Science.gov

Sample records for perovskite stacking polytypes

  1. Rapid and Nondestructive Identification of Polytypism and Stacking Sequences in Few-Layer Molybdenum Diselenide by Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Xin; Utama, M. Iqbal Bakti; Lin, Junhao; Luo, Xin; Zhao, Yanyuan; Zhang, Jun; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; Quek, Su Ying; Xiong, Qihua

    2015-07-02

    Various combinations of interlayer shear modes emerge in few-layer molybdenum diselenide grown by chemical vapor deposition depending on the stacking configuration of the sample. Raman measurements may also reveal polytypism and stacking faults, as supported by first principles calculations and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Thus, Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in probing stacking-dependent properties in few-layer 2D materials.

  2. Anisotropy of Earth's D'' layer and stacking faults in the MgSiO3 post-perovskite phase.

    PubMed

    Oganov, Artem R; Martonák, Roman; Laio, Alessandro; Raiteri, Paolo; Parrinello, Michele

    2005-12-22

    The post-perovskite phase of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 is believed to be the main mineral phase of the Earth's lowermost mantle (the D'' layer). Its properties explain numerous geophysical observations associated with this layer-for example, the D'' discontinuity, its topography and seismic anisotropy within the layer. Here we use a novel simulation technique, first-principles metadynamics, to identify a family of low-energy polytypic stacking-fault structures intermediate between the perovskite and post-perovskite phases. Metadynamics trajectories identify plane sliding involving the formation of stacking faults as the most favourable pathway for the phase transition, and as a likely mechanism for plastic deformation of perovskite and post-perovskite. In particular, the predicted slip planes are {010} for perovskite (consistent with experiment) and {110} for post-perovskite (in contrast to the previously expected {010} slip planes). Dominant slip planes define the lattice preferred orientation and elastic anisotropy of the texture. The {110} slip planes in post-perovskite require a much smaller degree of lattice preferred orientation to explain geophysical observations of shear-wave anisotropy in the D'' layer.

  3. Mica polytypes: Systematic description and identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, M.; Takeda, H.; Wones, D.R.

    1966-01-01

    X-ray studies of mica specimens from a variety of geological localities show that biotite and certain lithium-rich mica samples are composed of a mixture of different polytypes. Many of the biotite structures are new complex polytypes not before reported. A new method of designating mica polytypes is proposed. Techniques are described for the systematic generation of all the possible layer-stacking sequences of mica polytypes and for the verification of the stacking sequences in newly discovered forms.

  4. A novel polytype - the stacking fault based γ-MoO3 nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Sławiński, Wojciech A; Fjellvåg, Øystein S; Ruud, Amund; Fjellvåg, Helmer

    2016-04-01

    γ-MoO3 nanobelts prepared by hydrothermal synthesis were studied by synchrotron radiation powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Their nm dimensions, in particular in two crystallographic directions, have a profound influence on electrochemical properties during cycling as the cathode material in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The diffraction analysis shows clearly that the crystal structure for the γ-MoO3 nanobelts differs significantly from that of bulk α-MoO3. The observed powder diffraction pattern, with asymmetric peaks, extremely broad peaks, as well as additional or absent diffraction peaks, is fully described by means of a model based on stacking disorder of MoO3 slabs. PMID:27048722

  5. Distribution of mica polytypes among space groups.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, H.

    1971-01-01

    All the possible space groups for mica polytypes are deduced by making use of the characteristics of the mica unit layer and stacking mode. The algebraic properties of the vector-stacking symbol of Ross et al. (1966) are examined, and a simple algorithm for deducing the space group from this symbol is presented. A method considered for enumerating all possible stacking sequences of mica polytypes makes use of a computer.

  6. Polytypism and mixed layering in minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers, J. P. R.

    Polytypes are stacking variations that occur in crystals, forming periodic extended defects, without changing the overall composition. Mineral examples are the different polytypes of micas, kaolinite, talc, graphite. None of the theories that have been proposed to explain the occurrence of short and long period superstructures have met with universal success in explaining their occurrences. Polysomatism is defined as the stacking of compositionally different modules, similar to polytypism. Minerals belonging to a polysomatic series have compositions that are linear combinations of the end members. Structures derived from the bixbyite (Mn2O3) structure are used as examples of a polysomatic series and a number of polysomes in single crystals have been described using HRTEM. The relative stabilities of different polysomes have been modelled with a lattice energy minimization programme. The results show that certain polysomes are significantly more stable than others, and that the contribution of next-nearest neighbour interactions seems to be an important factor in determining polysome stability.

  7. Polytypism in superhard transition-metal triborides

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yongcheng; Yang, Jiong; Yuan, Xun; Qiu, Wujie; Zhong, Zheng; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    The quest of novel compounds with special structures and unusual functionalities continues to be a central challenge to modern materials science. Even though their exact structures have puzzled scientists for decades, superhard transition-metal borides (TMBs) have long been believed to exist only in simple crystal structures. Here, we report on a polytypic phenomenon in superhard WB3 and MoB3 with a series of energetically degenerate structures due to the random stacking of metal layers amongst the interlocking boron layers. Such polytypism can create a multiphase solid-solution compound with a large number of interfaces amongst different polytypes, and these interfaces will strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movement within each polytype, thereby further increase the hardness of this particular material. Furthermore, in contrast to the conventional knowledge that intrinsically strong chemical bonds in superhard materials should lead to high lattice thermal conductivity, the polytypic TMB3 manifest anomalously low lattice thermal conductivity due to structural disorders and phonon folding. These findings promise to open a new avenue to searching for novel superhard materials with additional functionalities. PMID:24863493

  8. Epitaxial growth of hexagonal silicon polytypes on sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, D. A.; Pirogov, A. V. Krivulin, N. O.; Bobrov, A. I.

    2015-01-15

    The formation of a single-crystal silicon polytype is observed in silicon-on-sapphire structures by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The appearance of inclusions with a structure different from that of diamond is attributed to the formation of strong-twinning regions and the aggregation of stacking faults, which form their own crystal structure in the crystal lattice of silicon. It is demonstrated that the given modification belongs to the 9R silicon polytype.

  9. Raman Signatures of Polytypism in Molybdenum Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Ung; Kim, Kangwon; Han, Songhee; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Zonghoon; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2016-02-23

    Since the stacking order sensitively affects various physical properties of layered materials, accurate determination of the stacking order is important for studying the basic properties of these materials as well as for device applications. Because 2H-molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is most common in nature, most studies so far have focused on 2H-MoS2. However, we found that the 2H, 3R, and mixed stacking sequences exist in few-layer MoS2 exfoliated from natural molybdenite crystals. The crystal structures are confirmed by HR-TEM measurements. The Raman signatures of different polytypes are investigated by using three different excitation energies that are nonresonant and resonant with A and C excitons, respectively. The low-frequency breathing and shear modes show distinct differences for each polytype, whereas the high-frequency intralayer modes show little difference. For resonant excitations at 1.96 and 2.81 eV, distinct features are observed that enable determination of the stacking order.

  10. Raman Signatures of Polytypism in Molybdenum Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Ung; Kim, Kangwon; Han, Songhee; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Zonghoon; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2016-02-23

    Since the stacking order sensitively affects various physical properties of layered materials, accurate determination of the stacking order is important for studying the basic properties of these materials as well as for device applications. Because 2H-molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is most common in nature, most studies so far have focused on 2H-MoS2. However, we found that the 2H, 3R, and mixed stacking sequences exist in few-layer MoS2 exfoliated from natural molybdenite crystals. The crystal structures are confirmed by HR-TEM measurements. The Raman signatures of different polytypes are investigated by using three different excitation energies that are nonresonant and resonant with A and C excitons, respectively. The low-frequency breathing and shear modes show distinct differences for each polytype, whereas the high-frequency intralayer modes show little difference. For resonant excitations at 1.96 and 2.81 eV, distinct features are observed that enable determination of the stacking order. PMID:26756836

  11. Strong Photocurrent from Two-Dimensional Excitons in Solution-Processed Stacked Perovskite Semiconductor Sheets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Room-temperature photocurrent measurements in two-dimensional (2D) inorganic–organic perovskite devices reveal that excitons strongly contribute to the photocurrents despite possessing binding energies over 10 times larger than the thermal energies. The p-type (C6H9C2H4NH3)2PbI4 liberates photocarriers at metallic Schottky aluminum contacts, but incorporating electron- and hole-transport layers enhances the extracted photocurrents by 100-fold. A further 10-fold gain is found when TiO2 nanoparticles are directly integrated into the perovskite layers, although the 2D exciton semiconducting layers are not significantly disrupted. These results show that strong excitonic materials may be useful as photovoltaic materials despite high exciton binding energies and suggest mechanisms to better understand the photovoltaic properties of the related three-dimensional perovskites. PMID:26497547

  12. Polytypism, polymorphism, and superconductivity in TaSe2–xTex

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Huixia; Xie, Weiwei; Tao, Jing; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Gyenis, András; Krizan, Jason W.; Yazdani, Ali; Zhu, Yimei; Cava, Robert Joseph

    2015-03-03

    Polymorphism in materials often leads to significantly different physical properties - the rutile and anatase polymorphs of TiO₂ are a prime example. Polytypism is a special type of polymorphism, occurring in layered materials when the geometry of a repeating structural layer is maintained but the layer stacking sequence of the overall crystal structure can be varied; SiC is an example of a material with many polytypes. Although polymorphs can have radically different physical properties, it is much rarer for polytypism to impact physical properties in a dramatic fashion. Here we study the effects of polytypism and polymorphism on the superconductivitymore » of TaSe₂, one of the archetypal members of the large family of layered dichalcogenides. We show that it is possible to access 2 stable polytypes and 2 stable polymorphs in the TaSe2-xTex solid solution, and find that the 3R polytype shows a superconducting transition temperature that is between 6 and 17 times higher than that of the much more commonly found 2H polytype. Thus, the reason for this dramatic change is not apparent, but we propose that it arises either from a remarkable dependence of Tc on subtle differences in the characteristics of the single layers present, or from a surprising effect of the layer stacking sequence on electronic properties that instead are expected to be dominated by the properties of a single layer in materials of this kind.« less

  13. Thermal expansion and elastic anisotropies of SiC as related to polytype structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Z.; Bradt, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of the fraction of hexagonal stacking is used to describe the anisotropic thermal expansion coefficients of polytypes of SiC. The single crystal elastic anisotropy for the SiC polytype structures and the temperature dependencies of the anisotropies are examined. The anisotropic thermoelastic stress index for the 3C and 6H SiC polytypes are illustrated graphically. It is shown that this index is useful for predicting the most desirable crystal growth orientations for SiC whisker incorporation into composite matrices.

  14. Linearly arranged polytypic CZTSSe nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Feng-Jia; Wu, Liang; Gong, Ming; Chen, Shi You; Liu, Guang Yao; Yao, Hong-Bin; Liang, Hai-Wei; Wang, Yi-Xiu; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Even colloidal polytypic nanostructures show promising future in band-gap tuning and alignment, researches on them have been much less reported than the standard nano-heterostructures because of the difficulties involved in synthesis. Up to now, controlled synthesis of colloidal polytypic nanocrsytals has been only realized in II-VI tetrapod and octopod nanocrystals with branched configurations. Herein, we report a colloidal approach for synthesizing non-branched but linearly arranged polytypic I2-II-IV-VI4 nanocrystals, with a focus on polytypic non-stoichiometric Cu2ZnSnSxSe4−x nanocrystals. Each synthesized polytypic non-stoichiometric Cu2ZnSnSxSe4−x nanocrystal is consisted of two zinc blende-derived ends and one wurtzite-derived center part. The formation mechanism has been studied and the phase composition can be tuned through adjusting the reaction temperature, which brings a new band-gap tuning approach to Cu2ZnSnSxSe4-x nanocrystals. PMID:23233871

  15. Classification of polytype structures of zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, V.I.

    1994-12-31

    It is suggested that the existing classification of polytype structures of zinc sulfide be supplemented with an additional criterion: the characteristic of regular point systems (Wyckoff positions) including their type, number, and multiplicity. The consideration of the Wyckoff positions allowed the establishment of construction principles of known polytype series of different symmetries and the systematization (for the first time) of the polytypes with the same number of differently packed layers. the classification suggested for polytype structures of zinc sulfide is compact and provides a basis for creating search systems. The classification table obtained can also be used for numerous silicon carbide polytypes. 8 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Thermal expansion and thermal expansion anisotropy of SiC polytypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Z.; Bradt, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    The principal axial coefficients of thermal expansion for the (3C), (4H), and (6H) polytypes of SiC are considered to identify the structural role of the stacking layer sequence as it affects the thermal expansion. A general equation based on the fractions of cubic and hexagonal layer stacking is developed that expresses the principal axial thermal expansion coefficients of all of the SiC polytypes. It is then applied to address the thermal expansion anisotropy of the noncubic SiC structures.

  17. Polytypism, polymorphism, and superconductivity in TaSe2–xTex

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Huixia; Xie, Weiwei; Tao, Jing; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Gyenis, András; Krizan, Jason W.; Yazdani, Ali; Zhu, Yimei; Cava, Robert Joseph

    2015-03-03

    Polymorphism in materials often leads to significantly different physical properties - the rutile and anatase polymorphs of TiO₂ are a prime example. Polytypism is a special type of polymorphism, occurring in layered materials when the geometry of a repeating structural layer is maintained but the layer stacking sequence of the overall crystal structure can be varied; SiC is an example of a material with many polytypes. Although polymorphs can have radically different physical properties, it is much rarer for polytypism to impact physical properties in a dramatic fashion. Here we study the effects of polytypism and polymorphism on the superconductivity of TaSe₂, one of the archetypal members of the large family of layered dichalcogenides. We show that it is possible to access 2 stable polytypes and 2 stable polymorphs in the TaSe2-xTex solid solution, and find that the 3R polytype shows a superconducting transition temperature that is between 6 and 17 times higher than that of the much more commonly found 2H polytype. Thus, the reason for this dramatic change is not apparent, but we propose that it arises either from a remarkable dependence of Tc on subtle differences in the characteristics of the single layers present, or from a surprising effect of the layer stacking sequence on electronic properties that instead are expected to be dominated by the properties of a single layer in materials of this kind.

  18. Nanostructural and electronic properties of polytypes in InN nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect

    Kioseoglou, J.; Koukoula, T.; Komninou, Ph.; Kehagias, Th.; Georgakilas, A.; Androulidaki, M.

    2013-08-21

    Transmission electron microscopy techniques and density functional theory calculations were employed to investigate the nanostructural and electronic properties of InN polytypes observed in InN nanocolumns, grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy. Moiré fringes and alternating hexagonal and cubic lattice stacking sequences along the c-axis, observed among the wurtzite layers, implied the presence of different structures embedded in the basic 2H structure of the nanocolumns. Quantitative electron diffraction analysis and high-resolution image simulations verified the coexistence of the wurtzite structure with the 4H, 6H, and the 3C zinc-blende structural polytypes. Total energies calculations established the 2H wurtzite structure as the most stable polytype. The band gap of all polytypes was found direct with the energies and the band gaps of the 4H (E{sub g} = 0.64 eV) and 6H (E{sub g} = 0.60 eV) structures calculated between the corresponding values of the 2H (E{sub g} = 0.75 eV) and 3C (E{sub g} = 0.49 eV) basic structures. Theoretical and experimental analysis showed that at the initial stages of growth InN nanocolumns were under tensile strain along both the basal plane and growth direction. Structural polytypes were then introduced in the form of embedded inclusions to accommodate the excess tensile strain along the growth direction, allowing the entire process of polymorphism to be the dominant strain relaxation mechanism of InN nanocolumns. Moreover, the lattice and energetic properties and band gap values of InN polytypes showed a linear dependence on hexagonality, while the presence of polytypes led to a characteristic broadening of the photoluminescence emission peak toward lower emission energies.

  19. Perspectives and limitations of symmetric X-ray Bragg reflections for inspecting polytypism in nanowires.

    PubMed

    Köhl, Martin; Schroth, Philipp; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-03-01

    X-ray diffraction, possibly time-resolved during growth or annealing, is an important technique for the investigation of polytypism in free-standing nanowires. A major advantage of the X-ray diffraction approach for adequately chosen beam conditions is its high statistical significance in comparison with transmission electron microscopy. In this manuscript the interpretation of such X-ray intensity distribution is discussed, and is shown to be non-trivial and non-unique given measurements of the [111]c or [333]c reflection of polytypic nanowires grown in the (111)c direction. In particular, the diffracted intensity distributions for several statistical distributions of the polytypes inside the nanowires are simulated and compared. As an example, polytypic GaAs nanowires are employed, grown on a Si-(111) substrate with an interplanar spacing of the Ga (or As) planes in the wurtzite arrangement that is 0.7% larger than in the zinc blende arrangement along the (111)c direction. Most importantly, ambiguities of high experimental relevance in the case of strongly fluctuating length of the defect-free polytype segments in the nanowires are demonstrated. As a consequence of these ambiguities, a large set of deviations from the widely used Markov model for the stacking sequences of the nanowires cannot be detected in the X-ray diffraction data. Thus, the results here are of high relevance for the proper interpretation of such data. PMID:26917137

  20. An ab initio study of the polytypism in InP

    PubMed Central

    Dacal, Luis C. O.; Cantarero, A.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of polytypism in semiconductor nanostructures gives rise to the appearance of stacking faults which many times can be treated as quantum wells. In some cases, despite of a careful growth, the polytypism can be hardly avoided. In this work, we perform an ab initio study of zincblende stacking faults in a wurtzite InP system, using the supercell approach and taking the limit of low density of narrow stacking faults regions. Our results confirm the type II band alignment between the phases, producing a reliable qualitative description of the band gap evolution along the growth axis. These results show an spacial asymmetry in the zincblende quantum wells, that is expected due to the fact that the wurtzite stacking sequence (ABAB) is part of the zincblende one (ABCABC), but with an unexpected asymmetry between the valence and the conduction bands. We also present results for the complex dielectric function, clearly showing the influence of the stacking on the homostructure values and surprisingly proving that the correspondent bulk results can be used to reproduce the polytypism even in the limit we considered. PMID:27666092

  1. Crystal structure of Cr-bearing Mg3BeAl8O16, a new polytype of magnesiotaaffeite-2N'2S.

    PubMed

    Malcherek, Thomas; Schlüter, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The crystal structure of a new polytype of magnesiotaaffeite-2N'2S, ideally Mg3BeAl8O16 (trimagnesium beryllium octa-aluminium hexa-deca-oxide), is described in space-group symmetry P-3m1. It has been identified in a fragment of a mineral sample from Burma (Myanmar). The new polytype is composed of two Mg2Al4O8 (S)- and two BeMgAl4O8 (N')-modules in a stacking sequence N'SSN'' which differs from the N'SN'S-stacking sequence of the known magnesiotaaffeite-2N'2S polytype. The crystal structure can be derived from a close-packed arrangement of O atoms and is discussed with regard to its polytypism and its Cr(3+) chromophore content.

  2. Crystal structure of Cr-bearing Mg3BeAl8O16, a new polytype of magnesiotaaffeite-2N′2S

    PubMed Central

    Malcherek, Thomas; Schlüter, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of a new polytype of magnesiotaaffeite-2N′2S, ideally Mg3BeAl8O16 (trimagnesium beryllium octa­aluminium hexa­deca­oxide), is described in space-group symmetry P-3m1. It has been identified in a fragment of a mineral sample from Burma (Myanmar). The new polytype is composed of two Mg2Al4O8 (S)- and two BeMgAl4O8 (N′)-modules in a stacking sequence N′SSN′′ which differs from the N′SN′S-stacking sequence of the known magnesiotaaffeite-2N′2S polytype. The crystal structure can be derived from a close-packed arrangement of O atoms and is discussed with regard to its polytypism and its Cr3+ chromophore content. PMID:27555963

  3. Crystal structure of Cr-bearing Mg3BeAl8O16, a new polytype of magnesiotaaffeite-2N'2S.

    PubMed

    Malcherek, Thomas; Schlüter, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The crystal structure of a new polytype of magnesiotaaffeite-2N'2S, ideally Mg3BeAl8O16 (trimagnesium beryllium octa-aluminium hexa-deca-oxide), is described in space-group symmetry P-3m1. It has been identified in a fragment of a mineral sample from Burma (Myanmar). The new polytype is composed of two Mg2Al4O8 (S)- and two BeMgAl4O8 (N')-modules in a stacking sequence N'SSN'' which differs from the N'SN'S-stacking sequence of the known magnesiotaaffeite-2N'2S polytype. The crystal structure can be derived from a close-packed arrangement of O atoms and is discussed with regard to its polytypism and its Cr(3+) chromophore content. PMID:27555963

  4. Two new polytypes of 2,4,6-tri­bromo­benzo­nitrile

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Doyle; Noland, Wayland E.; Tritch, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Three polymorphs of 2,4,6-tri­bromo­benzo­nitrile (RCN), C7H2Br3N, two of which are novel and one of which is a redetermination of the original structure first determined by Carter & Britton [(1972). Acta Cryst. B28, 945–950] are found to be polytypic. Each has a layer structure which differs only in the stacking of the layers. Each layer is composed of mol­ecules associated through C N⋯Br contacts which form R 2 2(10) rings. Two such rings are associated with each N atom; one with each ortho-Br atom. No new polytypes of 1,3,5-tri­bromo-2-iso­cyano­benzene (RNC) were found but a re-determination of the original structure by Carter et al. [(1977). Cryst. Struct. Commun. 6, 543–548] is presented. RNC was found to be isostructural with one of the novel polytypes of RCN. Unit cells were determined for 23 RCN samples and 11 RNC samples. Polytypes could not be distinguished based on crystal habits. In all four structures, each mol­ecule of the asymmetric unit lies across a mirror plane. PMID:26958382

  5. Polytype-selective growth of SiC by supersaturation control in solution growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuaki; Alexander; Kozawa, Shigeta; Harada, Shunta; Ujihara, Toru; Takeda, Yoshikazu

    2012-12-01

    We realized the polytype-selective growth of 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC on a 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) seed crystal by controlling the supersaturation. Both 6H-SiC and 3C-SiC grew on the 6H-SiC seed crystal at low supersaturation, but 3C-SiC increased with increasing supersaturation. At high supersaturation, 3C-SiC grew so rapidly that it completely covered the 6H-SiC seed crystal. The growth rates of 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC have different dependences on supersaturation. In the present case, the growth rate of 3C-SiC in 2D nucleation mode is compared with that of 6H-SiC in spiral growth mode. The present kinetic polytype-control technique is based on polytypes having different growth rates and it differs considerably from the conventional technique that is based on "inheritance" of stacking sequence, which is well known as "step-controlled epitaxy".

  6. The structure of orange HgI2. I. Polytypic layer structure.

    PubMed

    Hostettler, Marc; Birkedal, Henrik; Schwarzenbach, Dieter

    2002-12-01

    The metastable orange crystals of HgI(2) comprise three different crystal structures, all of which are built from corner-linked Hg(4)I(10) supertetrahedra. Two of them are end members with the maximum degree of order (MDO) of a polytypic layer structure; the third shows a three-dimensional linkage. This paper presents the determination from X-ray diffraction data of the tetragonal polytypic structures and their stacking disorder. Diffraction patterns show sharp Bragg reflections and rods of diffuse intensity with pronounced maxima. In a first step, the diffuse intensity was neglected and all maxima were treated as Bragg reflections. The crystal was supposed to be a conglomerate of the two MDO structures diffracting independently, and their parameters and volume ratio were refined against the single data set. The geometries and anisotropic displacement parameters of the layers in the two structures are shown to be nearly identical. Layer contacts in the two stacking modes are identical. The structures are fractal complications of the stable red form of HgI(2). In a second step, the stacking disorder has been quantitatively analyzed with a Markov chain model. Two probabilities describing next-nearest-layer interactions were visually adjusted to observed intensity profiles extracted from image-plate detector data. Results consistently show that the crystal comprises nearly equal volumes of MDO structures with an average domain thickness of about 5 layers or 30 A

  7. Strain effects in polytypical wurtzite/zinc-blend nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahi, Guilherme; Faria, Paulo

    2012-02-01

    The recent interest on III-V nanowhiskers has led to the growth of high quality samples of systems with two different crystalline structures [1]. The crystals grown in [111]-direction for the zinc-blend (ZB) phase and [0001]-direction for the wurtzite (WZ) phase are very similar and can both be described as stacked hexagonal layers. The effect of two different structural phases coexisting in the same nanostrucure is known as polytypism and creates confinement profiles similar to a heterostructure. One can notice band offsets at the interface and the formation of electronic minibands that can be explored to design systems for device applications. Although some of the III-V compounds do not present WZ structure in bulk form, recent calculations [2] presented a theoretical prediction of their band structure. However, as they considered that ZB and WZ to have the same lattice parameters no strain effects should appear on a first approach. Our theoretical approach introduces strain effects in our previous model [3] by using group theory arguments. It allows the analysis of the biaxial strain effects for both structures in a single matrix. [1] P. Caroff et al. Nature Nanotech. 4, 50, 2009. [2] A. De and C. E. Pryor, Phys. Rev. B 81, 155210, 2010 [3] http://arxiv.org/abs/1012.022

  8. Copper thiocyanate: polytypes, defects, impurities, and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tsetseris, Leonidas

    2016-07-27

    Copper thiocyanate (CuSCN) is an established solid state dye in solar cells and has emerged as a key material for applications in transparent conductors and solution-processed thin film transistors. Here we report the results of density-functional theory calculations on several fundamental properties related to the performance of CuSCN in the above-mentioned systems. We describe the structural and electronic properties of CuSCN phases and show that the material is prone to polytypism. We also perform a systematic study on various defects and hydrogen impurities and determine their effect on the electronic properties of the host system, particularly with respect to doping. Finally, we show that non-polar surfaces have low formation energies, suggesting easy cleavage along certain directions. PMID:27248787

  9. Coexistence of multiple metastable polytypes in rhombohedral bismuth

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yu; Hu, Wentao; Liu, Zhongyuan; Shen, Guoyin; Xu, Bo; Zhao, Zhisheng; He, Julong; Wang, Yanbin; Tian, Yongjun; Yu, Dongli

    2016-01-01

    Derivative structural polytypes coexisting with the rhombohedral A7 structure of elemental bismuth (Bi) have been discovered at ambient condition, based on microstructure analyses of pure Bi samples treated under high pressure and high temperature conditions. Three structures with atomic positions close to those of the A7 structure have been identified through first-principles calculations, showing these polytypes energetically comparable to the A7 structure under ambient condition. Simulated diffraction data are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. We argue that previously reported some variations of physical properties (e.g., density, electrical conductivity, and magnetism) in bismuth could be due to the formation of these polytypes. The coexistence of metastable derivative structural polytypes may be a widely occurring phenomenon in other elemental materials. PMID:26883895

  10. Polytypism and unexpected strong interlayer coupling in two-dimensional layered ReS2.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhou, Linwei; Qiao, Jingsi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Wei; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-04-21

    Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and anisotropic-like (AI) N layer (NL, N > 1) ReS2 are revealed by ultralow- and high-frequency Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence and first-principles density functional theory calculation. Two interlayer shear modes are observed in AI-NL-ReS2 while only one shear mode appears in IS-NL-ReS2, suggesting anisotropic- and isotropic-like stacking orders in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2, respectively. This explicit difference in the observed frequencies identifies an unexpected strong interlayer coupling in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2. Quantitatively, the force constants of them are found to be around 55-90% of those of multilayer MoS2. The revealed strong interlayer coupling and polytypism in multi-layer ReS2 may stimulate future studies on engineering physical properties of other anisotropic 2D materials by stacking orders. PMID:27035503

  11. Rhombohedral polytypes of the layered honeycomb delafossites with optical brilliance in the visible.

    PubMed

    Roudebush, John H; Sahasrabudhe, Girija; Bergman, Susanna L; Cava, R J

    2015-04-01

    We report the synthesis of the Delafossite honeycomb compounds Cu3Ni2SbO6 and Cu3Co2SbO6 via a copper topotactic reaction from the layered α-NaFeO2-like precursors Na3Ni2SbO6 and Na3Co2SbO6. The low-temperature exchange reaction exclusively produces the rhombahedral 3R polytype subcell, whereas only the hexagonal 2H polytype subcell has been made by conventional synthesis. The thus-synthesized 3R variants are visually striking; they are bright lime-green (Ni variant) and terracotta-orange (Co variant), while both of the conventionally synthesized 2H variants have a burnt-red color. The new structures are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis as well as magnetic susceptibility, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and diffuse-reflectance optical spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, we identify a second order 3R → 2H phase transition as well as a first-order structural transition associated with rearrangement of the honeycomb stacking layers. The optical absorbance spectra of the samples show discrete edges that correlate well to their visual colors. Exposing Cu3Ni2SbO6 to O2 and heat causes the sample to change color. XPS confirms the presence of Cu(2+) in these samples, which implies that the difference in color between the polytypes is due to oxygen intercalation resulting from their different synthetic routes.

  12. Interband polarized absorption in InP polytypic superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Faria Junior, P. E.; Sipahi, G. M.; Campos, T.

    2014-11-21

    Recent advances in growth techniques have allowed the fabrication of semiconductor nanostructures with mixed wurtzite/zinc-blende crystal phases. Although the optical characterization of these polytypic structures is well reported in the literature, a deeper theoretical understanding of how crystal phase mixing and quantum confinement change the output linear light polarization is still needed. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the mixing effects of wurtzite and zinc-blende phases on the interband absorption and in the degree of light polarization of an InP polytypic superlattice. We use a single 8 × 8 k⋅p Hamiltonian that describes both crystal phases. Quantum confinement is investigated by changing the size of the polytypic unit cell. We also include the optical confinement effect due to the dielectric mismatch between the superlattice and the vaccum and we show it to be necessary to match experimental results. Our calculations for large wurtzite concentrations and small quantum confinement explain the optical trends of recent photoluminescence excitation measurements. Furthermore, we find a high sensitivity to zinc-blende concentrations in the degree of linear polarization. This sensitivity can be reduced by increasing quantum confinement. In conclusion, our theoretical analysis provides an explanation for optical trends in InP polytypic superlattices, and shows that the interplay of crystal phase mixing and quantum confinement is an area worth exploring for light polarization engineering.

  13. Combinatorial approaches to understanding polytypism in III-V nanowires.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jonas; Bolinsson, Jessica; Ek, Martin; Caroff, Philippe; Dick, Kimberly A

    2012-07-24

    Polytypism in III-V semiconductor nanowires is a topic that has received considerable attention in recent years. Achieving a pure nanowire crystal phase requires well-controlled and advanced parameter tuning for most III-V materials. Additionally, the new and unusual phases sometimes observed may present unique material properties if they can be controllably fabricated. With the prospect of using nanowires in applications within several different fields (including electronics, photonics, and life science), theoretical models are necessary to explain experimental trends and to attain a high level of crystal phase control. At present, there is no theoretical model (or combination of models) that fully explains how and why nanowire crystal structures commonly include several different polytypes. Here we use combinatorics and interlayer interactions to include higher order polytypes (4H and 6H) with the aim to explain nanowire crystal structure beyond the well-investigated zinc blende-wurtzite polytypism. Predictions from our theoretical models compare well with experimental results. PMID:22681568

  14. Second-harmonic generation in silicon carbide polytypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, S.; Schillinger, H.; Sauerbrey, R.; Adolph, B.; Bechstedt, F.

    1999-08-01

    We report simultaneous measurements and ab initio calculations of the second-order nonlinear coefficients for SiC polytypes. Our measured values for χzzz (χzxx) are 18 (-4) pm/V for 4H SiC and 24 (-4) pm/V for 6H SiC. They are in good agreement with our theoretical results.

  15. Polytypism and unexpected strong interlayer coupling in two-dimensional layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhou, Linwei; Qiao, Jingsi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Wei; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-04-01

    Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and anisotropic-like (AI) N layer (NL, N > 1) ReS2 are revealed by ultralow- and high-frequency Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence and first-principles density functional theory calculation. Two interlayer shear modes are observed in AI-NL-ReS2 while only one shear mode appears in IS-NL-ReS2, suggesting anisotropic- and isotropic-like stacking orders in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2, respectively. This explicit difference in the observed frequencies identifies an unexpected strong interlayer coupling in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2. Quantitatively, the force constants of them are found to be around 55-90% of those of multilayer MoS2. The revealed strong interlayer coupling and polytypism in multi-layer ReS2 may stimulate future studies on engineering physical properties of other anisotropic 2D materials by stacking orders.Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and

  16. Radiometric dating of brittle fault rocks; illite polytype age analysis and application to the Spanish Pyrenees.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, B. A.; Haines, S. H.

    2008-12-01

    A variety of approaches have been available to indirectly date the timing of deformation and motion on faults, but few approaches for direct, radiometric dating of shallow crustal fault rocks were available until recently. The growing recognition of clay neomineralization at low temperatures in many fault rocks, particularly the 1Md illite polytype, allows the successful application of Ar dating to these K-bearing phases. In this presentation we will discuss our recent illite age analysis approach (sampling, treatments, analytical methods), and present new results from fault dating along the Spanish Pyrenean orogenic front as an example. X-ray quantification of polytype ratios in three or more size fractions is used to define a mixing line between (1Md illite) authigenic and (2M illite) detrital end-member phases that constrain the fault age and host rock provenance/cooling age for each fault. The common problem of recoil in clays is addressed by encapsulating samples before irradiation. Nine fault gouge ages in the south-central and south-eastern Pyrenees support several contractional pulses in the Pyrenean orogen: 1) Late Cretaceous thrusting (Boixols), 2) Latest Paleocene-Early Eocene deformation (Nogueres Zone and Freser antiformal stack), 3) Middle-Late Eocene deformation (Ripoll syncline, Vallfogona, Gavernie, Abocador and L'Escala thrusts), and 4) Middle Oligocene thrusting in the central portion of the Axial Zone (Llavorsi-Senet). The late Paleocene-Early Eocene and Middle-Late Eocene events may or may not be one single phase, due to slightly overlapping error estimates. The outboard thrusts give Hercynian ages for the detrital component of the fault rock, while the inboard thrusts, which juxtapose metamorphic units, give Cretaceous ages for the non-authigenic component, reflecting the cooling age of the adjacent wallrocks. Based on our latest work, the illite polytype dating method complements previously developed illite-smectite dating (van der Pluijm et

  17. Polytypic Nanocrystals of Cu-Based Ternary Chalcogenides: Colloidal Synthesis and Photoelectrochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Chen, Shi-You; Fan, Feng-Jia; Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Dai, Chen-Min; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Heterocrystalline polytype nanostructured semiconductors have been attracting more and more attention in recent years due to their novel structures and special interfaces. Up to now, controlled polytypic nanostructures are mostly realized in II-VI and III-V semiconductors. Herein, we report the synthesis and photoelectrochemical properties of Cu-based ternary I-III-VI2 chalcogenide polytypic nanocrystals, with a focus on polytypic CuInS2 (CIS), CuInSe2 (CISe), and CuIn(S0.5Se0.5)2 alloy nanocrystals. Each obtained polytypic nanocrystal is constructed with a wurtzite hexagonal column and a zinc blende/chalcopyrite cusp, regardless of the S/Se ratio. The growth mechanisms of polytypic CIS and CISe nanocrystals have been studied by time-dependent experiments. The polytypic nanocrystals are solution-deposited on indium-tin oxide glass substrate and used as a photoelectrode, thus showing stable photoelectrochemical activity in aqueous solution. Density functional theory calculation was used to study the electronic structure and the band gap alignment. This versatile synthetic method provides a new route for synthesis of novel polytypic nanostructured semiconductors with unique properties. PMID:27063512

  18. Orientation, alignment, and polytype control in epitaxial growth of SiC nanowires for electronics application in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshka, Yaroslav; Thirumalai, Rooban Venkatesh K. G.; Krishnan, Bharat K.; Levin, Igor; Merrett, J. Neil; Davydov, Albert V.

    2013-09-01

    SiC nanowires (NWs) are attractive building blocks for the next generation electronic devices since silicon carbide is a wide bandgap semiconductor with high electrical breakdown strength, radiation resistance, mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, chemical stability and biocompatibility. Epitaxial growth using metal-catalyst-based vapor-liquid-solid mechanism was employed for SiC NW growth in this work. 4H-SiC substrates having different crystallographic orientations were used in order to control NW alignment and polytype. A new technique based on vapor-phase delivery of the metal catalyst was developed to facilitate control of the NW density. Both 4H and 3C polytypes with a strong stacking disorder were obtained. The 4H and 3C NWs had different orientations with respect to the substrate. 4H NWs grew perpendicular to the c-plane of the substrate. The stacking faults (SFs) in these nanowires were perpendicular to the [0001] nanowire axes. All 3C NWs grew at 20° with respect to the substrate c-plane, and their projections on the c-plane corresponded to one of the six equivalent ⟨101-0⟩ crystallographic directions. All six orientations were obtained simultaneously when growing NWs on the (0001) substrate surface, while only one or two NW orientations were observed when growing NWs on any particular crystallographic plane parallel to the c-axis of the substrate. Growth on {101-0} surfaces resulted in only one NW orientation, thereby producing well-aligned NW arrays. Preliminary measurements of the NW electrical conductivity are reported utilizing two-terminal device geometry.

