducing in Tampa Bay. Recruitment was observed on sampling plates in May and continued through July 2000. The full extent of mussel colonization is not clear, but mussels were found outside Tampa Bay in St. Petersburg, Florida, south to Venice. Based on these studies it is evident that P. viridis has successfully invaded Tampa Bay and the west coast of Florida. The long-term impact of P. viridis on native communities off the west coast of Florida cannot be predicted at this time.

  17. Mate locating and access behaviour of the parasitic pea crab, Nepinnotheres novaezelandiae, an important parasite of the mussel Perna canaliculus

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Oliver; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Pea crabs are globally ubiquitous symbionts in the marine environment that cause serious economic impact in the aquaculture production of several major bivalve species. However, little is known about their host-parasite interactions, especially the mating behaviour of these parasites that could prove useful for controlling their infestation in aquaculture. In this study, the mate location behaviour of male New Zealand pea crabs, Nepinnotheres novaezelandiae (Filhol, 1885), was observed when dwelling in its preferred host, the commercially important green-lipped mussel, Perna canaliculus. Given the cryptic behaviour of the male crabs, a novel trapping system was developed to determine whether male crabs would exit their mussel hosts in response to an upstream female crab. The presence of receptive female crabs placed upstream successfully attracted 60% of male crabs from their host over 24 h. Observations of the nocturnal mate-finding behaviour of male crabs were made in darkness using infrared video recordings. Males spent on average 49 min on empty hosts and never left a mussel containing a female conspecific once found, spending 200 min on average to gain entry to the mussel. Male crabs were often observed stroking the mantle edge of the mussel whilst attempting to gain entry, successfully increasing mussel valve gape during entry from 3.7 to 5.5 mm. A pheromone-based mate location system is likely used by this crab to greatly reduce the risks associated with the location of females. PMID:25786327

  18. Pectenotoxin-2 seco acid: a toxin converted from pectenotoxin-2 by the New Zealand Greenshell mussel, Perna canaliculus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Mackenzie, L; Stirling, D; Adamson, J

    2001-04-01

    Comparison of pectenotoxin (PTX) profiles of toxic dinoflagellate Dinophysis acuta, Greenshell mussels (Perna canaliculus) and Blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected from Wedge Point, Queen Charlotte Sound, New Zealand was carried out by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with turbo-ionspray ionization. Although the major PTX homologue in D. acuta was pectenotoxin-2 (PTX2), both Greenshell and Blue mussels contained pectenotoxin-2 seco acid (PTX2SA) as the predominant toxin. More than 90% of PTX2 isolated from D. acuta was rapidly converted to PTX2SA and its epimer 7-epi-pectenotoxin-2 seco acid (7-epi-PTX2SA) in the Greenshell mussel extracts. The conversion from PTX2 to PTX2SA and 7-epi-PTX2SA was not observed in phosphate buffers at various pH ranging from 4.1 to 9.1. These findings indicate that PTX2SA and 7-epi-PTX2SA are not artifact toxins resulting from hydrolysis of PTX2, but arise from the conversion of PTX2 by mussel tissues.

  19. Chronic hypoxia and low salinity impair anti-predatory responses of the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youji; Hu, Menghong; Cheung, S G; Shin, P K S; Lu, Weiqun; Li, Jiale

    2012-06-01

    The effects of chronic hypoxia and low salinity on anti-predatory responses of the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis were investigated. Dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from hypoxic to normoxic (1.5 ± 0.3 mg l(-1), 3.0 ± 0.3 mg l(-1) and 6.0 ± 0.3 mg l(-1)), and salinities were selected within the variation during the wet season in Hong Kong coastal waters (15‰, 20‰, 25‰ and 30‰). The dissolved oxygen and salinity significantly affected some anti-predatory responses of mussel, including byssus production, shell thickness and shell weight, and the adductor diameter was only significantly affected by salinity. Besides, interactive effects of dissolved oxygen and salinity on the byssus production and shell thickness were also observed. In hypoxic and low salinity conditions, P. viridis produced fewer byssal threads, thinner shell and adductor muscle, indicating that hypoxia and low salinity are severe environmental stressors for self-defence of mussel, and their interactive effects further increase the predation risk.

  20. A comparison of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and petroleum hydrocarbon uptake by mussels (Perna viridis) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) in Hong Kong coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Bruce J; Zheng, Gene J; Tse, Edmund S C; De Luca-Abbott, Sharon B; Siu, Stanley Y M; Lam, Paul K S

    2003-01-01

    The ability of mussels (Perna viridis) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to accumulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) from five sites in Hong Kong's coastal waters was compared. Mussels consistently had higher levels of contaminants, but their utility was limited at one highly polluted site due to mortality. Mussels and SPMDs ranked sites differently in terms of individual contaminant levels. Although SPMDs overcome many of the disadvantages of using living organisms to measure contaminants in marine waters, they cannot be used as "mimics" due to different PAH and PHC accumulation patterns.

  1. Assimilation of cadmium, chromium, and zinc by the green mussel Perna viridis and the clam Ruditapes philippinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, K.; Wang, W.X.

    2000-06-01

    The green mussel Perna viridis and the clam Ruditapes philippinarum have been frequently used as biomonitors of coastal contamination in subtropical and tropical waters, yet the physiological processes controlling metal uptake in these bivalves are unknown. Assimilation efficiency (AE) is an important physiological parameter quantifying metal bioavailability from ingested food. The authors determined the AEs of Cd, CR, and Zn in these bivalves feeding on five species of phytoplankton and one natural section. The influences of the cytoplasmic distribution of metals in the algal cells and the digestive physiology of bivalves on metal AEs were also examined. Among the three metals, Zn was generally assimilated at the highest efficiency, i.e., 21 to 36% in the mussels and 29 to 59% in the clams. Cr was the least assimilated metal, with AEs being 10 to 16% in the mussels and 11 to 24% in the clams. The AEs of Cd and Zn in the clams were 1.8 to 4.7 and 1.1 to 1.9 times higher, respectively, than the AEs in the mussels. Assimilation efficiencies of Cr were, however, comparable between the mussels and the clams. A positive significant relationship between the metal AE and the percent of metals in the algal cytoplasm was found only for Cd in the clams, suggesting that Cd fractionation in the algal cells influenced its assimilation. No significant relationship, however, was found for other metals in both bivalves. A significant relationship between Cr-assimilation efficiency and gut passage time (GPT) was documented in the mussels, indicating a higher assimilation when Cr was retained longer in the gut. There was also significant correlation of metal AEs among the three metals, which were probably subjected to the same digestive pathway in the bivalves. Their study demonstrated that both the green mussels and the clams were able to accumulate metals from ingested food source, and food quality appeared to have different effects on metal assimilation in different bivalve

  2. Variations of 210Po activity in mussel (Perna viridis) of Samut Sakhon and its contribution to dose assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porntepkasemsan, B.; Srisuksawad, K.; Kulsawat, W.

    2015-05-01

    The activities of 210Po and its effective dose in green mussel (Perna viridis) collected from a mussel farming area in Samut Sakhon province during the period of 20122013 are presented. Several parameters including maximum shell length and the physiological performance of mussels using condition index and physical properties of seawater (pH, salinity, conductivity, TDS, DO and cation-anion elements) were measured. Each individual mussel was measured for its maximum shell length which was adopted as size class. The activity concentration of 210Po was determined spectroscopically through its 5.30 MeV alpha particle emission, using 209Po as an internal tracer. The 210Po activity concentration in mussels was found to vary between 1.044 and 6.951 Bq/kg wet weight. The 210Po concentration was higher in smaller-sized (≤35 mm) and lower in larger ones (40-70 mm). This confirmed that larger mussels have lower 210Po activities on a weight basis. The 210Po body burden (activity per mussel) ranged from 1.035 to 17.183 mBq. Contrary to the 210Po concentrations, results of the body burden revealed the lower activities in smaller-sized mussels (≤35 mm) and the higher in larger-sized ones (40-70 mm). The type of fluctuations observed with 210Po concentrations were interpreted as a seasonal effect. Total annual effective 210Po dose due to mussel consumption was calculated to be in the range of 3.081 to 16.401 pSv. Based on the international guideline, the average dose calculated due to 210Po in mussels of Samut Sakhon would not pose any significant radiological impact on human health and the mussels are considered to be safe for consumption.

  3. Coating Proteins: Structure and Cross-Linking in fp-1 from the Green Shell Mussel Perna canaliculus†‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Waite, J. Herbert

    2007-01-01

    The protein family known as fp-1 provides mussel byssus with a protective outer coating and has drawn much attention for its water resistant bioadhesive properties in vitro. A new fp-l isolated from the green shell mussel Perna canaliculus (pcfp-1) reveals a composition dominated by only four amino acids: 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa), lysine, proline, and valine at ~20 mol % each. SDS–PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry detected size variants at 48 and 52 kDa in preparations of purified Pcfp-1. The N-terminal sequence enabled construction of oligonucleotide primers for PCR and RACE-derived cDNAs from which the complete sequence of four variants was deduced. pcfp-1 deviates from all known homologues in other mussels in several notable respects: its mass is half, most of its sequence is represented by 75 tandem repeats of a tetrapeptide, i.e., PY*VK, in which Y* is dopa, prolines are not hydroxylated, and thiolate cysteines are clustered in homologous sequences at both the amino and carboxy termini. Amino acids in the repeat sequence show a striking resemblance to proline-rich cell wall proteins with tandemly repeated PPVYK pentapeptides [Hong, J. C., Nagao, R. T., and Key, J. L. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 8367–8376]. Cysteine plays a key role in cross-linking pcfp-1 by forming adducts with dopaquinone. Significant 5-S-cysteinyldopa and smaller amounts of 2-S-cysteinyldopa were detected in hydrolysates of the byssal threads of P. canaliculus. The cross-links could also be formed by oxidation of pcfp-1 in vitro using mushroom tyrosinase. Cysteinyldopa cross-links were present in trace amounts only in the byssus of other mussel species. PMID:16313194

  4. Thermal Constraints for Range Expansion of the Invasive Green Mussel, Perna viridis, in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    URIAN, ALYSON G.; HATLE, JOHN D.; GILG, MATTHEW R.

    2013-01-01

    Cold temperatures are thought to be among the most important determining factors of geographic distribution for tropical and sub-tropical marine invertebrates. The Asian green mussel, Perna viridis, has been introduced into coastal waters of Florida where its current distribution is hypothesized to be limited by low temperatures during winter. Lethal and sub-lethal effects (heat shock protein/Hsp70 expression) of cold water and air temperatures were analyzed in two size classes of P. viridis from Florida in an effort to determine the effects of current and forecasted temperatures on the potential for range expansion. Mussels were exposed to water temperatures of 14, 10, 7 and 3°C for up to 30 days, or to air temperatures of 14, 7, 0 and –10°C for periods of 2 hr. Mortality was significantly increased at all water and air temperatures ≤ 14°C. No differences in mortality rates were observed between small (15–45 mm) and large (75–105 mm) size classes except after exposure to 7°C air, in which small mussels had higher mortality. Significant increases in Hsp70 expression were observed after a 2-hour exposure to 10°C water, but Hsp70 expression was not significantly increased at any temperatures in which mortality was not also significant. The temperature threshold for survival in this population appears to be between 10 and 14°C, suggesting that under current conditions P. viridis may already be at the northern edge of its potential range in the United States. If water temperatures increase with global climate change, northerly flowing currents may permit range expansion as temperatures allow. PMID:20853420

  5. P-glycoprotein expression in Perna viridis after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Wen-Chang; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Tao Jiang; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2014-08-01

    Bivalves naturally exposed to toxic algae have mechanisms to prevent from harmful effects of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins. However, quite few studies have examined the mechanisms associated, and the information currently available is still insufficient. Multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) is ubiquitous in aquatic invertebrates and plays an important role in defense against xenobiotics. Here, to explore the roles of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the DSP toxins resistance in shellfish, complete cDNA of P-gp gene in the mussel Perna viridis was cloned and analyzed. The accumulation of okadaic acid (OA), a main component of DSP toxins, MXR activity and expression of P-gp in gills of P. viridis were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins in the presence or absence of P-gp inhibitors PGP-4008, verapamil (VER) and cyclosporin A (CsA). The mussel P. viridis P-gp closely matches MDR/P-gp/ABCB protein from various organisms, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. After exposure to P. lima, OA accumulation, MXR activity and P-gp expression significantly increased in gills of P. viridis. The addition of P-gp-specific inhibitors PGP-4008 and VER decreased MXR activity induced by P. lima, but had no effect on the OA accumulation in gills of P. viridis. However, CsA, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of ABC transporter not only decreased MXR activity, but also increased OA accumulation in gills of P. viridis. Together with the ubiquitous presence of other ABC transporters such as MRP/ABCC in bivalves and potential compensatory mechanism in P-gp and MRP-mediated resistance, we speculated that besides P-gp, other ABC transporters, especially MRP might be involved in the resistance mechanisms to DSP toxins.

  6. Mercury depuration effectiveness on green mussel (Perna viridis L.) and blood cockle (Anadara granosa L.) from Jakarta Bay using ozone, chitosan and hydrodynamic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiah Ningrum, Endar; Duryadi Solihin, Dedy; Butet, Nurlisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Depuration has been used to eliminate microorganism and toxic chemical contaminants in bivalve. However, scientific research still needs to discover the effectiveness of depuration. This research aimed at assessing the best depuration effectiveness in decreasing mercury (Hg) concentration level in two species of bivalves, green mussel (Perna viridis L.) and blood cockle (Anadara granosa L.). The depuration treatments applied 1.5 ppm ozon, 0.5 ppm chitosan, hydrodynamic technique (1.3 m/s), combination between hydrodynamic-ozon, hydrodynamic-chitosan and ozon-chitosan. The experiment were conducted in mini aquaria for 60 minutes. Mercury concentration was measured in 10 g dry weight of green mussel (4.05±0.020 ppm) and blood cockle (3.27 ± 0.666 ppm). The result showed that mercury depuration were highly effective by combination of ozone-chitosan in green mussel (96.51%) and 1.5 ppm ozone in blood cockle (87.06%).

  7. Habitat degradation correlates with tolerance to climate-change related stressors in the green mussel Perna viridis from West Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Carolin Charlotte; Huhn, Mareike; Ayu, Nurina; Bachtiar, Ramadian; von Juterzenka, Karen; Lenz, Mark

    2013-06-15

    It is unclear whether habitat degradation correlates with tolerance of marine invertebrates to abiotic stress. We therefore tested whether resistance to climate change-related stressors differs between populations of the green mussel Perna viridis from a heavily impacted and a mostly pristine site in West Java, Indonesia. In laboratory experiments, we compared their oxygen consumption and mortality under lowered salinity (-13 and -18 units, both responses), hypoxia (0.5 mg/l, mortality only) and thermal stress (+7 °C, mortality only). Mussels from the eutrophied and polluted Jakarta Bay showed a significantly smaller deviation from their normal oxygen consumption and higher survival rates when stressed than their conspecifics from the unaffected Lada Bay. This shows that human induced habitat degradation correlates with mussel tolerance to environmental stress. We discuss possible mechanisms - e.g. the selection of tolerant genotypes or habitat-specific differences in the nutritional status of the mussels - that could explain our observation.

  8. Spatiotemporal variations in metal accumulation, RNA/DNA ratio and energy reserve in Perna viridis transplanted along a marine pollution gradient in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jamius W Y; Zhou, Guang-Jie; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2017-01-21

    We examined spatiotemporal variations of metal levels and three growth related biomarkers, i.e., RNA/DNA ratio (RD), total energy reserve (Et) and condition index (CI), in green-lipped mussels Perna viridis transplanted into five locations along a pollution gradient in the marine environment of Hong Kong over 120days of deployment. There were significant differences in metal levels and biomarker responses among the five sites and six time points. Mussels in two clean sites displayed better CI and significantly lower levels of Ag, Cu, Pb and Zn in their tissues than the other sites. Temporal patterns of RD in P. viridis were found to be site-specific. Across all sites, Et decreased in P. viridis over the deployment period, though the rate of decrease varied significantly among the sites. Therefore, temporal variation of biomarkers should be taken to consideration in mussel-watch programs because such information can help discriminate pollution-induced change from natural variation.

  9. Biomonitoring of heavy metals and trace organics using the intertidal mussel Perna viridis in Hong Kong coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Liu, J H; Kueh, C S W

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a 6-year (1998-2003) survey of trace toxics in the intertidal mussel Perna viridis conducted by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department. Concentrations of heavy metals and trace organics were measured in the soft bodies of P. viridis collected from five sites in Hong Kong waters, i.e. Wu Kai Sha (Tolo Harbour), Ma Wan (Northwest), Tsim Sha Tsui (Victoria Harbour), Tai Tam (Hong Kong South) and Lamma Island (Southern Waters) in order to establish the spatial patterns of contaminants in mussels. Among the metals analysed, Cd showed a significant concentration gradient in Hong Kong waters. The levels of Cd in P. viridis were significantly higher at Ma Wan as compared to the other sites studied. Ma Wan also had relatively higher concentrations of Pb. Mn concentrations were particularly prominent at Wu Kai Sha. Significantly higher concentrations of Hg and Cu were recorded at Tai Tam and Tsim Sha Tsui. Tai Tam and Wu Kai Sha had higher levels of V; whereas higher Ni concentrations were recorded at Lamma Island and Tai Tam. No clear spatial patterns for Al, As, Cr, Fe and Zn were observed. Higher concentrations of PAHs in P. viridis were observed around urban centres impacted by sewage discharges (e.g. Tsim Sha Tsui); whereas higher PCB levels were found not only in Tsim Sha Tsui but also in less urbanised areas such as Lamma Island and Tai Tam, suggesting that these may be due to non-sewage related inputs. The study also shows that Northwest and Southern waters are subject to a higher degree of DDT pollution compared with other sites. Of the 17 dioxin compounds analysed, positive data were mostly recorded for two compounds which are of low toxicity (i.e. OCDD and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD) whereas the most toxic congeners (i.e. 2,3,7,8-TCDD and 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD) were not detected in the 6 years of monitoring. In general, the levels of OCDD in P. viridis were found to be higher in Tai Tam and Lamma Island in Southern Waters of Hong

  10. Impact of marine pollution in green mussel Perna viridis from four coastal sites in Karachi, Pakistan, North Arabian Sea: histopathological observations.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Iftikhar; Ayub, Zarrien; Siddiqui, Ghazala

    2015-04-01

    Pathological changes are regarded as a standard technique to monitor the effects of pollutants in marine animals. Histopathological examination of the population of green mussel Perna viridis (L.) from four sites in Pakistan, namely, Manora Channel, Rehri Creek, Sandspit Backwaters and Bhanbore was conducted. The first three sites are on the Karachi coast, whereas the fourth one, Bhanbore is situated outside Karachi, and is considered to be less polluted. Two types of parasites, Rickettsia-like organisms and metacestode were found in the mussels studied. In the present study, we observed various pathological lesions, such as inflammatory responses, granulocytomas, lipofuscin pigments, vacuolation in the digestive gland and gonads, lamellar fusion and dilated hemolymphatic sinus in the gills of P. viridis. These observations indicate the extent of environmental pollution in the studied areas. Although, Bhanbore is considered to be relatively less polluted compared to other three sites, the present results have revealed that the waters of Bhanbore are also polluted as evidenced by the pathological changes observed in the mussels collected from there.

  11. Isoform-specific responses of metallothioneins in a marine pollution biomonitor, the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis, towards different stress stimulations.

    PubMed

    Leung, Priscilla T Y; Park, T J; Wang, Yu; Che, C M; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2014-08-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are commonly used as biomarker for metal pollution assessment in marine ecosystems. Using integrated genomic and proteomic analyses, this study characterized two types of MT isoform in the digestive gland of a common biomonitor, the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis, towards the challenges of a metal (cadmium; Cd) and a non-metal oxidant (hydrogen peroxide; H2 O2 ) respectively. The two isoforms differed in their deduced protein sequences, with 73 amino acids for MT10-I and 72 for MT10-II (a novel type), but both consisted of a high percentage (27.4 to 29.2%) of cysteine. Two-dimensional gel and Western blot showed that the MT proteins were present in multiple isoform spots, and they were further validated to be MT10-I and MT10-II using MS analysis coupled with unrestricted modifications searching. Expression of mRNA revealed that MT10-I responded promptly to Cd but had a lagged induction to H2 O2 treatments, while MT10-II was exclusively induced by Cd treatment over the course of exposure. Expression of the MT proteins also showed a delayed response to H2 O2 , compared to Cd treatments. This study uncovered the potential different functional roles of various MTs isoforms in P. viridis and thus advances the resolution of using MTs as biomarkers in future applications.

  12. Toxicological effects of benzo(a)pyrene, DDT and their mixture on the green mussel Perna viridis revealed by proteomic and metabolomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinqin; Chen, Hao; Li, Yuhu; Zhou, Hailong; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) are persistent organic pollutants and environmental estrogens (EEs) with known toxicity towards the green mussel, Perna viridis. In this study, the toxic effects of BaP (10 µg/L) and DDT (10 µg/L) and their mixture were assessed in green mussel gills with proteomic and metabolomic approaches. Metabolic responses indicated that BaP mainly caused disturbance in osmotic regulation by significantly decrease in branched chain amino acids, dimethylamine and dimethylglycine in gills of male green mussels after exposure for 7 days. DDT mainly caused disturbance in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism by differential alteration of betaine, dimethylamine, dimethylglycine, amino acids, and succinate in gills of male green mussels. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT didn't show obvious metabolite changes. Proteomic analysis showed different protein expression profiles between different treatment groups, which demonstrated that BaP, DDT and their mixture may have different modes of action. Proteomic responses revealed that BaP induced cell apoptosis, disturbance in protein digestion and energy metabolism in gills of green mussels, whereas DDT exposure altered proteins that were associated with oxidative stress, cytoskeleton and cell structure, protein digestion and energy metabolism. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT affected proteins related to the oxidative stress, cytoskeleton and cell structure, protein biosynthesis and modification, energy metabolism, growth and apoptosis.

  13. Determination of volatile compounds in New Zealand Greenshell™ mussels (Perna canaliculus) during chilled storage using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tuckey, Nicholas P L; Day, Jacqueline R; Miller, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    Greenshell™ mussels (Perna canaliculus) were dry-stored at 6.44±0.54°C for 8 days during which time volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored using SPME GC-MS. Thirty-four VOCs were identified in homogenised mussel meat and 29 in the mussel liquor (i.e. the seawater enclosed in the mantle cavity). Of the 34 VOCs identified 20 were reliably identified throughout the storage treatment and 9 were found to change in relative concentration in homogenised mussel meat. Dimethyl sulphide, 1-penten-3-ol, 1-hexen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-ol increased during storage, whereas pentanal, hexanal, heptanal, octanal and 3-undecen-2-one decreased. In the mussel liquor, dimethyl sulphide was undetectable pre-storage, becoming detectable after 2 days, and a large increase was noted after 6 days. SPME GC-MS was a useful tool for monitoring VOC profiles of Greenshell™ mussels and could aid in the development of technologies that monitor and improve product quality and consistency.

  14. Influences of ammonia-nitrogen and dissolved oxygen on lysosomal integrity in green-lipped mussel Perna viridis: laboratory evaluation and field validation in Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Fang, J K H; Wu, R S S; Chan, A K Y; Yip, C K M; Shin, P K S

    2008-12-01

    Lysosomal integrity in mussels has been applied as a biomarker to detect the pollution of trace organics and metals in the natural environments. However, few studies have examined the effects of water quality on the response of lysosomal integrity, in particular total ammonia-nitrogen (TAN) and dissolved oxygen (DO). This study demonstrated that high level of TAN (2.0mg/l) and low DO (2.5mg O(2)/l) could significantly reduce the lysosomal integrity in green-lipped mussel Perna viridis, respectively by 33% and 38%, whereas the mussel lysosomal integrity decreased by 70% in the combined treatment of TAN and low DO under laboratory conditions after one week. The mussel lysosomal integrity of all treatment groups could return to the control level after a three week recovery period. In the field validation in Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong during an one-year study period, lysosomal integrity in P. viridis identified the cleanest site east to the harbour, where the lowest TAN and highest DO concentrations were found. While lysosomal integrity in mussels seemed not affected by seasonal changes, approximately 40% of the variation of this biomarker could be attributable to the changes in TAN and DO in seawater. In conclusion, the response of the mussel lysosomal integrity can be confounded by both TAN and DO prevailing in the natural environments and thus caution must be exercised in relating the observed changes in lysosomal integrity to any specific pollutant in coastal water quality monitoring studies.

  15. Non-Lethal Heat Shock of the Asian Green Mussel, Perna viridis, Promotes Hsp70 Synthesis, Induces Thermotolerance and Protects Against Vibrio Infection.

    PubMed

    Aleng, Nor Afiqah; Sung, Yeong Yik; MacRae, Thomas H; Abd Wahid, Mohd Effendy

    2015-01-01

    Mild heat stress promotes thermotolerance and protection against several different stresses in aquatic animals, consequences correlated with the accumulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). The purpose of this study was to determine if non-lethal heat shock (NLHS) of the Asian green mussel, Perna viridis, an aquatic species of commercial value, promoted the production of Hsp70 and enhanced its resistance to stresses. Initially, the LT50 and LHT for P. viridis were determined to be 42°C and 44°C, respectively, with no heat shock induced death of mussels at 40°C or less. Immunoprobing of western blots revealed augmentation of constitutive (PvHsp70-1) and inducible (PvHsp70-2) Hsp70 in tissue from adductor muscle, foot, gill and mantel of P. viridis exposed to 38°C for 30 min followed by 6 h recovery, NLHS conditions for this organism. Characterization by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) revealed that PvHsp70-1 and PvHsp70-2 respectively corresponded most closely to Hsp70 from P. viridis and Mytilus galloprovincialis. Priming of adult mussels with NLHS promoted thermotolerance and increased resistance to V. alginolyticus. The induction of Hsp70 in parallel with enhanced thermotolerance and improved protection against V. alginolyticus, suggests Hsp70 functions in P. viridis as a molecular chaperone and as a stimulator of the immune system.

  16. Concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Zn and Ni) and PAHs in Perna viridis collected from seaport and non-seaport waters in the Straits of Johore.

    PubMed

    Yap, C K; Shahbazi, A; Zakaria, M P

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the ranges of pollutants found in the soft tissues of Perna viridis collected from Kg. Masai and Kg. Sg. Melayu, both located in the Straits of Johore, were 0.85-1.58 μg/g dry weight (dw) for Cd, 5.52-12.2 μg/g dw for Cu, 5.66-8.93 μg/g dw for Ni and 63.4-72.3 μg/g dw for Zn, and 36.4-244 ng/g dry weight for ∑PAHs. Significantly (p < 0.05) higher concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn and ∑PAHs in the mussels were found in the water of a seaport site at Kg. Masai than a non-seaport site at Kg. Sg. Melayu population. The ratios of low molecular weight/high molecular weight hydrocarbons (2.94-3.42) and fluoranthene/pyrene (0.43-0.45) in mussels from both sites indicated the origin of the PAHs to be mainly petrogenic. This study has demonstrated the utility of using the soft tissues of P. viridis as a biomonitor of PAH contamination and bioavailability in the coastal waters of Peninsular Malaysia.

  17. Toxic effects of male Perna viridis gonad exposed to BaP, DDT and their mixture: A metabolomic and proteomic study of the underlying mechanism.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinqin; Zheng, Pengfei; Qiu, Liguo; Jiang, Xiu; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhou, Hailong; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-05

    Benzo(a)pyrene and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are typical persistent organic pollutants, and also the widespread environmental estrogens with known toxicity towards green mussels Perna viridis. In this study, the toxicological effects of BaP and DDT and their mixture were assessed in green mussel gonads using proteomic and metabolomic approaches. Metabolomics by NMR spectroscopy revealed that BaP did not show obvious metabolite changes in the gonad of male green mussel. DDT mainly caused some disturbance of osmotic regulation and energy metabolism by changing BCAAs, alanine, threonine, arginine, etc., unknown metabolite (3.53 ppm), glycine, homarine and ATP at different levels. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT mainly caused some disturbance in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism by differentially altering branched chain amino acids, glutamate, alanine, arginine, unknown metabolite (3.53 ppm), glycine, 4-aminobutyrate, dimethylglycine, homarine and ATP. The results suggest that DDT alone may cause most of metabolites changes in the mixture exposed male mussel gonad, and the results also show that the male P. viridis gonad was more sensitive to DDT than BaP exposures. Proteomic study showed that BaP, DDT and their mixture may have different modes of action. Proteomic responses revealed that BaP induced signal transduction, oxidative stress, spermatogenesis, etc. in the male green mussel gonad; whereas DDT exposure altered proteins that were associated with signal transduction, oxidative stress, cytoskeleton and cell structure, cellular organization, energy metabolism, etc. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT affected proteins related to cytoskeleton and cell structure, oxidative stress, cellular organization, etc. This research demonstrated that metabolomic and proteomic approaches could better elucidate the underlying mechanism of environmental pollutants gonad toxicity.

  18. Influences of dissolved and colloidal organic carbon on the uptake of Ag, Cd, and Cr by the marine mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jin-Fen; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2004-06-01

    The cross-flow ultrafiltration and radiotracer techniques were used to study the influences of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colloidal organic carbon (COC) on the bioavailability of Ag, Cd, and Cr to the green mussel Perna viridis. We examined the uptake of these metals by the mussels at different concentrations of DOC and COC from different origins (estuarine, coastal, and diatom decomposed). Using the DOC originating from the decomposed diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana), we demonstrated that Cd and Cr uptake, quantified by the concentration factor (DCF), increased linearly with increasing DOC concentration. There was, however, no consistent influence of natural DOC concentration on the metal uptake when the DOC was obtained from different sources of seawater (coastal and estuarine). The influences of COC on metal bioavailability were metal-specific and dependent on the geochemical properties of colloids and colloid-metal complexation. Cd uptake rate was not influenced by the COC concentrations. Uptake of diatom-decomposed colloidal Cr was enhanced by 3.4x, whereas the uptake of diatom-decomposed colloidal Ag was decreased by 8.2x compared with the uptake of low molecular weight Cr and Ag (<1 kDa). The uptake of diatom-decomposed colloidal Cr and Ag was generally lower than the uptake of metals bound with the same type of colloids for 2 days. Further aging of the colloid-metal binding reduced metal bioavailability to the mussels. In the presence of different sizes of colloidal particles where there was no major binding of colloids with the metals, metal uptake by the mussels was not influenced by different COC concentrations. Overall, our study suggests that although metal dissociation from colloids may be an important step for the uptake of colloidal metals, other mechanisms such as pinocytosis and co-transport may also be involved in the uptake of these metals, especially in aquatic environments with high DOC and COC concentrations.

  19. Can the byssus of green-lipped mussel Perna viridis (Linnaeus) from the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia be a biomonitoring organ for Cd, Pb and Zn? Field and laboratory studies.

    PubMed

    Yap, C K; Ismail, A; Tan, S G

    2003-07-01

    Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) in total soft tissues (ST) and byssus (BYS) of the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis from 11 different geographical locations off the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia were determined. The metal concentrations distributed between the BYS and ST were compared. The results of this study indicated that higher levels of Cd (1.31 microg/g), Pb (38.49 microg/g) and Zn (206.52 microg/g) were accumulated in the BYS than in the total ST (Cd: 0.29 microg/g; Pb: 8.27 microg/g; Zn: 102.6 microg/g). Semi-static and short period controlled laboratory experiments were also conducted for the accumulation and depuration of Cd, Pb and Zn in the total ST and BYS of P. viridis. The ratios (BYS/ST) for Pb and Cd from the laboratory experiments showed that the total ST accumulated more metals than the BYS. Therefore, these laboratory results disagreed with those found for the field samples. However, the laboratory results for the Zn ratio (BYS/ST) agreed with those of the field samples. It was evident that when compared to the ST, the BYS was a more sensitive biomonitoring organ for Zn while it could be a complementary organ for Cd and Pb in the total ST. Since total ST of P. viridis had been reported to have regulative mechanism for Zn, its BYS can be used as a biomonitoring organ for the identification of coastal areas exposed to Zn pollution.

  20. A Review of Marine Growth Protection System (MGPS) Options for the Royal Australian Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    DSTO-TR-2631 2.5.2 Protection or remediation  Mexel® 432 is a “ molecular level” filming agent of proprietary formulation which is marketed as...Salinity and temperature tolerances of the green and brown mussels, Perna viridis and Perna perna (Bivalvia: Mytilidae). Revista de Biologia Tropical

  1. A randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of PCSO-524®, a patented oil extract of the New Zealand green lipped mussel (Perna canaliculus), on the behaviour, mood, cognition and neurophysiology of children and adolescents (aged 6–14 years) experiencing clinical and sub-clinical levels of hyperactivity and inattention: study protocol ACTRN12610000978066

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence rate of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) within Western cultures is between 5% and 12%, and is the most common psychiatric illness among school-aged children, with an estimated 50% of these children retaining ADHD symptoms for the rest of their lives. Children with ADHD have lower blood levels of long-chain Poly Unsaturated Fatty Acids (LC PUFAs) compared with children without ADHD, and following PUFA supplementation, have shown improvements in ADHD-related symptoms. One highly promising marine based LC PUFA preparation is the Omega-3-rich Lyprinol/Omega XL which is a natural formulation containing standardised lipid extract of the New Zealand green lipped mussel (Perna canaliculus) known as PCSO-524® which contains a unique combination of free fatty acids, sterol esters, polar lipids and carotenoids. It is this unique combination of marine lipids that may assist in correcting the decreased levels of LC PUFA levels in children with symptoms of ADHD. The compound is a mixture belonging to a lipid group called sterol esters (SE). The fatty acids in the SE fraction are mainly myristic acid, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Lyprinol/Omega XL has previously been shown to contain a potent group of Omega-3 lipids that block the 5 - lipoxygenase metabolic pathway responsible for inflammation in the body. Methods A randomized double blind placebo controlled trial will be utilized to assess the effects of 14 weeks administration of Lyprinol/Omega XL versus placebo in 150 children aged 6 to 14 years with high levels of hyperactivity and inattention. Additionally, a range of cognitive, mood and central electrophysiological measures will be undertaken during the 14 week supplementation trial. The primary outcome measure, the Conners’ Parent Rating Scales will be completed initially at baseline, then in weeks 4, 8, 10, 14 and then

  2. [Characteristics of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from mussels (Perna perna) commercialized at Niterói, Rio de Janeiro].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Christiane Soares; Possas, Cristina de Albuquerque; Viana, Célio Mauro; Rodrigues, Dália dos Prazeres

    2007-01-01

    The marine ecosystem is the natural habitat of bacteria like Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an important pathogen that cause human gastroenteritis associated with seafood consumption. In the present investigation, the presence of V. parahaemolyticus in 86 in natural and precooked mussel samples was evaluated. Vibrio parahaemolyticus was isolated from 11.6% of the in natural and precooked mussels. All strains tested were urease-positive and 28.5% were Kanagawa-positive, which suggests that they have pathogenic potential for humans. There was predominance of the O10:K52 serotype and the emerging O3:K6 strain was identified. These results show the epidemiological relevance of V. parahaemolyticus in cases of human gastroenteritis following mussel consumption without adequately cooking them (100 degrees C/15 min). Moreover, it is important to alert the Brazilian Sanitary Surveillance authorities regarding their presence in the food chain and their public health risks.

  3. Assessment of trace element contamination and bioaccumulation in algae (Ulva lactuca), mussels (Perna perna), shrimp (Penaeus kerathurus), and fish (Mugil cephalus, Saratherondon melanotheron) along the Senegalese coast.

    PubMed

    Diop, Mamadou; Howsam, Michael; Diop, Cheikh; Goossens, Jean F; Diouf, Amadou; Amara, Rachid

    2016-02-15

    Concentrations of 11 elements were quantified in five marine species from different trophic levels of a food web (algae, mussel, shrimp and fish), representative for shallow Senegalese coastal waters, and including species of commercial importance. Significant differences in element concentrations and bioaccumulation were demonstrated, revealing the utility of employing a suite of organisms as bioindicators to monitor metal contamination in coastal areas. There was no clear seasonal pattern in concentration of elements, however inter-site differences were observed. Calculations of transfer factors for all the studied elements showed that transfer factors from water were greater than those from sediments. For shrimp and mussel, the concentrations of Pb and Cd were below the EU's maximum level for human consumption, however high concentrations of arsenic in shrimp were recorded at all sites.

  4. Uptake, release, and absorption of nutrients into the marine environment by the green mussel (Perna viridis).

    PubMed

    Srisunont, Chayarat; Babel, Sandhya

    2015-08-15

    The nutrient uptake and release by the mussels in relation with amount of food consumption are emphasised in this research. Results of the study demonstrate that about 16% of the total mass dry weight food consumed by the mussels was released as faeces. The depositions of particulate carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in mussel faeces were found to be 26.3, 5.7, and 0.6mg/day/indv respectively. Soluble inorganic nutrients such as NH4(+)-N (2.5mg/day/indv), and PO4(3-)-P (0.6mg/day/indv) were also released as mussel excretion. The nutrient absorption efficiency for the green mussel body was found to be 65.1% for carbon, 62.1% for nitrogen, and 79.2% for phosphorus. Subsequently, green mussels can remove particulate carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus at 108.1, 13.5, and 4.6mg/day/indv from aquatic systems. Finally, the results can help in estimating the carrying capacity of mussel cultivation without deteriorating the water quality in marine ecosystems.

  5. High mortality and poor growth of green mussels, Perna viridis, in high chlorophyll- a environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Tan Kar; Denil, Delta Jenetty; Ransangan, Julian

    2016-03-01

    The current study was carried out from May 2014 to April 2015 to estimate the stock status of P. viridis in Marudu Bay. The gonad development was monitored by histological examination, while the population parameters including asymptotic length ( L ∞), growth coefficient ( K), mortality rate ( Z, F and M), exploitation level ( E) and recruitment of P. viridis were estimated using the lengthfrequency data. Results of the current study demonstrated that P. viridis in Marudu Bay spawned throughout the year with two major peaks, one in April to May and another one in October to December. The recruitment pattern was continuous with the peak in May to June 2014, which corresponded to the first spawning peak in April. However, no significant recruitment was observed from the second spawning peak due to the difference in spawning timing between male and female populations. The estimated asymptotic length ( L ∞), growth coefficient ( K), total mortality ( Z), natural mortality ( M), fishing mortality ( F) and growth performance ( φ) of P. viridis in Marudu Bay were estimate to be 117 mm, 0.97 yr-1, 4.39 yr-1, 1.23 yr-1, 3.16 yr-1 and 4.123, respectively. The exponent b of the lengthweight relationship was 2.4 and exploitation level ( E) was 0.72. The high mortality, low condition indices and negative allometric of P. viridis in Marudu Bay is caused by a lack of suitable food in the surrounding water.

  6. Genotoxicity of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) to the green mussel (Perna viridis).

    PubMed

    Liu, Changhui; Chang, Victor W C; Gin, Karina Y H; Nguyen, Viet Tung

    2014-07-15

    Concerns regarding perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) have grown significantly in recent years. However, regulations and guidelines regarding the emission and treatment of PFCs are still missing in most parts of the world, mostly due to the lack of PFC toxicity data. In the current study, the genotoxic effects of four common PFCs, named perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluoroocanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) were investigated on marine mussels. The effects of exposure time and concentration on the toxic behavior of the compounds were also examined. Genotoxicity of PFCs was assessed in biomarker assays, showing that exposure to the target compounds could damage the organism's genetic material to varying extents, including DNA strand breaks and fragmentation, chromosomal breaks and apoptosis. The adverse effects increased with both exposure concentration and time and were related with the organism burden of PFCs. The integrated biomarker response analysis demonstrated that PFOS exhibited a higher genotoxicity than the other tested compounds. The EC50 values and confidence intervals based on integrative genotoxicity were 33 (29-37), 594 (341-1036), 195 (144-265) and 78 (73-84) μg/L for PFOS, PFOA, PFNA and PFDA respectively, classifying PFOS as a highly genotoxic compound. Although primary DNA damage was shown to be recoverable after exposure ceased, permanent genetic damage caused by elevated PFC concentrations was not restored. This is the first ecotoxicity study of PFCs that focuses on the genotoxic effects of the compounds, clearly indicating the genotoxicity of the tested PFCs and demonstrating that functional groups have a major impact on the compounds' genotoxic behavior.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Taxonomy of potentially hazardous asteroids (Perna+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, D.; Dotto, E.; Ieva, S.; Barucci, M. A.; Bernardi, F.; Fornasier, S.; de Luise, F.; Perozzi, E.; Rossi, A.; Epifani, E. M.; Micheli, M.; Deshapriya, J. D. P.

    2016-07-01

    Observations of 14 Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) were carried out at the 3.6-m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, La Palma, Spain), the ESO 3.6-m New Technology Telescope (NTT, La Silla, Chile), and the NASA 3.0-m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF, Mauna Kea, USA). The observational circumstances, as well as the instrumentation used are given in Table1. According to the population model by Mainzer et al. (2012ApJ...752..110M), ~4700+/-1450 PHAs are expected to exist. To further investigate the PHA population as a whole, and in particular to verify how the different taxonomic types are distributed with respect to other physical and dynamical properties, we combined our results with the available literature. We started retrieving the European Asteroid Research Node (EARN; http://earn.dlr.de/; retrieved on 2015 April 28) database of Near-Earth Object (NEO) physical properties, selecting those 255 Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) with published taxonomic classifications. Of our 14 targets, 7 are classified in the present work for the first time, for a total sample of 262 targets to be considered in our analysis (see Table4). The results for our remaining seven targets are in agreement with the literature. (2 data files).

  8. Evaluating Complementary Therapies for Canine Osteoarthritis Part I: Green-lipped Mussel (Perna canaliculus)

    PubMed Central

    Tulamo, Riitta-Mari; Salonen, Hanna; Raekallio, Marja

    2009-01-01

    A green-lipped mussel (GLM) preparation was evaluated in a randomized, double-controlled and double-blinded clinical trial. It was hypothesized that the treatment effect would be less than that of the positive control (carprofen) but more than that of the negative control (placebo). Forty-five dogs with chronic pain and a radiographic diagnosis of osteoarthritis that were randomly allocated into one of three groups completed the study. All dogs were fed the test products or placebo for 8 weeks. The dogs were evaluated four times, at 4-week intervals. Six different variables were assessed: veterinary-assessed mobility index, two force plate variables, owner-evaluated chronic pain index and pain as well as locomotion visual analogue scales (VASs). Intake of extra carprofen was also evaluated. A chi-squared and a Mann–Whitney test were used to determine significance between groups. When changed to dichotomous variables, there were more dogs in the GLM than in the placebo group that improved, according to veterinary-assessed mobility, owner-evaluated chronic pain index and pain VAS (P = 0.031, P = 0.025, P = 0.011, respectively). For the same three, the odds ratio and their confidence interval were over one. The extent of improvement was significantly different between the GLM and the control in veterinary-assessed mobility (P = 0.012) and pain VAS (P = 0.004). In conclusion, GLM alleviated chronic orthopedic pain in dogs although it was not as effective as carprofen. As no side-effects were detected, GLM may be beneficial in dogs e.g. when non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cannot be used. PMID:18955269

  9. Fauna Europaea: Mollusca - Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Mollusca-Bivalvia, data from 5 families (Margaritiferidae, Unionidae, Sphaeriidae, Cyrenidae, Dreissenidae) containing 55 species are included in this paper. European freshwater bivalves belong to the Orders Unionoida and Cardiida. All the European unionoids are included in the superfamily Unionoidea, the freshwater mussels or naiads. The European cardiids belong to the following three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Cyrenoidea and Dreissenoidea. Among the Unionoidea there are the most imperilled animal groups on the planet while the Cardioidea includes the cosmopolitan genus Pisidium, the Cyrenoidea the Asiatic clam (Corbiculafluminea) and the Dreissenoidea the famous invasive zebra mussel (Dreissenapolymorpha). Basic information is summarized on their taxonomy and biology. Tabulations include a complete list of the current estimated families, genera and species.

  10. Prevalence and biofilm-forming ability of Listeria monocytogenes in New Zealand mussel (Perna canaliculus) processing plants.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Cristina D; Fletcher, Graham C

    2011-10-01

    Greenshell™ mussels are New Zealand's largest seafood export species. Some export markets require compliance with 'zero' tolerance legislation for Listeria monocytogenes in 25 g of product. Even though individually quick frozen (IQF) mussel products are labeled 'to be cooked', and are not classified as ready-to-eat, some markets still require them to comply with the strict policy. Three mussel processing plants were assessed for the pattern of L. monocytogenes contamination on raw material, environment, food contact surfaces, and in the final product. Cultures (n = 101) obtained from an industrial Listeria monitoring program from August 2007 to June 2009 were characterized by serotyping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Using the crystal violet method, isolates were assessed for their ability to form biofilms. This work confirmed the presence of L. monocytogenes in raw and processed product, and the importance of cross-contamination from external and internal environments. Processing plants had L. monocytogenes pulsotypes that were detected more than once over 6 months. No correlation was found between biofilm-forming ability and persistent isolates. Two pulsotypes (including a persistent one), were previously isolated in human cases of listeriosis in New Zealand, but none of the pulsotypes matched those involved in international outbreaks.

  11. Fauna Europaea: Mollusca – Bivalvia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Mollusca-Bivalvia, data from 5 families (Margaritiferidae, Unionidae, Sphaeriidae, Cyrenidae, Dreissenidae) containing 55 species are included in this paper. European freshwater bivalves belong to the Orders Unionoida and Cardiida. All the European unionoids are included in the superfamily Unionoidea, the freshwater mussels or naiads. The European cardiids belong to the following three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Cyrenoidea and Dreissenoidea. Among the Unionoidea there are the most imperilled animal groups on the planet while the Cardioidea includes the cosmopolitan genus Pisidium, the Cyrenoidea the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) and the Dreissenoidea the famous invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). Basic information is summarized on their taxonomy and biology. Tabulations include a complete list of the current estimated families, genera and species. PMID:26311403

  12. Preparation of gluten free bread enriched with green mussel (Perna canaliculus) protein hydrolysates and characterization of peptides responsible for mussel flavour.

    PubMed

    Vijaykrishnaraj, M; Roopa, B S; Prabhasankar, P

    2016-11-15

    Green mussel protein hydrolysates (GMPH) utilization for the enrichment of gluten-free bread followed by characterization of flavour peptides using chromatography and electronic nose techniques have been done. The degree of hydrolysis was carried out in each protease digest, and the higher degree of hydrolysis was observed in pepsin digestion. Gluten-free (GF) bread was formulated by using buckwheat flour (BWF), rice flour (RF) and chickpea flour (CPF) (70:20:10) and GMPH were added in the range of 0-20% in the GF bread for enrichment with GMPH. Radar plot of the electronic nose analysis showed that the sensors P30/2, T30/1 and T70/2 had a higher response to the GF bread and GMPH. Consequently, the peptide sequence was obtained manually by ESI-MS spectra of GMPH (KGYSSYICDK) and F-II (SSYCIVKICDK). Flavour quality was 97% discriminately comparable to the GMPH and F-II fractions. Mussel flavoured GF bread can be included in the celiac diet.

  13. Toxicity and Traces of Hg, Pb and Cd in the Hepatopancreas, Gills and Muscles of Perna viridis from Jakarta Bay, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Irnidayanti, Y

    2015-02-01

    Heavy metals contamination on the coast of Jakarta Bay has led to the level of pollution and can cause toxicity to organisms living in the sea, i.e., green mussels. Green mussels have the ability to detoxify metals entering their bodies. Their ability to accumulate metals is higher than other aquatic animals. This is due to their sedentary life which prevents them from avoiding the effects of pollution and their high tolerance to certain metals. The high concentration of metal content would be toxic to the cell because metal ions can act as oxidants and bind to organic and protein molecules. The results of the study showed that traces of heavy metals were detected in the hepatopancreas, gills, muscles and gonads organs of the mussels living in the waters of Muara Angke. Lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) were found in all four organs, while mercury (Hg) was not detected in the muscles. Traces of Hg and Cd were not detected in hepatopancreas, gills, muscles and gonads of green mussels in Panimbang, while Pb was detected by 0.00 1 in the male gonads and 0.01 in hepatopancreas. The concentration of Pb in the male gonads are still below the acceptable limit and concentration of Pb in the hepatopancreas is relatively equivalent to the acceptable limit. Metal detection in the organs above shows that the Muara Angke waters tend to be polluted and have an impact on the mussels weight loss as a result of heavy metal toxicity.

  14. Gas chromatography-chemical ionization-mass spectrometric fatty acid analysis of a commercial supercritical carbon dioxide lipid extract from New Zealand green-lipped mussel (Perna canaliculus).

    PubMed

    Wolyniak, Christopher J; Brenna, J Thomas; Murphy, Karen J; Sinclair, Andrew J

    2005-04-01

    Supercritical fluid extracts of New Zealand green-lipped mussels (NZGLM) have been suggested to have therapeutic properties related to their oil components. The large number of minor FA in NZGLM extract was characterized by a GC-CIMS/MS method that excels at identification of double-bond positions in FAME. The extract contained five major lipid classes: sterol esters, TAG, FFA, sterols, and polar lipids. The total FA content of the lipid extract was 0.664 g/mL. Fifty-three unsaturated FA (UFA) were fully identified, of which 37 were PUFA, and a further 21 UFA were detected for which concentrations were too low for assignment of double-bond positions. There were 17 saturated FA, with 14:0, 16:0, and 18:0 present in the greatest concentration. The 10 n-3 PUFA detected included 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3, the two main n-3 FA; n-3 PUFA at low concentrations were 18:3, 18:4, 20:3, 20:4, 21:5, 22:5, 24:6, and 28:8. There were 43 UFA from the n-4, n-5, n-6, n-7, n-8, n-9, n-10, n-1 families, with 16:2n-4, 16:1n-5, 18:1n-5, 18:2n-6, 20:4n-6, 16:1n-7, 20:1n-7, 16:1n-9, 18:1 n-9, and 20:1 n-9 being the most abundant. In general, we estimated that FAME concentrations greater than 0.05% (w/w) were sufficient to assign double-bond positions. In total, 91 FA were detected in an extract of the NZGLM, whereas previous studies of fresh flesh from the NZGLM had reported identification of 42 FA. These data demonstrate a remarkable diversity of NZGLM FA.

  15. Potential for Introduction of Invasive Species into Louisiana from Illinois River Dredged Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), Asian oyster (Crassostrea ariakensis), Chinese mitten crab (Eriochirus sinensis), and green crab (Carcinus maenas...Crustaceans Eriocheir sinensis Chinese mitten crab * Mollusks Perna perna Brown (Mexihalo) mussel* Mollusks Perna viridis ( Asian ) green mussel...tinca), Asian clam, zebra mussel, yellow iris (Iris pseudacorus), dotted duckweed (Landoltia punctata), purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria

  16. Mitogenomics reveals two subspecies in Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Meng, Xueping; Shen, Xin; Zhao, Nana; Tian, Mei; Liang, Meng; Hao, Jue; Cheng, Hanliang; Yan, Binlun; Dong, Zhiguo; Zhu, Xiaoling

    2013-04-01

    The mitochondrial genome sequence of Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in Zhangzhou (zz-mtDNA) was fully sequenced and compared with that in Rizhao (rz-mtDNA) in this study. A tRNA (tRNA (Met) ) located between tRNA (Ala) and cox1 genes was identified in zz-mtDNA but not in rz-mtDNA. The largest non-coding region (NCR; MNR) contained 11 copies 99nt tandem repeat sequences exclusively in rz-mtDNA, while the second largest NCR with 400 bp between tRNA (Ala) and tRNA (Met) in zz-mtDNA was absent in rz-mtDNA. Secondary structures of ZZ and RZ C. antiquata rRNAs are significantly different. The mitochondrial genomic characteristics clearly indicate that there are at least two subspecies in C. antiquata.

  17. [Taxonomic diversity of parasites in agnathans and fishes from the Volga River basin. VI. Acanthocephala, Hirudinea and Bivalvia].

    PubMed

    Molodozhnikova, N M; Zhokhov, A E

    2008-01-01

    The checklist of Acanthocephala, Hirudinea, and Bivalvia parasitizing agnathans and fishes in the Volga River basin is presented. Hosts and areas of distribution are indicated for each parasites species. The checklist includes 10 species of acanthocephalans, 7 species of leeches, and 9 species of Bivalvia (at the glochidium stage) from 45 fish species. None of the given parasite species is alien for the Volga River basin.

  18. A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach.

    PubMed

    González, Vanessa L; Andrade, Sónia C S; Bieler, Rüdiger; Collins, Timothy M; Dunn, Casey W; Mikkelsen, Paula M; Taylor, John D; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-02-22

    Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000-20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model for testing macroevolutionary theories, is lacking. Here, we present the first phylogenomic approach for this important group of molluscs, including novel transcriptomic data for 31 bivalves obtained through an RNA-seq approach, and analyse these data with published genomes and transcriptomes of other bivalves plus outgroups. Our results provide a well-resolved, robust phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia with all major lineages delineated, addressing long-standing questions about the monophyly of Protobranchia and Heterodonta, and resolving the position of particular groups such as Palaeoheterodonta, Archiheterodonta and Anomalodesmata. This now fully resolved backbone demonstrates that genomic approaches using hundreds of genes are feasible for resolving phylogenetic questions in bivalves and other animals.

  19. [Growth and survival of the green mussel P. viridis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) in bottom culture conditions in Turpialito, Golfo de Cariaco, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Acosta, Vanessa; Montes, Marbelis; Cortez, Roraysi; Guevara, Miguel; Lodeiros, César

    2012-12-01

    Mussels represent one of the most important mollusk species for culture activities around the world, and their growth may depend on the culture system used and locality. In this study, we evaluated the growth of Perna viridis in bottom culture to test its performance when using natural food, and to decide its use as a culture species in the Gulf of Cariaco. For this, mussel seeds (35.81 +/- 1.41 mm in length) were obtained in the locality of Guaca (North coast of Sucre state) and transferred to the Hydrobiological Station of Turpialito, Gulf of Cariaco, Sucre state, Venezuela, where they were planted in "Spanish baskets" to evaluate their growth between July 2007 and February 2008. Monthly survival was determined and the maximum shell length, dry mass of muscle and remains tissues of the gonad. The environmental parameters (water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a, total seston and organic fraction), in the cultivation area were determined every 15 days. Monthly measurements were made of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates to seston. During the entire study the mussels showed continued growth, ultimately reaching a maximum length of 78.7 +/- 4.43 mm. However, the growth rate of the dry mass of somatic (muscle, other tissue) and reproductive tissues showed variability throughout the study, and observed a significant increase by the end of the experiment. The observed variations in the growth rate of the reproductive tissue mass depended on the reserves accumulated and food offered by the environment. The organic seston throughout the experience showed an independence of temperature and chlorophyll a values; this one maintained values above 1 mg/L, thus forming the main food resource for mussels. The high content of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates observed in the seston at the end of the study, might be mainly associated with coastal upwelling, which provides a great food contribution of phytoplankton and organic type. The high survival rate

  20. First report of Perkinsus beihaiensis in wild clams Anomalocardia brasiliana (Bivalvia: Veneridae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinho Ferreira, Liana; Sabry, Rachel Costa; da Silva, Patrícia Mirella; Gesteira, Tereza Cristina Vasconcelos; de Souza Romão, Lidiane; Paz, Marcela Pinheiro; Feijó, Rubens Galdino; Neto, Maximiano Pinheiro Dantas; Maggioni, Rodrigo

    2015-03-01

    This is the first report of Perkinsus sp. (Bivalvia: Veneridae) infecting wild clams of the species Anomalocardia brasiliana in Brazil. The gill lamellae and rectum of 150 specimens of A. brasiliana collected in the Timonha river estuary (Ceará, Northeastern Brazil) in March 2012 were incubated in Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM) for detection of Perkinsus sp. In RFTM, the prevalence of Perkinsus sp. was 14.7% (22/150) and the intensity of infection ranged from very light (1-10 cells across the slide) to light (12-100 cells). The presence of Perkinsus sp. was confirmed by PCR in seven (31.8%) out of 22 RFTM-positive specimens. DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of the genus Perkinsus and the phylogenetic analysis strongly indicated Perkinsus beihaiensis as the species responsible for the infection.

  1. Spermatozoa and spermatogenesis in the northern quahaug Mercenaria mercenaria (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xue-Ping; Yang, Wan-Xi; Dahms, Hans-U.; Lin, Zhihua; Chai, Xueliang

    2008-12-01

    We studied the ultrastructure of spermatogenesis and spermatozoa in the northern quahaug, the clam Mercenaria mercenaria. Spermatogenetic cells gradually elongate. Mitochondria gradually fuse and increase in size and electron density. During spermatid differentiation, proacrosomal vesicles migrate towards the presumptive anterior pole of the nucleus and eventually form the acrosome. The spermatozoon of M. mercenaria is of a primitive type. It is composed of head, mid-piece, and tail. The acrosome shows a subacrosomal space with a short conical contour. The slightly curved nucleus of the spermatozoon contains fine-grained dense chromatin. The middle piece consists of a centriolar complex which is surrounded by four mitochondria. The flagellum has a standard “9 + 2” microtubular structure. The ultrastructure of spermatozoa and spermatogenesis of M. mercenaria shares a number of features with other species of the family Veneridae. M. mercenaria may be a suitable model species for further investigations into the mechanisms of spermatogenesis in the Bivalvia.

  2. Structure and meiotic behaviour of B chromosomes in Sphaerium corneum/S. nucleus complex (Bivalvia: Sphaeriidae).

    PubMed

    Kořínková, Tereza; Král, Jiří

    2011-02-01

    Karyotypes of eight populations of Sphaerium corneum and two populations of S. nucleus (Bivalvia: Sphaeriidae) from central Europe were compared. The basic set of these hermaphroditic molluscs is formed by 30 biarmed autosomes and exhibits only slight interpopulational variation in morphology. These differences are not species-specific. One pair of nucleolar organiser regions was detected by silver staining. The prophase and metaphase of the first meiotic division is highly modified in both species. Pachytene is followed by a diffuse stage, characterized by decondensation of chromosomes and by enhanced metabolic activity. The diffuse stage has not been reported in bivalves so far. Bivalents of the following stages are achiasmatic both in the testicular and ovarian part of the gonad. The two species are further peculiar for occurrence of B chromosomes, which is a rare phenomenon in organisms with achiasmatic meiotic systems. The small metacentric B chromosomes exhibit intra- and interindividual variability in number, they show irregular meiotic pairing and segregation (formation of bivalents or univalents), and possess larger proportional amount of constitutive heterochromatin than the A chromosomes. Interestingly, the B chromosomes also undergo decondensation during the diffuse stage like A chromosomes which may indicate their transcriptional activity.

  3. Molecular phylogenetics in 2D: ITS2 rRNA evolution and sequence-structure barcode from Veneridae to Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Daniele; Mariottini, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed the nuclear ITS2 rRNA primary sequence and secondary structure in Veneridae and comparatively with 20 Bivalvia taxa to test the phylogenetic resolution of this marker and its suitability for molecular diagnosis at different taxonomic levels. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian trees based on primary sequences were congruent with (profile-) neighbor-joining trees based on a combined model of sequence-structure evolution. ITS2 showed higher resolution below the subfamily level, providing a phylogenetic signal comparable to (mitochondrial/nuclear) gene fragments 2-5 times longer. Structural elements of the ITS2 folding, such as specific mismatch pairing and compensatory base changes, provided further support for the monophyly of some groups and for their phylogenetic relationships. Veneridae ITS2 folding is structured in six domains (DI-VI) and shows five striking sequence-structure features. Two of them, the Basal and Apical STEMs, are common to Bivalvia, while the presence of both the Branched STEM and the Y/R stretches occurs in five superfamilies of the two Heterodonta orders Myoida and Veneroida, thus questioning their reciprocal monophyly. Our results validated the ITS2 as a suitable marker for venerids phylogenetics and taxonomy, and underlined the significance of including secondary structure information for both applications at several systematic levels within bivalves.

  4. Vesicomyinae (Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae) of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and adjacent abyssal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylova, Elena M.; Kamenev, Gennady M.; Vladychenskaya, Irina P.; Petrov, Nikolai B.

    2015-01-01

    Representatives of the subfamily Vesicomyinae (Bivalvia, Vesicomyidae) are tiny deep-sea molluscs distributed worldwide and reaching huge abundances of hundreds and thousands of specimens in trawl catches. During the German-Russian deep-sea expedition KuramBio (R/V Sonne, 2012) for the first time two vesicomyin species were collected from the abyssal plain adjacent to the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench from the depths of 4861-5787 m, Vesicomya pacifica (Smith, 1885) and "Vesicomya" filatovae sp.n. Two species of vesicomyins, V. sergeeviFilatova, 1971 and V. profundiFilatova, 1971, which were previously reported from the hadal of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench, were not collected at the abyssal depth despite of the close geographical proximity of the sampling area to their distribution ranges. Altogether nine species of vesicomyins are recorded now from the West and Indo-West Pacific; data on distribution and morpho-anatomical characters of these species are provided. Taxonomic description of V. pacifica is revised including information on its soft part anatomy, new localities and COI sequences. For the first time for a vesicomyin bivalve molecular data is given for a species with an explicit morphological description and unambiguous taxonomic affiliation. Molecular analysis of 160 published COI sequences of vesicomyids and newly obtained molecular data on V. pacifica showed that V. pacifica and two undescribed vesicomyin species forming a monophyletic clade which exhibits sister relationships with the Pliocardiinae, the group of chemosymbiotic vesicomyids. "Vesicomya" filatovae sp.n. is provisionally assigned to the genus Vesicomya (s.l.) until additional morphological and molecular data are obtained. It differs from Vesicomya s.s. by a broader hinge margin with more radiating teeth and the presence of only one pair of demibranchs.

  5. Unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masteller, E.C.; Maleski, K.R.; Schloesser, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine species composition and relative abundance of unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) in Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania 1990-1992. This information was compared with data from the only other extensive survey of unionids in the bay conducted in 1909-1911 (Ortmann 1919) to assess changes over the 80 years preceding the present study. A total of 1,540 individuals representing 18 species were collected in 1990-1992. Five relatively common species (between 7 and 42% of total individuals), six uncommon species (2 and 6%), and seven rare species (<1%) were found. The rare species were Anodontoides ferussacianus, Lasmigona costata, Ligumia recta, Ptychobranchus fasciolaris, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa, Strophitus undaulatus, and Truncilla donaciformis. Five of the species found in Presque Isle Bay (Leptodea fragilis, Ligumia nasuta, Potamilus alatus, Quadrula quadrula, and Truncilla donaciformis) are listed as critically imperiled and one species (Truncilla truncata) as extirpated in the State of Pennsylvania by the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. Comparisons between unionid populations in 1909-1911 and 1990-1992 indicate few substantial changes occurred during the past 80 years. A total of 22 species were found; 21 in 1909-1911 and 18 in 1990-1992. Seventeen species were found in both studies, an additional four in 1909-1911 and one in 1990-1992. The relative abundance of 11 of the 17 species found in both studies remained stable (i.e., common or uncommon) over the past 80 years. Only four species listed as uncommon in 1909-1911 were listed as rare in 1990-1992. However, the invasion of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) is considered a threat to the continued existence of the entire Unionidae fauna in Presque Isle Bay, a unique habitat of the Great Lakes.

  6. Comparative mitogenomic analysis reveals cryptic species: A case study in Mactridae (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin; Meng, Xue Ping; Chu, Ka Hou; Zhao, Na Na; Tian, Mei; Liang, Meng; Hao, Jue

    2014-12-01

    The Chinese surf clam Mactra chinensis Philippi, 1846 is a commercially important marine bivalve belonging to the family Mactridae (Mollusca: Bivalvia). In this study, the M. chinensis mitochondrial genomic features are analyzed. The genome has 34 genes on the same strand, lacking atp8 and both trnS (trnS1 and trnS2) as compared with the typical gene content of metazoan mitochondrial genomes. The A+T content of M. chinensis mitochondrial genome is 63.72%, which is slightly lower than that of M. veneriformis (67.59%) and Coelomactra antiquata (64.33% and 64.14% for the samples from Ri Zhao, Shandong Province, and Zhang Zhou, Fujian Province, China, respectively) in the same family. There are 22 NCRs in the M. chinensis mitochondrial genome, accounting for 12.91% of the genome length. The longest NCR (1,075bp in length) is located between trnT and trnQ. A TRS (127bp×8.15) accounts for 96.3% (1,035/1,075) of this NCR. The occurrence of TRS in NCR is shared by the two Mactra mitochondrial genomes, but is not found in the two Coelomactra mitochondrial genomes. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on 12 PCGs of 25 bivalve mitochondrial genomes shows that all seven genera (Mactra, Coelomactra, Paphia, Meretrix, Solen, Mytilus, and Crassostrea) constitute monophyletic groups with very high support values. Pairwise genetic distance analyses indicate that the genetic distance of C. antiquata from the two localities is 0.084, which is greater than values between congeneric species, such as those in Mactra, Mytilus, Meretrix, and Crassostrea. The results show that the C. antiquata from the two localities represent cryptic species.

  7. Factors driving changes in freshwater mussel (Bivalvia, Unionida) diversity and distribution in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zieritz, Alexandra; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Bogan, Arthur E; Sousa, Ronaldo; Walton, Samuel; Rahim, Khairul Adha A; Wilson, John-James; Ng, Pei-Yin; Froufe, Elsa; McGowan, Suzanne

    2016-11-15

    Freshwater mussels (Bivalvia, Unionida) fulfil important ecosystem functions and are one of the most threatened freshwater taxa globally. Knowledge of freshwater mussel diversity, distribution and ecology in Peninsular Malaysia is extremely poor, and the conservation status of half of the species presumed to occur in the region has yet to be assessed. We conducted the first comprehensive assessment of Peninsular Malaysia's freshwater mussels based on species presence/absence and environmental data collected from 155 sites spanning all major river catchments and diverse habitat types. Through an integrative morphological-molecular approach we recognised nine native and one widespread non-native species, i.e. Sinanodonta woodiana. Two species, i.e. Pilsbryoconcha compressa and Pseudodon cambodjensis, had not been previously recorded from Malaysia, which is likely a result of morphological misidentifications of historical records. Due to their restriction to single river catchments and declining distributions, Hyriopsis bialata, possibly endemic to Peninsular Malaysia, Ensidens ingallsianus, possibly already extinct in the peninsula, and Rectidens sumatrensis, particularly require conservation attention. Equally, the Pahang, the Perak and the north-western river catchments are of particular conservation value due to the presence of a globally unique freshwater mussel fauna. Statistical relationships of 15 water quality parameters and mussel presence/absence identified acidification and nutrient pollution (eutrophication) as the most important anthropogenic factors threatening freshwater mussel diversity in Peninsular Malaysia. These factors can be linked to atmospheric pollution, deforestation, oil-palm plantations and a lack of functioning waste water treatment, and could be mitigated by establishing riparian buffers and improving waste water treatment for rivers running through agricultural and residential land.

  8. About Face

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jeff Goodrich US Army 1984 - 2006 Afghanistan, Canada, Germany, Iraq, Macedonia, USA Tap for Video Vince Bryant ... M. Perna US Army 1942 - 1945 Belgium, France, Germany, North Africa, Omaha Beach, Sicily Tap for Video ...

  9. Molecular phylogeny of Pholadoidea Lamarck, 1809 supports a single origin for xylotrophy (wood feeding) and xylotrophic bacterial endosymbiosis in Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Distel, Daniel L; Amin, Mehwish; Burgoyne, Adam; Linton, Eric; Mamangkey, Gustaf; Morrill, Wendy; Nove, John; Wood, Nicole; Yang, Joyce

    2011-11-01

    The ability to consume wood as food (xylotrophy) is unusual among animals. In terrestrial environments, termites and other xylotrophic insects are the principle wood consumers while in marine environments wood-boring bivalves fulfill this role. However, the evolutionary origin of wood feeding in bivalves has remained largely unexplored. Here we provide data indicating that xylotrophy has arisen just once in Bivalvia in a single wood-feeding bivalve lineage that subsequently diversified into distinct shallow- and deep-water branches, both of which have been broadly successful in colonizing the world's oceans. These data also suggest that the appearance of this remarkable life habit was approximately coincident with the acquisition of bacterial endosymbionts. Here we generate a robust phylogeny for xylotrophic bivalves and related species based on sequences of small and large subunit nuclear rRNA genes. We then trace the distribution among the modern taxa of morphological characters and character states associated with xylotrophy and xylotrepesis (wood-boring) and use a parsimony-based method to infer their ancestral states. Based on these ancestral state reconstructions we propose a set of plausible hypotheses describing the evolution of symbiotic xylotrophy in Bivalvia. Within this context, we reinterpret one of the most remarkable progressions in bivalve evolution, the transformation of the "typical" myoid body plan to create a unique lineage of worm-like, tube-forming, wood-feeding clams. The well-supported phylogeny presented here is inconsistent with most taxonomic treatments for xylotrophic bivalves, indicating that the bivalve family Pholadidae and the subfamilies Teredininae and Bankiinae of the family Teredinidae are non-monophyletic, and that the principle traits used for their taxonomic diagnosis are phylogenetically misleading.