  19. Characterization of the Waukesha Illite: A mixed-polytype illite in the Clay Mineral Society repository

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grathoff, Georg H.; Moore, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    The Waukesha Illite is an excellent example of the illites found in argillaceous rocks, typical for Paleozoic shales that have undergone significant burial diagenesis during their geologic history. It consists of a mixture of detrital 2M1, interpreted to be a residuum of karstification within Silurian carbonates, and diagenetic 1M and 1Md illite. The chemistry and the age of the illite polytypes are different. Extrapolating to 100%, the 1M and 1Md polytypes have an apparent diagenetic age between 295 and 325 Ma. The chemistry of the 1M polytype could not be determined because of its low abundance. The approximate chemical composition of the 1Md polytype is 0.67 K, 3.6 Si, and 1.9 Al per half unit cell. The 2M1 polytype has an apparent detrital age between 440 and 520 Ma, and an approximate chemical composition per half unit cell of 0.78 K, 3.4 Si, and 2.1 Al, all within our margin of error. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results of both random powder and oriented preparations both indicate that the Waukesha Illite consists of a mixture of illites. The XRD patterns of the random powder preparation indicate it is a physical mixture of three different illite polytypes. This result was confirmed using 3 different methods: (1) by measuring illite polytype-specific reflections; (2) by mixing illite polytype reference samples; and (3) by mixing WILDFIRE calculated XRD patterns. Decomposition of the illite 001 XRD peak from oriented preparations also indicates mixtures of illites. However, the proportions of the three illitic components derived from the oriented 001 peak decomposition differ from those results derived from the analysis of the random powder data. Therefore, the shape of the 001 reflection of the Waukesha Illite cannot be explained by mixing the three different illite polytypes.

  20. Complex (Nonstandard) Six-Layer Polytypes of Lizardite Revealed from Oblique-Texture Electron Diffraction Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistov, A.P.; Zinchuk, N.N.; Kotel'nikov, D.D.

    2004-11-01

    Association of simple (1T and 3R) and two complex (nonstandard) orthogonal polytypes of the serpentine mineral lizardite from the Catoca kimberlite pipe (West Africa) association is revealed from oblique-texture electron diffraction patterns. A six-layer polytype with an ordered superposition of equally oriented layers (notation 3{sub 2}3{sub 2}3{sub 4}3{sub 4}3{sub 6}3{sub 6} or ++ - -00) belonging to the structural group A and a three-layer (336 or I,I,II) or a six-layer (336366 or I,I,II,I,II,II) polytype with alternating oppositely oriented layers and semi-disordered structure are identified using polytype analysis.

  1. Analysis of polytype stability in PVT grown silicon carbide single crystal using competitive lattice model Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hui-Jun; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xi; Gao, Pan; Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Xin, Jun; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Zheng, Yan-Qing; Yang, Jian-Hua; Shi, Er-Wei

    2014-09-01

    Polytype stability is very important for high quality SiC single crystal growth. However, the growth conditions for the 4H, 6H and 15R polytypes are similar, and the mechanism of polytype stability is not clear. The kinetics aspects, such as surface-step nucleation, are important. The kinetic Monte Carlo method is a common tool to study surface kinetics in crystal growth. However, the present lattice models for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations cannot solve the problem of the competitive growth of two or more lattice structures. In this study, a competitive lattice model was developed for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of the competition growth of the 4H and 6H polytypes of SiC. The site positions are fixed at the perfect crystal lattice positions without any adjustment of the site positions. Surface steps on seeds and large ratios of diffusion/deposition have positive effects on the 4H polytype stability. The 3D polytype distribution in a physical vapor transport method grown SiC ingot showed that the facet preserved the 4H polytype even if the 6H polytype dominated the growth surface. The theoretical and experimental results of polytype growth in SiC suggest that retaining the step growth mode is an important factor to maintain a stable single 4H polytype during SiC growth.

  2. Metallic VS2 Monolayer Polytypes as Potential Sodium-Ion Battery Anode via ab Initio Random Structure Searching.

    PubMed

    Putungan, Darwin Barayang; Lin, Shi-Hsin; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2016-07-27

    We systematically investigated the potential of single-layer VS2 polytypes as Na-battery anode materials via density functional theory calculations. We found that sodiation tends to inhibit the 1H-to-1T structural phase transition, in contrast to lithiation-induced transition on monolayer MoS2. Thus, VS2 can have better structural stability in the cycles of charging and discharging. Diffussion of Na atom was found to be very fast on both polytypes, with very small diffusion barriers of 0.085 eV (1H) and 0.088 eV (1T). Ab initio random structure searching was performed in order to explore stable configurations of Na on VS2. Our search found that both the V top and the hexagonal center sites are preferred adsorption sites for Na, with the 1H phase showing a relatively stronger binding. Notably, our random structures search revealed that Na clusters can form as a stacked second layer at full Na concentration, which is not reported in earlier works wherein uniform, single-layer Na adsorption phases were assumed. With reasonably high specific energy capacity (232.91 and 116.45 mAh/g for 1H and 1T phases, respectively) and open-circuit voltage (1.30 and 1.42 V for 1H and 1T phases, respectively), VS2 is a promising alternative material for Na-ion battery anodes with great structural sturdiness. Finally, we have shown the capability of the ab initio random structure searching in the assessment of potential materials for energy storage applications. PMID:27373121

  3. Metallic VS2 Monolayer Polytypes as Potential Sodium-Ion Battery Anode via ab Initio Random Structure Searching.

    PubMed

    Putungan, Darwin Barayang; Lin, Shi-Hsin; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2016-07-27

    We systematically investigated the potential of single-layer VS2 polytypes as Na-battery anode materials via density functional theory calculations. We found that sodiation tends to inhibit the 1H-to-1T structural phase transition, in contrast to lithiation-induced transition on monolayer MoS2. Thus, VS2 can have better structural stability in the cycles of charging and discharging. Diffussion of Na atom was found to be very fast on both polytypes, with very small diffusion barriers of 0.085 eV (1H) and 0.088 eV (1T). Ab initio random structure searching was performed in order to explore stable configurations of Na on VS2. Our search found that both the V top and the hexagonal center sites are preferred adsorption sites for Na, with the 1H phase showing a relatively stronger binding. Notably, our random structures search revealed that Na clusters can form as a stacked second layer at full Na concentration, which is not reported in earlier works wherein uniform, single-layer Na adsorption phases were assumed. With reasonably high specific energy capacity (232.91 and 116.45 mAh/g for 1H and 1T phases, respectively) and open-circuit voltage (1.30 and 1.42 V for 1H and 1T phases, respectively), VS2 is a promising alternative material for Na-ion battery anodes with great structural sturdiness. Finally, we have shown the capability of the ab initio random structure searching in the assessment of potential materials for energy storage applications.

  4. Graphanes: Sheets and stacking under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Hand, Louis; Labet, Vanessa; Yang, Tao; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N. W.; Oganov, Artem R.; Lyakhov, Andriy O.

    2011-04-26

    Eight isomeric two-dimensional graphane sheets are found in a theoretical study. Four of these nets—two built on chair cyclohexanes, two on boat—are more stable thermodynamically than the isomeric benzene, or polyacetylene. Three-dimensional crystals are built up from the two-dimensional sheets, and their hypothetical behavior under pressure (up to 300 GPa) is explored. While the three-dimensional graphanes remain, as expected, insulating or semiconducting in this pressure range, there is a remarkable inversion in stability of the five crystals studied. Two stacking polytypes that are not the most stable at ambient pressure (one based on an unusual chair cyclohexane net, the other on a boat) are significantly stabilized with increasing pressure relative to stackings of simple chair sheets. The explanation may lie in the balance on intra and intersheet contacts in the extended arrays.

  5. Illite polytype quantification using Wildfire© calculated x-ray diffraction patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grathoff, Georg H.; Moore, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    Illite polytype quantification allows the differentiation of diagenetic and detrital illite components. In Paleozoic shales from the Illinois Basin, we observe 3 polytypes: 1Md, 1M and 2M1. 1Md and 1M are of diagenetic origin and 2M1 is of detrital origin. In this paper, we compare experimental X-ray diffraction (XRD) traces with traces calculated using WILDFIRE© and quantify mixtures of all 3 polytypes, adjusting the effects of preferred orientation and overlapping peaks. The broad intensity (“illite hump”) around the illite 003, which is very common in illite from shales, is caused by the presence of 1Md illite and mixing of illite polytypes and is not an artifact of sample preparation or other impurities in the sample. Illite polytype quantification provides a tool to extrapolate the K/Ar age and chemistry of the detrital and diagenetic end-members by analysis of different size fractions containing different proportions of diagenetic and detrital illite polytypes.

  6. Crystal Phase Effects in Si Nanowire Polytypes and Their Homojunctions.

    PubMed

    Amato, Michele; Kaewmaraya, Thanayut; Zobelli, Alberto; Palummo, Maurizia; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-09-14

    Recent experimental investigations have confirmed the possibility to synthesize and exploit polytypism in group IV nanowires. Driven by this promising evidence, we use first-principles methods based on density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory to investigate the electronic and optical properties of hexagonal-diamond and cubic-diamond Si NWs as well as their homojunctions. We show that hexagonal-diamond NWs are characterized by a more pronounced quantum confinement effect than cubic-diamond NWs. Furthermore, they absorb more light in the visible region with respect to cubic-diamond ones and, for most of the studied diameters, they are direct band gap materials. The study of the homojunctions reveals that the diameter has a crucial effect on the band alignment at the interface. In particular, at small diameters the band-offset is type-I whereas at experimentally relevant sizes the offset turns up to be of type-II. These findings highlight intriguing possibilities to modulate electron and hole separations as well as electronic and optical properties by simply modifying the crystal phase and the size of the junction. PMID:27530077

  7. Crystal Phase Effects in Si Nanowire Polytypes and Their Homojunctions.

    PubMed

    Amato, Michele; Kaewmaraya, Thanayut; Zobelli, Alberto; Palummo, Maurizia; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-09-14

    Recent experimental investigations have confirmed the possibility to synthesize and exploit polytypism in group IV nanowires. Driven by this promising evidence, we use first-principles methods based on density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory to investigate the electronic and optical properties of hexagonal-diamond and cubic-diamond Si NWs as well as their homojunctions. We show that hexagonal-diamond NWs are characterized by a more pronounced quantum confinement effect than cubic-diamond NWs. Furthermore, they absorb more light in the visible region with respect to cubic-diamond ones and, for most of the studied diameters, they are direct band gap materials. The study of the homojunctions reveals that the diameter has a crucial effect on the band alignment at the interface. In particular, at small diameters the band-offset is type-I whereas at experimentally relevant sizes the offset turns up to be of type-II. These findings highlight intriguing possibilities to modulate electron and hole separations as well as electronic and optical properties by simply modifying the crystal phase and the size of the junction.

  8. Polytype control of spin qubits in silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Abram L.; Buckley, Bob B.; Calusine, Greg; Koehl, William F.; Dobrovitski, Viatcheslav V.; Politi, Alberto; Zorman, Christian A.; Feng, Philip X.-L.; Awschalom, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Crystal defects can confine isolated electronic spins and are promising candidates for solid-state quantum information. Alongside research focusing on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, an alternative strategy seeks to identify new spin systems with an expanded set of technological capabilities, a materials-driven approach that could ultimately lead to ‘designer’ spins with tailored properties. Here we show that the 4H, 6H and 3C polytypes of SiC all host coherent and optically addressable defect spin states, including states in all three with room-temperature quantum coherence. The prevalence of this spin coherence shows that crystal polymorphism can be a degree of freedom for engineering spin qubits. Long spin coherence times allow us to use double electron–electron resonance to measure magnetic dipole interactions between spin ensembles in inequivalent lattice sites of the same crystal. Together with the distinct optical and spin transition energies of such inequivalent states, these interactions provide a route to dipole-coupled networks of separately addressable spins. PMID:23652007

  9. Low-temperature production of silicon carbide films of different polytypes

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, A. V. Puzikov, V. M.; Golubova, E. P.; Baumer, V. N.; Dobrotvorskaya, M. V.

    2009-05-15

    The study is concerned with the effect of temperature on the structure of SiC films formed by deposition of the C and Si ions with the energy 120 eV. On the basis of the X-ray structural studies, it is unambiguously established that the structure of the growing polytype is finely dependent on the substrate temperature. In the temperature range from 1080 deg. C to 1510 deg. C, the sequence of films involving the 21R, 51R, 27R, and 6H polytypes is produced for the first time. The effect of temperature on the silicon-carbon atomic content ratio [Si]/[C] in the deposited films is determined. At optimized parameters of deposition the film structured as the 51R rhombohedral polytype is grown.

  10. Communication: Thermodynamics of stacking disorder in ice nuclei.

    PubMed

    Quigley, D

    2014-09-28

    A simple Ising-like model for the stacking thermodynamics of ice 1 is constructed for nuclei in supercooled water, and combined with classical nucleation theory. For relative stabilities of cubic and hexagonal ice I within the range of experimental estimates, this predicts critical nuclei are stacking disordered at strong sub-cooling, consistent with recent experiments. At higher temperatures nucleation of pure hexagonal ice is recovered. Lattice-switching Monte-Carlo is applied to accurately compute the relative stability of cubic and hexagonal ice for the popular mW model of water. Results demonstrate that this model fails to adequately capture the relative energetics of the two polytypes, leading to stacking disorder at all temperatures. PMID:25273401

  11. Communication: Thermodynamics of stacking disorder in ice nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, D.

    2014-09-01

    A simple Ising-like model for the stacking thermodynamics of ice 1 is constructed for nuclei in supercooled water, and combined with classical nucleation theory. For relative stabilities of cubic and hexagonal ice I within the range of experimental estimates, this predicts critical nuclei are stacking disordered at strong sub-cooling, consistent with recent experiments. At higher temperatures nucleation of pure hexagonal ice is recovered. Lattice-switching Monte-Carlo is applied to accurately compute the relative stability of cubic and hexagonal ice for the popular mW model of water. Results demonstrate that this model fails to adequately capture the relative energetics of the two polytypes, leading to stacking disorder at all temperatures.

  12. Measurement of Optical, Mechanical and Transport properties of the hexagonal closed packed 4H polytype of metallic silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indrani; Shirodkar, Sharmila N.; Gohil, Smita; Waghmare, Umesh; Ayyub, Pushan

    2013-03-01

    Optical, mechanical and transport property measurements were done on the hexagonal closed packed (hcp) 4H polytype of Ag with stacking sequence ABCBABCB.. grown as bulk films on Al2O3 substrates. Diffused reflectance measurements done on the 4H films showed a general loss of reflectivity amounting to a decrease of 35% as compared to normal fcc (3C) Ag near 500 nm with a blueshift of 5nm in the bulk plasmon frequency, possibly due to the modified electronic structure of the hcp form. Raman spectroscopic measurements showed the appearance of a peak at 64.3 cm-1 at 4K which underwent ``Mode softening,'' that is shifted to lower wave numbers with increase of temperature and disappeared above 350K. Low temperature transport measurements done on 4H films gave the in-plane resistivity value to be 39 times higher than that of a similarly synthesized fcc Ag film at 295 K. Vicker's microhardness measurements done on the 4H films showed that the 4H samples to be almost 5 times harder than the 3C Ag. Density functional theory simulations were done to obtain the phonon dispersion, band structure and nature of Fermi surface for the 4H Ag which corroborated with the experimental observations. The 4H form appears to be a much less metallic, darker and harder form of Ag.

  13. Stacking Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Chimneys and stacks appear to be strong and indestructible, but chimneys begin to deteriorate from the moment they are built. Early on, no signs are apparent; but deterioration accelerates in subsequent years, and major repairs are soon needed instead of minor maintenance. With proper attention, most structures can be repaired and continue to…

  14. Fuel cell stack arrangements

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Somers, Edward V.

    1982-01-01

    Arrangements of stacks of fuel cells and ducts, for fuel cells operating with separate fuel, oxidant and coolant streams. An even number of stacks are arranged generally end-to-end in a loop. Ducts located at the juncture of consecutive stacks of the loop feed oxidant or fuel to or from the two consecutive stacks, each individual duct communicating with two stacks. A coolant fluid flows from outside the loop, into and through cooling channels of the stack, and is discharged into an enclosure duct formed within the loop by the stacks and seals at the junctures at the stacks.

  15. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  16. Computer Simulations to Study Diffraction Effects of Stacking Faults in Beta-SiC: II. Experimental Verification. 2; Experimental Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujar, Vijay V.; Cawley, James D.; Levine, S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Earlier results from computer simulation studies suggest a correlation between the spatial distribution of stacking errors in the Beta-SiC structure and features observed in X-ray diffraction patterns of the material. Reported here are experimental results obtained from two types of nominally Beta-SiC specimens, which yield distinct XRD data. These samples were analyzed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and the stacking error distribution was directly determined. The HRTEM results compare well to those deduced by matching the XRD data with simulated spectra, confirming the hypothesis that the XRD data is indicative not only of the presence and density of stacking errors, but also that it can yield information regarding their distribution. In addition, the stacking error population in both specimens is related to their synthesis conditions and it appears that it is similar to the relation developed by others to explain the formation of the corresponding polytypes.

  17. Ferroelectric ultrathin perovskite films

    DOEpatents

    Rappe, Andrew M; Kolpak, Alexie Michelle

    2013-12-10

    Disclosed herein are perovskite ferroelectric thin-film. Also disclosed are methods of controlling the properties of ferroelectric thin films. These films can be used in a variety materials and devices, such as catalysts and storage media, respectively.

  18. Perovskite ferroelectric nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraje, Nurxat; Su, Kai

    2013-09-01

    In this review, the main concept of ferroelectricity of perovskite oxides and related materials at nanometer scale and existing difficulties in the synthesis of those nanocrystals are discussed. Important effects, such as depolarization field and size effect, on the existence of ferroelectricity in perovskite nanocrystals are deliberated. In the discussion of modeling works, different theoretical calculations are pinpointed focusing on their studies of lattice dynamics, phase transitions, new origin of ferroelectricity in nanostructures, etc. As the major part of this review, recent research progress in the facile synthesis, characterization and various applications of perovskite ferroelectric nanomaterials, such as BaTiO3, PbTiO3, PbZrO3, and BiFeO3, are also scrutinized. Perspectives concerning the future direction of ferroelectric nanomaterials research and its potential applications in renewable energy, etc., are presented. This review provides an overview in this area and guidance for further studies in perovskite ferroelectric nanomaterials and their applications.In this review, the main concept of ferroelectricity of perovskite oxides and related materials at nanometer scale and existing difficulties in the synthesis of those nanocrystals are discussed. Important effects, such as depolarization field and size effect, on the existence of ferroelectricity in perovskite nanocrystals are deliberated. In the discussion of modeling works, different theoretical calculations are pinpointed focusing on their studies of lattice dynamics, phase transitions, new origin of ferroelectricity in nanostructures, etc. As the major part of this review, recent research progress in the facile synthesis, characterization and various applications of perovskite ferroelectric nanomaterials, such as BaTiO3, PbTiO3, PbZrO3, and BiFeO3, are also scrutinized. Perspectives concerning the future direction of ferroelectric nanomaterials research and its potential applications in renewable

  19. Perovskite solid electrolytes for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Sammells, A.F.

    1992-09-01

    Selected perovskite solid electrolytes incorporated into research size fuel cells have shown stability for > 4000 hours at 600{degrees}C. Perovskite lattice requirements which favor low E{sub a} for ionic conduction include (i) that the perovskite lattice possess a moderate enthalpy of formation, (ii) perovskite lattice possess large free volumes, (iii) that the lattice minimally polarizes the mobile ion and (iv) that the crystallographic saddle point r{sub c} for ionic conduction is {approx_equal} 1.

  20. Perovskite solid electrolytes for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Sammells, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Selected perovskite solid electrolytes incorporated into research size fuel cells have shown stability for > 4000 hours at 600{degrees}C. Perovskite lattice requirements which favor low E{sub a} for ionic conduction include (i) that the perovskite lattice possess a moderate enthalpy of formation, (ii) perovskite lattice possess large free volumes, (iii) that the lattice minimally polarizes the mobile ion and (iv) that the crystallographic saddle point r{sub c} for ionic conduction is {approx equal} 1.

  1. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-06-15

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase.

  2. Perovskite photonic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Brandon R.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-05-01

    The field of solution-processed semiconductors has made great strides; however, it has yet to enable electrically driven lasers. To achieve this goal, improved materials are required that combine efficient (>50% quantum yield) radiative recombination under high injection, large and balanced charge-carrier mobilities in excess of 10 cm2 V-1 s-1, free-carrier densities greater than 1017 cm-3 and gain coefficients exceeding 104 cm-1. Solid-state perovskites are -- in addition to galvanizing the field of solar electricity -- showing great promise in photonic sources, and may be the answer to realizing solution-cast laser diodes. Here, we discuss the properties of perovskites that benefit light emission, review recent progress in perovskite electroluminescent diodes and optically pumped lasers, and examine the remaining challenges in achieving continuous-wave and electrically driven lasing.

  3. Selective epitaxial growth of zinc blende-derivative on wurtzite-derivative: the case of polytypic Cu2CdSn(S1-xSex)4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liang; Fan, Feng-Jia; Gong, Ming; Ge, Jin; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-02-01

    Polytypic nanocrystals with zinc blende (ZB) cores and wurtzite (WZ) arms, such as tetrapod and octopod nanocrystals, have been widely reported. However, polytypic nanocrystals with WZ cores and ZB arms or ends have been rarely reported. Here, we report a facile, solution-based approach to the synthesis of polytypic Cu2CdSn(S1-xSex)4 (CCTSSe) nanocrystals with ZB-derivative selectively engineered on (000+/-2)WZ facets of WZ-derived cores. Accordingly, two typical morphologies, i.e., bullet-like nanocrystals with a WZ-derivative core and one ZB-derivative end, and rugby ball-like nanocrystals with a WZ-derivative core and two ZB-derivative ends, can be selectively prepared. The epitaxial growth mechanism is confirmed by the time-dependent experiments. The ratio of rugby ball-like and bullet-like polytypic CCTSSe nanocrystals can be tuned through changing the amount of Cd precursor to adjust the reactivity difference between (0002)WZ and (000-2)WZ facets. These unique polytypic CCTSSe nanocrystals may find applications in energetic semiconducting materials for energy conversion in the future.Polytypic nanocrystals with zinc blende (ZB) cores and wurtzite (WZ) arms, such as tetrapod and octopod nanocrystals, have been widely reported. However, polytypic nanocrystals with WZ cores and ZB arms or ends have been rarely reported. Here, we report a facile, solution-based approach to the synthesis of polytypic Cu2CdSn(S1-xSex)4 (CCTSSe) nanocrystals with ZB-derivative selectively engineered on (000+/-2)WZ facets of WZ-derived cores. Accordingly, two typical morphologies, i.e., bullet-like nanocrystals with a WZ-derivative core and one ZB-derivative end, and rugby ball-like nanocrystals with a WZ-derivative core and two ZB-derivative ends, can be selectively prepared. The epitaxial growth mechanism is confirmed by the time-dependent experiments. The ratio of rugby ball-like and bullet-like polytypic CCTSSe nanocrystals can be tuned through changing the amount of Cd precursor

  4. Data in support of crystal structures of highly-ordered long-period stacking-ordered phases with 18R, 14H and 10H-type stacking sequences in the Mg-Zn-Y system.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Kyosuke; Nagai, Kaito; Matsumoto, Akihide; Inui, Haruyuki

    2015-12-01

    The crystal structures of highly-ordered Mg-Zn-Y long-period stacking-ordered (LPSO) phases with the 18R, 14H and 10H-type stacking sequences have been investigated by atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and transmission electron microscopy (Kishida et al., 2015) [1]. This data article provides supporting materials for the crystal structure analysis based on the crystallographic theory of the order-disorder (OD) structure and the crystallographic information obtained through the structural optimization for various simple polytypes of the highly-ordered Mg-Zn-Y LPSO phases with the 18R, 14H and 10H-type stacking sequences by first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  5. Multilayer Transparent Top Electrode for Solution Processed Perovskite/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 Four Terminal Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang Michael; Chen, Qi; Hsieh, Yao-Tsung; Song, Tze-Bin; Marco, Nicholas De; Zhou, Huanping; Yang, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Halide perovskites (PVSK) have attracted much attention in recent years due to their high potential as a next generation solar cell material. To further improve perovskites progress toward a state-of-the-art technology, it is desirable to create a tandem structure in which perovskite may be stacked with a current prevailing solar cell such as silicon (Si) or Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIGS). The transparent top electrode is one of the key components as well as challenges to realize such tandem structure. Herein, we develop a multilayer transparent top electrode for perovskite photovoltaic devices delivering an 11.5% efficiency in top illumination mode. The transparent electrode is based on a dielectric/metal/dielectric structure, featuring an ultrathin gold seeded silver layer. A four terminal tandem solar cell employing solution processed CIGS and perovskite cells is also demonstrated with over 15% efficiency.

  6. Crystal Structure of a Layered Perovskite Niobate KCa 2Nb 3O 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Isami, Toshiyuki; Yamanaka, Shoji

    2000-04-01

    The crystal structure of a layered perovskite niobate KCa2Nb3O10 was investigated through single-crystal X-ray analysis. The niobate crystallized in the orthorhombic system Cmcm with lattice constants of a=3.8802(9) Å, b=29.508(6) Å, c=7.714(1) Å, V=883.2(2) Å3. The final refinement using the 908 independent reflections converged into R=4.1%, and Rw=4.7%. The structure of KCa2Nb3O10 was composed of triple-layered perovskite slabs, potassium ions being situated between the slabs. The adjacent perovskite slabs, stacking along the c axis, were mutually displaced with a displacement vector of a→/2. The potassium ions were coordinated by six oxygen atoms to form two short and four long bonds. Apparent disordering was observed in the equatorial oxygen sites of the central niobium atoms in the triple perovskite slabs.

  7. Process for the controlled growth of single-crystal films of silicon carbide polytypes on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, David J.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1992-11-01

    A method for the controlled growth of single-crystal semiconductor-device-quality films of SiC polytypes on vicinal (0001) SiC wafers with low tilt angles is presented. Both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial SiC films can be produced on the same wafer. In particular, 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC films can be produced within selected areas of the same 6H-SiC wafer.

  8. Process for the controlled growth of single-crystal films of silicon carbide polytypes on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, David J.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1994-11-01

    This invention is a method for the controlled growth of single-crystal semiconductor-device-quality films of SiC polytypes of vicinal (0001) SiC wafers with low tilt angles. Both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial SiC films can be produced on the same wafer. In particular, 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC films can be produced within selected areas of the same 6H-SiC wafer.

  9. Process for the controlled growth of single-crystal films of silicon carbide polytypes on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-06-01

    This invention is a method for the controlled growth of single-crystal semiconductor device quality films of SiC polytypes on vicinal (0001) SiC wafers with low tilt angles. Both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial SiC films can be produced on the same wafer. In particular, 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC films can be produced within selected areas of the same 6H-SiC wafer.

  10. Process for the controlled growth of single-crystal films of silicon carbide polytypes on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This invention is a method for the controlled growth of single-crystal semiconductor device quality films of SiC polytypes on vicinal (0001) SiC wafers with low tilt angles. Both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial SiC films can be produced on the same wafer. In particular, 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC films can be produced within selected areas of the same 6H-SiC wafer.

  11. Process for the controlled growth of single-crystal films of silicon carbide polytypes on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, David J. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for the controlled growth of single-crystal semiconductor-device-quality films of SiC polytypes on vicinal (0001) SiC wafers with low tilt angles is presented. Both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial SiC films can be produced on the same wafer. In particular, 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC films can be produced within selected areas of the same 6H-SiC wafer.

  12. van der Waals Heterojunction Devices Based on Organohalide Perovskites and Two-Dimensional Materials.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Wang, Gongming; Li, Dehui; He, Qiyuan; Yin, Anxiang; Liu, Yuan; Wu, Hao; Ding, Mengning; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-13

    The recently emerged organohalide perovskites (e.g., CH3NH3PbI3) have drawn intense attention for high efficiency solar cells. However, with a considerable solubility in many solvents, these perovskites are not typically compatible with conventional lithography processes for more complicated device fabrications that are important for both fundamental studies and technological applications. Here, we report the creation of novel heterojunction devices based on perovskites and two-dimensional (2D) crystals by taking advantage of the layered characteristic of lead iodide (PbI2) and vapor-phase intercalation. We show that a graphene/perovskite/graphene vertical stack can deliver a highest photoresponsivity of ∼950 A/W and photoconductive gain of ∼2200, and a graphene/WSe2/perovskite/graphene heterojunction can display a high on/off ratio (∼10(6)) transistor behavior with distinct gate-tunable diode characteristics and open-circuit voltages. Such unique perovskite-2D heterostructures have significant potential for future optoelectronic research and can enable broad possibilities with compositional tunability of organohalide perovskites and the versatility offered by diverse 2D materials.

  13. Embedded polytypes in Bi2Sr2-xLaxCuO6 thin films grown by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancellieri, C.; Lin, P. H.; Ariosa, D.; Pavuna, D.

    2007-11-01

    We investigate the presence of secondary phases in La-doped Bi-2201 thin films grown by laser ablation. The cation ratios in the target material, the oxygen pressure, and the substrate temperature during the deposition are the main parameters determining the presence of diluted intergrowth and/or polytype aggregates. A statistical model of random intergrowth is used to analyze the x-ray diffraction (XRD) anomalies caused by hidden defects and to characterize the latter. A detailed structural XRD refinement on oriented aggregates allows us to identify the guest phase as a Bi deficient phase, Bi-1201. The occurrence of this particular embedded polytype is accompanied by a global Bi deficiency introduced in the films by the growing process and/or by the annealing treatment. The presence of La favors the Bi-1201 formation mostly as La-rich c -axis oriented aggregates. Bi excess in the target material improves considerably the crystallographic structure of Bi-2201, avoids intergrowth formation, but does not prevent the phase separation of Bi-1201 in La-doped thin films. We also investigate the influence of the deposition parameters on the type of intergrowth as well as their variation with La doping. This work introduces a specific methodology for optimizing the growth of thin films grown by laser ablation, which applies to layered oxides that admit polytypes with close formation enthalpies in their phase diagram.

  14. Towards optical optimization of planar monolithic perovskite/silicon-heterojunction tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Steve; Saliba, Michael; Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo; Jäger, Klaus; Korte, Lars; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Rech, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    Combining inorganic–organic perovskites and crystalline silicon into a monolithic tandem solar cell has recently attracted increased attention due to the high efficiency potential of this cell architecture. Promising results with published efficiencies above 21% have been reported so far. To further increase the device performance, optical optimizations enabling device related guidelines are highly necessary. Here we experimentally show the optical influence of the ITO thickness in the interconnecting layer and fabricate an efficient monolithic tandem cell with a reduced ITO layer thickness that shows slightly improved absorption within the silicon sub-cell and a stabilized power output of 17%. Furthermore we present detailed optical simulations on experimentally relevant planar tandem stacks to give practical guidelines to reach efficiencies above 25%. By optimizing the thickness of all functional and the perovskite absorber layers, together with the optimization of the perovskite band-gap, we present a tandem stack that can yield ca 17.5 mA cm‑ 2 current in both sub-cells at a perovskite band-gap of 1.73 eV including losses from reflection and parasitic absorption. Assuming that the higher band-gap of the perovskite absorber directly translates into a higher open circuit voltage, the perovskite sub-cell should be able to reach a value of 1.3 V. With that, realistic efficiencies above 28% are within reach for planar monolithic tandem cells in which the thickness of the perovskite top-cell and the perovskite band-gap are highly optimized. When applying light trapping schemes such as textured surfaces and by reducing the parasitic absorption of the functional layers, for example in spiro-OMeTAD, this monolithic tandem can overcome 30% power conversion efficiency.

  15. High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Lin, Feng; Wu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells fabricated from organometal halide light harvesters have captured significant attention due to their tremendously low device costs as well as unprecedented rapid progress on power conversion efficiency (PCE). A certified PCE of 20.1% was achieved in late 2014 following the first study of long‐term stable all‐solid‐state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, showing their promising potential towards future cost‐effective and high performance solar cells. Here, notable achievements of primary device configuration involving perovskite layer, hole‐transporting materials (HTMs) and electron‐transporting materials (ETMs) are reviewed. Numerous strategies for enhancing photovoltaic parameters of perovskite solar cells, including morphology and crystallization control of perovskite layer, HTMs design and ETMs modifications are discussed in detail. In addition, perovskite solar cells outside of HTMs and ETMs are mentioned as well, providing guidelines for further simplification of device processing and hence cost reduction.

  16. Revealing the preferred interlayer orientations and stackings of two-dimensional bilayer gallium selenide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xufan; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A.; Yoon, Mina; Ma, Cheng; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-21

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking order of bilayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) that result from different layer stacking provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in bilayer 2D crystals. Here, through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method we selectively grow bilayer GaSe crystals and investigate their two preferred 0° or 60° interlayer rotations. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA' and AB-stacking) in as-grown 2D bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale and the Ga-terminated edge structure are identified for the first time by using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Theoretical analysis of the interlayer coupling energetics vs. interlayer rotation angle reveals that the experimentally-observed orientations are energetically preferred among the bilayer GaSe crystal polytypes. Here, the combined experimental and theoretical characterization of the GaSe bilayers afforded by these growth studies provide a pathway to reveal the atomistic relationships in interlayer orientations responsible for the electronic and optical properties of bilayer 2D crystals and vdW heterostructures.

  17. Revealing the preferred interlayer orientations and stackings of two-dimensional bilayer gallium selenide crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xufan; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A.; Yoon, Mina; Ma, Cheng; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; et al

    2015-01-21

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking order of bilayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) that result from different layer stacking provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in bilayer 2D crystals. Here, through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method we selectively grow bilayer GaSe crystals and investigate their two preferred 0° or 60° interlayer rotations. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA' and AB-stacking) in as-grown 2D bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale andmore » the Ga-terminated edge structure are identified for the first time by using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Theoretical analysis of the interlayer coupling energetics vs. interlayer rotation angle reveals that the experimentally-observed orientations are energetically preferred among the bilayer GaSe crystal polytypes. Here, the combined experimental and theoretical characterization of the GaSe bilayers afforded by these growth studies provide a pathway to reveal the atomistic relationships in interlayer orientations responsible for the electronic and optical properties of bilayer 2D crystals and vdW heterostructures.« less

  18. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  19. Facile one-pot synthesis of polytypic (wurtzite-chalcopyrite) CuGaS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidshad, Yaser; Mirkazemi, Seyed Mohammad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Zad, Azam Iraji; Ghasemzadeh, Reza; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    In this investigation, monodisperse CuGaS2 nanoparticles intended for use as visible-light-absorbing materials were synthesized using a facile one-step heating method that involved dissolving the precursors copper chloride, gallium acetylacetonate, and thiourea in a solvent consisting of either oleylamine alone or a combination of oleylamine, oleic acid, and 1-octadecene. The shapes of the resulting nanoparticles were either elongated, polygonal, or a mixture of both, depending on whether the crystal structure of the nanoparticles was predominantly wurtzite, predominantly chalcopyrite, or a more balanced mixture of both wurtzite and chalcopyrite (i.e., the nanoparticles were polytypic: both wurtzite and chalcopyrite phases were present). The crystal structure of the synthesized nanoparticles was found to be influenced by the temperature and the solvent applied during synthesis. X-ray diffraction data for the nanoparticles indicated that applying a temperature of 270 °C or using oleylamine, oleic acid solvent, and 1-octadecene during synthesis tended to yield a chalcopyrite phase, whereas applying a somewhat lower temperature (210 °C) or using oleylamine alone during synthesis tended to result in a wurtzite phase. The chemical states of the compounds obtained at different temperatures and using various solvents, as well as their crystal structures, morphologies, and optical properties were characterized via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and photoluminescence.

  20. Characterization of paramagnetic defect centers in three polytypes of dry heat treated, oxidized SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, P. J.; Zvanut, M. E.

    2000-10-01

    This work describes the characterization of defect centers in 3C-SiC, 4H-SiC, and 6H-SiC. The different SiC crystal structures are examined with electron paramagnetic resonance after thermal oxidation, and after dry (<1 ppm H2O) N2 or O2 heat treatment. The centers are described by g values that range from 2.0025 to 2.0029, which are typical of C dangling bonds. Because the centers are activated in ambients that eliminate H2O and are passivated in ambients that contain H2O, it is suggested that the centers are C dangling bonds created during the dry heat treatment when hydrogen or a hydrogenous species releases from C bonds. The activation characteristics for the centers is the same for both 6H and 3C polytypes; however, centers in the 6H-SiC samples are passivated at lower temperatures than the centers in the 3C-SiC samples. The passivation behavior is attributed to differences in the hydrogen diffusion rates in these materials rather than significant differences in the chemistry of the centers. Etching studies conducted with hydrofluoric acid indicate that the centers are not located in the SiO2, but are located in the SiC at a distance of, at most, 200 nm from the SiO2/SiC interface.

  1. Stack gas treatment

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Adam A.

    1977-04-12

    Hot stack gases transfer contained heat to a gravity flow of pebbles treated with a catalyst, cooled stacked gases and a sulfuric acid mist is withdrawn from the unit, and heat picked up by the pebbles is transferred to air for combustion or other process. The sulfuric acid (or sulfur, depending on the catalyst) is withdrawn in a recovery unit.

  2. New hexagonal perovskite with Mn4+ and Mn5+ at distinct structural positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarakina, N. V.; Tyutyunnik, A. P.; Bazuev, G. V.; Vasiliev, A. D.; Berger, I. F.; Gould, C.; Nikolaenko, I. V.

    2015-10-01

    A new hexagonal perovskite, Ba7Li1.75Mn3.5O15.75, has been synthesised using microwave-assisted solid-state synthesis. Its crystal structure has elements typical for the layered hexagonal perovskites and quasi-one-dimensional oxides, hence representing a new polytype. Structural solution based on simultaneous refinement of X-ray and neutron diffraction data shows that Ba7Li1.75Mn3.5O15.75 crystallizes in a hexagonal unit cell with parameters a = 5.66274(2) Å and c = 16.7467(1) Å (V = 465.063(4) Å3). Columns of face- shared octahedra occupied by Mn4+, Li+ cations and vacancies along the c axis are separated in the ab plane by barium atoms, so that every sixth layer, the coordination of Mn5+ and Li+ changes to tetrahedral. Separation of Mn4+ and Mn5+ cations in two distinct structural positions makes the structure unique. A scanning transmission electron microscopy study revealed the formation of a rhombohedrally centered supercell, which might be attributed to the ordering of manganese and lithium atoms among cationic sites.

  3. PAM stack test utility

    2007-08-22

    The pamtest utility calls the normal PAM hooks using a service and username supplied on the command line. This allows an administratory to test any one of many configured PAM stacks as any existing user on the machine.

  4. Stacked optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Dieter W.; Rodrigo, Sergio G.; Novotny, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    We propose and analyze a stacked optical antenna (SOA). It is characterized by a stacked structure of its arms at the center, and an interstitial gap layer (IGL) in between, which plays the role of the feed gap. Because of its in-plane arrangement, the IGL can be fabricated by standard planar deposition techniques providing high accuracy and control. A SOA can be an enabling element for several technologies, in particular for optical detection, communication, and encryption besides applications in microscopy.

  5. Atomic and electronic structure of trilayer graphene/SiC(0001): Evidence of Strong Dependence on Stacking Sequence and charge transfer

    PubMed Central

    Pierucci, Debora; Brumme, Thomas; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Calandra, Matteo; Silly, Mathieu G.; Sirotti, Fausto; Barbier, Antoine; Mauri, Francesco; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2016-01-01

    The transport properties of few-layer graphene are the directly result of a peculiar band structure near the Dirac point. Here, for epitaxial graphene grown on SiC, we determine the effect of charge transfer from the SiC substrate on the local density of states (LDOS) of trilayer graphene using scaning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Different spectra are observed and are attributed to the existence of two stable polytypes of trilayer: Bernal (ABA) and rhomboedreal (ABC) staking. Their electronic properties strongly depend on the charge transfer from the substrate. We show that the LDOS of ABC stacking shows an additional peak located above the Dirac point in comparison with the LDOS of ABA stacking. The observed LDOS features, reflecting the underlying symmetry of the two polytypes, were reproduced by explicit calculations within density functional theory (DFT) including the charge transfer from the substrate. These findings demonstrate the pronounced effect of stacking order and charge transfer on the electronic structure of trilayer or few layer graphene. Our approach represents a significant step toward understand the electronic properties of graphene layer under electrical field. PMID:27629702

  6. Atomic and electronic structure of trilayer graphene/SiC(0001): Evidence of Strong Dependence on Stacking Sequence and charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Pierucci, Debora; Brumme, Thomas; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Calandra, Matteo; Silly, Mathieu G; Sirotti, Fausto; Barbier, Antoine; Mauri, Francesco; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2016-09-15

    The transport properties of few-layer graphene are the directly result of a peculiar band structure near the Dirac point. Here, for epitaxial graphene grown on SiC, we determine the effect of charge transfer from the SiC substrate on the local density of states (LDOS) of trilayer graphene using scaning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Different spectra are observed and are attributed to the existence of two stable polytypes of trilayer: Bernal (ABA) and rhomboedreal (ABC) staking. Their electronic properties strongly depend on the charge transfer from the substrate. We show that the LDOS of ABC stacking shows an additional peak located above the Dirac point in comparison with the LDOS of ABA stacking. The observed LDOS features, reflecting the underlying symmetry of the two polytypes, were reproduced by explicit calculations within density functional theory (DFT) including the charge transfer from the substrate. These findings demonstrate the pronounced effect of stacking order and charge transfer on the electronic structure of trilayer or few layer graphene. Our approach represents a significant step toward understand the electronic properties of graphene layer under electrical field.

  7. Atomic and electronic structure of trilayer graphene/SiC(0001): Evidence of Strong Dependence on Stacking Sequence and charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Pierucci, Debora; Brumme, Thomas; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Calandra, Matteo; Silly, Mathieu G; Sirotti, Fausto; Barbier, Antoine; Mauri, Francesco; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2016-01-01

    The transport properties of few-layer graphene are the directly result of a peculiar band structure near the Dirac point. Here, for epitaxial graphene grown on SiC, we determine the effect of charge transfer from the SiC substrate on the local density of states (LDOS) of trilayer graphene using scaning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Different spectra are observed and are attributed to the existence of two stable polytypes of trilayer: Bernal (ABA) and rhomboedreal (ABC) staking. Their electronic properties strongly depend on the charge transfer from the substrate. We show that the LDOS of ABC stacking shows an additional peak located above the Dirac point in comparison with the LDOS of ABA stacking. The observed LDOS features, reflecting the underlying symmetry of the two polytypes, were reproduced by explicit calculations within density functional theory (DFT) including the charge transfer from the substrate. These findings demonstrate the pronounced effect of stacking order and charge transfer on the electronic structure of trilayer or few layer graphene. Our approach represents a significant step toward understand the electronic properties of graphene layer under electrical field. PMID:27629702

  8. Methodologies for high efficiency perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    Since the report on long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell in 2012, perovskite solar cells based on lead halide perovskites having organic cations such as methylammonium CH3NH3PbI3 or formamidinium HC(NH2)2PbI3 have received great attention because of superb photovoltaic performance with power conversion efficiency exceeding 22 %. In this review, emergence of perovskite solar cell is briefly introduced. Since understanding fundamentals of light absorbers is directly related to their photovoltaic performance, opto-electronic properties of organo lead halide perovskites are investigated in order to provide insight into design of higher efficiency perovskite solar cells. Since the conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cell is found to depend significantly on perovskite film quality, methodologies for fabricating high quality perovskite films are particularly emphasized, including various solution-processes and vacuum deposition method.

  9. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  10. Barrier RF Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-08

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  11. Barrier RF Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver ±7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  12. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B; Hush, Don

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  13. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  14. Advances in Perovskite Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Chuantian; Bolink, Henk J.; Han, Hongwei; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Organolead halide perovskite materials possess a combination of remarkable optoelectronic properties, such as steep optical absorption edge and high absorption coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes. Taken together with the ability for low temperature preparation, also from solution, perovskite‐based devices, especially photovoltaic (PV) cells have been studied intensively, with remarkable progress in performance, over the past few years. The combination of high efficiency, low cost and additional (non‐PV) applications provides great potential for commercialization. Performance and applications of perovskite solar cells often correlate with their device structures. Many innovative device structures were developed, aiming at large‐scale fabrication, reducing fabrication cost, enhancing the power conversion efficiency and thus broadening potential future applications. This review summarizes typical structures of perovskite solar cells and comments on novel device structures. The applications of perovskite solar cells are discussed. PMID:27812475

  15. Structure and magnetic properties of Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15}, a new 10H-polytype in the Ba-Ce-Mn-O system

    SciTech Connect

    Macias, Mario A.; Mentre, Olivier; Cuello, Gabriel J.; Gauthier, Gilles H.

    2013-02-15

    Based on the peculiar magnetic properties that are observed in pseudo one-dimensional manganites, we decided to synthesize the new Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15} compound. The preparation was performed by solid state reaction in air at about 1350 Degree-Sign C, for which we found that the compound crystallizes in a hexagonal symmetry with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc (No-194) and cell parameters a=b=5.7861(2) A and c=23.902(1) A. The structural description was correlated with neutron diffraction and bond valence calculations, confirming the presence of Ce{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 4+} segregated in the different crystallographic positions. Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15} displays evidence for strong AFM couplings already set at room temperature. The main arrangement of Mn{sup 4+} in magnetically isolated tetramers of face-sharing octahedra is responsible for a metamagnetic-like transition around 50 K. - Graphical abstract: The new Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15} polytype shows strong AFM couplings in magnetically isolated [Ce{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15}] tetramers of face-sharing octahedral, resulting in a metamagnetic-like transition around 50 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15}, a new 10H polytype, has been prepared in the Ba-Ce-Mn-O system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compound crystallizes in the P6{sub 3}/mmc space group with (cchhh){sub 2} stacking sequence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Ce{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15}] tetramers are separated by [CeO{sub 6}] octahedra in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Instead of robust AFM ordering, a metamagnetic-like transition is found around 50 K.

  16. Gene stacking by recombinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient methods of stacking genes into plant genomes are needed to expedite transfer of multigenic traits into diverse crops grown in a variety of environments. Over two decades of research has identified several site-specific recombinases that carry out efficient cis and trans recombination betw...

  17. 23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, coke gas pipe to left; in background, BOF building, limestone piles, Levy's Slag Dump. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  18. Effects of Ordered Stacking Faults on Electrical Transport Properties in Silicon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, Marc; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Champagne, Alexandre

    Lattice defects in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) allow the exploration of the fundamental physics governing transport mechanisms. We study charge transport in SiNW transistors with stacking faults in the 3C sequence, producing local hexagonal ordering. This structure leads to polytype SiNWs with distinct properties for novel applications in thermoelectronics. Since charge carrier and phonon behavior depend on crystal structure, these planar defects affect the transport properties of the nanowire. We grow our SiNWs using a VLS method, with stacking faults induced during growth. Structural characterization of each SiNW is done with Raman spectroscopy to quantify hexagonality. Individual nanowires are located and contacted using different metals to understand the Schottky barrier of the contacts at the SiNWs. We suspend 2 μm-long SiNW devices using a wet oxide etch to uncouple the SiNW from the substrate. We study the electrical properties by I-V measurements across the FET device while modulating the applied back gate voltage. Our initial data show that the presence of stacking faults causes an increase in resistivity by two orders of magnitude, thus greatly hindering charge transport through the SiNW.

  19. Review of Stack CSP Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, R.

    1999-01-01

    CSP is an emerging technology with significant potential growth in stacking. Many of the stacking techniques for conventional packages could be implemented for CSP once materials, process, and system development for finer features are developed.

  20. Role of polytypism and degree of hexagonality on the photoinduced optical second harmonic generation in SiC nanocrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A.; Puziko, V.; Skorik, S.; Wojciechowski, A.; Fedorchuk, A. O.; Maciąg, A.

    2015-05-01

    Photoinduced optiсal second harmonic generation was studied in nanocrystalline SiC films prepared by the method of direct ion deposition. For the studies were chosen three types of polytypes (with different degree of hexagonality) - 24R with degree hexagonality G=25, 27R-G=44, 33R with - G=36. The bicolor photoinduced treatment was performed by the wavelengths 1064nm/532 nm by 15 ns YAG:Nd laser. The efficiency of the output SHG was evaluated by ratio of the corresponding signal intensities with respect to the references and by the time delay between the SHG and the fundamental maxima. Explanation of the observed effect is given within a framework of the occurrence of the nano-trapping levels in the film crystalline interfaces.

  1. Energy Expenditure of Sport Stacking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Steven R.; Udermann, Brian E.; Reineke, David M.; Battista, Rebecca A.

    2009-01-01

    Sport stacking is an activity taught in many physical education programs. The activity, although very popular, has been studied minimally, and the energy expenditure for sport stacking is unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the energy expenditure of sport stacking in elementary school children and to compare that value…

  2. Stacked magnet superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Rigney, T.K. II; Saville, M.P.

    1993-06-15

    A superconducting bearing is described, comprising: a plurality of permanent magnets magnetized end-to-end and stacked side-by-side in alternating polarity, such that flux lines flow between ends of adjacent magnets; isolating means, disposed between said adjacent magnets, for reducing flux leakage between opposing sides of said adjacent magnets; and a member made of superconducting material having at least one surface in communication with said flux lines.

  3. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  4. Thermoacoustic Refrigerator's Stack Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fawal, Mawahib Hassan; Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Yaacob, Mohd. Shafik; Darus, Amer Nordin

    2010-06-01

    The standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator, which uses sound generation to transfer heat, was developed rapidly during the past four decades. It was regarded as a new, promising and environmentally benign alternative to conventional compression vapor refrigerators, although it was not competitive regarding the coefficient of performance (COP) yet. Thus the aim of this paper is to enhance thermoacoustic refrigerator's stack performance through optimization. A computational optimization procedure of thermoacoustic stack design was fully developed. The procedure was designed to achieve optimal coefficient of performance based on most of the design and operating parameters. Cooling load and acoustic power governing equations were set assuming the linear thermoacoustic theory. Lagrange multipliers method was used as an optimization technique tool to solve the governing equations. Numerical analyses results of the developed design procedure are presented. The results showed that the stack design parameters are the most significant parameters for the optimal overall performance. The coefficient of performance obtained increases by about 48.8% from the published experimental optimization methods. The results are in good agreement with past established studies.

  5. Effect of Stacking Faults on the X-Ray Diffraction Profiles of Beta-SiC Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujar, Vijay V.; Cawley, James D.; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns or beta-SiC (3C or the cubic polytype or sic) powders often exhibit an additional peak at d = 0.266 nm, high background intensity around the (111) peak, and relative intensities for peaks which differ from those predicted from the crystal structure. Computer simulations were used to show that all these features are due to stacking faults in the powders and not due to the presence of other polytypes in the powders. Such simulations allow diffraction patterns to be generated for different types, frequencies, and spatial distribution or faults. Comparison of the simulation results to the XRD data indicates that the B-SiC particles consist either of heavily faulted clusters distributed irregularly between regions that have only occasional faults or twins, or the powders consist of two types of particles with different populations of faults: those with a high density of faults and those with only twins or occasional faults. Additional information is necessary to determine which description is correct. However, the simulation results can be used to rule out certain fault configurations.

  6. Organometal Trihalide Perovskite Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dali

    The family of organometal trihalide perovskite (OTP), CH3NH3PbX3 (where X is halogen) has recently revolutionized the photovoltaics field, and shows promise in applications such as solar energy harnessing, light emitting diodes, field effect transistors and laser action. The OTP spin characteristic properties are influenced by the large spin-orbit-coupling of the Pb atoms, and thus may offer a new class of semiconductors for spin-based applications. In this talk we will summarize the `magnetic field effect' on photocurrent and electroluminescence in OTP optoelectronic devices, and photoluminescence from OTP films; and report more recent studies of pure spin-current and spin-aligned carrier injection in OTP spintronics devices using `spin-pumping' and `spin-injection', respectively. We measured relatively large inverse-spin-Hall effect using pulsed microwave excitation in OTP devices at resonance with a ferromagnetic (FM) layer, and giant magnetoresistance in OTP-based spin-valves. Our studies launch the field of OTP spintronics. Research sponsored by the DOE, Office of Science, Grant DE-SC0014579. Work done in collaboration with Chuang Zhang, Marzieh Kavand, Kipp J. van Schooten, Hans Malissa, Matthew Groesbeck, Ryan Mclaughlin, Christoph Boehme, and Z. Valy Vardeny.

  7. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  8. Modelling dislocation cores in MgSiO3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Kraych, A.

    2012-12-01

    MgSiO3 perovskite is the most abundant mineral of the Earth's lower mantle (i.e. between 700 and 2900 km depth) and accounts for half of Earth's mass. At lower mantle pressures (25-135 GPa) MgSiO3 crystallises in a distorted (orthorhombic) perovskite structure (described in the following using the Pbnm space group). In this structure, SiO6 octahedra are tilted with tilt angles increasing with increasing pressure. Since it is very difficult to perform deformation experiments under the extreme P, T conditions of the lower mantle, little is known about plastic deformation of MgSiO3 perovskite and its slip systems are still a matter of debate. To overcome this difficulty, we model dislocation core structures in this mineral taking into account the influence of pressure. In this study, we focus on dislocation core structures of dislocations with [100] and [010] Burgers vectors (which derive from <110> Burgers vectors of the underlying pseudo-cubic structure). Atomistic calculations are performed using pair-wise potentials as implemented in the LAMMPS code. The choice of potentials was initially validated by comparing generalized stacking fault (GSF) energies to similar calculations performed with the density functional theory (DFT). The core structures of screw dislocations are calculated using two independent methods. The first one is based on Peierls-Nabarro-Galerkin simulations involving GSF as an input. Direct calculations have also bee performed using cluster approach. It turns out that screw dislocations with [100] Burgers vector are characterised by a core mostly spread in the (010) plane. The core exhibits two edge-sharing octahedra in a configuration very similar to that modelled in SrTiO3 cubic perovskite. The structure of [010] screw dislocations is more complex with dissociation into two, non-collinear partial dislocations with a significant non-screw component. Both dislocations exhibit high Peierls stresses. This illustrates the effect of orthorhombic

  9. Asymmetric Flexible Supercapacitor Stack

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Electrical double layer supercapacitor is very significant in the field of electrical energy storage which can be the solution for the current revolution in the electronic devices like mobile phones, camera flashes which needs flexible and miniaturized energy storage device with all non-aqueous components. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique over hydrogen decrepitated Mischmetal (Mm) based AB3alloy hydride. The polymer dispersed MWNTs have been obtained by insitu polymerization and the metal oxide/MWNTs were synthesized by sol-gel method. Morphological characterizations of polymer dispersed MWNTs have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM). An assymetric double supercapacitor stack has been fabricated using polymer/MWNTs and metal oxide/MWNTs coated over flexible carbon fabric as electrodes and nafion®membrane as a solid electrolyte. Electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor stack has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  10. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, K.D.

    1991-06-25

    Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  11. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  12. Polytype stability, microstructural evolution, and impurities at the interface of homoepitaxial 4H-silicon carbide(1120) thin films grown via hot-wall chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Seann M. G.

    The electronic properties of 4H-SiC make it a leading semiconductor material for high-power applications. Despite advances in SiC crystal growth, devices fabricated in 4H-SiC(0001) continue to be limited by defects like micropipes, dislocations and stacking faults. Investigations performed here on non-basal 4H-SiC have demonstrated micropipe-free, 4H-SiC(112¯0) films comparable with conventional 4H-SiC(0001). Improved device performance has been achieved for p-i-n rectifiers fabricated in 4H-SiC(112¯0). Hot-wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most widely used growth process employed to meet the material demands for 4H-SiC-based high-power electronics; however, the suitability of this technique for the growth of thin films (<10 mum) is not well established. A detailed analysis of the epitaxial growth of 4H-SiC(112¯0) thin films by vertical, hot-wall CVD has been performed in this work. Two growth regimes were identified and termed sublimation growth and precursor growth. In the former, the SiC coating decomposes and results in the in-situ (sublimation) growth of epitaxial SiC films. It is proposed that in-situ layer aids in subsequent thin film growth from reactant gases. Transmission electron microscopy revealed areas without observable defects and an indistinguishable interface between the substrate and sublimation grown layer. Aluminum impurity concentrations to 3x10 18 cm-3 were identified near the interface with the substrate. The influence of these impurities on the cathodoluminescence spectrum of 4H-SiC was studied. A model based on boundary layer theory was developed to explain the origin and the profile of the aluminum impurities. Secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed the SiC coating to be the major source of aluminum impurities. An argon diluent reduced the concentration of aluminum at the interface to 2x1017 cm-3. Films deposited via precursor growth exhibited specular surfaces. Optical and structural characterization showed the films

  13. Time-varying imagery of ice features dynamic scattering in presence climate change: polytypical lakes Ladoga and Peipus as example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melentyev, V.; Melentyev, K.; Pettersson, L.; Mushkudiany, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Problem of dynamical instability of ice conditions and modification of ice regime of polytypical lakes owing to global warming was investigated using time-varying satellite imagery. Deep-water Lake Ladoga and shallow-water Lake Peipus both situated at the north-western part of Russian Federation in moderate climatic zone but possessed different heat capacity were used for comparative studies. The comprehensive analysis of ERS/RADARSAT/Envisat SAR images was provided using the results of long-term studies of thermal structures of these inland water bodies and peculiarities of their variability during open water season as well calculations of heat supply in different weather conditions. 1993-2008 NERSC/NIERSC SAR archive as well materials sub-satellite experiments on board research vessel and research aircraft since 1960-s is used. Shipborne observations were used for validation satellite information. Thematic interpretation of satellite data shows that SAR signature of ice could be applied as tracer of various natural processes and phenomena, including climatically and ecologically important ones. As result dependence of hydrological features and the time of freeze-up and ice destruction in both selected lakes in consequence of climate change and softening of winter severity in nowadays was assessed. Wind regime patterns (speed and direction) were analyzed using algorithm CMOD 4 and in the upshot the increase of seasonal and regional variability of windy weather in studied regions was fixed. In frame of these studies wind cadastre appurtenant to the NW part of RF was composed on the basis of satellite SAR survey. In particular the modification of "wind climate" was disclosed. And what is more: it was revealed that intensification of windy weather resulted in intensification of dynamic range of water and ice exchange between the central part of both studied polytypical lakes and their gulfs. These natural processes took place due to widening duration of the open

  14. Time-varying imagery of ice features dynamic scattering in presence climate change: polytypical lakes Ladoga and Peipus as example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melentyev, V. V.; Melentyev, K. V.; Pettersson, L. H.; Mushkudany, M. I.

    2009-04-01

    Problem of dynamical instability of ice conditions and modification of ice regime of polytypical lakes owing to global warming were investigated using time-varying satellite imagery. Deep-water Lake Ladoga and shallow-water Lake Peipus both situated at the north-western part of Russian Federation in moderate climatic zone but possessed different heat capacity were used for comparative studies. The comprehensive analysis of ERS/RADARSAT/Envisat SAR images was provided using the results of long-term studies of thermal structures of these inland waterbodies and peculiarities of their variability during open water season as well calculations of heat supply in different weather conditions. 1993-2008 NERSC/NIERSC SAR archive as well materials sub-satellite experiments onboard research vessel and research aircraft since 1960-s is used. Shipborne observations were used for validation satellite information. Thematic interpretation of satellite data shows that SAR signature of ice could be applied as tracer of various natural processes and phenomena, including climatically and ecologically important ones. As result dependence of hydrological features and the time of freeze-up and ice destruction in both selected lakes in consequence of climate change and softening of winter severity in nowadays was assessed. Wind regime patterns (speed and direction) were analyzed using algorithm CMOD 4 and in the upshot the increase of seasonal and regional variability of windy weather in studied regions was fixed. In frame of these studies wind cadastre appurtenant to the NW part of RF was composed on the basis of satellite SAR survey. In particular the modification of "wind climate" was disclosed. And what is more: it was revealed that intensification of windy weather resulted in intensification of dynamic range of water and ice exchange between the central part of both studied polytypical lakes and their gulfs. These natural processes took place due to widening duration of the open water

  15. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree. The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.

  16. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  17. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  18. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree. The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.

  19. The LSST Software Stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Timothy; LSST Data Management Team

    2016-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an 8-m optical ground-based telescope being constructed on Cerro Pachon in Chile. LSST will survey half the sky every few nights in six optical bands. The data will be transferred to the data center in North America and within 60 seconds it will be reduced using difference imaging and an alert list be generated for the community. Additionally, annual data releases will be constructed from all the data during the 10-year mission, producing catalogs and deep co-added images with unprecedented time resolution for such a large region of sky. In the paper we present the current status of the LSST stack including the data processing components, Qserv database and data visualization software, describe how to obtain it, and provide a summary of the development road map.

  20. High Energy Electron Diffraction from Transverse Stacking Faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesson, David Edward

    1987-12-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The principal aim of this work is to study electron diffraction phenomena associated with high symmetry zone axes of crystals which contain transverse stacking faults. A theory is developed to describe diffraction effects visible in convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns obtained from faulted crystals. In particular, it is shown that the idea of Bloch wave excitation transfers is of importance in understanding the origin of the diffraction phenomena. Three-dimensional (3D) diffraction is treated under pseudo-kinematic assumptions and an expression is derived for the higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) intensity profile associated with a single fault. As a basis for studying the faulted crystal, CBED patterns are obtained from perfect samples of the layered structure 2Hb MoS_2. Wide angle CBED (WACBED) results are simulated computationally and understood in terms of the dispersion surface construction. In particular, the relationship between HOLZ intensities and kinematic structure factors is investigated for the 2Hb polytype. In the case of faulted crystals, it is shown how the projected displacement vector can be determined from the symmetry of zone axis patterns (ZAP's). The sensitivity of pattern features to fault depth is examined by computer simulation and in some cases it is found useful to describe the excitation transfers in terms of tight binding functions. The phenomenon of HOLZ line splitting is clarified and it is shown how 3D diffraction can be used to provide information on the full displacement vector, including the non-zero layer component. Finally, absorption effects are shown to be important in simulating HOLZ intensity profiles from faulted crystals.

  1. Zigzag stacks and m-regular linear stacks.

    PubMed

    Chen, William Y C; Guo, Qiang-Hui; Sun, Lisa H; Wang, Jian

    2014-12-01

    The contact map of a protein fold is a graph that represents the patterns of contacts in the fold. It is known that the contact map can be decomposed into stacks and queues. RNA secondary structures are special stacks in which the degree of each vertex is at most one and each arc has length of at least two. Waterman and Smith derived a formula for the number of RNA secondary structures of length n with exactly k arcs. Höner zu Siederdissen et al. developed a folding algorithm for extended RNA secondary structures in which each vertex has maximum degree two. An equation for the generating function of extended RNA secondary structures was obtained by Müller and Nebel by using a context-free grammar approach, which leads to an asymptotic formula. In this article, we consider m-regular linear stacks, where each arc has length at least m and the degree of each vertex is bounded by two. Extended RNA secondary structures are exactly 2-regular linear stacks. For any m ≥ 2, we obtain an equation for the generating function of the m-regular linear stacks. For given m, we deduce a recurrence relation and an asymptotic formula for the number of m-regular linear stacks on n vertices. To establish the equation, we use the reduction operation of Chen, Deng, and Du to transform an m-regular linear stack to an m-reduced zigzag (or alternating) stack. Then we find an equation for m-reduced zigzag stacks leading to an equation for m-regular linear stacks. PMID:25455155

  2. Spherical Torus Center Stack Design

    SciTech Connect

    C. Neumeyer; P. Heitzenroeder; C. Kessel; M. Ono; M. Peng; J. Schmidt; R. Woolley; I. Zatz

    2002-01-18

    The low aspect ratio spherical torus (ST) configuration requires that the center stack design be optimized within a limited available space, using materials within their established allowables. This paper presents center stack design methods developed by the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Project Team during the initial design of NSTX, and more recently for studies of a possible next-step ST (NSST) device.

  3. Stacking disorder in ice I.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Tamsin L; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Molinero, Valeria; Pickering, Steven J; Whale, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, ice I was considered to exist in two well-defined crystalline forms at ambient pressure: stable hexagonal ice (ice Ih) and metastable cubic ice (ice Ic). However, it is becoming increasingly evident that what has been called cubic ice in the past does not have a structure consistent with the cubic crystal system. Instead, it is a stacking-disordered material containing cubic sequences interlaced with hexagonal sequences, which is termed stacking-disordered ice (ice Isd). In this article, we summarise previous work on ice with stacking disorder including ice that was called cubic ice in the past. We also present new experimental data which shows that ice which crystallises after heterogeneous nucleation in water droplets containing solid inclusions also contains stacking disorder even at freezing temperatures of around -15 °C. This supports the results from molecular simulations, that the structure of ice that crystallises initially from supercooled water is always stacking-disordered and that this metastable ice can transform to the stable hexagonal phase subject to the kinetics of recrystallization. We also show that stacking disorder in ice which forms from water droplets is quantitatively distinct from ice made via other routes. The emerging picture of ice I is that of a very complex material which frequently contains stacking disorder and this stacking disorder can vary in complexity depending on the route of formation and thermal history. PMID:25380218

  4. Assessing Elementary Algebra with STACK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangwin, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper concerns computer aided assessment (CAA) of mathematics in which a computer algebra system (CAS) is used to help assess students' responses to elementary algebra questions. Using a methodology of documentary analysis, we examine what is taught in elementary algebra. The STACK CAA system, http://www.stack.bham.ac.uk/, which uses the CAS…

  5. The Pleistocene glaciations and the evolutionary history of the polytypic snail species Arianta arbustorum (Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Helicidae).

    PubMed

    Gittenberger, E; Piel, W H; Groenenberg, D S J

    2004-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the snail Arianta arbustorum is controversial. This diverse, polytypic species has two distinct forms: one, with a globular shell and closed umbilicus, is found from lowland to high altitudes; the other, with a depressed shell and open umbilicus, is found at a few scattered, high altitude localities. What is the origin of these two forms? Some believe that the depressed shell is a recent, local, ecotypic adaptation to alpine environments. Others believe that this form is a relic of an ancestral condition that may have survived the Pleistocene glaciations on nunatak-like montane refugia, while the globular shell is a derived condition and its presence at high altitudes follows post-Pleistocene recolonisation. We analysed a portion of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I for 100 snails of the species A. arbustorum, three additional Arianta species, and nine outgroup taxa from five genera, in order to understand the phylogeographic history of the species. Despite some confounding artefacts that are likely due to introgression among the morphological forms, the resulting phylogeny shows that the depressed shell is plesiomorphic, while the globular shell is derived. Moreover, their disparate histories suggest that the depressed shell variety survived the glaciations in pockets of alpine refugia, while the globular shell variety recolonised the alpine environment post-glacially. PMID:15022758

  6. The Pleistocene glaciations and the evolutionary history of the polytypic snail species Arianta arbustorum (Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Helicidae).

    PubMed

    Gittenberger, E; Piel, W H; Groenenberg, D S J

    2004-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the snail Arianta arbustorum is controversial. This diverse, polytypic species has two distinct forms: one, with a globular shell and closed umbilicus, is found from lowland to high altitudes; the other, with a depressed shell and open umbilicus, is found at a few scattered, high altitude localities. What is the origin of these two forms? Some believe that the depressed shell is a recent, local, ecotypic adaptation to alpine environments. Others believe that this form is a relic of an ancestral condition that may have survived the Pleistocene glaciations on nunatak-like montane refugia, while the globular shell is a derived condition and its presence at high altitudes follows post-Pleistocene recolonisation. We analysed a portion of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I for 100 snails of the species A. arbustorum, three additional Arianta species, and nine outgroup taxa from five genera, in order to understand the phylogeographic history of the species. Despite some confounding artefacts that are likely due to introgression among the morphological forms, the resulting phylogeny shows that the depressed shell is plesiomorphic, while the globular shell is derived. Moreover, their disparate histories suggest that the depressed shell variety survived the glaciations in pockets of alpine refugia, while the globular shell variety recolonised the alpine environment post-glacially.

  7. Electronic bands and excited states of III-V semiconductor polytypes with screened-exchange density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2014-03-31

    The electronic band structures and excited states of III-V semiconductors such as GaP, AlP, AlAs, and AlSb for various polytypes are determined employing the screened-exchange density functional calculations implemented in the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave methods. We demonstrate that GaP and AlSb in the wurtzite (WZ) structure have direct gap while III-V semiconductors in the zinc blende, 4H, and 6H structures considered in this study exhibit an indirect gap. Furthermore, we find that inclusion of Al atoms less than 17% and 83% in the hexagonal Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}P and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As alloys, respectively, leads to a direct transition with a gap energy of ∼2.3 eV. The feasibility of III-V semiconductors with a direct gap in WZ structure offers a possible crystal structure engineering to tune the optical properties of semiconductor materials.

  8. 49 CFR 178.815 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stacking test. 178.815 Section 178.815... Stacking test. (a) General. The stacking test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types intended to be stacked. (b) Special preparation for the stacking test. (1) All IBCs...

  9. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘polarization twist’, which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  10. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-02

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms.

  11. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  12. Multiferroic crossover in perovskite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, L.; Cui, X. Y.; Ringer, S. P.; Stampfl, C.

    2016-04-01

    The coexistence of ferroelectricity and magnetism in A B O3 perovskite oxides is rare, a phenomenon that has become known as the ferroelectric "d0 rule." Recently, the perovskite BiCoO3 has been shown experimentally to be isostructural with PbTiO3, while simultaneously the d6Co3 + ion has a high-spin ground state with C -type antiferromagnetic ordering. It has been suggested that the hybridization of Bi 6 s states with the O 2 p valence band stabilizes the polar phase, however, we have recently demonstrated that Co3 + ions in the perovskite structure can facilitate a ferroelectric distortion via the Co 3 d -O 2 p covalent interaction [L. Weston, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 247601 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.247601]. In this paper, using accurate hybrid density functional calculations, we investigate the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structure of BiCoO3 to elucidate the origin of the multiferroic state. To begin with, we perform a more general first-principles investigation of the role of d electrons in affecting the tendency for perovskite materials to exhibit a ferroelectric distortion; this is achieved via a qualitative trend study in artificial cubic and tetragonal La B O3 perovskites. We choose La as the A cation so as to remove the effects of Bi 6 s hybridization. The lattice instability is identified by the softening of phonon modes in the cubic phase, as well as by the energy lowering associated with a ferroelectric distortion. For the La B O3 series, where B is a d0-d8 cation from the 3 d block, the trend study reveals that increasing the d orbital occupation initially removes the tendency for a polar distortion, as expected. However, for high-spin d5-d7 and d8 cations a strong ferroelectric instability is recovered. This effect is explained in terms of increased pseudo-Jahn-Teller (PJT) p -d vibronic coupling. The PJT effect is described by the competition between a stabilizing force (K0) that favors the cubic phase, and a vibronic term that

  13. High-performance perovskite light-emitting diodes via morphological control of perovskite films.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jae Choul; Kim, Da Bin; Jung, Eui Dae; Lee, Bo Ram; Song, Myoung Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Solution-processable perovskite materials have garnered tremendous attention because of their excellent charge carrier mobility, possibility of a tunable optical bandgap, and high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (PLQE). In particular, the uniform morphology of a perovskite film is the most important factor in realizing perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) with high efficiency and full-coverage electroluminescence (EL). In this study, we demonstrate highly efficient PeLEDs that contain a perovskite film with a uniform morphology by introducing HBr into the perovskite precursor. The introduction of HBr into the perovskite precursor results in a perovskite film with a uniform, continuous morphology because the HBr increases the solubility of the inorganic component in the perovskite precursor and reduces the crystallization rate of the perovskite film upon spin-coating. Moreover, PeLEDs fabricated using perovskite films with a uniform, continuous morphology, which were deposited using 6 vol% HBr in a dimethylformamide (DMF)/hydrobromic acid (HBr) cosolvent, exhibited full coverage of the green EL emission. Finally, the optimized PeLEDs fabricated with perovskite films deposited using the DMF/HBr cosolvent exhibited a maximum luminance of 3490 cd m(-2) (at 4.3 V) and a luminous efficiency of 0.43 cd A(-1) (at 4.3 V). PMID:26607474

  14. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailie, Colin D.; Christoforo, M. Greyson; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bowring, Andrea R.; Unger, Eva L.; Nguyen, William H.; Burschka, Julian; Pellet, Norman; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Grätzel, Michael; Noufi, Rommel; Buonassisi, Tonio; Salleo, Alberto; McGehee, Michael D.

    2014-12-23

    A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. Furthermore, this work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-cost and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.

  15. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    DOE PAGES

    Bailie, Colin D.; Christoforo, M. Greyson; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bowring, Andrea R.; Unger, Eva L.; Nguyen, William H.; Burschka, Julian; Pellet, Norman; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Grätzel, Michael; et al

    2014-12-23

    A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. Furthermore, this work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-costmore » and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.« less

  16. Flexible Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskite Memory.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chungwan; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-05-24

    Active research has been done on hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite materials for application to solar cells with high power conversion efficiency. However, this material often shows hysteresis, which is undesirable, shift in the current-voltage curve. The hysteresis may come from formation of defects and their movement in perovskite materials. Here, we utilize the defects in perovskite materials to be used in memory operations. We demonstrate flexible nonvolatile memory devices based on hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite as the resistive switching layer on a plastic substrate. A uniform perovskite layer is formed on a transparent electrode-coated plastic substrate by solvent engineering. Flexible nonvolatile memory based on the perovskite layer shows reproducible and reliable memory characteristics in terms of program/erase operations, data retention, and endurance properties. The memory devices also show good mechanical flexibility. It is suggested that resistive switching is done by migration of vacancy defects and formation of conducting filaments under the electric field in the perovskite layer. It is believed that organic-inorganic perovskite materials have great potential to be used in high-performance, flexible memory devices. PMID:27093096

  17. Achieving High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, metal halide perovskite based solar cell with the characteristics of rather low raw materials cost, great potential for simple process and scalable production, and extreme high power conversion efficiency (PCE), have been highlighted as one of the most competitive technologies for next generation thin film photovoltaic (PV). In UCLA, we have realized an efficient pathway to achieve high performance pervoskite solar cells, where the findings are beneficial to this unique materials/devices system. Our recent progress lies in perovskite film formation, defect passivation, transport materials design, interface engineering with respect to high performance solar cell, as well as the exploration of its applications beyond photovoltaics. These achievements include: 1) development of vapor assisted solution process (VASP) and moisture assisted solution process, which produces perovskite film with improved conformity, high crystallinity, reduced recombination rate, and the resulting high performance; 2) examination of the defects property of perovskite materials, and demonstration of a self-induced passivation approach to reduce carrier recombination; 3) interface engineering based on design of the carrier transport materials and the electrodes, in combination with high quality perovskite film, which delivers 15 ~ 20% PCEs; 4) a novel integration of bulk heterojunction to perovskite solar cell to achieve better light harvest; 5) fabrication of inverted solar cell device with high efficiency and flexibility and 6) exploration the application of perovskite materials to photodetector. Further development in film, device architecture, and interfaces will lead to continuous improved perovskite solar cells and other organic-inorganic hybrid optoelectronics.

  18. Stability of organometal perovskites with organic overlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Catherine D. T.; Liu, Yi; Thibau, Emmanuel S.; Llanos, Adrian; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2015-08-15

    The air-stability of vapour-phase-deposited methylammonium lead triiodide (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) perovskite thin films has been studied using X-ray diffraction. It is found that the perovskite structure without organic coating decomposes completely within a short period of time (∼two days) upon exposure to ambient environment. The degradation of the perovskite structure is drastically reduced when the perovskite films are capped with thin N,N′-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N′-diphenyl-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4,4′-diamine (NPB) films. We discovered that the amount of lead iodide (PbI{sub 2}), a product of the degradation, grows as a function of time in a sigmoidal manner. Further mathematical modeling analysis shows that the perovskite degradation follows the Avrami equation, a kinetics theory developed for quantifying phase transformations in solid-state materials.