  10. Gastropoda-Bivalvia Fauna And Neogene-Quaternary Stratigraphy of the Southwest of Dardanelles (Çanakkale-NWAnatolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapan, Sevinç; Kabasakal, Sinem

    2016-04-01

    Gastropoda-Bivalvia Fauna And Neogene-Quaternary Stratigraphy of the Southwest of Dardanelles (Çanakkale-NWAnatolia) Sevinç KAPAN, Sinem KABASAKAL, Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Engineering Faculty, Geological Engineering Department sevinckapan_yesilyurt@hotmail.com In this study, paleontology and stratigraphy of Neogene and Quaternary units around south of the Dardanelles have been examined using Gastropoda and Bivalvia fauna. In the investigation area, the base of the sediments that belongs to Neogene, consist of the volcanics which are formed with basalts, andesites and tuff. Neogene begins unconformity with basal conglomerate which are formed with basalt and tuff gravels. The measurable thickness of the Neogene sediments is approximately 200meters in total. First fossiliferius level which consist of Lymnocardium (Euxinicardium) nobile Sabba has showed similarities with the Pontian (Late Miocene) fauna of the Eastern Paratethys. The existence of Melanopsis and Psidium species indicate that the basin has been brackish water feeding by fresh water in the Early Pliocene. Theodoxus fluviatilis (Linne), Theodoxus (Calvertia) aff. imbricata Brusina, Theodoxus (Calvertia) licherdopoli scriptus (Stefanescu), Viviparus mammatus (Stefanescu), Valvata (Valavata) sulekiana Brusina, Valvata (Cincinna) crusitensis Fontannes, Hydrobia cf grandis Cobalcescu, Hydrobia ventrosa Monfort, Melanopsis (Melanopsis) cf. bergeroni Stefanescu, , Melanopsis (Melanopsis) sandbergeri rumana Tournouer, Melanopsis (Canthidomus) hybostoma anili Taner, Melanopsis (Canthidomus) hybostoma amaradica Fontannes, Melanopsis (Canthidomus) lanceolata Neumayr, Amphimelania fossariformis (Tournouer), Melanoides tuberculata monolithica (Bukowski), Radix (Radix) peregra (Müller), Planorbarius thiollierei (Michaud), Potamida (Potamida) craiovensis craiovensis (Tournouer), Potamida (Potamida) berbestiensis (Fontannes), Unio pristinus davilai Porumbaru, Unio subexquisitus Jatzko, Anadonta zmaji

  11. Molecular phylogenetic analysis supports a Gondwanan origin of the Hyriidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionida) and the paraphyly of Australasian taxa.

    PubMed

    Graf, Daniel L; Jones, Hugh; Geneva, Anthony J; Pfeiffer, John M; Klunzinger, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    The freshwater mussel family Hyriidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionida) has a disjunct trans-Pacific distribution in Australasia and South America. Previous phylogenetic analyses have estimated the evolutionary relationships of the family and the major infra-familial taxa (Velesunioninae and Hyriinae: Hyridellini in Australia; Hyriinae: Hyriini, Castaliini, and Rhipidodontini in South America), but taxon and character sampling have been too incomplete to support a predictive classification or allow testing of biogeographical hypotheses. We sampled 30 freshwater mussel individuals representing the aforementioned hyriid taxa, as well as outgroup species representing the five other freshwater mussel families and their marine sister group (order Trigoniida). Our ingroup included representatives of all Australian genera. Phylogenetic relationships were estimated from three gene fragments (nuclear 28S, COI and 16S mtDNA) using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference, and we applied a Bayesian relaxed clock model calibrated with fossil dates to estimate node ages. Our analyses found good support for monophyly of the Hyriidae and the subfamilies and tribes, as well as the paraphyly of the Australasian taxa (Velesunioninae, (Hyridellini, (Rhipidodontini, (Castaliini, Hyriini)))). The Hyriidae was recovered as sister to a clade comprised of all other Recent freshwater mussel families. Our molecular date estimation supported Cretaceous origins of the major hyriid clades, pre-dating the Tertiary isolation of South America from Antarctica/Australia. We hypothesize that early diversification of the Hyriidae was driven by terrestrial barriers on Gondwana rather than marine barriers following disintegration of the super-continent.

  12. Sequence motifs associated with paternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA in the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus (Bivalvia: Mytilidae).

    PubMed

    Robicheau, Brent M; Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2017-03-20

    In the majority of metazoans paternal mitochondria represent evolutionary dead-ends. In many bivalves, however, this paradigm does not hold true; both maternal and paternal mitochondria are inherited. Herein, we characterize maternal and paternal mitochondrial control regions of the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus (Bivalvia: Mytilidae). The maternal control region is 808bp long, while the paternal control region is longer at 2.3kb. We hypothesize that the size difference is due to a combination of repeated duplications within the control region of the paternal mtDNA genome, as well as an evolutionarily ancient recombination event between two sex-associated mtDNA genomes that led to the insertion of a second control region sequence in the genome that is now transmitted via males. In a comparison to other mytilid male control regions, we identified two evolutionarily Conserved Motifs, CMA and CMB, associated with paternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA. CMA is characterized by a conserved purine/pyrimidine pattern, while CMB exhibits a specific 13bp nucleotide string within a stem and loop structure. The identification of motifs CMA and CMB in M. modiolus extends our understanding of Sperm Transmission Elements (STEs) that have recently been identified as being associated with the paternal transmission of mitochondria in marine bivalves.

  13. Presence and histopathological effects of the Parvatrema sp. (Digenea, Gymnophallidae) in the stout razor clam Tagelus plebeius (Bivalvia, Psammobiidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Cremonte, Florencia; Sabry, Rachel Costa; Rosa, Rafael Diego; Cantelli, Liege; Barracco, Margherita Anna

    2009-09-01

    The stout razor clam Tagelus plebeius (Bivalvia, Psammobiidae) has a wide geographic distribution range, including the Brazilian coasts from the northeast (Alagoas) to the south (Santa Catarina). In March 2008, an episode of mass T. plebeius mortality (70%) occurred in an intertidal bed at The Pontal da Daniela, State of Santa Catarina, Brazil. We report here high prevalences (to 100%) of the trematode parasite Parvatrema sp. Cable, 1953 (Digenea, Gymnophallidae) infecting T. plebeius at high intensities. We describe the gymnophalid, echinostomatid and unidentified metacercariae parasites infecting the clam and the host reactions elicited by them. The use of special diagnostic techniques such as Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM) and PCR assays to detect Perkinsus sp. pathogens, hemolymph cytology, and histopathological examinations did not show Perkinsus sp. infections, microcell infections, or neoplastic conditions. However, neither infections or pathology caused by trematode parasites; nor any other pathological condition could be uniquely correlated with the mortality event. A coincident flash flood might have contributed to cause the mortality episode. This is the first report of the Parvatrema sp. metacercariae larvae infecting the stout razor clam T. plebeius from Brazil.

  14. Thermal dependency of shell growth, microstructure, and stable isotopes in laboratory-reared Scapharca broughtonii (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kozue; Suzuki, Atsushi; Isono, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Yuzo; Irie, Takahiro; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Mori, Chiharu; Sato, Mizuho; Sato, Kei; Sasaki, Takenori

    2015-07-01

    We experimentally examined the growth, microstructure, and chemistry of shells of the bloody clam, Scapharca broughtonii (Mollusca: Bivalvia), reared at five temperatures (13, 17, 21, 25, and 29°C) with a constant pCO2 condition (˜450 μatm). In this species, the exterior side of the shell is characterized by a composite prismatic structure; on the interior side, it has a crossed lamellar structure on the interior surface. We previously found a negative correlation between temperature and the relative thickness of the composite prismatic structure in field-collected specimens. In the reared specimens, the relationship curve between temperature and the growth increment of the composite prismatic structure was humped shaped, with a maximum at 17°C, which was compatible with the results obtained in the field-collected specimens. In contrast, the thickness of the crossed lamellar structure was constant over the temperature range tested. These results suggest that the composite prismatic structure principally accounts for the thermal dependency of shell growth, and this inference was supported by the finding that shell growth rates were significantly correlated with the thickness of the composite prismatic structure. We also found a negative relationship between the rearing temperature and δ18O of the shell margin, in close quantitative agreement with previous reports. The findings presented here will contribute to the improved age determination of fossil and recent clams based on seasonal microstructural records.

  15. The influence of fish cage culture on δ13C and δ15N of filter-feeding Bivalvia (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Benedito, E; Figueroa, L; Takeda, A M; Manetta, G I

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Oreochromis niloticus cage culture promoted variations in the δ13C and δ15N in Corbicula fluminea (Mollusca; Bivalvia) and in the sediment of an aquatic food web. Samples were taken before and after net cage installation in the Rosana Reservoir (Paranapanema River, PR-SP). Samples of specimens of the bivalve filterer C. fluminea and samples of sediment were collected using a modified Petersen grab. All samples were dried in an oven (60 °C) for 72 hours, macerated to obtain homogenous fine powders and sent for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopic value analysis in a mass spectrometer. There were significant differences in the δ13C and δ15N values of the invertebrate C. fluminea between the beginning and the end of the experiment. There were no differences between the δ13C and δ15N values of sediment. These results indicate that the installation of fish cage culture promoted impacts in the isotopic composition of the aquatic food web organisms, which could exert influence over the native species and the ecosystem.

  16. Reproductive biology of blood cockle Anadara granosa (Bivalvia: Arcidae) in the northern region of the Strait of Malacca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Munawar; Yasin, Zulfigar; Hwai, Tan Shau

    2017-03-01

    A study on the reproductive cycle of the blood cockle Anadara granosa (Bivalvia: Arcidae) was conducted at three different areas in the northern region of the Strait of Malacca. A total of 1,920 samples of adult A. granosa (38-71 mm length) were collected from June 2009 until September 2010. Qualitative techniques (gonadal microscopic fresh smear test and histology analysis) as well as quantitative techniques (analysis of condition index and gonadal index) were used to predict monthly gonadal development stages of A. granosa. The gonadal index of A. granosa from Banda Aceh (Indonesia) ( r = 0.469, P > 0.05) and Pulau Pinang (Malaysia) ( r = 0.123, P > 0.05) did not show any correlation to their condition index, whereas the gonadal index of A. granosa from Lhokseumawe (Indonesia) ( r = 0.609, P < 0.05) showed moderate positive correlation to the condition index. During the 16 month sampling period, four reproductive cycles were observed: each from three to six months. The process of releasing gametes is termed dribble spawning, and is the same in all populations. The principle component analysis (PCA) indicated that A. granosa reproduction was affected by interaction between internal physiological factors and indigenous environmental factors. In all sampling areas, phytoplankton density played a key role in the reproductive cycle in A. granosa. Information on the reproductive biology of this species is essential for species management and to improve the sustainability practices of the fisheries industry. These findings will provide basic information on the biology of the blood cockle A. granosa for stock management in the region.

  17. Mitochondrial genomes and Doubly Uniparental Inheritance: new insights from Musculista senhousia sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs (Bivalvia Mytilidae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) is a fascinating exception to matrilinear inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Species with DUI are characterized by two distinct mtDNAs that are inherited either through females (F-mtDNA) or through males (M-mtDNA). DUI sex-linked mitochondrial genomes share several unusual features, such as additional protein coding genes and unusual gene duplications/structures, which have been related to the functionality of DUI. Recently, new evidence for DUI was found in the mytilid bivalve Musculista senhousia. This paper describes the complete sex-linked mitochondrial genomes of this species. Results Our analysis highlights that both M and F mtDNAs share roughly the same gene content and order, but with some remarkable differences. The Musculista sex-linked mtDNAs have differently organized putative control regions (CR), which include repeats and palindromic motifs, thought to provide sites for DNA-binding proteins involved in the transcriptional machinery. Moreover, in male mtDNA, two cox2 genes were found, one (M-cox2b) 123bp longer. Conclusions The complete mtDNA genome characterization of DUI bivalves is the first step to unravel the complex genetic signals allowing Doubly Uniparental Inheritance, and the evolutionary implications of such an unusual transmission route in mitochondrial genome evolution in Bivalvia. The observed redundancy of the palindromic motifs in Musculista M-mtDNA may have a role on the process by which sperm mtDNA becomes dominant or exclusive of the male germline of DUI species. Moreover, the duplicated M-COX2b gene may have a different, still unknown, function related to DUI, in accordance to what has been already proposed for other DUI species in which a similar cox2 extension has been hypothesized to be a tag for male mitochondria. PMID:21896183

  18. A new species of freshwater mussel (Bivalvia: Unionidae), Pleurobema athearni, from the Coosa River Drainage of Alabama, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gangloff, M.M.; Williams, J.D.; Feminella, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The Mobile Basin historically supported one of the most diverse freshwater mussel (Bivalvia: Unionidae) assemblages in North America. More than 65 species of mussels are known from the Basin, but it is difficult to determine how many species were present historically. The drainage's unique physical habitat was largely destroyed between the late 1800s and mid-1900s by impoundment and channel modifications of most of the larger rivers. Many species that were once common are now restricted to small headwater rivers and mid-sized tributaries. Recent Coosa River tributary surveys revealed a new, undescribed species of Pleurobema. This new species, Pleurobema athearni, is distinctive in outward appearance, shell morphometry and reproductive morphology, and can be distinguished from other Coosa River drainage unionids. Our analysis indicates that P. athearni is morphologically different from other similar taxa. It differs both in shell width/length and width/height ratios and thus provides a simple, quantitative means to differentiate this species from P. georgianum (Lea, 1841) Fusconaia barnesiana (Lea, 1838), and F. cerina (Conrad, 1838), which it superficially resembles and that also occur in the area. Our morphological diagnosis of this species is supported by recent molecular analyses that suggest this species is a Pleurobema and one closely related to other endemic Coosa River drainage unionids. The discovery of a new species of large, long-lived macroinvertebrate from a relatively well-sampled drainage in a populated region of the southeast United States underscores the need for more detailed surveys in isolated stretches of tributary streams. It should also serve as a reminder that almost 40 species of aquatic mollusks have been extirpated from the Mobile Basin before anything could be learned about their habitat or life history requirements. Copyright ?? 2006 Magnolia Press.

  19. Reproductive biology of blood cockle Anadara granosa (Bivalvia: Arcidae) in the northern region of the Strait of Malacca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Munawar; Yasin, Zulfigar; Hwai, Tan Shau

    2017-02-01

    A study on the reproductive cycle of the blood cockle Anadara granosa (Bivalvia: Arcidae) was conducted at three different areas in the northern region of the Strait of Malacca. A total of 1,920 samples of adult A. granosa (38-71 mm length) were collected from June 2009 until September 2010. Qualitative techniques (gonadal microscopic fresh smear test and histology analysis) as well as quantitative techniques (analysis of condition index and gonadal index) were used to predict monthly gonadal development stages of A. granosa. The gonadal index of A. granosa from Banda Aceh (Indonesia) (r = 0.469, P > 0.05) and Pulau Pinang (Malaysia) (r = 0.123, P > 0.05) did not show any correlation to their condition index, whereas the gonadal index of A. granosa from Lhokseumawe (Indonesia) (r = 0.609, P < 0.05) showed moderate positive correlation to the condition index. During the 16 month sampling period, four reproductive cycles were observed: each from three to six months. The process of releasing gametes is termed dribble spawning, and is the same in all populations. The principle component analysis (PCA) indicated that A. granosa reproduction was affected by interaction between internal physiological factors and indigenous environmental factors. In all sampling areas, phytoplankton density played a key role in the reproductive cycle in A. granosa. Information on the reproductive biology of this species is essential for species management and to improve the sustainability practices of the fisheries industry. These findings will provide basic information on the biology of the blood cockle A. granosa for stock management in the region.

  20. Persistent Contamination of Octopuses and Mussels with Lipophilic Shellfish Toxins during Spring Dinophysis Blooms in a Subtropical Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, Luiz L.; Lopes, Daiana; Bonilauri, Vanessa C.; Uchida, Hajime; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the occurrence of diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) and their producing phytoplankton species in southern Brazil, as well as the potential for toxin accumulation in co-occurring mussels (Perna perna) and octopuses (Octopus vulgaris). During the spring in 2012 and 2013, cells of Dinophysis acuminata complex were always present, sometimes at relatively high abundances (max. 1143 cells L−1), likely the main source of okadaic acid (OA) in the plankton (max. 34 ng L−1). Dinophysis caudata occurred at lower cell densities in 2013 when the lipophilic toxins pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and PTX-2 seco acid were detected in plankton and mussel samples. Here, we report for the first time the accumulation of DSTs in octopuses, probably linked to the consumption of contaminated bivalves. Perna perna mussels were consistently contaminated with different DSTs (max. 42 µg kg−1), and all octopuses analyzed (n = 5) accumulated OA in different organs/tissues: digestive glands (DGs) > arms > gills > kidneys > stomach + intestine. Additionally, similar concentrations of 7-O-palmytoyl OA and 7-O-palmytoly dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) were frequently detected in the hepatopancreas of P. perna and DGs of O. vulgaris. Therefore, octopuses can be considered a potential vector of DSTs to both humans and top predators such as marine mammals. PMID:26096277

  1. Persistent Contamination of Octopuses and Mussels with Lipophilic Shellfish Toxins during Spring Dinophysis Blooms in a Subtropical Estuary.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Luiz L; Lopes, Daiana; Bonilauri, Vanessa C; Uchida, Hajime; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2015-06-18

    This study investigates the occurrence of diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) and their producing phytoplankton species in southern Brazil, as well as the potential for toxin accumulation in co-occurring mussels (Perna perna) and octopuses (Octopus vulgaris). During the spring in 2012 and 2013, cells of Dinophysis acuminata complex were always present, sometimes at relatively high abundances (max. 1143 cells L-1), likely the main source of okadaic acid (OA) in the plankton (max. 34 ng L-1). Dinophysis caudata occurred at lower cell densities in 2013 when the lipophilic toxins pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and PTX-2 seco acid were detected in plankton and mussel samples. Here, we report for the first time the accumulation of DSTs in octopuses, probably linked to the consumption of contaminated bivalves. Perna perna mussels were consistently contaminated with different DSTs (max. 42 µg kg-1), and all octopuses analyzed (n = 5) accumulated OA in different organs/tissues: digestive glands (DGs) > arms > gills > kidneys > stomach + intestine. Additionally, similar concentrations of 7-O-palmytoyl OA and 7-O-palmytoly dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) were frequently detected in the hepatopancreas of P. perna and DGs of O. vulgaris. Therefore, octopuses can be considered a potential vector of DSTs to both humans and top predators such as marine mammals.

  2. Phylogenetic relationships of chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts of Solemya velum say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, J A; Smith, S W; Cavanaugh, C M

    1992-01-01

    The protobranch bivalve Solemya velum Say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) houses chemoautotrophic symbionts intracellularly within its gills. These symbionts were characterized through sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA coding regions and hybridization of an Escherichia coli gene probe to S. velum genomic DNA restriction fragments. The symbionts appeared to have only one copy of the 16S rRNA gene. The lack of variability in the 16S sequence and hybridization patterns within and between individual S. velum organisms suggested that one species of symbiont is dominant within and specific for this host species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S sequences of the symbionts indicates that they lie within the chemoautotrophic cluster of the gamma subdivision of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria. Images PMID:1577710

  3. Phylogenetic relationships of chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts of Solemya velum say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, J A; Smith, S W; Cavanaugh, C M

    1992-05-01

    The protobranch bivalve Solemya velum Say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) houses chemoautotrophic symbionts intracellularly within its gills. These symbionts were characterized through sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA coding regions and hybridization of an Escherichia coli gene probe to S. velum genomic DNA restriction fragments. The symbionts appeared to have only one copy of the 16S rRNA gene. The lack of variability in the 16S sequence and hybridization patterns within and between individual S. velum organisms suggested that one species of symbiont is dominant within and specific for this host species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S sequences of the symbionts indicates that they lie within the chemoautotrophic cluster of the gamma subdivision of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria.

  4. Phylogenetic and morphometric analyses reveal ecophenotypic plasticity in freshwater mussels Obovaria jacksoniana and Villosa arkansasensis (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kentaro; Hayes, David M; Harris, John L; Christian, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Freshwater mollusk shell morphology exhibits clinal variation along a stream continuum that has been termed the Law of Stream Distribution. We analyzed phylogenetic relationships and morphological similarity of two freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae), Obovaria jacksoniana and Villosa arkansasensis, throughout their ranges. The objectives were to investigate phylogenetic structure and evolutionary divergence of O. jacksoniana and V. arkansasensis and morphological similarity between the two species. Our analyses were the first explicit tests of phenotypic plasticity in shell morphologies using a combination of genetics and morphometrics. We conducted phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA (1416 bp; two genes) and morphometric analyses for 135 individuals of O. jacksoniana and V. arkansasensis from 12 streams. We examined correlations among genetic, morphological, and spatial distances using Mantel tests. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed a monophyletic relationship between O. jacksoniana and V. arkansasensis. Within this O. jacksoniana/V. arkansasensis complex, five distinct clades corresponding to drainage patterns showed high genetic divergence. Morphometric analysis revealed relative differences in shell morphologies between the two currently recognized species. We conclude that morphological differences between the two species are caused by ecophenotypic plasticity. A series of Mantel tests showed regional and local genetic isolation by distance. We observed clear positive correlations between morphological and geographic distances within a single drainage. We did not observe correlations between genetic and morphological distances. Phylogenetic analyses suggest O. jacksoniana and V. arkansasensis are synonomous and most closely related to a clade composed of O. retusa, O. subrotunda, and O. unicolor. Therefore, the synonomous O. jacksoniana and V. arkansasensis should be recognized as Obovaria arkansasensis (Lea 1862) n

  5. A comparative study of the anti-settlement properties of mytilid shells.

    PubMed

    Bers, A V; Prendergast, G S; Zürn, C M; Hansson, L; Head, R M; Thomason, J C

    2006-03-22

    Marine organisms have evolved defence mechanisms to prevent epibiosis. This study investigated the anti-settlement properties of natural periostracal microtopographies of two mytilid species, Mytilus edulis (from North, Baltic and White Seas) and Perna perna (from the SW Atlantic). Resin replicas of shells were exposed to cyprids of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides. Replicas with intact isotropic microtopographies and smooth controls were much less fouled than roughened anisotropic surfaces. This indicates that in both M. edulis and P. perna the periostracum possesses a generic anti-settlement property, at least against S. balanoides cyprids, which is not regionally adapted. Such a potential globally effective anti-settlement mechanism possibly contributes to the invasive success of Mytilidae.

  6. Existence and Uniqueness of Maximal Regular Flows for Non-smooth Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, Luigi; Colombo, Maria; Figalli, Alessio

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we provide a complete analogy between the Cauchy-Lipschitz and the DiPerna-Lions theories for ODE's, by developing a local version of the DiPerna-Lions theory. More precisely, we prove the existence and uniqueness of a maximal regular flow for the DiPerna-Lions theory using only local regularity and summability assumptions on the vector field, in analogy with the classical theory, which uses only local regularity assumptions. We also study the behaviour of the ODE trajectories before the maximal existence time. Unlike the Cauchy-Lipschitz theory, this behaviour crucially depends on the nature of the bounds imposed on the spatial divergence of the vector field. In particular, a global assumption on the divergence is needed to obtain a proper blow-up of the trajectories.

  7. Microplastic contamination in natural mussel beds from a Brazilian urbanized coastal region: Rapid evaluation through bioassessment.

    PubMed

    Santana, M F M; Ascer, L G; Custódio, M R; Moreira, F T; Turra, A

    2016-05-15

    Microplastic pollution (particles <5mm) is a widespread marine threat and a trigger for biological effects, especially if ingested. The mussel Perna perna, an important food resource, was used as bioindicator to investigate the presence of microplastic pollution on Santos estuary, the most urbanized area of the coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. A simple and rapid assessment showed that 75% of sampled mussels had ingested microplastics, an issue of human and environmental concern. All sampling points had contaminated mussels and this contamination had no clear pattern of distribution along the estuary. This was the first time that microplastic bioavailability was assessed in nature for the southern hemisphere and that wild P. perna was found contaminated with this pollutant. This is an important issue that should be better assessed due to an increase in seafood consumption and culture in Brazil and worldwide.

  8. Cheating the Locals: Invasive Mussels Steal and Benefit from the Cooling Effect of Indigenous Mussels.

    PubMed

    Lathlean, Justin A; Seuront, Laurent; McQuaid, Christopher D; Ng, Terence P T; Zardi, Gerardo I; Nicastro, Katy R

    2016-01-01

    The indigenous South African mussel Perna perna gapes during periods of aerial exposure to maintain aerobic respiration. This behaviour has no effect on the body temperatures of isolated individuals, but when surrounded by conspecifics, beneficial cooling effects of gaping emerge. It is uncertain, however, whether the presence of the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis limits the ability of P. perna for collective thermoregulation. We investigated whether varying densities of P. perna and M. galloprovincialis influences the thermal properties of both natural and artificial mussel beds during periods of emersion. Using infrared thermography, body temperatures of P. perna within mixed artificial beds were shown to increase faster and reach higher temperatures than individuals in conspecific beds, indicating that the presence of M. galloprovincialis limits the group cooling effects of gaping. In contrast, body temperatures of M. galloprovincialis within mixed artificial mussel beds increased slower and exhibited lower temperatures than for individuals in beds comprised entirely of M. galloprovincialis. Interestingly, differences in bed temperatures and heating rates were largely dependent on the size of mussels, with beds comprised of larger individuals experiencing less thermal stress irrespective of species composition. The small-scale patterns of thermal stress detected within manipulated beds were not observed within naturally occurring mixed mussel beds. We propose that small-scale differences in topography, size-structure, mussel bed size and the presence of organisms encrusting the mussel shells mask the effects of gaping behaviour within natural mussel beds. Nevertheless, the results from our manipulative experiment indicate that the invasive species M. galloprovincialis steals thermal properties as well as resources from the indigenous mussel P. perna. This may have significant implications for predicting how the co-existence of these two species may

  9. Cheating the Locals: Invasive Mussels Steal and Benefit from the Cooling Effect of Indigenous Mussels

    PubMed Central

    Lathlean, Justin A.; Seuront, Laurent; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Ng, Terence P. T.; Zardi, Gerardo I.; Nicastro, Katy R.

    2016-01-01

    The indigenous South African mussel Perna perna gapes during periods of aerial exposure to maintain aerobic respiration. This behaviour has no effect on the body temperatures of isolated individuals, but when surrounded by conspecifics, beneficial cooling effects of gaping emerge. It is uncertain, however, whether the presence of the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis limits the ability of P. perna for collective thermoregulation. We investigated whether varying densities of P. perna and M. galloprovincialis influences the thermal properties of both natural and artificial mussel beds during periods of emersion. Using infrared thermography, body temperatures of P. perna within mixed artificial beds were shown to increase faster and reach higher temperatures than individuals in conspecific beds, indicating that the presence of M. galloprovincialis limits the group cooling effects of gaping. In contrast, body temperatures of M. galloprovincialis within mixed artificial mussel beds increased slower and exhibited lower temperatures than for individuals in beds comprised entirely of M. galloprovincialis. Interestingly, differences in bed temperatures and heating rates were largely dependent on the size of mussels, with beds comprised of larger individuals experiencing less thermal stress irrespective of species composition. The small-scale patterns of thermal stress detected within manipulated beds were not observed within naturally occurring mixed mussel beds. We propose that small-scale differences in topography, size-structure, mussel bed size and the presence of organisms encrusting the mussel shells mask the effects of gaping behaviour within natural mussel beds. Nevertheless, the results from our manipulative experiment indicate that the invasive species M. galloprovincialis steals thermal properties as well as resources from the indigenous mussel P. perna. This may have significant implications for predicting how the co-existence of these two species may

  10. Predicting the effects of climate change on population connectivity and genetic diversity of an imperiled freshwater mussel, Cumberlandia monodonta (Bivalvia: Margaritiferidae), in riverine systems.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kentaro; Berg, David J

    2017-01-01

    In the face of global climate change, organisms may respond to temperature increases by shifting their ranges poleward or to higher altitudes. However, the direction of range shifts in riverine systems is less clear. Because rivers are dendritic networks, there is only one dispersal route from any given location to another. Thus, range shifts are only possible if branches are connected by suitable habitat, and stream-dwelling organisms can disperse through these branches. We used Cumberlandia monodonta (Bivalvia: Unionoida: Margaritiferidae) as a model species to investigate the effects of climate change on population connectivity because a majority of contemporary populations are panmictic. We combined ecological niche models (ENMs) with population genetic simulations to investigate the effects of climate change on population connectivity and genetic diversity of C. monodonta. The ENMs were constructed using bioclimatic and landscape data to project shifts in suitable habitat under future climate scenarios. We then used forward-time simulations to project potential changes in genetic diversity and population connectivity based on these range shifts. ENM results under current conditions indicated long stretches of highly suitable habitat in rivers where C. monodonta persists; populations in the upper Mississippi River remain connected by suitable habitat that does not impede gene flow. Future climate scenarios projected northward and headwater-ward range contraction and drastic declines in habitat suitability for most extant populations throughout the Mississippi River Basin. Simulations indicated that climate change would greatly reduce genetic diversity and connectivity across populations. Results suggest that a single, large population of C. monodonta will become further fragmented into smaller populations, each of which will be isolated and begin to differentiate genetically. Because C. monodonta is a widely distributed species and purely aquatic, our

  11. The linked units of 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA of razor shells (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae).

    PubMed

    Vierna, J; Jensen, K T; Martínez-Lage, A; González-Tizón, A M

    2011-08-01

    The linkage between 5S ribosomal DNA and other multigene families has been detected in many eukaryote lineages, but whether it provides any selective advantage remains unclear. In this work, we report the occurrence of linked units of 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) and U1 small nuclear DNA (U1 snDNA) in 10 razor shell species (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae) from four different genera. We obtained several clones containing partial or complete repeats of both multigene families in which both types of genes displayed the same orientation. We provide a comprehensive collection of razor shell 5S rDNA clones, both with linked and nonlinked organisation, and the first bivalve U1 snDNA sequences. We predicted the secondary structures and characterised the upstream and downstream conserved elements, including a region at -25 nucleotides from both 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA transcription start sites. The analysis of 5S rDNA showed that some nontranscribed spacers (NTSs) are more closely related to NTSs from other species (and genera) than to NTSs from the species they were retrieved from, suggesting birth-and-death evolution and ancestral polymorphism. Nucleotide conservation within the functional regions suggests the involvement of purifying selection, unequal crossing-overs and gene conversions. Taking into account this and other studies, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which both multigene families could have become linked in the Pharidae lineage. The reason why 5S rDNA is often found linked to other multigene families seems to be the result of stochastic processes within genomes in which its high copy number is determinant.

  12. From the Kinetic Theory of Gases to Continuum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Golse, Francois

    2011-05-20

    Recent results on the fluid dynamic limits of the Boltzmann equation based on the DiPerna-Lions theory of renormalized solutions are reviewed in this paper, with an emphasis on regimes where the velocity field behaves to leading order like that of an incompressible fluid with constant density.

  13. A Grounded Theory Approach to Understanding the Persistence Issue That Exists for Lower-Socio Economic Status College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaggs, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of research and program implementation in both the K-12 and higher educational systems, students of low socio-economic status (SES) still have access to and persist in higher education at significantly lower numbers than their more affluent peers (Gollnick & Chinn, 2012; Perna, 2005). This study employed a grounded-theory…

  14. Structural and Concurrent Validity Evidence for the Academic Competence Evaluation Scales-College Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, James Clyde

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the structural and concurrent validity of the Academic Competence Evaluation Scales-College (ACES-College; J. C. DiPerna & S. N. Elliott, 2001). Results indicated that the ACES-College is composed of 2 scales--Academic Skills and Academic Enablers--each with multiple subscales. Results also indicated that…

  15. Academic Enablers and Student Achievement: Implications for Assessment and Intervention Services in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, James Clyde

    2006-01-01

    Academic enablers have been defined as attitudes and behaviors that facilitate students' participation in, and benefit from, academic instruction in the classroom (J.C. DiPerna & S.N. Elliott, 2000). The purpose of this article is to provide practitioners with an overview of specific academic enablers (motivation, study skills, engagement, and…

  16. Screening for Early Learning Problems within an Urban Population: The Brief Academic Competence Evaluation Screening System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettler, Ryan J.

    2007-01-01

    The Brief Academic Competence Evaluation Screening System (BACESS; Elliott, DiPerna, & Huai, 2003) is a multi-phase instrument designed to assist educators in the identification of students who are likely to experience early learning problems. The BACESS was used in eight elementary classrooms (n=71) in southern California. Each phase of the…

  17. Graduate Education Attainment and Salary: An Examination of Institutional Type, Major Choice, Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Parental Education and Work Experience Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chandra M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated two major sources of influence (institution and individual characteristics) on the earnings of graduate degree recipients. These factors have been shown in previous research to influence the initial earnings of graduates at the undergraduate level. This research seeks to build on previous studies by Perna (2003, 2005) that…

  18. Measuring Social-Emotional Skills to Advance Science and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKown, Clark; Russo-Ponsaran, Nicole; Johnson, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The ability to understand and effectively interact with others is a critical determinant of academic, social, and life success (DiPerna & Elliott, 2002). An area in particular need of scalable, feasible, usable, and scientifically sound assessment tools is social-emotional comprehension, which includes mental processes enlisted to encode,…

  19. Making the Grade: The Importance of Academic Enablers in the Elementary School Counseling Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barna, Jennifer S.; Brott, Pamelia E.

    2014-01-01

    Elementary school counselors can support academic achievement by connecting their comprehensive programs to increasing academic competence. One valuable framework focuses on academic enablers, which are identified as interpersonal skills, motivation, engagement, and study skills (DiPerna, 2004). In this article, the authors (a) discuss the…

  20. Understanding and Targeting Epigenetic Alterations in Acquired Bone Marrow Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Shih AH, Pandey S, Patel JP, Chung YR, Koche R, Perna F, Zhao X, Taylor JE, Park CY, Carroll M, Melnick A, Nimer SD, Jaffe JD, Aifantis I...Christopher E. Mason,14 Christopher Y. Park,1,4, Bradley E. Bernstein,8,9,10 Iannis Aifantis,5,6 and Ross L. Levine1,2,3,13 1Human Oncology and

  1. College Prep and Access from the Perspective of Diversity College Admission Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethea, Kathryn A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have found that there is a college access gap for students of color in P-16 education. I utilize Perna's (2006) integrated college access model in exploring college admission's knowledge of college preparation in education. The present study uses qualitative questionnaires to measure diversity college admission professionals' (DCAPs)…

  2. Ensuring That Professors Who Enhance the University Earn Tenure and Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    Tenure provides professors with a unique level of job security and utmost respect in the academy (Shea, 2002). Receiving tenure and progressing through the academic ranks are among the most visible and valued accomplishments for college and university faculty (Perna, 2001). Faculty who achieve excellence in teaching, research, and service readily…

  3. TOXOPLASMA GONDII ISOLATES FROM FREE-RANGE CHICKENS FORM THE NORTHEAST REGION OF BRAZIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging chickens is a good indicator of the prevalence of T. gondii oocysts in the soil because chickens feed from the ground. The prevalence of T. gondii in 152 free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) from 22 municipalities in 7 northeastern states (Perna...

  4. An Examination of Construct Validity for the EARLI Numeracy Skill Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Weiyi; Lei, Pui-Wa; DiPerna, James C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine dimensionality and concurrent validity evidence of the EARLI numeracy measures (DiPerna, Morgan, & Lei, 2007), which were developed to assess key skills such as number identification, counting, and basic arithmetic. Two methods (NOHARM with approximate chi-square test and DIMTEST with DETECT…

  5. Global existence proof for relativistic Boltzmann equation

    SciTech Connect

    Dudynski, M. ); Ekiel-Jezewska, M.L. )

    1992-02-01

    The existence and causality of solutions to the relativistic Boltzmann equation in L[sup 1] and in L[sub loc][sup 1] are proved. The solutions are shown to satisfy physically natural a priori bounds, time-independent in L[sup 1]. The results rely upon new techniques developed for the nonrelativistic Boltzmann equation by DiPerna and Lions.

  6. Predictors of Graduate Enrollment in Hard and Soft Academic Disciplines and the Impact of Sex and Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnulty, Katheryn G.

    2009-01-01

    Given the underrepresentation of research on graduate college choice, particularly that which utilizes a national sample of students enrolled in a wide range of institutions of higher education across the United States, this study aims to contribute significantly to the field of graduate access and admissions. Building on the work of Perna (2004)…

  7. Increasing Access to College: Extending Possibilities for All Students. SUNY Series, Frontiers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William G., Ed.; Hagedorn, Linda Serra, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines pre-college enrichment programs that offer a specific remedy to the problem of low income and underrepresented students' access to higher education. The 10 papers are: (1) "Pre-College Outreach Programs: A National Perspective" (Watson Scott Swail and Laura W. Perna); (2) "The Relationship between…

  8. Mexican Americans Acquiring Bachelor's Degrees: Whose Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This study offers a small, highly contextualized counter-example to several recent large-scale analyses depicting Latino underachievement in higher education (R. Fry, 2002; J. Immerwahr, 2003; S. Miller & E. Garcia, 2004; W. Swail, A. Cabrera, & C. Lee, 2004; W. S. Swail, K. E. Redd, & L. W. Perna, 2003). The purpose is to analyze…

  9. Be Bold ... Be Enrollment Rich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, marketing specialist Mark Perna offers advice on how career and technical schools can market themselves and their programs. To become "enrollment rich," he suggests the following: (1) develop a brand plan--something that separates your organization from competitors in the mind of the community; (2) deliver the message--the community…

  10. The College Choice Process of Four Students from Rural Appalachian Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Kristen L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which the college choice process of four students from one high school in rural Appalachian Kentucky aligned with Perna's (2006; 2010) nested process model of college choice. I used qualitative case study methodology and inductive analysis to describe how four high-academic achieving students of varying family…

  11. How Four-Year Colleges and Universities Organize Themselves to Promote Student Persistence: The Emerging National Picture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board Advocacy & Policy Center, 2011

    2011-01-01

    As leading measures of student success and institutional quality, persistence and graduation rates are intensely debated at education conferences, institutional meetings and legislative sessions (Adelman, 1999; American Association of State Colleges and Universities [AASCU], 2002; Gold & Albert, 2006; Perna & Thomas, 2006; Tinto & Pusser, 2006;…

  12. Flows for non-smooth vector fields with subexponentially integrable divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clop, Albert; Jiang, Renjin; Mateu, Joan; Orobitg, Joan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study flows associated to Sobolev vector fields with subexponentially integrable divergence. Our approach is based on the transport equation following DiPerna-Lions [17]. A key ingredient is to use a quantitative estimate of solutions to the Cauchy problem of transport equation to obtain the regularity of density functions.

  13. Effects of College Access Programs on College Readiness and Enrollment: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvill, Eleanor L.; Maynard, Rebecca A.; Nguyen, Hoa T. H.; Robertson-Kraft, Claire; Tognatta, Namrata

    2012-01-01

    For decades, college access programs have aimed to improve college readiness and enrollment rates, particularly for underrepresented populations. Though several published reports have produced comprehensive inventories of college access programs (Gandara, 2001; Perna, 2002; Tierney, Bailey, Constantine, Finkelstein, & Hurd, 2009), no systematic…

  14. A new species of pea crab of the genus Serenotheres Ahyong & Ng, 2005 (Crustacea, Brachyura, Pinnotheridae) from the date mussel Leiosolenus Carpenter, 1857 (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Mytilidae, Lithophaginae) from the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Ng, Peter K L; Meyer, Chistopher

    2016-01-01

    The pea crab genus Serenotheres Ahyong & Ng, 2005 (Pinnotheridae) is currently only represented by one species, Serenotheres besutensis (Serène, 1967). A new species is now assigned to this genus, described from a date mussel Leiosolenus obesus Carpenter, 1857 (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Mytilidae: Lithophaginae) collected in the Solomon Islands. Serenotheres janussp. n. differs from Serenotheres besutensis in possessing a conspicuously broader carapace, with the lateral margins of the dorsal lamellum distinctly produced and the posterolateral part deeply concave, the dorsal lamellum being highest at the median cleft, the rostrum is relatively more prominent, the surfaces of the anterolateral margin and hepatic region are less prominently pitted and eroded, the ischiomerus of the third maxilliped is relatively more rectangular, and the P2 merus is proportionately longer.

  15. A new species of pea crab of the genus Serenotheres Ahyong & Ng, 2005 (Crustacea, Brachyura, Pinnotheridae) from the date mussel Leiosolenus Carpenter, 1857 (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Mytilidae, Lithophaginae) from the Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Peter K. L.; Meyer, Chistopher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The pea crab genus Serenotheres Ahyong & Ng, 2005 (Pinnotheridae) is currently only represented by one species, Serenotheres besutensis (Serène, 1967). A new species is now assigned to this genus, described from a date mussel Leiosolenus obesus Carpenter, 1857 (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Mytilidae: Lithophaginae) collected in the Solomon Islands. Serenotheres janus sp. n. differs from Serenotheres besutensis in possessing a conspicuously broader carapace, with the lateral margins of the dorsal lamellum distinctly produced and the posterolateral part deeply concave, the dorsal lamellum being highest at the median cleft, the rostrum is relatively more prominent, the surfaces of the anterolateral margin and hepatic region are less prominently pitted and eroded, the ischiomerus of the third maxilliped is relatively more rectangular, and the P2 merus is proportionately longer. PMID:27843386

  16. Evidence for chemoautotrophic symbiosis in a Mediterranean cold seep clam (Bivalvia: Lucinidae): comparative sequence analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA, APS reductase and RubisCO genes.

    PubMed

    Duperron, Sébastien; Fiala-Médioni, Aline; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Olu, Karine; Sibuet, Myriam

    2007-01-01

    Symbioses between lucinid clams (Bivalvia: Lucinidae) and autotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria have mainly been studied in shallow coastal species, and information regarding deep-sea species is scarce. Here we study the symbiosis of a clam, resembling Lucinoma kazani, which was recently collected in sediment cores from new cold-seep sites in the vicinity of the Nile deep-sea fan, eastern Mediterranean, at depths ranging from 507 to 1691 m. A dominant bacterial phylotype, related to the sulphide-oxidizing symbiont of Lucinoma aequizonata, was identified in gill tissue by comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. A second phylotype, related to spirochete sequences, was identified twice in a library of 94 clones. Comparative analyses of gene sequences encoding the APS reductase alpha subunit and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase support the hypothesis that the dominant symbiont can perform sulphide oxidation and autotrophy. Transmission electron micrographs of gills confirmed the dominance of sulphide-oxidizing bacteria, which display typical vacuoles, and delta(13)C values measured in gill and foot tissue further support the hypothesis for a chemoautotrophic-sourced host carbon nutrition.

  17. [Ecophysiological adaptability of tropical water organisms to salinity changes].

    PubMed

    Chung, K S

    2001-03-01

    Physiological response of tropical organisms to salinity changes was studied for some marine, estuarine and freshwater fishes (Astyanax bimaculatus, Petenia karussii, Cyprinodon dearborni, and Oreochromis mossambicus), marine and freshwater crustaceans (Penaeus brasiliensis, Penaeus schmitti and Macrobrachium carcinus), and marine bivalves (Perna perna, Crassostrea rhizophorae, and Arca zebra) collected from Northeast Venezuela. They were acclimated for four weeks at various salinities, and (1) placed at high salinities to determine mean lethal salinity, (2) tested by increasing salinity 5@1000 per day to define upper lethal salinity tolerance limit, or (3) observed in a saline gradient tank to determine salinity preference. Acclimation level was the most significant factor. This phenomenon is important for tropical aquatic organisms in shallow waters, where they can adapt to high salinity during the dry season and cannot lose their acclimation level at low salinity during abrupt rain. For saline adaptation of tropical organisms, this behavior will contribute to their proliferation and distribution in fluctuating salinity environments.

  18. Metals and pesticides in commercial bivalve mollusc production areas in the North and South Bays, Santa Catarina (Brazil).

    PubMed

    de Souza, R V; Garbossa, L H P; Campos, C J A; Vianna, L F de N; Vanz, A; Rupp, G S

    2016-04-15

    Concentrations of heavy metals were quantified in mussels Perna perna and Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas in 28 cultivation sites in the North and South Bays, SC (Brazil). Concentrations of pesticides were also quantified in these bivalve, water and sediment samples collected in 14 cultivation sites on four occasions in the period October 2012-October 2013. Pesticides were not detected in any of the mussel, oyster, water or sediment samples. The South Bay was found to be generally more contaminated with As while the North Bay showed higher concentrations of Ni. Concentrations of Pb and Cd were below the limit of detection of the method (0.5mg/kg) in all samples. Mussels accumulated more As and Ni than oysters, while the opposite was observed for Cu. Metal concentrations were below the maximum levels for foodstuffs specified in the Brazilian legislation.

  19. Challenges associated with pre-border management of biofouling on oil rigs.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Grant A; Forrest, Barrie M

    2010-11-01

    The potential for oil rigs to transport diverse, reef-like communities around the globe makes them high risk vectors for the inadvertent spread of non-indigenous species (NIS). This paper describes two case studies where a suite of pre-border management approaches was applied to semi-submersible drilling rigs. In the first case study, a drilling rig was defouled in-water prior to departure from New Zealand to Australia. Risk mitigation measures were successful in reducing biosecurity risks to the recipient region, but they resulted in the unintentional introduction of the non-indigenous brown mussel (Perna perna) to New Zealand when the rig was defouled in-water by divers. In the second case study, lessons learned from this high-profile incursion resulted in a more structured approach to pre-border management, and this serves as a useful template for future rig transfers.

  20. Toxic responses of bivalves to metal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, P.; Menon, N.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Although there is a growing body of information on the toxicity of individual heavy metals to economically important on the toxicity of individual heavy metals to economically important species of bivalves, literature on the lethal toxicity of metal mixtures to bivalves under controlled conditions is rather limited. In the present investigation the toxic effects of combinations of copper - mercury and copper - mercury and copper - cadmium at lethal levels of two marine bivalve species, Perna indica and Donax incarnatus, have been delineated.

  1. Army Sustainment. Volume 47, Issue 5, September-October 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-29

    sustainment plans, programs, policies , opera- tions, procedures, and doctrine for the benefit of all sustain- ment personnel. Its purpose is to...experience to get there. Lt. Gen. Gustave “Gus” Perna is the Army Deputy Chief of Staff, G–4. He oversees policies and procedures used by 270,000 Army...action that sat- isfies foreign policy objectives. In our search for a reasonable and accessible work about analytics, we dis- covered a remarkable

  2. The Continuous Coagulation-FragmentationEquations with Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurençot, Philippe; Mischler, Stéphane

    Existence of global weak solutions to the continuous coagulation-fragmentation equations with diffusion is investigated when the kinetic coefficients satisfy a detailed balance condition or the coagulation coefficient enjoys a monotonicity condition. Our approach relies on weak and strong compactness methods in L1 in the spirit of the DiPerna-Lions theory for the Boltzmann equation. Under the detailed balance condition the large-time behaviour is also studied.

  3. Linking environmental heavy metal concentrations and salinity gradients with metal accumulation and their effects: A case study in 3 mussel species of Vitória estuary and Espírito Santo bay, Southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Rodrigues, Paulo Pinheiro; Mubiana, Valentine K; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2015-08-01

    The present study was conducted to link the heavy metal load in three species of mussels (Perna perna, Mytella falcata and Mytella guyanensis) from the estuaries and bays around Vitória island, south-east of Brazil, with the salinity gradient and the heavy metal levels in the abiotic environment (including water, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediment). Primarily based on the salinity gradient, a total of 26 sites around Vitória Island were selected for sampling of water, SPM, sediments and organisms. Besides tissue metal levels, the condition index and energy stores (glycogen, lipid and protein) were quantified as an indicator of fitness in response to metal pollution. Dissolved metals in water indicate that Cd and Mn content was higher along Espírito Santo Bay, while Al, Co, Cu, Cr and Fe were elevated in the sites with low salinity such as river mouths, estuarine and sewage canals. Likewise, suspended matter sampled from low salinity sites showed a higher heavy metal load compared to moderate and high salinity sites. Though mussels were sampled from different sites, the contamination for Cd, Cu, Fe and Mn was higher in mussels inhabiting low salinity sites (M. guyanensis and M. falcata) compared to P. perna, a high saline water inhabitant. However, a higher Zn body burden was observed for P. perna compared to Mytella species. Tissue Fe accumulation (but not Mn and Zn) correlated with heavy metal levels in suspended material for all three species, and for M. falcata this correlation also existed for Cd and Cu. Energy store and condition index in all mussels varied depending on the sampling sites and correlated with salinity gradient rather than tissue metal concentration. Overall, metal concentration in mussels did not exceed the safe levels as per the international standards for metals, and would be of no risk for human consumption.

  4. Setting the Theater: Planning Today Provides Options for Tomorrow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-29

    November–December 2015 Army Sustainment2 AR M Y G –4  By Lt. Gen. Gustave “Gus” Perna Setting the Theater: Planning Today Provides Options for... capacity . You deployed, executed your mission, and redeployed, and you did it well. However, it took years to establish the sustainment...com- manders’ theater campaign plans and other operational plans . Setting the theater is an essential part of this preparation. Setting the

  5. Vesicomyidae (bivalvia): current taxonomy and distribution.

    PubMed

    Krylova, Elena M; Sahling, Heiko

    2010-04-01

    Vesicomyid bivalves are a consistent component of communities of sulphide-rich reducing environments distributed worldwide from 77 degrees N to 70 degrees S at depths from 100 to 9050 m. Up-to-now the taxonomy of the family has been uncertain. In this paper, the current state of vesicomyid taxonomy and distribution at the generic rank are considered. This survey is founded on a database including information both from literature sources and also unpublished data of the authors on all recent species of vesicomyids. We suggest that the Vesicomyidae is not a synonym of Kelliellidae, and is therefore a valid family name. We propose to divide the family Vesicomyidae into two subfamilies: Vesicomyinae and Pliocardiinae. The Vesicomyinae includes one genus, Vesicomya, which comprises small-sized bivalves characterized by non-reduced gut and the absence of subfilamental tissue in gills. Symbiosis with chemoautotrophic bacteria has, so far, not been proved for Vesicomya and the genus is not restricted to sulphide-rich reducing habitats. The subfamily Pliocardiinae currently contains about 15 genera with mostly medium or large body size, characterized by the presence of subfilamental tissue in the gills. The Pliocardiinae are highly specialized for sulphide-rich reducing environments, harbouring chemoautrophic bacteria in their gills. This is the first summary of the generic structure of the family Vesicomyidae that allow us to analyze the distribution of vesicomyids at the generic level. We recognize here five different distribution patterns that are related to the specific environmental demands. The general trends in the distribution patterns of the vesicomyids are an occurrence of the majority of genera in broad geographical ranges and the prevalence of near continental type of distribution.

  6. Vesicomyidae (Bivalvia): Current Taxonomy and Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Krylova, Elena M.; Sahling, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    Vesicomyid bivalves are a consistent component of communities of sulphide-rich reducing environments distributed worldwide from 77° N to 70°S at depths from 100 to 9050 m. Up-to-now the taxonomy of the family has been uncertain. In this paper, the current state of vesicomyid taxonomy and distribution at the generic rank are considered. This survey is founded on a database including information both from literature sources and also unpublished data of the authors on all recent species of vesicomyids. We suggest that the Vesicomyidae is not a synonym of Kelliellidae, and is therefore a valid family name. We propose to divide the family Vesicomyidae into two subfamilies: Vesicomyinae and Pliocardiinae. The Vesicomyinae includes one genus, Vesicomya, which comprises small-sized bivalves characterized by non-reduced gut and the absence of subfilamental tissue in gills. Symbiosis with chemoautotrophic bacteria has, so far, not been proved for Vesicomya and the genus is not restricted to sulphide-rich reducing habitats. The subfamily Pliocardiinae currently contains about 15 genera with mostly medium or large body size, characterized by the presence of subfilamental tissue in the gills. The Pliocardiinae are highly specialized for sulphide-rich reducing environments, harbouring chemoautrophic bacteria in their gills. This is the first summary of the generic structure of the family Vesicomyidae that allow us to analyze the distribution of vesicomyids at the generic level. We recognize here five different distribution patterns that are related to the specific environmental demands. The general trends in the distribution patterns of the vesicomyids are an occurrence of the majority of genera in broad geographical ranges and the prevalence of near continental type of distribution. PMID:20376362

  7. Metal bioaccumulation in consumed marine bivalves in Southeast Brazilian coast.

    PubMed

    Lino, A S; Galvão, P M A; Longo, R T L; Azevedo-Silva, C E; Dorneles, P R; Torres, J P M; Malm, O

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to investigate metal bioaccumulation by mussels (Perna perna) and Lion's Scallop (Nodipecten nodosus) farmed in tropical bays, in order to estimate spatial and temporal variation in the exposure to these elements, as well as human health risk. The concentration of each measured element was considered for this evaluation, using maximum residue level (MRL) in foods established by the Brazilian (ANVISA), American (USFDA) and European Communities (EC) legislations. Values for estimated daily ingestion (EDI) were determined for metals intake through mussel and scallop consumption. These estimates were compared with the reference value of (PTDI) proposed by World Health Organization (WHO). Trace elements concentration was measured on ninety mussels P. perna (tissue) and ninety Lion's Scallop N. nodosus (muscle and gonad) reared in four different tropical areas of the Southeast Brazilian coast, between 2009 and 2010. Zinc (Zn), Iron (Fe), Copper (Cu), Manganese (Mn), Chrome (Cr), Nickel (Ni), Cadmium (Cd) and Lead (Pb) concentrations were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after acid mineralization. Cd and Mn were more efficiently bioaccumulated by scallops than mussels and the opposite was found for Fe, Cu and Ni. Guanabara Bay and Sepetiba Bay were considered the most impacted between ecosystems studied. Higher Cd values in Arraial do Cabo in the other sites studied were associated with upwelling that occurs in the region. Consumption of both species cannot be considered safe, because the Cu and Cr concentrations, in accordance with the limits established by the Brazilian Agency (ANVISA). On the other hand, any EDI value exceeded the corresponding value of the PTDI, proposed by World Health Organization (WHO).

  8. On a Kinetic Equation for Coalescing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Miguel; Laurençot, Philippe; Mischler, Stéphane

    Existence of global weak solutions to a spatially inhomogeneous kinetic model for coalescing particles is proved, each particle being identified by its mass, momentum and position. The large time convergence to zero is also shown. The cornestone of our analysis is that, for any nonnegative and convex function, the associated Orlicz norm is a Liapunov functional. Existence and asymptotic behaviour then rely on weak and strong compactness methods in L1 in the spirit of the DiPerna-Lions theory for the Boltzmann equation.

  9. Global existence in L 1 for the modified nonlinear Enskog equation in ℝ3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polewczak, Jacek

    1989-07-01

    A global existence theorem with large initial data in L 1 is given for the modified Enskog equation in ℝ3. The method, which is based on the existence of a Liapunov functional (analog of the H-Boltzmann theorem), utilizes a weak compactness argument in L 1 in a similar way to the DiPerna-Lions proof for the Boltzmann equation. The existence theorem is obtained under certain condition on the behavior of the geometric factor Y. The condition on Y amounts to the fact that the L 1 norm of the collision term grows linearly when the local density tends to infinity.

  10. Global existence in L sup 1 for the modified nonlinear Enskog equation in R sup 3

    SciTech Connect

    Polewczak, J. )

    1989-07-01

    A global existence theorem with large initial data in L{sup 1} is given for the modified Enskog equation in R{sup 3}. The method, which is based on the existence of a Liapunov functional (analog of the H-Boltzmann theorem), utilizes a weak compactness argument in L{sup 1} in a similar way to the DiPerna-Lions proof for the Boltzmann equation. The existence theorem is obtained under certain condition on the behavior of the geometric factor Y. The condition on Y amounts to the fact that the L{sup 1} norm of the collision term grows linearly when the local density tends to infinity.

  11. Polonium-210 in marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) inhabiting the southern coast of India.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Feroz; Wesley, S Godwin; Rajan, M P

    2014-12-01

    The present study focused on the determination of the alpha-emitter, (210)Po, in two species of marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) commonly available in the southern coastal region of India. The brown mussel, Perna indica was collected from the west coast and the green mussel, Perna viridis from the east coast. The concentration of (210)Po was related to the allometry (length of shell, wet/dry weight of shell/soft tissue) of the mussels and significant results were found. The study period focused on three seasons namely, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon for a 1-year period (2010-2011). The results revealed higher activity levels in smaller-sized mussels compared to larger ones. Marked variation in (210)Po activity concentration was noted in the whole-body soft tissues between seasons and sampling site (p < 0.05). The dose rate assessment for mussels was performed using the ERICA Assessment tool. The chronic exposure to mussels due to (210)Po was found to be lesser than the global benchmark dose rate of 10 μGy h(-1). The effective ingestion dose to adults who intake mussels was estimated to be in the range 5.1-34.9 μSv y(-1). The measurement contributes to the furthering of knowledge of (210)Po, since no data exist in this region.

  12. Mussels as ecosystem engineers: Their contribution to species richness in a rocky littoral community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthagaray, Ana Inés; Carranza, Alvar

    Mussels are important ecosystem engineers in marine benthic systems because they aggregate into beds, thus modifying the nature and complexity of the substrate. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of mussels ( Brachidontes rodriguezii, Mytilus edulis platensis, and Perna perna) to the benthic species richness of intertidal and shallow subtidal communities at Cerro Verde (Uruguay). We compared the richness of macro-benthic species between mussel-engineered patches and patches without mussels but dominated by algae or barnacles at a landscape scale (all samples), between tidal levels, and between sites distributed along a wave exposition gradient. Overall, we found a net increase in species richness in samples with mussels (35 species), in contrast to samples where mussels were naturally absent or scarce (27 species). The positive trend of the effect did not depend upon tidal level or wave exposition, but its magnitude varied between sites. Within sites, a significant positive effect was detected only at the protected site. Within the mussel-engineered patches, the richness of all macro-faunal groups (total, sessile and mobile) was positively correlated with mussel abundance. This evidence indicates that the mussel beds studied here were important in maintaining species richness at the landscape-level, and highlights that beds of shelled bivalves should not be neglected as conservation targets in marine benthic environments.

  13. Interspecies comparison of the mechanical properties and biochemical composition of byssal threads.

    PubMed

    Bouhlel, Zeineb; Genard, Bertrand; Ibrahim, Neilly; Carrington, Emily; Babarro, José M F; Lok, Aynur; Flores, Augusto A V; Pellerin, Christian; Tremblay, Réjean; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2017-03-15

    Several bivalve species produce byssus threads to provide attachment to substrates, with mechanical properties highly variable among species. Here, we examined the distal section of byssal threads produced by a range of bivalve species (Mytilus edulis, Mytilus trossulus, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Mytilus californianus, Pinna nobilis, Perna perna, Xenostrobus securis, Brachidontes solisianus and Isognomon bicolor) collected from different nearshore environments. Morphological and mechanical properties were measured, and biochemical analyses were performed. Multivariate redundancy analyses on mechanical properties revealed that byssal threads of M. californianus, M. galloprovincialis and P. nobilis have very distinct mechanical behaviours compared with the remaining species. Extensibility, strength and force were the main variables separating these species groups, which were highest for M. californianus and lowest for P. nobilis Furthermore, the analysis of the amino acid composition revealed that I. bicolor and P. nobilis threads are significantly different from the other species, suggesting a different underlying structural strategy. Determination of metal contents showed that the individual concentration of inorganic elements varies, but that the dominant elements are conserved between species. Altogether, this bivalve species comparison suggests some molecular bases for the biomechanical characteristics of byssal fibres that may reflect phylogenetic limitations.

  14. Ecological relevance of Sentinels' biomarker responses: a multi-level approach.

    PubMed

    Seabra Pereira, Camilo D; Abessa, Denis M S; Choueri, Rodrigo B; Almagro-Pastor, Victor; Cesar, Augusto; Maranho, Luciane A; Martín-Díaz, María Laura; Torres, Ronaldo J; Gusso-Choueri, Paloma K; Almeida, João E; Cortez, Fernando S; Mozeto, Antonio A; Silbiger, Helcy L N; Sousa, Eduinetty C P M; Del Valls, Tommas Angel; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2014-05-01

    In response to the need for more sensitive and rapid indicators of environmental quality, sublethal effects on the lowest levels of biological organization have been investigated. The ecological relevance of these responses assumes a prevailing role to assure effectiveness as indicator of ecological status. This study aimed to investigate the linkages between biomarker responses of caged bivalves and descriptive parameters of macrobenthic community structure. For this purpose a multi-level environmental assessment of marine and estuarine zones was performed in São Paulo coast, Brazil. Multivariate analysis was applied to identify linkages between biological responses and ecological indices, as well as to characterizing the studied stations. Individuals of the marine mussel Perna perna caged along Santos Bay showed signs of oxidative stress, lysosomal membrane destabilization, histological alterations and reduced embryonic development. The estuarine oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae caged along Santos Port Channel showed alterations on biotransformation enzymes and antioxidant system, DNA damage and lysosomal membrane destabilization. The benthic community analysis showed reduced richness and diversity in the same areas of the Santos bay and estuary where biomarker responses were altered. Our results revealed that xenobiotics are inducing physiological stress, which may lead to changes of the benthic community structure and deterioration of the ecological status over time. Integrating biomarker responses and ecological indexes improved certainty that alterations found at community level could be related to xenobiotic as stressors, which was very useful to improve the discriminatory power of the environmental assessment.

  15. Leachate from microplastics impairs larval development in brown mussels.

    PubMed

    Gandara E Silva, Pablo Pena; Nobre, Caio Rodrigues; Resaffe, Pryscila; Pereira, Camilo Dias Seabra; Gusmão, Felipe

    2016-12-01

    Microplastic debris is a pervasive type of contaminant in marine ecosystems, being considered a major threat to marine biota. One of the problems of microplastics is that they can adsorb contaminants in extremely high concentrations. When released from the particle, these contaminants have the potential to cause toxic effects in the biota. So far, reports of toxic effects are mostly linked with the direct exposure of organisms through ingestion of contaminated microplastics. There is little information on the toxicity of leachates from microplastics to marine organisms. In this study, we conducted experiments to evaluate the toxicity of leachates from virgin and beached plastic pellets to embryo development of the brown mussel (Perna perna). We compared the efficiency of two test procedures, and evaluated the toxicity of beached pellets collected in a coastal marine protected area. We observed that mussel embryo is sensitive to leachate from both virgin and beached pellets. However, the toxicity of the leachate from beached pellets was much higher than that of virgin pellets. We suggest contaminants adsorbed onto the surface of beached pellets were responsible for the high toxicity of leachate from beached pellets, while the toxicity of leachate from virgin pellets was mainly due to plastic additives. Our results suggest microplastic debris may be harmful even if ingestion is not the only or main pathway of interaction of marine organisms with contaminated plastic debris.

  16. A critical examination of the possible application of zinc stable isotope ratios in bivalve mollusks and suspended particulate matter to trace zinc pollution in a tropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Daniel; Machado, Wilson; Weiss, Dominik; Mulholland, Daniel S; Boaventura, Geraldo R; Viers, Jerome; Garnier, Jeremie; Dantas, Elton L; Babinski, Marly

    2017-04-09

    The application of zinc (Zn) isotopes in bivalve tissues to identify zinc sources in estuaries was critically assessed. We determined the zinc isotope composition of mollusks (Crassostrea brasiliana and Perna perna) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) in a tropical estuary (Sepetiba Bay, Brazil) historically impacted by metallurgical activities. The zinc isotope systematics of the SPM was in line with mixing of zinc derived from fluvial material and from metallurgical activities. In contrast, source mixing alone cannot account for the isotope ratios observed in the bivalves, which are significantly lighter in the contaminated metallurgical zone (δ(66)ZnJMC = +0.49 ± 0.06‰, 2σ, n = 3) compared to sampling locations outside (δ(66)ZnJMC = +0.83 ± 0.10‰, 2σ, n = 22). This observation suggests that additional factors such as speciation, bioavailability and bioaccumulation pathways (via solution or particulate matter) influence the zinc isotope composition of bivalves.

  17. Evolution of an accretion disc in binary black hole systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Toma, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    We investigate evolution of an accretion disc in binary black hole (BBH) systems and possible electromagnetic counterparts of the gravitational waves from mergers of BBHs. Perna et al. proposed a novel evolutionary scenario of an accretion disc in BBHs in which a disc eventually becomes 'dead', i.e. the magnetorotational instability (MRI) becomes inactive. In their scenario, the dead disc survives until a few seconds before the merger event. We improve the dead disc model and propose another scenario, taking account of effects of the tidal torque from the companion and the critical ionization degree for MRI activation more carefully. We find that the mass of the dead disc is much lower than that in the Perna's scenario. When the binary separation sufficiently becomes small, the mass inflow induced by the tidal torque reactivates MRI, restarting mass accretion on to the black hole. We also find that this disc 'revival' happens more than thousands of years before the merger. The mass accretion induced by the tidal torque increases as the separation decreases, and a relativistic jet could be launched before the merger. The emissions from these jets are too faint compared to gamma-ray bursts, but detectable if the merger events happen within ≲10 Mpc or if the masses of the black holes are as massive as ∼105 M⊙.

  18. Carbonate-associated sulfate in lucinid (Bivalvia) shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.; Bao, H.; Anderson, L.; Engel, A. S.

    2007-12-01

    Symbiosis is a fundamental driver of evolution, with examples ranging from mitochondria in eukaryotic cells to barnacle-whale commensalism. The association between sulfur-oxidizing (thiotrophic) bacteria and the lucinid bivalve clade is particularly intriguing because the inferred antiquity of the relationship (>400 m.y.) seems at odds with the relatively loose ecologic linkage of living members. Because only half of genus-level lucinid taxa are extant, and the δ13C of shell carbonate exhibits no systematic difference between symbiotic and non- symbiotic bivalves, a new morphologically-independent proxy to determine whether fossil taxa possessed thiotrophic endosymbionts is needed. The δ34S of carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS) in bivalve shells may hold promise because biogenic carbonate incorporates sulfate into its crystal structure during biomineralization. Incorporation of bacterially derived SO42- (with a more negative δ34S value due to its reduced sulfur origin) into the lucinid-shell crystal lattice would, therefore, impart a distinctly lower δ34SCAS value than that from seawater SO42-, and would be distinguishable from CAS values of co- occurring heterotrophic bivalves. We measured CAS contents, δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS values of 15 sets of lucinid and co-occurring infaunal and epifaunal heterotrophic bivalve shells collected from modern and Cenozoic shallow marine sites. The modern bivalve shells had variable CAS content, from 100 to 2600 ppm. Epifauna often had the highest concentrations relative to the other ecological groups. The δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS clustered at values corresponding to modern seawater sulfate, but with significant scatter. There was no systematic isotope- compositional difference among all bivalves in the same habitat, or among the same lucinid, infaunal, or epifaunal groups across different sites. The fossil bivalve shells tended to preserve lower CAS concentrations and the isotope compositions further deviated from seawater values. These data suggest that 1) pore-water sulfate in shallow sediments is highly heterogeneous in its concentration and isotope composition, probably due to active microbial sulfate reduction, bioturbation, and water-pumping by bivalves and other infaunal filter feeders; 2) CAS is derived from ambient porewater or pumped-in seawater for infauna or epifauna, as well as for lucinids; and 3) CAS concentration and isotope compositions are vulnerable to later diagenetic processes.