  19. Non-collinear magnetism in multiferroic perovskites.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Eric; Cano, Andrés

    2016-03-31

    We present an overview of the current interest in non-collinear magnetism in multiferroic perovskite crystals. We first describe the different microscopic mechanisms giving rise to the non-collinearity of spins in this class of materials. We discuss, in particular, the interplay between non-collinear magnetism and ferroelectric and antiferrodistortive distortions of the perovskite structure, and how this can promote magnetoelectric responses. We then provide a literature survey on non-collinear multiferroic perovskites. We discuss numerous examples of spin cantings driving weak ferromagnetism in transition metal perovskites, and of spin-induced ferroelectricity as observed in the rare-earth based perovskites. These examples are chosen to best illustrate the fundamental role of non-collinear magnetism in the design of multiferroicity.

  20. Organohalide Lead Perovskites for Photovoltaic Applications.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Abd Rashid Bin Mohd; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-03-01

    Perovskite solar cells have recently exhibited a significant leap in efficiency due to their broad absorption, high optical absorption coefficient, very low exciton binding energy, long carrier diffusion lengths, efficient charge collection, and very high open-circuit potential, similar to that of III-IV semiconductors. Unlike silicon solar cells, perovskite solar cells can be developed from a variety of low-temperature solutions processed from inexpensive raw materials. When the perovskite absorber film formation is optimized using solvent engineering, a power conversion efficiency of over 21% has been demonstrated, highlighting the unique photovoltaic properties of perovskite materials. Here, we review the current progress in perovskite solar cells and charge transport materials. We highlight crucial challenges and provide a summary and prospects. PMID:26885884

  1. Identifying and mapping the polytypes and orientation relationships in ZnO/CdSe core–shell nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consonni, Vincent; Rapenne, Laetitia; Renou, Gilles; Roussel, Hervé; Gérard, Lionel; Cuscó, Ramón; Artús, Lluís; André, Régis; Rauch, Edgar F.

    2016-11-01

    Identifying and mapping the crystalline phases and orientation relationships on the local scale in core–shell ZnO nanowire heterostructures are of primary importance to improve the interface quality, which governs the performances of the nanoscale devices. However, this represents a major difficulty, especially when the expected polytypes exhibit very similar properties as in the case of CdSe. In the present work, we address that issue in ZnO nanowire heterostructures involving a uniform and highly conformal CdSe shell grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown by x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy through the occurrence of the (101¯0) and (101¯1) diffraction peaks and of the {{{{E}}}2}{{low}} mode at 34 cm‑1, respectively, that the CdSe shell is mostly crystallized into the wurtzite phase. By using automated crystal phase and orientation mapping with precession (ASTAR) in a transmission electron microscope and thus by benefiting from highly precise electron diffraction patterns, the CdSe shell is found to crystallize also into the minority zinc blende phase. The wurtzite CdSe shell is epitaxially grown on the top of ZnO nanowires, and some specific orientation relationships are mapped and revealed when grown on their vertical sidewalls. Zinc blende CdSe domains are also formed exclusively in the center of wurtzite CdSe grains located on the vertical sidewalls; both wurtzite and zinc blende CdSe crystalline phases have a strong orientation relationship. These findings reveal that ASTAR is a powerful technique to elucidate the structural properties on the local scale and to gain a deeper insight into their crystalline phases and orientation relationships, which is highly promising for many types of semiconducting nanowire heterostructures.

  2. Polytypes and twins in the diamond-lonsdaleite system formed by high-pressure and high-temperature treatment of graphite.

    PubMed

    Kulnitskiy, Boris; Perezhogin, Igor; Dubitsky, Gennady; Blank, Vladimir

    2013-10-01

    As a result of the high-temperature and high-pressure treatment of graphite we obtained a powder containing diamond and lonsdaleite. The structure and properties of the powder were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). It was found that the synthesized material contains not only diamond nanoparticles, but also some relatively large (up to several nanometers) fragments of lonsdaleite. 4H and 6H polytypes were found in some of the diamond particles. Incoherent twin boundaries were observed in the diamond particle containing fragments of lonsdaleite.

  3. 49 CFR 178.1055 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stacking test. 178.1055 Section 178.1055... Containers § 178.1055 Stacking test. (a) General. The stacking test must be conducted for the qualification of all Flexible Bulk Containers design types. (b) Special preparation for the stacking test....

  4. Large Grained Perovskite Solar Cells Derived from Single-Crystal Perovskite Powders with Enhanced Ambient Stability.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hung-Ju; Liang, Po-Wei; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Yang, Zhibin; Jen, Alex K-Y; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the large grained perovskite solar cells prepared from precursor solution comprising single-crystal perovskite powders for the first time. The resultant large grained perovskite thin film possesses a negligible physical (structural) gap between each large grain and is highly crystalline as evidenced by its fan-shaped birefringence observed under polarized light, which is very different from the thin film prepared from the typical precursor route (MAI + PbI2).

  5. Fuel cell stack compressive loading system

    DOEpatents

    Fahle, Ronald W.; Reiser, Carl A.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell module comprising a stack of fuel cells with reactant gas manifolds sealed against the external surfaces of the stack includes a constraint system for providing a compressive load on the stack wherein the constraint system maintains the stack at a constant height (after thermal expansion) and allows the compressive load to decrease with time as a result of the creep characteristics of the stack. Relative motion between the manifold sealing edges and the stack surface is virtually eliminated by this constraint system; however it can only be used with a stack having considerable resiliency and appropriate thermal expansion and creep characteristics.

  6. Perovskites: transforming photovoltaics, a mini-review

    DOE PAGES

    Chilvery, Ashwith Kumar; Batra, Ashok K.; Yang, Bin; Xiao, Kai; Guggilla, Padmaja; Aggarwal, Mohan D.; Surabhi, Raja; Lal, Ravi B.; Currie, James R.; Penn, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-06

    The recent power-packed advent of perovskite solar cells is transforming photovoltaics (PV) with their superior efficiencies, ease of fabrication, and cost. This perovskite solar cell further boasts of many unexplored features that can further enhance its PV properties and lead to it being branded as a successful commercial product. This paper provides a detailed insight of the organometal halide based perovskite structure, its unique stoichiometric design, and its underlying principles for PV applications. Finally, the compatibility of various PV layers and its fabrication methods is also discussed.

  7. Templated Synthesis of Uniform Perovskite Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Michael J; O'Brien, Matthew N; Hedderick, Konrad R; Mason, Jarad A; Ross, Michael B; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-08-17

    While the chemical composition of semiconducting metal halide perovskites can be precisely controlled in thin films for photovoltaic devices, the synthesis of perovskite nanostructures with tunable dimensions and composition has not been realized. Here, we describe the templated synthesis of uniform perovskite nanowires with controlled diameter (50-200 nm). Importantly, by providing three examples (CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3PbBr3, and Cs2SnI6), we show that this process is composition general and results in oriented nanowire arrays on transparent conductive substrates. PMID:27501464

  8. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  9. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  10. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations. PMID:27279218

  11. A study of the dechanneling of protons in SiC polytype crystals in the energy range Ep=400-650 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkoris, M.; Perdikakis, G.; Kossionides, S.; Petrović, S.; Vlastou, R.; Grötzschel, R.

    2004-06-01

    In the present work, the energy spectra of protons channeled along the (0 0 0 1) axis of SiC polytype crystals (namely 4H and 6H) in the energy range Ep=400-650 keV, in the backscattering geometry, were taken and analyzed. Computer simulations are in very good agreement with the measured spectra. The accurate reproduction of the experimental channeling spectra in the backscattering geometry is strongly based on the investigation of the correct dechanneling function and α, the ratio of the stopping powers in the aligned and random mode. In the present work, the applicability of a Gompertz type sigmoidal dechanneling function, with two parameters, k and xc, which represent characteristic dechanneling rate and range, respectively, is examined, and the results are compared to the ones obtained in the past, concerning the same polytype structures, based on the assumption that the dechanneling of protons follows an exponential law, for the energy range Ep=1.7-2.4 MeV.

  12. Effect of symmetry reduction on the electronic transitions in polytypic GdAl3(BO3)4:Eu:Tb crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengyel, K.; Beregi, E.; Földvári, I.; Corradi, G.; Kovács, L.; Solarz, P.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.

    2016-03-01

    The existence of a recently described monoclinic phase (C2/c, Z = 8) (Beregi et al., 2012) in addition to the well-known Huntite type rhombohedral (R32) polytypic modification of the GdAl3(BO3)4 (GAB) crystal at room temperature provides a unique possibility to investigate the incorporation of rare earth dopants into slightly modified crystal lattice by spectroscopic methods. In these characteristic GAB structures the dopant ions, e.g. Tb3+ or Eu3+, possess slightly different neighbor geometries and local symmetries. The Tb3+: 7F6 → 5D4 and Eu3+: 7F0,1,2 → 5D0,1,2 electronic transitions were successfully identified in the absorption spectra using polarization, concentration and temperature dependent measurements in both polytypic modifications. The positions of the investigated Tb lines are shifted by up to 10 cm-1 due to symmetry changes. In addition, some of the Eu lines show splittings of about 4-30 cm-1 as a consequence of the change of the local environment. From the room temperature absorption measurements some of the low energy crystal field levels of 7F and 5D states of the Eu3+ ions were successfully determined for both modifications.

  13. Split stack blowout prevention system

    SciTech Connect

    Crager, B.L.; Ray, D.R.; Steddum, R.E.

    1980-03-18

    A blowout prevention system for an offshore structure positioned on the underwater bottom in a body of water which contains moving ice masses that could force the structure off location wherein a surface blowout preventer stack for conventional well control is connected to the upper end of a riser with the lower end of the riser being disconnectably connected to a subsurface blowout preventer stack which provides the necessary well control should the structure be forced off location. The subsurface stack is positioned on a wellhead located in a chamber in the subsea bottom and is disconnectably connected to the riser so that the riser may be quickly removed from the subsea bottom should the structure be forced off location.

  14. High-performance perovskite light-emitting diodes via morphological control of perovskite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jae Choul; Kim, Da Bin; Jung, Eui Dae; Lee, Bo Ram; Song, Myoung Hoon

    2016-03-01

    Solution-processable perovskite materials have garnered tremendous attention because of their excellent charge carrier mobility, possibility of a tunable optical bandgap, and high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (PLQE). In particular, the uniform morphology of a perovskite film is the most important factor in realizing perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) with high efficiency and full-coverage electroluminescence (EL). In this study, we demonstrate highly efficient PeLEDs that contain a perovskite film with a uniform morphology by introducing HBr into the perovskite precursor. The introduction of HBr into the perovskite precursor results in a perovskite film with a uniform, continuous morphology because the HBr increases the solubility of the inorganic component in the perovskite precursor and reduces the crystallization rate of the perovskite film upon spin-coating. Moreover, PeLEDs fabricated using perovskite films with a uniform, continuous morphology, which were deposited using 6 vol% HBr in a dimethylformamide (DMF)/hydrobromic acid (HBr) cosolvent, exhibited full coverage of the green EL emission. Finally, the optimized PeLEDs fabricated with perovskite films deposited using the DMF/HBr cosolvent exhibited a maximum luminance of 3490 cd m-2 (at 4.3 V) and a luminous efficiency of 0.43 cd A-1 (at 4.3 V).Solution-processable perovskite materials have garnered tremendous attention because of their excellent charge carrier mobility, possibility of a tunable optical bandgap, and high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (PLQE). In particular, the uniform morphology of a perovskite film is the most important factor in realizing perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) with high efficiency and full-coverage electroluminescence (EL). In this study, we demonstrate highly efficient PeLEDs that contain a perovskite film with a uniform morphology by introducing HBr into the perovskite precursor. The introduction of HBr into the perovskite precursor results in

  15. Perovskite thin films via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Brandon R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Adachi, Michael M; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Wong, Chris T O; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ning, Zhijun; Houtepen, Arjan J; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm(-1) .

  16. Pressurized electrolysis stack with thermal expansion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, Richard Scott

    2015-07-14

    The present techniques provide systems and methods for mounting an electrolyzer stack in an outer shell so as to allow for differential thermal expansion of the electrolyzer stack and shell. Generally, an electrolyzer stack may be formed from a material with a high coefficient of thermal expansion, while the shell may be formed from a material having a lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion may lead to damage to the electrolyzer stack as the shell may restrain the thermal expansion of the electrolyzer stack. To allow for the differences in thermal expansion, the electrolyzer stack may be mounted within the shell leaving a space between the electrolyzer stack and shell. The space between the electrolyzer stack and the shell may be filled with a non-conductive fluid to further equalize pressure inside and outside of the electrolyzer stack.

  17. Modeling Anomalous Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    van Reenen, Stephan; Kemerink, Martijn; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-10-01

    Organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites are distinct from most other semiconductors because they exhibit characteristics of both electronic and ionic motion. Accurate understanding of the optoelectronic impact of such properties is important to fully optimize devices and be aware of any limitations of perovskite solar cells and broader optoelectronic devices. Here we use a numerical drift-diffusion model to describe device operation of perovskite solar cells. To achieve hysteresis in the modeled current-voltage characteristics, we must include both ion migration and electronic charge traps, serving as recombination centers. Trapped electronic charges recombine with oppositely charged free electronic carriers, of which the density depends on the bias-dependent ion distribution in the perovskite. Our results therefore show that reduction of either the density of mobile ionic species or carrier trapping at the perovskite interface will remove the adverse hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. This gives a clear target for ongoing research effort and unifies previously conflicting experimental observations and theories.

  18. Ambipolar solution-processed hybrid perovskite phototransistors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Ma, Chun; Wang, Hong; Hu, Weijin; Yu, Weili; Sheikh, Arif D.; Wu, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Organolead halide perovskites have attracted substantial attention because of their excellent physical properties, which enable them to serve as the active material in emerging hybrid solid-state solar cells. Here we investigate the phototransistors based on hybrid perovskite films and provide direct evidence for their superior carrier transport property with ambipolar characteristics. The field-effect mobilities for triiodide perovskites at room temperature are measured as 0.18 (0.17) cm2 V−1 s−1 for holes (electrons), which increase to 1.24 (1.01) cm2 V−1 s−1 for mixed-halide perovskites. The photoresponsivity of our hybrid perovskite devices reaches 320 A W−1, which is among the largest values reported for phototransistors. Importantly, the phototransistors exhibit an ultrafast photoresponse speed of less than 10 μs. The solution-based process and excellent device performance strongly underscore hybrid perovskites as promising material candidates for photoelectronic applications. PMID:26345730

  19. Perovskite solar cells: from materials to devices.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells based on organometal halide light absorbers have been considered a promising photovoltaic technology due to their superb power conversion efficiency (PCE) along with very low material costs. Since the first report on a long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, a PCE as high as 19.3% was demonstrated in 2014, and a certified PCE of 17.9% was shown in 2014. Such a high photovoltaic performance is attributed to optically high absorption characteristics and balanced charge transport properties with long diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, there are lots of puzzles to unravel the basis for such high photovoltaic performances. The working principle of perovskite solar cells has not been well established by far, which is the most important thing for understanding perovksite solar cells. In this review, basic fundamentals of perovskite materials including opto-electronic and dielectric properties are described to give a better understanding and insight into high-performing perovskite solar cells. In addition, various fabrication techniques and device structures are described toward the further improvement of perovskite solar cells.

  20. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  1. Multibeam collimator uses prism stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.

    1981-01-01

    Optical instrument creates many divergent light beams for surveying and machine element alignment applications. Angles and refractive indices of stack of prisms are selected to divert incoming laser beam by small increments, different for each prism. Angles of emerging beams thus differ by small, precisely-controlled amounts. Instrument is nearly immune to vibration, changes in gravitational force, temperature variations, and mechanical distortion.

  2. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    ScienceCinema

    Cody, Tom

    2016-07-12

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  3. Multilayer Piezoelectric Stack Actuator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher M.; Aldrich, Jack B.; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xioaqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2008-01-01

    Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to use actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of fractions of a nanometer. For this purpose, multilayer piezoelectric stacks are being considered as actuators for driving these precision mechanisms. In this study, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and extreme temperatures and voltages. AC signal testing included impedance, capacitance and dielectric loss factor of each actuator as a function of the small-signal driving sinusoidal frequency, and the ambient temperature. DC signal testing includes leakage current and displacement as a function of the applied DC voltage. The applied DC voltage was increased to over eight times the manufacturers' specifications to investigate the correlation between leakage current and breakdown voltage. Resonance characterization as a function of temperature was done over a temperature range of -180C to +200C which generally exceeded the manufacturers' specifications. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators from one manufacturer were driven by a 60volt, 2 kHz sine-wave for ten billion cycles. The tests were performed using a Lab-View controlled automated data acquisition system that monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The measurements included the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current and the analysis of the experimental results will be presented.

  4. Multiferroicity in Perovskite Manganite Superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yong-Mei; Jiang, Xue-Fan; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Multiferroic properties of short period perovskite type manganite superlattice ((R1MnO3)n/(R2MnO3)n (n=1,2,3)) are considered within the framework of classical Heisenberg model using Monte Carlo simulation. Our result revealed the interesting behaviors in Mn spins structure in superlattice. Apart from simple plane spin cycloid structure which is shown in all manganites including bulk, film, and superlattice here in low temperature, a non-coplanar spiral spin structure is exhibited in a certain temperature range when n equals 1, 2 or 3. Specific heat, spin-helicity vector, spin correlation function, spin-helicity correlation function, and spin configuration are calculated to confirm this non-coplanar spiral spin structure. These results are associated with the competition among exchange interaction, magnetic anisotropy, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant No. 11447136

  5. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Pinakin; Urko, Willam

    2008-01-29

    A modular multi-stack fuel-cell assembly in which the fuel-cell stacks are situated within a containment structure and in which a gas distributor is provided in the structure and distributes received fuel and oxidant gases to the stacks and receives exhausted fuel and oxidant gas from the stacks so as to realize a desired gas flow distribution and gas pressure differential through the stacks. The gas distributor is centrally and symmetrically arranged relative to the stacks so that it itself promotes realization of the desired gas flow distribution and pressure differential.

  6. Research Update: Interface-engineered oxygen octahedral tilts in perovskite oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Daisuke Aso, Ryotaro; Kurata, Hiroki; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    Interface engineering of structural distortions is a key for exploring the functional properties of oxide heterostructures and superlattices. In this paper, we report on our comprehensive investigations of oxygen octahedral distortions at the heterointerface between perovskite oxides SrRuO{sub 3} and BaTiO{sub 3} on GdScO{sub 3} substrates and of the influences of the interfacially engineered distortions on the magneto-transport properties of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer. Our state-of-the-art annular bright-field imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that the RuO{sub 6} octahedral distortions in the SrRuO{sub 3} layer have strong dependence on the stacking order of the SrRuO{sub 3} and BaTiO{sub 3} layers on the substrate. This can be attributed to the difference in the interfacial octahedral connections. We also found that the stacking order of the oxide layers has a strong impact on the magneto-transport properties, allowing for control of the magnetic anisotropy of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer through interface engineering. Our results demonstrate the significance of the interface engineering of the octahedral distortions on the structural and physical properties of perovskite oxides.

  7. Effect of Perovskite Overlayers on TiO2 Electrodes in Perovskite-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang-Pil; Kim, Jeong-Hwa; Hwang, Dae-Kue

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have studied the effect of the thickness of a CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite overlayer on mesoporous TiO2 electrodes in perovskite solar cells. The overlayers were prepared by spin coating PbI2 films on the electrodes, which were subsequently exposed to a CH3NH3I/2-propanol solution. We controlled the thickness of the perovskite overlayer by changing the PbI2 solution concentration. The thicknesses of the overlayers spin-coated from 0.5, 0.75, 0.9, and 1 M PbI2 solutions were approximately 179, 262, 316, and 341 nm, respectively. Perovskite solar cells with an approximately 316-nm-thick overlayer showed the highest efficiency of 9.11%. We conclude that optimization of the perovskite overlayer thickness in the solar cell structure is necessary to improve the cell efficiency. PMID:27483921

  8. Making and Breaking of Lead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Manser, Joseph S; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Christians, Jeffrey A; Bakr, Osman M; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-02-16

    A new front-runner has emerged in the field of next-generation photovoltaics. A unique class of materials, known as organic metal halide perovskites, bridges the gap between low-cost fabrication and exceptional device performance. These compounds can be processed at low temperature (typically in the range 80-150 °C) and readily self-assemble from the solution phase into high-quality semiconductor thin films. The low energetic barrier for crystal formation has mixed consequences. On one hand, it enables inexpensive processing and both optical and electronic tunability. The caveat, however, is that many as-formed lead halide perovskite thin films lack chemical and structural stability, undergoing rapid degradation in the presence of moisture or heat. To date, improvements in perovskite solar cell efficiency have resulted primarily from better control over thin film morphology, manipulation of the stoichiometry and chemistry of lead halide and alkylammonium halide precursors, and the choice of solvent treatment. Proper characterization and tuning of processing parameters can aid in rational optimization of perovskite devices. Likewise, gaining a comprehensive understanding of the degradation mechanism and identifying components of the perovskite structure that may be particularly susceptible to attack by moisture are vital to mitigate device degradation under operating conditions. This Account provides insight into the lifecycle of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites, including (i) the nature of the precursor solution, (ii) formation of solid-state perovskite thin films and single crystals, and (iii) transformation of perovskites into hydrated phases upon exposure to moisture. In particular, spectroscopic and structural characterization techniques shed light on the thermally driven evolution of the perovskite structure. By tuning precursor stoichiometry and chemistry, and thus the lead halide charge-transfer complexes present in solution, crystallization

  9. Isotopic stack: measurement of heavy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Beaujean, R.; Schmidt, M.; Enge, W.; Siegmon, G.; Krause, J.; Fischer, E.

    1984-07-13

    A stack of plastic nuclear track detectors was exposed to heavy cosmic rays on the pallet of Spacelab 1. Some layers of the stack were rotated with respect to the main stack to determine the arrival time of the particles. After return of the stack the latent particle tracks are revealed by chemical etching. Under the optical microscope the charge, mass, energy, and impact direction of the particles can be deduced from the track geometry.

  10. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  11. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  12. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  13. Helping Students Design HyperCard Stacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Ken

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how to teach students to design HyperCard stacks. Highlights include introducing HyperCard, developing storyboards, introducing design concepts and scripts, presenting stacks, evaluating storyboards, and continuing projects. A sidebar presents a HyperCard stack evaluation form. (AEF)

  14. 49 CFR 178.980 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stacking test. 178.980 Section 178.980... Packagings § 178.980 Stacking test. (a) General. The stacking test must be conducted for the qualification of... test. (1) All Large Packagings except flexible Large Packaging design types must be loaded to...

  15. 49 CFR 178.606 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stacking test. 178.606 Section 178.606... Packagings and Packages § 178.606 Stacking test. (a) General. All packaging design types other than bags must be subjected to a stacking test. (b) Number of test samples. Three test samples are required for...

  16. PRECISION COSMOGRAPHY WITH STACKED VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2012-08-01

    We present a purely geometrical method for probing the expansion history of the universe from the observation of the shape of stacked voids in spectroscopic redshift surveys. Our method is an Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test based on the average sphericity of voids posited on the local isotropy of the universe. It works by comparing the temporal extent of cosmic voids along the line of sight with their angular, spatial extent. We describe the algorithm that we use to detect and stack voids in redshift shells on the light cone and test it on mock light cones produced from N-body simulations. We establish a robust statistical model for estimating the average stretching of voids in redshift space and quantify the contamination by peculiar velocities. Finally, assuming that the void statistics that we derive from N-body simulations is preserved when considering galaxy surveys, we assess the capability of this approach to constrain dark energy parameters. We report this assessment in terms of the figure of merit (FoM) of the dark energy task force and in particular of the proposed Euclid mission which is particularly suited for this technique since it is a spectroscopic survey. The FoM due to stacked voids from the Euclid wide survey may double that of all other dark energy probes derived from Euclid data alone (combined with Planck priors). In particular, voids seem to outperform baryon acoustic oscillations by an order of magnitude. This result is consistent with simple estimates based on mode counting. The AP test based on stacked voids may be a significant addition to the portfolio of major dark energy probes and its potentialities must be studied in detail.

  17. Rational Strategies for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jangwon; Noh, Jun Hong; Seok, Sang Il

    2016-03-15

    A long-standing dream in the large scale application of solar energy conversion is the fabrication of solar cells with high-efficiency and long-term stability at low cost. The realization of such practical goals depends on the architecture, process and key materials because solar cells are typically constructed from multilayer heterostructures of light harvesters, with electron and hole transporting layers as a major component. Recently, inorganic-organic hybrid lead halide perovskites have attracted significant attention as light absorbers for the fabrication of low-cost and high-efficiency solar cells via a solution process. This mainly stems from long-range ambipolar charge transport properties, low exciton binding energies, and suitable band gap tuning by managing the chemical composition. In our pioneering work, a new photovoltaic platform for efficient perovskite solar cells (PSCs) was proposed, which yielded a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12%. The platform consisted of a pillared architecture of a three-dimensional nanocomposite of perovskites fully infiltrating mesoporous TiO2, resulting in the formation of continuous phases and perovskite domains overlaid with a polymeric hole conductor. Since then, the PCE of our PSCs has been rapidly increased from 3% to over 20% certified efficiency. The unprecedented increase in the PCE can be attributed to the effective integration of the advantageous attributes of the refined bicontinuous architecture, deposition process, and composition of perovskite materials. Specifically, the bicontinuous architectures used in the high efficiency comprise a layer of perovskite sandwiched between mesoporous metal-oxide layer, which is a very thinner than that of used in conventional dye-sensitized solar cells, and hole-conducting contact materials with a metal back contact. The mesoporous scaffold can affect the hysteresis under different scan direction in measurements of PSCs. The hysteresis also greatly depends on

  18. Perovskites with the Framework-Forming Xenon.

    PubMed

    Britvin, Sergey N; Kashtanov, Sergei A; Krzhizhanovskaya, Maria G; Gurinov, Andrey A; Glumov, Oleg V; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Kretser, Yury L; Zaitsev, Anatoly N; Chukanov, Nikita V; Krivovichev, Sergey V

    2015-11-23

    The Group 18 elements (noble gases) were the last ones in the periodic system to have not been encountered in perovskite structures. We herein report the synthesis of a new group of double perovskites KM(XeNaO6) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) containing framework-forming xenon. The structures of the new compounds, like other double perovskites, are built up of the alternating sequence of corner-sharing (XeO6) and (NaO6) octahedra arranged in a three-dimensional rocksalt order. The fact that xenon can be incorporated into the perovskite structure provides new insights into the problem of Xe depletion in the atmosphere. Since octahedrally coordinated Xe(VIII) and Si(IV) exhibit close values of ionic radii (0.48 and 0.40 Å, respectively), one could assume that Xe(VIII) can be incorporated into hyperbaric frameworks such as MgSiO3 perovskite. The ability of Xe to form stable inorganic frameworks can further extend the rich and still enigmatic chemistry of this noble gas. PMID:26429762

  19. Size- and structure-dependence of thermal and mechanical behaviors of single-crystalline and polytypic superlattice ZnS nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Junghwan; Cho, Maenghyo; Zhou, Min

    2015-06-07

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to study the thermal and mechanical behaviors of single-crystalline wurtzite (WZ), zinc-blende (ZB), and polytypic superlattice ZnS nanowires containing alternating WZ and ZB regions with thicknesses between 1.85 nm and 29.62 nm under tensile loading. The wires analyzed have diameters between 1.77 nm and 5.05 nm. The Green-Kubo method is used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the wires at different deformed states. A non-equilibrium MD approach is used to analyze the thermal transport behavior at the interfaces between different structural regions in the superlattice nanowires (SLNWs). The Young's modulus and thermal conductivity of ZB nanowires are approximately 2%–12% and 23%–35% lower than those of WZ nanowires, respectively. The lower initial residual compressive stress due to higher irregularity of surface atoms causes the Young's modulus of ZB nanowires to be lower. The dependence of the thermal conductivity on structure comes from differences in phonon group velocities associated with the different wires. The thermal conductivity of polytypic superlattice nanowires is up to 55% lower than that of single-crystalline nanowires, primarily because of phonon scattering at the interfaces and the resulting lower effective phonon mean free paths for each structural region. As the periodic lengths (1.85–29.62 nm) and specimen lengths (14.81–59.24 nm) of SLNWs decrease, these effects become more pronounced, causing the thermal conductivity to further decrease by up to 30%.

  20. Stacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimber, Lizzie

    2010-01-01

    Linton Waters and Jayne Kranat ran a session on the Nuffield "Applying Mathematical Processes" (AMP) activities at BCME7 in Manchester in April this year. These 1-2 hour activities are revamps of some of the Graded Assessment in Mathematics (GAIM) resources, developed in the 1980s, and are freely available via the Nuffield website and the original…

  1. Modeling functional piezoelectricity in perovskite superlattices with competing instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Charles; Wu, Xifan

    2012-02-01

    Multi-component Perovskite Superlattices (SLs) of the form ABO3, provide a very promising avenue for the design of materials with multifunctional properties. Furthermore the interfaces of such multi-component SLs are home to competing anti-ferrodistortive and ferroelectric instabilities which can produce unexpected functionalities. However, at present first principles calculations exceeding more than 10 units cells, are particularly costly as they scale with the valence electrons as N^3. We present a first-principles modeling technique that allows us to accurately model the piezoelectric strains of paraelectric/ferroelectric SLs, BaTiO3/CaTiO3 and PbTiO3/SrTiO3, under a fixed displacement field. The model is based on a maximally localized wannier center layer polarization technique, as well as a truncated cluster expansion, that makes use of the fact that such PE/FE SLs have been shown to have highly localized ionic and electronic interface effects. The prediction of the piezoelectricity for a SL of an arbitrary stacking sequence will be demonstrated. We also use our model to conduct a systemic study of the interface effects on piezoelectric response in the above SLs paying special attention to a strong non-linear effect observed in Bulk SrTiO3.

  2. Atomistic theory of hybrid improper ferroelectricity in perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong Jian; Íñiguez, Jorge; Ren, Wei; Chen, Xiang Ming; Bellaiche, L.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the so-called hybrid improper ferroelectricity (HIF) appearing in A'BO3/A''BO3 perovskite superlattices. By means of straightforward analytical derivations and/or associated graphical analysis, we demonstrate that two previously-proposed elemental interatomic couplings between the O6 octahedral rotations and the displacements of the A-site cations [Bellaiche and Íñiguez, Phys. Rev. B 88, 014104 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.014104] naturally reproduce and explain HIF in (A'BO3)1/(A''BO3)1 superlattices composed of layers that are only one unit cell thick. Further, we show that our approach permits an easy treatment of superlattices of arbitrary stacking direction and layer thickness. In particular, this allows us to predict (i) other previously overlooked types of HIF in (A'BO3)1/(A''BO3)1 superlattices and (ii) original and striking effects, such as the possibility of discretizing the magnitude of the spontaneous polarization in (A'BO3)m/(A''BO3)n systems when varying the m and n layer thicknesses. We further show first-principles results confirming the latter predictions.

  3. A novel micro-Raman technique to detect and characterize 4H-SiC stacking faults

    SciTech Connect

    Piluso, N. Camarda, M.; La Via, F.

    2014-10-28

    A novel Micro-Raman technique was designed and used to detect extended defects in 4H-SiC homoepitaxy. The technique uses above band-gap high-power laser densities to induce a local increase of free carriers in undoped epitaxies (n < 10{sup 16} at/cm{sup −3}), creating an electronic plasma that couples with the longitudinal optical (LO) Raman mode. The Raman shift of the LO phonon-plasmon-coupled mode (LOPC) increases as the free carrier density increases. Crystallographic defects lead to scattering or recombination of the free carriers which results in a loss of coupling with the LOPC, and in a reduction of the Raman shift. Given that the LO phonon-plasmon coupling is obtained thanks to the free carriers generated by the high injection level induced by the laser, we named this technique induced-LOPC (i-LOPC). This technique allows the simultaneous determination of both the carrier lifetime and carrier mobility. Taking advantage of the modifications on the carrier lifetime induced by extended defects, we were able to determine the spatial morphology of stacking faults; the obtained morphologies were found to be in excellent agreement with those provided by standard photoluminescence techniques. The results show that the detection of defects via i-LOPC spectroscopy is totally independent from the stacking fault photoluminescence signals that cover a large energy range up to 0.7 eV, thus allowing for a single-scan simultaneous determination of any kind of stacking fault. Combining the i-LOPC method with the analysis of the transverse optical mode, the micro-Raman characterization can determine the most important properties of unintentionally doped film, including the stress status of the wafer, lattice impurities (point defects, polytype inclusions) and a detailed analysis of crystallographic defects, with a high spectral and spatial resolution.

  4. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  5. Nonlinear acoustic impedance of thermoacoustic stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Huan; Fan, Li; Xiao, Shu-yu; Tao, Sha; Qiu, Mei-chen; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In order to optimize the performances of the thermoacoustic refrigerator working with the high sound pressure level, the nonlinear acoustic characteristics of the thermoacoustic stack in the resonant pipe are studied. The acoustic fluid impedance of the stack made of copper mesh and set up in a resonant pipe is measured in the acoustic fields with different intensities. It is found that when the sound pressure level in the pipe increases to a critical value, the resistance of the stack increases nonlinearly with the sound pressure, while the reactance of the stack keeps constant. Based on the experimental results, a theory model is set up to describe the acoustic characteristics of the stack, according to the rigid frame theory and Forchheimmer equation. Furthermore, the influences of the sound pressure level, operating frequency, volume porosity, and length of the stack on the nonlinear impedance of the stack are evaluated.

  6. A Heteroepitaxial Perovskite Metal-Base Transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, T.; Hikita, Y.; Hwang, H.Y.; /Tokyo U. /JST, PRESTO /SLAC

    2011-08-11

    'More than Moore' captures a concept for overcoming limitations in silicon electronics by incorporating new functionalities in the constituent materials. Perovskite oxides are candidates because of their vast array of physical properties in a common structure. They also enable new electronic devices based on strongly-correlated electrons. The field effect transistor and its derivatives have been the principal oxide devices investigated thus far, but another option is available in a different geometry: if the current is perpendicular to the interface, the strong internal electric fields generated at back-to-back heterojunctions can be used for oxide electronics, analogous to bipolar transistors. Here we demonstrate a perovskite heteroepitaxial metal-base transistor operating at room temperature, enabled by interface dipole engineering. Analysis of many devices quantifies the evolution from hot-electron to permeable-base behaviour. This device provides a platform for incorporating the exotic ground states of perovskite oxides, as well as novel electronic phases at their interfaces.

  7. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    DOEpatents

    Krumpel, Michael; Liu, Di-Jia

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  8. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Uberuaga, Blas; Ramprasad, Rampi; Gubernatis, James; Lookman, Turab

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions of bandgaps for double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps for double perovskites. After evaluating a set of nearly 1.2 million features, we identify several elemental features of the constituent atomic species as the most crucial and relevant predictors. The developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science (on a dataset of more than 1300 double perovskite bandgaps) and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory LDRD program and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences.

  9. Nanoimprinted Perovskite Solar Cells With Enhanced Photocurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroldson, Ross; Balachandran, Balasubramaniam?; Ren, Yixin; Zakhidov, Anvar; Hu, Wenchuang; UTD Nanoimprint Team

    We have developed a new method of Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) to shape the morphology of organolead trihalide perovskite. With this hot stamping process we created ordered gratings or other micro or nanostructures of perovskite resembling 2D photonic crytals on the scale of 200 to 600 nm from a starting small grain spin-coated film of the same scale. With this new method of nanoimprinting, we demonstrate that perovskite PV device performance can be improved and controlled. Initial results comparing flat vs. NIL-PV structure devices show dramatic increase in photocurrent as well as better crystallinity. The origin of Isc enhancement is explained in terms of better morphology and larger grains, resulting in longer diffusion length of carriers, while better light absorption by photonic crystal nanopatterns cannot be excluded.

  10. Metal halide perovskites for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Eperon, Giles E.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2016-06-01

    Exploring prospective materials for energy production and storage is one of the biggest challenges of this century. Solar energy is one of the most important renewable energy resources, due to its wide availability and low environmental impact. Metal halide perovskites have emerged as a class of semiconductor materials with unique properties, including tunable bandgap, high absorption coefficient, broad absorption spectrum, high charge carrier mobility and long charge diffusion lengths, which enable a broad range of photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Since the first embodiment of perovskite solar cells showing a power conversion efficiency of 3.8%, the device performance has been boosted up to a certified 22.1% within a few years. In this Perspective, we discuss differing forms of perovskite materials produced via various deposition procedures. We focus on their energy-related applications and discuss current challenges and possible solutions, with the aim of stimulating potential new applications.

  11. Electronic and Ionic Transport Dynamics in Organolead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Wang, Gongming; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-07-26

    Ion migration has been postulated as the underlying mechanism responsible for the hysteresis in organolead halide perovskite devices. However, the electronic and ionic transport dynamics and how they impact each other in organolead halide perovskites remain elusive to date. Here we report a systematic investigation of the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskite microplate crystals and thin films using temperature-dependent transient response measurements. Our study reveals that thermally activated ionic and electronic conduction coexist in perovskite devices. The extracted activation energies suggest that the electronic transport is easier, but ions migrate harder in microplates than in thin films, demonstrating that the crystalline quality and grain boundaries can fundamentally modify electronic and ionic transport in perovskites. These findings offer valuable insight on the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskites, which is critical for optimizing perovskite devices with reduced hysteresis and improved stability and efficiency.