  19. Cytogenetics of the razor clam Solen marginatus (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Solenidae).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tajes, J; González-Tizón, A; Martínez-Lage, A; Méndez, J

    2003-01-01

    The razor clam Solen marginatus has a diploid chromosome number of 38. The karyotype consists of one metacentric/submetacentric, three submetacentric/metacentric, five submetacentric, one submetacentric/subtelocentric, one subtelocentric/submetacentric, six subtelocentric and two telocentric chromosome pairs. Staining with chromomycin A3 revealed bright positive bands subcentromerically in the long arms of one medium-sized subtelocentric pair, while DAPI staining showed uniform fluorescence in all chromosomes of the complement. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using an 18S-5.8S-28S rDNA probe locates these loci at the subcentromeric region of one subtelocentric pair and at the subtelomeric region of another subtelocentric pair.

  20. Mitochondrial genome of the Peruvian scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Bivalvia: Pectinidae).

    PubMed

    Marín, Alan; Alfaro, Rubén; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of the Peruvian scallop Argopecten purpuratus was determined. The length of the mitochondrial coding region is 15,608 bp. A typical bivalve mitochondrial composition was detected with 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 21 transfer RNA genes, with the absence of the atp8 gene. Fifty percent of the protein-coding genes use typical ATG start codon, whereas five genes utilize ATA as their start codon. Only one gene was found to utilize TTG as its start codon. The A. purpuratus mitogenome shows a significant similarity to that of A. irradians irradians, in length as well as in gene composition.

  1. The behaviour of giant clams (Bivalvia: Cardiidae: Tridacninae).

    PubMed

    Soo, Pamela; Todd, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Giant clams, the largest living bivalves, live in close association with coral reefs throughout the Indo-Pacific. These iconic invertebrates perform numerous important ecological roles as well as serve as flagship species-drawing attention to the ongoing destruction of coral reefs and their associated biodiversity. To date, no review of giant clams has focussed on their behaviour, yet this component of their autecology is critical to their life history and hence conservation. Almost 100 articles published between 1865 and 2014 include behavioural observations, and these have been collated and synthesised into five sections: spawning, locomotion, feeding, anti-predation, and stress responses. Even though the exact cues for spawning in the wild have yet to be elucidated, giant clams appear to display diel and lunar periodicities in reproduction, and for some species, peak breeding seasons have been established. Perhaps surprisingly, giant clams have considerable mobility, ranging from swimming and gliding as larvae to crawling in juveniles and adults. Chemotaxis and geotaxis have been established, but giant clams are not phototactic. At least one species exhibits clumping behaviour, which may enhance physical stabilisation, facilitate reproduction, or provide protection from predators. Giant clams undergo several shifts in their mode of acquiring nutrition; starting with a lecithotrophic and planktotrophic diet as larvae, switching to pedal feeding after metamorphosis followed by the transition to a dual mode of filter feeding and phototrophy once symbiosis with zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium spp.) is established. Because of their shell weight and/or byssal attachment, adult giant clams are unable to escape rapidly from threats using locomotion. Instead, they exhibit a suite of visually mediated anti-predation behaviours that include sudden contraction of the mantle, valve adduction, and squirting of water. Knowledge on the behaviour of giant clams will benefit conservation and restocking efforts and help fine-tune mariculture techniques. Understanding the repertoire of giant clam behaviours will also facilitate the prediction of threshold levels for sustainable exploitation as well as recovery rates of depleted clam populations.

  2. Sublethal foot-predation on Donacidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Carmen; Tirado, Cristina; Manjón-Cabeza, Maria Eugenia

    2001-08-01

    The incidence of foot nipping was studied on the Donax spp. of the littoral of Málaga (Southern Spain, 2875 specimens collected from February 1990 to January 1991) and of Ré island (French Atlantic coast, 262 specimens of Donax vittatus (Da Costa, 1778) collected in May 1996). In Málaga, Donax trunculus L., 1758 was the species most regularly nipped (18% of individuals), with peaks in summer (25% in August and 48% in September) and winter (34% in December). In Ré island, 27% of the specimens showed a nipped foot. Logistic regression shows that in D. trunculus length is the variable that most influences the probability of foot nipping, followed by weight and chlorophyll a. However, the difference in length between damaged and undamaged individuals was not significant (U-Mann-Whitney test). The size class frequency and the values of Ivlev's index show that the small size classes were avoided, while for the other size classes predation remained balanced throughout the year. Therefore, the avoidance of the small size classes makes length the most influential variable. The logistic regression indicated a coefficient B=-0.03 for weight. This implies a slightly negative influence on the probability of foot nipping. However, without the data of September, there is a positive correlation ( r=0.76, p<0.01) between the monthly percentages of predation and the flesh dry weight of a standard individual (25 mm long). The peak in September could be due to the recruitment peak of bivalves, which may have attracted more predators to the area, and/or to the recruitment of predators such as crabs to the swash zone. Logistic regression and test of comparison of percentages indicate that there was not any influence of the sex of an animal on the probability of foot nipping. Only in February was a significantly higher percentage ( p<0.05) of females nipped (44.44%) than the total of females in the sample (20.20%). The biomass (as flesh dry weight) of D. trunculus lost by foot nipping amounts to more than 20% in most of the size classes. There was an increase from the small sizes to the largest ones, in which it reaches 37%, with a positive correlation ( r=0.84; p<0.005) between size class and loss of biomass. Possible predators responsible for the foot nipping are crabs. Crab species usually found together with the donacids were Portumnus latipes (Pennant, 1777) Liocarcinus vernalis (Risso, 1816) and Atelecyclus undecimdentatus (Herbst, 1783). In aquarium experiments, they demonstrated an ability to nip the foot of clams. Portumnus latipes was the most active foot nipper, but left alive all the damaged clams. Therefore, we conclude that crabs are the most likely foot-nipping predators in the field.

  3. Trace metals in water, sediment and bivalves of a tropical estuary, west coast of India.

    PubMed

    Parvez Al-Usmani, S M; Jagtap, T G; Patil, D N

    2015-10-15

    Trace metal pollution was studied in water, sediment and three selected bivalves in Mandovi and Chapora estuaries of Goa. The trace metal in water and sediment of Mandovi was higher than in Chapora. The concentration in the tissues was in the range of 1205.2-2506.7 ppm for Paphia malabarica, 1906.2-2802.6 ppm for Perna viridis and 778.7-1607.5 ppm for Saccostrea cucullata in Mandovi estuary. Tha values for Chapora were 199.4-625.8 ppm for P. malabarica, 812.6-1220.2 for P. viridis and 392.5-418.6 ppm for S. cucullata. The anthropogenic input of metal in Mandovi estuary appears to be mainly responsible for the high accumulation of trace metals. These bivalves have potential to serve as indicator for metal contamination in seafood of Goa.

  4. Selective colors reflection from stratified aragonite calcium carbonate plates of mollusk shells.

    PubMed

    Lertvachirapaiboon, Chutiparn; Parnklang, Tewarak; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Wongravee, Kanet; Thammacharoen, Chuchaat; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2015-08-01

    An interaction between the incident light and the structural architecture within the shell of Asian green mussel (Perna viridis) induces observable pearlescent colors. In this paper, we investigate the influence of the structural architecture on the expressed colors. After a removal of the organic binder, small flakes from crushed shells show vivid rainbow reflection under an optical microscope. An individual flake expresses vivid color under a bright-field illumination while become transparent under a dark-field illumination. The expressed colors of the aragonite flakes are directly associated with its structural architecture. The flakes with aragonite thickness of 256, 310, and 353 nm, respectively, appear blue, green, and red under an optical microscope. The spectral simulation corroborates the experimentally observed optical effects as the flakes with thicker aragonite layers selectively reflected color with longer wavelengths. Flakes with multiple aragonite thicknesses expressed multi-color as the upper aragonite layers allow reflected colors from the lower layers to be observed.

  5. Accumulation patterns of lipophilic organic contaminants in surface sediments and in economic important mussel and fish species from Jakarta Bay, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dwiyitno; Dsikowitzky, Larissa; Nordhaus, Inga; Andarwulan, Nuri; Irianto, Hari Eko; Lioe, Hanifah Nuryani; Ariyani, Farida; Kleinertz, Sonja; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2016-09-30

    Non-target screening analyses were conducted in order to identify a wide range of organic contaminants in sediment and animal tissue samples from Jakarta Bay. High concentrations of di-iso-propylnaphthalenes (DIPNs), linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected in all samples, whereas phenylmethoxynaphthalene (PMN), DDT and DDT metabolites (DDX) were detected at lower concentrations. In order to evaluate the uptake and accumulation by economic important mussel (Perna viridis) and fish species, contaminant patterns of DIPNs, LABs and PAHs in different compartments were compared. Different patterns of these contaminant groups were found in sediment and animal tissue samples, suggesting compound-specific accumulation and metabolism processes. Significantly higher concentrations of these three contaminant groups in mussel tissue as compared to fish tissue from Jakarta Bay were found. Because P. viridis is an important aquaculture species in Asia, this result is relevant for food safety.

  6. A few remarks on ordinary differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, B.

    1996-12-31

    We present in this note existence and uniqueness results for solutions of ordinary differential equations and linear transport equations with discontinuous coefficients in a bounded open subset {Omega} of R{sup N} or in the whole space R{sup N} (N {ge} 1). R.J. Di Perna and P.L. Lions studied the case of vector fields b with coefficients in Sobolev spaces and bounded divergence. We want to show that similar results hold for more general b: we assume in the bounded autonomous case that b belongs to W{sup 1,1}({Omega}), b.n = 0 on {partial_derivative}{Omega}, and that there exists T{sub o} > O such that exp(T{sub o}{vert_bar}div b{vert_bar}) {element_of} L{sup 1}({Omega}). Furthermore, we establish results on transport equations with initial values in L{sup p} spaces (p > 1). 9 refs.

  7. Heavy metals in bivalve mollusks collected from Da-Peng Bay Lagoon in south-southwestern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Shue, Meei-Fang; Chen, Wen-Der; Su, Chia-Chi; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, concentrations of several heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Cr, and Cd) were measured in Katelysia hiantina, Anomalocardia squamosa, Perna viridis, Anadara antiquata, Paphia undulata, and Sanguinolaria diphos bivalve mollusks from Da-Peng Bay Lagoon near the south-southwestern coast of Taiwan. The metal pollution index (MPI) values were highest and lowest in winter and autumn, respectively. The MPI value in the viscera of P. viridis was higher than in muscles. In all four seasons, Zn concentrations in viscera and muscles of P. viridis were higher than for other metals. The capacities of A. squamosa to accumulate the concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Cr and of A. antiquata to accumulate concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cd were significant. Analytical results suggested that A. squamosa and A. antiquata may be used as bioindicators for monitoring Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb, Zn, and Cd heavy-metal pollution in Da-Peng Bay Lagoon throughout the year.

  8. Uniqueness and Long Time Asymptotic for the Keller-Segel Equation: The Parabolic-Elliptic Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egaña Fernández, Giani; Mischler, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    The present paper deals with the parabolic-elliptic Keller-Segel equation in the plane in the general framework of weak (or "free energy") solutions associated to initial datum with finite mass M, finite second moment and finite entropy. The aim of the paper is threefold: (1) We prove the uniqueness of the "free energy" solution on the maximal interval of existence [0, T*) with T* = ∞ in the case when M ≦ 8π and T* < ∞ in the case when M > 8π. The proof uses a DiPerna-Lions renormalizing argument which makes it possible to get the "optimal regularity" as well as an estimate of the difference of two possible solutions in the critical L 4/3 Lebesgue norm similarly to the 2 d vorticity Navier-Stokes equation.

  9. Does cannibalism of larvae by adults affect settlement and connectivity of mussel populations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porri, Francesca; Jordaan, Tembisa; McQuaid, Christopher D.

    2008-09-01

    Intertidal population dynamics are driven by a complex series of processes, including larval supply and the possibility of larval predation by benthic animals such as filter-feeders. We hypothesised that cannibalism by adults could play a major role in the population connectivity of mussel populations by removing larvae as they attempt to settle in the adult habitat. Specifically, we tested hypotheses that consumption of mussel larvae by adults removes a significant proportion of potential settlers and is influenced by both settlement intensity and tidal state (flooding or ebbing). Predation of mussel larvae by adult mussels was investigated on incoming and ebbing tides during four spring tides by analysing the gut contents of adult Perna perna and Mytilus galloprovincialis collected from the low intertidal mussel zone between October 2005 and January 2006. Consumption rates were then compared with estimates of successful settler densities on natural beds. The results showed that mortality of competent mussel larvae through adult ingestion removes up to 77% a of potential settlers. Rates of larval consumption were highest during months of intense settlement, suggesting that mussels feed opportunistically, filtering a relatively fixed volume of water and removing particles, including larvae, in proportion to their densities in the water. Rates of larviphagy were also higher during receding than incoming tides. We suggest that this is due to changes in larval density or, more probably, in adult filtration efficiency that are related to the state of the tide. Despite significant effects of both tidal state and settlement intensity on rates of larval ingestion, neither had a significant effect on the proportion of potential settlers removed. During settlement more than half of all potential settlers are lost through cannibalism, with potentially serious consequences for population maintenance. The results highlight the paradoxical nature of the evolution of settlement

  10. Chronic contamination assessment integrating biomarkers' responses in transplanted mussels--a seasonal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C D S; Martín-Díaz, M L; Catharino, M G M; Cesar, A; Choueri, R B; Taniguchi, S; Abessa, D M S; Bícego, M C; Vasconcellos, M B A; Bainy, A C D; Sousa, E C P M; Delvalls, T A

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to provide the first biomonitoring integrating biomarkers and bioaccumulation data in São Paulo coast, Brazil and, for this purpose, a battery of biomarkers of defense mechanisms was analyzed and linked to contaminants' body burden in a weigh-of-evidence approach. The brown mussel Perna perna was selected to be transplanted from a farming area (Caraguatatuba) to four possibly polluted sites: Engenho D'Água, DTCS (Dutos e Terminais do Centro-Oeste de São Paulo) oil terminal (Sao Sebastiao zone), Palmas Island, and Itaipu (It; Santos Bay zone). After 3 months of exposure in each season, mussels were recollected and the cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A)- and CYP3A-like activities, glutathione-S-transferase and antioxidants enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) were analyzed in gills. The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, linear alkylbenzenes, and nonessential metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, and Hg) in whole tissue were also analyzed and data were linked to biomarkers' responses by multivariate analysis (principal component analysis-factor analysis). A representation of estimated factor scores was performed to confirm the factor descriptions and to characterize the studied stations. Biomarkers exhibited most significant alterations all year long in mussels transplanted to It, located at Santos Bay zone, where bioaccumulation of organic and inorganic compounds was detected. This integrated approach using transplanted mussels showed satisfactory results, pointing out differences between sites, seasons, and critical areas, which could be related to land-based contaminants' sources. The influence of natural factors and other contaminants (e.g., pharmaceuticals) on biomarkers' responses are also discussed.

  11. Patchiness and co-existence of indigenous and invasive mussels at small spatial scales: the interaction of facilitation and competition.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Johan; McQuaid, Christopher D; Sköld, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that two species with similar requirements will fail to show long-term co-existence in situations where shared resources are limiting, especially at spatial scales that are small relative to the size of the organisms. Two species of intertidal mussels, the indigenous Perna perna and the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis, form mixed beds on the south coast of South Africa in a situation that has been stable for several generations of these species, even though these populations are often limited by the availability of space. We examined the spatial structure of these species where they co-exist at small spatial scales in the absence of apparent environmental heterogeneity at two sites, testing: whether conspecific aggregation of mussels can occur (using spatial Monte-Carlo tests); the degree of patchiness (using Korcak B patchiness exponent), and whether there was a relationship between percent cover and patchiness. We found that under certain circumstances there is non-random conspecific aggregation, but that in other circumstances there may be random distribution (i.e. the two species are mixed), so that spatial patterns are context-dependent. The relative cover of the species differed between sites, and within each site, the species with higher cover showed low Korcak B values (indicating low patchiness, i.e. the existence of fewer, larger patches), while the less abundant species showed the reverse, i.e. high patchiness. This relationship did not hold for either species within sites. We conclude that co-existence between these mussels is possible, even at small spatial scales because each species is an ecological engineer and, while they have been shown to compete for space, this is preceded by initial facilitation. We suggest that a patchy pattern of co-existence is possible because of a balance between direct (competitive) and indirect (facilitative) interactions.

  12. The biological importance of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin backup systems in bivalves during peroxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Uliano-Silva, Marcela; Delapedra, Gabriel; Arl, Miriam; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2014-10-01

    Organic peroxide elimination in eukaryotes essentially depends on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx) enzymes, which are supported by their respective electron donors, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx). This system depends on the ancillary enzymes glutathione reductase (GR) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to maintain GSH and Trx in their reduced state. This study discusses the biological importance of GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx during cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) exposure in brown mussel Perna perna. ZnCl2 or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenze (CDNB) was used to decrease GR and TrxR activities in gills, as already reported with mammals and bivalves. ZnCl2 exposure lowered GR activity (28%), impaired the in vivo CHP decomposition and decreased the survival rates under CHP exposure. CDNB decreased GR (54%) and TrxR (73%) activities and induced glutathione depletion (99%), promoting diminished peroxide elimination and survival rates at a greater extent than ZnCl2. CDNB also increased the susceptibility of hemocytes to CHP toxicity. Despite being toxic and causing mortality at longer exposures, short (2 h) exposure to CHP promoted an up regulation of GSH (50 and 100 μM CHP) and protein-thiol (100 μM CHP) levels, which was blocked by ZnCl2 or CDNB pre-exposure. Results highlight the biological importance of GSH, GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx activities, contributing to organic peroxides elimination and mussel survival under oxidative challenges. To our knowledge, this is the first work that demonstrates, albeit indirectly, the biological importance of GPx/GR/GSH and Prx/TrxR/Trx systems on in vivo organic peroxide elimination in bivalves.

  13. Effects of Endolithic Parasitism on Invasive and Indigenous Mussels in a Variable Physical Environment

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Christopher David; Gektidis, Marcos

    2009-01-01

    Biotic stress may operate in concert with physical environmental conditions to limit or facilitate invasion processes while altering competitive interactions between invaders and native species. Here, we examine how endolithic parasitism of an invasive and an indigenous mussel species acts in synergy with abiotic conditions of the habitat. Our results show that the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis is more infested than the native Perna perna and this difference is probably due to the greater thickness of the protective outer-layer of the shell of the indigenous species. Higher abrasion due to waves on the open coast could account for dissimilarities in degree of infestation between bays and the more wave-exposed open coast. Also micro-scale variations of light affected the level of endolithic parasitism, which was more intense at non-shaded sites. The higher levels of endolithic parasitism in Mytilus mirrored greater mortality rates attributed to parasitism in this species. Condition index, attachment strength and shell strength of both species were negatively affected by the parasites suggesting an energy trade-off between the need to repair the damaged shell and the other physiological parameters. We suggest that, because it has a lower attachment strength and a thinner shell, the invasiveness of M. galloprovincialis will be limited at sun and wave exposed locations where endolithic activity, shell scouring and risk of dislodgement are high. These results underline the crucial role of physical environment in regulating biotic stress, and how these physical-biological interactions may explain site-to-site variability of competitive balances between invasive and indigenous species. PMID:19668334

  14. Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial DNA in Donax trunculus (Bivalvia: Donacidae) and the problem of its sporadic detection in Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Theologidis, Ioannis; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Gaspar, Miguel B; Zouros, Eleftherios

    2008-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is transmitted maternally in metazoan species. This rule does not hold in several species of bivalves that have two mtDNA types, one that is transmitted maternally and the other paternally. This system of mitochondrial DNA transmission is known as doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). Here we present evidence of DUI in the clam Donax trunculus making Donacidae the sixth bivalve family in which the phenomenon has been found. In addition, we present the taxonomic affiliation of all species in which DUI is currently known to occur and construct a phylogeny of the maternal and paternal genomes of these species. We use this information to address the question of a single or multiple origins of DUI and to discuss whether failed attempts to demonstrate the presence of DUI in several bivalve species might be due to problems of detection or to genuine absence of the phenomenon.

  15. [Reproductive cycle of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae (Bivalvia: Ostreidae) in Camamu Bay, Bahia, Brasil].

    PubMed

    Lenz, Tiago; Boehs, Guisla

    2011-03-01

    The mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae is important fishery resource along the entire Brasilian coast with excellent potential for marine culture. The purpose of this paper was to examine the reproductive characteristics of the oyster of the Maraú river estuary in Camamu Bay, Bahia, Brasil. The samples were collected monthly, from September 2006 to August 2007, at two points (I and II) in Camamu Bay. At each site 20 oysters were collected for histological analysis, fixed in Davidson's solution, embedded in paraffin, dehydrated in an ethanol series, sectioned (7 microm thick) and stained with Harris hematoxylin and Eosin (HE). Additionally, 30 oysters were sampled, at each point, for a condition index analysis. The water temperature ranged from 23.5 degrees C to 30 degrees C and the salinity from 15 to 25 ups at Point I (Maraú) and from 25 to 35 at Point II (Tanque Island). The oyster's height ranged from 30 to 92 mm at Point I and from 27 to 102 mm at Point II, with an average of 49.0 mm +/- 9.1 (n = 230) and 49.9 mm +/- 9.9 (n = 237), respectively. Among the sampled oysters at Point I, 59.1% were females, 31.3% males, 1.3% hermaphrodites and 8.2% of the oysters of undetermined sex. At Point II, 66.2% were females, 30.4% males, 0.8% hermaphrodites and 2.5% (n = 237) of undetermined sex. The gonadic stage analysis indicated that the reproduction period of the C. rhizophorae in the Maraú Peninsula was continuous all year, without any regressive phase. The condition index (R) ranged from 8.0% to 17.7%. The peak periods of R coincided with the expressive oyster's percentage in the maturation and liberation gametic stages. The results of these findings will contribute information for the oyster spat collection and to the process installation of the oyster culture in Camamu Bay.

  16. [Effect of probiotic bacteria on survival and growth of Cortez oyster larvae, Crassostrea corteziensis (Bivalvia: Ostreidae)].

    PubMed

    Campa-Córdova, Angel Isidro; Luna-González, Antonio; Mazón-Suastegui, José Manuel; Aguirre-Guzmán, Gabriel; Ascencio, Felipe; González-Ocampo, Héctor Abelardo

    2011-03-01

    Disease control problems have major constraints in aquaculture production, and the use of probiotics in larviculture is a valid alternative to antibiotics. This study analyzed the effect of probiotic bacteria on survival and final size of Cortez oyster larvae Crassostrea corteziensis. Two different probiotic concentrations were evaluated, 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(5) CFU/ml of Lactic acid bacteria (strain NS61) isolated from Nodipecten subnodosus, and bacilli isolated from the white leg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain YC58) and C. corteziensis (Burkholderia cepacia, strain Y021). Bacteria were added directly into culture tanks, starting the bioassays from veliger to pediveliger stages as follows: (1) Control, without probiotics; (2) lactic acid bacteria (Lb); (3) bacilli mix (Mb) in a proportion 1:1. Results showed a higher larval survival with Lb and Mb at a dose of 1 x 10(4) CFU/ml compared to the control group. Larvae exposed to Mb at 1 x 10(5) CFU/ml showed higher survival than Lb and control. Larval final size was not significantly increased with the tested probiotics, but larvae treated with Lb at 1 x 10(5) CFU/ml showed less survival rate than those treated at 1 x 10(4) CFU/ml. This study showed the beneficial effect of these probiotics, added individually or mixed in C. corteziensis larvae culture.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Olympia oyster Ostrea lurida (Bivalvia, Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu; Wu, Xiangyun; Li, Lu; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-06-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of the Olympia oyster Ostrea lurida (16,344 bp), an economically important bivalve, was newly sequenced and annotated. Ostrea lurida is the largest reported Ostrea oyster mt genomes to date and has a comparatively highest overall A + T content (65%) among the available genomes of marine oysters. High levels of variability of nad2 and nad6 genes and that of major non-coding region (MNR) indicate their potential value as useful molecular markers for population and conservation genetic studies in the future. Phylogenetic analyses based on concatenated nucleotide sequences from all 13 PCGs and 2 rRNA genes show that the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis is sister to the Asian slipper oyster Ostrea denselamellosa, while O. lurida is put at the most basal position of the clade, and indicate that Ostrea are closer to Saccostrea than Crassostrea, although gene arrangement shows a closer relationship between Ostrea and Crassostrea. The observations of the evolutionary pattern of start codon usage among the three congeneric oysters indicate that variation in start codon usage is species-correlated rather than gene-correlated, and to some extent, bears useful phylogenetic information.

  18. Comparative Large-Scale Mitogenomics Evidences Clade-Specific Evolutionary Trends in Mitochondrial DNAs of Bivalvia

    PubMed Central

    Plazzi, Federico; Puccio, Guglielmo; Passamonti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Despite the figure of complete bivalve mitochondrial genomes keeps growing, an assessment of the general features of these genomes in a phylogenetic framework is still lacking, despite the fact that bivalve mitochondrial genomes are unusual under different aspects. In this work, we constructed a dataset of one hundred mitochondrial genomes of bivalves to perform the first systematic comparative mitogenomic analysis, developing a phylogenetic background to scaffold the evolutionary history of the class' mitochondrial genomes. Highly conserved domains were identified in all protein coding genes; however, four genes (namely, atp6, nad2, nad4L, and nad6) were found to be very divergent for many respects, notwithstanding the overall purifying selection working on those genomes. Moreover, the atp8 gene was newly annotated in 20 mitochondrial genomes, where it was previously declared as lacking or only signaled. Supernumerary mitochondrial proteins were compared, but it was possible to find homologies only among strictly related species. The rearrangement rate on the molecule is too high to be used as a phylogenetic marker, but here we demonstrate for the first time in mollusks that there is correlation between rearrangement rates and evolutionary rates. We also developed a new index (HERMES) to estimate the amount of mitochondrial evolution. Many genomic features are phylogenetically congruent and this allowed us to highlight three main phases in bivalve history: the origin, the branching of palaeoheterodonts, and the second radiation leading to the present-day biodiversity. PMID:27503296

  19. Muscle and neuronal differentiation in primary cell culture of larval Mytilus trossulus (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Odintsova, Nelly A; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav A; Nezlin, Leonid P

    2010-03-01

    Molluscan in vitro technology allows the study of the differentiation of isolated cells undergoing experimental manipulations. We have used the immunofluorescence technique and laser scanning microscopy to investigate the organization of muscle proteins (actin, myosin, paramyosin, and twitchin) and the localization of neurotransmitters (serotonin and FMRFamide) in cultured mussel larval cells. Differentiation into muscle and neuron-like cells occurs during the cultivation of mussel cells from premyogenic and prenervous larval stages. Muscle proteins are colocalized in contractile cells through all stages of cultivation. The cultivation of mussel cells on various substrates and the application of integrin receptor blockers suggest that an integrin-dependent mechanism is involved in cell adhesion and differentiation. Dissociated mussel cells aggregate and become self-organized in culture. After 20 days of cultivation, they form colonies in which serotonin- and FMRFamide-immunoreactive cells are located centrally, whereas muscle cells form a contractile network at the periphery. The pattern of thick and thin filaments in cultivated mussel cells changes according to the scenario of muscle arrangement in vivo: initially, a striated pattern of muscle filaments forms but is then replaced by a smooth muscle pattern with a diffuse distribution of muscle proteins, typical of muscles of adult molluscs. Myogenesis in molluscs thus seems to be a highly dynamic and potentially variable process. Such a "flexible" developmental program can be regarded as a prerequisite for the evolution of the wide variety of striated and smooth muscles in larval and adult molluscs.

  20. Misidentification of freshwater mussel species (Bivalvia:Unionidae): contributing factors, management implications, and potential solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shea, Colin P.; Peterson, James T.; Wisniewski, Jason M.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Surveys of freshwater mussel populations are used frequently to inform conservation decisions by providing information about the status and distribution of species. It is generally accepted that not all mussels or species are collected during surveys, and incomplete detection of individuals and species can bias data and can affect inferences. However, considerably less attention has been given to the potential effects of species misidentification. To evaluate the prevalence of and potential reasons for species misidentification, we conducted a laboratory-based identification exercise and quantified the relationships between mussel species characteristics, observer experience, and misidentification rate. We estimated that misidentification was fairly common, with rates averaging 27% across all species and ranging from 0 to 56%, and was related to mussel shell characteristics and observer experience. Most notably, species with shell texturing were 6.09× less likely than smooth-shelled species to be misidentified. Misidentification rates declined with observer experience, but for many species the risk of misidentification averaged >10% even for observers with moderate levels of experience (5–6 y). In addition, misidentification rates among observers showed substantial variability after controlling for experience. Our results suggest that species misidentification may be common in field surveys of freshwater mussels and could potentially bias estimates of population status and trends. Misidentification rates possibly could be reduced through use of regional workshops, testing and certification programs, and the availability of archived specimens and tissue samples in museum collections.

  1. Life history and propagation of the endangered fanshell pearlymussel, Cyprogenia stegaria Rafinesque (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.; Neves, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Aspects of the reproduction, age, growth, fish hosts, and culture of juveniles were determined for the endangered fanshell pearlymussel, Cyprogenia stegaria Rafinesque, 1820, in the Clinch River, Tennessee. Glochidia of C. stegaria are contained in red, worm-like conglutinates that resemble oligochaetes. Conglutinates are 20 to 80 mm long and are released through the excurrent aperture. Estimated fecundity was 22,357 to 63,459 glochidia/mussel. Eighty-four valves of C. stegaria were thin-sectioned for aging; ages ranged from 6 to 26 y. Of 16 fish species tested, 9 hosts were identified through induced infestations of glochidia: mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), banded sculpin (Cottus carolinae), greenside darter (Etheostoma blennioides), snubnose darter (Etheostoma simoterurn), banded darter (Etheostoma zonale), tangerine darter (Percina aurantiaca), blotchside logperch (Percina burtoni), logperch (Percina caprodes), and Roanoke darter (Percina roanoka). Newly metamorphosed juveniles were cultured in recirculating and nonrecirculating aquaculture systems within dishes containing sediments of 300 to 500 ??m diameter (sand) or <105 ??m diameter (silt), and fed either the green algae Neochloris oleoabundans or Scenedesrnus quadricauda daily. Growth and survival of juvenile mussels were highest in the nonrecirculating aquaculture system, with a mean survival of 72% after 2 wk and 38% after 4 wk.

  2. Chlorine toxicity to early life stages of freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Valenti, Theodore W; Cherry, Donald S; Currie, Rebecca J; Neves, Richard J; Jones, Jess W; Mair, Rachel; Kane, Cynthia M

    2006-09-01

    Chlorine (Cl) is a highly toxic, widely used halogen disinfectant that is present in point-source pollution discharges from wastewater treatment plants and industrial facilities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency freshwater criteria for Cl are 19 microg total residual Cl (TRC)/L as a maximum 1-h average concentration and 11 microg TRC/L as a maximum 4-d average; however, toxicological data for unionids were not used in these calculations. To address this void in the data, we conducted acute tests with glochidia from several species and 21-d bioassays with three-month-old Epioblasma capsaeformis and three-, six-, and 12-month-old Villosa iris juveniles. The 24-h lethal concentration 50 values for glochidia were between 70 and 220 [Lg TRC/L, which are 2.5 to 37 times higher than those reported in other studies for cladocerans. Significant declines in growth and survivorship were observed in the 21-d test with E. capsaeformis at 20 microg TRC/L. Lowest-observed-adverse-effects concentrations in bioassays with juvenile V. iris were higher (30-60 microg TRC/L) but showed a significant trend of declining toxicity with increased age. Although endpoints were above water quality criteria, the long life spans of unionids and potential implications of chronic exposure to endangered juvenile mussels still warrant concern.

  3. Direct evidence for maternal inheritance of bacterial symbionts in small deep-sea clams (Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae).

    PubMed

    Szafranski, Kamil M; Gaudron, Sylvie M; Duperron, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial symbiont transmission is a key step in the renewal of the symbiotic interaction at each host generation, and different modes of transmission can be distinguished. Vesicomyidae are chemosynthetic bivalves from reducing habitats that rely on symbiosis with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, in which two studies suggesting vertical transmission of symbionts have been published, both limited by the imaging techniques used. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that bacterial symbionts of Isorropodon bigoti, a gonochoristic Vesicomyidae from the Guiness cold seep site, occur intracellularly within female gametes at all stages of gametogenesis from germ cells to mature oocytes and in early postlarval stage. Symbionts are completely absent from the male gonad and gametes. This study confirms the transovarial transmission of symbionts in Vesicomyidae and extends it to the smaller species for which no data were previously available.

  4. [Does the comparator method has a future in diagnosing large bivalves (Bivalvia: Unionida)?].

    PubMed

    Bogatov, V V

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the contours of the frontal sections of valves in shells of different size of the same species run through different parts of the valve. A new modification of the comparator method is proposed, which allows studying the shape of the maximum convex contour of the cross-section of the shell.

  5. Pattern and process of diversification in an ecologically diverse epifaunal bivalve group Pterioidea (Pteriomorphia, Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Remi; Kameda, Yuichi; Kato, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The pterioid bivalves (superfamily Pterioidea) are epifaunal filter feeders that attach to various substrata, including rocks, corals, gorgonians, and sponges. An intriguing question is how different substratum types have affected the diversification of pterioid bivalves. To elucidate the evolutionary pathway of Pterioidea, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of 49 individuals belonging to 18 pterioid and 5 outgroup species using 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes. The results supported the monophyly of superfamily Pterioidea and recovered three major clades within Pterioidea: Malleus, Pteria and Electroma (Pterelectroma) zebra and the rest. This result contradicts the current circumscription of the pterioid families, Pteriidae, Malleidae, and Isognomonidae, and suggests that hinge morphology, which has long been used as a diagnostic character, does not reflect phylogenetic relationships. The monophyly of most genera, however, was confirmed. Mapping substrata types on the phylogenetic tree indicated that the ancestors of pterioid bivalves were epifaunal on rocks, and that epizoic life on sessile cnidarians had a single origin. Although we could not ascertain whether endozoic life in sponges evolved once or twice, our results suggest that colonization of biotic substrata resulted in diversification and morphological and ecological adaptation to epi-/endozoic life. We estimated that the genus Pteria has diversified since the late Cretaceous in response to gorgonian diversification. These results emphasize the importance of substratum shifts in speciation and diversification of pterioid bivalves.

  6. Mitochondrial genome of the cockscomb pearl mussel Cristaria plicata (Bivalvia, Unionoida, Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hee; Choi, Eun Hwa; Kim, Sang Ki; Ryu, Shi Hyun; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2012-02-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the cockscomb pearl mussel Cristaria plicata, which is an endangered species in South Korea, was sequenced. The circle genome (15,708 bp in size) consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes. There were 26 noncoding regions (NCs) found throughout the mitogenome of C. plicata, ranging in size from 2 to 327 bp, and the two largest NC regions, NC286 and NC326, were found between ND5 and tRNA(Gln) (286 bp) and between tRNA(Glu) and ND2 (326 bp), respectively. The 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes of a female individual of C. plicata collected from Korea (15,708 bp) were compared to those of the Chinese individual (15,712 bp) published before. The result showed that ND3 is the most conserved with 100% nucleotide similarity, and each of the other protein-coding genes has ca. 99%, respectively. The two largest NCs among 26 NCs have totally 98% nucleotide similarity between Korean and Chinese ones.

  7. The complete maternal mitochondrial genome of rare Chinese freshwater mussel Lepidodesma languilati (Bivalvia: Unionidae: Unioninae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Hua; Ouyang, Shan; Wu, Xiao-Ping; Ding, Mei-Huang

    2016-11-01

    Lepidodesma languilati is considered threatened because of the influence of human activities in China. The complete F-type mitochondrial genome of L. languilati was determined in this study (GenBank accession no. KT381195). It is a 15 754-bp-long circular molecule that consists of 37 genes that are typically found in other invertebrates. The overall base composition of the entire sequence is as follows: A (39.1%), T (25.7%), C (23.4%), and G (11.8%). Except for cox1 (TTG), cob (ATT), nad1 (ATT), nad6 (ATA), nad4 (TTG), and atp8 (GTG), 7 of the 13 protein-coding genes initiate with orthodox ATG start codon. All the 13 protein-coding genes have complete termination codon TAA or TAG. Phylogenetic tree indicates that L. languilati belongs to Unioninae. The newly sequenced complete mitogenome can provide basic data for comparative studies on mitochondrial genomes of Unionidae. It could also lay the important theoretical foundation for phylogenetics, population genetics, germplasm resources protection, sustainable, and reasonable utilization.

  8. Host specificity and metamorphosis of the glochidium of the freshwater mussel Unio tumidiformis (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Reis, Joaquim; Collares-Pereira, Maria João; Araujo, Rafael

    2014-02-01

    The glochidium larvae of freshwater mussels of the family Unionidae need to find suitable hosts to attach themselves and metamorphose into free-living juveniles. The specificity of the host-parasite relationship was investigated for the Iberian Unio tumidiformis Castro, 1885 by means of experimental infections and also by analyzing naturally infected fish. The process of encapsulation of glochidia was studied using scanning electron microscopy. Unio tumidiformis has proven to be an unusual host-specific unionid mussel, apparently parasitizing only fish of the genus Squalius Bonaparte, 1837. Successful encapsulation or complete metamorphosis was observed in five fish taxa: S. aradensis (Coelho, Bogutskaya, Rodrigues et Collares-Pereira), S. caroliterti (Doadrio), S. pyrenaicus (Günther), S. torgalensis (Coelho, Bogutskaya, Rodrigues et Collares-Pereira) and S. alburnoides (Steindachner) complex (only for the nuclear hybrids with at least one copy of the S. pyrenaicus genome). Complete metamorphose was achieved in 6 to 14 days at mean temperatures ranging from 21.8 to 26.1 degrees C. The current study provides support for cell migration being the main force of cyst formation and shows the influence of potential host's genome in response to the infection process to determine the success of the metamorphosis.

  9. Byssogenesis in the juvenile pink heelsplitter mussel, Potamilus alatus (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Wen, Hai B; Hua, Dan; Ma, Xue Y; Jin, Wu; Zhuang, Yan B; Gu, Ruo B; Yuan, Xin H; Du, Xin W; Xu, Pao

    2015-11-01

    The North American pink heelsplitter (Potamilus alatus) differs from most freshwater mussels in China by the ability to secrete an ephemeral byssus during its juvenile stage. In the present study, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate this ephemeral byssal structure, and amino acid composition was analyzed and compared with that of other species. The results revealed that the byssus consists of a long byssal thread and a few adhesive plaques which are randomly set up along the thread and assembled by petioles. There is a thin but distinctive cuticle with a continuous homogeneous matrix surrounding the byssal thread. Structural variation occurred when the byssal thread was differentially stretched. Four-stranded helical primary fasciculi, which form a stable rope-like structure, become evident after removal of the cuticle. The primary fasciculi consist of bundles of hundreds of parallel secondary fasciculi, each measuring about 5 μm in diameter. All evidence indicates that the byssus of the pink heelsplitter has a significantly different macrostructure and microstructure than the permanent byssus of the marine mussel Mytilus. Byssogenesis ceases when juveniles exceed 30 mm in length, although it varies greatly even among juveniles of similar size. Byssus formation is influenced by substrate type. The unique characteristics of the byssus have important advantages for survival, transition, and aggregation during the early life history. This study not only provides first insight into the structure of the ephemeral byssus and its relationship to freshwater mussel development and growth, but also suggests possibilities for the synthesis of novel biopolymer materials particularly useful in freshwater ecosystems.

  10. Cytogenetic characterization of the invasive mussel species Xenostrobus securis Lmk. (Bivalvia: Mytilidae).

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Concepción; Morán, Paloma; Pasantes, Juan J

    2011-09-01

    The chromosomes of the invasive black-pigmy mussel (Xenostrobus securis (Lmk. 1819)) were analyzed by means of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) / propidium iodide (PI) and chromomycin A3 (CMA) / DAPI fluorescence staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization using major rDNA, 5S rDNA, core histone genes, linker histone genes, and telomeric sequences as probes. The diploid chromosome number in this species is 2n = 30. The karyotype is composed of seven metacentric, one meta/submetacentric, and seven submetacentric chromosome pairs. Telomeric sequences appear at both ends of every single chromosome. Major rDNA clusters appear near the centromeres on chromosome pairs 1 and 3 and are associated with bright CMA fluorescence and dull DAPI fluorescence. This species shows five 5S rDNA clusters close to the centromeres on four chromosome pairs (2, 5, 6, and 8). Three of the four core histone gene clusters map to centromeric positions on chromosome pairs 7, 10, and 13. The fourth core histone gene cluster occupies a terminal position on chromosome pair 8, also bearing a 5S rDNA cluster. The two linker histone gene clusters are close to the centromeres on chromosome pairs 12 and 14. Therefore, the use of these probes allows the unequivocal identification of 11 of the 15 chromosome pairs that compose the karyotype of X. securis.

  11. Parasites of the mangrove mussel Mytella guyanensis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) in Camamu Bay, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ceuta, L O; Boehs, G

    2012-08-01

    This contribution reports the parasites found in the mangrove mussel Mytella guyanensis in Camamu Bay, Bahia, Brazil. Samples were collected monthly from September 2006 through October 2007. A total of 460 individuals were collected, fixed in Davidson's solution, and processed by standard histological techniques, and the sections were stained with Harris hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The water temperature ranged from 23.5 to 31.6 ºC, and the salinity from 25 to 37‰. Microscopic analysis showed Rickettsia-like organisms (RLOs), Nematopsis sp. (Apicomplexa), and Platyhelminthes, including a turbellarian, sporocysts of Bucephalus sp., metacercariae, and metacestodes of Tylocephalum sp. Parasites were observed mainly in the gills, mantle, and digestive gland. The prevalence of Nematopsis sp. was 100%, and in heavily infected mussels the tissues of the labial palps were damaged. RLOs occurred in high prevalence and intensity of infection in some periods. The digenean sporocysts showed moderate prevalence but high intensity of infection, and caused parasitic castration. In general, there was no significant spatial or temporal variation (p > 0.05) of the parasites, which is probably attributable to the small variations of temperature and salinity in the region.

  12. Troponin-like regulation in muscle thin filaments of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Bivalvia: Mytiloida).

    PubMed

    Vyatchin, Ilya G; Shevchenko, Ulyana V; Lazarev, Stanislav S; Matusovsky, Oleg S; Shelud'ko, Nikolay S

    2015-10-01

    Muscles of bivalve molluscs have double calcium regulation--myosin-linked and actin-linked. While the mechanism of myosin-linked regulation is sufficiently studied, there is still no consensus on the mechanism of actin-linked regulation. Earlier we showed a high degree of Ca2+-sensitivity of thin filaments from the adductor muscle of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Mytiloida). In order to elucidate the nature of this regulation, we isolated the fraction of minor proteins from the mussel thin filaments, which confers Ca2+-sensitivity to reconstituted actomyosin-tropomyosin. Proteins of this fraction, ABP-19, ABP-20, and ABP-28, were chromatographically purified and identified. According to the results of mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis, as well as by their functional properties, these mussel actin-binding proteins appeared to correspond to the troponin components from the skeletal muscles of vertebrates (TnC, TnI and TnT). The reconstituted mussel troponin complex confers to actomyosin-tropomyosin more than 80% Ca2+-sensitivity. The in vivo molar ratio of actin/tropomyosin/troponin was calculated to be 7:1:0.5, i.e., the content of troponin in mussel thin filaments is two times lower than in thin filaments of skeletal muscles of vertebrates. These data demonstrate that troponin-like regulation found in the catch muscle of the mussel C. grayanus is present at least in two suborders of bivalves: Pectinoida and Mytiloida.

  13. The Complete Maternally and Paternally Inherited Mitochondrial Genomes of a Freshwater Mussel Potamilus alatus (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Wen, Hai B; Cao, Zhe M; Hua, Dan; Xu, Pao; Ma, Xue Y; Jin, Wu; Yuan, Xin H; Gu, Ruo B

    2017-01-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial DNA, found only in some bivalve families and characterized by the existence of gender-associated mtDNA lineages that are inherited through males (M-type) or females (F-type), is one of the very few exceptions to the general rule of strict maternal mtDNA inheritance in animals. M-type sequences are often undetected and hence still underrepresented in the GenBank, which hinders the progress of the understanding of the DUI phenomenon. We have sequenced and analyzed the complete M and F mitogenomes of a freshwater mussel, Potamilus alatus. The M-type was 493 bp longer (M = 16 560, F = 16 067 bp). Gene contents, order and the distribution of genes between L and H strands were typical for unionid mussels. Candidates for the two ORFan genes (forf and morf) were found in respective mitogenomes. Both mitogenomes had a very similar A+T bias: F = 61% and M = 62.2%. The M mitogenome-specific cox2 extension (144 bp) is much shorter than in other sequenced unionid mitogenomes (531-576 bp), which might be characteristic for the Potamilus genus. The overall topology of the phylogenetic tree is in very good agreement with the currently accepted phylogenetic relationships within the Unionidae: both studied sequences were placed within the Ambleminae subfamily clusters in the corresponding M and F clades.

  14. Complete maternal mitochondrial genome of freshwater mussel Aculamprotula tientsinensis (Bivalvia: Unionidae: Unioninae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui-Wen; An, Chang-Ting; Wu, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Ouyang, Shan

    2016-11-01

    Aculamprotula tientsinensis is a rare and endemic species of freshwater mussel in China. This study firstly determined the complete F-type mitochondrial genome of A. tientsinensis. The circle genome (15 695 bp) comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, 1 FORF gene. Except for cob, nad5 and nad6, the remaining protein-coding genes initiate with the orthodox start codon (ATG, ATA, ATT). There are 26 non-coding regions in the mitogenome of A. tientsinensis, ranging in size from 1 to 229 bp. The base composition of the genome is A (37.83%), G (12.69%), T (25.43%) and C (24.06%). Gene order is identical to other female species of Unionidae but for Gonideinae. The phylogenetic analyses of Unionidae indicate that A. tientsinensis is closely related to A. tortuosa and A. coreana, which belong to Unioninae. The complete mitogenome can deepen comparative and evolutionary genomics of Unionidae and be more comprehensive to parse the genetic relationship between the species and the ownership beyond species.

  15. Complete maternal mitochondrial genome of freshwater mussel Anodonta lucida (Bivalvia: Unionidae: Anodontinae).

    PubMed

    Song, Xue-Lin; Ouyang, Shan; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The taxonomy of genus Anodonta is rather ambiguous, as it has great variation on the shell shape. Anodonta lucida is an endemic species of freshwater mussel in China, characterized by shining epidermis. The complete maternal mitochondrial genome of freshwater mussel A. lucida was first determined (GenBank accession no. KF667529). The genome is 16,285 bp long with an AT content of 64.02%. All the 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes are found, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 2 rRNA genes. The genome also contains 24 unassigned regions, ranking from 1 to 830 bp in length, the largest of which is the putative control region (CR). The base composition of the genome is A (36.32%), G (13.01%), T (27.70%) and C (22.98%). Gene order is identical to other species of Unionidae except Gonideinae.

  16. Comparisons of Gymnophallid digeneans from north Pacific and Baltic clams, Macoma balthica (Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Pekkarinen, M; Ching, H L

    1994-08-01

    Three gymnophallid species in Macoma balthica from the northeastern Pacific Ocean are similar to 3 species in M. balthica from the Baltic Sea. Using light and scanning electron microscopy, we compared the anatomy of the larvae of 2 species of Lacunovermis and of Gymnophallus, and the adults of 2 species of Lacunovermis recovered from incubation on chick allantoic membrane. The third similar pair of Meiogymnophallus multigemmulus and Parvatrema affinis was restudied with light microscopy. Previously described anatomical differences between the 3 pairs of Pacific and Baltic gymnophallids were nullified in this study. Lacunovermis conspicuus Ching, 1965 is synonymized with Lacunovermis macomae (Lebour, 1908), and Gymnophallus gibberosus Loos-Frank, 1971 is synonymized with Gymnophallus somateriae (Levinsen, 1881). Meiogymnophallus multigemmulus Ching, 1965 is synonymized with Parvatrema affinis (Jameson and Nicoll, 1913), becoming M. affinis n. comb.

  17. Oocyte Degeneration Associated with Follicle Cells in Female Mactra chinensis (Bivalvia: Mactridae)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Han; Chung, Ee-Yung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies of oocyte degeneration in the oocyte, and the functions of follicle cells during oocyte degeneration are described to clarify the reproductive mechanism on oocyte degeneration of Mactra chinensis using cytological methods. Commonly, the follicle cells are attached to the oocyte. Follicle cells play an important role in oocyte degeneration. In particular, the functions of follicle cells during oocyte degeneration are associated with phagocytosis and the intracellular digestion of products. In this study, morphologically similar degenerated phagosomes (various lysosomes), which were observed in the degenerated oocytes, appeared in the follicle cells. After the spawning of the oocytes, the follicle cells were involved in oocyte degeneration through phagocytosis by phagolysosomes. Therefore, it can be assumed that follicle cells reabsorb phagosomes from degenerated oocytes. In this study, the presence of lipid granules, which occurred from degenerating yolk granules, gradually increased in degenerating oocytes. The function of follicle cells can accumulate reserves of lipid granules and glycogen in the cytoplasm, which can be employed by the vitellogenic oocyte. Based on observations of follicle cells attached to degenerating oocytes after spawning, the follicle cells of this species are involved in the lysosomal induction of oocyte degeneration for the reabsorption of phagosomes (phagolysosomes) in the cytoplasm for nutrient storage, as seen in other bivalves. PMID:25949203

  18. Microbial distribution and abundance in the digestive system of five shipworm species (Bivalvia: Teredinidae).

    PubMed

    Betcher, Meghan A; Fung, Jennifer M; Han, Andrew W; O'Connor, Roberta; Seronay, Romell; Concepcion, Gisela P; Distel, Daniel L; Haygood, Margo G

    2012-01-01

    Marine bivalves of the family Teredinidae (shipworms) are voracious consumers of wood in marine environments. In several shipworm species, dense communities of intracellular bacterial endosymbionts have been observed within specialized cells (bacteriocytes) of the gills (ctenidia). These bacteria are proposed to contribute to digestion of wood by the host. While the microbes of shipworm gills have been studied extensively in several species, the abundance and distribution of microbes in the digestive system have not been adequately addressed. Here we use Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) and laser scanning confocal microscopy with 16S rRNA directed oligonucleotide probes targeting all domains, domains Bacteria and Archaea, and other taxonomic groups to examine the digestive microbiota of 17 specimens from 5 shipworm species (Bankia setacea, Lyrodus pedicellatus, Lyrodus massa, Lyrodus sp. and Teredo aff. triangularis). These data reveal that the caecum, a large sac-like appendage of the stomach that typically contains large quantities of wood particles and is considered the primary site of wood digestion, harbors only very sparse microbial populations. However, a significant number of bacterial cells were observed in fecal pellets within the intestines. These results suggest that due to low abundance, bacteria in the caecum may contribute little to lignocellulose degradation. In contrast, the comparatively high population density of bacteria in the intestine suggests a possible role for intestinal bacteria in the degradation of lignocellulose.

  19. Phylogeny and androgenesis in the invasive Corbicula clams (Bivalvia, Corbiculidae) in Western Europe

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genus Corbicula is one of the most invasive groups of molluscs. It includes both sexual and androgenetic lineages. The present study re-assessed the different morphotypes and haplotypes of West European Corbicula in order to clarify their taxonomic identification and phylogenetic relationships with American and Asian Corbicula clams. We studied several populations from West European river basins (Meuse, Seine, Rhine and Rhône) through an "integrative taxonomy" approach. We combined morphology, partial mitochondrial COI and cyt b sequences and eleven microsatellite loci. Furthermore, we looked for discrepancies between mtDNA and nrDNA/morphology, indicative of androgenesis between lineages. Results There are three Corbicula morphotypes in Western Europe associated to three mitochondrial lineages and three genotypes. Form R shares the same COI haplotype as the American form A and the Japanese C. leana. Form S and the American form C have the same haplotype, although their morphologies seem divergent. The European form Rlc belongs to the same mitochondrial lineage as both the American form B and the Asian C. fluminea. Interestingly, within each haplotype/genotype or lineage, no genetic diversity was found although their invasive success is high. Moreover, we detected rare mismatches between mtDNA and nrDNA/morphology, indicative of androgenesis and mitochondrial capture between form R and form S and therefore challenging the phylogenetic relatedness and the species status within this genus. The global phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sexual Corbicula lineages seem restricted to the native areas while their androgenetic relatives are widespread and highly invasive. Conclusions We clarified the discrepancies and incongruent results found in the literature about the European morphotypes of Corbicula and associated mitochondrial lineages. The three West European morphotypes belong to three distinct nuclear and mitochondrial lineages. However mitochondrial capture occurs in sympatric populations of forms R and S. The species status of the morphotypes therefore remains doubtful. Moreover the androgenetic lineages seem widely distributed compared to their sexual relatives, suggesting that androgenesis and invasive success may be linked in the genus Corbicula. PMID:21619630

  20. A biomechanical model of rock drilling in the piddock Barnea candida (Bivalvia; Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Nederlof, Ralf; Muller, Mees

    2012-11-07

    The bivalve Barnea candida (Pholadacea) makes its burrow in clay, soft rock and peat. Barnea has developed a number of adaptations to accommodate this lifestyle. Four muscles enable burrowing. These are situated around a dorsal pivot in such a way that the piddock is able to rotate the shells around two approximate orthogonal axes. The anterior adductor muscle anterior (AAM-A) and the posterior adductor muscle rotate the shells around a dorso-ventral axis; the anterior adductor muscle posterior (AAM-P) and the ventral adductor muscle rotate the shells around an antero-posterior axis. The AAM-A and the AAM-P have evolved from a single anterior adductor muscle and are attached to a piece of the shell that is folded inside out, the umbonal reflection. At the dorsal side of the piddock, the shell margins are reduced. This prevents collision of these margins during movement. Electrical stimulation experiments revealed that the opening of the antero-ventral side of the piddock is faster than its closure. These results were incorporated into a computer model that could simulate shell movements. The computer model allowed predictions about the shapes of burrows and scrape marks. As in Nature, simulated burrows had a long droplet shape with straight scrape marks.

  1. Growth and production of Donax striatus (Bivalvia: Donacidae) from Las Balsas beach, Gibara, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Ocaña, Frank A

    2015-09-01

    Clams of the genus Donax are worldwide the dominating group of the invertebrate community on sandy beaches. They are primary consumers that provide a significant abundance and biomass to the ecosystem. In the Caribbean, Donax striatus has an important role for nature and human, nonetheless studies on the population dynamics of this beach clam are scarce and no information exists on secondary production of this species. Growth parameters and secondary production of D. striatus were estimated from February 2008 to November 2009 at Las Balsas beach, Northeastern Cuba, in order to provide basic information for management purposes. In each month 45 samples were taken by means of a PVC corer of 0.025 m2 area and sieved with a 1 mm mesh. Animals were measured and weighted with and without shell. A total of 5 471 specimens were collected during the sampling period. Shell length ranged from 2.7-33.3 mm. Growth parameters estimated from length frequency data were L∞ = 36.1 mm, K= 0.8/yr and t0= 0.2/yr. The growth performance resulted in values of Φ'= 3.02. Life span was 2.4 yrs and mortality rate was 3.07 /yr. In 2008, mean abundance of D. striatus ranged between 17.1 - 770.7 ind./m2. In 2009 the lowest mean abundance was 34.4 and the highest was 892.5 ind./m2. During 2009 biomass and production was more than twice higher in comparison with 2008. Individual production showed highest values in the 24 mm shell size (3.74 g/m2.yr) and 25 mm (0.71 g/m2.yr), considering mass with shell and without shell, respectively. During 2009 abundance of individuals with 15 mm shell length or more increased resulting in higher biomass and production, compared to 2008. Using the conversion factor of wet mass to ash free dry mass (AFDM), annual production ranged between 2.87-6.11 g AFDM/m2.yr, resulting in a turnover rate (P/B) between 5.11 and 3.47 in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The rapid growth and high turnover rate of D. striatus suggest a rapid recovery of the population. These results support the idea that this beach clam is an important resource at Las Balsas beach. Thus its exploitation must continue with caution, and only at the level of a recreational fishery.

  2. Molecular insights into the taxonomy of Hypanis (Bivalvia, Cardiidae, Lymnocardiinae) in the Black Sea lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Luis; Popa, Oana; Iorgu, Elena; Kelemen, Beatrice; Murariu, Dumitru

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we used data from morphology and three DNA markers to assess the taxonomic status of the putative bivalve species Hypanis colorata and Hypanis angusticostata in a Black Sea lagoon, the Razelm Lake in Romania. The morphological data (the shape of shell ribs and the multivariate analysis of morphometric variance of three variables constructed as the ratios between the main dimensions of the shell) confirmed that the two analyzed species are distinct morphological entities. Three molecular markers, one from the nuclear genome (18S rRNA) and two from the mitochondrial genome (16S rRNA and COI), showed extremely reduced sequence divergence (0-0.1%) between the two putative species. Based on these results, we suggest that H. angusticostata and H. colorata are morphotypes of a single species.

  3. [Mollusc diversity in an Arca zebra (Mollusca: Bivalvia) community, Chacopata, Sucre, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Prieto, A S; Ruiz, L J; García, N; Alvarez, M

    2001-06-01

    The diversity of a subtidal epifaunal mollusk community was studied from September, 1990 to September, 1991 in Chacopata, Sucre State, Venezuela. There were 40 species (24 bivalves and 16 gastropods). The diversity indexes (H' = 2.087, J' = 0.392, 1/D = 0.528) were low when compared with other tropical zones. Monthly diversity reached its maximum in September, 1990 (1.63 bits/ind.) and July, 1991 (1.60 bits/ind.); minimum diversity occurred in June, 1991 (0.52 bits/ind.). A Log series model applied to species abundance data showed a straight line with a diversity index alpha of 5.56. Of 40 species identified, the turkeywing Arca zebra was dominant (69% in number of individuals and 72% of biomass) followed by Pinctada imbricata, Modiolus squamosus, Chama macerophyla and Anadara notabilis. The predatory snails Phyllonotus pomum, Chicoreus brevifrons and Murex recurvirostris seemed to have trophic relationships with A. zebra. The total mean biomass in wet weight (469.20 +/- 263 g m-2, shell included) was high which indicates that A. zebra, a species with a rapid growth rate, occupies a central role in the assemblage as an efficient filter feeder that converts planktonic food into available biomass, supporting one of the most important fisheries in Venezuela.

  4. A Methanotrophic Marine Molluscan (Bivalvia, Mytilidae) Symbiosis: Mussels Fueled by Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, James J.; Fisher, C. R.; Brooks, J. M.; Kennicutt, M. C.; Bidigare, R.; Anderson, A. E.

    1986-09-01

    An undescribed mussel (family Mytilidae), which lives in the vicinity of hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico, consumes methane (the principal component of natural gas) at a high rate. The methane consumption is limited to the gills of these animals and is apparently due to the abundant intracellular bacteria found there. This demonstrates a methane-based symbiosis between an animal and intracellular bacteria. Methane consumption is dependent on the availability of oxygen and is inhibited by acetylene. The consumption of methane by these mussels is associated with a dramatic increase in oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. As the methane consumption of the bivalve can exceed its carbon dioxide production, the symbiosis may be able to entirely satisfy its carbon needs from methane uptake. The very light (δ 13C = -51 to -57 per mil) stable carbon isotope ratios found in this animal support methane (δ 13C = -45 per mil at this site) as the primary carbon source for both the mussels and their symbionts.

  5. Identifying the true oysters (Bivalvia: Ostreidae) with mitochondrial phylogeny and distance-based DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2011-09-01

    Oysters (family Ostreidae), with high levels of phenotypic plasticity and wide geographic distribution, are a challenging group for taxonomists and phylogenetics. As a useful tool for molecular species identification, DNA barcoding might offer significant potential for oyster identification and taxonomy. This study used two mitochondrial fragments, cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and the large ribosomal subunit (16S rDNA), to assess whether oyster species could be identified by phylogeny and distance-based DNA barcoding techniques. Relationships among species were estimated by the phylogenetic analyses of both genes, and then pairwise inter- and intraspecific genetic divergences were assessed. Species forming well-differentiated clades in the molecular phylogenies were identical for both genes even when the closely related species were included. Intraspecific variability of 16S rDNA overlapped with interspecific divergence. However, average intra- and interspecific genetic divergences for COI were 0-1.4% (maximum 2.2%) and 2.6-32.2% (minimum 2.2%), respectively, indicating the existence of a barcoding gap. These results confirm the efficacy of species identification in oysters via DNA barcodes and phylogenetic analysis.

  6. Inheritance of the general shell color in the scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Bivalvia: Pectinidae).

    PubMed

    Winkler, F M; Estévez, B F; Jollán, L B; Garrido, J P

    2001-01-01

    Although some external coloration and pigmentation patterns in molluscan shells may be attributable to environmental factors, most variation in these phenotypic characters depends on uncomplicated genetic mechanisms. Genetic research on inheritance of color variations in the north-Chilean scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) has now been expanded to analyze color segregation in juvenile scallops produced under controlled conditions employing self- and cross-fertilization. Calculations from the results were used for comparison with different numerical models based on Mendelian inheritance, and results were also obtained on the inheritance of a dorsoventral white line often observed on the left (upper) valve in this species. The results confirmed the hereditary basis for color variation in the shell of this scallop, suggesting a simple, dominant model of epistasis to explain the distribution of the different color variants observed (purple, brown, orange, yellow, and white). The presence of the white line may be controlled by a recessive allele with simple Mendelian traits on a locus distinct from those that control color variation.

  7. [Energy metabolism and body mass ratio in bivalves mollusca (Mollusca: Bivalvia)].

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, I G; Kleĭmenov, S Iu; Radzinskaia, L I

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of experimental and published data, the interspecific and intraspecific (ontogenetic) dependence of energy metabolism on body weight in bivalves was calculated. Changes in the parameters of intraspecific allometric dependence under the effect of environmental factors were analyzed. The rate of comparable standard metabolism (coefficient a at k = 0.76) was shown to vary in different taxonomic and zoogeographic groups of bivalves.

  8. Arctica islandica (Bivalvia): A unique paleoenvironmental archive of the northern North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution environmental proxy data from the extratropical North Atlantic prior to the instrumental era are of critical importance to decipher processes and mechanisms of global change. In this regard, shells of the extremely long-lived bivalve mollusc, Arctica islandica (Linnaeus, 1767), have gained particular attention during the last decade because they serve as reliable, subseasonally resolved multi-proxy archives of environmental variability in that very region. With a lifespan of more than 500 years, A. islandica is the longest-lived solitary animal. Its shell grows periodically throughout life and contains distinct annual and daily growth increments. These growth patterns function as a calendar that can be used to place each shell portion into a precise temporal context. Furthermore, changing environmental conditions are encoded in the shells in the form of variable increment widths and geochemical properties. By means of cross-dating, growth increment width chronologies from different specimens can be combined into much longer time-series, so-called composite or master chronologies, covering centuries to millennia and many generations of bivalves. The present paper provides a comprehensive review of research on this species with a special focus on long-term climate and environmental reconstructions using isotopes, trace and minor elements and variations in shell growth. This review also highlights challenges involved with the interpretation of proxy data obtained from A. islandica and identifies future research needs. A. islandica does not easily reveal its secrets. It needs a holistic approach to unlock the multi-proxy records stored in their shells. The goal of this paper is to increase the recognition of this high-potential natural archive and encourage future interdisciplinary research.

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of Solemya velum (Mollusca: Bivalvia) and its relationships with Conchifera

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bivalve mitochondrial genomes exhibit a wide array of uncommon features, like extensive gene rearrangements, large sizes, and unusual ways of inheritance. Species pertaining to the order Solemyida (subclass Opponobranchia) show many peculiar evolutionary adaptations, f.i. extensive symbiosis with chemoautotrophic bacteria. Despite Opponobranchia are central in bivalve phylogeny, being considered the sister group of all Autobranchia, a complete mitochondrial genome has not been sequenced yet. Results In this paper, we characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of the Atlantic awning clam Solemya velum: A-T content, gene arrangement and other features are more similar to putative ancestral mollusks than to other bivalves. Two supranumerary open reading frames are present in a large, otherwise unassigned, region, while the origin of replication could be located in a region upstream to the cox3 gene. Conclusions We show that S. velum mitogenome retains most of the ancestral conchiferan features, which is unusual among bivalve mollusks, and we discuss main peculiarities of this first example of an organellar genome coming from the subclass Opponobranchia. Mitochondrial genomes of Solemya (for bivalves) and Haliotis (for gastropods) seem to retain the original condition of mollusks, as most probably exemplified by Katharina. PMID:23777315

  10. Long-term decline in freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae) of the western basin of Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nalepa, Thomas F.; Manny, Bruce A.; Roth, James C.; Mozley, Samuel C.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    1991-01-01

    Long-term trends in the abundance of unionids in the western basin of Lake Erie were examined from data collected at 17 stations in 1961, 1972, and 1982. The mean number of unionids at these stations declined over this time period, decreasing from 10 m−2 in 1961, to 6 m−2 in 1972, down to 4 m−2 in 1982. This decline in abundance was reflected in the decrease in the number of stations where mussels were found; unionids were found at 16 of the 17 stations in 1961, but at only 6 stations in 1982. Reasons for the decrease in the unionid population are not generally apparent, but are probably related to the decline in water quality and periods of low oxygen levels over the time period of the surveys.

  11. Size-differential feeding in Pinna nobilis L. (Mollusca: Bivalvia): Exploitation of detritus, phytoplankton and zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, John; Ezgeta-Balić, Daria; Peharda, Melita; Skejić, Sanda; Ninčević-Gladan, Živana; Matijević, Slavica

    2011-04-01

    The endangered fan shell Pinna nobilis is a large bivalve mollusc (<120 cm shell length) endemic to the Mediterranean that lives one-third buried in soft substrata, generally in shallow coastal waters. We hypothesised that P. nobilis of different sizes would ingest different food sources, because small fan shells will inhale material from closer to the substratum than do large fan shells. We studied stomach contents and faeces of 18 fan shells, 6 small (mean 23.0 cm length), 6 medium-sized (mean 41.5 cm length) and 6 large (mean 62.7 cm length) living in a small area of a low-energy coastal detritic bottom characterised by mud, sand and macroalgae at Mali Ston Bay, Croatia. We found that all P. nobilis ingested copious quantities of undetermined detritus (probably at least 95% of ingested material), phytoplankton, micro and mesozooplankton and pollen grains. Large P. nobilis stomach contents showed a preponderance of water column calanoid copepods, while small fan shells had higher numbers of bivalve larvae. All fan shells took in high numbers of harpacticoid copepods that are benthonic, feeding on microbial communities of detritus and benthic vegetation. There was also a significant selection of phytoplankton species, some apparently occurring between inhalation and ingestion. The stomach contents of small P. nobilis had a higher organic matter content than either medium-sized or large fan shells; this indicated that small fan shells ingested detritus of higher organic content than did larger P. nobilis. As the faeces of all P. nobilis had similar organic matter content, this also indicates higher assimilation efficiencies in small fan shells. The demonstration of differential dietary selectivity by different sized animals has implications for future trophic studies of this endangered species. This study also provides the first demonstration of predation on zooplankton by P. nobilis.

  12. Molecular Cytogenetics in Trough Shells (Mactridae, Bivalvia): Divergent GC-Rich Heterochromatin Content

    PubMed Central

    García-Souto, Daniel; Pérez-García, Concepción; Kendall, Jack; Pasantes, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    The family Mactridae is composed of a diverse group of marine organisms, commonly known as trough shells or surf clams, which illustrate a global distribution. Although this family includes some of the most fished and cultured bivalve species, their chromosomes are poorly studied. In this work, we analyzed the chromosomes of Spisula solida, Spisula subtruncata and Mactra stultorum by means of fluorochrome staining, C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization using 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), 5S rDNA, H3 histone gene and telomeric probes. All three trough shells presented 2n = 38 chromosomes but different karyotype compositions. As happens in most bivalves, GC-rich regions were limited to the nucleolus organizing regions in Spisula solida. In contrast, many GC-rich heterochromatic bands were detected in both Spisula subtruncata and Mactra stultorum. Although the three trough shells presented single 5S rDNA and H3 histone gene clusters, their chromosomal locations differed. Regarding major rDNA clusters, while Spisula subtruncata presented a single cluster, both Spisula solida and Mactra stultorum showed two. No evidence of intercalary telomeric signals was detected in these species. The molecular cytogenetic characterization of these taxa will contribute to understanding the role played by chromosome changes in the evolution of trough shells. PMID:27537915

  13. [The testing of growth functions for the length of Siliqua patula (Bivalvia) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sager, G

    1980-01-01

    After preceding investigations of the author into increase and growth functions of organic matter the gained formulae are tested together with the classical functions. As an example the razor clam siliqua patula from the Alaskan coast seems rather well fitted because of the number of length measurements and the existence of an inflexion point of the growth curve. Non linear regressions are exercised following the Paul-method. Results are not seldom unexpected, sometimes leaving firmly introduced functions with smaller chances than recently developed ones. The number of parameters of the functions will not necessarily increase the quality of approximation. The best results arise from the increase ansatz W = k Wm/tp proposed by the author Sager 1979c).

  14. Reproductive Cycle of Hard Clam, Meretrix lyrata Sowerby, 1851 (Bivalvia: Veneridae) from Sarawak, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Hamli, Hadi; Idris, Mohd Hanafi; Rajaee, Amy Halimah; Kamal, Abu Hena Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    A study of the reproductive cycle of the hard clam, Meretrix lyrata, was documented based on histological observation and Gonad Index (GI). Samples were taken from estuarine waters of the Buntal River in Sarawak, Malaysia. The gonad of M. lyrata started to develop in September 2013. Gametogenesis continued to develop until the maturation and spawning stage from February to April 2014. The GI pattern for a one-year cycle showed a significant correlation with chlorophyll a. The corresponding GI with chlorophyll a suggested that the development of the reproductive cycle of M. lyrata required a high amount of food to increase gametogenesis. PMID:26868710

  15. Molecular phylogenetics and historical biogeography amid shifting continents in the cockles and giant clams (Bivalvia: Cardiidae).

    PubMed

    Herrera, Nathanael D; Ter Poorten, Jan Johan; Bieler, Rüdiger; Mikkelsen, Paula M; Strong, Ellen E; Jablonski, David; Steppan, Scott J

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructing historical biogeography of the marine realm is complicated by indistinct barriers and, over deeper time scales, a dynamic landscape shaped by plate tectonics. Here we present the most extensive examination of model-based historical biogeography among marine invertebrates to date. We conducted the largest phylogenetic and molecular clock analyses to date for the bivalve family Cardiidae (cockles and giant clams) with three unlinked loci for 110 species representing 37 of the 50 genera. Ancestral ranges were reconstructed using the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis (DEC) method with a time-stratified paleogeographic model wherein dispersal rates varied with shifting tectonics. Results were compared to previous classifications and the extensive paleontological record. Six of the eight prior subfamily groupings were found to be para- or polyphyletic. Cardiidae originated and subsequently diversified in the tropical Indo-Pacific starting in the Late Triassic. Eastern Atlantic species were mainly derived from the tropical Indo-Mediterranean region via the Tethys Sea. In contrast, the western Atlantic fauna was derived from Indo-Pacific clades. Our phylogenetic results demonstrated greater concordance with geography than did previous phylogenies based on morphology. Time-stratifying the DEC reconstruction improved the fit and was highly consistent with paleo-ocean currents and paleogeography. Lastly, combining molecular phylogenetics with a rich and well-documented fossil record allowed us to test the accuracy and precision of biogeographic range reconstructions.

  16. Multi-species generalist predation on the stochastic harvested clam Tivela mactroides (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turra, Alexander; Fernandez, Wellington S.; Bessa, Eduardo; Santos, Flavia B.; Denadai, Márcia R.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down control is an important force modulating the abundance of prey and structuring marine communities. The harvested trigonal clam Tivela mactroides is hypothesized to be part of the diet of a variety of marine organisms, with its stock influencing predator abundance and being influenced by them. Here we analyzed the diet of potential predators of T. mactroides in Caraguatatuba Bay, northern coast of São Paulo State, Brazil, to identify the main consumers of this marine resource, and also to address the importance of this clam in the diet of each predator. Samples were taken year-round by trawls; all specimens collected were identified and measured and the food items identified and quantified. Twenty-one species consumed T. mactroides, whose importance in the diet varied greatly in both the volume ingested and the frequency of occurrence (pompano Trachinotus carolinus > blue crab Callinectes danae > starfish Astropecten marginatus). Top-down influence on T. mactroides was also dependent on the abundance of consumers (yellow catfish Cathorops spixii > rake stardrum Stellifer rastrifer > barred grunt Conodon nobilis > A. marginatus). Considering the mean volume ingested, the frequency of occurrence of T. mactroides in the diet, and the relative abundance of consumers, the predators that most influenced T. mactroides were T. carolinus, A. marginatus, and C. danae, in decreasing order. Large numbers of small-sized individuals of T. mactroides (<10 mm) were generally preyed upon by A. marginatus, which may have a stronger effect on clam abundance in comparison to C. danae and T. carolinus, which preyed upon larger clams. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that predators' consumption of T. mactroides in Caraguatatuba Bay can influence its stocks, mainly due to the type and/or abundance of predator species, the volume and number of individuals of T. mactroides preyed upon, and the temporal variations in the abundance of predators.

  17. External morphology of spermatozoa and spermatozeugmata of the freshwater mussel Truncilla truncata (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, D.L.; Lasee, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Truncilla truncata males release spherical aggregates of spermatozoa, called spermatozeugmata, at spawning. Sperm aggregates from other bivalve species have been described, but few detailed studies exist of the morphology of unionid spermatozeugmata and spermatozoa. We provide the first description of the external morphology of spermatozeugmata and spermatozoa of T. Truncata. The spermatozeugmata had an inside diameter of 76 mu m and contained 8000-9000 spermatozoa. Heads of spermatozoa were directed toward the center of the sphere into a translucent shell; tails were arranged radially and caused the spermatozeugmata to rotate. Spermatozoa of T. Truncata measured 3.3 mu m in length (excluding tail) and each had a head, a midpiece and a flagellum. We also documented the release of spermatozeugmata in two additional unionid species, Lampsilis cardium and Amblema plicata plicata.

  18. The Complete Maternally and Paternally Inherited Mitochondrial Genomes of a Freshwater Mussel Potamilus alatus (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Dan; Xu, Pao; Ma, Xue Y.; Jin, Wu; Yuan, Xin H.; Gu, Ruo B.

    2017-01-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial DNA, found only in some bivalve families and characterized by the existence of gender-associated mtDNA lineages that are inherited through males (M-type) or females (F-type), is one of the very few exceptions to the general rule of strict maternal mtDNA inheritance in animals. M-type sequences are often undetected and hence still underrepresented in the GenBank, which hinders the progress of the understanding of the DUI phenomenon. We have sequenced and analyzed the complete M and F mitogenomes of a freshwater mussel, Potamilus alatus. The M-type was 493 bp longer (M = 16 560, F = 16 067 bp). Gene contents, order and the distribution of genes between L and H strands were typical for unionid mussels. Candidates for the two ORFan genes (forf and morf) were found in respective mitogenomes. Both mitogenomes had a very similar A+T bias: F = 61% and M = 62.2%. The M mitogenome-specific cox2 extension (144 bp) is much shorter than in other sequenced unionid mitogenomes (531–576 bp), which might be characteristic for the Potamilus genus. The overall topology of the phylogenetic tree is in very good agreement with the currently accepted phylogenetic relationships within the Unionidae: both studied sequences were placed within the Ambleminae subfamily clusters in the corresponding M and F clades. PMID:28068380

  19. Spawning, fertilization, and larval development of Potamocorbula amurensis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicolini, M.H.; Penry, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    In Potamocorbula amurensis time for development to the straight-hinge larval stage is 48 hr at 15??C. Potamocorbula amurensis settles at a shell length of approximately 135 ??m 17 to 19 days after fertilization. Our observations of timing of larval devdlopment in P. amurensis support the hypothesis of earlier workers that its route of initial introduction to San Francisco Bay was as veliger larvae transported in ballast water by trans-Pacific cargo ships. The length of the larval period of P. amurensis relative to water mass residence times in San Francisco Bay suggests that it is sufficient to allow substantial dispersal from North Bay to South Bay populations in concordance with previous observations that genetic differentiation among populations of P. amurensis in San Francisco Bay is low. Potamocorbula amurensis is markedly euryhaline at all stages of development. Spawning and fertilization can occur at salinities from 5 to 25 psu, and eggs and sperms can each tolerance at least a 10-psu step increase or decrease in salinity. Embryos that are 2 hr old can tolerate the same range of salinities from (10 to 30 psu), and by the time they are 24 hr old they can tolerate the same range of salinities (2 to 30 psu) that adult clams can. The ability of P. amurensis larvae to tolerate substantial step changes in salinity suggests a strong potential to survive incomplete oceanic exchanges of ballast water and subsequent discharge into receiving waters across a broad range of salinities.

  20. Submarine canyons as the preferred habitat for wood-boring species of Xylophaga (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, C.; Voight, J. R.; Company, J. B.; Plyuscheva, M.; Martin, D.

    2013-11-01

    Submarine canyons are often viewed as natural “debris concentrators” on the seafloor. Organic substrates may be more abundant inside than outside canyon walls. To determine the effects of the presence these substrates in the Blanes submarine canyon (NW Mediterranean) and its adjacent western open slope, we deployed wood to study colonizing organisms. Three replicate pine and oak cubes (i.e. most common trees inland) were moored at 900, 1200, 1500 and 1800 m depth and collected after 3, 9 and 12 months. Wood from inside the canyon was significantly more heavily colonized by the five morphotypes of wood-boring bivalves than was wood on the adjacent open slope. Xylophaga sp. A dominated all wood types and locations, with peak abundance at 900 and 1200 m depth. Its growth rate was highest (0.070 mm d-1) during the first three months and was faster (or it recruits earlier) in pine than in oak. Size distribution showed that several recruitment events may have occurred from summer to winter. Xylophaga sp. B, appeared first after 9 months and clearly preferred pine over oak. As the immersion time was the same, this strongly supported a specific association between recruiters and type of substrate. Three morphotypes, pooled as Xylophaga spp. C, were rare and seemed to colonize preferentially oak inside the canyon and pine in the adjacent open slope. Individuals of Xylophaga were more abundant inside the canyon than in nearby off-canyon locations. Blanes Canyon may serve as a long-term concentrator of land-derived vegetal fragments and as a consequence sustain more animals. Are the species richness and abundance of wood-boring bivalves higher inside the canyon than on the adjacent open slope? Do the composition and density of the wood-boring bivalves change with deployment time and depth, as well as on the type of the sunken wood? What is the growth rate of the dominant wood-boring species?

  1. Phylogeny and evolution of ontogeny of the family Oxytomidae Ichikawa, 1958 (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutikov, O. A.; Temkin, I. E.; Shurygin, B. N.

    2010-08-01

    We described ontogenies and reconstructed morphogeneses of hinges in some supraspecific taxa of the bivalve family Oxytomidae Ichikawa, 1958 from the Mesozoic of Russia. The phylogeny of the family is reconstructed using evolutionary and cladistic methods. The appearance of the endemic genus Arctotis Bodylevsky, 1960 in the epicontinental seas of Siberia can be explained in terms of gradual transformations of the ligament and byssal apparatus in the Northern Siberian members of Praemeleagrinella Lutikov et Shurygin, 2009 and Praearctotis Lutikov et Shurygin, 2009.

  2. Temporal dynamics of amino and fatty acid composition in the razor clam Ensis siliqua (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Narciso, Luis; Marques, António; Bandarra, Narcisa; Rosa, Rui

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the temporal dynamics of both amino acid (AA) and fatty acid (FA) profiles in marine bivalves. We investigated the seasonal variation of these compounds in the pod razor clam Ensis siliqua in relation to food availability, salinity, water temperature and reproductive cycle. AA content varied between 46.94 and 54.67 % dry weight (DW), and the AAs found in greater quantity were glutamic acid, glycine and aspartic acid. FA content varied between 34.02 and 87.94 mg g-1 DW and the FAs found in greater quantity were 16:0 and 22:6 n-3. Seasonal trends were observed for AAs and FAs. FAs increased with gametogenesis and decreased with spawning while AA content increased throughout spawning. The effect of increasing temperature and high food availability during the spawning season masked the loss of AAs resulting from gamete release. Still, a comparatively greater increase in the contents of glutamic acid and leucine with spawning indicate their possible involvement in a post-spawning gonad recovery mechanism. A post-spawning decrease in 14:0, 16:0, 16:1 n-7, 18:1 n-7 and 18:1 n-9 is indicative of the importance of these FAs in bivalve eggs. An increase in 18:3 n-3, 18:4 n-3, 20:1 n-9 and 20:2 n-6 during gametogenesis suggests their involvement in oocyte maturation. The FA 22:4 n-6, while increasing with spawning, appears to play a role in post-spawning gonad recovery. Salinity did not have an effect on the AA composition. None of the environmental parameters measured had an effect on FA composition.

  3. Cytogenetics of Anodonta cygnea (Mollusca: Bivalvia) as possible indicator of environmental adversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrilho, J.; Leitão, A.; Vicente, C.; Malheiro, I.

    2008-11-01

    Anodonta cygnea is a freshwater clam, belonging to the Unionidae family, which can be found in rivers and lagoons all over Europe and Northern America. As they appear as important case studies for ecological damage assessments, the various species of the Unionidae family have been submitted to a sort of recent studies on their chromosomal or cytogenetic status. In this study we confirmed the diploid chromosome number of 2 n = 38 for this species, and established for the first time the karyotype, which comprised six metacentric, 12 submetacentric and one subtelocentric chromosome pairs. We also found a high percentage of cells with an abnormal number of chromosomes. Considering that karyotype disturbances in Unionids have been previously related with exposure to chemicals, either natural or produced by human activity, we determined the aneuploidy index for our population. The aneuploidy index is an excellent marker for pollutant presence/effect. The animals acclimatized in tap water and in natural water from the lake where the individuals were collected showed different levels of aneuploidy. The higher values were found in tap water. Chromosome analysis techniques seem a suitable tool to study the impact of contaminants referred above, and making A. cygnea a suitable organism for assessment of an eugenic damage in aquatic systems. On the other hand, our results also point out to the importance of doing the acclimatizing process of the collected animals in their own natural water.

  4. Clarifying phylogenetic relationships and the evolutionary history of the bivalve order Arcida (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia).

    PubMed

    Combosch, David J; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The systematics of the bivalve order Arcida constitutes an unresolved conundrum in bivalve systematics. The current definition of Arcida encompasses two superfamilies: Limopsoidea, which includes the recent families Philobryidae and Limopsidae, and Arcoidea, which encompasses the families Arcidae, Cucullaeidae, Noetiidae, Glycymerididae and Parallelodontidae. This classification, however, is controversial particularly with respect to the position and taxonomic status of Glycymerididae. Previous molecular phylogenies were limited either by the use of only a single molecular marker or by including only a few limopsoid and glycymeridid taxa. The challenging nature of Arcida taxonomy and the controversial results of some of the previous studies, prompted us to use a broad range of taxa (55 species), three nuclear markers (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA and histone H3) and a wide range of algorithmic approaches. This broad but stringent approach led to a number of results that differ significantly from previous studies. We provide the first molecular evidence that supports the separation of Arcoidea from Limopsoidea, although the exact position of Glycymerididae remains unresolved, and the monophyly of Limopsoidea is algorithm-dependent. In addition, we present the first time-calibrated evolutionary tree of Arcida relationships, indicating a significant increase in the diversification of arcidan lineages at the beginning of the Cretaceous, around 140Ma. The monophyly of Arcida, which has been supported previously, was confirmed in all our analyses. Although relationships among families remain somehow unresolved we found support for the monophyly of most arcidan families, at least under some analytical conditions (i.e., Glycymerididae, Noetiidae, Philobryidae, and Limopsidae). However, Arcidae, and particularly Arcinae, remain a major source of inconsistency in the current system of Arcida classification and are in dire need of taxonomic revision.

  5. BIOMARKER RESPONSES IN MACOMA NASUTA (BIVALVIA) EXPOSED TO SEDIMENTS FROM NORTHERN SAN FRANCISCO BAY. (R826940)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Our study investigates biomarker responses and survival of Macoma nasuta exposed to sediments collected from six locations in northern San Francisco Bay. Biomarkers analyzed were stress proteins (hsp70) in gill, mantle and digestive gland, lysosomal mem...

  6. Mesozoic Bivalvia from Clerke and Mermaid Canyons, northwest Australian continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant-Mackie, J. A.

    Four sets of rock samples from two sites off the northwest Australian shelf in 3625-4480 m of water contain macrofaunas, mainly bivalves, of warm shallow-water origin. Mermaid Canyon (16 deg 19 min S, 118 deg 23 min E) provided many samples of oolitic calcarenite containing Pseudopecten (Pseudopecten) dugong n.sp., indicating an Early Jurassic age and Tethyan relationship. Three hand-specimens from the ridge forming the western edge of Clerke Canyon (16 deg 29 min S, 118 deg 30 min E) yielded a Norian coral-?Lima-oyster assemblage and the Norian-Rhaetian bivalve Palaeocardita aff. globiformis (Boettger). The latter shows relationship with south-east Asian (Indonesia-Vietnam-south China) forms.

  7. Life history and propagation of the endangered dromedary pearlymussel (Dromus dromas) (Bivalvia:Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.; Neves, R.J.; Ahlstedt, S.A.; Mair, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    The reproduction, demography, and propagation of the endangered dromedary pearlymussel (Dromus dromas) (Lea, 1834) were studied in the Clinch and Powell rivers, Tennessee. Viable populations of the dromedary pearlymussel now occur only in the Clinch and Powell rivers; the species has been extirpated from the remaining portions of its range in the Cumberland and Tennessee river drainages. Females are long-term winter brooders, and they are gravid from October to June. Glochidia are contained in conglutinates that are red to white and resemble freshwater leeches or flatworms. Conglutinates are 20 to 40 mm long and are released through the excurrent aperture. Estimates of fecundity based on 7 gravid females collected from the Clinch River were 55,110 to 253,050 glochidia/mussel. The ages of 66 valves of D. dromas were determined by thin-sectioning and ranged from 3 to 25 y. Annual growth averaged 5 mm/y until age 10 and decreased to ???1.2 mm/ y thereafter. Nineteen fish species were tested for suitability as hosts for glochidia. Ten were confirmed as hosts through induced infestations of glochidia: black sculpin (Cottus baileyi), greenside darter (Etheostoma blennioides), fantail darter (Etheostoma flabellare), snubnose darter (Etheostoma simoterum), tangerine darter (Percina aurantiaca), blotchside logperch (Percina burtoni), logperch (Percina caprodes), channel darter (Percina copelandi), gilt darter (Percina evides), and Roanoke darter (Percina roanoka). Juveniles produced from these hosts were cultured in dishes held in nonrecirculating aquaculture systems containing fine sediment (<105 ??m) and were fed the green alga Nannochloropsis oculata every 2 d. Survival of 2810 newly metamorphosed juveniles was 836 (29.7%) after 1 to 2 wk.

  8. Redescription and anatomy of Diplodonta portesiana (d’Orbigny, 1846) (Bivalvia, Ungulinidae) from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Romera, Bárbara L. V.; Simone, Luiz R. L.; Cunha, Carlo M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The present redescription of Diplodonta portesiana (d’Orbigny, 1846) is the first part of the revision of this genus in the East Atlantic. This species, despite being common in the Atlantic coast, remains poorly known. A detailed shell and anatomical study was conducted based not only on specimens from the type locality’s vicinities but also on samples from other regions. Diagnostic characters for Diplodonta portesiana includes: rounded shell with a small ligament; triangular, short and deep nymph; external micro ornamentation composed of small concavities in a concentric pattern; small adductor muscles; reduced pedal gape; pair of long hemipalps with a large area covered by folds; stomach with four ducts leading to digestive diverticula; and long intestine length. Our study suggests at least two new diagnostic characters to the genus: the two pair of muscles that controls the incurrent and excurrent openings and a residual ring-like tissue surrounding the anterior half of the posterior foot retractor muscle. PMID:23794808

  9. Influence of the invasive Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae) on estuarine epibenthic assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilarri, M. I.; Souza, A. T.; Antunes, C.; Guilhermino, L.; Sousa, R.

    2014-04-01

    One of the most widespread invasive alien species (IAS) in aquatic ecosystems is the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea. Several studies have shown that C. fluminea can cause large-scale changes in macrozoobenthic assemblages; however, very few attempted to investigate the effects of this IAS on mobile epibenthic species, such as fishes and crustaceans. In this context, the influence of C. fluminea on epibenthic species was investigated during one year by comparing the associated epibenthic fauna in three nearby sites of the Minho estuary (NW of the Iberian Peninsula), wherein the abiotic conditions are similar but the density of the Asian clam is highly different. From a total of 13 species, six were significantly influenced by C. fluminea; five responded positively, namely the brown shrimp Crangon crangon, the European eel Anguilla anguilla, the common goby Pomatoschistus microps, the brown trout Salmo trutta fario and the great pipefish Syngnathus acus, whereas the shore crab Carcinus maenas was negatively influenced. However, stomach contents analysis revealed that fish and crustacean species do not feed on C. fluminea, suggesting that this IAS is still not a large component of the diet of higher trophic levels in this estuarine ecosystem. Our results suggest that the structure provided by C. fluminea shells is likely to be one of the main factors responsible for the differences observed. C. fluminea physical structure seems to influence the epibenthic associated fauna, when found in densities higher than 1000 ind./m2, with sedentary small-bodied crustaceans and fishes being mainly attracted by the increasing in habitat complexity and consequent enhancement of heterogeneity and shelter availability.

  10. Non-invasive method to obtain DNA from freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henley, W.F.; Grobler, P.J.; Neves, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether DNA could be isolated from tissues obtained by brush-swabbing the mantle, viscera and foot, mantle-clips and swabbed cells were obtained from eight Quadrula pustulosa (Lea, 1831). DNA yields from clips and swabbings were 447.0 and 975.3 ??g/??L, respectively. Furthermore, comparisons of sequences from the ND-1 mitochondrial gene region showed a 100% sequence agreement of DNA from cells obtained by clips and swabs. To determine the number of swabs needed to obtain adequate yields of DNA for analyses, the visceras and feet of 5 Q. pustulosa each were successively swabbed 2, 4 and 6 times. DNA yields from the 2, 4 and 6 swabbed mussel groups were 399.4, 833.8 and 852.6 ng/??L, respectively. ND-1 sequences from the lowest yield still provided 846-901 bp for the ND-1 region. Nevertheless, to ensure adequate DNA yield from cell samples obtained by swabbing, we recommend that 4 swab-strokes of the viscera and foot be obtained. The use of integumental swabbing for collection of cells for determination of genetic relationships among freshwater mussels is noninvasive, when compared with tissue collection by mantle-clipping. Therefore, its use is recommended for freshwater mussels, especially state-protected or federally listed mussel species.

  11. Organization pattern of nacre in Pteriidae (Bivalvia: Mollusca) explained by crystal competition

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio G; Okamoto, Takashi; Ramírez, Joaquín

    2006-01-01

    Bivalve nacre is a brick-wall-patterned biocomposite of aragonite platelets surrounded by organic matter. SEM–electron back scatter diffraction analysis of nacre of the bivalve family Pteriidae reveals that early aragonite crystals grow with their c-axes oriented perpendicular to the growth surface but have their a- and b-axes disoriented. With the accumulation of successive lamellae, crystals progressively orient themselves with their b-axes mutually parallel and towards the growth direction. We propose that progressive orientation is a result of competition between nacre crystals at the growth front of lamellae, which favours selection of crystals whose fastest growth axis (b-axis) is oriented parallel to the direction of propagation of the lamella. A theoretical model has been developed, which simulates competition of rhombic plates at the lamellar growth front as well as epitaxial growth of crystals onto those of the preceding lamella. The model predicts that disordered nacre progressively produces bivalve-like oriented nacre. As growth fronts become diffuse (as is the common case in bivalves) it takes longer for nacre to become organized. Formation of microdomains of nacre platelets with different orientations is also reproduced. In conclusion, not only the organic matrix component, but also the mineral phase plays an active role in organizing the final microstructure. PMID:16777720

  12. Epibiotic relationships on Zygochlamys patagonica (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Pectinidae) increase biodiversity in a submarine canyon in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schejter, Laura; López Gappa, Juan; Bremec, Claudia Silvia

    2014-06-01

    The continental slope of the southern SW Atlantic Ocean has many distinguishable deep submarine canyons, varying in depth and extension. The benthic fauna within one of them, detected in April 2005 by means of a multibeam SIMRAD EM1002 sonar, and located at 43°35‧S to 59°33‧W, 325 m depth, was studied to discuss faunal affinities with the neighbouring Patagonian scallop fishing grounds located at upper slope depths. In order to add faunal information to the previous general study, we studied the epibiotic species settled on Patagonian scallops (the dominant species in the area) collected in the reference sampling site using a 2.5-m mouth-opening dredge, 10 mm mesh size. We sampled 103 scallops with shell heights between 22 and 69 mm; epibionts were recorded on both valves. We found 53 epibiotic taxa, which were most conspicuous on the upper valve. Bryozoa was the most diverse group (34 species) while Polychaeta was the most abundant group, recorded on 94% of the scallops. Stylasteridae (2 species) and Clavulariidae (Cnidaria) conform newly recorded epibionts on Z. patagonica and the sponge Tedania (Tedaniopsis) infundibuliformis also represents a new record for the SW Atlantic Ocean.

  13. Body condition and gametogenic cycle of Galatea paradoxa (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the Volta River estuary, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei-Boateng, D.; Wilson, J. G.

    2013-11-01

    The reproductive cycle of Galatea paradoxa which is the basis for an artisanal fishery in the Volta River estuary, Ghana, was studied using condition indices and histological methods from March 2008 to July 2009. The cycle is annual with a single spawning event between June and October. Gametogenesis starts in November progressing steadily to a peak in June-July when spawning begins until October when the animal is spent. The condition indices (shell-free wet weight/total wet weight, ash-free dry weight/shell weight and gonad wet weight/shell weight) showed a clear relationship with the gametogenic stage rising from a minimum at stage (I) start of gametogenesis, to their highest values at stages (IIIA) ripe and (IIIB) start of spawning before declining significantly to stage (IV) spent.It is suggested that condition index may prove a valuable technique in fishery management to recognise the reproductive stages of G. paradoxa as it is less expensive and time consuming than histological techniques in addition to being easier to teach to non-specialists. The data presented in this study provide information on the timing of spawning events for G. paradoxa, which is necessary for developing sustainable management strategies and selection of broodstock for aquaculture.

  14. Gill Development and its functional and evolutionary implications in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae).

    PubMed

    Cannuel, Rozenn; Beninger, Peter G; McCombie, Helen; Boudry, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Study of gill development in bivalve larvae and postlarvae provides information on the evolution of this organ and feeding mechanisms of early stages. Scanning electron microscopy was used to document the development of the filibranch homorhabdic gill in hatchery-reared larval, postlarval, and juvenile Mytilus edulis. Four key stages were identified during gill development: (1) transfer of the particle collection function from velum to gill at metamorphosis, with subsequent elongation of the gill filaments to form a gill basket, with complete frontal ciliation; (2) reflection of the inner demibranchs, and transition to a V-shaped gill; (3) delayed development of the outer demibranchs, occuring simultaneously along the gill axis, with transition to the adult final W-shape; and (4) formation of the ventral particle grooves and concomitant acquisition of dense abfrontal ciliation. These key stages signal shifts in the mechanisms of particle processing during the early development of M. edulis. Gill development in the homorhabdic filibranch M. edulis was similar to that of the early homorhabdic stages of the heterorhabdic filibranchs studied to date (Pectinidae), but different from that of the pseudolamellibranchs (Ostreidae), suggesting divergent evolution of this character. Similarly, the systems responsible for gill cohesion and structural integrity are common to both the homorhabdic and heterorhabdic filibranchs, suggesting evolutionary proximity, but they are patently different from those of the eulamellibranchs and pseudolamellibranchs, suggesting evolutionary divergence.

  15. Oceanographic conditions govern shell growth of Arctica islandica (Bivalvia) in surface waters off Northeast Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marali, Soraya; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Shells of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica provide absolutely dated, highly resolved archives of environmental variability in the extratropical realm. Shell growth rates of contemporaneous A. islandica specimens are synchronized by one or several environmental factor(s), such as seawater temperature, food supply etc. Based on the growth synchrony, increment width records can be combined to composite chronologies. However, according to existing studies, A. islandica specimens from shallow waters do not show synchronous changes in shell growth and may thus not provide information about environmental conditions such as sea surface temperature. Here, we present the first statistically robust composite chronology of A. islandica from unpolluted surface waters (8-23 m) off Northeast Iceland. The complete record spans the time interval of 1835 to 2012. Times of enhanced shell growth coincide with periods of higher temperature and elevated food supply. Instrumental sea surface temperature (SST) during the growing season explains up to 43% of the variation in relative shell growth. However, the correlation strength varies over time. When the environmental conditions at the sampling site were stable over many consecutive years, i.e. one of the two major surface currents (the warm, nutrient-rich Irminger Current or the cold, nutrient-deficient East Icelandic Current) predominated the area over longer time intervals, the growth synchrony among coeval A. islandica weakened and the correlation between shell growth and SSTs was markedly reduced. Conversely, if the habitat was under the alternating influence of both ocean currents, shell growth was stronger correlated to each other and to SST. Thus, environmental variability is required to synchronize shell growth rates within an A. islandica population. This study further enlightens the relationship between bivalve shell growth and environmental variables.

  16. [Rearing crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia:Ostreidae) in a semi-rigid net].

    PubMed

    Acosta Ruíz, M J; Gutiérrez Wing, M T

    1996-08-01

    A culture system, consisting of a semi-rigid net, with an ABS frame filled with styrofoam was used for the culture of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, from 3.0 mm length seed. The culture system was tested in three locations, two inside San Quintín Bay and one in San Martín Island. The mean monthly growth was 8.69 mm and 8.96 mm in the Bay and 7.33 mm in San Martín Island. These growth rates show that this species can attain commercial sizes in 6 months, using the culture system tested.

  17. Ultrastructure of the spermatogenesis of the cockle Anadara granosa L. (Bivalvia: Arcidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwanjarat, J.

    1999-11-01

    In this paper spermatogenesis and sperm ultrastructure of the cockle Anadara granosa are studied using transmission electron microscopy. The spermatocyte presents electron-dense vesicles and the arising axoneme that begins to form the flagellum. During spermatid differentiation, proacrosomal vesicles appear to migrate towards the presumptive anterior pole of the nucleus; eventually these vesicles become acrosome. The spermatozoon of Anadara granosa is of the primitive type. The acrosome, situated at the apex of the nucleus, is cap-shaped and deeply invaginated at the inner side. The spherical nucleus of the spermatozoon contains dense granular chromatin and shows invagination at the posterior poles. The centriole shows the classic nine triplets of microtubules. The middle piece consists of the centriolar complex surrounded by five giant mitochondria. It is shown that the ultrastructure of spermatozoa and spermiogenesis of Anadara granosa reveals a number of features that are common among bivalves.

  18. Physiological responses of the European cockle Cerastoderma edule (Bivalvia: Cardidae) as indicators of coastal lagoon pollution.

    PubMed

    Nilin, Jeamylle; Pestana, João Luís Teixeira; Ferreira, Nuno Gonçalo; Loureiro, Susana; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia Veras; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2012-10-01

    Physiological responses can be used as effective parameters to identify environmentally stressful conditions. In this study, physiology changes such as oxygen consumption, clearance rate, survival in air, condition index and energy reserves were measured on natural populations of cockles collected from different sites at Ria de Aveiro, Portugal. At those sites, sediment samples were collected for Hg concentration analysis. Cockles were used for the evaluation of both the Hg concentration and physiological response. Mercury was detected in the cockle tissue and in the sediment collected from the sampling points both nearby and distant from the main mercury contamination source. The energy content was negatively correlated with both Hg concentration in cockle tissues and survival in air. Nonetheless, the energy content was positively correlated with the condition index, and there was a positive correlation between the survival in air test and the tissue mercury concentration. A PCA-factor analysis explained 86.8% of the total variance. The principal factor (62.7%) consisted of the air survival, the Hg in soft tissues (positive) and the condition index (negative). The second factor (24.1%) consisted of a negative correlation between the oxygen consumption and the clearance rate. Due to their sensitivity to environmental conditions, the physiological responses of cockles can be used to assess the ecological status of aquatic environments. More effort should be invested in investigating the effects of environmental perturbations on cockle health once they are a good reporter organism.

  19. [Population dynamic of Donax denticulatus (Bivalvia: Donacidae) at Carenero Beach, Southeastern Cuba].

    PubMed

    Ocaña, Frank A; Apín, Yanet C; Cala, Yuself R

    2013-12-01

    Bivalve molluscs of Donax genus are a very important component of macro-invertebrate assemblages of sandy beaches, and some species are of commercial value in different countries. Although in Cuba Donax denticulatus is not a currently exploited species, the information concerning a stock assessment is a basic step for future use of this resource. With the aim to generate new data on this species structure, growth and secondary production, monthly samples of D. denticulatus were taken from a beach of the Southeastern coast of Cuba, from February to December 2008. Samples were taken from four stations located along the beach; three strata were marked (P1, P2 and P3) per station across the intertidal zone. Three replicated samples of sediments were taken from each stratum with a 0.025 m2 PVC core and were posteriorly sieved with a 1 mm mesh. Histograms of shell length were constructed based on 1 mm intervals and growth parameters were estimated using ELEFAN I routine of FISAT. Mean density ranged from 146.67-855.55 ind./m2 and no differences were found among months (ANOVA, p > 0.05) but among strata (Scheffé, p < 0.05). An association of recruits, young and adults abundances with the strata (chi2, p < 0.01) was found. Most of the recruits were found in the upper strata while young and adult individuals were abundant in the mid-lower strata. Size frequency histograms of this population showed recruitment between March-June. Growth parameters estimated by Von Bertalanffy were Linfinity = 27.5 mm and K = 1.5/year; and the life spam was estimated in 1.5 years. Using the length-converted catch curve, the mortality rate (Z) was estimated in 4.97/year. Based in terms of Ash free dry mass (AFDM), mean biomass was estimated in 0.47 g/m2.year and the somatic production in 12.4 g/m2.year. The renewal rate (P/B) estimated for this population was 26.38, the highest among other Donax populations. High densities, fast growth and high somatic production indicate that this population can be exploited for fishing purposes for which some management measures are proposed.

  20. Mechanisms and functional morphology associated with metal transport in Mercenaria mercenaria (Bivalvia:Mollusca)

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.E.; Morse, M.P.

    1984-02-20

    Studies on the morphological and physiological effects of environmental pollutants on both adult and larval marine bivalve molluscs are described. We have established a substantial data base on metals accumulation within individual organs of the quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria. In addition, studies on the transport, detoxification and elimination of cadmium and silver in this important species are reported. We have shown that various components of marine oilwell drilling muds can have deleterious effects on both adult sea scallops, Placopecten magellanicus, and surf clams, Spisula solidissima. For example, both Q-broxin and attapulgite clay, at concentrations as low as 100 mg 1/sup -1/, effected both the integrity of the sea scallop pseudolamellibranch gill and the rate of gill frontal ciliary activity.

  1. Reproductive ecology of Actinonaias ligamentina (Bivalvia:Unionidae) in a regulated river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moles, K.R.; Layzer, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Factors affecting the reproductive success of freshwater mussels in lotic systems are poorly understood. Gravidity, fecundity, and fertilization success of Actinonaias ligamentina were examined at 4 sites along a 63-km reach of the Green River immediately below the Green River Dam, Kentucky. No gravid females were collected at the site closest to the dam, and the percentage of gravid females at downstream sites ranged from 20 to 36%. Not all females became gravid, despite the presence of early stages of ova in the gonadal fluid. This observation suggests that female A. ligamentina undergo a resting stage and, therefore, might not become gravid every year. Fecundity differed among sites and increased with distance from the dam. Fertilization rates ranged from 32 to 97% among sites and increased with distance from the dam. Fertilization rate was independent of local mussel density and position in the mussel bed. The high fertilization rates observed in the upstream portions of mussel beds indicate that freshwater mussel sperm have the ability to travel to distant females in lotic systems. Therefore, females are not necessarily dependent upon nearby males for fertilization. Successful fertilization of A. ligamentina at low mussel densities in the Green River suggests that natural recovery of rare endangered species might be possible if host fish and suitable conditions for juvenile survival and growth are present. ?? 2008 by The North American Benthological Society.

  2. Intraspecific phylogeography of Lasmigona subviridis (Bivalvia: Unionidae): Conservation implications of range discontinuity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Gjetvaj, B.; Hoeh, W.R.

    1999-01-01

    A nucleotide sequence analysis of the first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1) between the 5.8S and 18S ribosomal DNA genes (640 bp) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) (576 bp) was conducted for the freshwater bivalve Lasmigona subviridis and three congeners to determine the utility of these regions in identifying phylogeographic and phylogenetic structure. Sequence analysis of the ITS-1 region indicated a zone of discontinuity in the genetic population structure between a group of L. subviridis populations inhabiting the Susquehanna and Potomac Rivers and more southern populations. Moreover, haplotype patterns resulting from variation in the COI region suggested an absence of gene exchange between tributaries within two different river drainages, as well as between adjacent rivers systems. The authors recommend that the northern and southern populations, which are reproductively isolated and constitute evolutionarily significant lineages, be managed as separate conservation units. Results from the COI region suggest that, in some cases, unionid relocations should be avoided between tributaries of the same drainage because these populations may have been reproductively isolated for thousands of generations. Therefore, unionid bivalves distributed among discontinuous habitats (e.g. Atlantic slope drainages) potentially should be considered evolutionarily distinct. The DNA sequence divergences observed in the nuclear and mtDNA regions among the Lasmigona species were congruent, although the level of divergence in the COI region was up to three times greater. The genus Lasmigona, as represented by the four species surveyed in this study, may not be monophyletic.

  3. Distinct symbiont lineages in three thyasirid species (Bivalvia: Thyasiridae) from the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Clara F.; Duperron, Sébastien

    2011-04-01

    Thyasiridae are one of the less studied groups of chemosymbiotic bivalves. Here, we investigated symbioses in three different thyasirid species collected at three cold seeps from the Atlantic and Mediterranean. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences demonstrated that each thyasirid species harbours a single phylotype of symbiont that belongs to a distinct lineage of putative sulphur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. This result is confirmed by other marker genes (encoding 23S rRNA and APS reductase) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. This work highlights the diversity of bacteria involved in symbiosis with thyasirids and underlines the relevance of this group as a target for future symbiosis studies.

  4. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Alasmidonta heterodon (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, K.M.; King, T.L.; Lellis, W.A.; Eackles, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    We developed 13 species-specific microsatellite markers for the federally endangered Atlantic slope unionid Alasmidonta heterodon. Four to 18 alleles per locus were observed among 30 individuals. Observed heterozygosity throughout the loci ranged from 26.9 to 86.2% and averaged 63.6%. Estimates of individual pairwise genetic distances indicated that levels of genetic diversity among loci were sufficient to produce unique multilocus genotypes for all animals surveyed. Randomization tests showed that genotypes for this collection were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, and no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed between loci. These loci therefore appear suitable for population surveys, kinship assessment and other such applications. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Characteristics of a refuge for native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae) in Lake St. Clair

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGoldrick, D.J.; Metcalfe-Smith, J. L.; Arts, M.T.; Schloesser, D.W.; Newton, T.J.; Mackie, G.L.; Monroe, E.M.; Biberhofer, J.; Johnson, K.

    2009-01-01

    The Lake St. Clair delta (??? 100??km2) provides an important refuge for native freshwater mussels (Unionidae) wherein 22 of the ??? 35 historical species co-occur with invasive dreissenids. A total of 1875 live unionids representing 22 species were found during snorkeling surveys of 32 shallow (??? 1??m) sites throughout the delta. Richness and density of unionids and zebra mussel infestation rates varied among sites from 3 to 13 unionid species, 0.02 to 0.12 unionids/m2, and < 1 to 35 zebra mussels/unionid, respectively. Zebra mussel infestation of unionids in the delta appears to be mitigated by dominant offshore currents, which limit densities of zebra mussel veligers in nearshore compared to offshore waters (13,600 vs. 28,000/m3, respectively). Glycogen concentrations in the tissues of a common and widespread species in the delta (Lampsilis siliquoidea) suggest that zebra mussels may be adversely affecting physiological condition of unionids in a portion of the Lake St. Clair delta. Physiological condition and community structure of unionids within the delta may also be influenced by differences in food quantity and quality resulting from the uneven distribution of water flowing from the St. Clair River. The delta likely supports the largest living unionid community in the lower Great Lakes and includes several species that have been listed as Endangered or Threatened in Canada and/or the state of Michigan, making it an important refuge for the conservation of native unionids. Crown Copyright ?? 2009.

  6. Evolutionary history of relict Congeria (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae): unearthing the subterranean biodiversity of the Dinaric Karst

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patterns of biodiversity in the subterranean realm are typically different from those encountered on the Earth’s surface. The Dinaric karst of Croatia, Slovenia and Bosnia and Herzegovina is a global hotspot of subterranean biodiversity. How this was achieved and why this is so remain largely unresolved despite a long tradition of research. To obtain insights into the colonisation of the Dinaric Karst and the effects of the subterranean realm on its inhabitants, we studied the tertiary relict Congeria, a unique cave-dwelling bivalve (Dreissenidae), using a combination of biogeographical, molecular, morphological, and paleontological information. Results Phylogenetic and molecular clock analyses using both nuclear and mitochondrial markers have shown that the surviving Congeria lineage has actually split into three distinct species, i.e., C. kusceri, C. jalzici sp. nov. and C. mulaomerovici sp. nov., by vicariant processes in the late Miocene and Pliocene. Despite millions of years of independent evolution, analyses have demonstrated a great deal of shell similarity between modern Congeria species, although slight differences in hinge plate structure have enabled the description of the two new species. Ancestral plesiomorphic shell forms seem to have been conserved during the processes of cave colonisation and subsequent lineage isolation. In contrast, shell morphology is divergent within one of the lineages, probably due to microhabitat differences. Conclusions Following the turbulent evolution of the Dreissenidae during the Tertiary and major radiations in Lake Pannon, species of Congeria went extinct. One lineage survived, however, by adopting a unique life history strategy that suited it to the underground environment. In light of our new data, an alternative scenario for its colonisation of the karst is proposed. The extant Congeria comprises three sister species that, to date, have only been found to live in 15 caves in the Dinaric karst. Inter-specific morphological stasis and intra-specific ecophenotypic plasticity of the congerid shell demonstrate the contrasting ways in which evolution in the underground environments shapes its inhabitants. PMID:23388548

  7. Growth, mortality, and reproduction of Tagelus plebeius (Bivalvia: Solecurtidae) in Southeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Camila Fernanda; Corte, Guilherme Nascimento; Yokoyama, Leonardo Querobim; Abrahão, Jolnnye Rodrigues; Amaral, Antônia Cecília Zacagnini

    2015-03-01

    Tagelus plebeius (Lightfoot, 1786) is a stout razor clam that is economically exploited in several countries, including several local fisheries along the Brazilian coast. Despite its wide distribution and economic importance, there are few studies that have examined the population biology of this species. This study aimed to improve the current knowledge about the biology of T. plebeius by investigating its growth and mortality on a subtropical sandy beach in Southeast Brazil over a 1-year period. In addition, the reproduction of T. plebeius was analyzed through qualitative and quantitative histological analyses during the last 7 months of the study. The parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function were estimated to be L ∞ = 74.14 mm, K = 0.52 year-1, C = 0.47, and WP = 0.94. The instantaneous mortality rate ( Z) was 2.16 year-1, and the life span was 2.58 years. We confirmed variations ( H = 651.35; P < 0.05) in the shell length over the months of the study, and the recruitment was higher—but still low—in summer. Four cohorts were observed in the distribution of shell length frequencies. The sex ratio of the population was 1:1 during the study period, and a synchronism in gonadal development and spawning was found between males and females. The high mortality ( Z) and low recruitment rates can be interpreted as reflecting that the population of T. plebeius is under a low restoration process and could be an indication that this species has an endangered status in the study area.

  8. Chlorine toxicity to early life stages of freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valenti, T.W.; Cherry, D.S.; Currie, R.J.; Neves, R.J.; Jones, J.W.; Mair, R.; Kane, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl) is a highly toxic, widely used halogen disinfectant that is present in point-source pollution discharges from wastewater treatment plants and industrial facilities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency freshwater criteria for Cl are 19 ??g total residual Cl (TRC)/L as a maximum 1-h average concentration and 11 ??g TRC/L as a maximum 4-d average; however, toxicological data for unionids were not used in these calculations. To address this void in the data, we conducted acute tests with glochidia from several species and 21-d bioassays with three-month-old Epioblasma capsaeformis and three-, six-, and 12-month-old Villosa iris juveniles. The 24-h lethal concentration 50 values for glochidia were between 70 and 220 ??g TRC/L, which are 2.5 to 37 times higher than those reported in other studies for cladocerans. Significant declines in growth and survivorship were observed in the 21-d test with E. capsaeformis at 20 ??g TRC/L. Lowest-observed-adverse- effects concentrations in bioassays with juvenile V. iris were higher (30-60 ??g TRC/L) but showed a significant trend of declining toxicity with increased age. Although endpoints were above water quality criteria, the long life spans of unionids and potential implications of chronic exposure to endangered juvenile mussels still warrant concern. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  9. Morphological differences in Macoma balthica (Bivalvia, Tellinacea) from a Dutch and three southeastern United States estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamermans, Pauline; Van der Veer, Henk W.; Witte, Johannes IJ.; Adriaans, Ewout J.

    1999-05-01

    Field collections of the bivalve Macoma balthica in the Dutch Wadden Sea and three southeastern United States estuaries revealed morphological differences between populations of the two sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Individuals of the same age showed much larger shell lengths at the American stations. In addition, bivalves of the same body weight had higher siphon weights at the American stations than at the Dutch stations. This difference in siphon size was related to their burying depths. The American population, which invested more in heavier siphons, was able to burrow much deeper into the sediment (up to 30 cm). Deep burial may be an adaptation to avoid exposure to the high southern temperatures. Furthermore, it may serve as a refuge from blue crab predation. The results of our comparison between the southern American population and the European support the suggestion that populations of M. balthica living in these two regions should be considered separate and sibling species.

  10. Lifespan, growth rate, and body size across latitude in marine Bivalvia, with implications for Phanerozoic evolution.

    PubMed

    Moss, David K; Ivany, Linda C; Judd, Emily J; Cummings, Patrick W; Bearden, Claire E; Kim, Woo-Jun; Artruc, Emily G; Driscoll, Jeremy R

    2016-08-17

    Mean body size in marine animals has increased more than 100-fold since the Cambrian, a discovery that brings to attention the key life-history parameters of lifespan and growth rate that ultimately determine size. Variation in these parameters is not well understood on the planet today, much less in deep time. Here, we present a new global database of maximum reported lifespan and shell growth coupled with body size data for 1 148 populations of marine bivalves and show that (i) lifespan increases, and growth rate decreases, with latitude, both across the group as a whole and within well-sampled species, (ii) growth rate, and hence metabolic rate, correlates inversely with lifespan, and (iii) opposing trends in lifespan and growth combined with high variance obviate any demonstrable pattern in body size with latitude. Our observations suggest that the proposed increase in metabolic activity and demonstrated increase in body size of organisms over the Phanerozoic should be accompanied by a concomitant shift towards faster growth and/or shorter lifespan in marine bivalves. This prediction, testable from the fossil record, may help to explain one of the more fundamental patterns in the evolutionary and ecological history of animal life on this planet.

  11. Transcriptomics provides insight into Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) mantle function and its role in biomineralisation.

    PubMed

    Bjärnmark, Nadège A; Yarra, T; Churcher, A M; Felix, R C; Clark, M S; Power, D M

    2016-06-01

    The mantle is an organ common to all molluscs and is at the forefront of the biomineralisation process. The present study used the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) as a model species to investigate the structural and functional role of the mantle in shell formation. The transcriptomes of three regions of the mantle edge (umbo to posterior edge) were sequenced using Illumina technology which yielded a total of 61,674,325 reads after adapter trimming and filtering. The raw reads assembled into 179,879 transcripts with an N50 value of 1086bp. A total of 1363 transcripts (321, 223 and 816 in regions 1, 2 and 3, respectively) that differed in abundance in the three mantle regions were identified and putative function was assigned to 54% using BLAST sequence similarity searches (cut-off less than 1e(-10)). Morphological differences detected by histology of the three mantle regions was linked to functional heterogeneity by selecting the top five most abundant Pfam domains in the annotated 1363 differentially abundant transcripts across the three mantle regions. Calcium binding domains dominated region two (middle segment of the mantle edge). Candidate biomineralisation genes were mined and tested by qPCR. This revealed that Flp-like, a penicillin binding protein potentially involved in shell matrix maintenance of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), had significantly higher expression in the posterior end of the mantle edge (region one). Our findings are intriguing as they indicate that the mantle edge appears to be a heterogeneous tissue, displaying structural and functional bias.

  12. Vertical transmission of chemoautotrophic symbionts in the bivalve Solemya velum (Bivalvia: Protobranchia).

    PubMed

    Krueger, D M; Gustafson, R G; Cavanaugh, C M

    1996-04-01

    Adults of the bivalve species Solemya velum live in symbiosis with chemoautotrophic bacteria in specialized gill bacteriocytes. The bacteria play an essential nutritional role in the mature association, fixing CO2 via the Calvin cycle with energy obtained through the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. To understand how the continuity of this partnership is maintained between host generations, we investigated the mode of symbiont transfer in S. velum. A diagnostic assay using the polymerase chain reaction and primers specific for the S. velum symbiont ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) gene consistently detected bacterial sequence in female gonad tissue, suggesting the presence of symbiont cells in host ovaries and a vertical mode of symbiont transmission from mother to offspring. Furthermore, intracellular bacteria were present in the developing gills of juveniles that had not yet hatched from the gelatinous capsule in which larval development occurs (11 days after fertilization). By 64 days postfertilization, the typical adult gill ultrastructure of alternating bacteriocytes and symbiont-free-intercalary cells was apparent. Knowledge about the mode of symbiont transfer in S. velum allows further study into the dynamics of host-symbiont interactions in chemoautotrophic associations.

  13. Peptide derived from Pvfp-1 as bioadhesive on bio-inert surface.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhen; Yu, Yabiao; Du, Lina; Ding, Xiyu; Xu, Hui; Sun, Yanan; Zhang, Qiqing

    2012-02-01

    Surface property is one important characteristic of materials, especially for ones that are bio-inert but designed for bio-medical application. In this study, we designed a series of peptides and compared their capacities as bioadhesive to improve the surface bioactivity of bio-inert material. The peptides were designed according to the sequence of Perna viridis foot protein 1 (Pvfp-1), one of the Mfp-1s (mussel foot protein 1) which play key roles in wet adhesion of mussel byssus. And the Teflon (PTFE) was chosen as a model of bio-inert material. With adsorption, adhesion and coating analysis, it was found that peptide C2 (M) (derived from the non-repeating region of Pvfp-1, contains modified DOPA) has superior coating and adhesion abilities especially on the bio-inert surface of PTFE. After coating with peptide C2 (M), the cell adhesion and spreading of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells on PTFE were significantly improved compared with those on non-coated surface, and the peptide-coating did not show any cell toxicity. Therefore, peptide C2 (M) is effective for improving the bioactivity of bio-inert PTFE, and could be potentially used as a bioadhesive on other bio-inert materials for biomedical application. Moreover, this study also provided new insights in designing other peptide-based bioadhesive materials.

  14. Flares in gamma-ray bursts: disc fragmentation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osso, Simone; Perna, Rosalba; Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-02-01

    Flaring activity following gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), observed in both long and short GRBs, signals a long-term activity of the central engine. However, its production mechanism has remained elusive. Here, we develop a quantitative model of the idea proposed by Perna et al. of a disc whose outer regions fragment due to the onset of gravitational instability. The self-gravitating clumps migrate through the disc and begin to evolve viscously when tidal and shearing torques break them apart. Our model consists of two ingredients: theoretical bolometric flare light curves whose shape (width, skewness) is largely insensitive to the model parameters, and a spectral correction to match the bandpass of the available observations, that is calibrated using the observed spectra of the flares. This simple model reproduces, with excellent agreement, the empirical statistical properties of the flares as measured by their width-to-arrival time ratio and skewness (ratio between decay and rise time). We present model fits to the observed light curves of two well-monitored flares, GRB 060418 and GRB 060904B. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative model able to reproduce the flare light curves and explain their global statistical properties.

  15. Cadmium-induced changes in trace element bioaccumulation and proteomics perspective in four marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengjie; Wang, Da-Zhi; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2012-06-01

    Bivalves are employed widely as biomonitors of metal pollution and proteomics has increasingly been applied to solve ecotoxicological issues. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Cd exposure on the bioaccumulation of other trace elements and reveal the molecular mechanisms using proteomics technologies. The results showed that Cd exposure resulted in remarkable changes in body concentrations of Zn, Cu, Ag, Co, Ni, Pb, and Se in four marine bivalves (scallop Chlamys nobilis, clam Ruditapes philippinarum, mussel Perna viridis, and oyster Saccostrea cucullata). Generally, the bivalves exposed to higher Cd concentration accumulated higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Se, but a lower concentration of Co. The accumulation of Ag, Ni, and Pb was specific for different species. The data strongly suggest that the influences of one metal exposure on the bioaccumulation of other metals/metalloids need to be considered in interpreting body concentrations of the elements in the biomonitors. Cd exposure had little effect on bivalve proteomes, and the identified proteins were insufficient to explain the observed disruption of trace element metabolism. However, protein expression signatures composed of the altered proteins could distinguish the clams and the mussels with different body Cd levels. The strong up-regulation of galectin in Cd-exposed oysters indicated the protein as a novel biomarker in environmental monitoring.

  16. Mercury accumulation in marine bivalves: influences of biodynamics and feeding niche.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ke; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-10-01

    Differences in the accumulation of mercury (Hg) in five species of marine bivalves, including scallops Chlamys nobilis, clams Ruditapes philippinarum, oysters Saccostrea cucullata, green mussels Perna viridis, and black mussels Septifer virgatus, were investigated. The bivalves displayed different patterns of Hg accumulation in terms of the body concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total Hg (THg), as well as the ratio of MeHg to THg. Parameters of the biodynamics of the accumulation of Hg(II) and MeHg could reflect the species-dependent Hg concentrations in the bivalves. With the exception of black mussels, we found a significant relationship between the efflux rates of Hg(II) and the THg concentrations in the bivalves. The interspecific variations in the MeHg to THg ratio were largely controlled by the relative difference between the elimination rates of Hg(II) and MeHg. Stable isotope (δ(13)C) analysis indicated that the five bivalve species had contrasting feeding niches, which may also affect the Hg accumulation.

  17. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N; Patil, Navinkumar J; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-28

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  18. Spectral Evolution in GRB 990510

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Rol, E.; Galama, T. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Frontera, F.; Pian, E.; Palazzi, E.; Masetti, N.

    2000-01-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the afterglow of GRB 990510. Through the identification of several absorption lines in the first epoch spectrum, we determine the redshift for this burst to be z >= 1.6190 +/- 0.0016. No clear emission lines are detected. From the absence of the Ly.alpha drop, we can put an upper limit to the redshift of z <= 2.3. We study the time evolution of the MgII absorption line in our spectra taken 0.8 and 3.9 days after the burst, whose equivalent width (E.W.) is expected to change in case the burst resides in a dense compact medium (Perna & Loeb 1998). We measure an E.W. of 2.5 /- 0.2 and 2.3 +/- 0.6 in the spectra 0.8 and 3.8 days after the burst, respectively. Our results suggest that the atoms responsible for the absorption are not in the vicinity of the site of the burst.

  19. Contamination of butyltin compounds in Malaysian marine environments.

    PubMed

    Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Iwata, Hisato; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Ismail, Ahmad

    2004-08-01

    Concentration of butyltin compounds (BTs), including tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) and total tin (SigmaSn) were determined in green mussel (Perna viridis), 10 species of muscle fish and sediment from coastal waters of Malaysia. BTs were detected in all these samples ranging from 3.6 to 900 ng/g wet wt., 3.6 to 210 ng/g wet wt., and 18 to 1400 ng/g dry wt. for mussels, fish and sediments, respectively. The concentrations of BTs in several locations of this study were comparable with the reported values from some developed countries and highest among Asian developing nations. Considerable concentration of BTs in several locations might have ecotoxicological consequences and may cause concern to human health. The parent compound TBT was found to be highest than those of its degradation compounds, DBT and MBT, suggesting recent input of TBT to the Malaysian marine environment. Significant positive correlation (Spearman rank correlation: r2=0.82, P<0.0001) was found between BTs and SigmaSn, implying considerable anthropogenic input of butyltin compounds to total tin contamination levels. Enormous boating activities may be a major source of BTs in this country, although aquaculture activities may not be ignored.

  20. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  1. Estimation of ²¹⁰Po and ²¹⁰Pb and its dose to human beings due to consumption of marine species of Ennore Creek, South India.

    PubMed

    Musthafa, M Saiyad; Krishnamoorthy, R

    2012-10-01

    A systemic study on the natural radionuclides such as (210)Po and (210)Pb in the environmental matrices and biota of Ennore Creek has been undertaken to establish a baseline data on the radiation profile of Ennore Creek environment. The environmental samples such as water, sediment, and biota (seaweeds, molluscs, crustaceans, and fishes) have been subjected to analyses. It has been observed that the concentration of (210)Po and (210)Pb in the water samples of Ennore Creek as 2.7 and 1.63 m Bq L(-1), respectively. The activity concentration of (210)Po and (210)Pb in the sediment sample was 17.9 and 28.9 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The bivalve mollusk Perna viridis have been identified to accumulate higher concentrations of (210)Po and (210)Pb suggesting that they could serve as bioindicator of radionuclides in the Ennore Creek environment. The committed effective dose for human beings was found at 81.13-216.8 and 2.1-297.2 μSv year(-1) for (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively.

  2. Biomarker responses of mussels exposed to earthquake disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandurvelan, Rathishri; Marsden, Islay D.; Glover, Chris N.; Gaw, Sally

    2016-12-01

    The green-lipped mussel, Perna canaliculus is recognised as a bioindicator of coastal contamination in New Zealand (NZ). Mussels (shell length 60-80 mm) were collected from three intertidal areas of Canterbury in the South Island of NZ prior to extreme earthquake disturbances on 22nd February 2011, and 9 months later in October 2011. Trace elements, including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn), were measured in the gills, digestive gland, foot and mantle. Metal levels in tissues were site specific, and mostly unaffected by earthquake disturbances. Physiological biomarkers were negatively affected by earthquake disturbances and mussels from the Port of Lyttelton had higher negative scope for growth post-earthquake. Metallothionein-like protein in the digestive gland correlated with metal content of tissues, as did catalase activity in the gill and lipid peroxidation values for the digestive gland. This research demonstrates that physiological and other biomarkers are effective at detecting the effects of multiple stressors following seismic disturbances.

  3. Trace metals in mussels from mariculture zones, Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chiu, S T; Lam, F S; Tze, W L; Chau, C W; Ye, D Y

    2000-07-01

    In 1997, concentrations of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and nickel (Ni) were analysed in green-lipped mussels (Perna viridis) from three mariculture zones located in the north-east (Kat O), south (Lo Tik Wan) and to the west (Ma Wan) of Hong Kong. Spatial differences in the concentration of metals were found, chromium and copper were higher at Ma Wan and Lo Tik Wan compared to Kat O in the north-east. In contrast, the highest levels of lead (mean = 4.37 microg/g dry wt) were recorded at Kat O. There were no differences in the level of nickel between the study sites. A comparison of the metal concentrations in mussels with the results of a previous study seven years before, in 1990, showed a twofold increase in the mean levels of cadmium for all three sites. However, levels of the other metals in 1997 were lower by 12-32% for chromium, 32-39% for copper and 24-25% for nickel. The greatest reductions were recorded for lead: Kat O (39%), Ma Wan (51%) and Lo Tik Wan (75%). This may be related to the introduction of lead-free petrol in 1991. Despite the apparent reduction in some heavy metal bioaccumulation between 1990 and 1997, from a public health risk perspective, the data suggest a continued need for monitoring of heavy metals in mussels from mariculture zones.

  4. Pathogenic marine microbes influence the effects of climate change on a commercially important tropical bivalve

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lucy M.; Alsterberg, Christian; Turner, Andrew D.; Girisha, S. K.; Rai, Ashwin; Havenhand, Jonathan N.; Venugopal, M. N.; Karunasagar, Indrani; Godhe, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that climate change will increase the prevalence of toxic algae and harmful bacteria, which can accumulate in marine bivalves. However, we know little about any possible interactions between exposure to these microorganisms and the effects of climate change on bivalve health, or about how this may affect the bivalve toxin-pathogen load. In mesocosm experiments, mussels, Perna viridis, were subjected to simulated climate change (warming and/or hyposalinity) and exposed to harmful bacteria and/or toxin-producing dinoflagellates. We found significant interactions between climate change and these microbes on metabolic and/or immunobiological function and toxin-pathogen load in mussels. Surprisingly, however, these effects were virtually eliminated when mussels were exposed to both harmful microorganisms simultaneously. This study is the first to examine the effects of climate change on determining mussel toxin-pathogen load in an ecologically relevant, multi-trophic context. The results may have considerable implications for seafood safety. PMID:27576351

  5. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  6. Hydatid disease of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Calamai, G.; Perna, A. M.; Venturini, A.

    1974-01-01

    Calamai, G., Perna, A. M., and Venturini, A. (1974).Thorax, 29, 451-458. Hydatid disease of the heart: report of five cases and review of the literature. The world literature on the surgical treatment of echinococcosis of the heart is reviewed. Few cases are surgically treated, although the disease has been known for a long time. Localization to the liver and lungs is the most frequent. Cardiopulmonary bypass techniques make possible surgical treatment of hydatid cyst of the heart. The present paper is concerned with five cases operated upon between 1959 and 1969, three males and two females, their ages ranging from 13 to 46 years. A preoperative diagnosis was made in each case. One case was operated upon under cardiopulmonary bypass. The need for cardiopulmonary bypass on a stand-by basis is emphasized. The localization of the hydatid cyst was in the left ventricular wall (three cases), right ventricular wall (one case), and multiple (one case). The frequency of cardiac echinococcosis ranges between 0·5% and 2% according to various authors. Diagnosis is achieved with the aid of laboratory tests, radiology, and angiography; but the presence of the disease must be suspected in all patients who come from endemic areas. Surgical therapy is mandatory. Due to the growth characteristics of the cyst itself, the danger of damaging the ventricular wall at operation is increased; thus it is essential to have cardiopulmonary bypass facilities immediately available. Images PMID:4277513

  7. Adverse effects of herbal medicines: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Posadzki, Paul; Watson, Leala K; Ernst, Edzard

    2013-02-01

    This overview of systematic reviews (SRs) aims to evaluate critically the evidence regarding the adverse effects of herbal medicines (HMs). Five electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant SRs, with 50 SRs of 50 different HMs meeting our inclusion criteria. Most had only minor weaknesses in methods. Serious adverse effects were noted only for four HMs: Herbae pulvis standardisatus, Larrea tridentate, Piper methysticum and Cassia senna. The most severe adverse effects were liver or kidney damage, colon perforation, carcinoma, coma and death. Moderately severe adverse effects were noted for 15 HMs: Pelargonium sidoides, Perna canaliculus, Aloe vera, Mentha piperita, Medicago sativa, Cimicifuga racemosa, Caulophyllum thalictroides, Serenoa repens, Taraxacum officinale, Camellia sinensis, Commifora mukul, Hoodia gordonii, Viscum album, Trifolium pratense and Stevia rebaudiana. Minor adverse effects were noted for 31 HMs: Thymus vulgaris, Lavandula angustifolia Miller, Boswellia serrata, Calendula officinalis, Harpagophytum procumbens, Panax ginseng, Vitex agnus-castus, Crataegus spp., Cinnamomum spp., Petasites hybridus, Agave americana, Hypericum perforatum, Echinacea spp., Silybum marianum, Capsicum spp., Genus phyllanthus, Ginkgo biloba, Valeriana officinalis, Hippocastanaceae, Melissa officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Cnicus benedictus, Salvia hispanica, Vaccinium myrtillus, Mentha spicata, Rosmarinus officinalis, Crocus sativus, Gymnema sylvestre, Morinda citrifolia and Curcuma longa. Most of the HMs evaluated in SRs were associated with only moderately severe or minor adverse effects.

  8. Bioactive compounds from marine mussels and their effects on human health.

    PubMed

    Grienke, Ulrike; Silke, Joe; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of marine mussels as popular seafood has increased steadily over the past decades. Awareness of mussel derived molecules, that promote health, has contributed to extensive research efforts in that field. This review highlights the bioactive potential of mussel components from species of the genus Mytilus (e.g. M. edulis) and Perna (e.g. P. canaliculus). In particular, the bioactivity related to three major chemical classes of mussel primary metabolites, i.e. proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates, is evaluated. Within the group of proteins the focus is mainly on mussel peptides e.g. those obtained by bio-transformation processes, such as fermentation. In addition, mussel lipids, comprising polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), are discussed as compounds that are well known for prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Within the third group of carbohydrates, mussel polysaccharides are investigated. Furthermore, the importance of monitoring the mussel as food material in respect to contaminations with natural toxins produced by microalgae is discussed.

  9. The genetic architecture of hybridisation between two lineages of greenshell mussels

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, J P A; Wei, K-J

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach has identified sigmoidal genetic clines on the east and west coasts in central New Zealand where low-density ecological interactions occur between northern and southern lineages of the endemic greenshell mussel, Perna canaliculus. The sigmoidal clines indicate the existence of a mussel hybrid zone in a region of genetic discontinuities for many continuously distributed coastal taxa, in particular marine invertebrates. Examination of the genetic architecture of the hybrid zone revealed the differential contribution of individual microsatellite loci and/or alleles to defining the zone of interaction and no evidence of increased allelic richness or heterozygosity inside versus outside the hybrid zone. Genomics cline analysis identified one locus in particular (Pcan1–27) as being different from neutral expectations, thereby contributing to lineage differentiation. Estimates of contemporary gene flow revealed very high levels of within-lineage self-recruitment and a hybrid zone composed mostly (~85%) of northern immigrants. Broad scale interpretation of these results is consistent with a zone of genetic interaction that was generated between 0.3 and 1.3 million years before present at a time of pronounced global sea-level change. At that time, the continuous distribution of the greenshell mussel was split into northern and southern groups, which differentiated to become distinct lineages, and which have subsequently been reunited (secondary contact) resulting in the generation of the hybrid zone at ~42°S. PMID:25424842

  10. Young Neutron Stars in Extragalactic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Nathan; Lorimer, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars are compact remnants of stellar cores left behind by supernova explosions. They spin rapidly and emit electromagnetic radiation from their magnetic poles, and gradually lose rotational energy. This project tests and expands upon a previous prediction by Perna et al. for the initial spin rates of neutron stars by attempting to model the x-ray emission from extragalactic supernovae. A computer simulation generated a set of pulsars of known initial rotational periods, magnetic field strengths, and ages, and will calculate the expected x-ray luminosities from the known relationship between magnetic field strengths, slow-down rates, and radio luminosities. This experiment expanded upon the original research by incorporating variability in the angle between the magnetic and rotational axes of each pulsar as well as the braking index value, which in the original publication were kept constant. This examines the effect of the angle on pulsars’ x-ray luminosities. The simulated x-ray luminosities were compared to the known x-ray luminosities of known supernova explosions, which served as an upper limit to determine the highest possible initial rotation speeds. Funding was provided through the WVU Summer Undergraduate Research Program.

  11. Heavy metal contamination along the China coastline: A comprehensive study using Artificial Mussels and native mussels.