  12. Functionalization of perovskite thin films with moisture-tolerant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Wang, Yun; Liu, Porun; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Zhao, Hui Jun; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-02-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are particularly suited as light-harvesting materials in photovoltaic devices. The power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has reached certified values of over 20% in just a few years. However, one of the major hindrances for application of these materials in real-world devices is the performance degradation in humid conditions, leading to a rapid loss of photovoltaic response. Here, we demonstrate that hydrophobic tertiary and quaternary alkyl ammonium cations can be successfully assembled on the perovskite surface as efficient water-resisting layers via a facile surface functionalization technique. Such layers can protect the perovskite film under high relative humidity (90 ± 5%) over 30 days. More importantly, devices based on such films can retain the photovoltaic capacities of bulk perovskites, with power conversion efficiencies over 15%. Improving the humidity tolerance of perovskite materials is a necessary step towards large-scale production of high-performance perovskite-based devices under ambient humidity.

  13. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-09-01

    Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  14. Nanoscale investigation of organic - inorganic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacovich, S.; Divitini, G.; Vrućinić, M.; Sadhanala, A.; Friend, R. H.; Sirringhaus, H.; Deschler, F.; Ducati, C.

    2015-10-01

    Over the last few years organic - inorganic halide perovskite-based solar cells have exhibited a rapid evolution, reaching certified power conversion efficiencies now surpassing 20%. Nevertheless the understanding of the optical and electronic properties of such systems on the nanoscale is still an open problem. In this work we investigate two model perovskite systems (based on iodine - CH3NH3PbI3 and bromine - CH3NH3PbBr3), analysing the local elemental composition and crystallinity and identifying chemical inhomogeneities.

  15. Stability of tetravalent actinides in perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.W.; Morss, L.R.; Choi, I.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports the first determination of the enthalpy of formation of a complex actinide(IV) oxide: ..delta..H/sup 0//sub f/ (BaUO/sub 3/, s, 298 K) = -1690 +- 10 kJ mol/sup -1/. The preparation and properties of this and other actinide(IV) complex oxides are described and are compared with other perovskites BaMO/sub 3/. The relative stabilities of tetravalent and hexavalent uranium in various environments are compared in terms of the oxidation-reduction behavior of uranium in geological nuclear waste storage media; in perovskite, uranium(IV) is very unstable in comparison with uranium(VI).

  16. Excited State Properties of Hybrid Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Saba, Michele; Quochi, Francesco; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni

    2016-01-19

    Metal halide perovskites have come to the attention of the scientific community for the progress achieved in solar light conversion. Energy sustainability is one of the priorities of our society, and materials advancements resulting in low-cost but efficient solar cells and large-area lighting devices represent a major goal for applied research. From a basic point of view, perovskites are an exotic class of hybrid materials combining some merits of organic and inorganic semiconductors: large optical absorption, large mobilities, and tunable band gap together with the possibility to be processed in solution. When a novel class of promising semiconductors comes into the limelight, lively discussions ensue on the photophysics of band-edge excitations, because just the states close to the band edge are entailed in energy/charge transport and light emission. This was the case several decades ago for III-V semiconductors, it has been up to 10 years ago for organics, and it is currently the case for perovskites. Our aim in this Account is to rationalize the body of experimental evidence on perovskite photophysics in a coherent theoretical framework, borrowing from the knowledge acquired over the years in materials optoelectronics. A crucial question is whether photon absorption leads to a population of unbound, conductive free charges or instead excitons, neutral and insulating bound states created by Coulomb interaction just below the energy of the band gap. We first focus on the experimental estimates of the exciton binding energy (Eb): at room temperature, Eb is comparable to the thermal energy kBT in MAPbI3 and increases up to values 2-3kBT in wide band gap MAPbBr3 and MAPbCl3. Statistical considerations predict that these values, even though comparable to or larger than thermal energy, let free carriers prevail over bound excitons for all levels of excitation densities relevant for devices. The analysis of photophysics evidence confirms that all hybrid halide

  17. A High Volume Stack Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boubel, Richard W.

    1971-01-01

    The stack sampler described in this paper has been developed to overcome the difficulties of particulate sampling with presently available equipment. Its use on emissions from hog fuel fired boilers, back-fired incinerators, wigwam burners, asphalt plants, and seed cleaning cyclones is reported. The results indicate that the sampler is rapid and reliable in its use. It is relatively simple and inexpensive to operate. For most sources it should be considered over the more complicated and expensive sampling trains being used and specified.

  18. Novel Solvent-free Perovskite Deposition in Fabrication of Normal and Inverted Architectures of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Gharibzadeh, Saba; Ahmadi, Vahid; Shahverdi, H Reza

    2016-01-01

    We introduced a new approach to deposit perovskite layer with no need for dissolving perovskite precursors. Deposition of Solution-free perovskite (SFP) layer is a key method for deposition of perovskite layer on the hole or electron transport layers that are strongly sensitive to perovskite precursors. Using deposition of SFP layer in the perovskite solar cells would extend possibility of using many electron and hole transport materials in both normal and invert architectures of perovskite solar cells. In the present work, we synthesized crystalline perovskite powder followed by successful deposition on TiO2 and cuprous iodide as the non-sensitve and sensitive charge transport layers to PbI2 and CH3NH3I solution in DMF. The post compressing step enhanced the efficiency of the devices by increasing the interface area between perovskite and charge transport layers. The 9.07% and 7.71% cell efficiencies of the device prepared by SFP layer was achieved in respective normal (using TiO2 as a deposition substrate) and inverted structure (using CuI as deposition substrate) of perovskite solar cell. This method can be efficient in large-scale and low cost fabrication of new generation perovskite solar cells.

  19. Novel Solvent-free Perovskite Deposition in Fabrication of Normal and Inverted Architectures of Perovskite Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Gharibzadeh, Saba; Ahmadi, Vahid; Shahverdi, H. Reza

    2016-01-01

    We introduced a new approach to deposit perovskite layer with no need for dissolving perovskite precursors. Deposition of Solution-free perovskite (SFP) layer is a key method for deposition of perovskite layer on the hole or electron transport layers that are strongly sensitive to perovskite precursors. Using deposition of SFP layer in the perovskite solar cells would extend possibility of using many electron and hole transport materials in both normal and invert architectures of perovskite solar cells. In the present work, we synthesized crystalline perovskite powder followed by successful deposition on TiO2 and cuprous iodide as the non-sensitve and sensitive charge transport layers to PbI2 and CH3NH3I solution in DMF. The post compressing step enhanced the efficiency of the devices by increasing the interface area between perovskite and charge transport layers. The 9.07% and 7.71% cell efficiencies of the device prepared by SFP layer was achieved in respective normal (using TiO2 as a deposition substrate) and inverted structure (using CuI as deposition substrate) of perovskite solar cell. This method can be efficient in large-scale and low cost fabrication of new generation perovskite solar cells. PMID:27640991

  20. Novel Solvent-free Perovskite Deposition in Fabrication of Normal and Inverted Architectures of Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Gharibzadeh, Saba; Ahmadi, Vahid; Shahverdi, H. Reza

    2016-09-01

    We introduced a new approach to deposit perovskite layer with no need for dissolving perovskite precursors. Deposition of Solution-free perovskite (SFP) layer is a key method for deposition of perovskite layer on the hole or electron transport layers that are strongly sensitive to perovskite precursors. Using deposition of SFP layer in the perovskite solar cells would extend possibility of using many electron and hole transport materials in both normal and invert architectures of perovskite solar cells. In the present work, we synthesized crystalline perovskite powder followed by successful deposition on TiO2 and cuprous iodide as the non-sensitve and sensitive charge transport layers to PbI2 and CH3NH3I solution in DMF. The post compressing step enhanced the efficiency of the devices by increasing the interface area between perovskite and charge transport layers. The 9.07% and 7.71% cell efficiencies of the device prepared by SFP layer was achieved in respective normal (using TiO2 as a deposition substrate) and inverted structure (using CuI as deposition substrate) of perovskite solar cell. This method can be efficient in large-scale and low cost fabrication of new generation perovskite solar cells.

  1. Novel Solvent-free Perovskite Deposition in Fabrication of Normal and Inverted Architectures of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Gharibzadeh, Saba; Ahmadi, Vahid; Shahverdi, H Reza

    2016-01-01

    We introduced a new approach to deposit perovskite layer with no need for dissolving perovskite precursors. Deposition of Solution-free perovskite (SFP) layer is a key method for deposition of perovskite layer on the hole or electron transport layers that are strongly sensitive to perovskite precursors. Using deposition of SFP layer in the perovskite solar cells would extend possibility of using many electron and hole transport materials in both normal and invert architectures of perovskite solar cells. In the present work, we synthesized crystalline perovskite powder followed by successful deposition on TiO2 and cuprous iodide as the non-sensitve and sensitive charge transport layers to PbI2 and CH3NH3I solution in DMF. The post compressing step enhanced the efficiency of the devices by increasing the interface area between perovskite and charge transport layers. The 9.07% and 7.71% cell efficiencies of the device prepared by SFP layer was achieved in respective normal (using TiO2 as a deposition substrate) and inverted structure (using CuI as deposition substrate) of perovskite solar cell. This method can be efficient in large-scale and low cost fabrication of new generation perovskite solar cells. PMID:27640991

  2. Status of MCFC stack development at Hitachi

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, S.; Kahara, T.; Takeuchi, M.

    1996-12-31

    Hitachi, Ltd. has been developing Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells in the New Sunshine project in Japan, and Hitachi is taking part in the development of 1,000kW MCFC pilot plant at Kawagoe. Hitachi is engaged in system planning of the 1,000kW pilot plant, design and manufacturing of the reformer subsystem and the fuel cell subsystem, and design and manufacturing of the 250kW stacks for the 1,000kW plant. The 250kW stacks are developed on the basis of the results of the 100kW stack in 1993 and the following 25kW stack in 1994. In parallel to the stack development, Hitachi is also conducting researches for long endurance cells and stacks. In addition to the researches for anode, cathode, electrolyte, and electrolyte matrix, improvement of temperature distribution in stacks is investigated to extend the stack life. This paper describes the planning status of the 250kW stacks for the 1,000kW MCFC plant and the developing status of stack cooling method for longer life.

  3. Unraveling Base Stacking Driving Forces in DNA.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H

    2016-07-01

    Base stacking is a key determinant of nucleic acid structures, but the precise origin of the thermodynamic driving force behind the stacking of nucleobases remains open. The rather mild stacking free energy measured experimentally, roughly a kcal/mol depending on the identity of the bases, is physiologically significant because while base stacking confers stability to the genome in its double helix form, the duplex also has to be unwound in order to be replicated or transcribed. A stacking free energy that is either too high or too low will over- or understabilize the genome, impacting the storage of genetic information and also its retrieval. While the molecular origin of stacking driving force has been attributed to many different sources including dispersion, electrostatics, and solvent hydrogen bonding, here we show via a systematic decomposition of the stacking free energy using large-scale computer simulations that the dominant driving force stabilizing base stacking is nonhydrophobic solvent entropy. Counteracting this is the conformational entropic penalty on the sugar-phosphate backbone against stacking, while solvent hydrogen-bonding, charge-charge interactions, and dispersive forces produce only secondary perturbations. Solvent entropic forces and DNA backbone conformational strains therefore work against each other, leading to a very mild composite stacking free energy in agreement with experiments. PMID:27045853

  4. - and Perovskite-Sensitised Mesoscopic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grätzel, Michael; Durrant, James R.

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Historical background * Mode of function of dye-sensitised solar cells * DSSC research and development * Solid-state mesoscopic cells based on molecular dyes or perovskite pigments as sensitisers * Pilot production of modules, field tests and commercial DSSC development * Outlook * Acknowledgements * References

  5. Perovskite solar cells: Different facets of performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eperon, Giles E.; Ginger, David S.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of halide perovskites vary significantly between crystalline grains, but the impact of this heterogeneity on solar cell performance is unclear. Now, this variability is shown to limit the photovoltaic properties of solar cells, and its origins are linked to differing properties between crystal facets.

  6. Prediction of temperature profile in MCFC stack

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kab Soo; Kim, Hwayong; Hong, Seong-An; Lim, Hee Chun

    1996-12-31

    A simple three dimensional model was developed to simulate the temperature distribution and the performance of various flow types of the MCFC stack. The objective of this study was to understand the complicated phenomena occurring in the MCFC stack and to supply the basic data for optimizing the operating condition of the MCFC stack. Assuming that the stack consists of a number of differential elements which have uniform temperature and gas composition, the model was solved by finite difference method. The performance of this model was demonstrated by comparing the calculated value with experimental data of the 1.5kW class co-flow type MCFC stack operated in KIST. This model can be utilized as a simple diagnostic tool in case of the operational abnormality such as the hot spot which often occurs inside the stack.

  7. Improving the Stability and Performance of Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes by Thermal Annealing Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jae Choul; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Da Bin; Jung, Eui Dae; Park, Jong Hyun; Lee, Ah-Young; Lee, Bo Ram; Di Nuzzo, Daniele; Friend, Richard H; Song, Myoung Hoon

    2016-08-01

    A perovskite LED with a perovskite film treated under optimum thermal annealing conditions exhibits a significantly enhanced long-term stability with full coverage of the green electroluminescence emission due to the highly uniform morphology of the perovskite film.

  8. Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  9. Film stacking architecture for immersion lithography process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Sanada, Masakazu; Miyagi, Tadashi; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Kanaoka, Masashi; Yasuda, Shuichi; Tamada, Osamu; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary due to film peeling. However, the architecture will restrict lithographic area within a wafer due to top side EBR accuracy In this paper, we report an effective film stacking architecture that also allows maximum lithographic area. This study used a new bevel rinse system on RF3 for all materials to make suitable film stacking on the top side bevel. This evaluation showed that the new bevel rinse system allows the maximum lithographic area and a clean wafer edge. Patterning defects were improved with suitable film stacking.

  10. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOEpatents

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  11. Thermoelectric properties of the 3C, 2H, 4H, and 6H polytypes of the wide-band-gap semiconductors SiC, GaN, and ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zheng; Lü, Tie-Yu; Wang, Hui-Qiong; Zheng, Jin-Cheng

    2015-09-15

    We have investigated the thermoelectric properties of the 3C, 2H, 4H, and 6H polytypes of the wide-band-gap(n-type) semiconductors SiC, GaN, and ZnO based on first-principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory. Our results show that the thermoelectric performance increases from 3C to 6H, 4H, and 2H structures with an increase of hexagonality for SiC. However, for GaN and ZnO, their power factors show a very weak dependence on the polytype. Detailed analysis of the thermoelectric properties with respect to temperature and carrier concentration of 4H-SiC, 2H-GaN, and 2H-ZnO shows that the figure of merit of these three compounds increases with temperature, indicating the promising potential applications of these thermoelectric materials at high temperature. The significant difference of the polytype-dependent thermoelectric properties among SiC, GaN, and ZnO might be related to the competition between covalency and ionicity in these semiconductors. Our calculations may provide a new way to enhance the thermoelectric properties of wide-band-gap semiconductors through atomic structure design, especially hexagonality design for SiC.

  12. Debuncher Cooling Limitations to Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1991-08-13

    During the January studies period we performed studies to determine the effect that debuncher cooling has on the stacking rate. Two different sets of measurements were made separated by about a week. Most measurements reported here are in PBAR log 16, page 243-247. These measurements were made by changing the accelerator timeline to give about 6 seconds between 29's, and then gating the cooling systems to simulate reduced cycle times. For the measurement of the momentum cooling effectiveness the gating switches could not be made to work, so the timeline was changed for each measurement. The cooling power of all three systems was about 800 watts for the tests reported here. We now regularly run at 1200 watts per system.

  13. Performance evaluation of PEFC stack

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Jun-ichi; Ohtsuki, Jitsuji; Shindo, Yoshihiko

    1996-12-31

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) have many advantages such as high current density, short start-up time and endurance for start-stop cycles. Making use of these advantages, Fuji Electric has been working with the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. to explore practical applications of PEFCs for an electric utility use. Since large-sized electrodes are required in the electric utility applications, we have fabricated 600cm{sup 2} membrane-electrode assemblies by using hot-press method. We have also designed a cell structure to realize a uniform reaction over the electrodes. The structure includes a properly-shaped gas flow channel, a temperature-gradient cooling system. Using the 600cm{sup 2} (25x24cm) electrodes, a 30-cell stack (5kW) were constructed and tested.

  14. Synthesis of freestanding single-crystal perovskite films and heterostructures by etching of sacrificial water-soluble layers

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Di; Baek, David J.; Hong, Seung Sae; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2016-09-12

    Here, the ability to create and manipulate materials in two-dimensional (2D) form has repeatedly had transformative impact on science and technology. In parallel with the exfoliation and stacking of intrinsically layered crystals1, 2, 3, 4, 5, atomic-scale thin film growth of complex materials has enabled the creation of artificial 2D heterostructures with novel functionality6, 7, 8, 9 and emergent phenomena, as seen in perovskite heterostructures10, 11, 12. However, separation of these layers from the growth substrate has proved challenging, limiting the manipulation capabilities of these heterostructures with respect to exfoliated materials. Here we present a general method to create freestandingmore » perovskite membranes. The key is the epitaxial growth of water-soluble Sr3Al2O6 on perovskite substrates, followed by in situ growth of films and heterostructures. Millimetre-size single-crystalline membranes are produced by etching the Sr3Al2O6 layer in water, providing the opportunity to transfer them to arbitrary substrates and integrate them with heterostructures of semiconductors and layered compounds13, 14.« less

  15. Perovskite/c-Si tandem solar cell with inverted nanopyramids: realizing high efficiency by controllable light trapping

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dai; Zeng, Yang; Shen, Wenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite/c-Si tandem solar cells (TSCs) have become a promising candidate in recent years for achieving efficiency over 30%. Although general analysis has shown very high upper limits for such TSCs, it remains largely unclear what specific optical structures could best approach these limits. Here we propose the combination of perovskite/c-Si tandem structure with inverted nanopyramid morphology as a practical way of achieving efficiency above 31% based on realistic solar cell parameters. By full-field simulation, we have shown that an ultra-low surface reflectance can be achieved by tuning the pyramid geometry within the range of experimental feasibility. More importantly, we have demonstrated that the index-guided modes can be excited within the top cell layer by introducing a TCO interlayer that prevents coupling of guided light energy into the bottom cell. This light trapping scheme has shown superior performance over the Bragg stack intermediate reflector utilized in previous micropyramid-based TSCs. Finally, by controlling the coupling between the top and bottom cell through the thickness of the interlayer, current generation within the tandem can be optimized for both two- and four-terminal configurations, yielding efficiencies of 31.9% and 32.0%, respectively. These results have provided useful guidelines for the fabrication of perovskite/c-Si TSCs. PMID:26566176

  16. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Organometal Halide Perovskite Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-11-01

    The booming development of organometal halide perovskites in recent years has prompted the exploration of morphology-control strategies to improve their performance in photovoltaic, photonic, and optoelectronic applications. However, the preparation of organometal halide perovskites with high hierarchical architecture is still highly challenging and a general morphology-control method for various organometal halide perovskites has not been achieved. A mild and scalable method to prepare organometal halide perovskites in inverse opal morphology is presented that uses a polystyrene-based artificial opal as hard template. Our method is flexible and compatible with different halides and organic ammonium compositions. Thus, the perovskite inverse opal maintains the advantage of straightforward structure and band gap engineering. Furthermore, optoelectronic investigations reveal that morphology exerted influence on the conducting nature of organometal halide perovskites. PMID:26376773

  17. Band gap engineering strategy via polarization rotation in perovskite ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Fenggong Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2014-04-14

    We propose a strategy to engineer the band gaps of perovskite oxide ferroelectrics, supported by first principles calculations. We find that the band gaps of perovskites can be substantially reduced by as much as 1.2 eV through local rhombohedral-to-tetragonal structural transition. Furthermore, the strong polarization of the rhombohedral perovskite is largely preserved by its tetragonal counterpart. The B-cation off-center displacements and the resulting enhancement of the antibonding character in the conduction band give rise to the wider band gaps of the rhombohedral perovskites. The correlation between the structure, polarization orientation, and electronic structure lays a good foundation for understanding the physics of more complex perovskite solid solutions and provides a route for the design of photovoltaic perovskite ferroelectrics.

  18. Neutral- and Multi-Colored Semitransparent Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Guo, L Jay; Park, Hui Joon

    2016-04-11

    In this review, we summarize recent works on perovskite solar cells with neutral- and multi-colored semitransparency for building-integrated photovoltaics and tandem solar cells. The perovskite solar cells exploiting microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands" and transparent electrodes-the latter of which include thin metallic films, metal nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphenes, and transparent conductive oxides for achieving optical transparency-are investigated. Moreover, the perovskite solar cells with distinctive color generation, which are enabled by engineering the band gap of the perovskite light-harvesting semiconductors with chemical management and integrating with photonic nanostructures, including microcavity, are discussed. We conclude by providing future research directions toward further performance improvements of the semitransparent perovskite solar cells.

  19. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Organometal Halide Perovskite Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-11-01

    The booming development of organometal halide perovskites in recent years has prompted the exploration of morphology-control strategies to improve their performance in photovoltaic, photonic, and optoelectronic applications. However, the preparation of organometal halide perovskites with high hierarchical architecture is still highly challenging and a general morphology-control method for various organometal halide perovskites has not been achieved. A mild and scalable method to prepare organometal halide perovskites in inverse opal morphology is presented that uses a polystyrene-based artificial opal as hard template. Our method is flexible and compatible with different halides and organic ammonium compositions. Thus, the perovskite inverse opal maintains the advantage of straightforward structure and band gap engineering. Furthermore, optoelectronic investigations reveal that morphology exerted influence on the conducting nature of organometal halide perovskites.

  20. A bundled-stack discotic columnar liquid crystalline phase with inter-stack electronic coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Bin; Sun, Runkun; Günbaş, Duygu D.; Zhang, Hao; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Xiao, Kai; Jin, Shi

    2015-06-15

    The first compound proving to be capable of forming a bundled-stack discotic columnar liquid crystalline (BSDCLC) phase was designed and synthesized. Finally, the unique perylene anhydride inter-stack interaction was found to be the key to the formation of the BSDCLC structure and inter-stack electronic coupling (ISEC).

  1. Photovoltaic Performance of Perovskite Solar Cells with Different Grain Sizes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Do; Ohkita, Hideo; Benten, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2016-02-01

    Perovskite solar cells exhibit improved photovoltaic parameters with increasing perovskite grain size. The larger photocurrent is due to the enhanced absorption efficiency for thicker perovskite layers. The larger open-circuit voltage (VOC ) is ascribed to the reduced trap-assisted recombination for the larger grains. As a result, the power conversion efficiency exceeds 19% at best. Further improvement in VOC would be possible if the trap density were reduced.

  2. Predominant Intermediate-Spin Ferrous Iron in Lowermost Mantle Post-Perovskite and Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Watson, H. C.; Vanko, G.; Alp, E. E.; Prakapenka, V.; Dera, P.; Struzhkin, V. V.; Kubo, A.; Zhao, J.; McCammon, C.; Evans, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    Silicate post-perovskite and perovskite are believed to be the dominant minerals of the lowermost mantle and the lower mantle, respectively, and their properties, which can be strongly influenced by the electronic state of iron in these phases, affect our understanding of the nature of the deep Earth. To date, in these minerals the electronic spin state of iron remains unknown under lowermost-mantle pressure-temperature conditions, although recent studies have showed an electronic spin crossover from high-spin to low-spin in ferropericlase over an extended pressure-temperature range of the lower mantle (i.e., Lin et al., Science, 2007) and from high-spin to intermediate-spin in silicate perovskite near the top of the lower mantle (McCammon et al., Nature Geoscience, 2008). Here we report the spin and valence states of iron in post-perovskite and perovskite at pressure-temperature conditions relevant to the lowermost mantle using in situ X-ray emission, X-ray diffraction, and synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopies in a laser-heated diamond cell. Perovskite and post-perovskite display extremely high quadrupole splitting (QS) of approximately 4 mm/s and relatively high center shift in the synchrotron Mossbauer spectra at 110 GPa and 134 GPa, respectively. Our results show that Fe2+ exists predominantly in the intermediate-spin state with a total spin number of one in both phases (Lin et al., Nature Geoscience, 2008). Together with recent results on the effects of the spin transition in the lower-mantle ferropericlase (see a recent review by Lin and Tsuchiya, PEPI, 2008), here we will address how the electronic spin states in lower-mantle phases and their associated effects affect our understanding on the composition, geophysics, and dynamics of the lower mantle.. References: 1. Lin, J. F., H. C. Watson, G. Vanko, E. E. Alp, V. B. Prakapenka, P. Dera, V. V. Struzhkin, A. Kubo, J. Zhao, C. McCammon, W. J. Evans, Intermediate-spin ferrous iron in lowermost mantle post-perovskite

  3. Anticorrelated seismic velocity anomalies from post-perovskite in the lowermost mantle.

    PubMed

    Hutko, Alexander R; Lay, Thorne; Revenaugh, Justin; Garnero, Edward J

    2008-05-23

    Earth's lowermost mantle has thermal, chemical, and mineralogical complexities that require precise seismological characterization. Stacking, migration, and modeling of over 10,000 P and S waves that traverse the deep mantle under the Cocos plate resolve structures above the core-mantle boundary. A small -0.07 +/- 0.15% decrease of P wave velocity (Vp) is accompanied by a 1.5 +/- 0.5% increase in S wave velocity (V(s)) near a depth of 2570 km. Bulk-sound velocity [Vb = (Vp2 - 4/3Vs2)1/2] decreases by -1.0 +/- 0.5% at this depth. Transition of the primary lower-mantle mineral, (Mg(1-x-y) Fe(x)Al(y))(Si,Al)O3 perovskite, to denser post-perovskite is expected to have a negligible effect on the bulk modulus while increasing the shear modulus by approximately 6%, resulting in local anticorrelation of Vb and Vs anomalies; this behavior explains the data well.

  4. Efficient Hole-Transporting Materials with Triazole Core for High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeju; Jo, Hyeonjun; Paek, Sanghyun; Koh, Kyungkuk; Ko, Haye Min; Lee, Jae Kwan; Ko, Jaejung

    2016-02-18

    Efficient hole-transporting materials (HTMs), TAZ-[MeOTPA]2 and TAZ-[MeOTPATh]2 incorporating two electron-rich diphenylamino side arms, through direct linkage or thiophen bridges, respectively, on the C3- and C5-positions of a 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole core were synthesized. These synthetic HTMs with donor-acceptor type molecular structures exhibited effective intramolecular charge transfer for improving the hole-transporting properties. The structural modification of HTMs by thiophene bridging might increase intermolecular π-π stacking in the solid state and afford a better spectral response because of their increased π-conjugation length. Perovskite-based cells using TAZ-[MeOTPA]2 and TAZ-[MeOTPATh]2 as HTMs afforded high power conversion efficiencies of 10.9 % and 14.4 %, respectively, showing a photovoltaic performance comparable to that obtained using spiro-OMeTAD. These synthetically simple and inexpensive HTMs hold promise for replacing the more expensive spiro-OMeTAD in high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. PMID:26573775

  5. Development of new layered selenide oxides with perovskite-type oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushiyama, Koichi; Ogino, Hiraku; Kishio, Kohji; Shimoyama, Jun-Ichi

    2010-03-01

    Several Fe-based superconductors with perovskite-type oxide layers, such as Sr2ScFePO3 (Tc ˜ 17 K)^[1], were discovered in our previous study. These compounds are composed of alternate stacking of superconducting layers with antifluorite structure and perovskite-type blocking layers. Since both layers are flexible in terms of chemical composition, development of various new functional materials can be expected from this family. In the present study, we have attempted to synthesize new layered selenide oxides with CuSe layers and discovered more than ten compounds, such as Sr2MCu2Se2O2 (M = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) and Sr2MCuSeO3 (M = Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ga, In), thus far. These indicated that the CuSe layer can accommodate various types of blocking layers, which may lead various functions. Among them, Sr2Cu3Se2O2 has a potential as for the mother compound of superconductor, if appropriate concentration of carrier is introduced to the CuO2 layer. Crystal structure and physical properties of these newly found compounds will be reported. [1] H. Ogino et al., Supercond. Sci. Technol. 22 (2009) 075008

  6. Anticorrelated seismic velocity anomalies from post-perovskite in the lowermost mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutko, Alexander R.; Lay, T.; Revenaugh, Justin; Garnero, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Earth's lowermost mantle has thermal, chemical, and mineralogical complexities that require precise seismological characterization. Stacking, migration, and modeling of over 10,000 P and S waves that traverse the deep mantle under the Cocos plate resolve structures above the core-mantle boundary. A small -0.07 ?? 0.15% decrease of P wave velocity (Vp) is accompanied by a 1.5 ?? 0.5% increase in S wave velocity (Vs) near a depth of 2570 km. Bulk-sound velocity [Vb = (V p2 - 4/3Vs2)1/2] decreases by -1.0 ?? 0.5% at this depth. Transition of the primary lower-mantle mineral, (Mg1-x-y FexAly)(Si,Al) O3 perovskite, to denser post-perovskite is expected to have a negligible effect on the bulk modulus while increasing the shear modulus by ???6%, resulting in local anticorrelation of Vb and Vs anomalies; this behavior explains the data well.

  7. Effective Stack Design in Air Pollution Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John H.

    1968-01-01

    Stack design problems fall into two general caterories--(1) those of building re-entry, and (2) those of general area pollution. Extensive research has developed adequate information, available in the literature, to permit effective stack design. A major roadblock to effective design has been the strong belief by architects and engineers that high…

  8. Interconnections For Stacked Parallel Computer Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannesson, Richard T.

    1996-01-01

    Concept for interconnecting modules in parallel computers leads to cheaper, smaller, lighter, lower-power computing systems for aerospace, industrial, business, and consumer applications. Computer modules stacked and interconnected in various configurations. Connections among stacks controlled by switching within gateways and/or by addresses on buses.

  9. Project W-420 stack monitoring system upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    CARPENTER, K.E.

    1999-02-25

    This project will execute the design, procurement, construction, startup, and turnover activities for upgrades to the stack monitoring system on selected Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) ventilation systems. In this plan, the technical, schedule, and cost baselines are identified, and the roles and responsibilities of project participants are defined for managing the Stack Monitoring System Upgrades, Project W-420.

  10. Organohalide Perovskites for Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qianqian; Armin, Ardalan; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul

    2016-03-15

    Lead-based organohalide perovskites have recently emerged as arguably the most promising of all next generation thin film solar cell technologies. Power conversion efficiencies have reached 20% in less than 5 years, and their application to other optoelectronic device platforms such as photodetectors and light emitting diodes is being increasingly reported. Organohalide perovskites can be solution processed or evaporated at low temperatures to form simple thin film photojunctions, thus delivering the potential for the holy grail of high efficiency, low embedded energy, and low cost photovoltaics. The initial device-driven "perovskite fever" has more recently given way to efforts to better understand how these materials work in solar cells, and deeper elucidation of their structure-property relationships. In this Account, we focus on this element of organohalide perovskite chemistry and physics in particular examining critical electro-optical, morphological, and architectural phenomena. We first examine basic crystal and chemical structure, and how this impacts important solar-cell related properties such as the optical gap. We then turn to deeper electronic phenomena such as carrier mobilities, trap densities, and recombination dynamics, as well as examining ionic and dielectric properties and how these two types of physics impact each other. The issue of whether organohalide perovskites are predominantly nonexcitonic at room temperature is currently a matter of some debate, and we summarize the evidence for what appears to be the emerging field consensus: an exciton binding energy of order 10 meV. Having discussed the important basic chemistry and physics we turn to more device-related considerations including processing, morphology, architecture, thin film electro-optics and interfacial energetics. These phenomena directly impact solar cell performance parameters such as open circuit voltage, short circuit current density, internal and external quantum efficiency

  11. Organohalide Perovskites for Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qianqian; Armin, Ardalan; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul

    2016-03-15

    Lead-based organohalide perovskites have recently emerged as arguably the most promising of all next generation thin film solar cell technologies. Power conversion efficiencies have reached 20% in less than 5 years, and their application to other optoelectronic device platforms such as photodetectors and light emitting diodes is being increasingly reported. Organohalide perovskites can be solution processed or evaporated at low temperatures to form simple thin film photojunctions, thus delivering the potential for the holy grail of high efficiency, low embedded energy, and low cost photovoltaics. The initial device-driven "perovskite fever" has more recently given way to efforts to better understand how these materials work in solar cells, and deeper elucidation of their structure-property relationships. In this Account, we focus on this element of organohalide perovskite chemistry and physics in particular examining critical electro-optical, morphological, and architectural phenomena. We first examine basic crystal and chemical structure, and how this impacts important solar-cell related properties such as the optical gap. We then turn to deeper electronic phenomena such as carrier mobilities, trap densities, and recombination dynamics, as well as examining ionic and dielectric properties and how these two types of physics impact each other. The issue of whether organohalide perovskites are predominantly nonexcitonic at room temperature is currently a matter of some debate, and we summarize the evidence for what appears to be the emerging field consensus: an exciton binding energy of order 10 meV. Having discussed the important basic chemistry and physics we turn to more device-related considerations including processing, morphology, architecture, thin film electro-optics and interfacial energetics. These phenomena directly impact solar cell performance parameters such as open circuit voltage, short circuit current density, internal and external quantum efficiency

  12. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Pinakin

    2010-07-13

    A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

  13. Status of MCFC stack technology at IHI

    SciTech Connect

    Hosaka, M.; Morita, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Otsubo, M.

    1996-12-31

    The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is a promising option for highly efficient power generation possible to enlarge. IHI has been studying parallel flow MCFC stacks with internal manifolds that have a large electrode area of 1m{sup 2}. IHI will make two 250 kW stacks for MW plant, and has begun to make cell components for the plant. To improve the stability of stack, soft corrugated plate used in the separator has been developed, and a way of gathering current from stacks has been studied. The DC output potential of the plant being very high, the design of electric insulation will be very important. A 20 kW short stack test was conducted in 1995 FY to certificate some of the improvements and components of the MW plant. These activities are presented below.

  14. Post-perovskite transitions in CaB4+O3 at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaogi, M.; Shirako, Y.; Kojitani, H.; Takamori, S.; Yamaura, K.; Takayama-Muromachi, E.

    2010-03-01

    High-pressure phase transitions in CaRhO3 were examined using a multianvil apparatus up to 27 GPa and 1930 oC. CaRhO3 perovskite transforms to post-perovskite via a monoclinic intermediate phase with increasing pressure. Volume changes for the transitions of perovskite - intermediate phase and of intermediate phase - post-perovskite are -1.1 and -0.7 %, respectively. CaRhO3 post-perovskite is the fourth quenchable post-perovskite oxide found so far. By high-temperature calorimetric experiments, enthalpy of the perovskite - post-perovskite transition in CaRuO3 was measured as 15.2±3.3 kJ/mol. Combining the datum with those of CaIrO3, it is shown that CaIrO3 perovskite is energetically less stable than CaRuO3 perovskite. This is consistent with the fact that orthorhombic distortion of CaIrO3 perovskite is larger than CaRuO3, as indicated with the tilt-angle of octahedral framework of perovskite structure. The transition pressure from perovskite to post-perovskite in CaBO3 (B = Ru, Rh, Ir) increases almost linearly with decreasing the tilt-angle, suggesting that the perovskite - post-perovskite transition may result from instability of the perovskite structure with pressure.

  15. Protocol for In Vitro Stacked Molecules Compatible with In Vivo Recombinase-Mediated Gene Stacking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiqiang; Ow, David W

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we described a method for a recombinase-directed stacking of new DNA to an existing transgenic locus. Here, we describe how we can similarly stack DNA molecules in vitro and that the in vitro derived gene stack can be incorporated into an Agrobacterium transformation vector by in vitro recombination. After transfer to the chromosome by Agroinfection, the transgenic locus harbors a new target site that can be used for the subsequent in vivo stacking of new DNA. Alternatively, the in vitro derived gene stack has the potential to be integrated directly into the plant genome in vivo at a preexisting chromosomal target. Being able to stack DNA in vitro as well as in vivo, and with compatibility between the two systems, brings new flexibility for using the recombinase-mediated approach for transgene stacking. PMID:27557684

  16. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, G.; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, A.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Ramprasad, R.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions on bandgaps of double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps of double perovskites. After evaluating a set of more than 1.2 million features, we identify lowest occupied Kohn-Sham levels and elemental electronegativities of the constituent atomic species as the most crucial and relevant predictors. The developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance.

  17. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Pilania, G.; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, A.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Ramprasad, R.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2016-01-19

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions on bandgaps of double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps of double perovskites. After evaluating a set of more than 1.2 million features, we identify lowest occupied Kohn-Sham levels and elemental electronegativities of the constituent atomic species as the mostmore » crucial and relevant predictors. As a result, the developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance.« less

  18. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Pilania, G.; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, A.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Ramprasad, R.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions on bandgaps of double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps of double perovskites. After evaluating a set of more than 1.2 million features, we identify lowest occupied Kohn-Sham levels and elemental electronegativities of the constituent atomic species as the most crucial and relevant predictors. The developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance. PMID:26783247

  19. Barrier RF stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    A key issue to upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron Run2 program and to meet the neutrino requirement of the NuMI experiment at Fermilab is to increase the proton intensity on the target. This paper introduces a new scheme to double the number of protons from the Main Injector (MI) to the pbar production target (Run2) and to the pion production target (NuMI). It is based on the fact that the MI momentum acceptance is about a factor of four larger than the momentum spread of the Booster beam. Two RF barriers--one fixed, another moving--are employed to confine the proton beam. The Booster beams are injected off-momentum into the MI and are continuously reflected and compressed by the two barriers. Calculations and simulations show that this scheme could work provided that the Booster beam momentum spread can be kept under control. Compared with slip stacking, a main advantage of this new method is small beam loading effect thanks to the low peak beam current. The RF barriers can be generated by an inductive device, which uses nanocrystal magnet alloy (Finemet) cores and fast high voltage MOSFET switches. This device has been designed and fabricated by a Fermilab-KEK-Caltech team. The first bench test was successful. Beam experiments are being planned.

  20. Memory Stacking in Hierarchical Networks.

    PubMed

    Westö, Johan; May, Patrick J C; Tiitinen, Hannu

    2016-02-01

    Robust representations of sounds with a complex spectrotemporal structure are thought to emerge in hierarchically organized auditory cortex, but the computational advantage of this hierarchy remains unknown. Here, we used computational models to study how such hierarchical structures affect temporal binding in neural networks. We equipped individual units in different types of feedforward networks with local memory mechanisms storing recent inputs and observed how this affected the ability of the networks to process stimuli context dependently. Our findings illustrate that these local memories stack up in hierarchical structures and hence allow network units to exhibit selectivity to spectral sequences longer than the time spans of the local memories. We also illustrate that short-term synaptic plasticity is a potential local memory mechanism within the auditory cortex, and we show that it can bring robustness to context dependence against variation in the temporal rate of stimuli, while introducing nonlinearities to response profiles that are not well captured by standard linear spectrotemporal receptive field models. The results therefore indicate that short-term synaptic plasticity might provide hierarchically structured auditory cortex with computational capabilities important for robust representations of spectrotemporal patterns. PMID:26654206

  1. The photophysics of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sum, Tze Chien

    2014-09-01

    Solution-processed hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells, a newcomer to the photovoltaic arena, have taken the field by storm with their extraordinary power conversion efficiencies exceeding 17%. In this paper, the photophysics and the latest findings on the carrier dynamics and charge transfer mechanisms in this new class of photovoltaic material will be examined and distilled. Some open photophysics questions will also be discussed.

  2. 40 CFR 75.72 - Determination of NOX mass emissions for common stack and multiple stack configurations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... affected units are not underestimated. (c) Unit with a main stack and a bypass stack. Whenever any portion of the flue gases from an affected unit can be routed through a bypass stack to avoid the installed... emissions monitoring systems and flow monitoring systems on the main stack and the bypass stack...

  3. Resistance switching memory in perovskite oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.B. Liu, J.-M.

    2015-07-15

    The resistance switching behavior has recently attracted great attentions for its application as resistive random access memories (RRAMs) due to a variety of advantages such as simple structure, high-density, high-speed and low-power. As a leading storage media, the transition metal perovskite oxide owns the strong correlation of electrons and the stable crystal structure, which brings out multifunctionality such as ferroelectric, multiferroic, superconductor, and colossal magnetoresistance/electroresistance effect, etc. The existence of rich electronic phases, metal–insulator transition and the nonstoichiometric oxygen in perovskite oxide provides good platforms to insight into the resistive switching mechanisms. In this review, we first introduce the general characteristics of the resistance switching effects, the operation methods and the storage media. Then, the experimental evidences of conductive filaments, the transport and switching mechanisms, and the memory performances and enhancing methods of perovskite oxide based filamentary RRAM cells have been summarized and discussed. Subsequently, the switching mechanisms and the performances of the uniform RRAM cells associating with the carrier trapping/detrapping and the ferroelectric polarization switching have been discussed. Finally, the advices and outlook for further investigating the resistance switching and enhancing the memory performances are given.

  4. Light-trapping in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qing Guo; Shen, Guansheng; John, Sajeev

    2016-06-01

    We numerically demonstrate enhanced light harvesting efficiency in both CH3NH3PbI3 and CH(NH2)2PbI3-based perovskite solar cells using inverted vertical-cone photonic-crystal nanostructures. For CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells, the maximum achievable photocurrent density (MAPD) reaches 25.1 mA/cm2, corresponding to 92% of the total available photocurrent in the absorption range of 300 nm to 800 nm. Our cell shows 6% absorption enhancement compared to the Lambertian limit (23.7 mA/cm2) and has a projected power conversion efficiency of 12.9%. Excellent solar absorption is numerically demonstrated over a broad angular range from 0 to 60 degree for both S- and P- polarizations. For the corresponding CH(NH2)2PbI3 based perovskite solar cell, with absorption range of 300 nm to 850 nm, we find a MAPD of 29.1 mA/cm2, corresponding to 95.4% of the total available photocurrent. The projected power conversion efficiency of the CH(NH2)2PbI3 based photonic crystal solar cell is 23.4%, well above the current world record efficiency of 20.1%.

  5. Perovskite-related oxynitrides in photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Pokrant, Simone; Maegli, Alexandra E; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Weidenkaff, Anke

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades photocatalytic water splitting has become of increasing importance for fundamental and applied research, since the direct conversion of sunlight into chemical energy via the production of H2 has the potential to contribute to the world's energy needs without CO2 generation. One of the unsolved challenges consists of finding a highly efficient photocatalyst that is cheap, environmentally friendly, contains exclusively abundant elements, is (photo)chemically stable and absorbs visible light. Photocatalytic efficiency is closely connected to both structural properties like crystallinity, particle size and surface area and to electronic properties like the band gap and the quantum efficiency. Hence extensive control over a large parameter field is necessary to design a good photocatalyst. A material class where the structure-composition-property relations and the influence of substitution effects are well studied is the perovskite-type family of compounds. The perovskite-related oxynitrides belong to this very flexible compound family where many of the necessary characteristics for a photocatalyst are already given and some of the intrinsic properties like the band gap can be tuned within the same crystal structure by substitution. In this work we present materials' design concepts to improve the photocatalytic efficiency of a perovskite-type catalyst and describe their effects on the photocatalytic activity. PMID:23574956

  6. A-site ordered quadruple perovskite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youwen, Long

    2016-07-01

    The A-site ordered perovskite oxides with chemical formula display many intriguing physical properties due to the introduction of transition metals at both A‧ and B sites. Here, research on the recently discovered intermetallic charge transfer occurring between A‧-site Cu and B-site Fe ions in LaCu3Fe4O12 and its analogues is reviewed, along with work on the magnetoelectric multiferroicity observed in LaMn3Cr4O12 with cubic perovskite structure. The Cu-Fe intermetallic charge transfer leads to a first-order isostructural phase transition accompanied by drastic variations in magnetism and electrical transport properties. The LaMn3Cr4O12 is a novel spin-driven multiferroic system with strong magnetoelectric coupling effects. The compound is the first example of cubic perovskite multiferroics to be found. It opens up a new arena for studying unexpected multiferroic mechanisms. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB921500), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030300), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574378).

  7. Dynamical Stability of Slip-stacking Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-04

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  8. Parallel transport on principal bundles over stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Brian; Lerman, Eugene; Wolbert, Seth

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a notion of parallel transport for principal bundles with connections over differentiable stacks. We show that principal bundles with connections over stacks can be recovered from their parallel transport thereby extending the results of Barrett, Caetano and Picken, and Schreiber and Waldorf from manifolds to stacks. In the process of proving our main result we simplify Schreiber and Waldorf's original definition of a transport functor for principal bundles with connections over manifolds and provide a more direct proof of the correspondence between principal bundles with connections and transport functors.

  9. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  10. Stacked vapor fed amtec modules

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert K.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member. A transition piece is positioned about the interior of the member and contacts the transporting means. The transition piece divides the member into a first cell and a second cell such that each first and second cell has a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, a first and second porous electrode and a grid. The transition piece conducts electrons from the interior of the tubular member. There is supply means for supplying sodium to the transporting means. Preferably the supply means is a shell which surrounds the tubular member and is operated at a temperature such that the vaporized sodium condenses thereon. Returning means for returning the condensed sodium from the shell to the transporting means provides a continuous supply of liquid sodium to the transporting means. Also, there are first conducting means for conducting electric current from the transition piece which extends through the shell, and second conducting means for conducting electric current to the grid of the first cell which extends through the shell.

  11. Two Dimensional Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanorods with Tunable Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Aharon, Sigalit; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-05-11

    Organo-metal halide perovskite is an efficient light harvester in photovoltaic solar cells. Organometal halide perovskite is used mainly in its "bulk" form in the solar cell. Confined perovskite nanostructures could be a promising candidate for efficient optoelectronic devices, taking advantage of the superior bulk properties of organo-metal halide perovskite, as well as the nanoscale properties. In this paper, we present facile low-temperature synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) lead halide perovskite nanorods (NRs). These NRs show a shift to higher energies in the absorbance and in the photoluminescence compared to the bulk material, which supports their 2D structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the NRs demonstrates their 2D nature combined with the tetragonal 3D perovskite structure. In addition, by alternating the halide composition, we were able to tune the optical properties of the NRs. Fast Fourier transform, and electron diffraction show the tetragonal structure of these NRs. By varying the ligands ratio (e.g., octylammonium to oleic acid) in the synthesis, we were able to provide the formation mechanism of these novel 2D perovskite NRs. The 2D perovskite NRs are promising candidates for a variety of optoelectronic applications, such as light-emitting diodes, lasing, solar cells, and sensors. PMID:27089497

  12. Solution Chemistry Engineering toward High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Zhu, Kai

    2014-12-01

    Organic and inorganic hybrid perovskites (e.g., CH3NH3PbI3) have emerged as a revolutionary class of light-absorbing semiconductors that has demonstrated a rapid increase in efficiency within a few years of active research. Controlling perovskite morphology and composition has been found critical to developing high-performance perovskite solar cells. The recent development of solution chemistry engineering has led to fabrication of greater than 15-17%-efficiency solar cells by multiple groups, with the highest certified 17.9% efficiency that has significantly surpassed the best-reported perovskite solar cell by vapor-phase growth. In this Perspective, we review recent progress on solution chemistry engineering processes and various control parameters that are critical to the success of solution growth of high-quality perovskite films. We discuss the importance of understanding the impact of solution-processing parameters and perovskite film architectures on the fundamental charge carrier dynamics in perovskite solar cells. The cost and stability issues of perovskite solar cells will also be discussed.

  13. Solution Chemistry Engineering toward High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Zhu, Kai

    2014-12-01

    Organic and inorganic hybrid perovskites (e.g., CH3NH3PbI3) have emerged as a revolutionary class of light-absorbing semiconductors that has demonstrated a rapid increase in efficiency within a few years of active research. Controlling perovskite morphology and composition has been found critical to developing high-performance perovskite solar cells. The recent development of solution chemistry engineering has led to fabrication of greater than 15-17%-efficiency solar cells by multiple groups, with the highest certified 17.9% efficiency that has significantly surpassed the best-reported perovskite solar cell by vapor-phase growth. In this Perspective, we review recent progress on solution chemistry engineering processes and various control parameters that are critical to the success of solution growth of high-quality perovskite films. We discuss the importance of understanding the impact of solution-processing parameters and perovskite film architectures on the fundamental charge carrier dynamics in perovskite solar cells. The cost and stability issues of perovskite solar cells will also be discussed. PMID:26278951

  14. Self-Assembled PbSe Nanowire:Perovskite Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Yassitepe, Emre; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Janmohamed, Alyf; Lan, Xinzheng; Levina, Larissa; Comin, Riccardo; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-12-01

    Inorganic semiconductor nanowires are of interest in nano- and microscale photonic and electronic applications. Here we report the formation of PbSe nanowires based on directional quantum dot alignment and fusion regulated by hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite surface ligands. All material synthesis is carried out at mild temperatures. Passivation of PbSe quantum dots was achieved via a new perovskite ligand exchange. Subsequent in situ ammonium/amine substitution by butylamine enables quantum dots to be capped by butylammonium lead iodide, and this further drives the formation of a PbSe nanowire superlattice in a two-dimensional (2D) perovskite matrix. The average spacing between two adjacent nanowires agrees well with the thickness of single atomic layer of 2D perovskite, consistent with the formation of a new self-assembled semiconductor nanowire:perovskite heterocrystal hybrid.

  15. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Cui, Hui-Juan; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells. PMID:26733112

  16. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Cui, Hui-Juan; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2016-01-06

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  17. Perovskite-fullerene hybrid materials suppress hysteresis in planar diodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jixian; Buin, Andrei; Ip, Alexander H; Li, Wei; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Yuan, Mingjian; Jeon, Seokmin; Ning, Zhijun; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Sun, Jon-Paul; Lan, Xinzheng; Quan, Li Na; Kim, Dong Ha; Hill, Ian G; Maksymovych, Peter; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-05-08

    Solution-processed planar perovskite devices are highly desirable in a wide variety of optoelectronic applications; however, they are prone to hysteresis and current instabilities. Here we report the first perovskite-PCBM hybrid solid with significantly reduced hysteresis and recombination loss achieved in a single step. This new material displays an efficient electrically coupled microstructure: PCBM is homogeneously distributed throughout the film at perovskite grain boundaries. The PCBM passivates the key PbI3(-) antisite defects during the perovskite self-assembly, as revealed by theory and experiment. Photoluminescence transient spectroscopy proves that the PCBM phase promotes electron extraction. We showcase this mixed material in planar solar cells that feature low hysteresis and enhanced photovoltage. Using conductive AFM studies, we reveal the memristive properties of perovskite films. We close by positing that PCBM, by tying up both halide-rich antisites and unincorporated halides, reduces electric field-induced anion migration that may give rise to hysteresis and unstable diode behaviour.

  18. 40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack... Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30...

  19. 40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack... Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30...

  20. 40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack... Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30...

  1. 40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack... results reported to the Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall...

  2. 40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack... Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30...

  3. Near-Earth Asteroid Stack - Mission Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    A possible stack configuration - a deep space habitat, the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Space Exploration Vehicle - approaches a near-Earth asteroid. During a mission that could take months...

  4. Characterization of Piezoelectric Stacks for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher; Aldrich, Jack; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2008-01-01

    Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to actuate mechanisms to precision levels in the nanometer range and below. Co-fired multilayer piezoelectric stacks offer the required actuation precision that is needed for such mechanisms. To obtain performance statistics and determine reliability for extended use, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and high temperatures and voltages. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators were driven sinusoidally for up to ten billion cycles. An automated data acquisition system was developed and implemented to monitor each stack's electrical current and voltage waveforms over the life of the test. As part of the monitoring tests, the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current were measured to assess the operation degradation. This paper presents some of the results of this effort.

  5. Cosmic ray test of INO RPC stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M.; Datar, V. M.; Kalmani, S. D.; Lahamge, S. M.; Mondal, N. K.; Nagaraj, P.; Pal, S.; Reddy, L. V.; Redij, A.; Samuel, D.; Saraf, M. N.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.; Verma, P.

    2012-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to build a 50 kt magnetised iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector using glass Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detector elements. A stack of 12 such glass RPCs of 1 m ×1 m in area is tracking cosmic ray muons for over three years. In this paper, we will review the constructional aspects of the stack and discuss the performance of the RPCs using this cosmic ray data.

  6. Weakening of Calcium Iridate During its Transformation from Perovskite to Post-Perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, S.; Weidner, D; Li, L; Wang, L; Walte, N; Brodholt, J; Dobson, D

    2009-01-01

    The lowermost part of the Earth's mantle - the {approx}200-km-thick D{double_prime} layer - shows anomalous seismic properties, and is rheologically distinct from the rest of the lower mantle. The difference is thought to result from a phase transition from silicate perovskite to silicate post-perovskite. However, the rheology of the latter phase remains to be documented owing to experimental difficulties in reproducing pressures equivalent to those in the lowermost mantle. Here we address this problem by conducting laboratory experiments that use calcium iridate, which has been shown to be an appropriate low-pressure analogue. We find that the post-perovskite phase of this analogue is approximately five times weaker than its perovskite phase, and that it further weakens by a factor of two during the phase transformation; these are minimum estimates. If, as is likely, a similar weakening occurs in lower-mantle magnesium - silicate compositions, this could provide an explanation for the behaviour of the lowermost mantle as inferred from geophysical data.

  7. Generalized trends in the formation energies of perovskite oxides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, ZhenHua; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Mogensen, Mogens B; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-05-28

    Generalized trends in the formation energies of several families of perovskite oxides (ABO3) and plausible explanations to their existence are provided in this study through a combination of DFT calculations, solid-state physics analyses and simple physical/chemical descriptors. The studied elements at the A site of perovskites comprise rare-earth, alkaline-earth and alkaline metals, whereas 3d and 5d metals were studied at the B site. We also include ReO3-type compounds, which have the same crystal structure of cubic ABO3 perovskites except without A-site elements. From the observations we extract the following four conclusions for the perovskites studied in the present paper: for a given cation at the B site, (I) perovskites with cations of identical oxidation state at the A site possess close formation energies; and (II) perovskites with cations of different oxidation states at the A site usually have quite different but ordered formation energies. On the other hand, for a given A-site cation, (III) the formation energies of perovskites vary linearly with respect to the atomic number of the elements at the B site within the same period of the periodic table, and the slopes depend systematically on the oxidation state of the A-site cation; and (IV) the trends in formation energies of perovskites with elements from different periods at the B site depend on the oxidation state of A-site cations. Since the energetics of perovskites is shown to be the superposition of the individual contributions of their constituent oxides, the trends can be rationalized in terms of A-O and B-O interactions in the ionic crystal. These findings reveal the existence of general systematic trends in the formation energies of perovskites and provide further insight into the role of ion-ion interactions in the properties of ternary compounds.

  8. Generalized trends in the formation energies of perovskite oxides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, ZhenHua; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Mogensen, Mogens B; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-05-28

    Generalized trends in the formation energies of several families of perovskite oxides (ABO3) and plausible explanations to their existence are provided in this study through a combination of DFT calculations, solid-state physics analyses and simple physical/chemical descriptors. The studied elements at the A site of perovskites comprise rare-earth, alkaline-earth and alkaline metals, whereas 3d and 5d metals were studied at the B site. We also include ReO3-type compounds, which have the same crystal structure of cubic ABO3 perovskites except without A-site elements. From the observations we extract the following four conclusions for the perovskites studied in the present paper: for a given cation at the B site, (I) perovskites with cations of identical oxidation state at the A site possess close formation energies; and (II) perovskites with cations of different oxidation states at the A site usually have quite different but ordered formation energies. On the other hand, for a given A-site cation, (III) the formation energies of perovskites vary linearly with respect to the atomic number of the elements at the B site within the same period of the periodic table, and the slopes depend systematically on the oxidation state of the A-site cation; and (IV) the trends in formation energies of perovskites with elements from different periods at the B site depend on the oxidation state of A-site cations. Since the energetics of perovskites is shown to be the superposition of the individual contributions of their constituent oxides, the trends can be rationalized in terms of A-O and B-O interactions in the ionic crystal. These findings reveal the existence of general systematic trends in the formation energies of perovskites and provide further insight into the role of ion-ion interactions in the properties of ternary compounds. PMID:23579382

  9. Effects of Polytypism on Optical Properties and Band Structure of Individual Ga(N)P Nanowires from Correlative Spatially Resolved Structural and Optical Studies.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, Alexander; Persson, Per O Å; Sukrittanon, Supanee; Kuang, Yanjin; Tu, Charles W; Chen, Weimin M; Buyanova, Irina A

    2015-06-10

    III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have gained significant interest as building blocks in novel nanoscale devices. The one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure architecture allows one to extend band structure engineering beyond quantum confinement effects by utilizing formation of different crystal phases that are thermodynamically unfavorable in bulk materials. It is therefore of crucial importance to understand the influence of variations in the NWs crystal structure on their fundamental physical properties. In this work we investigate effects of structural polytypism on the optical properties of gallium phosphide and GaP/GaNP core/shell NW structures by a correlative investigation on the structural and optical properties of individual NWs. The former is monitored by transmission electron microscopy, whereas the latter is studied via cathodoluminescence (CL) mapping. It is found that structural defects, such as rotational twins in zinc blende (ZB) GaNP, have detrimental effects on light emission intensity at low temperatures by promoting nonradiative recombination processes. On the other hand, formation of the wurtzite (WZ) phase does not notably affect the CL intensity neither in GaP nor in the GaNP alloy. This suggests that zone folding in WZ GaP does not enhance its radiative efficiency, consistent with theoretical predictions. We also show that the change in the lattice structure have negligible effects on the bandgap energies of the GaNP alloys, at least within the range of the investigated nitrogen compositions of <2%. Both WZ and ZB GaNP are found to have a significantly higher efficiency of radiative recombination as compared with that in parental GaP, promising for potential applications of GaNP NWs as efficient nanoscale light emitters within the desirable amber-red spectral range.

  10. Structure of 18R shifted hexagonal perovskite La{sub 6}MgTi{sub 4}O{sub 18} revisited by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Fengqi; Kuang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-15

    The structure of 18-layer shifted B-site deficient hexagonal perovskite La{sub 6}MgTi{sub 4}O{sub 18} compound has been re-examined by neutron powder diffraction. Structural analysis reveals that La{sub 6}MgTi{sub 4}O{sub 18} compound adopts a 18R octahedral-tilted structure with LaO{sub 3} layer stacking sequence of (hhcccc){sub 3} in space group R{sup {sup -}}3, in contrast with the previously proposed R3m. La{sub 6}MgTi{sub 4}O{sub 18} demonstrates partially ordered Mg cation distribution with a preference on the central octahedral sites over the outer octahedral sites in the cubic perovskite blocks isolated by the single vacant octahedral layers between the two consecutive hexagonal layers. The instability of the La{sub 6}MgTi{sub 4}O{sub 18} on alumina ceramic substrate at high temperature and its dependencies of cell parameters and permittivity were characterized as well. - Graphical abstract: 18-layer shifted hexagonal perovskite La{sub 6}MgTi{sub 4}O{sub 18} adopts octahedral-tilted structure in R{sup {sup -}}3 and demonstrates partially ordered Mg distribution in the cubic perovskite blocks isolated by the vacant octahedral layers. - Highlights: • Neutron diffraction reveals an octahedra-tilted structure in R{sup {sup -}}3 for La{sub 6}MgTi{sub 4}O{sub 18}. • Mg/Ti distribution in La{sub 6}MgTi{sub 4}O{sub 18} is partially ordered in the perovskite blocks. • Instability of La{sub 6}MgTi{sub 4}O{sub 18} on alumina ceramic at high temperature is demonstrated.

  11. Evaluating user interfaces for stack mode viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, M. Stella; Kirkpatrick, Arthur E.; Knight, Adelle; Forster, Bruce

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this research was to evaluate two different stack mode layouts for 3D medical images - a regular stack mode layout where just the topmost image was visible, and a new stack mode layout, which included the images just before and after the main image. We developed stripped down user interfaces to test the techniques, and designed a look-alike radiology task using 3D artificial target stimuli implanted in the slices of medical image volumes. The task required searching for targets and identifying the range of slices containing the targets. Eight naive students participated, using a within-subjects design. We measured the response time and accuracy of subjects using the two layouts and tracked the eyegaze of several subjects while they performed the task. Eyegaze data was divided into fixations and saccades Subjects were 19% slower with the new stack layout than the standard stack layout, but 5 of the 8 subjects preferred the new layout. Analysis of the eyegaze data showed that in the new technique, the context images on both sides were fixated once the target was found in the topmost image. We believe that the extra time was caused by the difficulty in controlling the rate of scrolling, causing overshooting. We surmise that providing some contextual detail such as adjacent slices in the new stack mode layout is helpful to reduce cognitive load for this radiology look-alike task.

  12. Stacking interactions in PUF-RNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yiling Koh, Yvonne; Wang, Yeming; Qiu, Chen; Opperman, Laura; Gross, Leah; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Wickens, Marvin

    2012-07-02

    Stacking interactions between amino acids and bases are common in RNA-protein interactions. Many proteins that regulate mRNAs interact with single-stranded RNA elements in the 3' UTR (3'-untranslated region) of their targets. PUF proteins are exemplary. Here we focus on complexes formed between a Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein, FBF, and its cognate RNAs. Stacking interactions are particularly prominent and involve every RNA base in the recognition element. To assess the contribution of stacking interactions to formation of the RNA-protein complex, we combine in vivo selection experiments with site-directed mutagenesis, biochemistry, and structural analysis. Our results reveal that the identities of stacking amino acids in FBF affect both the affinity and specificity of the RNA-protein interaction. Substitutions in amino acid side chains can restrict or broaden RNA specificity. We conclude that the identities of stacking residues are important in achieving the natural specificities of PUF proteins. Similarly, in PUF proteins engineered to bind new RNA sequences, the identity of stacking residues may contribute to 'target' versus 'off-target' interactions, and thus be an important consideration in the design of proteins with new specificities.

  13. CH3 NH3 PbBr3 -CH3 NH3 PbI3 Perovskite-Perovskite Tandem Solar Cells with Exceeding 2.2 V Open Circuit Voltage.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk

    2016-07-01

    Perovskite-perovskite tandem solar cells with open-circuit voltages of over 2.2 V are reported. These cost-effective, solution-processible perovskite hybrid tandem solar cells with high open-circuit voltages are fabricated by the simple lamination of a front planar MAPbBr3 perovskite cell and a back MAPbI3 planar perovskite solar cell.

  14. Stacked subwavelength gratings for imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguzman, Panfilo Castro

    The stacking of subwavelength gratings (SWG) in an integrated structure is presented for an application in imaging polarimetry. Imaging polarimetry extends the capability of conventional imaging by providing polarization information about a scene, in addition to variations in intensity. In this dissertation, a novel approach is introduced to develop a real-time imaging polarimeter. Subwavelength gratings are implemented as linear and circular polarization filters that are directly mounted onto the focal plane array of an infrared (IR) camera. Wire grid polarizers are used as linear polarization filters. The stacked structure, consisting of a wire grid polarizer and a form birefringent quarter-wave plate (QWP), implements the circular polarization filter and is the focus of this dissertation. Initial investigations of the development of the individual SWG components and their integration are presented. Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) was used to design the SWG structures. A broadband form birefringent quarter-wave plate for the 3.5 to 5 μm wavelength range was designed as a grating structure patterned directly into the substrate. Two fabrication methods for the wire grid polarizer were investigated. A 0.5 μm period polarizer was patterned by interference lithography. A 1 μm period polarizer was patterned by contact printing. The stacking of the subwavelength grating structures was analyzed using the Jones Matrix calculus and a new RCWA method (developed by fellow graduate student Jianhua Jiang). Stacked SWG's were fabricated as large area (1.3 cm x 1.3 cm) filters and as a 256 x 256 array of small aperture (15 μm x 15 μm) pixels. Two stack designs were investigated, referred to as Stack I and Stack II. Stack I consisted of the 0.5 μm period polarizer and the form birefringent QWP. Stack II consisted of the I μm grid period polarizer and the form birefringent QWP. Simulation and measured results are presented to compare the cases of samples with and

  15. Ferroelectricity in d0 double perovskite fluoroscandates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Nenian; Rondinelli, James M.

    2015-08-01

    Ferroelectricity in strain-free and strained double perovskite fluorides, Na3ScF6 and K2NaScF6 , is investigated using first-principles density functional theory. Although the experimental room temperature crystal structures of these fluoroscandates are centrosymmetric, i.e., Na3ScF6 (P 21/n ) and K2NaScF6 (F m 3 ¯m ), lattice dynamical calculations reveal that soft polar instabilities exist in each prototypical cubic phase and that the modes harden as the tolerance factor approaches unity. Thus the double fluoroperovskites bear some similarities to A B O3 perovskite oxides; however, in contrast, these fluorides exhibit large acentric displacements of alkali metal cations (Na, K) rather than polar displacements of the transition metal cations. Biaxial strain investigations of the centrosymmetric and polar Na3ScF6 and K2NaScF6 phases reveal that the paraelectric structures are favored under compressive strain, whereas polar structures with in-plane electric polarizations (˜5 -18 μ C cm-2 ) are realized at sufficiently large tensile strains. The electric polarization and stability of the polar structures for both chemistries are found to be further enhanced and stabilized by a coexisting single octahedral tilt system. Our results suggest that polar double perovskite fluorides may be realized by suppression of octahedral rotations about more than one Cartesian axis; structures exhibiting in- or out-of-phase octahedral rotations about the c axis are more susceptible to polar symmetries.

  16. Piezoelectric activity in Perovskite ferroelectric crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Wang, Linghang; Jin, Li; Lin, Dabin; Li, Jinglei; Li, Zhenrong; Xu, Zhuo; Zhang, Shujun

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite ferroelectrics (PFs) have been the dominant piezoelectric materials for various electromechanical applications, such as ultrasonic transducers, sensors, and actuators, to name a few. In this review article, the development of PF crystals is introduced, focusing on the crystal growth and piezoelectric activity. The critical factors responsible for the high piezoelectric activity of PFs (i.e., phase transition, monoclinic phase, domain size, relaxor component, dopants, and piezoelectric anisotropy) are surveyed and discussed. A general picture of the present understanding on the high piezoelectricity of PFs is described. At the end of this review, potential approaches to further improve the piezoelectricity of PFs are proposed.

  17. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Dana A.; Farooque, Mohammad

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  18. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Keum, Jong; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Belianinov, Alex; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-20

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films, a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g., I(-), Cl(-), Br(-)) in the formation of the mixed-halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl(-) ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or, alternatively, where they are located is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br(-) or Cl(-) ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I(-) ions prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl(-) ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performing and cost-effective optoelectronic devices. PMID:26931634

  19. Anion order in perovskites: a group-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Talanov, M V; Shirokov, V B; Talanov, V M

    2016-03-01

    Anion ordering in the structure of cubic perovskite has been investigated by the group-theoretical method. The possibility of the existence of 261 ordered low-symmetry structures, each with a unique space-group symmetry, is established. These results include five binary and 14 ternary anion superstructures. The 261 idealized anion-ordered perovskite structures are considered as aristotypes, giving rise to different derivatives. The structures of these derivatives are formed by tilting of BO6 octahedra, distortions caused by the cooperative Jahn-Teller effect and other physical effects. Some derivatives of aristotypes exist as real substances, and some as virtual ones. A classification of aristotypes of anion superstructures in perovskite is proposed: the AX class (the simultaneous ordering of A cations and anions in cubic perovskite structure), the BX class (the simultaneous ordering of B cations and anions) and the X class (the ordering of anions only in cubic perovskite structure). In most perovskites anion ordering is accompanied by cation ordering. Therefore, the main classes of anion order in perovskites are the AX and BX classes. The calculated structures of some anion superstructures are reported. Comparison of predictions and experimentally investigated anion superstructures shows coherency of theoretical and experimental results. PMID:26919374

  20. Modeling of optical losses in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi, M. Javad; Houshmand, Mohammad; Zandi, M. Hossein; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-09-01

    The optical losses within the structure of hybrid perovskite solar cells are investigated using only the optical properties of each layer e.g. refractive index and extinction coefficient. This model allows calculating the transmission/reflection rates at the interfaces and absorption loss within any layer. Then, the short circuit current density and loss percentage are calculated versus the perovskite and TiO2 thicknesses from 50 nm to 150 nm. To make our calculations closer to reality, we extracted the optical properties of each device component from the literature reports on glass/TCO/TiO2/perovskite/metal. The simulations were fitted with the experimental results of some relevant references. Our simulations show that ITO transmits the light better than SnO2 as the TCO front electrode, and the light reflection at both sides of the perovskite layer, e.g. at TiO2/perovskite and perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD, is lower than 25%. The light interference and multiple reflections have been accounted in our calculations and finally we showed that a thicker TiO2 and perovskite cause more optical loss in current density due to stronger absorption.

  1. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth

    DOE PAGES

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g. I-, Cl-, Br-) in the formation of the mixed halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl- ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or alternatively, where they are located, is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br- or Cl- ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I- ionsmore » prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl- ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites, and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performance and cost-effective optoelectronic devices.« less

  2. Perovskite Materials for Light-Emitting Diodes and Lasers.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Boix, Pablo P; Yantara, Natalia; Li, Mingjie; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2016-08-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have cemented their position as an exceptional class of optoelectronic materials thanks to record photovoltaic efficiencies of 22.1%, as well as promising demonstrations of light-emitting diodes, lasers, and light-emitting transistors. Perovskite materials with photoluminescence quantum yields close to 100% and perovskite light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 8% and current efficiencies of 43 cd A(-1) have been achieved. Although perovskite light-emitting devices are yet to become industrially relevant, in merely two years these devices have achieved the brightness and efficiencies that organic light-emitting diodes accomplished in two decades. Further advances will rely decisively on the multitude of compositional, structural variants that enable the formation of lower-dimensionality layered and three-dimensional perovskites, nanostructures, charge-transport materials, and device processing with architectural innovations. Here, the rapid advancements in perovskite light-emitting devices and lasers are reviewed. The key challenges in materials development, device fabrication, operational stability are addressed, and an outlook is presented that will address market viability of perovskite light-emitting devices.

  3. Random lasing actions in self-assembled perovskite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuai; Sun, Wenzhao; Li, Jiankai; Gu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Kaiyang; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2016-05-01

    Solution-based perovskite nanoparticles have been intensively studied in the past few years due to their applications in both photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. Here, based on the common ground between solution-based perovskite and random lasers, we have studied the mirrorless lasing actions in self-assembled perovskite nanoparticles. After synthesis from a solution, discrete lasing peaks have been observed from optically pumped perovskites without any well-defined cavity boundaries. We have demonstrated that the origin of the random lasing emissions is the scattering between the nanostructures in the perovskite microplates. The obtained quality (Q) factors and thresholds of random lasers are around 500 and 60 μJ/cm2, respectively. Both values are comparable to the conventional perovskite microdisk lasers with polygon-shaped cavity boundaries. From the corresponding studies on laser spectra and fluorescence microscope images, the lasing actions are considered random lasers that are generated by strong multiple scattering in random gain media. In additional to conventional single-photon excitation, due to the strong nonlinear effects of perovskites, two-photon pumped random lasers have also been demonstrated for the first time. We believe this research will find its potential applications in low-cost coherent light sources and biomedical detection.

  4. Perovskite Materials for Light-Emitting Diodes and Lasers.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Boix, Pablo P; Yantara, Natalia; Li, Mingjie; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2016-08-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have cemented their position as an exceptional class of optoelectronic materials thanks to record photovoltaic efficiencies of 22.1%, as well as promising demonstrations of light-emitting diodes, lasers, and light-emitting transistors. Perovskite materials with photoluminescence quantum yields close to 100% and perovskite light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 8% and current efficiencies of 43 cd A(-1) have been achieved. Although perovskite light-emitting devices are yet to become industrially relevant, in merely two years these devices have achieved the brightness and efficiencies that organic light-emitting diodes accomplished in two decades. Further advances will rely decisively on the multitude of compositional, structural variants that enable the formation of lower-dimensionality layered and three-dimensional perovskites, nanostructures, charge-transport materials, and device processing with architectural innovations. Here, the rapid advancements in perovskite light-emitting devices and lasers are reviewed. The key challenges in materials development, device fabrication, operational stability are addressed, and an outlook is presented that will address market viability of perovskite light-emitting devices. PMID:27214091

  5. Stacking of Interferometric Data: New Tools for Stacking of ALMA Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, K. K.; Lindroos, L.; Vlemmings, W.; Conway, J.; Martí-Vidal, I.

    2015-12-01

    Radio and mm observations play an important role in determining the star formation properties of high-redshift galaxies. With the unprecedented sensitivity, ALMA now enable studies of faint , distant star-forming galaxies. However, most galaxies with low star formation rates at high redshift are too faint to be detected individually at these wavelengths. A way to study such galaxies is to use stacking. By averaging the emission of a large number of galaxies detected in optical or near-infrared surveys, we can achieve statistical detection. We investigate methods for stacking data from interferometric surveys. Interferometry poses unique challenges in stacking due to the nature of this data. We have compared stacking of uv-data with stacking of imaged data, the latter being the commonly used approach. Using simulated data, we find that uv-stacking may provide up to 50% less noise and that image based stacking systematically loses around 10% of the flux. More importantly, we find that the uv-stacking yield more robust results, especially in the case of (marginally) resolved sources and mosaicked data.

  6. Fungal melanins differ in planar stacking distances.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Nakouzi, Antonio; Crippa, Pier R; Eisner, Melvin

    2012-01-01

    Melanins are notoriously difficult to study because they are amorphous, insoluble and often associated with other biological materials. Consequently, there is a dearth of structural techniques to study this enigmatic pigment. Current models of melanin structure envision the stacking of planar structures. X ray diffraction has historically been used to deduce stacking parameters. In this study we used X ray diffraction to analyze melanins derived from Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus niger, Wangiella dermatitides and Coprinus comatus. Analysis of melanin in melanized C. neoformans encapsulated cells was precluded by the fortuitous finding that the capsular polysaccharide had a diffraction spectrum that was similar to that of isolated melanin. The capsular polysaccharide spectrum was dominated by a broad non-Bragg feature consistent with origin from a repeating structural motif that may arise from inter-molecular interactions and/or possibly gel organization. Hence, we isolated melanin from each fungal species and compared diffraction parameters. The results show that the inferred stacking distances of fungal melanins differ from that reported for synthetic melanin and neuromelanin, occupying intermediate position between these other melanins. These results suggest that all melanins have a fundamental diffracting unit composed of planar graphitic assemblies that can differ in stacking distance. The stacking peak appears to be a distinguishing universal feature of melanins that may be of use in characterizing these enigmatic pigments.

  7. A Late Pleistocene sea level stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Rachel M.; Lisiecki, Lorraine E.

    2016-04-01

    Late Pleistocene sea level has been reconstructed from ocean sediment core data using a wide variety of proxies and models. However, the accuracy of individual reconstructions is limited by measurement error, local variations in salinity and temperature, and assumptions particular to each technique. Here we present a sea level stack (average) which increases the signal-to-noise ratio of individual reconstructions. Specifically, we perform principal component analysis (PCA) on seven records from 0 to 430 ka and five records from 0 to 798 ka. The first principal component, which we use as the stack, describes ˜ 80 % of the variance in the data and is similar using either five or seven records. After scaling the stack based on Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) sea level estimates, the stack agrees to within 5 m with isostatically adjusted coral sea level estimates for Marine Isotope Stages 5e and 11 (125 and 400 ka, respectively). Bootstrapping and random sampling yield mean uncertainty estimates of 9-12 m (1σ) for the scaled stack. Sea level change accounts for about 45 % of the total orbital-band variance in benthic δ18O, compared to a 65 % contribution during the LGM-to-Holocene transition. Additionally, the second and third principal components of our analyses reflect differences between proxy records associated with spatial variations in the δ18O of seawater.