    PubMed

    Degger, Natalie; Chiu, Jill M Y; Po, Beverly H K; Tse, Anna C K; Zheng, Gene J; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Xu, Di; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Wang, Xin-Hong; Liu, Wen-Hua; Lau, T C; Wu, Rudolf S S

    2016-09-15

    A comprehensive study was carried out to assess metal contamination in five cities spanning from temperate to tropical environment along the coastal line of China with different hydrographical conditions. At each of the five cities, Artificial Mussels (AM) were deployed together with a native species of mussel at a control site and a polluted site. High levels of Cr, Cu and Hg were found in Qingdao, high level of Cd, Hg and Pb was found in Shanghai, and high level of Zn was found in Dalian. Furthermore, level of Cu contamination in all the five cities was consistently much higher than those reported in similar studies in other countries (e.g., Australia, Portugal, Scotland, Iceland, Korea, South Africa and Bangladesh). Levels of individual metal species in the AM showed a highly significant correlation with that in the native mussels (except for Zn in Mytilus edulis and Cd in Perna viridis), while no significant difference can be found between the regression relationships of metal in the AM and each of the two native mussel species. The results demonstrated that AM can provide a reliable time-integrated estimate of metal concentration in contrasting environments over large biogeographic areas and different hydrographic conditions, and overcome the shortcomings of monitoring metals in water, sediment and the use of biomonitors.

  12. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sediments and mussel tissues from Hong Kong marine waters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zheng, Gene J; Yu, Hongxia; Martin, Michael; Richardson, Bruce J; Lam, Michael H W; Lam, Paul K S

    2005-11-01

    Sediments and green-lipped mussels, Perna viridis, were used to investigate concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in Hong Kong's marine environment. PBDEs have been used extensively over the past two decades as flame retardants in polymer additives for a variety of plastics, computers, furniture, building materials, and fabrics. Many measurements of PBDEs in various environmental matrices have been reported from Belgium, Holland, Japan, Europe and North America, but few measurements are available for the southeast Asian region and Hong Kong. PBDE congeners (n=15) were measured in 13 sediments and nine mussel samples, taken from Hong Kong marine waters. The Sigma15PBDEs in sediments ranged between 1.7 and 53.6 ng g(-1) dry wt, with the highest concentrations located around the most heavily populated areas of Victoria Harbour and Sai Kung, while the lowest concentrations of Sigma15PBDEs were found at more remote locations of Sha Tau Kok, Wong Chuk Bay, Castle Peak Bay, and Gold Coast. Sigma15PBDEs ranged from 27.0 to 83.7 ng g(-1) dry wt of mussel tissues. Although not identical, most of the congeners in sediments were found in mussel tissues, with BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-153 and BDE-183 being the most prominent in both matrices. On the basis of a literature survey, the concentrations of PBDEs reported in Hong Kong sediments and mussel tissues are amongst the highest in the world.

  13. An overview of trace metal pollution in the coastal waters of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, G

    1998-06-18

    The state of metal pollution in Hong Kong's coastal waters has been assessed by measuring metal levels in: (i) the water column; (ii) sediments and (iii) in organisms, i.e. biomonitors. Current literature is reviewed. Data from sediment analysis have shown that metal pollution is most severe in the urban areas of Victoria Harbour, Tolo Harbour, Deep Bay and Northwestern waters. Bottom sediments in typhoon shelters are particularly heavily polluted with, for example, Cu levels from Kowloon Bay reaching 5300 mg.kg-1 in 1995. Since 1987, levels of pollution have generally either stabilized or fallen in Deep Bay and Victoria Harbour but have increased in Inner Tolo Harbour and Northwestern waters. Many biomonitors have been used to study metal pollution in Hong Kong, the most popular of which are barnacles, mussels (in particular Perna viridis) and algae (in particular Ulva lactuca). Biomonitoring studies generally recorded high levels of metal pollution in Victoria Harbour in the late nineteen seventies and early eighties, with increasing pollution of the semi-enclosed Tolo Harbour through the eighties and early nineties. In a recent study using barnacles, the levels of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn were shown to be greatly reduced as compared to those recorded in 1986 and 1989, respectively. Levels of metal pollution in Hong Kong coastal waters may have lowered in the last 10 years.

  14. Protective coatings on extensible biofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Fantner, Georg E.; Hohlbauch, Sophia; Waite, J. Herbert; Zok, Frank W.

    2007-09-01

    Formulating effective coatings for use in nano- and biotechnology poses considerable technical challenges. If they are to provide abrasion resistance, coatings must be hard and adhere well to the underlying substrate. High hardness, however, comes at the expense of extensibility. This property trade-off makes the design of coatings for even moderately compliant substrates problematic, because substrate deformation easily exceeds the strain limit of the coating. Although the highest strain capacity of synthetic fibre coatings is less than 10%, deformable coatings are ubiquitous in biological systems. With an eye to heeding the lessons of nature, the cuticular coatings of byssal threads from two species of marine mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Perna canaliculus, have been investigated. Consistent with their function to protect collagenous fibres in the byssal-thread core, these coatings show hardness and stiffness comparable to those of engineering plastics and yet are surprisingly extensible; the tensile failure strain of P. canaliculus cuticle is about 30% and that of M. galloprovincialis is a remarkable 70%. The difference in extensibility is attributable to the presence of deformable microphase-separated granules within the cuticle of M. galloprovincialis. The results have important implications in the design of bio-inspired extensible coatings.

  15. n-Alkanes and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh-forzen and precooked-frozen mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.E.; Machado, L.T.; Corbella, R.

    1995-09-01

    Heavy oil pollution has been found in sea water and coastal environments not only near industrial petroleum districts and places of oil spillage but also in other places where crude oil and/or refined products can be carried to by winds, streams, etc. Marine oil pollution may not only affect productivity and quality of marine organisms but may ultimately affect the health of the human population as there is a possible health risk from consumption of sea food contaminated by oil-derived carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the marine habitat, many organisms readily accumulate n-alkanes and PAHs from the environment and store them at a relatively high level in their tissues, and studies have been carried out on the accumulation and depuration of toxic organic pollutants in marine organisms. As a part of a continuous monitoring program of the foods imported to the Canary Islands this paper presents the results obtained in the determination of n-alkanes and PAHs in fresh-frozen and precooked-frozen mussels, Perna canaliculus, commercialized in these islands. 9 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Characterization of Generalized Gradient Young Measures Generated by Sequences in W1,1 and BV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Jan; Rindler, Filip

    2010-08-01

    Generalized Young measures as introduced by DiPerna and Majda (Commun Math Phys 108:667-689, 1987) provide a quantitative tool for studying the one-point statistics of oscillation and concentration in sequences of functions. In this work, after developing a functional-analytic framework for such measures, including a compactness theorem and results on the generation of such Young measures by L1-bounded sequences (or even by sequences of bounded Radon measures), we turn to investigation of those Young measures that are generated by bounded sequences of W1,1-gradients or BV-derivatives. We provide several techniques to manipulate such measures (including shifting, averaging and approximation by piecewise-homogeneous Young measures) and then establish the main new result of this work, the duality characterization of the set of (BV- or W1,1-)gradient Young measures in terms of Jensen-type inequalities for quasiconvex functions with linear growth at infinity. This result is the natural generalization of the Kinderlehrer-Pedregal Theorem (Arch Ration Mech Anal 115:329-365, 1991; J Geom Anal 4:59-90, 1994) for classical Young measures to the W1,1- and BV-case and contains its version for weakly converging sequences in W1,1 as a special case. Finally, we give an application to a new lower semicontinuity theorem in BV.

  17. Measurement and Modeling of Ecosystem Risk and Recovery for In Situ Treatment of Contaminated Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    lubrica 2 2 2 Venerupis philippinarum 4 Unidentified Bivalvia^ 1 Bryozoa + Chordata Molgula spp...Theora lubrica 2 6 Venerupis philippinarum 3 Unidentified Bivalvia^ 1 1 Bryozoa Chordata...lubrica 1 1 3 Venerupis philippinarum 1 1 Unidentified Bivalvia^ Bryozoa + + Chordata Molgula

  18. A new genus and species of Thyasiridae (Mollusca, Bivalvia) from deep-water, Beaufort Sea, northern Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Valentich-Scott, Paul; Powell, Charles L.; II; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Edwards, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bivalve mollusk shells were collected in 2350 m depth in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean off northern Alaska. Initial identification suggested the specimens were a member of the bivalve family Thyasiridae, but no known eastern Pacific or Arctic living or fossil thyasirid resembled these deep-water specimens. Comparisons were made with the type of the genera Maorithyas Fleming, 1950, Spinaxinus Oliver & Holmes, 2006, Axinus Sowerby, 1821, and Parathyasira Iredale, 1930. We determined the Beaufort Sea species represents a new genus, herein described as Wallerconcha. These specimens also represent a new species, herein named Wallerconcha sarae. These new taxa are compared with known modern and fossil genera and species of thyasirds. PMID:25589851

  19. [Seasonal variation in proximate composition of mussels Tagelus peruvianus (Bivalvia: Solecurtidae) from the Gulf of Nicoya, Puntarenas, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Fonseca Rodríguez, Cristian; Marín-Vindas, Carolina; Chavarría-Solera, Fabián; Agüero Pedro, Toledo

    2011-12-01

    Marine bivalves are a very important food source for human consumption, and species that has not been of traditional use as a fishery resource are gaining interest. Seasonal variation in proximate composition, condition index and energy or caloric content of the mussel Tagelus peruvianus were studied in the Gulf of Nicoya, Puntarenas, Costa Rica. From November 2007 to October 2008, a total of 35 to 40 specimens per month were collected. The proximate composition using the AOAC methods was determined. Results showed that the condition index during December, January and May decreased, indicative of two spawning periods and one gonadal resting phase. Soft tissues were respectively characterized by protein (61.9 +/- 4.3%), carbohydrates (15.7 +/- 2.4%), ash (14.0 +/- 1.9%) and lipids (8.5 +/- 1.7%). The average caloric content was 5.0 +/- 0.1 kcal/g. The results showed that the decrease in protein and fat percentage, and calories content, occurred during the spawning seasons. We suggest that T. peruvianus has an optimal nutritional value for human consumption because of the low-fat and moderate protein content.

  20. Morphology of the larval shell of three oyster species of the genus Crassostrea Sacco, 1897 (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Christo, S W; Absher, T M; Boehs, G

    2010-08-01

    In this study we describe the morphology of the larval shell of three oyster species of Crassostrea genus. Two species, C. rhizophorae and C. brasiliana, are native to the Brazilian coast, and C. gigas is an introduced species. Samples of laboratory reared larvae, obtained through artificial fertilisation, were collected at intervals during the cultivation process for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Prodissoconch morphology was observed in relation to the presence, position, form and number of teeth in the three larval stages: D-shaped larva, umbo larva and pediveliger. Characteristic of D-shaped larvae of C. rhizophorae was the total absence of teeth in the provinculum area while C. brasiliana and C. gigas had two anterior and two posterior teeth in each valve. In the umbo larval phase, the three species had the same number of teeth in each valve: two posterior and two anterior teeth in the right valve and three posterior and three anterior in the left valve. In the pediveliger stage the three species could be differentiated by the number of anterior teeth of the right valve: C. rhizophorae had two teeth, C. brasiliana one tooth and C. gigas three teeth.

  1. Sex Ratio and Sex Reversal in Two-year-old Class of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Seung Wan; An, Cheul Min; Lee, Sung-Ho; Gye, Myung Chan; Lee, Jung Sick

    2012-12-01

    The sex ratio (F:M) in the same population of oyster, Crassostrea gigas at the commencement of the study (2007) was 1:1.0, but changed to 1:2.8 by the end of the study (2008). The sex reversal rate in two-year-old oysters was 40.2%. Specifically, female to male sex reversal rate was 66.1%, which is higher than the male to female sex reversal rate of 21.1%. The sex reversal pattern of C. gigas appears to go from male⇒female⇒male, and as such is determined to be rhythmical hermaphroditism.

  2. Long-term monitoring of growth in the Eastern Elliptio, Elliptio complanata (Bivalvia: Unionidae), in Rhode Island: A transplant experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kesler, D.H.; Newton, T.J.; Green, L.

    2007-01-01

    The lengths of marked specimens of the freshwater mussel, Eastern Elliptio (Elliptio complanata [Lightfoot 1786]), were monitored annually in 3 lakes in Rhode Island, USA, from 1991 to 2005. Mussels growing in Worden Pond showed a change in mean shell length of only 4.3 mm over 14 y, whereas mussel growth in 2 nearby lakes was 3 to 8x greater than growth in Worden Pond over the same time period. L???, the length at which shell growth stops, was significantly different (p < 0.001) among lakes and ranged from 60.5 to 87.4 mm. Transplant experiments revealed that mussels moved to Worden Pond stopped growing, whereas mussels moved from Worden Pond to the 2 other lakes grew at rates similar to the rates observed for resident mussels in the 2 lakes. Standard water-quality measures did not explain the observed growth cessation and lower condition indices of mussels in Worden Pond. Our growth data are consistent with food limitation. The consistent slow growth of E. complanata in Worden Pond, without high mortality, and its ability to increase growth when placed in environments more favorable than Worden Pond, suggests both growth plasticity and longevity in these animals. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  3. Early life history and spatiotemporal changes in distribution of the rediscovered Suwannee moccasinshell Medionidus walkeri (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nathan A.; Mcleod, John; Holcomb, Jordan; Rowe, Matthew T.; Williams, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate distribution data are critical to the development of conservation and management strategies for imperiled species, particularly for narrow endemics with life history traits that make them vulnerable to extinction. Medionidus walkeri is a rare freshwater mussel endemic to the Suwannee River Basin in southeastern North America. This species was rediscovered in 2012 after a 16-year hiatus between collections and is currently proposed for listing under the Endangered Species Act. Our study fills knowledge gaps regarding changes in distribution and early life history requirements of M. walkeri. Spatiotemporal changes in M. walkeri distribution were displayed using a conservation status assessment map incorporating metadata from 98 historical (1916–1999) and 401 recent (2000–2015) site surveys from museums and field notes representing records for 312 specimens. Recent surveys detected M. walkeri only in the middle Suwannee subbasin (n = 86, 22 locations) and lower Santa Fe subbasin (n = 2, 2 locations), and it appears the species may be extirpated from 67% of historically occupied 10-digit HUCs. In our laboratory experiments, M. walkeri successfully metamorphosed onPercina nigrofasciata (56.2% ± 8.9) and Etheostoma edwini (16.1% ± 7.9) but not on Trinectes maculatus, Lepomis marginatus, Notropis texanus, Noturus leptacanthus, Etheostoma fusiforme, orGambusia holbrooki. We characterize M. walkeri as a lure-displaying host fish specialist and a long-term brooder (bradytictic), gravid from fall to early summer of the following year. The early life history and distribution data presented here provide the baseline framework for listing decisions and future efforts to conserve and recover the species.

  4. Modelling the risk of mortality of Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae) exposed to different turbidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Avelar, W E P; Neves, F F; Lavrador, M A S

    2014-05-01

    The provision of sediment in rivers, due to erosion processes that occur in the environment, consists of a major source of pollution and alteration of the physicochemical conditions of water resources. In addition, the increase in water turbidity may cause siltation, dramatically impacting aquatic communities. Specifically considering the bivalve Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774), the aim of this study was to analyse the effect of exposure to different turbidity conditions of sediments, as a risk factor for the animals. For this purpose, a docking device was designed to ensure water circulation in a closed system and to maintain the desired levels of turbidity. Although C. fluminea can generally tolerate environmental changes in aquatic systems, an intolerance to high turbidity levels was experimentally observed, expressed by the mortality rate of the animals when exposed to conditions above 150 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU). This value was similar to the one recorded at study sites in the rivers Pardo (Serrana-SP-Brazil) and Mogi Guaçu (Porto Ferreira-SP-Brazil) during the rainy season. Using a logistic regression model, the experimental results were analysed and the observed mortality rates indicate that the exposure of the animals to turbidity levels above 150 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU), for periods longer than 120 hours, may be considered a probable cause of mortality for the species.

  5. First molecular phylogeny of the circumtropical bivalve family Pinnidae (Mollusca, Bivalvia): evidence for high levels of cryptic species diversity.

    PubMed

    Lemer, Sarah; Buge, Barbara; Bemis, Amanda; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2014-06-01

    The family Pinnidae Leach, 1819, includes approximately 50 species of large subtidal and coastal marine bivalves. These commercially important species occur in tropical and temperate waters around the world and are most frequently found in seagrass meadows. The taxonomy of the family has been revised a number of times since the early 20th Century, the most recent revision recognizing 55 species distributed in three genera: Pinna, Atrina and Streptopinna, the latter being monotypic. However, to date no phylogenetic analysis of the family has been conducted using morphological or molecular data. The present study analyzed 306 pinnid specimens from around the world, comprising the three described genera and ca. 25 morphospecies. We sequenced the mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, and the nuclear ribosomal genes 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA. Phylogenetic analysis of the data revealed monophyly of the genus Atrina but also that the genus Streptopinna is nested within Pinna. Based on the strong support for this relationship we propose a new status for Streptopinna Martens, 1880 and treat it as a subgenus (status nov.) of Pinna Linnaeus, 1758. The phylogeny and the species delimitation analyses suggest the presence of cryptic species in many morphospecies displaying a wide Indo-Pacific distribution, including Pinna muricata, Atrina assimilis, A. exusta and P. (Streptopinna) saccata but also in the Atlantic species A. rigida. Altogether our results highlight the challenges associated with morphological identifications in Pinnidae due to the presence of both phenotypic plasticity and morphological stasis and reveal that many pinnid species are not as widely distributed as previously thought.

  6. Lucinid bivalves of Guadeloupe: diversity and systematics in the context of the tropical Western Atlantic (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Lucinidae).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ohn D; Glover, Emily A

    2016-11-23

    Intensive sampling of molluscs from the intertidal to depths of 800 m around the islands of Guadeloupe in the Lesser Antilles (KARUBENTHOS 2012, 2015) recovered 25 species of Lucinidae. All the Guadeloupe species are described and illustrated including details of larval shells and the taxonomy revised within the context of the wider western Atlantic fauna and recent classifications. Concurrent molecular analysis has helped separate frequently confounded species. 'Myrtea' pristiphora is placed in the Leucosphaerine genus Myrtina previously known from the Indo-West Pacific. A second western Atlantic species of Callucina, C. pauperatus previously known from the Pliocene of Jamaica is recognised from the southern Caribbean and off Brazil. The deeper water species 'Myrteopis' lens is placed in Afrolucina previously known from the eastern Atlantic. Lucinids commonly identified as Ctena orbiculata are shown to belong to two distinct species, C. orbiculata in the Gulf of Mexico and Florida and C. imbricatula in the Caribbean. Epicodakia is recognised for the first time in the western Atlantic with E. pectinata widely distributed across the region and E. filiata recorded from deeper water. Three species of Lucina are recognised, Lucina pensylvanica in the Gulf of Mexico and Florida and the similar Lucina roquesana from the Caribbean and Bahamas while the smaller L. aurantia has a wide distribution from central America to the Bahamas. A new species of Parvilucina, P. latens is described; this is similar to P. pectinella but has an internal ligament. The long problematic species 'Codakia' cubana is assigned to Ferrocina. A new genus, Guyanella is introduced for Parvilucina clenchi the smallest known lucinid. A critical reassessment of the lucinid fauna of the western Atlantic Ocean identifies 46 species for the region with 33 of these living at depths less than 200 m. Deeper-water habitats have been much less investigated except at sites of hydrocarbon seeps. Some species are widespread throught the whole region but others have more restricted ranges. Notable are species pairs, for example of Ctena, Lucina, Lucinisca and Parvilucina that are either largely Caribbean or Gulf of Mexico/Floridian in distribution. Although extralimital, two problematic species from the mid-south Atlantic island of St Helena are refigured and placed in Cavilinga.

  7. New lucinid bivalves from shallow and deeper water of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae).

    PubMed

    Taylor, John D; Glover, Emily A

    2013-01-01

    Four new species and a new genus of lucinid bivalves are described from shallow and deeper waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. The new genus Scabrilucina (subfamily Lucininae) includes the little-known Scabrilucina victorialis (Melvill, 1899) from the Arabian Sea and Scabrilucina vitrea (Deshayes, 1844) from the Andaman Sea as well as a new species Scabrilucina melvilli from the Torres Strait off northeastern Australia. Ferrocina brunei new species (Lucininae) was recovered from 60 m near oil drilling activities off Borneo; its anatomy confirmed the presence of symbiotic bacteria. Two unusual deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae are described, both species included in on-going molecular analyses; Gonimyrtea ferruginea from 400-650 m in the southwest Pacific and Myrtina reflexa from 200-825 m off Zanzibar and Madagascar.

  8. Exploring the hologenome concept in marine bivalvia: haemolymph microbiota as a pertinent source of probiotics for aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Desriac, Florie; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Brillet, Benjamin; Leguerinel, Ivan; Thuillier, Benoît; Paillard, Christine; Fleury, Yannick

    2014-01-01

    Haemolymph-associated microbiota of marine bivalves was explored for antibacterial activity against important aquaculture pathogens. A collection of 843 strains were cultured from the haemolymph of four bivalve species (Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus edulis, Pecten maximus and Tapes rhomboides) collected by deep-sea diving in the Glenan Archipelago (France). Cell-free culture supernatants were investigated for antibacterial activity using the well-diffusion assay. About 3% of haemolymph-associated cultivable bacteria displayed antibacterial activity toward Gram-negative pathogens. Among the active bacteria, Pseudoalteromonas strains exhibited the highest antibacterial activity. The cell-free culture supernatant of one of them, named hCg-51, was able to inhibit the growth of bacterial pathogens even after drastic dilution (1 : 1024). Hemocyte survival was not significantly altered in the presence of the haemolymph-associated strains assayed. Moreover, a dose-dependent beneficial effect on hemocyte survival rates was observed with the hCg-51 strain. These results suggest that haemolymph microbiota may participate in bivalve protection and therefore confer a health benefit on the host. As a result, the results highlight bivalve haemolymph microbiota as a promising novel source for aquaculture probiotics. This work also gives a first insight into the contribution of the haemolymph-associated microbiota as part of the bivalve 'hologenome'.

  9. Nuclear genes with sex bias in Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia, veneridae): Mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination in DUI species.

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Nuzhdin, Sergey V; Passamonti, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most metazoans, but in bivalves with Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) a mitochondrial lineage is transmitted through eggs (F-type), and another through sperm (M-type). In DUI species, a sex-ratio distortion of the progeny was observed: some females produce a female-biased offspring (female-biased family), others a male-biased progeny (male-biased family), and others a 50:50 sex-ratio. A peculiar segregation pattern of M-type mitochondria in DUI organisms appears to be correlated with the sex bias of these families. According to a proposed model for the inheritance of M-type mitochondria in DUI, the transmission of sperm mitochondria is controlled by three nuclear genes, named W, X, and Z. An additional S gene with different dosage effect would be involved in sex determination. In this study, we analyzed structure and localization of three transcripts (psa, birc, and anubl1) with specific sex and family biases in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum. In situ hybridization confirmed the localization of these transcripts in gametogenic cells. In other animals, homologs of these genes are involved in reproduction and ubiquitination. We hypothesized that these genes may have a role in sex determination and could also be responsible for the maintenance/degradation of spermatozoon mitochondria during embryo development of the DUI species R. philippinarum, so that we propose them as candidate factors of the W/X/Z/S system.

  10. Evidence for somatic transcription of male-transmitted mitochondrial genome in the DUI species Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Iannello, Mariangela; Passamonti, Marco

    2014-08-01

    In species with doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI), males are heteroplasmic for two sex-linked mitochondrial genomes (M- and F-mtDNA). While a role of M-mtDNA in male gametogenesis and sperm function is evident, there is an ongoing debate on whether it is transcribed or not in male soma. In this work we report a qPCR analysis in the DUI species Ruditapes philippinarum, showing that M-mtDNA is transcribed in somatic tissues. We observed a correlation between DNA copy numbers of the two analyzed genes, cytochrome b and a novel male-specific mitochondrial gene thought to be involved in DUI (orf21), and between their transcription levels. No correlation between a transcript and its DNA copy number was found, supporting the existence of complex regulatory mechanisms of mitochondrial transcription. We found the highest amount of mtDNA and mtRNA in gonads, likely due to the intense cell proliferation and high energy request for gametogenesis, while the observed variation among specimens is probably related to their different stages of gonad development. Finally, orf21 showed a highly variable transcription in advanced stages of gametogenesis. We hypothesize a differential storage of orf21 transcripts in spermatozoa, representing different paternal contributions to progeny, possibly leading to different developmental outcomes. A transcriptional activity does not necessarily imply the translation of M-mtDNA genes, and studies on mitochondrial proteins and their localization are needed to definitively assess the functioning of male-transmitted mitochondria in male soma. All that considered, the male soma of DUI species may represent an intriguing experimental model to study cytoplasmic genetic conflicts.

  11. Strict sex-specific mtDNA segregation in the germ line of the DUI species Venerupis philippinarum (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Milani, Liliana; Passamonti, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) is one of the most striking exceptions to the common rule of standard maternal inheritance of metazoan mitochondria. In DUI, two mitochondrial genomes are present, showing different transmission routes, one through eggs (F-type) and the other through sperm (M-type). In this paper, we report results from a multiplex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis on the Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum (formerly Tapes philippinarum). We quantified M- and F-types in somatic tissues, gonads, and gametes. Nuclear and external reference sequences were used, and the whole experimental process was designed to avoid any possible cross-contamination. In most male somatic tissues, the M-type is largely predominant: This suggests that the processes separating sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) in somatic tissues are less precise than in other DUI species. In the germ line, we evidenced a strict sex-specific mtDNA segregation because both sperm and eggs do carry exclusively M- and F-types, respectively, an observation that is in contrast with a previous analysis on Mytilus galloprovincialis. More precisely, whereas two mtDNAs are present in the whole gonad, only the sex-specific one is detected in gametes. Because of this, we propose that the mtDNA transmission is achieved through a three-checkpoint process in V. philippinarum. The cytological mechanisms of male mitochondria segregation in males and degradation in females during the embryo development (here named Checkpoint #1 and Checkpoint #2) are already well known for DUI species; a Checkpoint #3 would act when primordial germ cells (PGCs) are first formed and would work in both males and females. We believe that Checkpoint #3 is a mere variation of the "mitochondrial bottleneck" in species with standard maternal inheritance, established when their PGCs separate during embryo cleavage.

  12. Behavioral responses of Arctica islandica (Bivalvia: Arcticidae) to simulated leakages of carbon dioxide from sub-sea geological storage.

    PubMed

    Bamber, Shaw D; Westerlund, Stig

    2016-11-01

    Sub-sea geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) provides a viable option for the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) approach for reducing atmospheric emissions of this greenhouse gas. Although generally considered to offer a low risk of major leakage, it remains relevant to establish the possible consequences for marine organisms that live in or on sediments overlying these storage areas if such an event may occur. The present study has used a series of laboratory exposures and behavioral bioassays to establish the sensitivity of Arctica islandica to simulated leakages of CO2. This long-lived bivalve mollusc is widely distributed throughout the North Sea, an area where geological storage is currently taking place and where there are plans to expand this operation significantly. A recently published model has predicted a maximum drop of 1.9pH units in seawater at the point source of a substantial escape of CO2 from sub-sea geological storage in this region. Valve movements of A. islandica exposed to reduced pH seawater were recorded continuously using Hall effect proximity sensors. Valve movement regulation is important for optimising the flow of water over the gills, which supplies food and facilitates respiration. A stepwise reduction in seawater pH showed an initial increase in both the rate and extent of valve movements in the majority of individuals tested when pH fell to 6.2 units. Exposing A. islandica to pH 6.2 seawater continuously for seven days resulted in a clear increase in valve movements during the first 40h of exposure, followed by a gradual reduction in activity intensity over the subsequent five days, suggesting acclimation. The ability of both exposed and control bivalves to burrow successfully into sediment on completion of this exposure was very similar. A final exposure trial, testing whether increased valve movements initiated by reduced pH were related to foot extension during attempted burrowing, found no such association. In summary, significant changes in valve behavior did not occur until seawater pH fell to 6.2 units. The response took the form of an increase in valve activity rather than closure. The absence of foot extension coincident with increased valve movements indicates A. islandica were not attempting to burrow, leaving the possibility that valve movements are supporting a respiratory response to hypercapnia. In conclusion, A. islandica appears to be tolerant of reductions in seawater pH equivalent to those predicted for substantial losses of CO2 through leakage from sub-sea geological storage.

  13. The male and female complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the Endangered freshwater mussel Potomida littoralis (Cuvier, 1798) (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Froufe, Elsa; Gan, Han Ming; Lee, Yin Peng; Carneiro, João; Varandas, Simone; Teixeira, Amílcar; Zieritz, Alexandra; Sousa, Ronaldo; Lopes-Lima, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Freshwater mussels of the family Unionidae exhibit a particular form of mitochondria inheritance called double uniparental inheritance (DUI), in which the mitochondria are inherited by both male and female parents. The (M)ale and (F)emale mitogenomes are highly divergent within species. In the present study, we determine and describe the complete M and F mitogenomes of the Endangered freshwater mussel Potomida littoralis (Cuvier, 1798). The complete M and F mitogenomes sequences are 16 451 bp and 15 787 bp in length, respectively. Both F and M have the same gene content: 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (trn) and 2 ribosomal RNA (rrn) genes. Bayesian analyses based on the concatenated nucleotide sequences of 12 PCGs and 2 rrn genes of both genomes, including mitogenome sequences available from related species, were performed. Male and Female lineages are monophyletic within the family, but reveal distinct phylogenetic relationships.

  14. Uptake of methyl mercury by the floater mussel, Pyganodon grandis (Bivalvia, Unionidae), caged in a flooded wetland

    SciTech Connect

    Malley, D.F.; Stewart, A.R.; Hall, B.D. |

    1996-06-01

    A 16.7-ha wetland with a pond at the Experimental Lakes Area, northwestern Ontario, was experimentally flooded to determine causes of elevated waterborne methyl mercury (MeHg) associated with impoundment. Unionid mussels, Pyganodon grandis (formerly Anodonata grandis grandis) were caged in the experimental pond before and after flooding to determine their ability to monitor the elevated waterborne MeHg. Mussels were also caged in a reference wetland pond and in the lake from which they were collected (source lake). Background levels of MeHg in source lake mussel body parts were in the order mantle < gill or visceral remains < foot or kidney and ranged from 108 to 618 ng/g dry weight. Caging in the source lake did not alter MeHg concentration in any body part. Mussels transplanted to the ponds for 90 d showed statistically significant increases above background MeHg in the mantle and visceral remains in the preflood experimental pond (waterborne MeHg 0.24 ng/L). The visceral remains of mussels in the reference pond contained higher levels of MeHg than did those in the preflood experimental pond. Flooding increased waterborne MeHg from 0.1 to 2.3 ng/L and resulted in an increase in MeHg and total Hg (THg) in the mantle, foot, and visceral remains of mussels in the experimental pond. Inexplicably, mussels caged in a hypoxic environment in the experimental pond lost MeHg and THg from all body parts. The authors concluded that not only can P. grandis monitor elevation in waterborne MeHg with flooding, but the MeHg levels in mussels also reflect small differences in background levels of natural MeHg in ponds.

  15. The male and female complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the Endangered freshwater mussel Potomida littoralis (Cuvier, 1798) (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Froufe, Elsa; Gan, Han Ming; Lee, Yin Peng; Carneiro, João; Varandas, Simone; Teixeira, Amílcar; Zieritz, Alexandra; Sousa, Ronaldo; Lopes-Lima, Manuel

    2015-08-14

    Freshwater mussels of the family Unionidae exhibit a particular form of mitochondria inheritance called double uniparental inheritance (DUI), in which the mitochondria are inherited by both male and female parents. The (M)ale and (F)emale mitogenomes are highly divergent within species. In the present study, we determine and describe the complete M and F mitogenomes of the Endangered freshwater mussel Potomida littoralis (Cuvier, 1798). The complete M and F mitogenomes sequences are 16 451 bp and 15 787 bp in length, respectively. Both F and M have the same gene content: 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (trn) and 2 ribosomal RNA (rrn) genes. Bayesian analyses based on the concatenated nucleotide sequences of 12 PCGs and 2 rrn genes of both genomes, including mitogenome sequences available from related species, were performed. Male and Female lineages are monophyletic within the family, but reveal distinct phylogenetic relationships.

  16. Physiological response of invasive mussel Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857) (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) submitted to transport and experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, N I S; Andrade, J T M; Montresor, L C; Luz, D M R; Araújo, J M; Martinez, C B; Pinheiro, J; Vidigal, T H D A

    2017-03-01

    Successful animal rearing under laboratory conditions for commercial processes or laboratory experiments is a complex chain that includes several stressors (e.g., sampling and transport) and incurs, as a consequence, the reduction of natural animal conditions, economic losses and inconsistent and unreliable biological results. Since the invasion of the bivalve Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857) in South America, several studies have been performed to help control and manage this fouling pest in industrial plants that use raw water. Relatively little attention has been given to the laboratory rearing procedure of L. fortunei, its condition when exposed to a stressor or its acclimation into laboratory conditions. Considering this issue, the aims of this study are to (i) investigate L. fortunei physiological responses when submitted to the depuration process and subsequent air transport (without water/dry condition) at two temperatures, based on glycogen concentrations, and (ii) monitor the glycogen concentrations in different groups when maintained for 28 days under laboratory conditions. Based on the obtained results, depuration did not affect either of the groups when they were submitted to approximately eight hours of transport. The variation in glycogen concentration among the specimens that were obtained from the field under depurated and non-depurated conditions was significant only in the first week of laboratory growth for the non-depurated group and in the second week for the depurated group. In addition, the tested temperature did not affect either of the groups that were submitted to transport. The glycogen concentrations were similar to those of the specimens that were obtained from the field in third week, which suggests that the specimens acclimated to laboratory conditions during this period of time. Thus, the results indicate that the air transport and acclimation time can be successfully incorporated into experimental studies of L. fortunei. Finally, the tolerance of L. fortunei specimens to the stressor tested herein can help us understand the invasive capacity of this mussel during the establishment process.

  17. The male and female complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the Endangered freshwater mussel Potomida littoralis (Cuvier, 1798) (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Froufe, Elsa; Gan, Han Ming; Lee, Yin Peng; Carneiro, João; Varandas, Simone; Teixeira, Amílcar; Zieritz, Alexandra; Sousa, Ronaldo; Lopes-Lima, Manuel

    2015-08-19

    Freshwater mussels of the family Unionidae exhibit a particular form of mitochondria inheritance called double uniparental inheritance (DUI), in which the mitochondria are inherited by both male and female parents. The (M)ale and (F)emale mitogenomes are highly divergent within species. In the present study, we determine and describe the complete M and F mitogenomes of the Endangered freshwater mussel Potomida littoralis (Cuvier, 1798). The complete M and F mitogenomes sequences are 16 451 bp and 15 787 bp in length, respectively. Both F and M have the same gene content: 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (trn) and 2 ribosomal RNA (rrn) genes. Bayesian analyses based on the concatenated nucleotide sequences of 12 PCGs and 2 rrn genes of both genomes, including mitogenome sequences available from related species, were performed. Male and Female lineages are monophyletic within the family, but reveal distinct phylogenetic relationships.

  18. The complete F-type mitochondrial genome of threatened Chinese freshwater mussel Solenaia oleivora (Bivalvia: Unionidae: Gonideinae).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Chen; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Ouyang, Shan; Wu, Xiao-Ping

    2015-04-01

    The freshwater mussel Solenaia oleivora is considered threatened due to anthropogenic habitat modification and pollution. The complete F-type mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of S. oleivora was first determined (GenBank accession no. KF296320). The length of this mitogenome is 16,392 bp with an AT content of 59.9%. There are 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and a putative control region. Within the control region, 5 tandem repeats of a 106 bp element were identified. The gene order rearrangement of cox2-rrnS in F-type mitogenome compared to that of other freshwater mussels, is not unique for S. oleivora, but is shared with all other available freshwater mussels in the subfamily Gonideinae. The complete mitogenome can provide a basic data for the further studies on molecular taxonomy, phylogenetic analyses and conservation genetics.

  19. Reaction of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Bivalvia) to Eugymnanthea inquilina (Cnidaria) and Urastoma cyprinae (Turbellaria) concurrent infestation.

    PubMed

    Mladineo, Ivona; Petrić, Mirela; Hrabar, Jerko; Bočina, Ivana; Peharda, Melita

    2012-05-01

    In total 480 individuals of Mytilus galloprovincialis were sampled monthly from October 2009 to September 2010, at the shellfish farm in the Mali Ston Bay, south Adriatic Sea (Croatia) in order to assess the extent of pathology imposed by two parasites, Eugymnanthea inquilina (Cnidaria) and Urastoma cyprinae (Turbellaria). Although a deteriorating impact on host reproduction or condition index was lacking, we evidenced ultrastructural and functional alteration in host cells at the attachment site. Ultrastructural changes included hemocytic encapsulation of the turbellarian and cell desquamation in medusoid infestation. Caspase positive reaction inferred by immunohistochemistry (IHC) was triggered in cases of turbellarian infestation, in contrast with hydroids, suggesting that the former exhibits more complex host-parasite interaction, reflected in the persistent attempts of the parasite to survive bivalve reaction. We have evidenced that both organisms trigger specific host reaction that although not costly in terms of host reproductive cycle or growth, results in mild tissue destruction and hemocyte activation. A lower degree of tissue reaction was observed in cases of hydroid infestation, compared to turbellarian.

  20. Identification and characterization of the first microsatellite loci for the thick-shelled river mussel Unio crassus (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Sell, Jerzy; Mioduchowska, Monika; Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Szymańczak, Robert

    2013-02-01

    The thick-shelled river mussel Unio crassus is critically endangered throughout its range as a result of increasing human activity and habitat loss. Next generation DNA sequencing was used to develop a set of microsatellite markers that can be used for future ecological and population genetics studies of U. crassus. A total of 11 polymorphic loci were identified and characterized using 57 individuals from two Polish populations. Numbers of alleles ranged from 2 to 15 and expected heterozygosity levels ranged from 0.069 to 0.899. Deficiency of heterozygous genotypes was observed in four loci. Marker independence was confirmed with tests for linkage disequilibrium, however, analyses indicated evidence of null alleles in four loci. The microsatellite markers developed specifically for U. crassus provide a valuable tool for future ecological, population genetic assessments, and conservation management of this species.

  1. Is the body condition of the invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) enhanced through attachment to native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia, Unionidae)?

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Francesca; Sousa, Ronaldo; Aldridge, David C

    2016-05-15

    The invasion of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, into Western Europe and North America has driven widespread ecological change. Attachment of zebra mussels to the shell of native unionoid mussels has resulted in reductions in unionoid abundance and, in extreme cases, their localised extirpations. While the impacts of zebra mussels on infested unionoids are well documented, the possible benefits of the association to the zebra mussel have been little considered. We collected zebra mussels attached to unionoids and to inanimate structures. Zebra mussels attached to unionoids had significantly larger shells, higher standardized body mass and glycogen content than those attached to inanimate substrates, suggesting that D. polymorpha benefits from settling upon unionoids. The body condition of individual zebra mussels was negatively correlated with the number of zebra mussels attached to the unionoid, indicating intraspecific competition. Therefore, zebra mussels seem positively affected through attachment to unionoid mussels, but that these benefits decrease at higher densities of fouling. This association may offer advantages to the spread of zebra mussels within unionoid-rich systems, especially at sites with soft substrates and at the early stages of the invasion process where intraspecific competition is likely to be lower and benefits to the zebra mussels are higher.

  2. Evidence for accumulation of Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanobacteria: Cyanophyceae) in the tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Torres-Ariño, Alejandra; Girón-Cruz, Diego Ademir; Cuevas-Aguirre, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria appear to have direct relations with mollusks in several aspects. This is the first time, distinguishing Gram-negative cyanoprokaryotic Synechococcus elongatus as bright yellow-gold autofluorescence by Lillie's and Hiss' staining methods on paraffin-embedded tissues of Crassostrea gigas. Three diets: cyanoprokaryotes, cyanoprokaryotes with microalgae, and only microalgae were evaluated. Cyanoprokaryotes were intact, densely bundled, and immersed in the cytosol of the digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad of C. gigas, revealing an accumulation systemic without tissue damage observed by histology. Unexpectedly, cyanoprokaryotes were slightly most accumulated with microalgae diet by each of the tissues of the C. gigas than with any other diets. Cyanoprokaryotes tend to be in mean slightly higher in the digestive gland than in any other tissues respectively for each diet, although these values are closely similar to connective tissue. A possible order of exposure of the oyster tissues to accumulation of cyanoprokaryotes was digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad. Thereby, the digestive gland could be the major target tissue for the accumulation. Our observations provide a valuable insight regarding the ability of cyanoprokaryotes to penetrate, spread, and remain inside the oyster tissues, suggesting for S. elongatus: (1) a pre-accumulation in oyster tissues from the natural environment, (2) a phagocytosis and/or endocytosis process rather than ingestion and extracellular digestion, (3) an apparent cellular division in the cytosol of oyster tissues, (4) an apparent inter-tissue movement, and (5) a possible endosymbiosis between C. gigas and S. elongatus. Hereby, it is possible that S. elongatus have a well-developed host-endobiont relationship with oysters, and thereby support future work toward a description of the escape and spreading mechanisms of S. elongatus inside the tissues of mollusks, and put forward questions as why it is there? and are the cells active or inactive?

  3. A new species of the genus Policordia (Bivalvia, Verticordioidea, Lyonsiellidae) from off the coast of southern California

    PubMed Central

    Safonova, Lyudmila A.; Barwick, Kelvin L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species, Policordia hispida, is described and compared with three similar species: Policordia densicostata (Locard, 1898); Policordia pilula (Pelseneer, 1911) and a yet un-described species, Policordia sp. (= Policordia pilula sensu Ivanova, 1977 not Pelseneer, 1911). This is a first record for the genus in the Californian province. PMID:27843379

  4. Reproductive traits of the symbiotic pea crab Austinotheresangelicus (Crustacea, Pinnotheridae) living in Saccostreapalmula (Bivalvia, Ostreidae), Pacific coast of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Salas-Moya, Carolina; Mena, Sebastián; Wehrtmann, Ingo S

    2014-01-01

    Pea crabs of the family Pinnotheridae exhibit a symbiotic life style and live associated with a variety of different marine organisms, especially bivalves. Despite the fact that pea crabs can cause serious problems in bivalve aquaculture, the available information about the ecology of these crabs from Central America is extremely limited. Therefore, the present study aimed to describe different reproductive features of the pinnotherid crab Austinotheresangelicus associated with the oyster Saccostreapalmula in the Golfo de Nicoya, Pacific coast of Costa Rica. Monthly sampling was conducted from April to December 2012. Average carapace width (CW) of the 47 analyzed ovigerous females was 7.62 mm. The species produced on average 2677 ± 1754 recently -extruded embryos with an average volume of 0.020 ± 0.003 mm(3); embryo volume increased during embryogenesis by 21%, but did not vary significantly between developmental stages. Brood mass volume varied greatly (between 11.7 and 236.7 mm(3)), and increased significantly with female CW. Females invested on average 76.7% (minimum: 21.7%; maximum: 162.8%) of their body weight in brood production, which confirms a substantially higher energy allocation for embryo production in pinnotherid crabs compared to free-living decapods.

  5. Tissue-specific accumulation of cadmium in subcellular compartments of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica Gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Sokolova, I M; Ringwood, A H; Johnson, C

    2005-09-10

    Cadmium distribution was studied in different subcellular fractions of gill and hepatopancreas tissues of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica. Oysters were exposed for up to 21 days to low sublethal Cd concentrations (25 microg L(-1)). Gill and hepatopancreas tissues were sampled and divided into organelle fractions and cytosol by differential centrifugation. Organelle content of different fractions was verified by activities of marker enzymes, citrate synthase and acid phosphatase for mitochondria and lysosomes, respectively. In both tissue types, there was a significant accumulation of cadmium in cytosol reaching 230-350 ng mg(-1) protein. Among organelles, mitochondria were the main target for Cd bioaccumulation in gills (250-300 ng mg(-1) protein), whereas in hepatopancreas tissues, the highest cadmium accumulation occurred in lysosomes (90-94 ng mg(-1) protein). Although 75-83% of total cadmium burden was associated with the cytosol reflecting high volume fraction of this compartment, Cd concentrations in organelle fractions reached levels that could cause dysfunction of mitochondria and lysosomes. Organ- and organelle-specific patterns of cadmium bioaccumulation support our previous in vivo studies, which showed adverse effects of cadmium exposures on mitochondrial oxidation in gills and on the lysosomal system of hepatopancreas. This may have important implications for the development of biomarkers of effect for heavy metals and for understanding the mechanisms of toxic effects of metals.

  6. Combined effects of temperature acclimation and cadmium exposure on mitochondrial function in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Cherkasov, Anton S; Ringwood, Amy H; Sokolova, Inna M

    2006-09-01

    Cadmium and temperature have strong impacts on the metabolic physiology of aquatic organisms. To analyze the combined impact of these two stressors on aerobic capacity, effects of Cd exposure (50 microg/L) on mitochondrial function were studied in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) acclimated to 12 and 20 degrees C in winter and to 20 and 28 degrees C in fall. Cadmium exposure had different effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics of oysters depending on the acclimation temperature. In oysters acclimated to 12 degrees C, Cd exposure resulted in elevated intrinsic rates of mitochondrial oxidation, whereas at 28 degrees C, a rapid and pronounced decrease of mitochondrial oxidative capacity was found in Cd-exposed oysters. At the intermediate acclimation temperature (20 degrees C), effects of Cd exposure on intrinsic rates of mitochondrial oxidation were negligible. Degree of coupling significantly decreased in mitochondria from 28 degrees C-acclimated oysters but not in that from 12 degrees C- or 20 degrees C-acclimated oysters. Acclimation at elevated temperatures also increased sensitivity of oyster mitochondria to extramitochondrial Cd. Variation in mitochondrial membrane potential explained 41% of the observed variation in mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthesis and proton leak between different acclimation groups of oysters. Temperature-dependent sensitivity of metabolic physiology to Cd has significant implications for toxicity testing and for extrapolation of laboratory studies to field populations of aquatic poikilotherms, indicating the importance of taking into account the thermal regime of the environment.

  7. Larvae of Chironomids (Insecta, Diptera) Encountered in the Mantle Cavity of Zebra Mussels, Dreissena polymorpha (Bivalvia, Dreissenidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastitsky, Sergey E.; Samoilenko, Vera M.

    2005-02-01

    The paper includes data on species composition of chironomid larvae which were encountered in the mantle cavity of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) within 7 waterbodies in the Republic of Belarus. All were found to be free-living species commonly present in periphyton and/or benthos. A long-term study of the seasonal dynamics of these larvae in Dreissena did not reveal any typical pattern. Our data suppose that chironomids do not have an obligate association with zebra mussels and possibly enter their mantle cavity inadvertently.

  8. Seasonal growth and mortality of juveniles of Lampsilis fasciola (Bivalvia: Unionidae) released to a fish hatchery raceway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanlon, S.D.; Neves, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent efforts to restore remnant or extirpated populations of freshwater mussels have focused on artificial propagation as an effective and practical conservation strategy. Although artificially cultured juveniles have been produced and released to the wild at various times of the year, no study has investigated the best time of year to release these juveniles. Newly metamorphosed juveniles of the wavyrayed lampmussel (Lampsilis fasciola) were released into a stream-fed fish hatchery raceway during March, June, and September. Growth and survival rates were measured 32, 52, 72, and 92 days post-metamorphosis. Juveniles released in June experienced the greatest growth and survival rates. Juveniles released in September and March experienced high mortality within the first month of release and exhibited poor growth in the cool water conditions typical of those seasons. Overwinter survival exhibited a size-dependent relationship.

  9. Population genetics and phylogeography of freshwater mussels in North America, Elliptio dilatata and Actinonaias ligamentina (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Elderkin, Curt L; Christian, Alan D; Metcalfe-Smith, Janice L; Berg, David J

    2008-05-01

    Extrinsic and intrinsic forces combined shape the population structure of every species differently. Freshwater mussels are obligate parasites to a host fish during a juvenile stage (glochidia). Elliptio dilatata (ED) and Actinonaias ligamentina (AL) are co-occurring freshwater mussel taxa with similar North American distribution and share some potential host fish. Using mitochondrial DNA, we determined the genotypes of 190 + individuals from collection sites in at least two tributaries in the Lake Erie and Ohio River watersheds, along with the Ouachita and Strawberry rivers in the southeast. Both species had followed a stepping-stone model of dispersal, with greater pairwise genetic structure among collection sites of ED. Also, phylogeographical analysis for ED found significant geographical structuring of haplotype diversity. Overall, within-population variation increased significantly from north to south, with low genetic diversity in the Strawberry River. We calculated significant among-population structure for both species (ED: Phi(ST) = 0.62, P < 0.001; AL: Phi(ST) = 0.16, P < 0.001). Genetic analysis identified the Ouachita River as an area of significant reproductive isolation for both species. Results for AL indicated dispersal into northern areas from two genetically distinct glacial refugia, where results for ED indicated dispersal followed by low gene flow in northern areas. The conservation strategies for mussels that co-occur in the same 'bed' could be species specific. Species such as ED have management units on the population scale, where AL has a more homogeneous genetic structure across its range.

  10. New molecular phylogeny of Lucinidae: increased taxon base with focus on tropical Western Atlantic species (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Taylor, John D; Glover, Emily A; Smith, Lisa; Ikebe, Chiho; Williams, Suzanne T

    2016-11-23

    A new molecular phylogeny of the Lucinidae using 18S and 28S rRNA and cytochrome b genes includes many species from the tropical Western Atlantic as well as additional taxa from the Indo-West Pacific. This study provides a phylogenetic framework for a new taxonomy of tropical Western Atlantic lucinids. The analysis confirmed five major clades-Pegophyseminae, Leucosphaerinae, Myrteinae, Codakiinae and Lucininae, with Monitilorinae and Fimbriinae represented by single species. The Leucosphaerinae are expanded and include Callucina winckworthi and the W. Atlantic Myrtina pristiphora that groups with several Indo-West Pacific Myrtina species. Within the Codakiinae two abundant species of Ctena from the Western Atlantic with similar shells are discriminated as C. orbiculata and C. imbricatula, while in the Indo-West Pacific Ctena bella is a probable species complex. The Lucininae is the most species rich and disparate subfamily with several subclades apparent. Three species of Lucina are recognized in the W. Atlantic L. aurantia, L. pensylvanica and L. roquesana. Pleurolucina groups near to Cavilinga and Lucina, while Lucinisca muricata is more closely related to the E. Pacific L. fenestrata than to the Atlantic L. nassula. A new species of Parvilucina is identified from molecular analyses having been confounded with Parvilucina pectinata but differs in ligament structure. Also, the former Parvilucina clenchi is more distant and assigned to Guyanella.

  11. Unexpected co-occurrence of six bacterial symbionts in the gills of the cold seep mussel Idas sp. (Bivalvia: Mytilidae).

    PubMed

    Duperron, Sébastien; Halary, Sébastien; Lorion, Julien; Sibuet, Myriam; Gaill, Françoise

    2008-02-01

    Bathymodioline mussels occur in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems such as cold seeps, hydrothermal vents and organic debris worldwide. Their key adaptation to these environments is their association with bacterial endosymbionts which ensure a chemosynthetic primary production based on the oxidation of reduced compounds such as methane and sulfide. We herein report a multiple symbiosis involving six distinct bacterial 16S rRNA phylotypes, including two belonging to groups not yet reported as symbionts in mytilids, in a small Idas mussel found on carbonate crusts in a cold seep area located north to the Nile deep-sea fan (Eastern Mediterranean). Symbionts co-occur within hosts bacteriocytes based on fluorescence in situ hybridizations, and sequencing of functional genes suggests they have the potential to perform autotrophy, and sulfide and methane oxidation. Previous studies indicated the presence of only one or two symbiont 16S rRNA phylotypes in bathymodioline mussels. Together with the recent discovery of four bacterial symbionts in the large seep species Bathymodiolus heckerae, this study shows that symbiont diversity has probably been underestimated, and questions whether the common ancestor of bathymodioline mussels was associated with multiple bacteria.

  12. Karyotypic diversification in Mytilus mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) inferred from chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mussels of the genus Mytilus present morphologically similar karyotypes that are presumably conserved. The absence of chromosome painting probes in bivalves makes difficult verifying this hypothesis. In this context, we comparatively mapped ribosomal RNA and histone gene families on the chromosomes of Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. trossulus and M. californianus by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Major rRNA, core and linker histone gene clusters mapped to different chromosome pairs in the four taxa. In contrast, minor rRNA gene clusters showed a different behavior. In all Mytilus two of the 5S rDNA clusters mapped to the same chromosome pair and one of them showed overlapping signals with those corresponding to one of the histone H1 gene clusters. The overlapping signals on mitotic chromosomes became a pattern of alternate 5S rRNA and linker histone gene signals on extended chromatin fibers. Additionally, M. trossulus showed minor and major rDNA clusters on the same chromosome pair. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that at least some of the chromosomes bearing these sequences are orthologous and that chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters could be a good tool to help deciphering some of the many unsolved questions in the systematic classification of Mytilidae. PMID:25023072

  13. Application of the morpho-functional analysis of hydrobionts ( Anadara sp. cf. Anadara inaequivalvis Bivalvia) to environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolyuchkina, G. A.; Miljutin, D. M.

    2013-03-01

    The population dynamics and morphological and functional characteristics (the concentration of hemocytes in the hemolymph and the level of histopathology) of the bivalve Anadara sp. cf. Anadara inaequivalvis were studied in 2005-2007 on the North Caucasian coast of the Black Sea. A drastic decline in the abundance of the bivalves simultaneously with cadmium's exceedence in their soft tissues and bottom sediments were recorded in May of 2007. Six months before the manifestation of the population effects, morphological and functional changes (a decrease in the content of hemocytes in the hemolymph and an increase in the content of brown cells in the connective tissue and lipofuscin-like pigment granules in the digestive gland epithelium) in the bivalves were detected that were the consequences of an external effect (presumably, cadmium intoxication). Thus, the morphological and functional changes of the individual Anadaras may be a promising tool for the early detection of the impact of pollutants on benthic ecosystems.

  14. Biomonitoring study of an estuarine coastal ecosystem, the Sacca di Goro lagoon, using Ruditapes philippinarum (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Angela; Mouneyrac, Catherine; Bolognesi, Claudia; Sciutto, Andrea; Roggieri, Paola; Fusi, Marco; Beone, Gian Maria; Capri, Ettore

    2013-06-01

    Coastal lagoons are constantly subjected to releases of chemical pollutants, and so organisms may be exposed to such toxicants. This study investigated through a multivariate approach the physiological status of bivalve Ruditapes philippinarum, farmed in Sacca di Goro lagoon. Biomarkers at different levels of biological organization (catalase, superoxide dismutase, genotoxicity, reburrowing behavior) were evaluated at three sites exposed to different environmental conditions. A seasonal trend was observed, and micronucleus frequency was significantly lowest at the relatively pristine reference site. Enzymatic activity toward oxyradicals be quite efficient since variations in responsiveness were not consistent. However, behavioral impairment was observed in reburrowing rates. Sediment concentrations showed low PAH levels and high natural levels of trace metals Cr and Ni. DistLM statistical analysis revealed a non-significant relationship between selected biomarkers and xenobiotics. Therefore other potentially toxic compounds in admixture at low doses may be involved in driving differing spatial distribution of physiological impairment.

  15. Distribution, genetic analysis and conservation priorities for rare Texas freshwater molluscs in the genera Fusconaia and Pleurobema (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Freshwater bivalves in the order Unionoida are considered to be one of the most endangered groups of animals in North America. In Texas, where over 60% of unionids are rare or very rare, 15 species have been recently added to the state’s list of threatened species, and 11 are under consideration for federal listing. Due to insufficient survey efforts in the past decades, however, primary data on current distribution and habitat requirement for most of these rare species are lacking, thus challenging their protection and management. Taxonomic identification of endemic species based on shell morphology is challenging and complicates conservation efforts. In this paper we present historic and current distributional data for three rare Texas species, Fusconaia askewi, F. lananensis, and Pleurobema riddellii, collected during our 2003–2011 state-wide surveys and suggest appropriate conservation measures. In addition, we tested the genetic affinities of Fusconaia and similar species collected from eastern Texas and western Louisiana using cox1 and nad1 sequences. Results We found that F. askewi still inhabits four river basins in eastern and northeastern Texas and can be locally abundant, while P. riddellii was found only in one river basin. Pleurobema riddellii was well-separated from F. askewi and grouped with the P. sintoxia clade. The sequences for F. lananensis were very similar to those for F. askewi, with a maximum difference of just over 1% for nad1 and only 0.7% for cox1, similar to the variation between F. askewi alleles. Except for one low difference (1.55%) with the partial cox1 sequence for F. burkei, all other Fusconaia populations, including those from the Calcasieu drainage, differed by over 2.3% for both genes. Conclusions Our study suggested that F. lananensis is not a valid species, and it is likely that only one Fusconaia species (F. askewi or its probable senior synonym F. chunii) is currently present in East Texas, thus simplifying conservation efforts. Distribution range of both these regional endemics (F. askewi and P. riddellii) has been reduced in the last 80 years. PMID:22731520

  16. Acute toxicity and accumulation of the piscicide 3-trifluoromethyl-4- nitrophenol (TFM) in freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, D.L.; Rach, J.J.; Luoma, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    We compared the acute toxicity and initial accumulation of the piscicide TFM (3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol) in the freshwater unionacean mussels, Obliquaria reflexa and Fusconaia flava. Acute 48 h toxicity tests were conducted to determine the LC50 values for each species. The initial uptake clearances of TFM were measured by exposing the mussels to [14C]-TFM and counting the radioactivity in four organ tissues (foot, gill, mantle and viscera) over 48 h. TFM was about 2-fold more toxic to O. reflexa (LC50 1.80 mg I-1) than to F. flava (LC50 3.81 mg L-1) and the difference was not explained by accumulation patterns. The initial uptake clearance rates (0-6 h) for the whole body were similar between the species (11.2 ml g-1 h-2 in O. reflexa and 9.5 ml g-1 h-1 in F. flava). The accumulation of TFM residues among the organ tissues was also similar between species. The uptake clearance rates (ml g-1 h-1) of TFM equivalents were generally highest in the gill, but not significantly different than other organ tissues. The normalized concentration of TFM residues (??g per g whole body) was highest in the viscera. The toxicity data suggest that the mortality of both species would be minimal from sea lamprey control treatments with TFM. However, the behavioural effects and accumulation rates also indicate that mussels do not effectively avoid TFM exposure by valve closure.

  17. Acute toxicity and accumulation of the piscicide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Diane L.; Rach, Jeffrey J.; Luoma, James A.

    1998-01-01

    We compared the acute toxicity and initial accumulation of the piscicide TFM (3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol) in the freshwater unionacean mussels, Obliquaria reflexa and Fusconaia flava. Acute 48 h toxicity tests were conducted to determine the LC50 values for each species. The initial uptake clearances of TFM were measured by exposing the mussels to [14C]-TFM and counting the radioactivity in four organ tissues (foot, gill, mantle and viscera) over 48 h. TFM was about 2-fold more toxic to O. reflexa (LC50 1.80 mg l-1) than to F. flava (LC50 3.81 mg L-1) and the difference was not explained by accumulation patterns. The initial uptake clearance rates (0–6 h) for the whole body were similar between the species (11.2 ml g-1 h-2 in O. reflexa and 9.5 ml g-1 h-1 in F. flava). The accumulation of TFM residues among the organ tissues was also similar between species. The uptake clearance rates (ml g-1 h-1) of TFM equivalents were generally highest in the gill, but not significantly different than other organ tissues. The normalized concentration of TFM residues (μg per g whole body) was highest in the viscera. The toxicity data suggest that the mortality of both species would be minimal from sea lamprey control treatments with TFM. However, the behavioural effects and accumulation rates also indicate that mussels do not effectively avoid TFM exposure by valve closure.

  18. Reproductive cycle of Tagelus plebeius (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the estuary of the Cachoeira River, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ceuta, L O; Boehs, G

    2012-08-01

    This study characterized the reproductive cycle of the stout razor clam Tagelus plebeius in the estuary of the Cachoeira River, Ilhéus, Bahia, northeastern Brazil. Samples of 20 animals per collection were taken biweekly from August 2005 to August 2006. The 480 specimens were measured on the antero-posterior axis (length) and then removed from the shell. After macroscopic analysis, the gonads were fixed in Davidson's solution, processed by routine histology and stained by Harris hematoxylin and eosin. The gonads of both males and females appeared milky white, without sexual dimorphism. Microscopic analyses indicated a M: F ratio of 1.06: 1 and continuous reproduction of T. plebeius in the region. The period from August to October showed the most intense spawning. This study provides another example of continuous reproduction of bivalves in tropical waters, and because this species is a heavily exploited fishery resource in the region, it draws attention to the need for a management plan aimed at reducing harvests.

  19. Evolutionary Dynamics of rDNA Clusters in Chromosomes of Five Clam Species Belonging to the Family Veneridae (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Concepción; Hurtado, Ninoska S.; Morán, Paloma; Pasantes, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    The chromosomal changes accompanying bivalve evolution are an area about which few reports have been published. To improve our understanding on chromosome evolution in Veneridae, ribosomal RNA gene clusters were mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosomes of five species of venerid clams (Venerupis corrugata, Ruditapes philippinarum, Ruditapes decussatus, Dosinia exoleta, and Venus verrucosa). The results were anchored to the most comprehensive molecular phylogenetic tree currently available for Veneridae. While a single major rDNA cluster was found in each of the five species, the number of 5S rDNA clusters showed high interspecies variation. Major rDNA was either subterminal to the short arms or intercalary to the long arms of metacentric or submetacentric chromosomes, whereas minor rDNA signals showed higher variability. Major and minor rDNAs map to different chromosome pairs in all species, but in R. decussatus one of the minor rDNA gene clusters and the major rDNA cluster were located in the same position on a single chromosome pair. This interspersion of both sequences was confirmed by fiber FISH. Telomeric signals appeared at both ends of every chromosome in all species. FISH mapping data are discussed in relation to the molecular phylogenetic trees currently available for Veneridae. PMID:24967400

  20. First Report of Anterior Pallial Tentacles in Solen dactylus (Bivalvia: Solenidae) from the Northern Persian Gulf, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi, Hanieh; Costello, Mark J.; von Cosel, Rudo

    2013-01-01

    Solenidae are deep burrowing bivalves inhabiting intertidal and shallow sub-tidal soft bottom sediments mostly in tropical and sub-tropical areas. Solen dactylus has a restricted distribution within the Indian Ocean. Solen dactylus is frequently found on the sandy-muddy coast of the northern Persian Gulf, Iran. Specimens of S. dactylus were collected since 2006 from Bandar Abbas to study their biology and ecology. During these studies, an unexpected pair of anterior pallial tentacles at the dorsal end of the anterior pallial crest of the mantle was found. In the tentacles, two kinds of epithelial cells (pyramidal and vacuolated) and fibres (radial and longitudinal), and a branch of the pallial nerve located in the centre of a haemocoel, were determined. A possible coherence of a furrow parallel to the anterior shell margin with the presence of anterior pallial tentacles is discussed. All species with long anterior pallial tentacles have anterior shell furrows. Anterior pallial tentacles were found in 10 species of Solenidae from Asia to the Middle East and Europe. The function of the tentacles is unknown. However, more species need to be examined for anterior pallial tentacles and anterior shell furrows to determine if they reflect a common evolutionary history or ecology. PMID:23691053

  1. Prodigious polyphyly in imperilled freshwater pearly-mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae): a phylogenetic test of species and generic designations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lydeard, Charles; Minton, Russell L.; Williams, James D.

    2000-01-01

    Unionid bivalves or freshwater pearly-mussels (Unionoidea: Unionidae) serve as an exemplary system for examining many of the problems facing systematists and conservation biologists today. Most of the species and genera were described in the late 1800s and early 1900s, but few phylogenetic studies have been conducted to test conventional views of species and classification. Pearly-mussels of Gulf Coastal drainages of the southeastern United States from the Escambia (southern Alabama to Florida) to the Suwannee Rivers (Florida) are a unique fauna comprised of approximately 100 species, with about 30 endemic to the region. In this study, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and 16S rRNA gene sequences were used to test the monophyly and to estimate evolutionary relationships of five unionid species representing three different genera. The molecular phylogenies depict all three genera as polyphyletic. The prodigious polyphyly exhibited within unionids is due to incorrect notions of homology and false assumptions about missing anatomical data. In contrast, the molecular phylogeny provides evidence to support the recognition of all five unionid species as distinct evolutionary entities. Furthermore, molecular genealogical evidence supports the elevation of Quincuncina infucata (Conrad) of the Suwannee River to species level, for which Q. kleiniana (Lea) is available.

  2. Cytogenetic characterisation of the razor shells Ensis directus (Conrad, 1843) and E. minor (Chenu, 1843) (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tizón, Ana M.; Rojo, Verónica; Vierna, Joaquín; Jensen, K. Thomas; Egea, Emilie; Martínez-Lage, Andrés

    2013-03-01

    The European razor shell Ensis minor (Chenu 1843) and the American E. directus (Conrad 1843) have a diploid chromosome number of 38 and remarkable differences in their karyotypes: E. minor has four metacentric, one metacentric-submetacentric, five submetacentric, one subtelocentric and eight telocentric chromosome pairs, whereas E. directus has three metacentric, two metacentric-submetacentric, six submetacentric, six subtelocentric and two telocentric pairs. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using a major ribosomal DNA probe located the major ribosomal genes on one submetacentric chromosome pair in both species; FISH with a 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) probe rendered one chromosomal (weak) signal for E. minor and no signal for E. directus, supporting a more dispersed organisation of 5S rDNA compared to the major ribosomal genes. The vertebrate telomeric sequence (TTAGGG) n was located on both ends of each chromosome, and no interstitial signals were detected. In this work, a comparative karyological analysis was also performed between the four Ensis species analysed revealing that the three European species studied so far, namely E. minor, E. siliqua (Linné 1758) and E. magnus Schumacher 1817 show more similarities among them than compared to the American species E. directus. In addition, clear karyotype differences were found between the morphologically similar species E. minor and E. siliqua.

  3. Life cycle, population dynamics, growth and production of Abra segmentum (Mollusca, Bivalvia) at low salinities in a Mediterranean lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, Theodoros; Kasapis, K.; Kalpia, V.

    2009-12-01

    Aspects of the biology of Abra segmentum were investigated at low salinities in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Monolimni Lagoon, Northern Aegean Sea). Monthly samples were collected during the period from February 1998 to January 1999. Recruitment occurred from mid-spring to early autumn (0.3-5.7 psu) and recruits grew during summer and autumn (1.2-5.7 psu), while a major part vanished during next autumn, displaying a maximum life span of about 20 months. A positive correlation was found between the percentage of individuals having a shell length of ≤3.5 mm and temperature; age group 0 showed a growth rate of 0.97 mm per month, and the largest individual collected had a 19.76 mm shell length. The population density sharply increased during late spring (0.3-1.2 psu); this increase was followed by a decline during summer and, afterwards, a gradual increase up to late autumn. Secondary production calculated by the size-frequency method gave a mean annual density ( n) of 3,357 individuals m-2, a mean annual biomass ( B) of 21.98 g DW m-2, an annual production ( P) of 73.72 g DW m-2 and a P: B ratio of 3.35. A comparison of the present data with available data of A. segmentum populations from higher salinity habitats revealed that this bivalve in the study area showed a life history pattern similar to that of other populations of the species and a comparatively high growth rate, maximum body size, n, B, P and P: B ratio. Our findings suggest that the studied aspects of A. segmentum biology could not be markedly affected by low salinities.

  4. Integrative study of a new cold-seep mussel (Mollusca: Bivalvia) associated with chemosynthetic symbionts in the Marmara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, Bénédicte; Duperron, Sébastien; Lorion, Julien; Sara Lazar, Cassandre; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2012-09-01

    Recently, small Idas-like mussels have been discovered living on carbonate crusts associated with cold-seeps in the Marmara Sea. These mussels, here referred to as Idas-like nov. sp., differ morphologically and genetically from another species identified as Idas aff. modiolaeformis, living in the same type of ecosystem in the Nile Deep-Sea Fan (eastern Mediterranean Sea). A phylogenetic analysis confirms the distinction between the two species, which belong to highly divergent lineages. Carbon stable isotope values, as well as the detection of thiotroph-related bacteria in the gill tissue, support the presence of a symbiotic, thiotroph-derived nutrition. In contrast, Idas aff. modiolaeformis displays six different types of symbionts. Finally our size-frequency data suggest that the recruitment is continuous in the examined area. The present study extends the documented distribution of symbiont-bearing mussels to the Marmara Sea, and contributes to the characterisation of biological communities in this recently explored area.

  5. A new species of Pulvinites (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the upper Paleocene Paspotansa Member of the Aquia Formation in Virginia ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, L.W.; Waller, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Pulvinites lawrencei n.sp. is described from the upper Paleocene (Landenian Stage) Paspotansa Member of the Aquia Formation in Stafford County, Virginia. This is the first report of a member of the pteriacean family Pulvinitidae in the Tertiary on either side of the Atlantic, the only other post-Mesozoic records of Pulvinites being in the Paleocene of California and the present-day Pacific off southeast Australia. The stratigraphic setting and co-occurring molluscan assemblage of the new species indicate shallow-shelf, open-marine conditions with near normal salinities. -Authors

  6. Differences in absolute and relative growth between two shell forms of Pinna nobilis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) along the Tunisian coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaoui, Lotfi; Tlig-Zouari, Sabiha; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Belgacem, Walid; Hassine, Oum Kalthoum Ben

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the absolute and relative growth patterns of the fan mussel Pinna nobilis along the Tunisian coastline, taking into consideration both the variability among different areas and between the two shell forms "combed" and "straight and wide". Five subpopulations of the species were sampled, one from northern, two from eastern and two from southern Tunisia. Various assumptions on the growth patterns were tested based on an information theory approach and multi-model inference. For absolute growth, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two shell forms of P. nobilis and no difference among subpopulations was the most supported by the data. For the same age, "straight and wide" individuals gained on average greater lengths than the "combed" individuals. The absolute growth of the species was found to be asymptotic and the logistic model was the one most supported by the data. As for the relative growth, apart from the classical allometric model Y = aXb, more complicated models of the form ln Y = f(ln X) that either assumed non-linearities or breakpoints were tested in combination with assumptions for possible differences between the two forms and among subpopulations. Among the eight studied relationships between morphometric characters, the classical allometric model was supported in only two cases, while in all other cases more complicated models were supported. Moreover, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two forms was supported in three cases and the assumption of different growth patterns among subpopulations in four cases. Although precise relationships between the morphometric plasticity of the fan mussel and environmental factors have not been proven in this paper, local small scale constraints might be responsible of the different growth patterns observed in the same locality. A possible co-action of genetic factors should be evaluated in the future.

  7. Deep-water Thyasiridae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the Oman Margin, Arabian Sea, new species and examples of endemism and cosmopolitanism.

    PubMed

    Oliver, P Graham

    2015-08-05

    Seven species of Thyasiridae are reported from the Oman Margin of the Arabian Sea at depths between 688 m and 3356 m. Hypoxic conditions exist at depths between 400 and 1200 m and three species are restricted to this zone and to the Arabian Sea. Leptaxinus indusarium has also been recorded from the Indus Fan and Channelaxinus investigatoris from off Sri Lanka. A new species Thyasira anassa sp. nov. is described from the hypoxic zone. Another four species are recorded from the abyssal zone where oxygen levels are typical for the deep ocean. Here another new species is described, Parathyasira bamberi sp. nov. but the other species could not be conclusively identified because of close affinity with populations from other oceans.  Deep water Atlantic species Axinulus croulinensis and Mendicula ferruginosa are apparently present in the abyssal Indian Ocean while another thyasirid shell is very close to Channelaxinus excavatus from the Eastern Pacific and C. perplicata from the Atlantic. Accompanying these abyssal thyasirids were other bivalve species, Deminucula atacellana, Limopsis pelagica and Bentharca asperula that cannot be distinguished by morphology from their Atlantic populations. It is concluded that using morphology alone that the abyssal species may well be cosmopolitan in distribution.

  8. New records and a new species of bivalve (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from Miocene hydrocarbon seep deposits, North Island, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Saether, Kristian P; Jingeng, Sha; Little, Crispin T S; Campbell, Kathleen A

    2016-08-18

    Fourteen bivalve taxa belonging to 11 families are present in at least 13 early to middle Miocene hydrocarbon seep deposits in the East Coast Basin, North Island, New Zealand. Among these are at least three new species, one of which, Semeloidea (s. l.) bexhavenensis sp. nov. (Lasaeidae), is described here. New distribution data are recorded for bivalve species in the families Limidae, Propeamussiidae, Malleidae and Solemyidae. Additional morphological details of Gigantidas coseli (Mytilidae) and Pratulum quinarium (Cardiidae) are provided based upon previously unrecorded internal shell features. Palaeoecological analysis indicates that bivalves utilized a broad range of modes of life and niches within the New Zealand Miocene seep environment, and no more than ca. 30% of these bivalve species were likely to have been obligate to seeps.

  9. Effects of anthracene on filtration rates, antioxidant defense system, and redox proteomics in the Mediterranean clam Ruditapes decussatus (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Sellami, Badreddine; Khazri, Abdelhafidh; Louati, Héla; Dellali, Mohamed; Driss, Mouhamed Ridha; Aïssa, Patricia; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Hamouda, Beyrem; Coelho, Ana Varela; Sheehan, David

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the impact of a toxic polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), anthracene (ANT), on Ruditapes decussatus collected from a Tunisian coastal lagoon (Bizerte Lagoon). Filtration rates, several antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione transferase (GST)--as well as indices of protein oxidation status were determined in various tissues of this bivalve. Specimens were exposed to 100 μg/L of ANT for 2 days. ANT levels were evaluated using HPLC and were detected in the gill and digestive gland at different amounts. ANT exposure altered the behavior of bivalves by changing the siphon movement and decreasing filtration rate significantly. The enzymatic results indicated that ANT exposure affected the oxidative stress status of the gills of R. decussatus. In addition, modification of proteins was detected in the gills using redox proteomics after ANT treatment. Three protein spots were successfully identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). These proteins can be roughly related to muscle contraction function. In contrast, no significant modification of enzymatic and protein responses was detected in the digestive gland after ANT treatment. These data demonstrate that combined behavioral and biochemical analyses are a powerful tool to provide valuable insights into possible mechanisms of toxicity of anthracene in R. decussatus. Additionally, the results highlight the potential of the gill as a valuable candidate for investigating PAH toxicity.

  10. Age determination and growth rate of Mactra chinensis (Bivalvia: Mactridae) by external rings and chondrophore growth bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Yeon; Na, Jong Hun; Oh, Chul-Woong

    2016-12-01

    Age, growth and mortality of Mactra chinensis were investigated during the period from October 2012 to September 2013 in Busan, South Korea. The monthly variation of the marginal index (MI) of the shell and chondrophore showed that the ring of this species was formed once a year during July. We estimated the age of M. chinensis by reading the external rings on the shell and the growth bands of the chondrophore to compare growth parameters between the two growth characters. The age of this species ranged from 0 to 8 years (shell-based age reading) and from 0 to 10 years (chondrophore-based age reading). Based on external rings and growth bands of chondrophore for the same period, the von Bertalanffy growth functions were expressed by the equation, L t = 101.53[1-exp {-0.15( t + 0.75)}] and L t = 90.03[1-exp {-0.20( t + 0.50)}], respectively. The likelihood test showed that there was a significant difference in L ∞ ( P < 0.001), K ( P < 0.001), to ( P < 0.001) estimated from non-linear regression between the two growth characters.

  11. Direct measurement technique for determining ventilation rate in the deposit-feeding clam Macoma nasuta (bivalvia, tellinaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, D.T.; Lee, H.

    1989-01-01

    An exposure chamber, the 'clambox', was developed to measure ventilation rate, sediment processing rate, and efficiency of pollutant uptake by Macoma nasuta, Conrad, a surface-deposit-feeding clam. Clams, collected from Yaquina Bay, Oregon, USA, were cemented into a hole in a piece of rubber dental dam so that the inhalant siphons were separated by a membrane. The dental dam was then clamped between two glass chambers. The inhalant and exhalant siphons were thus diirected into separate chambers of the device so that the amount of water or feces discharged into the exhalant camber provided direct measure ventilation rate and sediment processing rate, respectively. The short-term pattern was for ventilation to be intermittently interrupted, essentially ceasing for 12 to 120 min, followed by a short period of active ventilation and then a resumption of the normal rate.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF SALINITY ON THE HEAT-SHOCK PROTEIN RESPONSE OF POTAMOCORBULA AMURENSIS (BIVALVIA). (R826940)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    For biomarkers to be useful in assessing anthropogenic impacts in field studies involving aquatic organisms, they should not be affected by naturally occurring changes in environmental parameters such as salinity. This is especially important in estuarine envi...

  13. Some population parameters of Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia, Veneridae) on the southern coast of the Marmara Sea, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolakoğlu, Serhat; Palaz, Mustafa

    2014-12-01

    Ruditapes philippinarum, a venerid clam, is a dominant species in the sandy and muddy areas in the coastal waters of the Marmara Sea. Intensive commercial harvesting of this species is conducted in these regions. We studied the population dynamics of R. philippinarum on the southern coast of the Marmara Sea (Bandırma). Samples were collected on a monthly basis between September 2012 and August 2013. Seasonal von Bertalanffy growth parameters using the length-frequency distribution of R. philippinarum were estimated at L ∞ = 67.50 mm and K = 0.33 year-1, and the seasonal oscillation in growth rate was 0.53. The slowest growth period was in January. The growth performance index and potential lifespan were 3.182 and 8.06 years, respectively. The growth relationship was confirmed to have a positive allometric pattern. The average total mortality rate was estimated to be 0.777 year-1, whereas the natural and fishing mortality rates were 0.539 and 0.238 year-1, respectively. The current exploitation rate of R. philippinarum was 0.306. The recruitment pattern peaked during June-August, and spawning occurred between May and August. The results of this study provide valuable information on the status of R. philippinarum stocks.

  14. Growth estimation of mangrove cockle Anadara tuberculosa (Mollusca: Bivalvia): application and evaluation of length-based methods.

    PubMed

    Flores, Luis A

    2011-03-01

    Growth is one of the key processes in the dynamic of exploited resources, since it provides part of the information required for structured population models. Growth of mangrove cockle, Anadara tuberculosa was estimated through length-based methods (ELEFAN I y NSLCA) and using diverse shell length intervals (SLI). The variability of L(infinity), k and phi prime (phi') estimates and the effect of each sample were quantified by jackknife techniques. Results showed the same L(infinity) estimates from ELEFAN I and NSLCA across each SLI used, and all L(infinity) were within the expected range. On the contrary, k estimates differed between methods. Jackknife estimations uncovered the tendency of ELEFAN I to overestimate k with increases in SLI, and allowed the identification of differences in uncertainty (PE and CV) between both methods. The average values of phi' derived from NSCLA1.5 and length-age sources were similar and corresponded to ranges reported by other authors. Estimates of L(infinity), k and (phi' from NSCLA1.5 were 85.97 mm, 0.124/year and 2.953 with jackknife and 86.36mm de L(infinity), 0.110/year de k and 2.914 de phi' without jackknife, respectively. Based on the observed evidence and according to the biology of the species, NSCLA is suggested to be used with jackknife and a SLI of 1.5 mm as an ad hoc approach to estimate the growth parameters of mangrove cockle.

  15. Changes in the freshwater mussel (Bivalvia: Unionidae) fauna of the Bear Creek system of Northwest Alabama and Northeast Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGregor, S.W.; Garner, J.T.

    2003-01-01

    Drastic reductions in diversity and abundance of mussel populations are documented in many systems. Bear Creek, located in northwest Alabama and northeast Mississippi, has seen changes to its fauna, possibly the result of impoundment, channelization, wastewater discharge, and sedimentation from such sources such as strip mining, agriculture, and silviculture. The most obvious influences have been impoundment of the lowermost 32 km of Bear Creek by Pickwick Reservoir of Tennessee River, the construction of four dams within the system, construction of a 29-km-long channel designed to limit flooding, and bank destabilization. Mussels are absent from much of the system and faunal composition has apparently been altered where mussels persist, based on comparison to limited previous studies. The most notable changes are the loss of Cumberlandian species diversity and the apparent increase in Ohioan species diversity. We sampled 40 stations in the Bear Creek system and report 32 mussel species live or fresh dead, including 3 Cumberlandian species, and 2 others weathered dead. Fourteen of these species were not reported in two earlier studies. During this study the most depauperate populations were upstream of Bear Creek km 41.0 and in tributaries. No mussels were collected immediately downstream of dams, and diversity gradually increased downstream from the lowermost main channel dam until 28 species occurred together in a free-flowing reach shortly before entering Pickwick Reservoir. One weathered dead zebra mussel, Dreisenna polymorpha, was also collected, representing a new tributary record. The population of Epioblasma brevidens in Bear Creek is the only population of that species known in the lower Tennessee River system, and the population of Lexingtonia dolabelloides, another new tributary record, is one of only two populations of that species known downstream of Paint Rock River.

  16. Analysis of EST and lectin expressions in hemocytes of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) (Bivalvia: Mollusca) infected with Perkinsus olseni.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Young-Mee; Park, Kyung-Il; Kim Cho, Somi; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Cho, Moonjae

    2006-01-01

    The hemocytes of invertebrates play key roles in both cellular and humoral immune reactions by phagocytosis or delivering immune factors such as lectin and anti-microbial peptides. Bacterial infection causes changes in components such as lectins, anti-bacterial peptides, and lysosomal enzymes of plasma or hemolymph in molluscs. Previously, we found that infection with the protozoan parasite, Perkinsus, increases lectin synthesis in hemocytes. In order to investigate the patterns of genes expressed in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) infected with the protozoan parasite Perkinsus olseni, we constructed a cDNA library and sequenced 1850 clones (expressed sequence tags). A total of 79 ESTs, were related to 29 functional immune genes such as C-type lectin, lysozyme, and cystatin B, in Manila clams. Lectins were the largest group of immune-function ESTs found in our Manila clams library. Among 7 lectin clones, two full length cDNAs of lectins were cloned. MCL-3, which is a simple C-type lectin composed of 151 amino acids, has a relatively short signal sequence of 17aa and single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of approximately 130 residues. It is highly homologous to eel C-type lectin. The sequence of mc-sialic acid-binding lectin consists of 168 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 19.2 and shows high homology to sialic acid-binding lectin from the snail, Cepaea hortensis. The expression of 7 different lectins in hemocytes was analyzed by RT-PCR using gene-specific primers. Hemocytes from Perkinsus-infected clam expressed different sets of lectins than with Vibrio infection. These results demonstrate that several lectins are involved in Manila clam innate immunity and different challenges induce expression of different lectins.

  17. Coexistence of Multiple Proteobacterial Endosymbionts in the Gills of the Wood-Boring Bivalve Lyrodus pedicellatus (Bivalvia: Teredinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Distel, Daniel L.; Beaudoin, David J.; Morrill, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    Wood-boring bivalves of the family Teredinidae (commonly called shipworms) are known to harbor dense populations of gram-negative bacteria within specialized cells (bacteriocytes) in their gills. These symbionts are thought to provide enzymes, e.g., cellulase and dinitrogenase, which assist the host in utilizing wood as a primary food source. A cellulolytic, dinitrogen-fixing bacterium, Teredinibacter turnerae, has been isolated from the gill tissues of numerous teredinid bivalves and has been proposed to constitute the sole or predominant symbiont of this bivalve family. Here we demonstrate that one teredinid species, Lyrodus pedicellatus, contains at least four distinct bacterial 16S rRNA types within its gill bacteriocytes, one of which is identical to that of T. turnerae. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the three newly detected ribotypes are derived from gamma proteobacteria that are related to but distinct (>6.5% sequence divergence) from T. turnerae. In situ hybridizations with 16S rRNA-directed probes demonstrated that the pattern of occurrence of symbiont ribotypes within bacteriocytes was predictable and specific, with some bacteriocytes containing two symbiont ribotypes. However, only two of the six possible pairwise combinations of the four ribotypes were observed to cooccur within the same host cells. The results presented here are consistent with the existence of a complex multiple symbiosis in this shipworm species. PMID:12450854

  18. Numerical Quantification of Perkinsus Marinus in the American Oyster Crassostrea virginicata (Gmelin 1791) (Mollusca: Bivalvia) by Modern Stereology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species of Perkinsus are responsible for high mortalities of bivalve molluscs world-wide. Techniques to accurately estimate parasites in tissues are required to improve understanding of perkinsosis. This study quantifies the number and tissue distribution of Perkinsus marinus in ...

  19. Early replication dynamics of sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs in the doubly uniparental inheritance species Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia Veneridae)

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, D; Ghiselli, F; Milani, L; Breton, S; Passamonti, M

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy, which is maintained by strictly maternal inheritance and a series of bottlenecks, is thought to be an adaptive condition for metazoans. Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) is a unique mode of mitochondrial transmission found in bivalve species, in which two distinct mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) lines are present, one inherited through eggs (F) and one through sperm (M). During development, the two lines segregate in a sex- and tissue-specific manner: females lose M during embryogenesis, whereas males actively segregate it in the germ line. These two pivotal events are still poorly characterized. Here we investigated mtDNA replication dynamics during embryogenesis and pre-adulthood of the venerid Ruditapes philippinarum using real-time quantitative PCR. We found that both mtDNAs do not detectably replicate during early embryogenesis, and that the M line might be lost from females around 24 h of age. A rise in mtDNA copy number was observed before the first reproductive season in both sexes, with the M mitochondrial genome replicating more than the F in males, and we associate these boosts to the early phase of gonad production. As evidence indicates that DUI relies on the same molecular machine of mitochondrial maternal inheritance that is common in most animals, our data are relevant not only to DUI but also to shed light on how differential segregations of mtDNA variants, in the same nuclear background, may be controlled during development. PMID:26626575

  20. Mitogenomics of southern hemisphere blue mussels (Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia): Insights into the evolutionary characteristics of the Mytilus edulis complex

    PubMed Central

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Quintero-Galvis, Julian F.; Mesas, Andres; D’Elía, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Marine blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) are widespread species that exhibit an antitropical distribution with five species occurring in the Northern Hemisphere (M. trossulus, M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. californianus and M. coruscus) and three in the Southern Hemisphere (M. galloprovincialis, M. chilensis and M. platensis). Species limits in this group remain controversial, in particular for those forms that live in South America. Here we investigated structural characteristics of marine mussels mitogenomes, based on published F mtDNA sequences of Northern Hemisphere species and two newly sequenced South American genomes, one from the Atlantic M. platensis and another from the Pacific M. chilensis. These mitogenomes exhibited similar architecture to those of other genomes of Mytilus, including the presence of the Atp8 gene, which is missing in most of the other bivalves. Our evolutionary analysis of mitochondrial genes indicates that purifying selection is the predominant force shaping the evolution of the coding genes. Results of our phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of Pteriomorphia and fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships among its five orders. Finally, the low genetic divergence of specimens assigned to M. chilensis and M. platensis suggests that these South American marine mussels represent conspecific variants rather than distinct species. PMID:27241855

  1. Isolation and characterization of the first microsatellite markers for the endangered relict mussel Hypanis colorata (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Cardiidae).

    PubMed

    Popa, Oana Paula; Iorgu, Elena Iulia; Krapal, Ana Maria; Kelemen, Beatrice Simona; Murariu, Dumitru; Popa, Luis Ovidiu

    2011-01-17

    Hypanis colorata (Eichwald, 1829) (Cardiidae: Lymnocardiinae) is a bivalve relict species with a Ponto-Caspian distribution and is under strict protection in Romania, according to national regulations. While the species is depressed in the western Black Sea lagoons from Romania and Ukraine, it is also a successful invader in the middle Dniepr and Volga regions. Establishing a conservation strategy for this species or studying its invasion process requires knowledge about the genetic structure of the species populations. We have isolated and characterized nine polymorphic microsatellite markers in H. colorata. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 28 and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.613 to 1.000. The microsatellites developed in the present study are highly polymorphic and they should be useful for the assessment of genetic variation within this species.

  2. Distribution, biomass, recruitment and productivity of Anadara senilis (L.) (Mollusca: Bivalvia) on the banc d'Arguin, Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, W. J.; Gueye, Abou; Meijboom, A.; Piersma, Th.; Alassane Sall, Mamadou

    Data on distribution, ecology, biomass, recruitment, growth, mortality and productivity of the West African bloody cockle Anadara senilis were collected at the Banc d'Aguuin, Mauritania, in early 1985 and 1986. Ash-free dry weight appeared to be correlated best with shell height. A. senilis was abundant on the tidal flats of landlocked coastal bays, but nearly absent on the tidal flats bordering the open sea. The average biomass for the entire area of tidal flats was estimated at 5.5 g·m -2 ash-free dry weight. The A. senilis population appeared to consist mainly of 10 to 20-year-old individuals, showing a very slow growth and a production: biomass ratio of about 0.02 y -1. Recruitment appeared negligible and mortality was estimated to be about 10% per year. Oystercatchers ( Haematopus ostralegus), the gastropod Cymbium cymbium and unknown fish species were responsible for a large share of this. The distinction of annual growth marks permitted the assessment of year-class strength, which appeared to be correlated with the average discharge of the river Senegal. This may be explained by assuming that year-class strength and river discharge both are correlated with rainfall at the Banc d'Arguin.

  3. Frequency, Magnitude, and Possible Causes of Stranding and Mass-Mortality Events of the Beach Clam Tivela mactroides (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Turra, Alexander; Pombo, Maíra; Petracco, Marcelo; Siegle, Eduardo; Fonseca, Mariana; Denadai, Márcia R

    2016-01-01

    Stranding combined with mass-mortality events of sandy-beach organisms is a frequent but little-understood phenomenon, which is generally studied based on discrete episodes. The frequency, magnitude, and possible causes of stranding and mass-mortality events of the trigonal clam Tivela mactroides were assessed based on censuses of stranded individuals, every four days from September 2007 through December 2008, in Caraguatatuba Bay, southeastern Brazil. Stranded clams were classified as dying (closed valves did not open when forced) or dead (closed valves were easily opened). Information on wave parameters and the living intertidal clam population was used to assess possible causes of stranding. This fine-scale monitoring showed that stranding occurred widely along the shore and year-round, with peaks interspersed with periods of low or no mortality. Dead clams showed higher mean density than dying individuals, but a lower mean shell length, attributed to a higher tolerance to desiccation of larger individuals. Wave height had a significant negative relationship to the density of dying individuals, presumed to be due to the accretive nature of low-energy waves: when digging out, clams would be more prone to be carried upward and unable to return; while larger waves, breaking farther from the beach and with a stronger backwash, would prevent stranding in the uppermost areas. This ecological finding highlights the need for refined temporal studies on mortality events, in order to understand them more clearly. Last, the similar size structure of stranded clams and the living population indicated that the stranded individuals are from the intertidal or shallow subtidal zone, and reinforces the ecological and behavioral components of this process, which have important ecological and socioeconomic implications for the management of this population.

  4. High-resolution elemental records of Glycymeris glycymeris (Bivalvia) shells from the Iberian upwelling system: Ontogeny and environmental control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Pedro; Richardson, Christopher; Chenery, Simon; Butler, Paul; Reynolds, David; Gaspar, Miguel; Scourse, James

    2015-04-01

    The great potential of bivalve shells as a high-resolution geochemical proxy archive of environmental conditions at the time of growth has been known for several decades. The elemental composition of bivalve shells has been studied with the purpose of reconstructing environmental conditions: e.g. seawater temperature (Sr and Mg), primary productivity (Li, Mn, Mo and Ba), redox conditions (Mn and Mo), terrigenous inputs (Li) and pollution (Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb). However, the interpretation of such records remains extremely challenging and complex, with processes affecting element incorporation in the shell (e.g. crystal fabrics, organic matrix, shell formation mechanisms and physiological processes) and the influence of more than one environmental parameter affecting elemental composition of bivalve shells. Nevertheless, bivalve shells remain an underused source of information on environmental conditions, with the potential to record high-resolution (sub-weekly to annually), multi-centennial time series of geochemical proxy data. The relatively long-lived bivalve (>100 years) Glycymeris glycymeris occurs in coastal shelf seas of Europe and North West Africa and is a valid annually resolved sclerochronological archive for palaeonvironmental reconstructions. The temporal framework provided by absolute annually dated shell material makes Glycymeris glycymeris a valuable, albeit unexplored, resource for investigating sub-annually resolved geochemical proxies. We present a first evaluation on the potential of Ba, P and U, the latter two elements rarely studied in bivalves, in Glycymeris glycymeris shells to record variations in the environmental conditions, respectively primary productivity, dissolved inorganic phosphorus and carbonate ion concentration/pH. High-resolution (31 to 77 samples per year) profiles of elemental/Ca ratios (E/Ca) over four years of growth (2001 to 2004) were obtained by LA-ICP-MS on two shells (13 and 16 years old) live-collected in 2010 at 30 m water depth on the Iberia upwelling system. In both shells, clear E/Ca annual cycles with significant higher-frequency variability (weekly to sub-monthly) were observed over the four years of growth analysed. However, E/Ca ratios and the amplitude of the annual E/Ca cycles were lower in the older shell and showed decreasing trends with age (ontogenetic effects). E/Ca ratios were age-detrended using statistical techniques derived from dendrochronology, resulting in similar and coherent profiles in both shells. It seems unlikely that enough variability in E/Ca ratios will be recorded in the shell after 15 to 20 years of age to allow the retrieval of an environmental signal by age-detrending E/Ca ratios. Detrended P/Ca, Ba/Ca and U/Ca in Glycymeris glycymeris shells showed coherent variations with coeval modelled and instrumental oceanographic series from the Iberia upwelling system that suggest a robust potential as an archive of environmental conditions in the first 15 to 20 years of growth. Nevertheless a robust calibration is required to distinguish between the influences of multiple environmental parameters. This study was financed and conducted in the frame of the Portuguese FCT GLYCY Project (contract PTDC/AAC-CLI/118003/2010).

  5. Metal sources to the Baltic clam Macoma balthica (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the southern Baltic Sea (the Gulf of Gdansk).

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Adam; Wolowicz, Maciej; Hummel, Herman

    2007-04-01

    Metal concentrations of Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in an infaunal facultative deposit-feeding bivalve, the Baltic clam Macoma balthica, in the Gulf of Gdansk (southern Baltic Sea) were assessed and compared to selected concentrations of metals in the environment. Between October 1996 and September 1997, dissolved and easy extractable (by 1M HCl) metal fractions of total suspended particulate matter (TPM) in the overlying water and of surficial sediments (<63 microm) were measured monthly at five sublittoral sites in the Gulf of Gdansk, and accumulated tissue metal concentrations in M. balthica were determined simultaneously. The study highlights the importance of sediment geochemistry as a factor modifying ambient trace metal bioavailabilities. Surficial sediments appeared to contribute most to the accumulation of Cu and Pb in M. balthica, reflecting the high metal availability in the Gulf. Assimilation of Cu from sediments is controlled by Mn components possibly through an inhibitory effect of Mn oxyhydroxides, while Pb accumulation from sediments depends on the organic content of the sediment. A dual metal uptake pathway, with a suspended particulate-bound fraction and surficial sediments, was apparent for Mn and Zn. Partitioning of Mn in sediments was related to the concentration of labile Fe, with increased levels of Fe tending to inhibit the accumulation of Mn by the clam. Tissue accumulated Zn might have been altered by the clam's internal regulation, making Zn tissue concentrations, to some degree, independent of its environmental level. The principal source of Ni accumulated by the clams exists in the soluble phase.

  6. Lack of bioaccumulation of metals by Elliptio complanata (Bivalvia) during acidic snowmelt in three south-central Ontario streams

    SciTech Connect

    Servos, M.R.; Malley, D.F.; Mackie, G.L.; LaZerte, B.D.

    1987-05-01

    Depression of pH and elevation of metals during spring snowmelt may be widespread. However, because of the episodic nature of these events they are very difficult to measure or even detect. Sampling of snowmelt at regular intervals of only a few days, may not be adequate to detect short-term variations in pH and metal concentrations. The objective of the present study was to determine the feasibility of using biomonitoring to detect short-term changes in concentration or bioavailability of metals (Al, Zn, Cd) during spring snowmelt. Unionid clams, (Elliptio complanata) were held in three south-central Ontario streams during the spring snowmelt period of 1982. The gill tissues accumulate metals more readily than other tissues and thus are better biomonitors of available metals than whole body concentrations of these elements. Therefore, the concentration of metals in soft tissues (gill, body, foot) were compared separately to the stream water chemistry during snowmelt.

  7. Reproductive biology of four freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae) endemic to eastern Gulf Coastal Plain drainages of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, C. A.; Williams, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    The reproductive biology and glochidial shell morphology of three federally endangered freshwater mussels, the fat threeridge, Amblema neislerii; Gulf moccasinshell, Medionidus penicillatus; and oval pigtoe, Pleurobema pyriforme; and one federally threatened mussel, the purple bankclimber, Elliptoideus sloatianus, were studied from May 1995 to June 1997 in the Apalachicola, Flint, and Ochlockonee river drainages of Florida and Georgia. Gravid A. neislerii were found in early June. Laboratory experiments indicated that five fish species served as hosts: weed shiner, Notropis texanus; bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus; redear sunfish, L. microlophus; largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides; and blackbanded darter, Percina nigrofasciata. Elliptoideus sloatianus were found gravid from late February through mid-April. None of the 14 fish species exposed to E. sloatianus glochidia resulted in the identification of a primary host fish. Medionidus penicillatus were found gravid during September, November, March, and April. The brown darter, Etheostoma edwini, and blackbanded darter, Percina nigrofasciata, were identified as primary host fishes for M. penicillatus. Pleurobema pyriforme were found gravid from March through July. Only the sailfin shiner, Pleronotropis hypsehpterus, was identified as a primary host fish for P. pyriforme. Glochidial shell morphology of A. neislerii, M. penicillatus, and P. pyriforme were similar to other species in their respective genera. The glochidia of the monotypic species E. sloatianus were morphologically most similar to Epioblasma brevidens and E. capsaeformis.

  8. Frequency, Magnitude, and Possible Causes of Stranding and Mass-Mortality Events of the Beach Clam Tivela mactroides (Bivalvia: Veneridae)

    PubMed Central

    Turra, Alexander; Pombo, Maíra; Petracco, Marcelo; Siegle, Eduardo; Fonseca, Mariana; Denadai, Márcia R.

    2016-01-01

    Stranding combined with mass-mortality events of sandy-beach organisms is a frequent but little-understood phenomenon, which is generally studied based on discrete episodes. The frequency, magnitude, and possible causes of stranding and mass-mortality events of the trigonal clam Tivela mactroides were assessed based on censuses of stranded individuals, every four days from September 2007 through December 2008, in Caraguatatuba Bay, southeastern Brazil. Stranded clams were classified as dying (closed valves did not open when forced) or dead (closed valves were easily opened). Information on wave parameters and the living intertidal clam population was used to assess possible causes of stranding. This fine-scale monitoring showed that stranding occurred widely along the shore and year-round, with peaks interspersed with periods of low or no mortality. Dead clams showed higher mean density than dying individuals, but a lower mean shell length, attributed to a higher tolerance to desiccation of larger individuals. Wave height had a significant negative relationship to the density of dying individuals, presumed to be due to the accretive nature of low-energy waves: when digging out, clams would be more prone to be carried upward and unable to return; while larger waves, breaking farther from the beach and with a stronger backwash, would prevent stranding in the uppermost areas. This ecological finding highlights the need for refined temporal studies on mortality events, in order to understand them more clearly. Last, the similar size structure of stranded clams and the living population indicated that the stranded individuals are from the intertidal or shallow subtidal zone, and reinforces the ecological and behavioral components of this process, which have important ecological and socioeconomic implications for the management of this population. PMID:26745804

  9. Phage particles infecting branchial Rickettsiales-like organisms in banded carpet shell Polititapes virgineus (Bivalvia) from Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Darriba, S; Ruiz, M; López, C

    2012-09-12

    Basophilic intracellular prokaryotic-like colonies were observed in the gills of banded carpet shell Polititapes virgineus (= Tapes rhomboides) (Linnaeus, 1767) from a natural bed in Galicia (NW Spain). Light microscope observations suggested the presence of 2 types of colonies, but transmission electron microscopy revealed that these were the same Rickettsiales-like colonies, one infected and the other uninfected by phage particles. This is the first report of the presence of phage particles in Rickettsiales-like organisms in the gills of P. virgineus.

  10. Phylogeny of the most species-rich freshwater bivalve family (Bivalvia: Unionida: Unionidae): Defining modern subfamilies and tribes.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Froufe, Elsa; Do, Van Tu; Ghamizi, Mohamed; Mock, Karen E; Kebapçı, Ümit; Klishko, Olga; Kovitvadhi, Satit; Kovitvadhi, Uthaiwan; Paulo, Octávio S; Pfeiffer, John M; Raley, Morgan; Riccardi, Nicoletta; Şereflişan, Hülya; Sousa, Ronaldo; Teixeira, Amílcar; Varandas, Simone; Wu, Xiaoping; Zanatta, David T; Zieritz, Alexandra; Bogan, Arthur E

    2017-01-01

    Freshwater mussels of the order Unionida are key elements of freshwater habitats and are responsible for important ecological functions and services. Unfortunately, these bivalves are among the most threatened freshwater taxa in the world. However, conservation planning and management are hindered by taxonomic problems and a lack of detailed ecological data. This highlights the urgent need for advances in the areas of systematics and evolutionary relationships within the Unionida. This study presents the most comprehensive phylogeny to date of the larger Unionida family, i.e., the Unionidae. The phylogeny is based on a combined dataset of 1032bp (COI+28S) of 70 species in 46 genera, with 7 of this genera being sequenced for the first time. The resulting phylogeny divided the Unionidae into 6 supported subfamilies and 18 tribes, three of which are here named for the first time (i.e., Chamberlainiini nomen novum, Cristariini nomen novum and Lanceolariini nomen novum). Molecular analyses were complemented by investigations of selected morphological, anatomical and behavioral characters used in traditional phylogenetic studies. No single morphological, anatomical or behavioral character was diagnostic at the subfamily level and few were useful at the tribe level. However, within subfamilies, many tribes can be recognized based on a subset of these characters. The geographical distribution of each of the subfamilies and tribes is also presented. The present study provides important advances in the systematics of these extraordinary taxa with implications for future ecological and conservation studies.

  11. Early replication dynamics of sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs in the doubly uniparental inheritance species Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Guerra, D; Ghiselli, F; Milani, L; Breton, S; Passamonti, M

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy, which is maintained by strictly maternal inheritance and a series of bottlenecks, is thought to be an adaptive condition for metazoans. Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) is a unique mode of mitochondrial transmission found in bivalve species, in which two distinct mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) lines are present, one inherited through eggs (F) and one through sperm (M). During development, the two lines segregate in a sex- and tissue-specific manner: females lose M during embryogenesis, whereas males actively segregate it in the germ line. These two pivotal events are still poorly characterized. Here we investigated mtDNA replication dynamics during embryogenesis and pre-adulthood of the venerid Ruditapes philippinarum using real-time quantitative PCR. We found that both mtDNAs do not detectably replicate during early embryogenesis, and that the M line might be lost from females around 24 h of age. A rise in mtDNA copy number was observed before the first reproductive season in both sexes, with the M mitochondrial genome replicating more than the F in males, and we associate these boosts to the early phase of gonad production. As evidence indicates that DUI relies on the same molecular machine of mitochondrial maternal inheritance that is common in most animals, our data are relevant not only to DUI but also to shed light on how differential segregations of mtDNA variants, in the same nuclear background, may be controlled during development.

  12. Reproductive biology and juvenile recruitment of the shinyrayed pocketbook, Lampsilis subangulata (Bivalvia: Unionidae) in the Gulf Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, C. A.; Brim-Box, J.

    1999-01-01

    The reproductive biology, glochidial morphology and recruitment of the federally endangered shinyrayed pocketbook, Lampsilis subangulata, were studied from May 1995 to July 1996 in the Flint River system, Georgia. Gravid female L. subangulata were found nine months of the year. On 19 May 1995, a L. subangulata was discovered releasing a superconglutinate, the first record confirming that this species used this specialized reproductive strategy. Superconglutinate release occurred from late May to mid-July in water temperatures ranging from 20.0 to 23.5 C. Laboratory experiments indicated that two fish species served as primary hosts, the spotted bass (Micropterus punctulatus) and largemouth bass (M. salmoides). Secondary host fish included the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), guppy (Poecilia reticulata) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). The glochidial morphology of L. subangulata was similar to other lampsiline species. Using quantitative survey methods, no evidence of recent juvenile recruitment was found in the largest known extant L. subangulata population.

  13. New lucinid bivalves from shallow and deeper water of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John D.; Glover, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Four new species and a new genus of lucinid bivalves are described from shallow and deeper waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. The new genus Scabrilucina (subfamily Lucininae) includes the little-known Scabrilucina victorialis (Melvill, 1899) from the Arabian Sea and Scabrilucina vitrea (Deshayes, 1844) from the Andaman Sea as well as a new species Scabrilucina melvilli from the Torres Strait off northeastern Australia. Ferrocina brunei new species (Lucininae) was recovered from 60 m near oil drilling activities off Borneo; its anatomy confirmed the presence of symbiotic bacteria. Two unusual deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae are described, both species included in on-going molecular analyses; Gonimyrtea ferruginea from 400–650 m in the southwest Pacific and Myrtina reflexa from 200–825 m off Zanzibar and Madagascar. PMID:24039537

  14. Low Genetic Diversity and High Invasion Success of Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia, Corbiculidae) (Müller, 1774) in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cidália; Sousa, Ronaldo; Mendes, Tito; Borges, Rui; Vilares, Pedro; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    The Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, is an invasive alien species (IAS) originally from Asia that has spread worldwide causing major ecological and economic impacts in aquatic ecosystems. Here, we evaluated C. fluminea genetic (using COI mtDNA, CYTb mtDNA and 18S rDNA gene markers), morphometric and sperm morphology variation in Portuguese freshwater ecosystems. The COI marker revealed a single haplotype, which belongs to the Asian FW5 invasive lineage, suggesting a common origin for all the 13 Portuguese C. fluminea populations analysed. Morphometric analyses showed differences between the populations colonizing the North (with the exception of the Lima River) and the Centre/South ecosystems. The sperm morphology examination revealed the presence of biflagellate sperm, a distinctive character of the invasive androgenetic lineages. The low genetic variability of the Portuguese C. fluminea populations and the pattern of sperm morphology have been illuminating for understanding the demographic history of this invasive species. We hypothesize that these populations were derived from a unique introductory event of a Corbicula fluminea FW5 invasive androgenic lineage in the Tejo River, which subsequently dispersed to other Portuguese freshwater ecosystems. The C. fluminea asexual reproductive mode may have assisted these populations to become highly invasive despite the low genetic diversity. PMID:27391333

  15. Patterns of species richness among assemblages of Unionicola spp. (Acari: Unionicolidae) inhabiting freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionoida) of North America.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Dale D; Vidrine, Malcolm F

    2013-04-01

    Water mites of Unionicola species are common symbionts of freshwater mussels, living on the gills or mantle and foot of their hosts and using these tissues as sites of oviposition. Although surveys of the mite fauna among North American mussels suggest that these mites represent highly diverse assemblages, there are currently no quantitative data characterizing Unionicola species diversity among their molluscan hosts. The present study addresses patterns of species richness of Unionicola assemblages from freshwater mussels, including the relationship between richness and host specificity among these mites. Results from this study indicate that mite species richness increased significantly with an increase in the number of host individuals sampled. When corrected for sampling effort, there was a positive relationship between host size and mite species richness. Results from this study also reveal a significant relationship between mite species richness and the geographical distribution of host mussels. Overall, the patterns of species richness observed for this study are consistent with those examining the richness of parasitic helminth communities. Because the phylogenetic history of host taxa can have a significant influence on patterns of parasite species richness, studies that correct for the phylogenetic history among host mussels will be required to better understand the role that evolutionary processes have in determining Unionicola species richness. The present study did not indicate a significant relationship between species richness and host specificity and, in not doing so, suggests that the dispersal ability of mites may also play a role in influencing Unionicola species richness. The host recognition behavior and swimming abilities for a larger sample of mites will be required to substantiate this hypothesis.

  16. The influence of diet on comparative trace metal cadmium, copper and zinc accumulation in Thais clavigera (Gastropoda: Muricidae) preying on intertidal barnacles or mussels.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Graham; Morton, Brian

    2002-09-01

    The influence of diet on comparative metal accumulation was investigated using a predatory muricid gastropod Thais clavigera. Individuals were fed for up to 56 days on either barnacles, i.e., Tetraclita squamosa, or mussels, i.e., Perna viridis, collected from metal-contaminated and clean sites. Barnacles and mussels have contrasting metal handling strategies and, therefore, different body concentrations, intracellular distributions and detoxification systems. Field collection of prey items that accumulated body metal concentrations over a lifetime of exposure allowed bioavailability to the predator, T. clavigera, to be assessed naturally, which may not be the case for prey exposed to metals for a short time in the laboratory. T. clavigera that was fed cadmium- and copper-contaminated barnacles or mussels ingested significantly greater amounts compared to those fed conspecifics collected from clean locations. T. clavigera body cadmium and copper concentrations were not, however, significantly different between individuals fed either contaminated or clean prey. Amount of zinc ingested was similar in mussels collected from clean and contaminated environments but much less when compared to the barnacle prey. The body concentrations of zinc in T. clavigera fed mussels collected from both sites fell. In contrast, the amount of zinc ingested from barnacle prey was significantly greater from those collected from the metal-contaminated site as compared to the clean one. This was reflected as significantly greater body zinc concentrations in T. clavigera fed contaminated barnacles compared to those fed clean individuals. Copper and zinc accumulation from prey was, therefore, complex. It varied between metal and between prey type, but appeared to be related to the amount ingested and the metal handling strategy of the prey.

  17. Characterization of the major plasma protein of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and a proposed role in host defense.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Naoki; Xue, Qing-Gang; Schey, Kevin L; Li, Yanli; Cooper, Richard K; La Peyre, Jerome F

    2011-01-01

    The major plasma protein of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was purified, characterized and named dominin. SDS-PAGE analyses revealed that dominin consistently made up more than 40% of eastern oyster plasma and extrapallial fluid proteins. Three different forms of dominin were observed under non-reducing conditions. PCR and RACE primers designed from partial amino acid sequences obtained by tandem mass spectrometry of purified dominin identified 720bp of complete cDNA encoding 192 amino acid residues. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence of mature dominin, its molecular mass was calculated to be 19,389Da and was lower than the molecular mass of purified dominin measured by MALDI. This difference is likely due to post-translational modifications of dominin as the purified protein was found to be glycolysated, phosphorylated and likely sulfated. The amino acid sequence showed high similarity to the major plasma protein of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), cavortin, and of the green-lipped mussel (Perna canaliculus), pernin, and to a recently described protein labeled as an extracellular superoxide dismutase from the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata. While dominin was found to possess a Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) domain, the domain was not completely conserved which explained why purified dominin lacked SOD activity. Dominin mRNA was detected in hemocytes by in situ hybridization and its expression measured by quantitative real time RT-PCR was significantly higher in winter than summer. Although the function(s) of dominin and homologous proteins is uncertain, the reported ability of cavortin to sequester iron and possibly limit the availability of this essential metal to pathogens suggests a potential role in host defense for this group of dominant plasma proteins. Other possible functions of dominin in antioxidation, wound repair, metal transport and shell mineralization are discussed leading us to conclude that dominin is likely a

  18. A comparison of virus concentration methods for molecular detection and characterization of rotavirus in bivalve shellfish species.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, Leera; Singhaboot, Yutatirat; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip; Pombubpa, Kannika; Hirunpetcharat, Chakrit

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a method for concentrating rotavirus, to assess the detection rate, and to characterize the genotype of naturally occurring rotavirus in bivalve shellfish species; including oysters (Saccostrea forskali), cockles (Anadara nodifera), and mussels (Perna viridis). The results demonstrated that an adsorption-twice elution-extraction method was less-time consuming method of concentrating the spiked rotavirus, yielding high sensitivity of 1.14 genome copies/g of digestive tissues from all three shellfish species, as detected using an RT-nested PCR. In seeding experiments, rotavirus as low as 1.39 genome copies was able to be detected in 4 g of digestive tissues or per sample. In the period of August 2011 to July 2012, of the 300 bivalve shellfish samples collected and tested, 24 (8.0%) were found to be contaminated with rotavirus, the figures being: oysters, 13/100 samples; mussels, 10/100 samples; and cockles, 1/100 samples. By DNA sequencing of the RT-nested PCR products and phylogenetic analysis, the rotaviruses detected were classified into G1, lineage II (4 samples); G3 (10 samples): lineage I (3 samples), lineage IIIc (3 samples), lineage IIId (3 samples), lineage IV (1 sample); G9 (6 samples); and G12, lineage III (1 sample). These findings suggest that this virus concentration method provides high sensitivity for the detection of rotavirus from the three bivalve shellfish species. The prevalence of rotavirus and the identified genotypes contribute to the molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in different shellfish species.

  19. Population structure and identification of two matrilinear and one patrilinear mitochondrial lineages in the mussel Mytella charruana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Thainara Oliveira; Alves, Francisco Arimateia dos Santos; Beasley, Colin Robert; de Simone, Luiz Ricardo Lopes; Marques-Silva, Nelane do Socorro; Santos-Neto, Guilherme da Cruz; Tagliaro, Claudia Helena

    2015-04-01

    The mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) was sequenced from Mytella charruana (N = 243) at 10 Brazilian coastal localities to search for cryptic species, doubly uniparental inheritance and investigate genetic population structure and demography. Three haplogroups were found: two matrilinear (A and B) in males and females, and one patrilinear (C) found only in males. The p-distances were 0.0624 (A and B), 0.2097 (A and C) and 0.2081 (B and C). Coalescence of M. charruana occurred around 12.5 Mya, and the origins of the lineages were 3.4 and 4 Mya (matrilinear A and B) and 51.2 Mya (patrilinear), which split before the separation of the genera Perna and Mytella. All individuals from the northern coast of Brazil belonged to haplogroup A, whereas haplogroup B predominated among individuals from the eastern and northeastern coasts, with one exception, Goiana. Haplogroup C was found in males from the northern to the eastern coast. GenBank sequences of M. charruana from Colombia, Ecuador and four populations introduced to the USA joined Brazilian haplogroup B. Nuclear gene 18S-ITS1 sequences confirmed that all specimens belong to the same species. Four populations from the northern coast of Brazil were homogenous with evidence of recent population expansion. All populations from the northeastern and eastern coasts of Brazil were significantly structured (pairwise FST and AMOVA). The heterogeneity among Brazilian populations requires that relocation for aquaculture be preceded by genetic identification of the haplogroups. Differences in salinity and temperature may have selected for distinct lineages of mussels and changing conditions in coasts and estuaries may allow only resistant lineages of mussel to persist with the loss of others. In the light of global climate change, more detailed data on temperature, pH, salinity and local currents could help explain the genetic structuring observed among populations of Brazilian M. charruana.

  20. Geographical distribution of non-PBDE-brominated flame retardants in mussels from Asian coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shohei P; Ramu, Karri; Sudaryanto, Agus; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-09-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) used as alternatives for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are also persistent in the environment as PBDEs. Limited information on these non-PBDE brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is available; in particular, there are only few publications on environmental pollution by these contaminants in the coastal waters of Asia. In this regard, we investigated the contamination status of HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE in the coastal waters of Asia using mussels as a bioindicator. Concentrations of HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE were determined in green (Perna viridis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) collected from the coastal areas in Cambodia, China (mainland), SAR China (Hong Kong), India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam on 2003-2008. BTBPE and DBDPE were analyzed using GC-MS, whereas HBCDs were determined by LC-MS/MS. HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE were found in mussels at levels ranging from <0.01 to 1,400, <0.1 to 13, and <0.3 to 22 ng/g lipid wt, respectively. Among the three HBCD diastereoisomers, α-HBCD was the dominant isomer followed by γ- and β-HBCDs. Concentrations of HBCDs and DBDPE in mussels from Japan and Korea were higher compared to those from the other Asian countries, indicating extensive usage of these non-PBDE BFRs in Japan and Korea. Higher levels of HBCDs and DBDPE than PBDEs were detected in some mussel samples from Japan. The results suggest that environmental pollution by non-PBDE BFRs, especially HBCDs in Japan, is ubiquitous. This study provides baseline information on the contamination status of these non-PBDE BFRs in the coastal waters of Asia.

  1. Comparison of trace metal contents of sediments and mussels collected within and outside Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Y. H.; Wong, M. H.

    1992-11-01

    Sediments collected from Tap Mun (within Tolo Harbour) and Yim Tin Tsai (outside Tolo Harbour) were extracted sequentially and the copper, cadmium, and chromium contents were determined. Total contents of copper, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic were also detected by acid digestion. The level of heavy metal extracted was higher in sequential extraction (which extracted all forms of metal ions) than total acid digestion. Among the four heavy metals studied, only copper showed a significantly higher ( P<0.001) level in samples collected from Yim Tin Tsai (16.10 mg/kg) than that from Tap Mun (3.19 mg/kg). Such a difference in copper level is mainly attributed to the significantly higher ( P<0.05) levels of copper in the organic, carbonate, and sulfide forms, whereas there was no significant difference ( P>0.05) in the exchangeable and sorbed forms. Green-lipped mussel ( Perna viridis) samples collected from the two sites were dissected into seven parts (gill, byssus, siphon, shell, digestive gland, soft tissue, and adductor muscle) and the concentrations of copper, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic were measured. The highest concentration of copper was obtained in the byssus. A higher concentration of copper was also noted in the mussels collected from Yim Tin Tsai than those collected from Tap Mun. No specific trend was revealed for the other metals tested. Chromium and arsenic concentrations were found to be independent of the body size of the mussels. Copper had a lower concentration in larger mussels and cadmium level was found to decrease with size. In addition, the mussels collected from Tap Mun were much larger than those collected from Yim Tin Tsai.

  2. Heavy metals in oysters, mussels and clams collected from coastal sites along the Pearl River Delta, South China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhan-Qiang; Cheung, R Y H; Wong, M H

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of 8 heavy metals: cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb) and tin (Sn) were examined in 3 species of bivalves ( Perna viridis, Crassostrea rivularis and Ruditapes philippinarum) collected from 25 sites along the Pearl River Delta coastal waters in the South China Sea from July to August 1996. In general, Cd, Cu, Zn and Sn concentrations in the three bivalve species collected from the Estuarine Zone were significantly higher than those collected from the Western and Eastern Zones of the Pearl River Delta, which are related to the existence of various anthropogenic activities in the catchment of the Pearl River Delta. The Western Estuarine Zone is mainly impacted hy Cr, Ni and Cu contamination. In Victoria Harbor, heavy metal contamination is mainly due to Cu and Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn concentrations in oysters were significantly higher than those in mussels and clams. This could be explained by the fact that oysters live mainly in the Estuarine Zone of the Pearl River Delta which receives most of the polluting discharges from the catchment of the Delta. During turbid condition, heavy metals( soluble or adsorbed on suspended particulates) discharged from the Delta are filtered from the water column and subsequently accumulated into the soft body tissues of oysters. Heavy metal concentrations in the three bivalve species were compared with the maximum permissible levels of heavy metals in seafood regulated by the Public Health and Municipal Services Ordinance, Laws of Hong Kong, and it was revealed that Cd and Cr concentrations in the three bivalve species exceeded the upper limits. At certain hotspots in the Delta, the maximum acceptable daily load for Cd was also exceeded.

  3. An X-Ray/SDSS Sample: Observational Characterization of The Outflowing Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Michele; Brusa, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Mignoli, M.

    2016-10-01

    Powerful ionised AGN-driven outflows, commonly detected both locally and at high redshift, are invoked to contribute to the co-evolution of SMBH and galaxies through feedback phenomena. Our recent works (Brusa+2015; 2016; Perna+2015a,b) have shown that the XMM-COSMOS targets with evidence of outflows collected so far ( 10 sources) appear to be associated with low X-ray kbol corrections (Lbol /LX ˜ 18), in spite of their spread in obscuration, in the locations on the SFR-Mstar diagram, in their radio emission. A higher statistical significance is required to validate a connection between outflow phenomena and a X-ray loudness. Moreover, in order to validate their binding nature to the galaxy fate, it is crucial to correctly determine the outflow energetics. This requires time consuming integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations, which are, at present, mostly limited to high luminosity objectsThe study of SDSS data offers a complementary strategy to IFS efforts. I will present physical and demographic characterization of the AGN-galaxy system during the feedback phase obtained studying a sample of 500 X-ray/SDSS AGNs, at z<0.8. Outflow velocity inferred from [OIII]5007 emission line profile has been related to optical (e.g., [OIII] and bolometric luminosities, Eddington ratio, stellar velocity dispersion) and X-ray properties (intrinsic X-ray luminosity, obscuration and X-ray kbol correction), to determine what drives ionised winds. Several diagnostic line ratios have been used to infer the physical properties of the ionised outflowing gas. The knowledge of these properties can reduce the actual uncertainties in the outflow energetics by a factor of ten, pointing to improve our understanding of the AGN outflow phenomenon and its impact on galaxy evolution.

  4. Introduced marine species: Management arrangements of consideration for the Torres Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, Kerry M.; Hilliard, Robert; Russell, Barry; Clark, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Introduced marine species (IMS) can have significant impacts on economic, ecological, social and cultural aspects of coastal marine environments. There is, therefore, a need to minimise these impacts through the implementation of comprehensive and consistent management strategies and monitoring processes that work towards preventing introductions, detecting introductions if they were to occur and managing incursions should they be detected. There is also the need to ensure that approaches taken are comparable to provide consistency of IMS management effort, particularly across areas that are multi-jurisdictional (e.g. spanning State or Territory borders). A number of studies have examined IMS, their vectors and management arrangements for the Torres Strait region, a multi-jurisdictional area between Queensland, Australia and Papua New Guinea. This paper presents information from a baseline survey conducted in the Torres Strait for marine pests in conjunction with a synthesis of information from other studies on IMS risks, their vectors and management strategies of relevance to the Torres Strait region. A number of strengths, but also gaps, between the various jurisdictions have been identified and discussed. Processes such as the establishment of Biosecurity Queensland as a specialist group and the development of the National System for the Prevention and Management of Marine Pest Incursions are occurring. However, the Torres Strait region is at current risk of marine pest inoculation, particularly for species such as Perna viridis, and management strategies to minimise this risk are lacking. The information presented here will assist management groups in their ability to work towards mitigating the risk of an IMS being translocated to and negatively impacting the unique and diverse ecology of the marine systems, and the industries, people and customs that rely on the coastal marine environment for food, recreation and commerce in the Torres Strait.

  5. Antifouling Activity towards Mussel by Small-Molecule Compounds from a Strain of Vibrio alginolyticus Bacterium Associated with Sea Anemone Haliplanella sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Huang, Yanqiu; Sheng, Yanqing; Su, Pei; Qiu, Yan; Ke, Caihuan; Feng, Danqing

    2017-03-28

    Mussels are major fouling organisms causing serious technical and economic problems. In this study, antifouling activity towards mussel was found in three compounds isolated from a marine bacterium associated with the sea anemone Haliplanella sp. This bacterial strain, called PE2, was identified as Vibrio alginolyticus using morphology, biochemical tests, and phylogenetic analysis based on sequences of 16S rRNA and four housekeeping genes (rpoD, gyrB, rctB, and toxR). Three small-molecule compounds (indole, 3-formylindole, and cyclo (Pro-Leu)) were purified from the ethyl acetate extract of V. alginolyticus PE2 using column chromatography techniques. They all significantly inhibited byssal thread production of the green mussel Perna viridis, with EC50 values of 24.45 μg/ml for indole, 50.07 μg/ml for 3-formylindole, and 49.24 μg/ml for cyclo (Pro-Leu). Previous research on the antifouling activity of metabolites from marine bacteria towards mussels is scarce. Indole, 3-formylindole and cyclo (Pro-Leu) also exhibited antifouling activity against settlement of the barnacle Balanus albicostatus (EC50 values of 8.84, 0.43, and 11.35 μg/ml, respectively) and the marine bacterium Pseudomonas sp. (EC50 values of 42.68, 69.68, and 39.05 μg/ml, respectively). These results suggested that the three compounds are potentially useful for environmentally friendly mussel control and/or the development of new antifouling additives that are effective against several biofoulers.

  6. Disruption of Microbial Biofilms by an Extracellular Protein Isolated from Epibiotic Tropical Marine Strain of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Dusane, Devendra H.; Damare, Samir R.; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V.; Ramaiah, N.; Venugopalan, Vayalam P.; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Marine epibiotic bacteria produce bioactive compounds effective against microbial biofilms. The study examines antibiofilm ability of a protein obtained from a tropical marine strain of Bacillus licheniformis D1. Methodology/Principal Findings B. licheniformis strain D1 isolated from the surface of green mussel, Perna viridis showed antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Candida albicans BH, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and biofouling Bacillus pumilus TiO1 cultures. The antimicrobial activity was lost after treatment with trypsin and proteinase K. The protein was purified by ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed the antimicrobial agent to be a 14 kDa protein designated as BL-DZ1. The protein was stable at 75°C for 30 min and over a pH range of 3.0 to 11.0. The sequence alignment of the MALDI-fingerprint showed homology with the NCBI entry for a hypothetical protein (BL00275) derived from B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 with the accession number gi52082584. The protein showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1.6 µg/ml against C. albicans. Against both P. aeruginosa and B. pumilus the MIC was 3.12 µg/ml. The protein inhibited microbial growth, decreased biofilm formation and dispersed pre-formed biofilms of the representative cultures in polystyrene microtiter plates and on glass surfaces. Conclusion/Significance We isolated a protein from a tropical marine strain of B. licheniformis, assigned a function to the hypothetical protein entry in the NCBI database and described its application as a potential antibiofilm agent. PMID:23691235

  7. Health risk assessments of heavy metal exposure via consumption of marine mussels collected from anthropogenic sites.

    PubMed

    Yap, Chee Kong; Cheng, Wan Hee; Karami, Ali; Ismail, Ahmad

    2016-05-15

    A total of 40 marine mussel Perna viridis populations collected (2002-2009) from 20 geographical sites located in two busy shipping lanes namely the Straits of Malacca (10 sites; 16 populations) and the Straits of Johore (8 sites; 21 populations) and three populations (2 sites) on the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia, was determined for Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations. In comparison with the maximum permissible limits (MPLs) set by existing food safety guidelines, all metal concentrations found in all the mussel populations were lower than the prescribed MPLs. In terms of the provisional tolerable weekly intake prescribed by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and oral reference doses (ORDs) by the USEPA, all the studied metals (except for Pb) were unlikely to become the limiting factors or unlikely to pose a risk for the consumption of the mussel populations. The estimated daily intake (EDI) for average level mussel (ALM) and high level mussel (HLM) consumers of mussels was found to be lower than the ORD guidelines for Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn. Furthermore, the target hazard quotient (THQ) was found to be less than 1 for ALM consumers but higher than 1 for HLM consumers in some sites. Therefore, there were no potential human health risks to the ALM consumers of the mussels. However, for Pb THQ values, the Pb levels in some mussel populations could create a health risk problem. Present results indicate that the consumption amounts of mussels should be limited for minimizing potential health risks of heavy metals to the HLM consumers.

  8. Organochlorines in sediments and mussels collected from coastal sites along the Pearl River Delta, South China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhan-qiang

    2004-01-01

    The level and pattern of residues of organochlorine pesticide and polychlorinated biphenyls(PCBs) were analyzed in sediment and mussel (Perna viridis) samples from ten coastal sites along the Pearl River Delta, South China. The range of total HCH was < 0.01 to 0.29 ng/g freeze-dried weight in sediment, and < 0.01 to 1.35 ng/g lipid weight in mussels. Average total DDTs concentrations ranged from < 0.01 to 1.04 ng/g in sediment, and < 0.01 to 148.5 ng/g in mussels. Average total PCB concentrations ranged from 16.4 to 198.6 ng/g in sediment, and from 41 to 729.2 ng/g in mussels. Organochlorine pesticide and PCBs in mussels and sediments presented similar distribution patterns. The regression analysis indicated that PCBs concentrations in mussels were significantly correlated (p < 0.01) with concentrations in sediments. However, their concentrations in mussels were several times higher than the concentration detected in surrounding sediments. The major fraction of DDT related compounds measured in mussels and sediments was DDD. Based on average PCB concentrations, penta-, hexa-, and tetrachlorobiphenyls were preferentially accumulated by mussels as compared to the average sediment composition. According to the present results,three organochlorine polluted "hot spot" sites, including Victoria Harbour, Lingding Yang and Huangmao Sea, were found in the Pearl River estuarine zone. HCHs, DDTs and PCBs in all mussel samples were below the limits of 2, 0.2 and 5.0 microg/g wet weight recommended by the Technical Group of Guangdong Coastal Zone Resource Comprehensive Survey and U. S. Food and Drug Administration.

  9. Assessment of a mussel as a metal bioindicator of coastal contamination: relationships between metal bioaccumulation and multiple biomarker responses.

    PubMed

    Chandurvelan, Rathishri; Marsden, Islay D; Glover, Chris N; Gaw, Sally

    2015-04-01

    This is the first study to use a multiple biomarker approach on the green-lipped mussel, Perna canaliculus to test its feasibility as a bioindicator of coastal metal contamination in New Zealand (NZ). Mussels were collected from six low intertidal sites varying in terms of anthropogenic impacts, within two regions (West Coast and Nelson) of the South Island of NZ. Trace elements, including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn), were measured in the gills, digestive gland, foot and mantle, and in the surface sediments from where mussels were collected. Metal levels in the sediment were relatively low and there was only one site (Mapua, Nelson) where a metal (Ni) exceeded the Australian and New Zealand Interim Sediment Quality Guideline values. Metal levels in the digestive gland were generally higher than those from the other tissues. A variety of biomarkers were assessed to ascertain mussel health. Clearance rate, a physiological endpoint, correlated with metal level in the tissues, and along with scope for growth, was reduced in the most contaminated site. Metallothionein-like protein content and catalase activity in the digestive gland, and catalase activity and lipid peroxidation in the gill, were also correlated to metal accumulation. Although there were few regional differences, the sampling sites were clearly distinguishable based on the metal contamination profiles and biomarker responses. P. canaliculus appears to be a useful bioindicator species for coastal habitats subject to metal contamination. In this study tissue and whole organism responses provided insight into the biological stress responses of mussels to metal contaminants, indicating that such measurements could be a useful addition to biomonitoring programmes in NZ.

  10. Does differential particulate food supply explain the presence of mussels in Wellington Harbour (New Zealand) and their absence on neighbouring Cook Strait shores?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helson, Jeremy G.; Pledger, Shirley; Gardner, Jonathan P. A.

    2007-03-01

    Rocky intertidal reef communities in Wellington Harbour, New Zealand, are dominated by mussels (the ribbed mussel Aulacomya maoriana, the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, and the greenshell mussel Perna canaliculus). Only a few kilometres away, outside the Harbour on exposed Cook Strait shores, these mussels are absent. We tested the hypothesis of bottom-up food limitation as the explanation for this distributional difference. The water column at three Harbour sites and five Cook Strait coastal sites was sampled over an 18-month period for temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, total particulate matter (TPM), particulate organic matter (POM), percent organic matter (PCOM), chlorophyll a (Chl a), particle counts (number of particles mL -1 in the range 2.5-63 μm), percent carbon, percent nitrogen, and C:N ratio. Mean values of PCOM and Chl a were significantly higher ( p < 0.05) in the Harbour than in Cook Strait. On two separate occasions mussels were transferred from Wellington Harbour to the Island Bay Marine Laboratory (IBML on Cook Strait) and sampled at regular intervals to permit the determination of body condition index (CI) and mortality rate to measure their response to the coastal seston regime. On both occasions monthly CI values of all three species held at IBML decreased significantly when compared with monthly CI values of mussels collected from Harbour sites. Mortality rates at IBML exhibited consistent taxon-specific responses ( P. canaliculus > M. galloprovincialis > A. maoriana). We interpret these field-based and laboratory-based findings as providing support for the hypothesis that multi-species mussel distributions and hence intertidal community structure at Cook Strait sites are regulated at least in part by particulate food supply.

  11. Heavy metal concentrations in green-lipped mussels collected from Tolo Harbour and markets in Hong Kong and Shenzhen.

    PubMed

    Wong, C K; Cheung, R Y; Wong, M H

    2000-07-01

    Green-lipped mussels, Perna viridis, were collected from Kat O, Yim Tin Tsai, Ma Liu Shui and Tap Mun around Tolo Harbour and six local markets in Hong Kong (Aberdeen, Shau Kei Wan, Kowloon City, Mongkok, Yuen Long) and Shenzhen (Dongmun) between July 1994 and February 1995 and analysed for cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn). The metal concentrations of mussels collected from the study sites were Cd (0.45-1.44 microg/g), Cr (0.82-4.89 microg/g), Cu (6.02-23.99 microg/g), Ni (3.25-6.87 microg/g), Pb (2.02-4.36 microg/g) and Zn (90-135 microg/g), while those from the markets were Cd (0.27-1.44 microg/g), Cr (1.09-3.30 microg/g), Cu (9.05-17.8 microg/g), Ni (2.44-5.25 microg/g), Pb (1.17-5 microg/g) and Zn (51-103 microg/g). The metal concentrations were below the maximum permissible levels set by the Hong Kong Government. In addition, seasonal variation of metal accumulation in mussels was investigated in Yim Tin Tsai and Ma Liu Shui and a reduction in the total heavy metal concentrations during winter was noted. The non-carcinogenic hazard index of mussels collected from Tolo Harbour and from Hong Kong markets was between 0.46 and 1.36 compared with those from Shenzhen markets (0.85-1.46), which indicated a low but possible risk in consuming the mussels.

  12. Gas Hydrate Exploration, Mid Chilean Coast; Geochemical-Geophysical Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-27

    Scleractinia - - - - - - - - Nemertinea - - Mollusca Bivalvia + - + - - ++ + - + - + - Aplacophora...Caelorinchus fasciatus and three unknow species) were observed. In addition, fauna inside stones was found ( Mollusca : Leptochiton americanus

  13. [Non detection of enterovirus in the bivalve Anadara tuberculosa (Bivalvia:Arcidae) caused by chemical contamination in the Pacific of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Libia Herrero, U; Alejandro Palacios, F; Laya Hun, O; Francisco Vega, A

    1999-09-01

    Anadara tuberculosa is one of the most abundant mollusks of commercial importance in Costa Rica. Its habitat water is a potential source of fecal and chemical contamination to humans. We wanted to asses enterovirus, mainly poliovirus and hepatitis A virus and chemicals such as sulphates and nitrates in meat and body fluids. Thirteen samples were taken from four sites in Nicoya Gulf, three sites in the Sierpe-Térraba mangrove (Pacific of Costa Rica) and from five fish markets in San José, the capital of Costa Rica. Samples were tested for 1) fecal coliforms (Most Probable Number/100 ml), 2) isolation of enterovirus in cell culture (Hep-2, FrhK-4), 3) cell cytotoxicity in Vero cells and 4) the ability to inactivate 10 ID50% of poliovirus in cell culture. The Most Probable Number/100 ml in surrounding water was higher than the accepted standard for recreational waters, although the number of fecal coliforms in meats and body fluids was lower than in the external water. No cytopathogenic agents were isolated, but we found nitrate and sulphate concentrations that exceeded maxima for human consumption and recreation. The intrinsic cytotoxicity of the samples was at a 1/8 dilution, but some samples were cytotoxic at dilutions of 1/128. Body fluids were more cytotoxic than meats, but a positive correlation between cytotoxicity and chemical contamination was not determined: apparently other pollutants not identified in this study were responsible. Fluid and meat capacity to inactivate 10 ID50% of poliovirus in cell culture was demonstrated. Samples that were toxic for cell cultures also showed a higher percentage of poliovirus inactivation. Monitoring chemical pollution in these waters is highly recommended.