  8. Technical description of Stack 296-B-5

    SciTech Connect

    Ridge, T.M.

    1994-11-15

    Of particular concern to facilities on the Hanford site is Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 40, Part 61, Subpart H, ``National emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.`` Assessments of facility stacks and potential radionuclide emissions determined whether these stacks would be subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. Stack 296-B-5 exhausts 221-BB building which houses tanks containing B Plant steam condensate and B Plant process condensate from the operation of the low-level waste concentrator. The assessment of potential radionuclide emissions from the 296-B-5 stack resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual of less than 0.1 millirem per year. Therefore, the stack is not subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. However, the sampling and monitoring system must be in compliance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5. Currently, 296-B-5 is sampled continuously with a record sampler and continuous air monitor (CAM).

  9. NREL Studies Carrier Separation and Transport in Perovskite Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    NREL scientists studied charge separation and transport in perovskite solar cells by determining the junction structure across the solar device using the nanoelectrical characterization technique of Kelvin probe force microscopy. The distribution of electrical potential across both planar and porous devices demonstrates a p-n junction structure at the interface between titanium dioxide and perovskite. In addition, minority-carrier transport within the devices operates under diffusion/drift. Clarifying the fundamental junction structure provides significant guidance for future research and development. This NREL study points to the fact that improving carrier mobility is a critical factor for continued efficiency gains in perovskite solar cells.

  10. Electronic spin state of iron in lower mantle perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Struzhkin, V.; Mao, H.-k.; Shu, J.; Hemley, R.; Fei, Y.; Mysen, B.; Dera, P.; Parapenka, V.; Shen, G.

    2010-11-16

    The electronic spin state of iron in lower mantle perovskite is one of the fundamental parameters that governs the physics and chemistry of the most voluminous and massive shell in the Earth. We present experimental evidence for spin-pairing transition in aluminum-bearing silicate perovskite (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O{sub 3} under the lower mantle pressures. Our results demonstrate that as pressure increases, iron in perovskite transforms gradually from the initial high-spin state toward the final low-spin state. At 100 GPa, both aluminum-free and aluminum-bearing samples exhibit a mixed spin state. The residual magnetic moment in the aluminum-bearing perovskite is significantly higher than that in its aluminum-free counterpart. The observed spin evolution with pressure can be explained by the presence of multiple iron species and the occurrence of partial spin-paring transitions in the perovskite. Pressure-induced spin-pairing transitions in the perovskite would have important bearing on the magnetic, thermoelastic, and transport properties of the lower mantle, and on the distribution of iron in the Earth's interior. The lower mantle constitutes more than half of the Earth's interior by volume (1), and it is believed to consist predominantly (80-100%) of (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O{sub 3} perovskite (hereafter called perovskite), with up to 20% (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase (2). The electronic spin state of iron has direct influence on the physical properties and chemical behavior of its host phase. Hence, knowledge on the spin state of iron is important for the interpretation of seismic observations, geochemical modeling, and geodynamic simulation of the Earth's deep interior (3, 4). Crystal field theory (4, 5) and band theory (6) predicted that a high-spin to low-spin transition would occur as a result of compression. To date, no experimental data exist on the spin sate of iron in Al-bearing perovskite. To detect possible spinpairing transition of iron in perovskite under the lower mantle

  11. Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks

    DOEpatents

    Meskanick, Gerald R.; Rosso, David T.

    1993-01-01

    A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

  12. Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks

    DOEpatents

    Meskanick, G.R.; Rosso, D.T.

    1993-04-13

    A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

  13. Finding New Perovskite Halides via Machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-01

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach towards rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning) via building a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 181 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. The trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.

  14. Perovskite oxides: Oxygen electrocatalysis and bulk structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbonio, R. E.; Fierro, C.; Tryk, D.; Scherson, D.; Yeager, Ernest

    1987-01-01

    Perovskite type oxides were considered for use as oxygen reduction and generation electrocatalysts in alkaline electrolytes. Perovskite stability and electrocatalytic activity are studied along with possible relationships of the latter with the bulk solid state properties. A series of compounds of the type LaFe(x)Ni1(-x)O3 was used as a model system to gain information on the possible relationships between surface catalytic activity and bulk structure. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate constants were measured for these compounds. Ex situ Mossbauer effect spectroscopy (MES), and magnetic susceptibility measurements were used to study the solid state properties. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to examine the surface. MES has indicated the presence of a paramagnetic to magnetically ordered phase transition for values of x between 0.4 and 0.5. A correlation was found between the values of the MES isomer shift and the catalytic activity for peroxide decomposition. Thus, the catalytic activity can be correlated to the d-electron density for the transition metal cations.

  15. Finding new perovskite halides via machine learning

    DOE PAGES

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-26

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach toward rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning, henceforth referred to as ML) via building a support vectormore » machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br, or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 185 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor, and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. As a result, the trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.« less

  16. Topological Phases in Perovskite Oxide Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Rokyeon; Yu, Jaejun; Jin, Hosub

    Quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a new state of matter characterized by gapless edge states and insulating bulk states. Because the edge states are topologically protected and therefore robust against non-magnetic perturbations, it has a potential to be utilized in spintronics devices. Quauntum vally Hall (QVH) phase, on the other hand, is another class of topological state exhibiting valley-contrasting Berry curvature and spin splitting, which could yield novel transport properties, such as valley Hall effect and valley spin Hall effect. We propose a new kind of perovskite (111) heterostructures which can host both QSH and QVH phases with appropriate choices of composing elements. By carrying out first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that a Dirac cone emerges in a particular choice of heterostructure, and a sizable spin-orbit coupling turns the system into the QSH phase. In addition, the QVH phase with different Berry phases and spin textures in each valley is shown to be realized in the heterostructure with broken inversion symmetry. We porpose that these perovskite heterostructures can provide a feasible platform for spintronics, valleytronics, and topological engineering of the two-dimensional electron system.

  17. Neutral color semitransparent microstructured perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Eperon, Giles E; Burlakov, Victor M; Goriely, Alain; Snaith, Henry J

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium.

  18. Guanine base stacking in G-quadruplex nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Lech, Christopher Jacques; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2013-02-01

    G-quadruplexes constitute a class of nucleic acid structures defined by stacked guanine tetrads (or G-tetrads) with guanine bases from neighboring tetrads stacking with one another within the G-tetrad core. Individual G-quadruplexes can also stack with one another at their G-tetrad interface leading to higher-order structures as observed in telomeric repeat-containing DNA and RNA. In this study, we investigate how guanine base stacking influences the stability of G-quadruplexes and their stacked higher-order structures. A structural survey of the Protein Data Bank is conducted to characterize experimentally observed guanine base stacking geometries within the core of G-quadruplexes and at the interface between stacked G-quadruplex structures. We couple this survey with a systematic computational examination of stacked G-tetrad energy landscapes using quantum mechanical computations. Energy calculations of stacked G-tetrads reveal large energy differences of up to 12 kcal/mol between experimentally observed geometries at the interface of stacked G-quadruplexes. Energy landscapes are also computed using an AMBER molecular mechanics description of stacking energy and are shown to agree quite well with quantum mechanical calculated landscapes. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a structural explanation for the experimentally observed preference of parallel G-quadruplexes to stack in a 5'-5' manner based on different accessible tetrad stacking modes at the stacking interfaces of 5'-5' and 3'-3' stacked G-quadruplexes. PMID:23268444

  19. Modified Peierls-Nabarro dislocation equation for < {{110}} rangle {{ 1bar{1}0} } dissociated superdislocations in perovskite CaSiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, ShaoRong; Wu, XiaoZhi; Zhang, Tao; Tian, YuXian; Yan, ZhengXin; Zhu, HuaZe

    2016-09-01

    In the paper, we investigate the core width of superpartials and dissociated width of the <110>{1-10} superdislocations in CaSiO3 perovskite under pressures of 30 and 100 GPa by using the modified P-N dislocation equation. Our results show that when taking into account the discrete effect correction, core width of superpartials and dissociated width become much wider, and both of them increase significantly with the increase of the superdislocation angle. Furthermore, it is found that the dissociated width and core width of superpartials are determined by value of the unstable stacking fault energy and antiphase boundary energy, which are independent of the position of unstable stacking energy. Interestingly, the Peierls stress of superpartials can be predicted by using the variational method to solve the modified P-N dislocation equation.

  20. Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Tak-kwong; Herath, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    The Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS), suitable for both geostationary and low earth orbit missions, has been developed. The memory module is fully functional and undergoing environmental and radiation characterization. A self-contained flight-like module is expected to be completed in 2006. RTIMS provides reconfigurable circuitry and 2 gigabits of error corrected or 1 gigabit of triple redundant digital memory in a small package. RTIMS utilizes circuit stacking of heterogeneous components and radiation shielding technologies. A reprogrammable field programmable gate array (FPGA), six synchronous dynamic random access memories, linear regulator, and the radiation mitigation circuitries are stacked into a module of 42.7mm x 42.7mm x 13.00mm. Triple module redundancy, current limiting, configuration scrubbing, and single event function interrupt detection are employed to mitigate radiation effects. The mitigation techniques significantly simplify system design. RTIMS is well suited for deployment in real-time data processing, reconfigurable computing, and memory intensive applications.

  1. Intelligent Control System of Stack-boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Jingxia, Niu; Jianhua, Lang; Shaofeng, Li; Zhi, Li

    Boiler combustion control system's basic task is to make fuel burn calories adapt to the needs of the water temperature and ensure the economical combustion and the safe operation. In the foundations which have analyzed the stack-boiler's work process and control system structure, the system designed by using the self-learning and self-optimizing fuzzy control system of the PC to make air/coal ratio achieve the best and realize the optimized combustion; through PLC to accelerate the speed of response to the boiler, and speed up the PC to optimize the speed and realize the double loop control system for stack-boiler. The control system in premise of the stack-boiler reaches the goal of the load to achieve the highest efficiency of the boiler combustion.

  2. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2005-01-25

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell. Other polarization curves may be generated and used for fuel cell stack monitoring based on different operating pressures, temperatures, hydrogen quantities.

  3. Electrochemical Detection in Stacked Paper Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiyuan; Lillehoj, Peter B

    2015-08-01

    Paper-based electrochemical biosensors are a promising technology that enables rapid, quantitative measurements on an inexpensive platform. However, the control of liquids in paper networks is generally limited to a single sample delivery step. Here, we propose a simple method to automate the loading and delivery of liquid samples to sensing electrodes on paper networks by stacking multiple layers of paper. Using these stacked paper devices (SPDs), we demonstrate a unique strategy to fully immerse planar electrodes by aqueous liquids via capillary flow. Amperometric measurements of xanthine oxidase revealed that electrochemical sensors on four-layer SPDs generated detection signals up to 75% higher compared with those on single-layer paper devices. Furthermore, measurements could be performed with minimal user involvement and completed within 30 min. Due to its simplicity, enhanced automation, and capability for quantitative measurements, stacked paper electrochemical biosensors can be useful tools for point-of-care testing in resource-limited settings.

  4. Progress of MCFC stack technology at Toshiba

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, M.; Hayashi, T.; Shimizu, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Toshiba is working on the development of MCFC stack technology; improvement of cell characteristics, and establishment of separator technology. For the cell technology, Toshiba has concentrated on both the restraints of NiO cathode dissolution and electrolyte loss from cells, which are the critical issues to extend cell life in MCFC, and great progress has been made. On the other hand, recognizing that the separator is one of key elements in accomplishing reliable and cost-competitive MCFC stacks, Toshiba has been accelerating the technology establishment and verification of an advanced type separator. A sub-scale stack with such a separator was provided for an electric generating test, and has been operated for more than 10,000 hours. This paper presents several topics obtained through the technical activities in the MCFC field at Toshiba.

  5. Perovskite Solar Cells: High Efficiency Pb-In Binary Metal Perovskite Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Kui; Li, Meng; Yang, Ying-Guo; Hu, Yun; Ma, Heng; Gao, Xing-Yu; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    On page 6695, X. Y. Gao, L.-S. Liao, and co-workers describe the fabrication of mixed Pb-In perovskite solar cells, using indium (III) chloride and lead (II) chloride with methylammonium iodide. A maximum power conversion efficiency as high as 17.55% is achieved owing to the high quality of the perovskites with multiple ordered crystal orientations. This work demonstrates the possibility of substituting the Pb (II) by using In (III), which opens a broad route to fabricating alloy perovskite solar cells with mitigated ecological impact.

  6. Perovskite Solar Cells: High Efficiency Pb-In Binary Metal Perovskite Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Kui; Li, Meng; Yang, Ying-Guo; Hu, Yun; Ma, Heng; Gao, Xing-Yu; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    On page 6695, X. Y. Gao, L.-S. Liao, and co-workers describe the fabrication of mixed Pb-In perovskite solar cells, using indium (III) chloride and lead (II) chloride with methylammonium iodide. A maximum power conversion efficiency as high as 17.55% is achieved owing to the high quality of the perovskites with multiple ordered crystal orientations. This work demonstrates the possibility of substituting the Pb (II) by using In (III), which opens a broad route to fabricating alloy perovskite solar cells with mitigated ecological impact. PMID:27511533

  7. Rain on Methylammonium Lead Iodide Based Perovskites: Possible Environmental Effects of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hailegnaw, Bekele; Kirmayer, Saar; Edri, Eran; Hodes, Gary; Cahen, David

    2015-05-01

    The great promise of hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite (HOIP)-based solar cells is being challenged by its Pb content and its sensitivity to water. Here, the impact of rain on methylammonium lead iodide perovskite films was investigated by exposing such films to water of varying pH values, simulating exposure of the films to rain. The amount of Pb loss was determined using both gravimetric and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements. Using our results, the extent of Pb loss to the environment, in the case of catastrophic module failure, was evaluated. Although very dependent on module siting, even total destruction of a large solar electrical power generating plant, based on HOIPs, while obviously highly undesirable, is estimated to be far from catastrophic for the environment.

  8. Investigation of perovskite-sensitized nanoporous titanium dioxide photoanodes with different thicknesses in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yaoming; Han, Gaoyi; Chang, Yunzhen; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanping; Li, Miaoyu

    2015-07-01

    Perovskite-sensitized nanoporous TiO2 films with different thicknesses are prepared by an in situ method, which are employed as photoanodes in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). The photoelectrochemical properties of different photoanodes are quantified by the ultraviolet to visible reflectance spectra, incident monochromatic photon-to-current conversion efficiency, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Results demonstrate that the thin photoanode has high electron lifetime for recombination, which can enhance the separation and transmission of the electron and hole. However, the sunlight utilization will decrease with reducing the photoanode thickness due to the small quantity of CH3NH3PbI3 filled into the photoanode to absorb sunlight. After optimization, PSC with 0.80 μm of the photoanode thickness shows a superior cell efficiency of 12.22% without a hole transporting material.

  9. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  10. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-02-17

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell.

  11. Nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, William B. (Inventor); Kontos, Karen B. (Inventor); Weir, Donald S. (Inventor); Nolcheff, Nick A. (Inventor); Gunaraj, John A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane having a characteristic curve that is characterized by a nonlinear sweep and a nonlinear lean is provided. The stator is in an axial fan or compressor turbomachinery stage that is comprised of a collection of vanes whose highly three-dimensional shape is selected to reduce rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction noise while maintaining the aerodynamic and mechanical performance of the vane. The nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane reduces noise associated with the fan stage of turbomachinery to improve environmental compatibility.

  12. Geometry and kinematics of experimental antiformal stacks.

    PubMed

    Gomes; Ferreira

    2000-06-01

    Sandbox experiments with different boundary conditions demonstrate that antiformal stacks result from a forward-breaking thrust sequence. An obstacle blocks forward thrust propagation and transfers the deformation back to the hinterland in a previously formed true duplex. In the hinterland, continued shortening causes faults to merge toward the tectonic transport direction until the older thrusts override the younger thrusts. In experiments using thin sand layers or high basal friction, shortening is accommodated by a cyclic process of thrusting, back rotation of the newly formed thrust combined with strong vertical strain, and nucleation of a new thrust. Continuous deformation produces an antiformal stack through progressive convergence of branch lines.

  13. Color considerations in fluorescent solar concentrator stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Paul D.; Smith, Geoff B.

    2003-09-01

    We present modeled results of the luminous and color outputs of a three-layer stack of fluorescent planar concentrators (FPCs). FPCs have the potential to provide sufficient luminous output to illuminate moderate-sized rooms for reasonably-sized collecting areas. It is of course necessary not only that the lumens be sufficient, but also that the light be sufficiently white as to be comfortable. Modeling shows that by use of a stack of three FPCs, one each of violet, green, and red, it is possible to achieve good color rendering and sufficient lighting levels for room illumination.

  14. Perovskite as light harvester: a game changer in photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Kazim, Samrana; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Grätzel, Michael; Ahmad, Shahzada

    2014-03-10

    It is not often that the scientific community is blessed with a material, which brings enormous hopes and receives special attention. When it does, it expands at a rapid pace and its every dimension creates curiosity. One such material is perovskite, which has triggered the development of new device architectures in energy conversion. Perovskites are of great interest in photovoltaic devices due to their panchromatic light absorption and ambipolar behavior. Power conversion efficiencies have been doubled in less than a year and over 15% is being now measured in labs. Every digit increment in efficiency is being celebrated widely in the scientific community and is being discussed in industry. Here we provide a summary on the use of perovskite for inexpensive solar cells fabrication. It will not be unrealistic to speculate that one day perovskite-based solar cells can match the capability and capacity of existing technologies. PMID:24519832

  15. The Coulombic Lattice Potential of Ionic Compounds: The Cubic Perovskites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francisco, E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents coulombic models representing the particles of a system by point charges interacting through Coulomb's law to explain coulombic lattice potential. Uses rubidium manganese trifluoride as an example of cubic perovskite structure. Discusses the effects on cluster properties. (CW)

  16. Oxyanions in perovskites: from superconductors to solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hancock, C A; Porras-Vazquez, J M; Keenan, P J; Slater, P R

    2015-06-21

    In this article we review work on oxyanion (carbonate, borate, nitrate, phosphate, sulphate, silicate) doping in perovskite materials beginning with early work on doping studies in superconducting cuprates, and extending to more recent work on doping into perovskite-type solid oxide fuel cell materials. In this doping strategy, the central atom of the oxyanion group occupies the perovskite B cation site, with the associated oxide ions filling 3 (carbonate, nitrate, borate) or 4 (phosphate, sulphate, silicate) of the available 6 anion sites around this site, albeit displaced so as to achieve the required geometry for the oxyanion. We highlight the potential of this doping strategy to prepare new systems, stabilize phases that cannot be prepared under ambient pressure conditions, and lead to modifications to the electronic and ionic conductivity. We also highlight the need for further work in this area, in particular to evaluate the carbonate content of perovskite phases in general. PMID:25407324

  17. Two-Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Photonic Films.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ke; Gao, Shanshan; Wu, Longlong; Wang, Geng; Liu, Xin; Chen, Gang; Liu, Zhou; Chen, Gang

    2016-07-13

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have created enormous expectations for low-cost and high-performance optoelectronic devices. In prospect, future advancements may derive from reaping novel electrical and optical properties beyond pristine perovskites through microscopic structure design and engineering. Herein, we report the successful preparation of two-dimensional inverse-opal perovskite (IOP) photonic films, featuring unique nanostructures and vivid colors. Further compositional and structural managements promise optical property and energy level tunability of the IOP films. They are further functionalized in solar cells, resulting in colorful devices with respectable power conversion efficiency. Such concept has not been previously applied for perovskite-based solar cells, which could open a route for more versatile optoelectronic devices.

  18. Two-Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Photonic Films.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ke; Gao, Shanshan; Wu, Longlong; Wang, Geng; Liu, Xin; Chen, Gang; Liu, Zhou; Chen, Gang

    2016-07-13

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have created enormous expectations for low-cost and high-performance optoelectronic devices. In prospect, future advancements may derive from reaping novel electrical and optical properties beyond pristine perovskites through microscopic structure design and engineering. Herein, we report the successful preparation of two-dimensional inverse-opal perovskite (IOP) photonic films, featuring unique nanostructures and vivid colors. Further compositional and structural managements promise optical property and energy level tunability of the IOP films. They are further functionalized in solar cells, resulting in colorful devices with respectable power conversion efficiency. Such concept has not been previously applied for perovskite-based solar cells, which could open a route for more versatile optoelectronic devices. PMID:27267266

  19. Perovskite-Fullerene Hybrid Materials Eliminate Hysteresis In Planar Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jixian; Buin, Andrei; Ip, Alexander H.; Li, Wei; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Yuan, Mingjian; Jeon, Seokmin; Ning, Zhijun; McDowell, Jeffrey; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Sun, Jon-Paul; Lan, Xinzheng; Quan, Li Na; Kim, Dong Ha; Hill, Ian; Maksymovych, Petro; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-03-31

    Solution-processed planar perovskite devices are highly desirable in a wide variety of optoelectronic applications; however, they are prone to hysteresis and current instabilities. Here we report the first perovskite–PCBM hybrid solid with significantly reduced hysteresis and recombination loss achieved in a single step. This new material displays an efficient electrically coupled microstructure: PCBM is homogeneously distributed throughout the film at perovskite grain boundaries. The PCBM passivates the key PbI3 antisite defects during the perovskite self-assembly, as revealed by theory and experiment. Photoluminescence transient spectroscopy proves that the PCBM phase promotes electron extraction. We showcase this mixed material in planar solar cells that feature low hysteresis and enhanced photovoltage. Using conductive AFM studies, we reveal the memristive properties of perovskite films. We close by positing that PCBM, by tying up both halide-rich antisites and unincorporated halides, reduces electric field-induced anion migration that may give rise to hysteresis and unstable diode behaviour.

  20. Tetravalent dysprosium in a perovskite-type oxide.

    PubMed

    Han, Donglin; Uda, Tetsuya; Nose, Yoshitaro; Okajima, Toshihiro; Murata, Hidenobu; Tanaka, Isao; Shinoda, Kozo

    2012-04-17

    The existence of tetravalent dysprosium in perovskite-type oxide barium zirconate is confirmed in this work. This discovery will stimulate many researchers in diverse fields such as catalysts, solid state ionics, sensors, and fluorescent materials.

  1. Highly Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells with Tunable Structural Color

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The performance of perovskite solar cells has been progressing over the past few years and efficiency is likely to continue to increase. However, a negative aspect for the integration of perovskite solar cells in the built environment is that the color gamut available in these materials is very limited and does not cover the green-to-blue region of the visible spectrum, which has been a big selling point for organic photovoltaics. Here, we integrate a porous photonic crystal (PC) scaffold within the photoactive layer of an opaque perovskite solar cell following a bottom-up approach employing inexpensive and scalable liquid processing techniques. The photovoltaic devices presented herein show high efficiency with tunable color across the visible spectrum. This now imbues the perovskite solar cells with highly desirable properties for cladding in the built environment and encourages design of sustainable colorful buildings and iridescent electric vehicles as future power generation sources. PMID:25650872

  2. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent development of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.

  3. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent developmentmore » of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.« less

  4. Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with tunable structural color.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Anaya, Miguel; Lozano, Gabriel; Calvo, Mauricio E; Johnston, Michael B; Míguez, Hernán; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-03-11

    The performance of perovskite solar cells has been progressing over the past few years and efficiency is likely to continue to increase. However, a negative aspect for the integration of perovskite solar cells in the built environment is that the color gamut available in these materials is very limited and does not cover the green-to-blue region of the visible spectrum, which has been a big selling point for organic photovoltaics. Here, we integrate a porous photonic crystal (PC) scaffold within the photoactive layer of an opaque perovskite solar cell following a bottom-up approach employing inexpensive and scalable liquid processing techniques. The photovoltaic devices presented herein show high efficiency with tunable color across the visible spectrum. This now imbues the perovskite solar cells with highly desirable properties for cladding in the built environment and encourages design of sustainable colorful buildings and iridescent electric vehicles as future power generation sources.

  5. Highly Tunable Colloidal Perovskite Nanoplatelets through Variable Cation, Metal, and Halide Composition.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Mark C; Seitz, Michael; Stranks, Samuel D; Tisdale, William A

    2016-08-23

    Colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets are a promising class of semiconductor nanomaterials-exhibiting bright luminescence, tunable and spectrally narrow absorption and emission features, strongly confined excitonic states, and facile colloidal synthesis. Here, we demonstrate the high degree of spectral tunability achievable through variation of the cation, metal, and halide composition as well as nanoplatelet thickness. We synthesize nanoplatelets of the form L2[ABX3]n-1BX4, where L is an organic ligand (octylammonium, butylammonium), A is a monovalent metal or organic molecular cation (cesium, methylammonium, formamidinium), B is a divalent metal cation (lead, tin), X is a halide anion (chloride, bromide, iodide), and n-1 is the number of unit cells in thickness. We show that variation of n, B, and X leads to large changes in the absorption and emission energy, while variation of the A cation leads to only subtle changes but can significantly impact the nanoplatelet stability and photoluminescence quantum yield (with values over 20%). Furthermore, mixed halide nanoplatelets exhibit continuous spectral tunability over a 1.5 eV spectral range, from 2.2 to 3.7 eV. The nanoplatelets have relatively large lateral dimensions (100 nm to 1 μm), which promote self-assembly into stacked superlattice structures-the periodicity of which can be adjusted based on the nanoplatelet surface ligand length. These results demonstrate the versatility of colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets as a material platform, with tunability extending from the deep-UV, across the visible, into the near-IR. In particular, the tin-containing nanoplatelets represent a significant addition to the small but increasingly important family of lead- and cadmium-free colloidal semiconductors.

  6. Highly Tunable Colloidal Perovskite Nanoplatelets through Variable Cation, Metal, and Halide Composition.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Mark C; Seitz, Michael; Stranks, Samuel D; Tisdale, William A

    2016-08-23

    Colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets are a promising class of semiconductor nanomaterials-exhibiting bright luminescence, tunable and spectrally narrow absorption and emission features, strongly confined excitonic states, and facile colloidal synthesis. Here, we demonstrate the high degree of spectral tunability achievable through variation of the cation, metal, and halide composition as well as nanoplatelet thickness. We synthesize nanoplatelets of the form L2[ABX3]n-1BX4, where L is an organic ligand (octylammonium, butylammonium), A is a monovalent metal or organic molecular cation (cesium, methylammonium, formamidinium), B is a divalent metal cation (lead, tin), X is a halide anion (chloride, bromide, iodide), and n-1 is the number of unit cells in thickness. We show that variation of n, B, and X leads to large changes in the absorption and emission energy, while variation of the A cation leads to only subtle changes but can significantly impact the nanoplatelet stability and photoluminescence quantum yield (with values over 20%). Furthermore, mixed halide nanoplatelets exhibit continuous spectral tunability over a 1.5 eV spectral range, from 2.2 to 3.7 eV. The nanoplatelets have relatively large lateral dimensions (100 nm to 1 μm), which promote self-assembly into stacked superlattice structures-the periodicity of which can be adjusted based on the nanoplatelet surface ligand length. These results demonstrate the versatility of colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets as a material platform, with tunability extending from the deep-UV, across the visible, into the near-IR. In particular, the tin-containing nanoplatelets represent a significant addition to the small but increasingly important family of lead- and cadmium-free colloidal semiconductors. PMID:27471862

  7. Two-Photon Absorption in Organometallic Bromide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Walters, Grant; Sutherland, Brandon R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Shi, Dong; Comin, Riccardo; Sellan, Daniel P; Bakr, Osman M; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-09-22

    Organometallic trihalide perovskites are solution-processed semiconductors that have made great strides in third-generation thin film light-harvesting and light-emitting optoelectronic devices. Recently, it has been demonstrated that large, high-purity single crystals of these perovskites can be synthesized from the solution phase. These crystals' large dimensions, clean bandgap, and solid-state order have provided us with a suitable medium to observe and quantify two-photon absorption in perovskites. When CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals are pumped with intense 800 nm light, we observe band-to-band photoluminescence at 572 nm, indicative of two-photon absorption. We report the nonlinear absorption coefficient of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskites to be 8.6 cm GW(-1) at 800 nm, comparable to epitaxial single-crystal semiconductors of similar bandgap. We have leveraged this nonlinear process to electrically autocorrelate a 100 fs pulsed laser using a two-photon perovskite photodetector. This work demonstrates the viability of organometallic trihalide perovskites as a convenient and low-cost nonlinear absorber for applications in ultrafast photonics.

  8. High Performance Tandem Perovskite/Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Bag, Monojit; Page, Zachariah; Renna, Lawrence; Kim, Paul; Choi, Jaewon; Emrick, Todd; Venkataraman, D.; Russell, Thomas

    Combining perovskites with other inorganic materials, such as copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) or silicon, is enabling significant improvement in solar cell device performance. Here, we demonstrate a highly efficient hybrid tandem solar cell fabricated through a facile solution deposition approach to give a perovskite front sub-cell and a polymer:fullerene blend back sub-cell. This methodology eliminates the adverse effects of thermal annealing during perovskite fabrication on polymer solar cells. The record tandem solar cell efficiency of 15.96% is 40% greater than the corresponding perovskite-based single junction device and 65% greater than the polymer-based single junction device, while mitigating deleterious hysteresis effects often associated with perovskite solar cells. The hybrid tandem devices demonstrate the synergistic effects arising from the combination of perovskite and polymer-based materials for solar cells. This work was supported by the Department of Energy-supported Energy Frontier Research Center at the University of Massachusetts (DE-SC0001087). The authors acknowledge the W.M. Keck Electron Microscopy.

  9. Iodomethane-Mediated Organometal Halide Perovskite with Record Photoluminescence Lifetime.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weidong; McLeod, John A; Yang, Yingguo; Wang, Yimeng; Wu, Zhongwei; Bai, Sai; Yuan, Zhongcheng; Song, Tao; Wang, Yusheng; Si, Junjie; Wang, Rongbin; Gao, Xingyu; Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Lijia; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-09-01

    Organometallic lead halide perovskites are excellent light harvesters for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, as the key component in these devices, a perovskite thin film with good morphology and minimal trap states is still difficult to obtain. Herein we show that by incorporating a low boiling point alkyl halide such as iodomethane (CH3I) into the precursor solution, a perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) film with improved grain size and orientation can be easily achieved. More importantly, these films exhibit a significantly reduced amount of trap states. Record photoluminescence lifetimes of more than 4 μs are achieved; these lifetimes are significantly longer than that of pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx films. Planar heterojunction solar cells incorporating these CH3I-mediated perovskites have demonstrated a dramatically increased power conversion efficiency compared to the ones using pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. Photoluminescence, transient absorption, and microwave detected photoconductivity measurements all provide consistent evidence that CH3I addition increases the number of excitons generated and their diffusion length, both of which assist efficient carrier transport in the photovoltaic device. The simple incorporation of alkyl halide to enhance perovskite surface passivation introduces an important direction for future progress on high efficiency perovskite optoelectronic devices. PMID:27529636

  10. Laser Crystallization of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Taewoo; Jin, Hyeong Min; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Ju Min; Park, Hyung Il; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Keon Jae; Shin, Byungha; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2016-08-23

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites attract enormous research interest for next generation solar energy harvest. Synergistic crystalline structures comprising organic and inorganic components enable solution processing of perovskite films. A reliable crystallization method for perovskites, compatible with fast continuous process over large-area flexible substrates, is crucial for high performance solar cell production. Here, we present laser crystallization of hybrid perovskite solar cells using near-infrared (NIR) laser (λ = 1064 nm). Crystalline morphology of CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) perovskite films are widely controllable with laser irradiation condition while maintaining film uniformity. Photothermal heating effectively assisted by interfacial photoconversion layers is critical for phase transformation without beam damage of multilayered device structures. Notably, laser crystallization attains higher device performances than conventional thermal annealing. Fast laser crystallization with manufacture level scan rate (1 m min(-1)) demonstrates inverted-type perovskite solar cells with 11.3 and 8.0% efficiencies on typical glass and flexible polymer substrates, respectively, without rigorous device optimization.

  11. Tracking the formation of methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijia; McLeod, John A.; Wang, Rongbin; Shen, Pengfei; Duhm, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    The formation mechanism of perovskite methylammonium lead triiodide (CH3NH3PbI3) was studied with in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on successive depositions of thermally evaporated methylammonium iodide (CH3NH3I) on a lead iodide (PbI2) film. This deposition method mimics the "two-step" synthesis method commonly used in device fabrication. We find that several competing processes occur during the formation of perovskite CH3NH3PbI3. Our most important finding is that during vapour deposition of CH3NH3I onto PbI2, at least two carbon species are present in the resulting material, while only one nitrogen species is present. This suggests that CH3NH3I can dissociate during the transition to a perovskite phase, and some of the resulting molecules can be incorporated into the perovskite. The effect of partial CH3NH3 substitution with CH3 was evaluated, and electronic structure calculations show that CH3 defects would impact the photovoltaic performance in perovskite solar cells. The possibility that not all A sites in the APbI3 perovskite are occupied by CH3NH3 is therefore an important consideration when evaluating the performance of organometallic trihalide solar cells synthesized using typical approaches.

  12. Laser Crystallization of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Taewoo; Jin, Hyeong Min; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Ju Min; Park, Hyung Il; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Keon Jae; Shin, Byungha; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2016-08-23

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites attract enormous research interest for next generation solar energy harvest. Synergistic crystalline structures comprising organic and inorganic components enable solution processing of perovskite films. A reliable crystallization method for perovskites, compatible with fast continuous process over large-area flexible substrates, is crucial for high performance solar cell production. Here, we present laser crystallization of hybrid perovskite solar cells using near-infrared (NIR) laser (λ = 1064 nm). Crystalline morphology of CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) perovskite films are widely controllable with laser irradiation condition while maintaining film uniformity. Photothermal heating effectively assisted by interfacial photoconversion layers is critical for phase transformation without beam damage of multilayered device structures. Notably, laser crystallization attains higher device performances than conventional thermal annealing. Fast laser crystallization with manufacture level scan rate (1 m min(-1)) demonstrates inverted-type perovskite solar cells with 11.3 and 8.0% efficiencies on typical glass and flexible polymer substrates, respectively, without rigorous device optimization. PMID:27377145

  13. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless a waiver of emission testing is obtained under § 61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  14. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless a waiver of emission testing is obtained under § 61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  15. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless a waiver of emission testing is obtained under § 61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  16. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless a waiver of emission testing is obtained under § 61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  17. 49 CFR 178.606 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... with specific gravities different from that of the liquid to be transported, the force must be calculated based on the specific gravity that will be marked on the packaging. The minimum height of the... number of containers that, when stacked, reach a height of 3 meters. s = specific gravity of lading....

  18. 49 CFR 178.606 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... with specific gravities different from that of the liquid to be transported, the force must be calculated based on the specific gravity that will be marked on the packaging. The minimum height of the... number of containers that, when stacked, reach a height of 3 meters. s = specific gravity of lading....

  19. 49 CFR 178.606 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with specific gravities different from that of the liquid to be transported, the force must be calculated based on the specific gravity that will be marked on the packaging. The minimum height of the... number of containers that, when stacked, reach a height of 3 meters. s = specific gravity of lading....

  20. Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-26

    Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

  1. Average Transmission Probability of a Random Stack

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Yin; Miniatura, Christian; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2010-01-01

    The transmission through a stack of identical slabs that are separated by gaps with random widths is usually treated by calculating the average of the logarithm of the transmission probability. We show how to calculate the average of the transmission probability itself with the aid of a recurrence relation and derive analytical upper and lower…

  2. 49 CFR 178.606 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... types other than bags must be subjected to a stacking test. (b) Number of test samples. Three test... 24 hours, except that plastic drums, jerricans, and composite packagings 6HH intended for liquids... maintain their position for one hour. Plastic packagings must be cooled to ambient temperature before...

  3. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bulkowski, J.E.

    1986-10-21

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will. 3 figs.

  4. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bulkowski, John E.

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will.

  5. Stack Gas Scrubber Makes the Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes a year long test of successful sulfur dioxide removal from stack gas with a calcium oxide slurry. Sludge disposal problems are discussed. Cost is estimated at 0.6 mill per kwh not including sludge removal. A flow diagram and equations are included. (GH)

  6. Removing Sulphur Dioxide From Stack Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    Process types, process concepts, claims and counterclaims, cost factors, and the level of developed technology for sulfur dioxide control in stack gases are focused upon and evaluated. Wet and dry processes as well as recovery and throwaway processes are compared. (BL)

  7. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    SciTech Connect

    Petry, S.F.

    1992-03-01

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart.

  8. Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

  9. Revisiting Stacking Fault Energy of Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan

    2016-02-01

    The stacking fault energy plays an important role in the transition of deformation microstructure. This energy is strongly dependent on the concentration of alloying elements and the temperature under which the alloy is exposed. Extensive literature review has been carried out and investigated that there are inconsistencies in findings on the influence of alloying elements on stacking fault energy. This may be attributed to the differences in chemical compositions, inaccuracy in measurements, and the methodology applied for evaluating the stacking fault energy. In the present research, a Bayesian neural network model is created to correlate the complex relationship between the extent of stacking fault energy with its influencing parameters in different austenitic grade steels. The model has been applied to confirm that the predictions are reasonable in the context of metallurgical principles and other data published in the open literature. In addition, it has been possible to estimate the isolated influence of particular variables such as nickel concentration, which exactly cannot in practice be varied independently. This demonstrates the ability of the method to investigate a new phenomenon in cases where the information cannot be accessed experimentally.