  14. Prevalence of a protozoan parasite Cristigera sp. (Ciliophora:Ciliatea) from edible oysters (Mollusca:Bivalvia) of Sundarbans, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tanima; Bandyopadhyay, Probir Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The coastal region of West Bengal is bestowed with a wide range of natural forest and aquatic resources. The estuarine complex is a culmination of the interaction of land, sea and freshwater. It offers diverse specialised habitats such as mangroves, non vegetated mudflats, inter tidal zones and reclaimed areas. Such areas are home to a number of terrestrial, freshwater and marine communities. Edible oyster resources in these regions are Crassostrea gryphoides and Saccostrea cucullata, which are the keystone species found in the intertidal zone and can tolerate huge variation of salinity. These are used as food by local people and marketed to earn cash. The population of this species has been declined due to parasitic infection and pollution. There are many protozoan parasites which infect these oysters causing diseases. During survey period, a protozoan parasite of the genus Cristigera have been observed only from the edible oyster Crassostrea gryphoides collected from Kaikhali and Frasergunj among three selected sites namely Kaikhali, Frasergunj and Digha of West Bengal mainly during monsoon and post-monsoon season. Considering such rare and specific prevalence of Cristigera sp, it may be considered as potential bio-indicator.

  15. Molecular characterization and expression of a novel homolog of uncoupling protein 5 (UCP5) from the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Kern, Britt; Ivanina, Anna V; Piontkivska, Helen; Sokolov, Eugene P; Sokolova, Inna M

    2009-06-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) belong to the mitochondrial anion carrier gene family which has been implicated in diverse physiological functions ranging from thermoregulation to antioxidant defense. In mammals, the UCP family is well characterized and contains five members (UCP1-5). In contrast, invertebrate homologues of uncoupling proteins are much less studied both from the viewpoints of structure and function. In this study we report nucleotide and predicted protein structure of an important member of UCP family, UCP5 from eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica. UCP5 from oysters appears to be a close homolog of the mammalian brain mitochondrial carrier protein (BMCP1, or UCP5) and is the first full-length UCP described from a Lophotrochozoan invertebrate. Evolutionary analysis of UCP sequences indicates at least three monophyletic UCP branches (UCP1-3, UCP4 and UCP5) that have diverged early in the evolution, prior to the divergence of vertebrates and invertebrates. In oysters, two forms of UCP5 transcript are found (UCP5S and UCP5L) that differ by 152 bp in length due to the presence of an intron in UCP5L. UCP5 was expressed in all studied oyster tissues, unlike mammals, where UCP5 is predominantly expressed in brains and male gonads. Hypoxia-reoxygenation stress, sublethal Cd exposure (50 ?g L(?1) Cd for 56 days) and acclimation to different temperatures (12 and 20 °C) had no significant effect on UCP5 mRNA expression in oysters indicative of its relative unimportance in antioxidant defense and temperature adaptation of oyster mitochondria. These data suggest that despite the relatively high degree of evolutionary conservation of the UCP5 amino acid sequence, its functional significance in mitochondria changed in the course of evolution of mollusks and vertebrates.

  16. A holistic approach to taxonomic evaluation of two closely related endangered freshwater mussel species, the oyster mussel Epioblasma capsaeformis and tan riffleshell Epioblasma florentina walkeri (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.; Neves, R.J.; Ahlstedt, S.A.; Hallerman, E.M.

    2006-01-01

    Species in the genus Epioblasma have specialized life history requirements and represent the most endangered genus of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the world. A genetic characterization of extant populations of the oyster mussel E. capsaeformis and tan riffleshell E. florentina walkeri sensu late was conducted to assess taxonomic validity and to resolve conservation issues for recovery planning. These mussel species exhibit pronounced phenotypic variation, but were difficult to characterize phylogenetically using DNA sequences. Monophyletic lineages, congruent with phenotypic variation among species, were obtained only after extensive analysis of combined mitochondrial (1396 bp of 16S, cytochrome-b, and ND1) and nuclear (515 bp of ITS-1) DNA sequences. In contrast, analysis of variation at 10 hypervariable DNA microsatellite loci showed moderately to highly diverged populations based on FST and R ST values, which ranged from 0.12 to 0.39 and 0.15 to 0.71, respectively. Quantitative variation between species was observed in fish-host specificity, with transformation success of glochidia of E. capsaeformis significantly greater (P<0.05) on greenside darter Etheostoma blennioides, and that of E. f. walkeri significantly greater (P<0.05) on fantail darter Etheostoma flabellare. Lengths of glochidia differed significantly (P<0.001) among species and populations, with mean sizes ranging from 241 to 272 ??m. The texture and colour of the mantle-pad of E. capsaeformis sensu stricto is smooth and bluish-white, whereas that of E. f. walkeri is pustuled and brown, with tan mottling. Based on extensive molecular, morphological and life history data, the population of E. capsaeformis from the Duck River, Tennessee, USA is proposed as a separate species, and the population of E. f. walkeri from Indian Creek, upper Clinch River, Virginia, USA is proposed as a distinct subspecies.

  17. Cadmium exposure affects mitochondrial bioenergetics and gene expression of key mitochondrial proteins in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica Gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Inna M; Sokolov, Eugene P; Ponnappa, Kavita M

    2005-07-01

    Cadmium is a ubiquitous and extremely toxic metal, which strongly affects mitochondrial function of aquatic organisms in vitro; however, nothing is known about the in vivo effects of sublethal concentrations of this metal on mitochondrial bioenergetics. We have studied the effects of exposure to 0 (control) or 25 microg L-1 (Cd-exposed) Cd2+ on mitochondrial function and gene expression of key mitochondrial proteins in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. Cadmium exposure in vivo resulted in considerable accumulation of cadmium in oyster mitochondria and in a significant decrease of ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3) by 30% indicating impaired capacity for ATP production. The decrease in state 3 respiration was similar to the level of inhibition expected from the direct effects of cadmium accumulated in oyster mitochondria. On the other hand, while no effect on proton leak was expected based on the mitochondrial accumulation of cadmium, Cd-exposed oysters in fact showed a significant decline of the proton leak rate (state 4+respiration) by 40%. This suggested a downregulation of proton leak, which correlated with a decrease in mRNA expression of a mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP6 and two other potential uncouplers, mitochondrial substrate carriers MSC-1 and MSC-2. Expression of other key mitochondrial proteins including cytochrome c oxidase, adenine nucleotide transporter and voltage dependent anion channel was not affected by cadmium exposure. Adenylate energy charge (AEC) was significantly lower in Cd-exposed oysters; however, this was due to higher steady state ADP levels and not to the decrease in tissue ATP levels. Our data show that adjustment of the proton leak in cadmium-exposed oysters may be a compensatory mechanism, which allows them to maintain normal mitochondrial coupling and ATP levels despite the cadmium-induced inhibition of capacity for ATP production.

  18. Morphological and Genetic Diversity of the Wood-Boring Xylophaga (Mollusca, Bivalvia): New Species and Records from Deep-Sea Iberian Canyons

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Chiara; Voight, Janet Ruth; Pérez-Portela, Rocío; Martin, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea bivalves of the Xylophagaidae, a poorly known group, are obligate wood-borers. Deployment of wood in three submarine canyons off the Iberian coast, the Blanes and La Fonera Canyons (Mediterranean Sea) and the Avilés Canyon (Cantabric Sea, Bay of Biscay), lead to the discovery of four xylophagaid species in our samples. Xylophaga dorsalis (the dominant species), X. atlantica, X. cf. anselli and the new species X. brava, were identified on the basis of morphological data, and supported by a phylogenetic reconstruction based on the nuclear genes 18S rDNA and 28S rDNA and including several genus of Xylophagaidae. Genetic divergence between species of Xylophaga varied between genes, ranging from 0.5 to 4.0% for the 18SrDNA and from 4.1 to 16.6% for the 28SrDNA. Xylophaga brava sp. nov. appeared to be restricted to the Mediterranean and morphologically resembled the closely related X. cf. anselli from the Cantabrian Sea. However, they clearly diverged in two well-supported clades. Low levels of intraspecific variability and higher interspecific divergence between species also supported the existence of these two different species. Morphologically they differ in the number of cirri at the siphon openings, in the shape of the posterior shell and in the size of prodissoconch II. The new species is characterized by having weak, poorly mineralized mesoplax and siphons united throughout, covered by a periostracal, non-calcified tube; distinct proximal and distal siphons, the former translucent and soft, the latter muscular, with concentric rings. Xylophaga atlantica, previously known only from the western Atlantic, is reported for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea. Whether its presence in the Mediterranean indicates its natural distribution or reflects its recent introduction is unknown. Although xylophagaids have been previously reported to recruit heavily to wood deposited on the seabed, these four species colonized wood suspended 30 m above the seafloor. PMID:25061913

  19. Dreissena polymorpha (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae) in the Neva Estuary (eastern Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea): is it a biofilter or source for pollution?

    PubMed

    Orlova, M; Golubkov, S; Kalinina, L; Ignatieva, N

    2004-08-01

    The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, a ponto-caspian byssate bivalve, forms permanent dense populations along the shoreline in the northern part of the inner Neva Estuary. Its total biomass along a 17 km transect reached 4980 tons (mean 1060 g m(-2)) in 2000 and 6510 tons (mean 1385 g m(-2)) in 2001. Being persistent and abundant, the zebra mussel populations played an important role in benthic-pelagic coupling in inner Neva River Estuary. The D. polymorpha population released up to 514 kg day(-1) of dissolved inorganic phosphorus and was, therefore, a major source of bioavailable nutrients in the area. Mussel beds were also efficient biofilters and precipitate 15,020 kg day(-1) of particulate organic matter during the warm season. About 50% of precipitated matter had a relatively long retention time, being utilized within zebra mussel populations, while the rest was deposited as faeces and pseudofaeces and served as a source for organic pollution to the eastern Gulf of Finland.

  20. Intra-specific variability in life-history traits of Anadara tuberculosa (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the mangrove ecosystem of the Southern coast of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Flores, Luis; Licandeo, Roberto; Cubillos, Luis A; Mora, Elba

    2014-06-01

    Anadara tuberculosa is one of the most important bivalves along the Western Pacific coast because of its commercial value. Nevertheless, the variability in growth, long-life span, natural mortality and reproductive parameters of this mangrove cockle has not yet been described. The aim of this study was to analyze these life-history traits in three areas of the Southern coast of Ecuador. Empirical and length-based methods were used to estimate these biological parameters. Body size data were collected from the commercial fishery between 2004 and 2011 in landing ports near to the Archipelago of Jambeli [Puerto Bolivar (PB), Puerto Jeli (PJ) and Puerto Hualtaco (PH)]. The von Bertalanffy growth parameters for combined sex were estimated between 70.87 to 93.45mm for L(infinity) and 0.22 to 0.80/year for k. The growth indices (PHI') ranged from 3.17 to 3.85, while the overall growth performance (OGP) ranged from 5.03 to 5.82. The mean of long-life span (t(max)), size and age at maturity (L50% and t50%) were estimated in 7.71 +/- 2.53 years, 39.13 +/- 2.24mm and 1.46 +/- 0.56 years for PB; 9.51 +/- 2.85 years, 37.78 +/- 1.95mm and 1.37 +/- 0.41 years for PJ and 5.81 +/- 2.11 years, 39.73 +/- 3.31mm and 0.94 +/- 0.41 years for PH. Natural mortality (M) ranged from 0.46 to 1.28/year. We concluded that significant intra-specific variation was observed in a temporal scale in PHI' and OGP indices as well as L50% and M. Therefore, temporal changes in these life-history traits should be taken into account when assessing the status of the mangrove cockle fishery.

  1. The genome of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas brings new insights on the massive expansion of the C1q gene family in Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Marco; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    C1q domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins are regarded as important players in the innate immunity of bivalve mollusks and other invertebrates and their highly adaptive binding properties indicate them as efficient pathogen recognition molecules. Although experimental studies support this view, the molecular data available at the present time are not sufficient to fully explain the great molecular diversification of this family, present in bivalves with hundreds of C1q coding genes. Taking advantage of the fully sequenced genome of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and more than 100 transcriptomic datasets, we: (i) re-annotated the oyster C1qDC loci, thus identifying the correct genomic organization of 337 C1qDC genes, (ii) explored the expression pattern of oyster C1qDC genes in diverse developmental stages and adult tissues of unchallenged and experimentally treated animals; (iii) investigated the expansion of the C1qDC gene family in all major bivalve subclasses. Overall, we provide a broad description of the functionally relevant features of oyster C1qDC genes, their comparative expression levels and new evidence confirming that a gene family expansion event has occurred during the course of Bivalve evolution, leading to the diversification of hundreds of different C1qDC genes in both the Pteriomorphia and Heterodonta subclasses.

  2. Sex-linked mitochondrial behavior during early embryo development in Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia Veneridae) a species with the Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Passamonti, Marco

    2012-05-01

    In most metazoans mitochondria are inherited maternally. However, in some bivalve molluscs, two mitochondrial lineages are present: one transmitted through females (F-type), the other through males (M-type). This unique system is called Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) of mitochondria. In DUI species, M-type mitochondria have to invade the germ line of male embryos during development, otherwise sperm would transmit F-type mtDNA and DUI would fail. The mechanisms by which sperm mitochondria enter the germ line are still unknown. To address this question, we traced the movement of spermatozoon mitochondria (M-type) in embryos of the DUI species Ruditapes philippinarum by fertilizing eggs with sperm stained with the mitochondrial-specific vital dye MitoTracker Green. As in Mytilus DUI species, in R. philippinarum the distribution of sperm mitochondria follows two different patterns: an aggregated one in which these organelles locate near the first cleavage furrow, and a dispersed one in which sperm mitochondria are scattered. The presence of the two mitochondrial patterns in these taxa, together with their absence in species with Strictly Maternal Inheritance (SMI), confirms that their occurrence is related to DUI. Moreover, a Real-Time qPCR analysis showed that neither M-type nor F-type mitochondria undergo replication boosts in the earliest embryo development. This is the first study on sex-linked mtDNA copy number carried out by qPCR analysis on embryos of a DUI species and the first time the segregation patterns of sperm mitochondria are described in a DUI system other than Mytilus.

  3. Survival of glochidial larvae of the freshwater pearl mussel, Margaritifera laevis (Bivalvia: Unionoida), at different temperatures: a comparison between two populations with and without recruitment.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Iwakuma, Toshio

    2007-09-01

    The viability of free-living glochidia of the freshwater pearl mussel (Margaritifera laevis) was studied in the laboratory at water temperatures of 10 degrees C, 15 degrees C and 20 degrees C. To obtain glochidia, gravid female mussels were collected from the Chitose River, inhabited by adult and juvenile mussels, and from the Abira River, where only adult mussels were found. Daily survival rates of glochidia from each population at various water temperatures were significantly different, and survival time was longest at the lowest temperature in each population. Maintenance of some field mussel populations might become difficult at higher water temperatures due to the short survival time of glochidia and expected low density of host fish. Daily survival rates of glochidia were compared between the Abira population at 15 degrees C and the Chitose population at 20 degrees C, since these temperatures were close to the mean water temperature during the period of glochidial release in the respective rivers. Daily mean survival rates were significantly different between the Abira population at 15 degrees C and the Chitose population at 20 degrees C. Mean glochidial survival rate for the Chitose population changed from 85.3% to 66.2% from 9 to 13 h, whereas that for the Abira population dropped suddenly from 80.4% to 34.2% from 10 to 14 h after the initiation of experiment. Absence of juveniles in the Abira River might have been caused by the low glochidial viability. Survival times of free-living glochidia in Margaritiferidae tend to be shorter than in other families in Unionoida. A trade-off is suggested between high fertility and low glochidial survival rate in Margaritiferidae.

  4. Temporal Changes in Gametogenesis of the Invasive Chinese Pond Mussel Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) (Bivalvia: Unionidae) from the Konin Lakes System (Central Poland).

    PubMed

    Hliwa, Piotr; Zdanowski, Bogusław; Dietrich, Grzegorz J; Andronowska, Aneta; Król, Jarosław; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Gametogenesis and the temporal changes occurring in the ovaries and testes throughout the reproductive cycle in the invasive alien bivalve, Chinese pond mussel Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea), from the heated Konin lakes system (central Poland) were studied using histological techniques. S. woodiana was confirmed to be a gonochoristic species with overall sex ratio of 1:1. The examined morphological parameters of Chinese pond mussel spermatozoa, i.e. 42 μm mean total length; 4.3 μm mean head length and the maximum size of previtellogenic (34-43 μm) and vitellogenic oocytes (75-83 μm) are consistent with values established for closely related members of the Unionidae family. Our results suggest that S. woodiana in the Konin lakes system are able to spawn throughout March to October, with a season of higher reproductive activity in females extending from March to April. This type of reproductive biology may contribute to the Chinese pond mussel's success in thriving in freshwater ecosystems.

  5. [Effect of excretion-secretion products of some fouling species on the biochemical parameters of blue mussel Mytilus edulis L. (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the White Sea].

    PubMed

    Skidchenko, V S; Vysotskaia, R U; Krupnova, M Iu; Khalaman, V V

    2011-01-01

    The effect of excretion-secretion products (ESP) of five abundant fouling invertebrate species (bivalve mollusks Hiatella arctica and Mytilus edulis, solitary ascidia Styela rustica, sponge Halichondria panicea, and sea starAsterias rubens, inhabiting the White Sea) on the biochemical status of blue mussel M. edulis was assessed by the dynamics of lysosomal enzymes activity (nucleases, glycoside hydrolases, and cathepsins). ESP of conspecific species had no effect on the metabolism of the mollusks of this species. ESP of A. rubens, S. rustica, and H. panicea activated the same enzymes. First, acid RNase and glycoside hydrolases activity increased, but in different ways. The metabolites of H. arctica affected the activity of proteometabolism enzymes.

  6. Gender-Associated Mitochondrial DNA Heteroplasmy in Somatic Tissues of the Endangered Freshwater Mussel Unio crassus (Bivalvia: Unionidae): Implications for Sex Identification and Phylogeographical Studies.

    PubMed

    Mioduchowska, Monika; Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Zając, Katarzyna; Zając, Tadeusz; Sell, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Some bivalve species possess two independent mitochondrial DNA lineages: maternally (F-type) and paternally (M-type) inherited. This phenomenon is called doubly uniparental inheritance. It is generally agreed that F-type mtDNA is typically present in female somatic and gonadal tissues as well as in male somatic tissues, whereas the M-type mtDNA occurs only in male germ line and gonadal tissue. In the present study, the mtDNA heteroplasmy (for both F and M genomes) in male somatic tissues of Unio crassus (Philipsson, 1788), species threatened with extinction, has been confirmed. Taking advantage from the presence of Mcox1 marker only in male somatic tissues, we developed a new method of sex identification in this endangered species, using nondestructive tissue sampling. Probability of correct sex identification was estimated at 97.5%. The present study is the first report on gender-associated mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in male somatic tissues of thick-shelled river mussel and first approach to U. crassus sex identification at molecular level. Our study also confirmed the utility of paternally inherited Mcox1 gene fragment as a complementary molecular tool for resolving phylogeographical relationships among populations of thick-shelled river mussel.

  7. Incongruence between mtDNA and nuclear data in the freshwater mussel genus Cyprogenia (Bivalvia: Unionidae) and its impact on species delineation.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jer Pin; Harris, John L; Roe, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    Accurately identifying species is a crucial step for developing conservation strategies for freshwater mussels, one of the most imperiled faunas in North America. This study uses genetic data to re-examine species delineation in the genus Cyprogenia. Historically, Cyprogenia found west of the Mississippi River have been ascribed to Cyprogenia aberti (Conrad 1850), and those east of the Mississippi River were classified as Cyprogenia stegaria (Rafinesque 1820). Previous studies using mitochondrial DNA sequences indicated that C. aberti and C. stegaria were not reciprocally monophyletic groups, suggesting the need for systematic revision. We generated a novel dataset consisting of 10 microsatellite loci and combined it with sequence data from the mitochondrial ND1 gene for 223 Cyprogenia specimens. Bayesian analysis of the ND1 nucleotide sequences identified two divergent clades that differ by 15.9%. Members of these two clades occur sympatrically across most sampling locations. In contrast, microsatellite genotypes support recognition of three allopatric clusters defined by major hydrologic basins. The divergent mitochondrial lineages are highly correlated with the color of the conglutinate lures used by mussels to attract and infest host fishes, and tests for selection at the ND1 locus were positive. We infer that the incongruence between mtDNA and microsatellite data in Cyprogenia may be the result of a combination of incomplete lineage sorting and balancing selection on lure color. Our results provide further evidence that mitochondrial markers are not always neutral with respect to selection, and highlight the potential problems of relying on a single-locus-marker for delineating species.

  8. Genetic relationships among freshwater mussel species from fifteen Amazonian rivers and inferences on the evolution of the Hyriidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionida).

    PubMed

    Santos-Neto, Guilherme da Cruz; Beasley, Colin Robert; Schneider, Horacio; Pimpão, Daniel Mansur; Hoeh, Walter Randolph; Simone, Luiz Ricardo Lopes de; Tagliaro, Claudia Helena

    2016-07-01

    The current phylogenetic framework for the South American Hyriidae is solely based on morphological data. However, freshwater bivalve morphology is highly variable due to both genetic and environmental factors. The present study used both mitochondrial (COI and 16S) and nuclear (18S-ITS1) sequences in molecular phylogenetic analyses of nine Neotropical species of Hyriidae, collected from 15 South American rivers, and sequences of hyriids from Australia and New Zealand obtained from GenBank. The present molecular findings support traditional taxonomic proposals, based on morphology, for the South American subfamily Hyriinae, currently divided in three tribes: Hyriini, Castaliini and Rhipidodontini. Phylogenetic trees based on COI nucleotide sequences revealed at least four geographical groups of Castalia ambigua: northeast Amazon (Piriá, Tocantins and Caeté rivers), central Amazon, including C. quadrata (Amazon and Aripuanã rivers), north (Trombetas river), and C. ambigua from Peru. Genetic distances suggest that some specimens may be cryptic species. Among the Hyriini, a total evidence data set generated phylogenetic trees indicating that Paxyodon syrmatophorus and Prisodon obliquus are more closely related, followed by Triplodon corrugatus. The molecular clock, based on COI, agreed with the fossil record of Neotropical hyriids. The ancestor of both Australasian and Neotropical Hyriidae is estimated to have lived around 225million years ago.

  9. [Effect of copper ions on spatial density of NO-synthase-positive cells in the intestine of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Mytilidae) a histochemical study].

    PubMed

    Pimenova, E A

    2010-01-01

    By the histochemical method of detection of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) (EC 1.6.99.1) the state of nitroxidergic enteric nervous system of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus was studied under conditions of an increased copper concentration in water. Under the action of copper ions the density of distribution of NADPH-d-positive cells has been established to be changed as compared with control throughout 28 days. A sharp rise of proportion of the labeled cells and their enzyme activity was noted after one day of the experiment. The labeled bipolar cells were of dark blue color and were located within the epithelium. There were revealed numerous nerve fibers penetrating the intestinal epithelium throughout its entire length as well as bipolar nerve cells in epithelium of the minor typhlosole and of crystalline style sac; in control molluscs the NADPH-d-positive cells in these parts were absent. After 7 days the difference between control and experimental decreased and remained at this level after 14 days, while after 21 days of exposition the proportion of labeled cells in the experimental mussels was lower than in control, but increased again after 28 days. It is suggested that nitric oxide is an important protective factor of the intestinal epithelium of the mussel C. grayanus and participates in adaptation of this mollusc to action of the elevated concentration of copper ions in water.

  10. The complete maternally and paternally inherited mitochondrial genomes of the endangered freshwater mussel Solenaia carinatus (Bivalvia: Unionidae) and implications for Unionidae taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Chen; Rong, Jun; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Wan, Yuan; Ouyang, Shan; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) is an exception to the typical maternal inheritance of mitochondrial (mt) DNA in Metazoa, and found only in some bivalves. In species with DUI, there are two highly divergent gender-associated mt genomes: maternal (F) and paternal (M), which transmit independently and show different tissue localization. Solenaia carinatus is an endangered freshwater mussel species exclusive to Poyang Lake basin, China. Anthropogenic events in the watershed greatly threaten the survival of this species. Nevertheless, the taxonomy of S. carinatus based on shell morphology is confusing, and the subfamilial placement of the genus Solenaia remains unclear. In order to clarify the taxonomic status and discuss the phylogenetic implications of family Unionidae, the entire F and M mt genomes of S. carinatus were sequenced and compared with the mt genomes of diverse freshwater mussel species. The complete F and M mt genomes of S. carinatus are 16716 bp and 17102 bp in size, respectively. The F and M mt genomes of S. carinatus diverge by about 40% in nucleotide sequence and 48% in amino acid sequence. Compared to F counterparts, the M genome shows a more compact structure. Different gene arrangements are found in these two gender-associated mt genomes. Among these, the F genome cox2-rrnS gene order is considered to be a genome-level synapomorphy for female lineage of the subfamily Gonideinae. From maternal and paternal mtDNA perspectives, the phylogenetic analyses of Unionoida indicate that S. carinatus belongs to Gonideinae. The F and M clades in freshwater mussels are reciprocal monophyly. The phylogenetic trees advocate the classification of sampled Unionidae species into four subfamilies: Gonideinae, Ambleminae, Anodontinae, and Unioninae, which is supported by the morphological characteristics of glochidia.

  11. Molecular resolution of the family Dreissenidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) with emphasis on Ponto-Caspian species, including first report of Mytilopsis leucophaeata in the Black Sea basin.

    PubMed

    Therriault, Thomas W; Docker, Margaret F; Orlova, Marina I; Heath, Daniel D; MacIsaac, Hugh J

    2004-03-01

    Considerable uncertainty exists in determination of the phylogeny among extant members of the Dreissenidae, especially those inhabiting the Ponto-Caspian basin, as multiple systematic revisions based on morphological characteristics have failed to resolve relationships within this group of bivalves. In this study we use DNA sequence analyses of two mitochondrial gene fragments, 16S rRNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), to determine phylogenetic relationships among Dreissena rostriformis, D. bugensis, D. polymorpha, D. stankovici, Congeria kusceri, and Mytilopsis leucophaeata. Dreissena stankovici was determined to represent a sister taxa to D. polymorpha and both are more closely related to other extant Dreissena species than Congeria or Mytilopsis. Sequence divergence between D. rostriformis and D. bugensis was relatively low (0.3-0.4%), suggesting that these two taxa constitute a single species. However, environmental differences suggest two races of D. rostriformis, a brackish water race (rostriformis) and a freshwater race (bugensis). Spread of bugensis-type individuals into habitats in the Caspian Sea that are occupied by rostriformis-type individuals may create novel hybridization opportunities. Species-specific molecular markers also were developed in this study since significant intraspecific variation in morphological features complicates dreissenid identification. Using two gene fragments (nuclear 28S and 16S), we identified restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) that distinguish among D. rostriformis/bugensis, D. polymorpha, and D. stankovici and revealed the presence of a cryptic invader to the Black Sea basin, Mytilopsis leucophaeata. This is the first report of this North American native in southern Europe.

  12. Growth, Survival and Reproduction of the Giant Clam Tridacna maxima (Röding 1798, Bivalvia) in Two Contrasting Lagoons in French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Van Wynsberge, Simon; Andréfouët, Serge; Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila; Wabnitz, Colette C C; Menoud, Mathilde; Le Moullac, Gilles; Levy, Peva; Gilbert, Antoine; Remoissenet, Georges

    2017-01-01

    Shell growth, reproduction, and natural mortality of the giant clam Tridacna maxima were characterized over a two-year-period in the lagoon of the high island of Tubuai (Austral Archipelago) and in the semi-closed lagoon of Tatakoto (Tuamotu Archipelago) in French Polynesia. We also recorded temperature, water level, tidal slope, tidal range, and mean wave height in both lagoons. Lower lagoon aperture and exposure to oceanic swells at Tatakoto than at Tubuai was responsible for lower lagoon water renewal, as well as higher variability in temperature and water level at Tatakoto across the studied period. These different environmental conditions had an impact on giant clams. Firstly, spawning events in the lagoon of Tatakoto, detected by gonad maturity indices in June and July 2014, were timed with high oceanic water inflow and a decrease in lagoon water temperature. Secondly, temperature explained differences in shell growth rates between seasons and lagoons, generating different growth curves for the two sites. Thirdly, local mortality rates were also found to likely be related to water renewal patterns. In conclusion, our study suggests that reef aperture and lagoon water renewal rates play an integral role in giant clam life history, with significant differences in rates of shell growth, mortality and fertility found between open versus semi-closed atoll lagoons in coral reef ecosystems.

  13. Planktivory by alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) on microcrustacean zooplankton and dreissenid (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae) veligers in southern Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, Edward L.; O'Gorman, Robert; Roseman, Edward F.; Adams, Connie; Owens, Randall W.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the diet of young-of-the-year and adult alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) in nearshore waters coincident with the colonization of Lake Ontario by Dreissena. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicated that alewife and rainbow smelt consumed dreissenid veligers and that the veligers remained intact and identifiable in the digestive tract for several hours. Dreissenid larvae were found in field-caught alewife and rainbow smelt in August 1992, even though veliger densities were low (<0.1/L). Zooplankton dominated the diet of all fish and veliger larvae were <0.1% of the biomass of prey eaten by these fish. Density of veligers and the distribution of settled dreissenids declined from west to east along the south shore of Lake Ontario. Based on veliger consumption rates we measured and the abundance of veligers and planktivores, we conclude that planktivory by alewife and smelt in the nearshore waters of Lake Ontario did not substantially reduce the number of veligers during 1991–1993. However, our results indicate that if the density of veligers in Lake Ontario decreases, and if planktivores remain abundant, planktivory on veliger populations could be significant.

  14. An attempt to extend the Habitat Harshness Hypothesis to tidal flats: A case study of Anomalocardia brasiliana (Bivalvia: Veneridae) reproductive biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte, Guilherme Nascimento; Yokoyama, Leonardo Querobim; Amaral, A. Cecília Z.

    2014-10-01

    The Habitat Harshness Hypothesis (HHH) predicts that populations inhabiting the intertidal area of a dissipative beach should produce more gametes and have a longer reproductive cycle than those inhabiting an intermediate or reflective beach. This hypothesis was proposed for the exposed morphodynamic continuum between the reflective and dissipative states; however, no attempt has been made thus far to verify whether the HHH is valid for tidal flats. In this study, we analysed the reproductive cycle of Anomalocardia brasiliana in an intermediate beach and in a tidal flat and compared the results to determine whether the reproductive cycles of A. brasiliana were in agreement with the predictions of the HHH and to examine the possibility of extending this hypothesis to tidal flats. A continuous spawning season and synchrony between sexes were observed at both sites, although the reproductive effort was higher in the intermediate beach. The results of this first attempt did not support the extension of the HHH to tidal flats. It is possible that hypotheses that take into account only physical variables may not be the most adequate for describing environments with such a high species richness and high abundance as tidal flats. Nevertheless, other studies are necessary to confidently expand or refute the HHH with regard to tidal flats, and this topic should be considered as a priority in future investigations in sandy beach ecology.

  15. Growth, Survival and Reproduction of the Giant Clam Tridacna maxima (Röding 1798, Bivalvia) in Two Contrasting Lagoons in French Polynesia

    PubMed Central

    Van Wynsberge, Simon; Andréfouët, Serge; Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila; Wabnitz, Colette C. C.; Menoud, Mathilde; Le Moullac, Gilles; Levy, Peva; Gilbert, Antoine; Remoissenet, Georges

    2017-01-01

    Shell growth, reproduction, and natural mortality of the giant clam Tridacna maxima were characterized over a two-year-period in the lagoon of the high island of Tubuai (Austral Archipelago) and in the semi-closed lagoon of Tatakoto (Tuamotu Archipelago) in French Polynesia. We also recorded temperature, water level, tidal slope, tidal range, and mean wave height in both lagoons. Lower lagoon aperture and exposure to oceanic swells at Tatakoto than at Tubuai was responsible for lower lagoon water renewal, as well as higher variability in temperature and water level at Tatakoto across the studied period. These different environmental conditions had an impact on giant clams. Firstly, spawning events in the lagoon of Tatakoto, detected by gonad maturity indices in June and July 2014, were timed with high oceanic water inflow and a decrease in lagoon water temperature. Secondly, temperature explained differences in shell growth rates between seasons and lagoons, generating different growth curves for the two sites. Thirdly, local mortality rates were also found to likely be related to water renewal patterns. In conclusion, our study suggests that reef aperture and lagoon water renewal rates play an integral role in giant clam life history, with significant differences in rates of shell growth, mortality and fertility found between open versus semi-closed atoll lagoons in coral reef ecosystems. PMID:28118406

  16. Morphological and genetic variation in North Atlantic giant file clams, Acesta spp. (Bivalvia: Limidae), with description of a new cryptic species in the northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Jean-Marc; Kenchington, Ellen; Port, Antony; Anstey, Lynne J; Murillo, Francisco Javier

    2015-08-27

    We analyze the morphological and genetic variability within and between seven species of Acesta and specimens recently collected in the northwest Atlantic using traditional morphological measurements, landmark-based geometric morphometrics, and the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences, with particular emphasis on North Atlantic species. Shell morphology and external shell appearance do not allow reliable distinction between the widely recognized northeastern Atlantic A. excavata and other northwest Atlantic species or populations of Acesta, with the exception of A. oophaga. Similarly, shape analysis reveals a wide variability within northeastern Atlantic A. excavata, and significant morphological overlap with A. bullisi from the Gulf of Mexico and A. rathbuni from the southwestern Pacific and South China Sea. Specimens from the northwestern and Mid-Atlantic display shell shapes marginally similar to that of A. excavata. These differences are at least partly related to anterior or posterior shifting of the shell body and to the opposite shifting of the hinge line/dorsal region and upper lunule. These morphological variations, along with the midline-width-ratio, explain much of the variability extracted by principal component analysis. Results from a mitochondrial DNA barcode approach (COI), however, suggest that the northwest Atlantic specimens belong to a new species for which we propose the name Acesta cryptadelphe sp. nov. Differences in larval shell sizes between northeastern and northwestern Atlantic specimens are consistent with this result.

  17. Scorched mussels (Brachidontes spp., Bivalvia: Mytilidae) from the tropical and warm-temperate southwestern Atlantic: the role of the Amazon River in their speciation.

    PubMed

    Trovant, Berenice; Basso, Néstor G; Orensanz, José María; Lessa, Enrique P; Dincao, Fernando; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2016-03-01

    Antitropicality is a distribution pattern where closely related taxa are separated by an intertropical latitudinal gap. Two potential examples include Brachidontes darwinianus (south eastern Brazil to Uruguay), considered by some authors as a synonym of B. exustus (Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean), and B. solisianus, distributed along the Brazilian coast with dubious records north of the intertropical zone. Using two nuclear (18S and 28S rDNA) and one mitochondrial gene (mtDNA COI), we aimed to elucidate the phylogeographic and phylogenetic relationships among the scorched mussels present in the warm-temperate region of the southwest Atlantic. We evaluated a divergence process mediated by the tropical zone over alternative phylogeographic hypotheses. Brachidontes solisianus was closely related to B. exustus I, a species with which it exhibits an antitropical distribution. Their divergence time was approximately 2.6 Ma, consistent with the intensification of Amazon River flow. Brachidontes darwinianus, an estuarine species is shown here not to be related to this B. exustus complex. We suspect ancestral forms may have dispersed from the Caribbean to the Atlantic coast via the Trans-Amazonian seaway (Miocene). The third species, B rodriguezii is presumed to have a long history in the region with related fossil forms going back to the Miocene. Although scorched mussels are very similar in appearance, their evolutionary histories are very different, involving major historical contingencies as the formation of the Amazon River, the Panama Isthmus, and the last marine transgression.

  18. An annually-resolved palaeoenvironmental archive for the Eastern Boundary North Atlantic upwelling system: Sclerochronology of Glycymeris glycymeris (Bivalvia) shells from the Iberian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Pedro; Monteiro, Carlos; Butler, Paul; Reynolds, David; Richardson, Christopher; Gaspar, Miguel; Scourse, James

    2015-04-01

    The seasonally variable western Iberia upwelling system, albeit placed at a crucial climatic boundary position to record high frequency climate events, lacks well-dated high-resolution records of environmental variability. Bivalve shells provide robust high-resolution archives of oceanographic and climatic variability on timescales of decades to millennia. In particular, the North Atlantic Ocean region has recently seen several noteworthy sclerochronological and geochemical reconstructions based on bivalve shells (mainly Arctica islandica) of high frequency oceanographic and climatic conditions during the last millennium. However, due to the absence of Arctica islandica and similarly long-lived bivalves, sclerochronological palaeoenvironmental studies of southern European coastal shelf seas are scarce. In particular, none of these studies focus on reconstructing the variability of an eastern boundary upwelling system. The relatively long-lived bivalve (>100 years) Glycymeris glycymeris occurs in European and North West African coastal shelf seas and provides a valid annually resolved archive of environmental conditions during growth. Annual growth increment width series from living G. glycymeris shells, collected in 2014 on the western Iberian continental shelf (ca. 35 m water depth), were used to construct a statistically robust, ca. 70-year long absolutely-dated chronology. Sub-annually resolved (11 to 22 samples per year) oxygen stable isotope (δ18Oshell) data covering three years of shell growth, together with the direct evaluation of the time of growth mark deposition in shells collected during the autumn and winter months, were used to constrain the season of growth and to evaluate the seasonal bias of the sea-surface temperature signal preserved in the δ18Oshelldata. The growth increment width and δ18Oshell series, once robustly calibrated against modelled and instrumental oceanographic and climatic series, potentially provide novel insights into the variability of the western Iberia upwelling system and the associated mechanisms. This study was financed and conducted in the frame of the Portuguese Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia (FCT) GLYCY Project (contract PTDC/AAC-CLI/118003/2010).

  19. Updated mitochondrial phylogeny of Pteriomorph and Heterodont Bivalvia, including deep-sea chemosymbiotic Bathymodiolus mussels, vesicomyid clams and the thyasirid clam Conchocele cf. bisecta.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Genki; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Ohara, Yasuhiko; Takishita, Kiyotaka; Maruyama, Tadashi; Fujikura, Katsunori; Yoshida, Takao

    2017-02-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of bivalves have often been used for comparative genomics and for resolving phylogenetic relationships. More than 100 bivalve complete mitochondrial genomes have been sequenced to date. However, few mitochondrial genomes have been reported for deep-sea chemosymbiotic bivalves, which belong to the subclasses Pteriomorphia and Heterodonta. In the present study, we sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of eight deep-sea chemosymbiotic bivalve species: three species of Bathymodiolus mussels (B. japonicus, B. platifrons, and B. septemdierum), four species of vesicomyid clams (Abyssogena mariana, A. phaseoliformis, Isorropodon fossajaponicum, and Phreagena okutanii, all of which were formerly classified in the genus Calyptogena), and one species of thyasirid clam (Conchocele cf. bisecta). With a few exceptions, these mitochondrial genomes contained genes that are typical of metazoans: 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes. The major non-coding region with a high A+T content of each genome, which contained tandem repeats and hairpins, was hypothesized to function as a control region. The phylogenetic trees of Pteriomorphia and Heterodonta were reconstructed based on the concatenated sequences of 14 shared genes. Bathymodiolus formed a monophyletic clade with asymbiotic Mytilidae mussels, the vesicomyid clams formed a monophyly that was sister to the Veneridae, and C. cf. bisecta branched basally in the Heterodonta. It is known that the gene orders of mitochondrial genomes vary among bivalves. To examine whether gene order variation exhibits phylogenetic signals, tree topologies based on the minimum number of gene rearrangements were reconstructed for two clades (superfamily Tellinoidea, which includes the Psammobiidae, Semelidae, Solecurtidae, and Tellinidae; and the clade comprising the Myidae, Mactridae, Arcticidae, Vesicomyidae, and Veneridae) with high statistical support in sequence-based phylogenies. The resulting tree topologies were almost identical to those of the sequence-based trees. Our present findings suggest that the evolution of bivalves could be precisely traced back through the analysis of mitochondrial genomes, and that such an analysis could contribute to understanding bivalve evolution and diversity.

  20. Long-term evolution of 5S ribosomal DNA seems to be driven by birth-and-death processes and selection in Ensis razor shells (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Vierna, Joaquín; González-Tizón, Ana M; Martínez-Lage, Andrés

    2009-10-01

    A study of nucleotide sequence variation of 5S ribosomal DNA from six Ensis species revealed that several 5S ribosomal DNA variants, based on differences in their nontranscribed spacers (NTS), occur in Ensis genomes. The 5S rRNA gene was not very polymorphic, compared with the NTS region. The phylogenetic analyses performed showed a between-species clustering of 5S ribosomal DNA variants. Sequence divergence levels between variants were very large, revealing a lack of sequence homogenization. These results strongly suggest that the long-term evolution of Ensis 5S ribosomal DNA is driven by birth-and-death processes and selection.

  1. Genetic Population Structure of Macridiscus multifarius (Mollusca: Bivalvia) on the Basis of Mitochondrial Markers: Strong Population Structure in a Species with a Short Planktonic Larval Stage.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ying Ying; Wu, Chang Wen; Li, Ji Ji

    2015-01-01

    The clam Macridiscus multifarius with a planktonic larval stage of about 10 days is an ecologically and economically important species in the coastal regions of China. In this study, 3 mt-DNA markers (COI, 12S rRNA, and ND1) were used to investigate the population structure and demography of wild M. multifarius populations in 3 coastal localities of the East China Sea (ZS and ZP populations) and Beibu Gulf in the South China Sea (BH population). Sequences of 685 bp in COI, 350 bp in 12S rRNA, and 496 bp in ND1 were determined. High level and significant FST values were obtained among the different localities on the basis of either COI (FST = 0.100-0.444, p < 0.05) or 12S rRNA (FST = 0.199-0.742, p < 0.05) gene, indicating a high degree of genetic differentiation among the populations. FST values were significant but weak for the ND1 gene because it is highly conservative. The median-joining network suggested an obvious genetic differentiation between ZS and BH populations, and the finding is consistent with the results of our demographic analyses using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean. Our study unraveled the extant population genetic structure of M. multifarius and explained the strong population structure of a species with a short planktonic larval stage species; this information could be useful for fishery management measures, including artificial breeding and conservation.

  2. Sediment analysis does not provide a good measure of heavy metal bioavailability to Cerastoderma glaucum (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in confined coastal ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Arjonilla, M.; Gomez-Parra, A. ); Forja, J.M. )

    1994-06-01

    Sediments are considered a sink for metals entering the marine environment, especially in coastal areas. Once in the sediment layer, metals are distributed amongst all different phases of the sediment, governed by physicochemical conditions. One fraction is immobilized due to its incorporation into weakly reactive phases of the sediment; Another fraction may remain weakly bound to organic or mineral phases as sorbed, precipitated, or coprecipitated and complexed forms and can be assimilated by detritivorous and suspension-feeding benthic organisms. Many selective procedures have been suggested for metal extraction from sediments in order to estimate concentrations of fractions which are directly or indirectly available to the biota. The absence of a chemical treatment adequate for accurate quantification of metal bioavailability is well-known. Nevertheless, a good correlation between metal content in some organisms and in the sediment after a specific extraction treatment has sometimes been found so sediments are frequently used as indicators in pollution studies. In this paper, concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Ph and Cd) in the cockle Cerastoderma glaucum, and in sediments at the same sampling locations are compared. C. glaucum is a suspension and deposit feeder, inhabiting a wide range of salinities. The study sampled 8 saltponds in the south of Cadiz Bay, located along a gradient of contamination produced by urban and industrial sewage effluents. The study sought to identify areas with different relative risk from metal pollution, in terms of biological effects and effects on water quality due to natural resuspension of sediments or to human relocation of sediments. C. glaucum was selected because of its wide distribution in the Bay, and also because it has no commercial value. This second fact means that its distribution and growth is not directly affected by man. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Mechanisms and functional morphology associated with metal transport in Mercenaria mercenaria (bivalvia: mollusca): Progress report No. 7 for the contract period 1 September 1985 to 31 December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.E.; Morse, M.P.

    1987-02-04

    Studies on metal transport in the quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria, are reported. Podocytes, a specialized type of cell that functions in ultrafiltration, have been identified in the pericardial glands of the quahog using transmission and scanning electron microscopy raising the question of whether metals may reach the kidney via the primary urine, or whether most metals arrive in the kidney via the blood. The accumulation of /sup 109/Cd in quahog extracellular kidney granules suggests the involvement the kidney cell's lysosomal system in the overall process of metal sequestration. The different patterns of metal interactions observed in the quahog kidney, digestive gland and gill demonstrate that each of these three organs utilizes different mechanisms of metal detoxification and accumulation.

  4. Large Vesicomyidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from cold seeps in the Gulf of Guinea off the coasts of Gabon, Congo and northern Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Cosel, Rudo; Olu, Karine

    2009-12-01

    Two new genera and three new species of large Vesicomyidae are described from cold-seep sites on pockmarks and other sulfide-rich environments in the Gulf of Guinea (tropical east Atlantic) off Gabon, Congo (Brazzaville) and northern Angola, from 500 to 4000 m depth: " Calyptogena" (s.l.) regab n. sp., Wareniconcha (n.g.) guineensis (Thiele and Jaeckel 1931), Elenaconcha guiness n.g. n. sp., and Isorropodon atalantae n. sp. For two other species already taken by the R/V Valdivia in 1898, Calyptogena valdiviae (Thiele and Jaeckel 1931) and Isorropodon striatum (Thiele and Jaeckel 1931) new localities were discovered, and the species are rediscussed. E. guiness n.g. n.sp. is also recorded from off Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania, collected by commercial fishing vessels. The vesicomyid species here treated were encountered in different depth ranges along the Gabon-Congo-Angola margin, between 500 and 4000 m depth, and it was found that, in comparison with the dredge samples taken by the Valdivia expedition off southern Cameroon and off Rio de Oro (both at 2500 m), the same species occur in other depth ranges, in some cases with a vertical difference of more than 1000 m. .That means that the species are not confined to a given depth thought being typical for them and that the characteristics of the biotope are likely to play a major role in the distribution of the vesicomyids associated to cold seeps or other reduced environments along the West African margin.

  5. Occurrence of the cis-4,7,10, trans-13-22:4 fatty acid in the family Pectinidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Kraffe, Edouard; Grall, Jacques; Palacios, Elena; Guerra, Citlali; Soudant, Philippe; Marty, Yanic

    2010-05-01

    The present study aimed to elucidate the effective phylogenetic specificity of distribution of a cis-4,7,10, trans-13-22:4 (22:4(n-9)Delta13trans) among pectinids. For this purpose, we extended the analysis of membrane glycerophospholipids FA composition to 13 species of scallops, covering 11 genera and 7 tribes representatives of the three subfamilies Chlamydinae, Palliolinae and Pectininae and the subgroup Aequipecten. In species belonging to the subfamily Pectininae and the Aequipecten subgroup, 22:4(n-9)Delta13trans was found in substantial amounts, but it was absent in other species belonging to the subfamilies Chlamydinae and Palliolinae. Homologous non-methylene-interrupted (NMI) FA, also hypothesized to differ along phylogenetic lines in bivalves, were totally absent or present only in trace amounts in representatives of the Aequipecten subgroup but ranged from 0.3 to 4.5% of the total FA in Pectinidae, Chlamydinae, and Palliolinae subfamilies. The species-specific occurrence of NMI and 22:4(n-9)Delta13trans FA in membrane lipids of pectinids agrees with the most recent phylogenies based on shell morphology and molecular characteristics. We examined the potential timing of the appearance of 22:4(n-9)Delta13trans in pectinids on a geologic time scale.

  6. Characterisation of 12 microsatellite loci in the Vietnamese commercial clam Lutraria rhynchaena Jonas 1844 (Heterodonta: Bivalvia: Mactridae) through next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Thai, Binh Thanh; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Gan, Han Ming; Tran, Trang Thi; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    The marine clam Lutraria rhynchaena is gaining popularity as an aquaculture species in Asia. Lutraria populations are present in the wild throughout Vietnam and several stocks have been established and translocated for breeding and aquaculture grow-out purposes. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of utilising Illumina next-generation sequencing technology to streamline the identification and genotyping of microsatellite loci from this clam species. Based on an initial partial genome scan, 48 microsatellite markers with similar melting temperatures were identified and characterised. The 12 most suitable polymorphic loci were then genotyped using 51 individuals from a population in Quang Ninh Province, North Vietnam. Genetic variation was low (mean number of alleles per locus = 2.6; mean expected heterozygosity = 0.41). Two loci showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and the presence of null alleles, but there was no evidence of linkage disequilibrium among loci. Three additional populations were screened (n = 7-36) to test the geographic utility of the 12 loci, which revealed 100 % successful genotyping in two populations from central Vietnam (Nha Trang). However, a second population from north Vietnam (Co To) could not be successfully genotyped and morphological evidence and mitochondrial variation suggests that this population represents a cryptic species of Lutraria. Comparisons of the Qang Ninh and Nha Trang populations, excluding the 2 loci out of HWE, revealed statistically significant allelic variation at 4 loci. We reported the first microsatellite loci set for the marine clam Lutraria rhynchaena and demonstrated its potential in differentiating clam populations. Additionally, a cryptic species population of Lutraria rhynchaena was identified during initial loci development, underscoring the overlooked diversity of marine clam species in Vietnam and the need to genetically characterise population representatives prior to microsatellite development. The rapid identification and validation of microsatellite loci using next-generation sequencing technology warrant its integration into future microsatellite loci development for key aquaculture species in Vietnam and more generally, aquaculture countries in the South East Asia region.

  7. Temporal variation in life-history traits of the clam Tivela mactroides (Bivalvia: Veneridae): Density-dependent processes in sandy beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turra, Alexander; Petracco, Marcelo; Amaral, A. Cecilia Z.; Denadai, Márcia R.

    2014-10-01

    Temporal variation in the structure and dynamics of a population of Tivela mactroides was examined over two periods (2003-2004 and 2007-2008) in the southern part of Caraguatatuba Bay, southeastern Brazil. During the first period from January 2003 to October 2004, sampling was conducted monthly. Sampling in the second period was performed in the summer (January and February 2007 and 2008) and winter (July and August 2007 and 2008). The von Bertalanffy growth function was applied to estimate growth parameters for both periods from length-frequency distributions. Production was determined using the mass-specific growth rate method. Results indicated that the mean abundance (±SE) of T. mactroides varied sharply between the two periods, with an increase of almost 150 times from 2003 to 2004 (8.67·102 ± 0.83·102 ind m-1) to 2007-2008 (1.25·105 ± 3.33·104 ind m-1). The higher abundance in the second period was related to successful recruitment events. While the mean biomass and the production were higher in the second (5.43 ± 0.87 kg AFDM m-1 and 7.89 kg AFDM m-1 yr-1) than in the first period (0.18 ± 0.02 kg AFDM m-1 and 0.18 kg AFDM m-1 yr-1), lower values of shell length, curvature parameter, asymptotic length of the VBGF, and the growth index phi-prime in 2007-2008 (17.57 ± 1.35 mm; K = 0.40 yr-1; L∞ = 38.60 mm, ϕ‧ = 2.78) than in 2003-2004 (26.21 ± 1.21 mm; K = 1.00 yr-1; L∞ = 40.75 mm, ϕ‧ = 3.22) were related to a strongly density-dependent growth process in the second period. The oscillation in growth observed in the second, but not in the first period also indicates a process of density-dependent growth. These sharp temporal variations in population parameters of T. mactroides suggest the occurrence of density-dependent processes, and reinforce the importance of these processes in structuring sandy-beach populations.

  8. Filter-feeding, food utilization, and nutrient remineralization by Corbicula fluminea (bivalvia) and its contribution to nutrient cycling in a North Carolina River

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    The introduced Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea is quite prolific, and since it is a filter-feeder, it can be expected to influence the cycling of nutrients within its habitat as a result of its feeding and excretory activities. Factors affecting filtration rates, food utilization, and excretion of metabolic wastes (ammonia and phosphate) were determined by laboratory experiments, and these physiological processes were then extrapolated to field estimates of Corbicula found in the upper Chowan River, N.C., to obtain an estimate of the potential impact the clams can have on nutrient cycling in the river. Clam filtration rates of four different /sup 14/C-labeled algae species (two greens, a blue-green, and a diatom) were similar, although partitioning of the ingested isotope showed significant differences between the algal foods. The diatom species was the most efficiently utilized by the clams, with more than 80% of the isotope ingested recovered in clam tissues. Corbicula freshly collected from the Chowan River excreted substantially more ammonia than phosphate, and rates of excretion of both nutrients were highest in summer. Clam excretion rates were much higher than sediment fluxes, and as a source of recycled nutrients, these clams could provide about one third of the nitrogen and phosphate requirements of the phytoplankton in the upper Chowan.

  9. Genomic in situ hybridization identifies parental chromosomes in hybrid scallop (Bivalvia, Pectinoida, Pectinidae) between female Chlamys farreri and male Argopecten irradians irradians

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoting; Bi, Ke; Lu, Wei; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Interspecific crossing was artificially carried out between Chlamys farreri (Jones & Preston, 1904) ♀ and Argopecten irradians irradians (Lamarck, 1819) ♂, two of the dominant cultivated scallop species in China. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to examine the chromosome constitution and variation in hybrids at early embryonic stage. The number of chromosomes in 66.38% of the metaphases was 2n = 35 and the karyotype was 2n = 3 m + 5 sm + 16 st + 11 t. After GISH, two parental genomes were clearly distinguished in hybrids, most of which comprised 19 chromosomes derived from their female parent (Chlamys farreri) and 16 chromosomes from their male parent (Argopecten irradians irradians). Some chromosome elimination and fragmentation was also observed in the hybrids. PMID:26140161

  10. Chromosomal mapping of rRNA genes, core histone genes and telomeric sequences in Brachidontes puniceus and Brachidontes rodriguezi (Bivalvia, Mytilidae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromosome rearrangements are an important part of the speciation process in many taxa. The study of chromosome evolution in bivalves is hampered by the absence of clear chromosomal banding patterns and the similarity in both chromosome size and morphology. For this reason, obtaining good chromosome markers is essential for reliable karyotypic comparisons. To begin this task, the chromosomes of the mussels Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi were studied by means of fluorochrome staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi both have 2n = 32 chromosomes but differing karyotype composition. Vertebrate-type telomeric sequences appear at both ends of every single chromosome. B. puniceus presents a single terminal major rRNA gene cluster on a chromosome pair while B. rodriguezi shows two. Both mussels present two 5S rDNA and two core histone gene clusters intercalary located on the long arms of two chromosome pairs. Double and triple-FISH experiments demonstrated that one of the 5S rDNA and one of the major rDNA clusters appear on the same chromosome pair in B. rodriguezi but not in B. puniceus. On the other hand, the second 5S rDNA cluster is located in one of the chromosome pairs also bearing one of the core histone gene clusters in the two mussel species. Conclusion Knowledge of the chromosomal distribution of these sequences in the two species of Brachidontes is a first step in the understanding of the role of chromosome changes on bivalve evolution. PMID:21143946

  11. Integrated Use of Biomarkers (O : N Ratio and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition) on Aulacomya ater (Molina, 1782) (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) as a Criteria for Effects of Organophosphate Pesticide Exposition

    PubMed Central

    Führer, Eduardo; Rudolph, Anny; Espinoza, Claudio; Díaz, Rodrigo; Gajardo, Marisol; Camaño, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    The effect of residual concentrations of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (Lorsban 4E) on the activity of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme and oxygen : nitrogen ratio in the mussel Aulacomya ater was analyzed. Toxicity tests show a sensitivity to the pesticide in the bivalve estimated at 16 μg L−1 (LC50−96 hours). Concentrations between 0.2 and 1.61 μg L−1 were able to inhibit significantly the AChE activity, and concentrations between 0.8 and 1.61 μg L−1 stimulate ammonia excretion and decrease oxygen : ammonia-N (O : N) ratio, with respect to the control group. A. ater proved to be a species sensitive to pesticide exposure and easy to handle in lab conditions. Thus, it is recommended as a bioindicator for use in programs of environmental alertness in the Eastern South Pacific coastal zone. PMID:22619673

  12. First record and description of metacercariae of Curtuteria arguinae n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae), parasite of cockles Cerastoderma edule (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in Arcachon Bay, France.

    PubMed

    Desclaux, Céline; Russell-Pinto, Fernanda; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Bachelet, Guy

    2006-06-01

    A new Himasthlinae species, Curtuteria arguinae, is described as metacercariae from the cockle Cerastoderma edule (L.), collected at Banc d'Arguin (southwestern France). These metacercariae encysted preferentially in the mantle and also in the foot of cockles. Encysted and chemically excysted metacercariae were studied by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Excysted metacercariae were elongated and curved ventrally. They bore a 33-spine circumoral collar. Sensory papillae were arranged around the oral sucker and also symmetrically along the ventral surface body, from the collar to the acetabulum. The dorsal and ventral tegument surfaces were densely packed with similar pointed spines. The posterior end of the body was without any spines. Among the Curtuteria species described previously, only Curtuteria haematopodis Smogorjewskaja and Iskova, 1966 had the same number of circumoral collar spines. A 6-yr field survey showed that the cockle population at Banc d'Arguin was subjected to a summer infection of C. arguinae. Curtuteria arguinae phenology of infection is characterized by interannual variability and seasonality (beginning in July-August and maximum in autumn). The first intermediate and final hosts remain unknown.

  13. Bucardium grateloupianum n. sp. from the Lower Miocene of Aquitaine with    taxonomic comments on some fossil species from Europe (Bivalvia, Cardiidae).

    PubMed

    Perna, Rafael La

    2016-10-26

    The genus Bucardium J. E. Gray, 1853 has been widely used in the past literature, either for living and fossil cardiids, but only a single species was known, its type species B. ringens (Bruguière, 1789), living in the tropical waters of West Africa. Another species, from the Lower Miocene of the Aquitaine Basin, turned out to be undescribed, though known since the 19th century. It is herein described as Bucardium grateloupianum n. sp. The genus seems to have always had a low diversity and a tropical distribution. Its disappearance in Europe coincides with the general cooling trend recorded after the Middle Miocene. Several poorly known cardiids from the Lower-Middle Miocene of France and Austria and from the Upper Oligocene of Hungary show closer morphological affinities with the living Cardium indicum Lamarck, 1819, rather than with the genus Bucardium or with Cardium costatum Linnaeus, 1758, the type species of Cardium Linnaeus, 1758. These affinities suggest the need of a systematic reappraisal of the living and fossil species currently assigned to Cardium.

  14. Combined Use of Morphological and Molecular Tools to Resolve Species Mis-Identifications in the Bivalvia The Case of Glycymeris glycymeris and G. pilosa

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Anna; Bušelić, Ivana; Thébault, Julien; Featherstone, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and molecular tools were combined to resolve the misidentification between Glycymeris glycymeris and Glycymeris pilosa from Atlantic and Mediterranean populations. The ambiguous literature on the taxonomic status of these species requires this confirmation as a baseline to studies on their ecology and sclerochronology. We used classical and landmark-based morphometric approaches and performed bivariate and multivariate analyses to test for shell character interactions at the individual and population level. Both approaches generated complementary information. The former showed the shell width to length ratio and the valve asymmetry to be the main discriminant characters between Atlantic and Mediterranean populations. Additionally, the external microsculpture of additional and finer secondary ribs in G. glycymeris discriminates it from G. pilosa. Likewise, landmark-based geometric morphometrics revealed a stronger opisthogyrate beak and prosodetic ligament in G. pilosa than G. glycymeris. Our Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses based on COI and ITS2 genes identified that G. glycymeris and G. pilosa form two separate monophyletic clades with mean interspecific divergence of 11% and 0.9% for COI and ITS2, respectively. The congruent patterns of morphometric analysis together with mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenetic reconstructions indicated the separation of the two coexisting species. The intraspecific divergence occurred during the Eocene and accelerated during the late Pliocene and Pleistocene. Glycymeris pilosa showed a high level of genetic diversity, appearing as a more robust species whose tolerance of environmental conditions allowed its expansion throughout the Mediterranean. PMID:27669452

  15. Megafauna recovered from a cold hydrocarbon seep in the deep Alaskan Beaufort Sea, including a new species of Axinus (Thracidae: Bivalvia: Mollusca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. L.; Valentich-Scott, P.; Lorenson, T. D.; Edwards, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    Several specimens of a new species of Axinus and a single well-worn gastropod columella provisionally assigned to the genus Neptunea (Buccinidae: Gastropoda: Mollusca) were recently recovered from at least two cores, the longest of which is 5.72 m long, from a large seafloor mound, informally named the Canning Seafloor Mound (CSM). The CSM is located at 2,530 m water depth on the Alaskan Beaufort Sea slope north of Camden Bay and is a fluid explosion feature containing methane hydrate and methane-saturated sediments overlying a folded and faulted deep basin. Only two modern species of Axinus are currently known. Axinus grandis (Verrill & Smith, 1885) is a northern Atlantic species and the recently described species, A. cascadiensis Oliver and Holmes (2007), is only known from Baby Bare Seamount, Cascadia Basin, northeastern Pacific Ocean. Common fragments, single valves, and a single articulated specimen represent this new Axinus species. These shells were distributed over nearly the entire length of the primary core. All specimens show wear and (or) dissolution. The age of these specimens is unknown and no living representatives were encountered. The genus Axinus has a fossil record back to the early Eocene in England and the Paleocene and Eocene in Egypt. Biogeographically the genus appears to have originated in the Tethys Sea and became established in the Atlantic Ocean during the Eocene, spreading across the Arctic Ocean in the late Tertiary. With the opening of the Bering Strait in the latest Miocene or early Pliocene the genus Axinus migrated southwest into the northeast Pacific. Interestingly, hydrocarbon seep deposits are also present on the adjacent North Slope of Alaska in the Marsh Anticline at Carter Creek, Camden Bay. These rocks, the Nuwok beds, contain abundant Thracidae bivalve of the genus Thracia, but not Axinus, however the rocks also represent cold seep deposits. These rocks have been variously dated from Oligocene to Pliocene and the exact age remains uncertain. Neptunea are a predatory snails well represented in the earliest Miocene to Holocene of the northern Pacific Ocean and in the late Pliocene to Holocene of the northern Atlantic. The presence of Neptunea at CSM, if identified properly, gives a maximum age for these deposits of latest Miocene or early Pliocene, after the opening of the Bering Strait, although they could be as young as Holocene.

  16. Reproductive traits of the symbiotic pea crab Austinotheres angelicus (Crustacea, Pinnotheridae) living in Saccostrea palmula (Bivalvia, Ostreidae), Pacific coast of Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Moya, Carolina; Mena, Sebastián; Wehrtmann, Ingo S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pea crabs of the family Pinnotheridae exhibit a symbiotic life style and live associated with a variety of different marine organisms, especially bivalves. Despite the fact that pea crabs can cause serious problems in bivalve aquaculture, the available information about the ecology of these crabs from Central America is extremely limited. Therefore, the present study aimed to describe different reproductive features of the pinnotherid crab Austinotheres angelicus associated with the oyster Saccostrea palmula in the Golfo de Nicoya, Pacific coast of Costa Rica. Monthly sampling was conducted from April to December 2012. Average carapace width (CW) of the 47 analyzed ovigerous females was 7.62 mm. The species produced on average 2677 ± 1754 recently -extruded embryos with an average volume of 0.020 ± 0.003 mm3; embryo volume increased during embryogenesis by 21%, but did not vary significantly between developmental stages. Brood mass volume varied greatly (between 11.7 and 236.7 mm3), and increased significantly with female CW. Females invested on average 76.7% (minimum: 21.7%; maximum: 162.8%) of their body weight in brood production, which confirms a substantially higher energy allocation for embryo production in pinnotherid crabs compared to free-living decapods. PMID:25561840

  17. Long-term feeding with Euglena gracilis cells modulates immune responses, oxidative balance and metabolic condition in Diplodon chilensis (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Hyriidae) exposed to living Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Virginia A; Castro, Juan M; Rocchetta, Iara; Nahabedian, Daniel E; Conforti, Visitación; Luquet, Carlos M

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the modulating effect of long-term feeding with lyophilized Euglena gracilis cells on immune response, oxidative balance and metabolic condition of the freshwater mussel Diplodon chilensis. Mussels, previously fed with Scenedesmus vacuolatus (SV) or E. gracilis (EG) for 90 days, were challenged with an environmentally relevant concentration of Escherichia coli in water for 5 days, under feeding or starvation conditions. EG diet increased overall phagocytic activity and tissue hemocyte accumulation (gill and mantle), and favored hemocyte viability upon E. coli challenge. Tissular hemocyte accumulation, and humoral bacteriolytic activity and protein content were similarly stimulated by EG and E. coli, with no further effect when both stimuli were combined. Both, E. coli challenge and EG diet reduced gill bacteriolytic activity with respect to nonchallenged SV mussels, while no effect was observed in challenged EG mussels. Gill and digestive gland protein contents, along with digestive gland bacteriolytic activity were higher in EG than in SV mussels. Both SV and EG mussels showed increased gill mass upon E. coli challenge, while digestive gland mass was increased by bacterial challenge only in SV mussels. Bacterial challenge produced no effect on humoral reactive oxygen species levels of both groups. Total oxyradical scavenging capacity levels was reduced in challenged SV mussels but remained unaffected in EG ones. In general, EG diet decreased glutathione S-transferase and catalase activities in gill and digestive gland, compared with SV diet; but increased enzyme activity was evident in challenged mussels of both groups. Gill and digestive gland lipid peroxidation levels were higher in EG than in SV mussels but E. coli challenge had stronger effect on SV mussels. Adductor muscle RNA:DNA ratio was higher in EG mussels than in SV ones, and increased upon E. coli challenge in mussels of both groups. E. gracilis can be suggested as a nutritional and protective diet complement suitable for filtering bivalves. However, our results obtained from starved mussels show that starvation periods after supplying this diet should be avoided, since these could revert part of the acquired benefits and/or exacerbate detrimental effects.

  18. Where’s Waldo? A new commensal species, Waldo arthuri (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Galeommatidae), from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Valentich-Scott, Paul; Ó Foighil, Diarmaid; Li, Jingchun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A galeommatid bivalve mollusk, representing a new species, is described from off the coasts of California and Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The new bivalve has a commensal relationship with the heart urchin, Brisaster latifrons. It has been observed crawling between the oral spines of this urchin, frequently near the peristome. The bivalve has been recorded from 80 (Vancouver Island) to 444 (southern California) meters depth, in muddy sediments. In common with other galeommatoideans, the new species broods its young; however it differs from the large majority of commensal members in lacking planktotrophic larval development. Waldo arthuri, new species, has multiple morphological, ecological and developmental similarities to other members of the genus Waldo Nicol, 1966, from the southern Atlantic and Antarctic Oceans. This is most pronounced for the Argentine species, Waldo paucitentaculatus Zelaya & Ituarte, 2013, Waldo arthuri’s sister speciesin nuclear and mitochondrial gene trees. Despite this close relationship, Waldo arthuri is phylogentically distinct and possesses several hinge, shell sculpture, foot, and mantle tentacle characteristics that merit its description as new. PMID:23878515

  19. Pleurolucina from the western Atlantic and eastern Pacific Oceans: a new intertidal species from Curaçao with unusual shell microstructure (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Emily A.; Taylor, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new shallow water species of the lucinid bivalve Pleurolucina is described from Curaçao in the southern Caribbean Sea and compared with known species of the genus from the western Atlantic and eastern Pacific Oceans. Although confused with the Floridian species Pleurolucina leucocyma, it is most similar to the eastern Pacific Pleurolucina undata. As in all studied lucinids, the new species possesses symbiotic bacteria housed in the ctenidia. The shell microstructure is unusual with repeated and intercalated conchiolin layers that have sublayers of ‘tulip-shaped’ calcareous spherules. Predatory drillings by naticid gastropods frequently terminate at the conchiolin layers. PMID:27853404

  20. In vivo effects of brown tide on the feeding function of the gill of the northern quahog Mercenaria mercenaria (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Robbins, Heather M; Bricelj, V Monica; Ward, J Evan

    2010-08-01

    The in vivo response of adult northern quahogs, Mercenaria mercenaria, to Aureococcus anophagefferens (brown tide) at the level of the gill was determined using video-endoscopy. Feeding activity, particle-approach velocities, and ventral-groove-transport velocities were documented after the quahogs were exposed to Isochryis galbana (baseline observations) supplemented with either toxic or nontoxic A. anophagefferens at two bloom concentrations (8 x 10(5) or 2 x 10(6) cells ml(-1)). Externally, there was no evidence of adverse effects of brown tide on feeding, as siphons remained extended and dilated. Toxic brown tide at both concentrations elicited gill muscular contractions, intermittent cessation of water flow, and decreased particle loading within the pallial cavity. The 8 x 10(5) cell ml(-1) toxic treatment had no significant effect on approach velocities or ventral-groove-transport velocities after 2 h, although time-averaging showed significant reduction of the latter during the last 30 min of exposure. The higher concentration of toxic brown tide caused a significant decrease in these velocities after only 1 h. Nontoxic brown tide produced none of these effects. Thus, A. anophagefferens compromised quahog feeding by stimulating contractions of the branchial musculature and interfering with lateral and ventral groove ciliary beating. These effects were both time- and concentration-dependent and could be caused by either a dopaminergic or a serotonergic toxic factor.

  1. New threats of an old enemy: the distribution of the shipworm Teredo navalis L. (Bivalvia: Teredinidae) related to climate change in the Port of Rotterdam area, the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Paalvast, Peter; van der Velde, Gerard

    2011-08-01

    The effects of four climate change scenarios for the Netherlands on the distribution of the shipworm upstream of the Rhine-Meuse estuary are described. Global warming will cause dry and warmer summers and decreased river discharges. This will extend the salinity gradient upstream in summer and fall and may lead to attacks on wooden structures by the shipworm. Scenarios including one or two degree temperature increases by 2050 compared to 1990 with a weak change in the air circulation over Europe will lead to an increased chance of shipworm damage upstream from once in 36 years to once in 27 or 22 years, respectively; however, under a strong change in air circulation, the chance of shipworm damage increases to once in 6 or 3 years, respectively. The upstream expansion of the distribution of the shipworm will also be manifested in other northwest European estuaries and will be even stronger in southern Europe.

  2. Surface morphology of Diplodon expansus (Küster, 1856; Mollusca, Bivalvia, Hyriidae) gill filaments after exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine herbicide.

    PubMed

    Nogarol, Larissa Rosa; Brossi-Garcia, Ana Luiza; Fontanetti, Carmem Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Brazilian endemic species Diplodon expansus (Küster, 1856) is found in freshwater bodies in the country's southeast, in large anthropogenic influence regions especially with an extensive agriculture emphasis. One of the main pesticides used in the species occurrence region is the atrazine herbicide, which has a great contamination potential in the aquatic environment. Therefore, several studies into its toxicity in aquatic systems have been developed. However, the tested concentrations are usually very high and rarely found in the environment and the short-term exposure responses in other aquatic organisms such as native bivalves are still scarce. Thus, this study sought to consider the potential effects of environmentally realistic concentrations of atrazine herbicide on the surface morphology of gill filaments of the bivalve D. expansus under laboratory-controlled conditions after short-term exposure. None of the animals died before the end of the experiment. The main alterations were observed on the frontal surface of filaments, which include mucus accumulation, cilia loss, and disruption. Mucus increased secretion and accumulation in the frontal filaments region preceded as a protective mechanism. Cilia loss and disruption on the frontal surface of the gill filament indicated that ciliated frontal cells were more sensitive to atrazine exposure and these alterations may cause gills functional damages, compromising the uptake of food particles and respiration. Therefore, higher sublethal concentrations of atrazine may compromise the survival and consequently the population of D. expansus in agriculture areas after a longer period of continuous exposure.

  3. Large-scale mitochondrial COI gene sequence variability reflects the complex colonization history of the invasive soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria (L.) (Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasota, Rafal; Pierscieniak, Karolina; Garcia, Pascale; Simon-Bouhet, Benoit; Wolowicz, Maciej

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine genetic diversity in the soft-shell clam Mya arenaria on a wide geographical scale using mtDNA COI gene sequences. Low levels of genetic diversity was found, which can most likely be explained by a bottleneck effect during Pleistocene glaciations and/or selection. The geographical genetic structuring of the studied populations was also very low. The star-like phylogeny of the haplotypes indicates a relatively recent, rapid population expansion following the glaciation period and repeated expansion following the founder effect(s) after the initial introduction of the soft-shell clam to Europe. North American populations are characterized by the largest number of haplotypes, including rare ones, as expected for native populations. Because of the founder effect connected with initial and repeated expansion events, European populations have significantly lower numbers of haplotypes in comparison with those of North America. We also observed subtle differentiations among populations from the North and Baltic seas. The recently founded soft-shell clam population in the Black Sea exhibited the highest genetic similarity to Baltic populations, which confirmed the hypothesis that M. arenaria was introduced to the Gulf of Odessa from the Baltic Sea. The most enigmatic results were obtained for populations from the White Sea, which were characterized by high genetic affinity with American populations.

  4. Morphological and genetic diversity of the wood-boring Xylophaga (Mollusca, Bivalvia): new species and records from deep-sea Iberian canyons.

    PubMed

    Romano, Chiara; Voight, Janet Ruth; Pérez-Portela, Rocío; Martin, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea bivalves of the Xylophagaidae, a poorly known group, are obligate wood-borers. Deployment of wood in three submarine canyons off the Iberian coast, the Blanes and La Fonera Canyons (Mediterranean Sea) and the Avilés Canyon (Cantabric Sea, Bay of Biscay), lead to the discovery of four xylophagaid species in our samples. Xylophaga dorsalis (the dominant species), X. atlantica, X. cf. anselli and the new species X. brava, were identified on the basis of morphological data, and supported by a phylogenetic reconstruction based on the nuclear genes 18S rDNA and 28S rDNA and including several genus of Xylophagaidae. Genetic divergence between species of Xylophaga varied between genes, ranging from 0.5 to 4.0% for the 18SrDNA and from 4.1 to 16.6% for the 28SrDNA. Xylophaga brava sp. nov. appeared to be restricted to the Mediterranean and morphologically resembled the closely related X. cf. anselli from the Cantabrian Sea. However, they clearly diverged in two well-supported clades. Low levels of intraspecific variability and higher interspecific divergence between species also supported the existence of these two different species. Morphologically they differ in the number of cirri at the siphon openings, in the shape of the posterior shell and in the size of prodissoconch II. The new species is characterized by having weak, poorly mineralized mesoplax and siphons united throughout, covered by a periostracal, non-calcified tube; distinct proximal and distal siphons, the former translucent and soft, the latter muscular, with concentric rings. Xylophaga atlantica, previously known only from the western Atlantic, is reported for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea. Whether its presence in the Mediterranean indicates its natural distribution or reflects its recent introduction is unknown. Although xylophagaids have been previously reported to recruit heavily to wood deposited on the seabed, these four species colonized wood suspended 30 m above the seafloor.

  5. Prevalence and Molecular Genotyping of Noroviruses in Market Oysters, Mussels, and Cockles in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, Leera; Thamjaroen, Anyarat; Chiawchan, Suwat; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip; Pombubpa, Kannika; Diraphat, Pornphan

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis associated with bivalve shellfish consumption. This study aimed to detect and characterize noroviruses in three bivalve shellfish species: oysters (Saccostrea forskali), cockles (Anadara nodifera), and mussels (Perna viridis). The virus concentration procedure (adsorption-twice elution-extraction) and a molecular method were employed to identify noroviruses in shellfish. RT-nested PCR was able to detect known norovirus GII.4 of 8.8 × 10(-2) genome copies/g of digestive tissues from oyster and cockle concentrates, whereas in mussel concentrates, the positive result was seen at 8.8 × 10(2) copies/g of digestive tissues. From August 2011 to July 2012, a total of 300 shellfish samples, including each of 100 samples from oysters, cockles, and mussels were collected and tested for noroviruses. Norovirus RNA was detected in 12.3 % of shellfish samples. Of the noroviruses, 7.7 % were of the genogroup (G) I, 2.6 % GII, and 2.0 % were mixed GI and GII. The detection rate of norovirus GI was 2.1 times higher than GII. With regards to the different shellfish species, 17 % of the oyster samples were positive, while 14.0 and 6.0 % were positive for noroviruses found in mussels and cockles, respectively. Norovirus contamination in the shellfish occurred throughout the year with the highest peak in September. Seventeen norovirus-positive PCR products were characterized upon a partial sequence analysis of the capsid gene. Based on phylogenetic analysis, five different genotypes of norovirus GI (GI.2, GI.3, GI.4, GI.5, and GI.9) and four different genotypes of GII (GII.1, GII.2, GII.3, and GII.4) were identified. These findings indicate the prevalence and distribution of noroviruses in three shellfish species. The high prevalence of noroviruses in oysters contributes to the optimization of monitoring plans to improve the preventive strategies of acute gastroenteritis.

  6. Asia-Pacific mussel watch: monitoring of butyltin contamination in coastal waters of Asian developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Monirith, In; Ismail, Ahmad; Muchtar, Muswerry; Zheng, Jinshu; Richardson, Bruce J; Subramanian, Annamalai; Prudente, Maricar; Hue, Nguyen Duc; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2002-10-01

    Butyltin compounds (BTs) including mono-, di-, and tributyltin and total tin (sigmaSn), were determined in green mussels (Perna viridis) from various Asian developing countries, such as Cambodia, China (Hong Kong and southern China), Malaysia, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam, to elucidate the contamination status, distribution, and possible sources and to assess the risks on aquatic organisms and humans. Butyltin compounds were detected in green mussels collected from all the sampling location investigated, suggesting widespread contamination of BTs along the coastal waters of Asian developing countries. Among butyltin derivatives, tributyltin (TBT) was the predominant compound, indicating its ongoing usage and recent exposures in Asian coastal waters. Higher concentrations of BTs were found in mussels collected at locations with intensive maritime activities, implying that the usage of TBT as a biocide in antifouling paints was a major source of BTs. In addition, relatively high concentrations of BTs were observed in mussels from aquaculture areas in Hong Kong and Malaysia, as it has been reported in Thailand. With the recent improvement in economic status in Asia, it is probable that an increase in TBT usage will occur in aquaculture. Although contamination levels were generally low in mussel samples from most of the Asian developing countries, some of those from polluted areas in Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand revealed levels comparable to those in developed nations. Furthermore, the concentrations of TBT in some mussels from polluted areas exceeded the threshold for toxic effects on organisms and estimated tolerable average residue levels as seafoods for human consumption. A significant correlation was observed between the concentrations of sigmaBTs and sigmaSn in mussels, and sigmaBTs were made up mostly 100% of sigmaSn in mussels taken from locations having intensive maritime/human activities. This suggests that

  7. African American women in STEM: Uncovering stories of persistence and resilience through an examination of social and cultural capital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Danielle Stevens

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the key factors that successful African American women said influenced their persistence and resilience in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) field at two key time periods; before beginning post-secondary education and during post-secondary education. Many researchers have expressed concern about missing out on the creativity and innovation of African American women that could be used to enhance or lead to scientific discoveries (Hanson, 2004; Ong et al., 2011; Perna et al., 2008). While there has been a fair amount of research on the lack of representation of African American women in the STEM field, it is very limited in its breathe and depth. Very few of these studies include the "voice" of African American women and most of the studies rely heavily on quantitative data. Therefore in this study, I used a qualitative, case study approach to interpret the stories of eight African American women currently working in a variety of STEM fields to understand how each of the factors that they said aided in their persistence and resilience related to the concepts of social and cultural capital. Furthermore, this study investigated the role cultural brokers played in their lives and the strategies these women used to create resilience. Narratives for each woman were created to provide insight into their experiences. Before beginning post-secondary education four themes emerged from this study; 1. Two parent households were important, 2. Science experiences outside of school sparked their interest, 3. All of the women participated in extracurricular activities, and 4. Religion was important. Cultural brokers were beneficial for some but not all of the women. During post-secondary education five themes emerged; 1. The majority of the women had a desire to help others, 2. Scholarships played an important role, 3. Parents were supportive, 4. Sexism/racism became evident, and 5. Religion was still

  8. "It's been a long journey": Exploring educationally mobile students' transition into STEM majors at a university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreygue, Aimee

    Today, one third of all college students are considered educationally "mobile," which means they will change institutions during their undergraduate careers. The concept of educational mobility challenges the traditional idea of students moving through an educational pipeline in a linear fashion, and recognizes that many of today's students, including those in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), will have multiple transition points. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the transitional experiences of educationally mobile students moving into and through the STEM disciplines at a public university. Students who move from one educational environment to another undergo a significant transition process, and understanding this process for individual students and the institution's role in supporting transition has implications for educational policy. Grounded in the conceptual framework guided by Schlossberg's Transition Theory, and Swail, Redd, and Perna's Geometric Model for Student Persistence and Achievement, this study explores the following research question: How do students who are educationally mobile experience academic, social, and institutional support while transitioning into and through STEM disciplines at a four-year public university? Eighteen science and mathematics majors participated in this study, all of whom attended at least one institution of higher education prior to their current attendance at Mountain View University, a four-year comprehensive Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) in Southern California. Participants were interviewed utilizing a semi-structured interview protocol and completed a demographic questionnaire as well. Trustworthiness measures included member checking and peer debriefing. The findings of this study show that educationally mobile students are savvy agents of their education, and make personal and professional sacrifices in their pursuit of a STEM degree. They want to connect to like

  9. [Cutaneous malignant melanoma: a retrospective study of seven years (2006-2012)].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Jorge; Moreira, Elisabete; Azevedo, Filomena; Mota, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: O melanoma maligno é a neoplasia cutânea mais agressiva, e a sua incidência tem vindo a aumentar nas últimas décadas. A possibilidade de cura depende de um diagnóstico atempado, sendo fundamental o conhecimento da sua epidemiologia para a implementação de programas de prevenção primária e deteção precoce do melanoma. Material e Métodos: Foi efetuada revisão dos processos clínicos dos doentes com melanoma maligno cutâneo primário, diagnosticados entre janeiro de 2006 e dezembro de 2012, no Centro Hospitalar de São João, Porto. Resultados: Analisaram-se os 148 casos de melanoma diagnosticados neste período, tendo-se observado um predomínio do sexo feminino (razão F:M - 1,6:1). A média etária na altura do diagnóstico foi de 61 anos. As localizações mais frequentemente envolvidas foram os membros inferiores e o tronco. No sexo masculino o dorso foi o local mais afetado, enquanto no sexo feminino as lesões ocorreram, preferencialmente, nas pernas. O melanoma de extensão superficial foi o subtipo predominante em quase todas as faixas etárias. Verificou-se um predomínio dos melanomas finos e o índice mitótico foi intermédio (1-6 mitoses/ mm2) na maioria dos doentes. A ulceração esteve presente em 22,3% dos casos e predominou nos melanomas espessos e no subtipo nodular. A maioria dos doentes encontrava-se no estádio IA. A progressão para doença metastática ocorreu em 20 doentes. Discussão: O perfil do doente com melanoma cutâneo, no Centro Hospitalar de São João, apresenta características relativamente semelhantes às descritas na literatura. Conclusão: O predomínio dos melanomas finos, considerados de melhor prognóstico, é provavelmente, o resultado de um diagnóstico cada vez mais precoce.

  10. Examination of factors which may contribute to the underrepresentation of African American teachers certified in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Rita C. F.

    Throughout this country the student population is becoming increasingly diverse, yet the teacher population does not reflect this diversity. This lack of diversity in the teacher population deprives students of color from having role models of the same race/ethnicity who look like them and who might have experiences which are similar to theirs (Epstein, 2005; Nettles & Perna, 1997). Having role models from their own race in the classroom could have a positive impact on students' attitudes about science (Perine, 2003), and facilitate their learning of the subject matter, and give students an incentive to do well in school (Vegas, Murnane, & Willett, 2001). In 2000, a national survey study of math and science teachers was conducted (Horizon Research, 2001). The majority of biology (90%), chemistry (93%), and physics (94%) teachers who participated in the study were White. Findings of the study revealed that only 55% to 60% of these teachers considered themselves well prepared to effectively teach a culturally diverse student population (Banilower, 2002; Smith, 2002; Wood, 2002). The majority of the teacher pool, which is White, prefer not to teach in urban communities as they have a preference for teaching jobs in the nonurban communities that are similar to those in which they were raised (Boyd, Lankford, Loeb, & Wyckoff, 2005; Epstein, 2005). The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine factors that may contribute to the underrepresentation of African American teachers certified in science. More specifically, it was decided to examine the high school experiences of in-service teachers. Study participants were teachers and other certificated faculty in two school districts located in the southern portion of the United States. Findings of the study revealed a statistically significant relationship between a teacher's decision to become certified in science and the following high school experiences: teachers and guidance counselors encouraging students to

  11. Cascading effects of fishing can alter carbon flow through a temperate coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Anne K; Shears, Nick T; Langlois, Timothy J; Babcock, Russell C

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that fishing can trigger trophic cascades and alter food web dynamics, yet its effects on ecosystem function remain largely unknown. We used the large-scale experimental framework of four marine reserves, spanning an oceanographic gradient in northeastern New Zealand, to test the extent to which the exploitation of reef predators can alter kelp carbon flux and secondary production. We provide evidence that the reduction of predatory snapper (Pagrus auratus) and lobster (Jasus edwardsii) can lead to an increase in sea urchins (Evechinus chloroticus) and indirect declines in kelp biomass in some locations but not others. Stable carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) of oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Perna canaliculus) transplanted in reserve and fished sites within four locations revealed that fishing indirectly reduced the proportion of kelp-derived organic carbon assimilated by filter feeders in two locations where densities of actively grazing sea urchins were 23.7 and 8.3 times higher and kelp biomass was an order of magnitude lower than in non-fished reserve sites. In contrast, in the two locations where fishing had no effect on urchin density or kelp biomass, we detected no effect of fishing on the carbon signature of filter feeders. We show that the effects of fishing on nearshore trophic structure and carbon flux are context-dependent and hinge on large-scale, regional oceanographic factors. Where cascading effects of fishing on kelp biomass were documented, enhanced assimilation of kelp carbon did not result in the magnification of secondary production. Instead, a strong regional gradient in filter feeder growth emerged, best predicted by chlorophyll a. Estimates of kelp contribution to the diet of transplanted consumers averaged 56.9% +/- 6.2% (mean +/- SE) for mussels and 33.8% +/- 7.3% for oysters, suggesting that organic carbon fixed by kelp is an important food source fueling northeastern New Zealand's nearshore food webs

  12. Contamination profiles of antifouling biocides in selected coastal regions of Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Harino, Hiroya; Arai, Takaomi; Ohji, Madoka; Ismail, Ahmad Bin; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-01

    The concentrations of butyltins (BTs) in sediment from Peninsular Malaysia along the Strait of Malacca and their spatial distribution are discussed. The concentrations of BTs were high in the southern part of Peninsular Malaysia where there is a lot of ship traffic, because trade is prosperous. The concentrations of monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), and tributyltin (TBT) in sediment from the coastal waters of Peninsular Malaysia were in the range 4.1-242 microg/kg dry weight (dw), 1.1-186 microg/kg dw, and 0.7-228 microg/kg dw, respectively. A higher percentage of TBT was observed in the area where TBT concentrations were high. The concentrations of monophenyltin (MPT), diphenyltin (DPT), and triphenyltin (TPT) were in the range <0.1-121 microg/kg dw, 0.4-27 microg/kg dw, and 0.1-34 microg/kg dw in sediment from Peninsular Malaysia, respectively. MPT was the dominant phenyltin species. MBT, DBT, and TBT in green mussel (Perna viridis) samples were detected in the range 41-102 microg/kg, 3-5 microg/kg, and 8-32 microg/kg, respectively. A tolerable average residue level (TARL) was estimated at 20.4 microg/kg from a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.25 microg TBTO/kg body weight/day. The maximum value of TBT detected in green mussel samples was the value near the TARL. TPTs were not detected in green mussel samples. The concentrations of Diuron and Irgarol 1051 in sediment from Peninsular Malaysia were in the range <0.1-5 microg/kg dw and <0.1-14 microg/kg dw, respectively. High concentrations of these compounds were observed in locations where the concentrations of TBT were high. Sea Nine 211, Dichlofluanid, and Pyrithiones were not detected in sediment. The concentrations of antifouling biocides in Melaka and the Strait of Johor were investigated in detail. BTs were found in similar concentrations among all sampling sites from Melaka, indicating that BT contamination spread off the coast. However, Sea Nine 211, Diuron, and Irgarol 1051 in the sediment from

  13. THREE YEAR VARIATION IN SHELL GROWTH OF THEMUSSEL, ELLIPTIO WACCAMAWENSIS (LEA), IN LAKEWACCAMAW, A BAY LAKE IN NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae) are one of the most endangered animal taxa in North America, and continued research on unionids will improve management decisions regarding their conservation. One unexplored aspect of unionid ecology is the magnitude of interannual variat...

  14. Effects of Surface Texture of Articulated Concrete Mattress Blocks on Their Habitat Value. Lower Mississippi River Environmental Program Report 19

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    of trichoptera, chironomidae, ephemeroptera, odonata , collembola, amphipoda, isopoda, hydracarinia, gas- tropoda, bivalvia, naididae, hydrozoa...Ephemeroptera Baetis sp. CaenIs sp. Heptagenia sp. Isonychia sp. Stenocron sp. Odonata Neurocordulia moles ta (Continued) 21 Table 1 (Concluded) .Taxonomic

  15. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF INTERACTIONS BETWEEN TWO UNIONIDS, ELLIPTIO WACCAMAWENSIS AND LEPTODEA OCHRACEA: VARIATION IN NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historical records indicate dense and diverse assemblages of unionid mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae) in a variety of aquatic communities, but the potential structuring role of competitive interactions among these organisms has not been adequately examined. We report here the result...

  16. Preliminary Investigations of Biofouling of Ships’ Hulls: Non-Indigenous Species Investigations in the Columbia River

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Cutter Chlorophyta Chlorophyta spp P Cirrepedia Balanus amphitrite P/S Bivalvia Ostreidae sp A P/S Ischadium sp? S Bryozoa Watersipora...Balanus improvisus P/S Hydrozoa Unidentified hydroid B P/S Bryozoa Fredericella indica P Amphipoda Americorophium spp P/S Passenger Chlorophyta...Chlorophyta spp P Tanker Chlorophyta Chlorophyta spp P Cirrepedia Megabalanus sp P Bivalvia Ostreidae sp B P/S Mytilus sp A S Bryozoa

  17. First report on the occurrence of the comb pen shell, Atrina pectinata (Linnaeus, 1767) (Bivalvia: Pinnidae) in Ulleungdo Island in the East Sea: Ecology and molecular identification of the species using COI gene sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyun-Sung; Kang, Hyun-Sil; Park, Heung-Sik; Noh, Choong Hwan; Jeong, Eui-Young; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2015-12-01

    Pen shell is one of the largest marine bivalves inhabiting shallow subtidal soft bottoms in the west Pacific and Indian Oceans. In Korea, the comb pen shell Atrina pectinata fisheries has been established on the south and west coasts. Recently, a pen shell population has been discovered from a subtidal sand flat (25-30 m depth) in Ulleungdo Island located in the East Sea of Korea, suggesting a potential shellfish resource in this area. In the present study, we first surveyed the population density and size of the unique pen shell using SCUBA, and identified the pen shell to species level using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI) sequence. An underwater survey carried out from July to September 2013 revealed that populations of pen shell patched on subtidal sand flat at a depth of 20-25 m. Grain size analysis indicated that sand particles accounted for 99% of the 600 × 700 m sand flat. The underwater survey also indicated that density of the pen shell ranged between 6-19 ind/m2, with a mean of 11 ind/m2. Shell height (i.e. longest axis of the shell) of the pen shell on the sand flat varied between 17.2 cm to 28.8 cm, with a mean of 25.1 cm, and the age was estimated to range between 1.5-7.5 yrs, with a mean of 5 yr. COI DNA sequence obtained from the pen shell in this study showed 98.9-99.2% similarity to Atrina pectinata (Linnaeus 1767) reported from Japan. In the cluster analysis, the COI DNA sequence of the pen shells from Ulleungdo Island was grouped with A. pectinata reported from Japan and China, indicating that the pen shell discovered in this study was A. pectinata, commonly distributed on the west and south coasts of Korea.

  18. The biology and functional morphology of Coralliophaga lithophagella (Bivalvia: Arcticoidea: Trapezidae): An abyssate, deep-water, nestler from the Açores. With comparative notes on the estuarine Trapezium liratum from Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Brian

    2014-04-01

    Coralliophaga lithophagella is a nestler of basaltic rocks in the deeper waters (˜57-360 m) of the Açores and of shallower limestone karst in the Mediterranean where it predominately occurs in empty lithophagine burrows. In the Açores, because of low oceanic productivity and the basaltic, un-boreable, substratum, C. lithophagella is but 50% the shell length of continental European conspecifics and the shell's postero-dorsal margin is growth elevated to enhance particle capture. This is also achieved with relatively enormous ctenidia, minute labial palps and a simplified intestine. Unusually amongst the Trapezidae, C. lithophagella is abyssate and the foot is reduced. Also atypically, and during ontogeny, the shell enlarges postero-dorsally to facilitate particle capture. Anatomical features of the representatives of the constituent genera of the Trapezidae are compared one with another and with Arctica islandica (Arcticidae), the constituent families of the Arcticoidea. It is concluded that the Trapezidae constitutes a discrete clade of epibenthic nestlers, possibly descended from an endobenthic arcticoid ancestor, and showing a trend towards a reduction in shell and hinge complexity. The status of Fluviolanatus subtorta with mantle margins filled with single-celled algae and putatively assigned to the Trapezidae, awaits molecular confirmation.

  19. Genetic Diversity of the Biofilm Covering Montacuta ferruginosa (Mollusca, Bivalvia) as Evaluated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis Analysis and Cloning of PCR-Amplified Gene Fragments Coding for 16S rRNA†

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, David C.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Zwart, Gabriel; De Ridder, Chantal

    1998-01-01

    The shell of the bivalve Montacuta ferruginosa, a symbiont living in the burrow of an echinoid, is covered with a rust-colored biofilm. This biofilm includes different morphotypes of bacteria that are encrusted with a mineral rich in ferric ion and phosphate. The aim of this research was to determine the genetic diversity and phylogenetic affiliation of the biofilm bacteria. Also, the possible roles of the microorganisms in the processes of mineral deposition within the biofilm, as well as their impact on the biology of the bivalve, were assessed by phenotypic inference. The genetic diversity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of short (193-bp) 16S ribosomal DNA PCR products obtained with primers specific for the domain Bacteria. This analysis revealed a diverse consortium; 11 to 25 sequence types were detected depending on the method of DNA extraction used. Individual biofilms analyzed by using the same DNA extraction protocol did not produce identical DGGE profiles. However, different biofilms shared common bands, suggesting that similar bacteria can be found in different biofilms. The phylogenetic affiliations of the sequence types were determined by cloning and sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. Close relatives of the genera Pseudoalteromonas, Colwellia, and Oceanospirillum (members of the γ-Proteobacteria lineage), as well as Flexibacter maritimus (a member of the Cytophaga-Flavobacter-Bacteroides lineage), were found in the biofilms. We inferred from the results that some of the biofilm bacteria could play a role in the mineral formation processes. PMID:9726898

  20. Freshwater Mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of the Upper Mississippi River: Observations at Selected Sites Within the 9-Foot Navigation Channel Project for the St. Paul District, United States Army Corps of Engineers, 1977 - 1979. Volume I. Text.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-10

    Platyhelminthes : Trematoda). This point somewhat coun- ters the idea of this population’s viability. Partially reviewed by Fuller (1974), Nearctic...infestation with flukes, a group of parasitic flatworms ( Platyhelminthes : Trematoda). UM -- Upper Mississippi. Unionicolidae, unionicolid -- the

  1. Freshwater Mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of the Upper Mississippi River: Observations at Selected Sites Within the 9-Foot Navigation Channel Project for the St. Paul District, United States Army Corps of Engineers, 1977 - 1979. Volume II. Appendices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-10

    111 16. Vermillion River 15 >2 1)9, _: L Hastings Small Boat Harbor 16 13 -,2 IS. Prescott 17 !14 199, 19. Pine Coulee 13 15 0. Truedaie Slough 19 116...Iowa Darter E. nigrum Rafinesque, Johnny Darter Perca flavescens (Mitchill), Yellow Perch Stizostedion e-avadense (Smith), Sauger Family Sciaenidae...brailing Brail runs: positive, 0 ; negative, 14 ;total, 14 Number of square ifeet brailed: 70,000 Exhibit 15 16. Vermillion River \\Tusc’ Tha, xni

  2. Fresh-Water Mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of the Upper Mississippi River: Observations at Selected Sites within the 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project on Behalf of the U.S. Army.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-16

    8217. Rational candidates for glochidial host( s ) of the Spectacle Case are, for example, 6 . 61 -_ _ ’ , , . - - - - one or more developmental stages of a...U) JUN 78 S L FULLER UNCLASSIFIED 78-33 NL 1.25 III 111112.5 N~ 2 PHOTOGRAPH THIS SHEET LEVEL of Nfafura.( Sc.enes 0*ORY :A; 41421467.:iw. ofL iw.(y...GOVTnr ACESONNS. RCNTT ORAGRANT NUMERe . PEFRMIN ORAIAINNMEASADES1. TP ORMELEMET& PEROOECTOVTASK at. COeRlLce ie ihnte9- tcanl S EFRING OFFCNAMGN DDESI

  3. TELAER: a multi-mode/multi-antenna interferometric airborne SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Stefano; Amaral, Tiago; Berardino, Paolo; Esposito, Carmen; Jackson, Giuseppe; Pauciullo, Antonio; Vaz Junior, Eurico; Wimmer, Christian; Lanari, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    a degradation of the geometric resolution, which in this case becomes equal to 5m. Such an operational flexibility, added to the above discussed single-pass interferometric capability and to the intrinsic flexibility of airborne platforms, renders the TELAER airborne SAR system a powerful instrument for fast generation of high resolution Digital Elevation Models, even in natural disaster scenarios. Accordingly, this system can play today a key role not only for strictly scientific purposes, but also for the monitoring of natural hazards, especially if properly integrated with other remote sensing sensors. [1] S. Perna et al., "Capabilities of the TELAER airborne SAR system upgraded to the multi-antenna mode", In Proceedings IGARSS 2012 Symposium, Munich, 2012. [2] G. Franceschetti, and R.Lanari, Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing, CRC PRESS, New York, 1999.

  4. Hot Jupiter atmospheres with the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Kamen O.

    I analyze Spitzer Space Telescope observations of seven transiting hot Jupiters during the time of secondary eclipse, the portion of the planet's orbit when it is behind the star from the point of view of a Solar System observer. For six of them, HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b, HAT-P-6b, HAT-P-8b, HAT-P-12b and XO-4b, I analyze broadband photometric light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microm. I compare the resulting eclipse depths, which are a measure of the planets' dayside emission, to model emergent spectra by Burrows et al. and Fortney et al. The atmosphere of XO-4b has a strong temperature inversion, HAT-P-6b has weak or no temperature inversion, HAT-P-8 has a non-inverted atmosphere. The models are inconclusive about the temperature structure of the atmospheres of HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-4b. I find that HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b and HAT-P-8b have relatively inefficient heat transport from their day sides to their night sides. The models suggest moderate to low heat transport for XO-4b and HAT-P-6b. I discuss the physical implications of my results in the context of theoretical and empirical hypotheses on correlations related to the temperature-pressure structures of the atmospheres and the efficiency of energy transfer to the night side of the planet. In particular, I focus on the idea by Knutson et al. that planets with chromospherically active host stars may in general not have a stratosphere-like temperature inversions, while a quiet host star may lead to an inverted atmosphere. Another hypothesis I examine is that by Cowan and Agol and Perna et al. who suggest that the hottest planets have a narrow range of permitted heat redistribution efficiencies and, thus, high day-night contrasts. The seventh object I study is HD 189733b. I examine the time series spectroscopy during 18 eclipses between wavelengths of 5 and 14 microm. This is the most extensive data set observed for the emission spectrum of any exoplanet to date. Some of these data sets have been analyzed in the past by Grillmair

  5. Shell biofilm nitrification and gut denitrification contribute to emission of nitrous oxide by the invasive freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha (zebra mussel).

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Nanna B; Heisterkamp, Ines M; Sigby-Clausen, Maria; Larsen, Lone H; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Nitrification in shell biofilms and denitrification in the gut of the animal accounted for N(2)O emission by Dreissena polymorpha (Bivalvia), as shown by gas chromatography and gene expression analysis. The mussel's ammonium excretion was sufficient to sustain N(2)O production and thus potentially uncouples invertebrate N(2)O production from environmental N concentrations.

  6. Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Guam Cleanup of Uruno Beach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    Artocarpus altilus, Ficus spp., Agilaia mariannensis, Guamia mariannae, Eugenia reinwardtiana, Premna obtusifolia, Melanolepis multiglandulosa...consisted of dwarfed forms of the limestone forest elements but favor certain species such as Mammea odorata and Ficus tinctoria, along with emerged limestone...ecliiritus (Jaeger) HOLLUSCA W-ohidschia Arjqs (Jaeger) Bivalvia . B. bivittata (Mitsukuri) Tridacna maxima (Roding) Roloftui (ITalodeima) atra Jaeger

  7. Determination of shell deposition rates of Arctica islandica from the New York Bight using natural /sup 228/Ra and /sup 228/Th and bomb-produced /sup 14/C

    SciTech Connect

    Turekian, K.K.; Cochran, J.K.; Nozaki, Y.; Thompson, I.; Jones, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    Shell deposition rates of specimens of Arctica islandica (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the New York Bight were determined using natural /sup 228/Ra and /sup 228/Th and bomb /sup 14/C. The specimens from deep (>55 m) offshore waters show annual growth banding. A shell obtained from the inner bight at <30-m depth seems to be younger than indicated by band counting.

  8. Environmental Habitat Conditions Associated with Freshwater Dreissenids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    of Dreissenid mussel in the Great Lakes. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 49:1501-1506. McMahon, R. F. 1991. Mollusca : Bivalvia...In The Mollusca . Vol. 6, Ecology, ed. W. D. Russell- Hunter, 463-503. Orlando, FL: Academic Press, Inc. Schneider, D. W., S. P. Madon, J. A. Stoeckel

  9. PREFACE: DICE 2012 : Spacetime Matter Quantum Mechanics - from the Planck scale to emergent phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

    2013-06-01

    Milano), F Guerra (Università 'La Sapienza', Roma) and G Vitiello (Università di Salerno), this event traditionally dedicated to the public drew a large audience involved in lively discussions until late. The workshop was organized by L Diósi (Budapest), H-T Elze (Pisa, chair), L Fronzoni (Pisa), J J Halliwell (London), E Prati (Milano) and G Vitiello (Salerno), with most essential help from our conference secretaries L Fratino, N Lampo, I Pozzana, and A Sonnellini, all students from Pisa, and from our former secretaries M Pesce-Rollins and L Baldini. Several institutions and sponsors supported the workshop and their representatives and, in particular, the citizens of Rosignano/Castiglioncello are deeply thanked for the generous help and kind hospitality: Comune di Rosignano - A Franchi (Sindaco di Rosignano), S Scarpellini (Segreteria sindaco), L Benini (Assessore ai lavori pubblici), M Pia (Assessore all' urbanistica) REA Rosignano Energia Ambiente s.p.a. - F Ghelardini (Presidente della REA), E Salvadori and C Peccianti (Segreteria) Associazione Armunia - A Nanni (Direttore), G Mannari (Programmazione), C Perna, F Bellini, M Nannerini, P Bruni and L Meucci (Tecnici). Special thanks go to G Mannari and her collaborators for advice and great help in all the practical matters that had to be dealt with, in order to run the meeting at Castello Pasquini smoothly Funds made available by Università di Pisa, Domus Galilaeana (Pisa), Centro Interdisciplinare per lo Studio dei Sistemi Complessi - CISSC (Pisa), Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale (Università di Salerno), Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Filosofici - IISF (Napoli), Solvay Italia SA (Rosignano), Institute of Physics Publishing - IOP (Bristol), Springer Verlag (Heidelberg), and Hungarian Scientific Research Fund OTKA are gratefully acknowledged. Last, but not least, special thanks are due to Laura Pesce (Vitrium Galleria, San Vincenzo) for the exposition of her artwork 'arte e scienza' at Castello Pasquini

  10. Pursuing the quest for better understanding the taxonomic distribution of the system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    Gusman, Arthur; Lecomte, Sophia; Stewart, Donald T.; Passamonti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is only one exception to strict maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the animal kingdom: a system named doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI), which is found in several bivalve species. Why and how such a radically different system of mitochondrial transmission evolved in bivalve remains obscure. Obtaining a more complete taxonomic distribution of DUI in the Bivalvia may help to better understand its origin and function. In this study we provide evidence for the presence of sex-linked heteroplasmy (thus the possible presence of DUI) in two bivalve species, i.e., the nuculanoid Yoldia hyperborea(Gould, 1841)and the veneroid Scrobicularia plana(Da Costa,1778), increasing the number of families in which DUI has been found by two. An update on the taxonomic distribution of DUI in the Bivalvia is also presented. PMID:27994972

  11. Food habits and seasonal variation of stomach contents of tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis (Günther) in the Bohai Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Shuozeng

    1993-03-01

    Examination of the food habits and seasonal variation of the stomach contents of adult tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis (Günther) taken in July 1982 July 1983 from Laizhou Bay and the Huanghe River estuary of the Bohai Sea showed crustacea, bivalvia and small fishes comprised the main prey. Invertebrates such as polychaeta, cephalopoda, gastropoda, echinodermata and actiniaria were also intermittently found in them. They intensively fed all the year found (monthly feeding rate of over 80%). The main food items were Alpheus japonica, Alpheus distinguendus. Oratosquilla oratoria, Eucrate crenata and Carcinoplax vestitus, etc. In summer and autumn, the portion of bivalvia such as Cultellus attenuatus and Musculus senhousei increased steadily. From summer to winter, a stable proportion of small fishes such as Rhinogobius pflaumi and Setipinna taty was in the diet.

  12. Pursuing the quest for better understanding the taxonomic distribution of the system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Gusman, Arthur; Lecomte, Sophia; Stewart, Donald T; Passamonti, Marco; Breton, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    There is only one exception to strict maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the animal kingdom: a system named doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI), which is found in several bivalve species. Why and how such a radically different system of mitochondrial transmission evolved in bivalve remains obscure. Obtaining a more complete taxonomic distribution of DUI in the Bivalvia may help to better understand its origin and function. In this study we provide evidence for the presence of sex-linked heteroplasmy (thus the possible presence of DUI) in two bivalve species, i.e., the nuculanoid Yoldia hyperborea(Gould, 1841)and the veneroid Scrobicularia plana(Da Costa,1778), increasing the number of families in which DUI has been found by two. An update on the taxonomic distribution of DUI in the Bivalvia is also presented.

  13. Assessment of Zebra Mussel (Dreissena Polymorpha) Infestation Risk Using GIS for Water Basins in the North-West Bulgaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-22

    August 9-13, 2004, San Diego, California, 12 pp. Angelov, A., 2000. Catalogus faunae bulgaricae. 4. Mollusca : Gastropoda et Bivalvia aquae dulcis...distribution of freshwater Mollusca in Bulgaria. Annuaire de l’Universite de Sofia. Faculte Physico-Mathematique 43 (3): 33- 54. (In Bulgarian, English summary...Dreissena polymorpha Pallas ( Mollusca ) in the energy budget of Lake Esrom, Denmark. Verh. Int. Ver. Limnol., 24: 621-625. Hayward, D., & E. Estevez

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of hydrothermal vent clam Calyptogena magnifica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Helu; Cai, Shanya; Zhang, Haibin; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    The mitochondrial genome of the hydrothermal vent clam Calyptogena magnifica (Bivalvia, Veneroida, Vesicomyidae) is reported for the first time in this study. The total length of its mitochondrial genome is 19 738 bp with overall GC content of 31.6%. The mitochondrial genome consists of 36 genes, including 13 protein-coding sequences, 2 rRNA and 21 tRNA genes. Two distinct repeat motifs are located between tRNA(Trp) and ND6.

  15. Occurrence and role of a Quaternary base, trimethylamine oxide, in two cockle species, Cerastoderma edule and Cerastoderma lamarcki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vooys, C. G. N.

    2002-02-01

    Trimethylamine oxide was demonstrated in the tissues of two European cockle species: Cerastoderma edule and Cerastoderma lamarcki (Mollusca: Bivalvia). No role in osmoregulation could be demonstrated, but a passive accumulation of the compound was found. Trimethylamine was demonstrated to be present in phytoplankton. Passive changes of the concentration of trimethylamine oxide are likely to occur in cockle tissues depending on the concentration of trimethylamine in the food.

  16. The Calyptogena magnifica chemoautotrophic symbiont genome

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, I.L.; Woyke, T.; Auchtung, T.A.; Dilly, G.F.; Dutton,R.J.; Fisher, M.C.; Fontanez, K.M.; Lau, E.; Stewart, F.J.; Richardson,P.M.; Barry, K.W.; Saunders, E.; Detter, J.C.; Wu, D.; Eisen, J.A.; Cavanaugh, C.M.

    2007-03-01

    Chemoautotrophic endosymbionts are the metabolic cornerstone of hydrothermal vent communities, providing invertebrate hosts with nearly all of their nutrition. The Calyptogena magnifica (Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae) symbiont, Candidatus Ruthia magnifica, is the first intracellular sulfur-oxidizing endosymbiont to have its genome sequenced, revealing a suite of metabolic capabilities. The genome encodes major chemoautotrophic pathways as well as pathways for biosynthesis of vitamins, cofactors, and all 20 amino acids required by the clam.

  17. Disturbance of shallow marine soft-bottom environments and megabenthos assemblages by a huge tsunami induced by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

    PubMed

    Seike, Koji; Shirai, Kotaro; Kogure, Yukihisa

    2013-01-01

    Huge tsunami waves associated with megathrust earthquakes have a severe impact on shallow marine ecosystems. We investigated the impact of a tsunami generated by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake on the seafloor and large benthic animals in muddy and sandy ria coasts (Otsuchi and Funakoshi bays) in northeastern Japan. We conducted underwater field surveys using scuba equipment in water depths of <20 m before the tsunami (September 2010) and after the tsunami (September 2011 and September 2012). During the study period, episodic changes in topography and grain-size composition occurred on the seafloor of the study area. Megabenthos sampling revealed a distinct pattern of distribution succession for each benthic species. For example, the protobranch bivalve Yoldia notabilis (Bivalvia: Nuculanidae) and the heterodont bivalve Felaniella usta (Bivalvia: Ungulinidae) disappeared after the tsunami event, whereas the distribution of the venus clam Gomphina melanaegis (Bivalvia: Veneridae) remained unchanged. In addition, the patterns of succession for a single species, such as the giant button top shell Umbonium costatum (Gastropoda: Trochidae) and the heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum (Echinoidea: Loveniidae), varied between the two bays studied. Our data also show that reestablishment of some benthic animal populations began within 18 months of the tsunami disturbance.

  18. Disturbance of Shallow Marine Soft-Bottom Environments and Megabenthos Assemblages by a Huge Tsunami Induced by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Seike, Koji; Shirai, Kotaro; Kogure, Yukihisa

    2013-01-01

    Huge tsunami waves associated with megathrust earthquakes have a severe impact on shallow marine ecosystems. We investigated the impact of a tsunami generated by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake on the seafloor and large benthic animals in muddy and sandy ria coasts (Otsuchi and Funakoshi bays) in northeastern Japan. We conducted underwater field surveys using scuba equipment in water depths of <20 m before the tsunami (September 2010) and after the tsunami (September 2011 and September 2012). During the study period, episodic changes in topography and grain-size composition occurred on the seafloor of the study area. Megabenthos sampling revealed a distinct pattern of distribution succession for each benthic species. For example, the protobranch bivalve Yoldia notabilis (Bivalvia: Nuculanidae) and the heterodont bivalve Felaniella usta (Bivalvia: Ungulinidae) disappeared after the tsunami event, whereas the distribution of the venus clam Gomphina melanaegis (Bivalvia: Veneridae) remained unchanged. In addition, the patterns of succession for a single species, such as the giant button top shell Umbonium costatum (Gastropoda: Trochidae) and the heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum (Echinoidea: Loveniidae), varied between the two bays studied. Our data also show that reestablishment of some benthic animal populations began within 18 months of the tsunami disturbance. PMID:23762365

  19. Mortality through ontogeny of soft-bottom marine invertebrates with planktonic larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Troels Møller; Hansen, Jørgen L. S.; Josefson, Alf B.; Hansen, Benni W.

    2008-09-01

    The present survey covers one spawning season of marine benthic invertebrates in a large geographical area, the inner Danish waters, and includes a wide range of habitats with steep salinity and nutrient load gradients. The loss ratios of soft-bottom marine invertebrates from one development stage to the next is calculated based on average abundances of pelagic larvae, benthic post-larvae and adults of Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Polychaeta and Echinodermata, with planktonic development. This gives a rough estimate of the larval and post-larval mortality. Loss ratios between post-larvae stage and adult stage (post-larval mortality) varies from 3:1 to 7:1 (71.2-84.9%) and loss ratios between larvae and post-larvae (larval mortality) and between larvae and adult, ranging from 7:1 to 42:1 (85.2-97.6%) and from 45:1 to 210:1 (97.8-99.5%), respectively. The results show a remarkable unity in loss ratios (mortality) between the mollusc taxa (Bivalvia and Gastropoda) at the phylum/class level. This similarity in loss ratios among the mollusc taxa exhibiting the same developmental pathways suggests that the mortality is governed by the same biotic and abiotic factors. Larval mortality is estimated to range from 0.10 d - 1 to 0.32 d - 1 for Bivalvia and ranging from 0.09 d - 1 to 0.23 d - 1 for Polychaeta. The species loss ratios combined with specific knowledge of the reproduction cycles give estimated loss ratios (mortality) between the post-larvae and the adult stage of 25:1 and 14:1 for the bivalves Abra spp. and Mysella bidentata. For the polychaete Pygospio elegans the loss ratio (larval mortality) between the larvae and the post-larval stage is 154:1 and between the post-larvae and the adult stage 41:1. For Pholoe inornata the loss ratio between post-larvae and adults is 7:1. The present results confirm that the larval stage, metamorphosis and settlement are the critical phase in terms of mortality in the life cycle for Bivalvia. Assuming steady state based on actual

  20. [Latin American malacology. Freshwater mollusks from Argentina].

    PubMed

    Rumi, Alejandra; Gregoric, Diego E Gutiérrez; Núñez, Verónica; Darrigran, Gustavo A

    2008-03-01

    A report and an updated list with comments on the species of freshwater molluscs of Argentina which covers an area of 2 777 815 km2 is presented. Distributions of Gastropoda and Bivalvia families, endemic, exotic, invasive as well as entities of sanitary importance are also studied and recommendations on their conservation are provided. Molluscs related to the Del Plata Basin have been thoroughly studied in comparison to others areas of the country. This fauna exhibits relatively the biggest specific richness and keeps its affinity with the fauna of other regions of the basin in areas of Paraguay and Brasil. The 4 500 records of molluscs considered in this paper arise from the study of the collections of Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia", Buenos Aires; Museo de La Plata, La Plata and Fundación "Miguel Lillo", Tucumán. These institutions keep very important collections of molluscs in southern South America. Field information has recently been obtained and localities cited by other authors are also included in the data base. Until today, 166 species have been described, 101 belonging to 10 families of Gastropoda and 65 to 7 of Bivalvia. Families with highest specific richness are Lithoglyphidae (22) and Sphaeriidae (25), respectively. The number of endemic species (those present only in Argentina) by family is: Gastropoda: Ampullariidae (1), Cochliopidae (10), Lithoglyphidae (11), Thiariidae (3), Chilinidae (11), Lymnaeidae (2) and Physidae (2?); Bivalvia: Hyriidae (1?); Etheriidae (1?) and Sphaeriidae (10). Families with a distribution that comprise almost the whole country are: the Sphaeriidae and the gastropods Cochliopidae, Chilinidae and Lymnaeidae. Families Erodonidae and Solecurtidae (Bivalvia) were registered in mixohaline environments from Buenos Aires province. Gastropod families Thiaridae and Glacidorbiidae show a very restricted distribution. The rest of the families are present mainly in the center and north of the country

  1. First report of intramolluscan stages of a gorgoderid digenean from a marine bivalve.

    PubMed

    Bott, Nathan J; Cribb, Thomas H

    2005-08-01

    A survey of bivalves from Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, revealed a novel digenean infection in Lioconcha castrensis (Bivalvia: Veneridae). The cercaria has oral and ventral suckers, a dorsoventrally orientated stylet embedded in the oral sucker, penetration glands, and a large tail that is inflated at its base. This morphology is broadly consistent with that of previously described gorgoderid cercariae. Partial large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (D1-D3 domains) was sequenced and aligned with sequences from other gorgoderids and related families. Phylogenetic analysis also suggests that the species belongs to the Gorgoderinae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gorgoderid from a marine bivalve.

  2. Estuarine Habitat Assessment for Construction of a Submarine Transmission Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, Amr Z.; Abdel-Salam, Khaled M.

    2010-07-01

    The present paper describes a submarine survey using the acoustic discrimination system QTC VIEW (Series V) as an exploratory tool to adjust final route alignment of a new pipeline. By using acoustic sound survey as an exploratory tool described in this paper to adjust final route alignment of a new pipeline to minimize the environmental impact caused and ultimately to avoid any mitigation measures. The transmission pipeline extended from the shore line of Abu-Qir Bay, on the Mediterranean Sea in Egypt, out to 70 nautical miles at sea (60 m water depth). Four main surface sediment types were defined in the study area, namely fine sand, silty sand, silt and clay. Results of the acoustic classification revealed four acoustic classes. The first acoustic class corresponded to fine sand, absence of shell debris and very poor habitats characteristics. The second acoustic class is predominant in the study area and corresponds to the region occupied by silt. It is also characterized by intermediate diversity of macrobenthic invertebrate community which is mainly characterized by polychaeta. The third acoustic class is characterized by silt to silty clay. It is characterized by a high diversity of macrobenthic invertebrate community which is mainly polychaeta with an intermediate diversity of gastropoda and bivalvia. The final acoustic class is characterized by clay and high occurrence of shell debris of gastropoda, bivalvia and polychaeta.

  3. Are flatfish nursery grounds richer in benthic prey?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, Noémie; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2009-08-01

    The density of macrobenthos was evaluated in the nursery grounds for flatfish of six estuarine systems along the coast of Portugal by comparison with adjacent non-nursery areas. The dry weight and density of macrobenthic fauna were significantly higher in the nursery grounds. Polychaeta, Bivalvia, Oligochaeta and Isopoda were found to be significantly more abundant in the nursery than in the non-nursery grounds. For Isopoda and Bivalvia, total dry weight was also significantly higher in the nursery areas. Correspondence analysis based on density showed that the nursery areas of the different estuaries grouped together relative to non-nursery sites, with a relative similarity in the abundance of Oligochaeta, Spionidae, Amage spp., Scrobicularia plana and Cerastoderma edule. Taking into consideration the generally opportunistic feeding ecology and low dietary selectivity of the flatfish species, the results indicated higher prey availability in the nursery grounds of the Portuguese estuaries, an important factor contributing to the quality of these areas. The relatively high macrobenthic productivity in the nursery areas might be linked to physical and biological interactions favouring the recruitment and maintenance of the communities.

  4. Density shift, morphological damage, lysosomal fragility and apoptosis of hemocytes of Indian molluscs exposed to pyrethroid pesticides.

    PubMed

    Ray, Mitali; Bhunia, Anindya Sundar; Bhunia, Niladri Sekhar; Ray, Sajal

    2013-08-01

    Bellamya bengalensis (Gastropoda: Prosobranchia) and Lamellidens marginalis (Bivalvia: Eulamellibranchiata) are the molluscs of Indian freshwater ecosystem and important biological resources. These edible species bear economical, ecological, nutritional and medicinal importance. Natural habitat of these organisms is under the ecological threat of contamination by cypermethrin and fenvalerate, the common pyrethroid pesticides of India. Hemocytes are chief immunoeffector cells of molluscs which exhibit responsiveness against environmental toxins and perform diverse immunological functions including phagocytosis, encapsulation and cytotoxicity. Experimental exposure of cypermethrin and fenvalerate resulted in significant shift in density and morphological damage in hemocytes of B. bengalensis and L. marginalis respectively. Pyrethroid induced fragility and destabilization of hemocyte lysosomal membrane was recorded and proposed as an indication of toxin induced stress in molluscs. Apoptosis is an immunologically important cellular response which is modulated by environmental toxins. Pyrethroid exposure suppressed the physiological level of apoptosis and necrosis in hemocytes of B. bengalensis and L. marginalis indicating possible impairment of apoptosis mediated immunoprotection. Differential responses of B. bengalensis and L. marginalis hemocytes may be due to species specificity, toxin specificity, nonidentical immune strategies of Gastropoda and Bivalvia, specific habitat preference and related ecological niches.

  5. Depositional environment, foraminifer content and ESR ages of Quaternary Gediz Delta Sediments (Eastern Aegean Sea, İzmir-Western Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökçe Benli, Ekin; Aydın, Hülya; İşintek, İsmail; Engin, Birol; Şengöçmen, Berna

    2016-04-01

    Sediments and fossil content of Gediz Delta (Eastern Aegean Sea - İzmir) were examined based on the drilling core samples of the YSK-C and SK-246 drilling. W-SW part of the Delta is represented by continental delta sediments up to 6 meters and shallow marine detritic sediments up to 35 meters in the YSK-C drilling. Continental part consists of an soiled, graveled, muddy and sandy sediment in terms of rich organic substance. As for marine part, it consists of bioclast, muddy, fine graveled sand and by repetition of pebble, sand and bioclast bearing mud layers. Bioclasts comprise of bivalvia, echinoid, ostracod, gastropod, foramifer and bryozoa fragments. Benthic foraminiferal fauna determinated in the marine levels are represented by 55 bethic, 2 planktonic species. These foraminifers and bioclasts reflect that the W-SW part of the delta, has been occured in marine conditions between 8-31m deep. E-NE part of the delta is generally represented by continental sediments up to 43.5m in SK-246 drilling. In addition, it includes marine levels in 18-19 m, 23-24 m and 36-37,5 m intervals. Continental sediments of E-NE part is generally represented by calcareous and sandy mud rocks which mostly includes ash, tuff, and pebble derived from Neogene volcanic rocks. As for marine levels, it is composed of calcareous mud stones and calcareous clay stones including very thin gastropod, bivalvia and ostracod in 18- 19 and 36-37.5 meters whereas it is represented by sandy mud stones including a great deal of bentic foraminifer, bivalvia, bryozoa, echinoid, gastropod in 23-24 metres. Thus show that E-NE part of the delta is usually in continental condition but it is occasionally covered by sea. In aging studies of YSK-C core done by ESR method, age of 8-9 m interval is determined to be 11. 376 ± 0,067 Ka; however ages of 10-11m and 24-25 m intervals are revealed to be 16.466 ± 0,016 Ka and 15.344 ± 0,021 Ka respectively; finally age of 25-26 m interval is found to be 19.995 ± 0

  6. "Recent" macrofossil remains from the Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duc, Cynthia; de Vernal, Anne; Archambault, Philippe; Brice, Camille; Roberge, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The examination of surface sediment samples collected from 17 sites along the Lomonosov Ridge at water depths ranging from 737 to 3339 meters during Polarstern Expedition PS87 in 2014 (Stein, 2015), indicates a rich biogenic content almost exclusively dominated by calcareous remains. Amongst biogenic remains, microfossils (planktic and benthic foraminifers, pteropods, ostracods, etc.) dominate but millimetric to centrimetric macrofossils occurred frequently at the surface of the sediment. The macrofossil remains consist of a large variety of taxa, including gastropods, bivalvia, polychaete tubes, scaphopods, echinoderm plates and spines, and fish otoliths. Among the Bivalvia, the most abundant taxa are Portlandia arctica, Hyalopecten frigidus, Cuspidaria glacilis, Policordia densicostata, Bathyarca spp., and Yoldiella spp. Whereas a few specimens are well preserved and apparently pristine, most mollusk shells displayed extensive alteration features. Moreover, most shells were covered by millimeter scale tubes of the serpulid polychaete Spirorbis sp. suggesting transport from low intertidal or subtidal zone. Both the ecological affinity and known geographic distribution of identified bivalvia as named above support the hypothesis of transportation rather than local development. In addition to mollusk shells, more than a hundred fish otoliths were recovered in surface sediments. The otoliths mostly belong to the Gadidae family. Most of them are well preserved and without serpulid tubes attached to their surface, suggesting a local/regional origin, unlike the shell remains. Although recovered at the surface, the macrofaunal assemblages of the Lomonosov Ridge do not necessarily represent the "modern" environments as they may result from reworking and because their occurrence at the surface of the sediment may also be due to winnowing of finer particles. Although the shells were not dated, we suspect that their actual ages may range from modern to several thousands of

  7. Aspects of Biodeterioration of Lapideous Submerged Artefacts: 3d Methodologies Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, S.; Antonelli, F.; Sacco Perasso, C.

    2015-04-01

    Submerged stone archaeological artefacts are bioeroded by endolithic microbiota (cyanobacteria, algae and fungi) and macroborers (Porifera, Bivalvia and Sipuncula). Optical microscope and SEM observations permit to analyse the bioerosion traces and to identify bioeroders. Data obtained with these techniques cannot be used to estimate volumes of material bioeroded. This aspect require the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from artefact. In this work we illustrate two 3D imaging techniques used to study bioerosion phenomena of underwater Cultural Heritage. In particular Digital Video Microscope permit the elaboration of 3D images, which are widely employed for close-range acquisitions. Underwater Laser Scanner documents the in situ degradation of submerged artefacts. This research aims to sensitize specialist figures in the study 3D offering a starting point for future collaborations that could lead to interesting results.

  8. Reproductive traits of the cold-seep symbiotic mussel Idas modiolaeformis: gametogenesis and larval biology.

    PubMed

    Marylène Gaudron, Sylvie; Demoyencourt, Emile; Duperron, Sébastien

    2012-02-01

    We describe the first reproductive features of a chemosynthetic mussel collected at cold seeps from the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Idas modiolaeformis (Bivalvia, Mytilidae) is a hermaphroditic species in which production of male and female gametes likely alternates, a feature regarded as an adaptation to patchy and ephemeral habitats. By using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we demonstrate that bacterial symbionts, while present within the gills, are absent within acini that enclose female gametes and male gametes. This supports the hypothesis of environmental acquisition of symbionts in chemosynthetic mytilids. Prodissoconch I (PI) is relatively small compared to prodissoconch II (PII), suggesting a planktotrophic larval stage. Diameters of the two larval shells are in the range of sizes reported for mytilids, with a PII size between that of the shallow Mytilus edulis and that of the cold-seep mussel "Bathymodiolus" childressi.

  9. Investigation of molluscan phylogeny on the basis of 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Winnepenninckx, B; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1996-12-01

    The 18S rRNA sequences of 12 molluscs, representing the extant classes Gastropoda, Bivalvia, Polyplacophora, Scaphopoda, and Caudofoveata, were determined and compared with selected known 18S rRNA sequences of Metazoa, including other Mollusca. These data do not provide support for a close relationship between Platyhelminthes (Turbellaria) and Mollusca, but rather suggest that the latter group belongs to a clade of eutrochozoan coelomates. The 18S rRNA data fail to recover molluscan, bivalve, or gastropod monophyly. However, the branching pattern of the eutrochozoan phyla and classes is unstable, probably due to the explosive Cambrian radiation during which these groups arose. Similarly, the 18S rRNA data do not provide a reliable signal for the molluscan interclass relationships. Nevertheless, we obtained strong preliminary support for phylogenetic inferences at more restricted taxonomic levels, such as the monophyly of Polyplacophora, Caenogastropoda, Euthyneura, Heterodonta, and Arcoida.

  10. Foods of Spectacled Eiders Somateria fischeri in the Bering Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.R.; Piatt, J.F.; Trust, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    The winter diet of Spectacled Eiders living in marine habitats is known only from two individuals described by Cottam (1939). Here we examine marine diets from 36 stomachs collected near St. Lawrence Island, Bering Sea, Alaska, during May-June in 1987 and 1992. All Spectacled Eiders ate Mollusca, including Gastropoda (snails; frequency of occurrence 20.0%; sole taxon 0.0%) and Bivalvia (bivalves; 80.0%; 48.0%), and Crustacea (barnacles, amphipods and crabs; 30.6%; 0.0%). One bird ate a cod. The predominant species group eaten was Macoma Clams (72.0%; 36.0%). Prey species of Spectacled Eiders occur predominantly in waters 25-60 m deep in the Bering Sea. To obtain these prey, especially the bivalves, on the winter area Spectacled Eiders must forage in waters exceeding 40 m. We speculate that Spectacled Eiders regularly forage at depths of 45-70 m throughout winter.

  11. Hemocyanin respiratory pigment in bivalve mollusks

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, M.P.; Meyhoefer, E.; Otto, J.J.; Kuzirian, A.M.

    1986-03-14

    Hemocyanins, high molecular weight oxygen-binding proteins, were identified in two species of protobranch bivalve mollusks, Acila castrensis and Yoldia limatula. Although hemocyanins have been reported in chitons, gastropods, and cephalopods, they have not been observed in the Class Bivalvia. In A. castrensis the dissociation products of hemocyanin, characterized by gel electrophoresis, had a subunit molecular weight of approximately 250K. Negatively stained preparations of extracted hemocyanin formed protein aggregates in the shape of cylinders measuring 35 by 38 nanometers. X-ray microanalysis of hemocyanin aggregates in thin sections of Y. limatula demonstrated the presence of copper in the molecules. The discovery of hemocyanin in the protobranchs reinforces the primitive nature of the taxon and is further evidence that the major molluscan classes have a common ancestry. 14 references, 3 figures.

  12. Aragonite shells are more ancient than calcite ones in bivalves: new evidence based on omics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaotong; Li, Li; Zhu, Yabing; Song, Xiaorui; Fang, Xiaodong; Huang, Ronglian; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-11-01

    Two calcium carbonate crystal polymorphs, aragonite and calcite, are the main inorganic components of mollusk shells. Some fossil evidences suggest that aragonite shell is more ancient than calcite shell for the Bivalvia. But, the molecular biology evidence for the above deduction is absent. In this study, we searched for homologs of bivalve aragonite-related and calcite-related shell proteins in the oyster genome, and found that no homologs of calcite-related shell protein but some homologs of aragonite-related shell proteins in the oyster genome. We explained the results as the new evidence to support that aragonite shells are more ancient than calcite shells in bivalves combined the published biogeological and seawater chemistry data.

  13. Crystallization in organo-mineral micro-domains in the crossed-lamellar layer of Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina).

    PubMed

    Nouet, Julius; Baronnet, Alain; Howard, Lauren

    2012-02-01

    Crossed-lamellar shell microstructure consists of a sophisticated arrangement of interspersed lamellae, which is very commonly found in Gastropoda or Bivalvia shell layers. Its smallest constitutive microstructural units are usually described as sub-micrometric fibers, or rods, and form very ordered and regular patterns. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging confirms the presence of even smaller building units in the form of organo-mineral granules, and we further investigate their internal structure within aragonite crossed-lamellar internal layer of Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina) shell. Their coalescence may have controlled anisotropically the propagation of the crystallographic coherence through this complex microstructure, as suggested by the propagation of the microtwinning pattern between neighboring granules.

  14. Life-cycle and biology of Sychnocotyle kholo n.g., n. sp. (Trematoda : Aspidogastrea) in Emydura macquarii (Pleurodira : Chelidae) from southern Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, M A; Cribb, T H; Smales, L R

    1999-05-01

    Sychnocotyle kholo n. g., n. sp. (Aspidogastrea: Aspidogastridae) is described from the small intestine of the freshwater turtle Emydura macquarii (Pleurodira: Chelidae). The new genus is distinguished from other aspidogastrids by the possession of the following suite of characters: no cirrus-sac; no hermaphroditic duct; four rows of alveoli on the ventral disc but no prominent papillae; Laurer's canal opening to the exterior. Eggs hatched to cotylocidia within 37-41 days at 17-24 degrees C. The life-cycle is obligate two-host, involving a mollusc and a freshwater turtle. Juvenile forms, almost entirely single worm infections, were found in the molluscs Corbiculina sp. (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae) and Thiara balonnensis (Prosobranchia: Thiaridae). Sychnocotyle is most likely to have evolved in Australia after the separation of Gondwanaland from Laurasia 120- 100 mya.

  15. An Efficient Method for Genomic DNA Extraction from Different Molluscs Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jorge C.; Chaves, Raquel; Bastos, Estela; Leitão, Alexandra; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    The selection of a DNA extraction method is a critical step when subsequent analysis depends on the DNA quality and quantity. Unlike mammals, for which several capable DNA extraction methods have been developed, for molluscs the availability of optimized genomic DNA extraction protocols is clearly insufficient. Several aspects such as animal physiology, the type (e.g., adductor muscle or gills) or quantity of tissue, can explain the lack of efficiency (quality and yield) in molluscs genomic DNA extraction procedure. In an attempt to overcome these aspects, this work describes an efficient method for molluscs genomic DNA extraction that was tested in several species from different orders: Veneridae, Ostreidae, Anomiidae, Cardiidae (Bivalvia) and Muricidae (Gastropoda), with different weight sample tissues. The isolated DNA was of high molecular weight with high yield and purity, even with reduced quantities of tissue. Moreover, the genomic DNA isolated, demonstrated to be suitable for several downstream molecular techniques, such as PCR sequencing among others. PMID:22174651

  16. Continental shelf benthos off Otago Peninsula, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probert, P. Keith; Wilson, John B.

    1984-09-01

    Benthic macrofauna of the continental shelf off Otago Peninsula, south-eastern New Zealand (45°51'S, 170°52'E) was surveyed by dredge sampling during 1973-1975. Numerical classification (Canberra metric coefficient and flexible sorting) was used to produce site groups and species groups, and three major benthic communities were recognised: a shallow-water (14-25 m) fauna inhabiting well-sorted fine sand, a mid-shelf fauna (concentrated in the depth range 50-76 m) associated with sediments containing the greatest proportions of gravel and siltclay, and a predominantly sand-bottom fauna occurring mainly on the outer shelf (87-150 m). All station groups were dominated numerically by polychaetes (mean of 36·6-56% of individuals) with Mollusca (13·8-25%) or Crustacea (12·1-19·4%) the next most abundant group. The inshore sand fauna was the most distinct, characteristic elements being the trochid gastropod Antisolarium egenum, an amphipod of the genus Hippomedon and dense patches of the spionid polychaete Spiophanes bombyx. Diagnostic species of the mid-shelf mixed sediments were Lepidonotus jacksoni, Psammolyce antipoda, Lumbrineris brevicirra and Phyllamphicteis foliata (Polychaeta), Terenochiton otagoensis, Micrelenchus caelatus caelatus, Maoricolpus roseus roseus and Zegalerus tenuis (Mollusca), Ampelisca chiltoni (Amphipoda) and Amphipholis squamata (Ophiuroidea). Outer shelf sand stations were faunally less distinct, but among the more characteristic species were Euthalenessa fimbriata, Sigalion sp. and Euchone sp. (Polychaeta) and Gari stangeri (Bivalvia). Several abundant species were widely distributed among station groups, notably Nephtys macroura, Lumbrineris magalhaensis, Phyllochaetopterus socialis and Owenia fusiformis (Polychaeta) and Nucula nitidula and Tawera spissa (Bivalvia). Free-living lunulitiform Bryozoa of the genus Otionella were a characteristic component of inner and outer shelf sand faunas, and their inshore penetration probably marks

  17. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization. PMID:27703977

  18. Diet shifts of lesser scaup are consistent with the spring condition hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, M.J.; Afton, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    We compared diets of lesser scaup (Aythya affinis (Eyton, 1838)) in the springs of 2000 and 2001 to those reported in the 1970s and the 1980s to determine whether forage quality has declined as predicted by the spring condition hypothesis. In Minnesota, we found that the current aggregate percentage of Amphipoda (an important food item) in lesser scaup diets was 94% lower than that reported from the same locations in the 1980s. Current mean individual prey mass of Amphipoda and Bivalvia in Minnesota were 86.6% and 85.1% lower than historical levels, respectively. In Manitoba, current aggregate percentages of Trichoptera an