  10. Stacking fault and twinning in nanocrystalline metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Y.; Srivilliputhur, S. G.; Zhou, F.; Lavernia, E. J.; Baskes, M. I.; Zhu, Y. T.; Xu, H. F.

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Al processed by cryogenic ball-milling and nanocrystalline Cu processed by high-pressure torsion at a very low strain rate and at room temperature were investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. For nanocrystalline Al, we observed partial dislocation emission from grain boundaries, which consequently resulted in deformation stacking faults and twinning. We also observed deformation twins formed via two other mechanisms recently predicted by molecular dynamic simulations. These results are surprising because (1) partial dislocation emission from grain boundaries has not been experimentally observed although it has been predicted by simulations and (2) deformation stacking faults and twinning have not been reported in Al due to its high stacking fault energy. For nanocrystalline Cu, we found that twinning becomes a major deformation mechanism, which contrasts with the literature reports that deformation twinning in coarse-grained Cu occurs only under high strain rate and/or low temperature conditions and that reducing grain sizes suppresses deformation twinning. The investigation of the twinning morphology suggests that twins and stacking faults in nanocrystalline Cu were formed through partial dislocation emissions from grain boundaries. This mechanism differs from the pole mechanism operating in coarse-grained Cu.

  11. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77... discharge stack provided with automatic venting which will permit gases from the dryer heating unit...

  12. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77... discharge stack provided with automatic venting which will permit gases from the dryer heating unit...

  13. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77... discharge stack provided with automatic venting which will permit gases from the dryer heating unit...

  14. Venturis as silencers in a BOF stack

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsall, T.; Gerritsen, T.; Landon, T.

    1995-06-01

    Installation of a venture in a BOF stack reduced the sound level in a local community by 10 to 15 db. This application resulted in the development of a new type of fan silencer, called the modal silencer, having the inherent advantages of low pressure drop and less maintenance compared with conventional types.

  15. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless a waiver of emission testing is obtained under § 61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  16. Scaling the CERN OpenStack cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T.; Bompastor, B.; Bukowiec, S.; Castro Leon, J.; Denis, M. K.; van Eldik, J.; Fermin Lobo, M.; Fernandez Alvarez, L.; Fernandez Rodriguez, D.; Marino, A.; Moreira, B.; Noel, B.; Oulevey, T.; Takase, W.; Wiebalck, A.; Zilli, S.

    2015-12-01

    CERN has been running a production OpenStack cloud since July 2013 to support physics computing and infrastructure services for the site. In the past year, CERN Cloud Infrastructure has seen a constant increase in nodes, virtual machines, users and projects. This paper will present what has been done in order to make the CERN cloud infrastructure scale out.

  17. 49 CFR 178.815 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mass and stacked on the test IBC; (ii) The calculated superimposed test load weight loaded on either a... must be calculated using the applicable formula: Liquids: A = (1.8)(n - 1) × 1.5; or Solids: A = (1.8... transportation. w = maximum weight of one empty container in pounds. s = specific gravity (liquids) or...

  18. Stability of the ternary perovskites Sc3EN (E=B,Al,Ga,In) from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylushkin, A. S.; Höglund, C.; Birch, J.; Czigány, Zs.; Hultman, L.; Simak, S. I.; Alling, B.; Tasnádi, F.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    Mechanical and thermodynamic stability of the isoelectronic ternary inverse perovskites Sc3EN (E=B,Al,Ga,In) has been studied from first principles. We confirm stability of recently synthesized cubic phases Sc3AlN and Sc3InN , and predict the stability of cubic Sc3GaN and a triclinic phase aP20- Sc3BN . Substantial phonon softening in Sc3AlN and Sc3GaN is observed indicating a possibility that structural defects could form readily. In accord, our experiments show that magnetron sputter deposited films contain regions with high density of nonperiodic stacking faults along the ⟨111⟩ growth direction. We suggest that defect-free crystals may exhibit anomalies in the carrier properties, promising for electronic applications.

  19. Novel Carbazole-Based Hole-Transporting Materials with Star-Shaped Chemical Structures for Perovskite-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Soo; Sung, Sang Do; Choi, In Taek; Kim, Hyoungjin; Hong, MunPyo; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Wan In; Kim, Hwan Kyu

    2015-10-14

    Novel carbazole-based hole-transporting materials (HTMs), including extended π-conjugated central core units such as 1,4-phenyl, 4,4'-biphenyl, or 1,3,5-trisphenylbenzene for promoting effective π-π stacking as well as the hexyloxy flexible group for enhancing solubility in organic solvent, have been synthesized as HTM of perovskite-sensitized solar cells. A HTM with 1,3,5-trisphenylbenzene core, coded as SGT-411, exhibited the highest charge conductivity caused by its intrinsic property to form crystallized structure. The perovskite-sensitized solar cells with SGT-411 exhibited the highest PCE of 13.00%, which is 94% of that of the device derived from spiro-OMeTAD (13.76%). Time-resolved photoluminescence spectra indicate that SGT-411 shows the shortest decay time constant, which is in agreement with the trends of conductivity data, indicating it having fastest charge regeneration. In this regard, a carbazole-based HTM with star-shaped chemical structure is considered to be a promising candidate HTM.

  20. Topological crystalline metal in orthorhombic perovskite iridates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yige; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Kee, Hae-Young

    2015-03-16

    Since topological insulators were theoretically predicted and experimentally observed in semiconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling, increasing attention has been drawn to topological materials that host exotic surface states. These surface excitations are stable against perturbations since they are protected by global or spatial/lattice symmetries. Following the success in achieving various topological insulators, a tempting challenge now is to search for metallic materials with novel topological properties. Here we predict that orthorhombic perovskite iridates realize a new class of metals dubbed topological crystalline metals, which support zero-energy surface states protected by certain lattice symmetry. These surface states can be probed by photoemission and tunnelling experiments. Furthermore, we show that by applying magnetic fields, the topological crystalline metal can be driven into other topological metallic phases, with different topological properties and surface states.

  1. Perovskites for use as sulfur tolerant anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Thomas G.

    One of the major obstacles encountered when using solid oxide fuel cells with hydrocarbon fuels is sulfur poisoning. The current anode material used is Ni/YSZ and Ni is not sulfur tolerant; therefore, the performance of the cell will degrade over time due to the formation of NiS. Perovskites have demonstrated superior sulfur tolerance but lack the high conductivity and catalytic activity of Ni/YSZ cermets. One of the objectives of this effort is to explore the substitution of the A-site in an A2MgMoO 6 perovskite with Sr and Ba, to create Sr2MgMoO6 (SMMO) and Ba2MgMoO6 (BMMO), respectively, to improve the sulfur tolerance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Sr2MgMoO 6, a double perovskite, has been previously studied and is suggested as a material of interest because of its relatively high conductivity and catalytic potential. Barium has not been previously studied and was selected as the dopant because the ionic radii (1.61 A) resulted in a calculated tolerance factor of 1.036 for BMMO when compared to SMMO, which has an ionic radii of 1.44 A and a calculated tolerance factor of 0.978. The tolerance factor for BaSrMgMoO6, a bi-substituted material synthesized for comparison as an intermediate formulation, was calculated to be 1.00. Another objective is to synthesize and characterize a series of lanthanum (La) doped Sr2MgMoO6 (SMMO) or La doped Sr2MgNbO 6 (SMNO) anode materials, which can be used in combination with electrolytes containing lanthanum to mitigate the effects of lanthanum poisoning in SOFCs. Currently, a La0.4Ce0.6O1.8 (LDC) transition layer is used with many perovskite-based anode materials to prevent La diffusion into the anode from the La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg 0.2O2.8 (LSGM) electrolyte, which can create a resistive La species that impedes electrochemical performance. To accomplish this, a new class of anode materials was synthesized with the goal of balancing La chemical potential between these neighboring materials. It was hypothesized that by

  2. Superconductivity and magnetism in rapidly solidified perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    O'Handley, R.C.; Kalonji, G.

    1991-01-01

    The report is divided into six parts, reflecting major thrusts of our work since 1987. The six areas are: molecular orbital theory of high {Tc} superconductivity; rapid solidification processing of oxide superconductors; time dependent magnetic and superconducting properties of these inhomogeneous materials; excess Gd in Gd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2-x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} perovskites; rapid solidification and directional annealing to achieve high Jc; and Mossbauer studies of T = Fe, Co and Ni site selection in YBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} and GdBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}.

  3. New Generation Perovskite Thermal Barrier Coating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, W.; Jarligo, M. O.; Mack, D. E.; Pitzer, D.; Malzbender, J.; Vaßen, R.; Stöver, D.

    2008-12-01

    Advanced ceramic materials of perovskite structure have been developed for potential application in thermal barrier coating systems, in an effort to improve the properties of the pre-existing ones like yttria-stabilized zirconia. Yb2O3 and Gd2O3 doped strontium zirconate (SrZrO3) and barium magnesium tantalate (Ba(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3) of the ABO3 and complex A(B'1/3B''2/3)O3 systems, respectively, have been synthesized using ball milling prior to solid state sintering. Thermal and mechanical investigations show desirable properties for high-temperature coating applications. On atmospheric plasma spraying, the newly developed thermal barrier coatings reveal promising thermal cycle lifetime up to 1350 °C.

  4. Measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Kuriyama, T.; Kuriyama, F.; Radebaugh, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental apparatus for the measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens as well as some experimental results taken with the apparatus. Screens are stacked in a fiberglass-epoxy cylinder, which is 24.4 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length. The cold end of the stacked screens is cooled by a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler at cryogenic temperature, and the hot end is maintained at room temperature. Heat conduction through the screens is determined from the temperature gradient in a calibrated heat flow sensor mounted between the cold end of the stacked screens and the GM cryocooler. The samples used for these experiments consisted of 400-mesh stainless steel screens, 400-mesh phosphor bronze screens, and two different porosities of 325-mesh stainless steel screens. The wire diameter of the 400-mesh stainless steel and phosphor bronze screens was 25.4 micrometers and the 325-mesh stainless steel screen wire diameters were 22.9 micrometers and 27.9 micrometers. Standard porosity values were used for the experimental data with additional porosity values used on selected experiments. The experimental results showed that the helium gas between each screen enhanced the heat conduction through the stacked screens by several orders of magnitude compared to that in vacuum. The conduction degradation factor is the ratio of actual heat conduction to the heat conduction where the regenerator material is assumed to be a solid rod of the same cross sectional area as the metal fraction of the screen. This factor was about 0.1 for the stainless steel and 0.022 for the phosphor bronze, and almost constant for the temperature range of 40 to 80 K at the cold end.

  5. Measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M A; Kuriyama, T; Kuriyama, F; Radebaugh, R

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental apparatus for the measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens as well as some experimental results taken with the apparatus. Screens are stacked in a fiberglass-epoxy cylinder, which is 24.4 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length. The cold end of the stacked screens is cooled by a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler at cryogenic temperature, and the hot end is maintained at room temperature. Heat conduction through the screens is determined from the temperature gradient in a calibrated heat flow sensor mounted between the cold end of the stacked screens and the GM cryocooler. The samples used for these experiments consisted of 400-mesh stainless steel screens, 400-mesh phosphor bronze screens, and two different porosities of 325-mesh stainless steel screens. The wire diameter of the 400-mesh stainless steel and phosphor bronze screens was 25.4 micrometers and the 325-mesh stainless steel screen wire diameters were 22.9 micrometers and 27.9 micrometers. Standard porosity values were used for the experimental data with additional porosity values used on selected experiments. The experimental results showed that the helium gas between each screen enhanced the heat conduction through the stacked screens by several orders of magnitude compared to that in vacuum. The conduction degradation factor is the ratio of actual heat conduction to the heat conduction where the regenerator material is assumed to be a solid rod of the same cross sectional area as the metal fraction of the screen. This factor was about 0.1 for the stainless steel and 0.022 for the phosphor bronze, and almost constant for the temperature range of 40 to 80 K at the cold end.

  6. The interaction between hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite and selective contacts in perovskite solar cells: an infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Idígoras, J; Todinova, A; Sánchez-Valencia, J R; Barranco, A; Borrás, A; Anta, J A

    2016-05-11

    The interaction of hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite and selective contacts is crucial to get efficient, stable and hysteresis-free perovskite-based solar cells. In this report, we analyze the vibrational properties of methylammonium lead halide perovskites deposited on different substrates by infrared absorption (IR) measurements (4000-500 cm(-1)). The materials employed as substrates are not only characterized by different chemical natures (TiO2, ZnO and Al2O3), but also by different morphologies. For all of them, we have investigated the influence of these substrate properties on perovskite formation and its degradation by humidity. The effect of selective-hole contact (Spiro-OmeTad and P3HT) layers on the degradation rate by moisture has also been studied. Our IR results reveal the existence of a strong interaction between perovskite and all ZnO materials considered, evidenced by a shift of the peaks related to the N-H vibrational modes. The interaction even induces a morphological change in ZnO nanoparticles after perovskite deposition, pointing to an acid-base reaction that takes place through the NH3(+) groups of the methylammonium cation. Our IR and X-ray diffraction results also indicate that this specific interaction favors perovskite decomposition and PbI2 formation for ZnO/perovskite films subjected to humid conditions. Although no interaction is observed for TiO2, Al2O3, and the hole selective contact, the morphology and chemical nature of both contacts appear to play an important role in the rate of degradation upon exposure to moisture.

  7. Special quasirandom structures for perovskite solid solutions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhijun; Nahas, Yousra; Xu, Bin; Prosandeev, Sergey; Wang, Dawei; Bellaiche, Laurent

    2016-11-30

    Special quasirandom structures (SQS) are presently generated for disordered (A'1-x [Formula: see text] x )BX3 and A(B'1-x [Formula: see text] x )X3 perovskite solid solutions, with x  =  1/2 as well as 1/3 and 2/3. These SQS configurations are obtained by imposing that the so-called Cowley parameters are as close to zero as possible for the three nearest neighboring shells. Moreover, these SQS configurations are slightly larger in size than those available in the literature for x  =  1/2, mostly because of the current capabilities of atomistic techniques. They are used here within effective Hamiltonian schemes to predict various properties, which are then compared to those associated with large random supercells, in a variety of compounds, namely (Ba1-x Sr x )TiO3, Pb(Zr1-x Ti x )O3, Pb(Sc0.5Nb0.5)O3, Ba(Zr1-x Ti x )O3, Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 and (Bi1-x Nd x )FeO3. It is found that these SQS configurations can reproduce many properties of large random supercells of most of these disordered perovskite alloys, below some finite material-dependent temperature. Examples of these properties are electrical polarization, anti-phase and in-phase octahedral tiltings, antipolar motions, antiferromagnetism, strain, piezoelectric coefficients, dielectric response, specific heat and even the formation of polar nanoregions (PNRs) in some relaxors. Some limitations of these SQS configurations are also pointed out and explained. PMID:27661191

  8. Special quasirandom structures for perovskite solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhijun; Nahas, Yousra; Xu, Bin; Prosandeev, Sergey; Wang, Dawei; Bellaiche, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    Special quasirandom structures (SQS) are presently generated for disordered (A‧1-x {{\\text{A}}\\prime \\prime} x )BX3 and A(B‧1-x {{\\text{B}}\\prime \\prime} x )X3 perovskite solid solutions, with x  =  1/2 as well as 1/3 and 2/3. These SQS configurations are obtained by imposing that the so-called Cowley parameters are as close to zero as possible for the three nearest neighboring shells. Moreover, these SQS configurations are slightly larger in size than those available in the literature for x  =  1/2, mostly because of the current capabilities of atomistic techniques. They are used here within effective Hamiltonian schemes to predict various properties, which are then compared to those associated with large random supercells, in a variety of compounds, namely (Ba1-x Sr x )TiO3, Pb(Zr1-x Ti x )O3, Pb(Sc0.5Nb0.5)O3, Ba(Zr1-x Ti x )O3, Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 and (Bi1-x Nd x )FeO3. It is found that these SQS configurations can reproduce many properties of large random supercells of most of these disordered perovskite alloys, below some finite material-dependent temperature. Examples of these properties are electrical polarization, anti-phase and in-phase octahedral tiltings, antipolar motions, antiferromagnetism, strain, piezoelectric coefficients, dielectric response, specific heat and even the formation of polar nanoregions (PNRs) in some relaxors. Some limitations of these SQS configurations are also pointed out and explained.

  9. Antiproton stacking and un-stacking in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra Bhat

    2003-06-12

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring (RR) is intended to be used as a future antiproton storage ring for the Run II proton-antiproton collider operation. It is proposed that about 40mA of antiproton beam from the Accumulator Ring will be transferred to the Recycler once for every two to three hours, stacked and cooled. This operation continues for about 10 to 20 hours depending on the collider needs for antiprotons. Eventually, the cooled antiproton beam will be un-stacked from the Recycler and transferred to the Tevatron via the Main Injector. They have simulated stacking and un-stacking of antiprotons in the Recycler using multi-particle beam dynamics simulation code ESME. In this paper they present results of these simulations.

  10. Fine control of perovskite-layered morphology and composition via sequential deposition crystallization process towards improved perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; Meng, Fanli; Zhao, Erfei; Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yali; Tao, Xia

    2016-04-01

    The ability to prepare high coverage and compact perovskite films via solution-based crystallization manipulation processes still represents a vital issue towards improving the ultimate photoelectric conversion efficiency of devices. In this work, we prepare the active perovskite layer by means of sequential deposition crystallization process i.e. dipping PbI2-infiltrated TiO2 film within CH3NH3I solution from 20s to 60s. The morphology and thickness of the as-prepared perovskite layer, and its overall performance superiority are investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals that a maximum conversion of PbI2 to perovskite is completed upon applying a sequential deposition crystallization process of 40s. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) demonstrates that the coverage of the perovskite capping layer exhibits a trend from rise to decline in the whole dipping time from 20s to 60s. By fine control of the dipping time, a 620 nm-thickness compact perovskite active layer is obtained at the optimized dipping time of 40s and is verified to possess strong light absorption and high electron extraction efficiency, leading to a higher photocurrent. By further optimizing the mesoporous TiO2 film thickness, a high photocurrent of 23.98 mA cm-2 and an efficiency of 13.47% are achieved.

  11. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-05-01

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells.

  12. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-01-01

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells. PMID:27211006

  13. 43. VIEW NORTHWEST OF WOODEN STACK ON CONNECTOR BETWEEN BUILDINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. VIEW NORTHWEST OF WOODEN STACK ON CONNECTOR BETWEEN BUILDINGS 49 AND 41; STACK VENTED CORROSIVE FUMES FROM DIPPING OPERATIONS IN BUILDING 49A - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  14. VIEW OF STACK WITH AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR REPAIR SHOP TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STACK WITH AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR REPAIR SHOP TO THE FAR RIGHT. WAREHOUSE WITH ITS RIDGELINE ROTARY VENTS TO RIGHT OF STACK. VIEW FROM THE WEST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  15. IET. Exhaust stack foundation under construction. Reinforced concrete footings for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Exhaust stack foundation under construction. Reinforced concrete footings for duct at right of stack. Foundation is in octagonal shape. Date: October 29, 1954. INEEL negative no. 12711 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Low-temperature fabrication of efficient wide-bandgap organolead trihalide perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Bi, Cheng; Yuan, Yongbo; Fang, Yanjun; Huang, Jinsong

    2014-11-25

    A mixed halide perovskite solar cell with a 1.72 eV bandgap is developed by incorporating Br into perovskite through a low-temperature solution process. A high efficiency of 13.1% is achieved by carefully tuning the thickness, morphology, and surface passivation of the perovskite layers. Furthermore, the fabrication techniques and conditions are compatible with future perovskite/Si tandem cell studies.

  17. Research Update: Overview of progress about efficiency and stability on perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Seigo

    2016-09-01

    Due to the high conversion efficiency, organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) solar cells are investigated for new practical energy resources for our future society. However, the perovskite solar cells have been quite unstable devices. In this manuscript, the history of perovskite solar cells is introduced, and then, the efforts to improve and understand the stability issue of perovskite solar cells are summarized.

  18. Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells Incorporating Metal-Organic Framework Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Hsiang; Kung, Chung-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Huang, Tzu-Yen; Kao, Sheng-Yuan; Lu, Hsin-Che; Lee, Min-Han; Boopathi, Karunakara Moorthy; Chu, Chih-Wei; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2015-11-25

    Zr-based porphyrin metal-organic framework (MOF-525) nanocrystals with a crystal size of about 140 nm are synthesized and incorporated into perovskite solar cells. The morphology and crystallinity of the perovskite thin film are enhanced since the micropores of MOF-525 allow the crystallization of perovskite to occur inside; this observation results in a higher cell efficiency of the obtained MOF/perovskite solar cell.

  19. Fe-Mg partitioning between perovskite, post-perovskite, and ferropericlase at the lowermost mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Ohtani, E.; Miyahara, M.; Nishijima, M.; Terasaki, H.; Kondo, T.; Kikegawa, T.; Hirao, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The lower mantle consists mainly of iron-bearing magnesium silicate perovskite and ferropericlase. The Fe-Mg partition coefficient between these minerals is important to understand the chemical and physical properties of the mantle. The lowermost 200 km of the mantle is called D" layer and it is considered to be a thermal and chemical boundary layer between the silicate mantle and outer core. Recent high pressure studies [e.g., Murakami et al., 2004] revealed that (Mg, Fe)SiO3 perovskite transformed to post-perovskite phase at the pressure and temperature conditions of D" layer. In this study, high pressure and high temperature partitioning experiments were performed up to 140 GPa at 2000 K using a laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC). Powdered or single crystalline Al-free San Carlos olivine (Mg0.88, Fe0.12)2SiO4 was used as a starting material in order to avoid complicated compositional effects. The starting material was embedded in sodium chloride which is pressure medium. Pressures were determined by both the ruby fluorescence method [Mao et al., 1978] and the Raman shift of the first-order Raman spectra of diamond anvil [Akahama and Kawamura, 2004]. Temperatures were measured by spectroradiometric method. The recovered samples were analyzed using the technique of combination of FIB and ATEM (JEOL JEM-3000F (FEG TEM-STEM)). The result shows that post- perovskite phase exhibits very small iron content, Fe# = 0.01 at 140 GPa and 2000 K. Therefore, the partition coefficient was K = 0.03, which indicates that iron prefers ferropericlase strongly rather than post-perovskite phase, which is consistent with the prediction of the ab initio calculation [Iitaka et al., 2004], and the high-spin/low- spin transition arguments of ferropericlase [Badro et al., 2003]. Kobayashi et al. (2005) showed higher partitioning coefficient of K= 0.30 in spite of the lower temperature condition of 1600 K compared to the present experiment. They reported that significant iron

  20. Influence of void-free perovskite capping layer on the charge recombination process in high performance CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Kunwu; Nelson, Christopher T.; Scott, Mary Cooper; Minor, Andrew; Mathews, Nripan; Wong, Lydia Helena

    2016-02-01

    The stunning rise of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite material as a light harvesting material in recent years has drawn much attention in the photovoltaic community. Here, we investigated in detail the uniform and void-free perovskite capping layer in the mesoscopic perovskite devices and found it to play a critical role in determining device performance and charge recombination process. Compared to the rough surface with voids of the perovskite layer, surface of the perovskite capping layer obtained from sequential deposition process is much more uniform with less void formation and distribution within the TiO2 mesoscopic scaffold is more homogeneous, leading to much improved photovoltaic parameters of the devices. The impact of void free perovskite capping layer surface on the charge recombination processes within the mesoscopic perovskite solar cells is further scrutinized via charge extraction measurement. Modulation of precursor solution concentrations in order to further improve the perovskite layer surface morphology leads to higher efficiency and lower charge recombination rates. Inhibited charge recombination in these solar cells also matches with the higher charge density and slower photovoltage decay profiles measured.The stunning rise of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite material as a light harvesting material in recent years has drawn much attention in the photovoltaic community. Here, we investigated in detail the uniform and void-free perovskite capping layer in the mesoscopic perovskite devices and found it to play a critical role in determining device performance and charge recombination process. Compared to the rough surface with voids of the perovskite layer, surface of the perovskite capping layer obtained from sequential deposition process is much more uniform with less void formation and distribution within the TiO2 mesoscopic scaffold is more homogeneous, leading to much improved photovoltaic parameters of the devices. The impact of

  1. Recent Advances in Interface Engineering for Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Pan, Lijia; Yang, Tingbin; Liang, Yongye

    2016-06-25

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells are considered as one of the most promising next-generation solar cells due to their advantages of low-cost precursors, high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and easy of processing. In the past few years, the PCEs have climbed from a few to over 20% for perovskite solar cells. Recent developments demonstrate that perovskite exhibits ambipolar semiconducting characteristics, which allows for the construction of planar heterojunction (PHJ) perovskite solar cells. PHJ perovskite solar cells can avoid the use of high-temperature sintered mesoporous metal oxides, enabling simple processing and the fabrication of flexible and tandem perovskite solar cells. In planar heterojunction materials, hole/electron transport layers are introduced between a perovskite film and the anode/cathode. The hole and electron transporting layers are expected to enhance exciton separation, charge transportation and collection. Further, the supporting layer for the perovskite film not only plays an important role in energy-level alignment, but also affects perovskite film morphology, which have a great effect on device performance. In addition, interfacial layers also affect device stability. In this review, recent progress in interfacial engineering for PHJ perovskite solar cells will be reviewed, especially with the molecular interfacial materials. The supporting interfacial layers for the optimization of perovskite films will be systematically reviewed. Finally, the challenges remaining in perovskite solar cells research will be discussed.

  2. Improving the Stability and Performance of Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes by Thermal Annealing Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jae Choul; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Da Bin; Jung, Eui Dae; Park, Jong Hyun; Lee, Ah-Young; Lee, Bo Ram; Di Nuzzo, Daniele; Friend, Richard H; Song, Myoung Hoon

    2016-08-01

    A perovskite LED with a perovskite film treated under optimum thermal annealing conditions exhibits a significantly enhanced long-term stability with full coverage of the green electroluminescence emission due to the highly uniform morphology of the perovskite film. PMID:27239729

  3. Learning algorithms for stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B; Hush, Don; Zimmer, Beate G

    2009-01-01

    Stack Filters define a large class of increasing filter that is used widely in image and signal processing. The motivations for using an increasing filter instead of an unconstrained filter have been described as: (1) fast and efficient implementation, (2) the relationship to mathematical morphology and (3) more precise estimation with finite sample data. This last motivation is related to methods developed in machine learning and the relationship was explored in an earlier paper. In this paper we investigate this relationship by applying Stack Filters directly to classification problems. This provides a new perspective on how monotonicity constraints can help control estimation and approximation errors, and also suggests several new learning algorithms for Boolean function classifiers when they are applied to real-valued inputs.

  4. Radiation-Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack - RTIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Tak-kwong; Herath, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation provides reconfigurable circuitry and 2-Gb of error-corrected or 1-Gb of triple-redundant digital memory in a small package. RTIMS uses circuit stacking of heterogeneous components and radiation shielding technologies. A reprogrammable field-programmable gate array (FPGA), six synchronous dynamic random access memories, linear regulator, and the radiation mitigation circuits are stacked into a module of 42.7 42.7 13 mm. Triple module redundancy, current limiting, configuration scrubbing, and single- event function interrupt detection are employed to mitigate radiation effects. The novel self-scrubbing and single event functional interrupt (SEFI) detection allows a relatively soft FPGA to become radiation tolerant without external scrubbing and monitoring hardware

  5. Multistage Force Amplification of Piezoelectric Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Zuo, Lei (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the disclosure include an apparatus and methods for using a piezoelectric device, that includes an outer flextensional casing, a first cell and a last cell serially coupled to each other and coupled to the outer flextensional casing such that each cell having a flextensional cell structure and each cell receives an input force and provides an output force that is amplified based on the input force. The apparatus further includes a piezoelectric stack coupled to each cell such that the piezoelectric stack of each cell provides piezoelectric energy based on the output force for each cell. Further, the last cell receives an input force that is the output force from the first cell and the last cell provides an output apparatus force In addition, the piezoelectric energy harvested is based on the output apparatus force. Moreover, the apparatus provides displacement based on the output apparatus force.

  6. SOFC cells and stacks for complex fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Edward M. Sabolsky; Matthew Seabaugh; Katarzyna Sabolsky; Sergio A. Ibanez; Zhimin Zhong

    2007-07-01

    Reformed hydrocarbon and coal (syngas) fuels present an opportunity to integrate solid oxide fuel cells into the existing fuel infrastructure. However, these fuels often contain impurities or additives that may lead to cell degradation through sulfur poisoning or coking. Achieving high performance and sulfur tolerance in SOFCs operating on these fuels would simplify system balance of plant and sequestration of anode tail gas. NexTech Materials, Ltd., has developed a suite of materials and components (cells, seals, interconnects) designed for operation in sulfur-containing syngas fuels. These materials and component technologies have been integrated into an SOFC stack for testing on simulated propane, logistic fuel reformates and coal syngas. Details of the technical approach, cell and stack performance is reported.

  7. Development of on-site PAFC stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, K.; Matsumoto, Y.; Horiuchi, H.; Ohtani, T.

    1996-12-31

    PAFC (Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell) has been researched for commercial use and demonstration plants have been installed in various sites. However, PAFC don`t have a enough stability yet, so more research and development must be required in the future. Especially, cell stack needs a proper state of three phases (liquid, gas and solid) interface. It is very difficult technology to keep this condition for a long time. In the small size cell with the electrode area of 100 cm{sup 2}, gas flow and temperature distributions show uniformity. But in the large size cell with the electrode area of 4000 cm{sup 2}, the temperature distributions show non-uniformity. These distributions would cause to be shorten the cell life. Because these distributions make hot-spot and gas poverty in limited parts. So we inserted thermocouples in short-stack for measuring three-dimensional temperature distributions and observed effects of current density and gas utilization on temperature.

  8. System for inspection of stacked cargo containers

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, Stephen

    2011-08-16

    The present invention relates to a system for inspection of stacked cargo containers. One embodiment of the invention generally comprises a plurality of stacked cargo containers arranged in rows or tiers, each container having a top, a bottom a first side, a second side, a front end, and a back end; a plurality of spacers arranged in rows or tiers; one or more mobile inspection devices for inspecting the cargo containers, wherein the one or more inspection devices are removeably disposed within the spacers, the inspection means configured to move through the spacers to detect radiation within the containers. The invented system can also be configured to inspect the cargo containers for a variety of other potentially hazardous materials including but not limited to explosive and chemical threats.

  9. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1996-01-01

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  10. A membraneless microfluidic fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salloum, Kamil S.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    A membraneless microfluidic fuel cell stack architecture is presented that reuses reactants from one cell to a subsequent one, analogous to PEMFC stacks. On-chip reactant reuse improves fuel utilization and power densities relative to single cells. The reactants flow separately through porous electrodes and interface with a non-reacting and conductive electrolyte which maintains their separation. The reactants remain separated downstream of the interface and are used in subsequent downstream cells. This fuel cell uses porous carbon for electrocatalysts and vanadium redox species as reactants with a sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte. The overall power density of the fuel cell increases with reactant flow rate and decreasing the separating electrolyte flow rate. The peak power, maximum fuel utilization, and efficiency nearly double when electrically connecting the cells in parallel.

  11. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, V.

    1998-11-10

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: (1) holding individual chips for batch processing, (2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, (3) opening vias in the dielectric, (4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and (5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume. 3 figs.

  12. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, Vincent

    1998-01-01

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: 1) holding individual chips for batch processing, 2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, 3) opening vias in the dielectric, 4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and 5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume.

  13. Stacked switchable element and diode combination

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  14. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOEpatents

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  15. Fast beam stacking using rf barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Capista, D.; Griffin, J.; Ng, K.-Y.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Two barrier RF systems were fabricated, tested and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. Each can provide 8 kV rectangular pulses (the RF barriers) at 90 kHz. When a stationary barrier is combined with a moving barrier, injected beams from the Booster can be continuously deflected, folded and stacked in the Main Injector, which leads to doubling of the beam intensity. This paper gives a report on the beam experiment using this novel technology.

  16. CAM and stack air sampler design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.D.

    1994-05-13

    About 128 air samplers and CAMs presently in service to detect and document potential radioactive release from `H` and `F` area tank farm ventilation stacks are scheduled for replacement and/or upgrade by Projects S-5764, S-2081, S-3603, and S-4516. The seven CAMs scheduled to be upgraded by Project S-4516 during 1995 are expected to provide valuable experience for the three remaining projects. The attached document provides design guidance for the standardized High Level Waste air sampling system.

  17. Method and apparatus for pulse stacking

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.

    1977-01-01

    An active pulse stacking system including an etalon and an electro-optical modulator apparatus combined with a pulse-forming network capable of forming and summing a sequence of time-delayed optical waveforms arising from, for example, a single laser pulse. The Pockels cell pulse stacker may attain an efficiency of about 2.6% while providing a controllable faster-than-exponential time rise in transmitted pulse intensity.

  18. When is stacking confusing? The impact of confusion on stacking in deep H I galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Papastergis, Emmanouil

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytic model to predict the H I mass contributed by confused sources to a stacked spectrum in a generic H I survey. Based on the ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) correlation function, this model is in agreement with the estimates of confusion present in stacked Parkes telescope data, and was used to predict how confusion will limit stacking in the deepest Square Kilometre Array precursor H I surveys. Stacking with LADUMA (Looking At the Distant Universe with MeerKAT) and DINGO UDEEP (Deep Investigation of Neutral Gas Origins - Ultra Deep) data will only be mildly impacted by confusion if their target synthesized beam size of 10 arcsec can be achieved. Any beam size significantly above this will result in stacks that contain a mass in confused sources that is comparable to (or greater than) that which is detectable via stacking, at all redshifts. CHILES (COSMOS H I Large Extragalactic Survey) 5 arcsec resolution is more than adequate to prevent confusion influencing stacking of its data, throughout its bandpass range. FAST (Five hundred metre Aperture Spherical Telescope) will be the most impeded by confusion, with H I surveys likely becoming heavily confused much beyond z = 0.1. The largest uncertainties in our model are the redshift evolution of the H I density of the Universe and the H I correlation function. However, we argue that the two idealized cases we adopt should bracket the true evolution, and the qualitative conclusions are unchanged regardless of the model choice. The profile shape of the signal due to confusion (in the absence of any detection) was also modelled, revealing that it can take the form of a double Gaussian with a narrow and wide component.

  19. Thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation.

    PubMed

    Teske, C; Jacoby, J; Schweizer, W; Wiechula, J

    2009-03-01

    A thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation has been developed and tested. The stack design includes a free wheeling diode assembly for current reversal. Triggering of the device is achieved by a high side biased, self supplied gate driver unit using gating energy derived from a local snubber network. The structure guarantees a hard firing gate pulse for the required high dI/dt application. A single fiber optic command is needed to achieve a simultaneous turn on of the thyristors. The stack assembly is used for switching a series resonant circuit with a ringing frequency of 30 kHz. In the prototype pulsed power system described here an inductive discharge has been generated with a pulse duration of 120 micros and a pulse energy of 50 J. A maximum power transfer efficiency of 84% and a peak power of 480 kW inside the discharge were achieved. System tests were performed with a purely inductive load and an inductively generated plasma acting as a load through transformer action at a voltage level of 4.1 kV, a peak current of 5 kA, and a current switching rate of 1 kA/micros. PMID:19334940

  20. Thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation.

    PubMed

    Teske, C; Jacoby, J; Schweizer, W; Wiechula, J

    2009-03-01

    A thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation has been developed and tested. The stack design includes a free wheeling diode assembly for current reversal. Triggering of the device is achieved by a high side biased, self supplied gate driver unit using gating energy derived from a local snubber network. The structure guarantees a hard firing gate pulse for the required high dI/dt application. A single fiber optic command is needed to achieve a simultaneous turn on of the thyristors. The stack assembly is used for switching a series resonant circuit with a ringing frequency of 30 kHz. In the prototype pulsed power system described here an inductive discharge has been generated with a pulse duration of 120 micros and a pulse energy of 50 J. A maximum power transfer efficiency of 84% and a peak power of 480 kW inside the discharge were achieved. System tests were performed with a purely inductive load and an inductively generated plasma acting as a load through transformer action at a voltage level of 4.1 kV, a peak current of 5 kA, and a current switching rate of 1 kA/micros.

  1. Hand calculator programs for stack particulate tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, W.A.; Jones, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    Those familiar with particulate stack testing understand that a great deal of number-crunching is necessary to generate end results. Two hand calculator programs, one designed for a Texas Instruments Programmable 57 and the other for a Hewlett-Packard 33E, have been developed to ease this workload and provide quick turnaround when results are required in a hurry. These two programs calculate all the variables surrounding a stack test except isokinetics. As such these programs are intended to be used as a supplement to, and not a replacement of, more advanced computer programs that calculate all the variables and provide hard copy documentation of raw data and end results. Each calculator program has been divided into two parts. The first part uses the equations presented in EPA's Reference Method 5-Determination of Particulate Emissions from Stationary Sources to calculate particulate concentration, dry and wet gas volumes and moisture content. The second part uses the results of the first part and equations presented in EPA Reference Method 2-Determination of Stack Gas Velocity and Volumetric Flow Rate to calculate volumetric flow rate, emission rate and velocity.

  2. Extended Life PZT Stack Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, S.; Bao, X.; Aldrich, J.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Jones, C.

    2009-01-01

    Piezoelectric stacks are being sought to be used as actuators for precision positioning and deployment of mechanisms in future planetary missions. Beside the requirement for very high operation reliability, these actuators are required for operation at space environments that are considered harsh compared to normal terrestrial conditions.These environmental conditions include low and high temperatures and vacuum or high pressure. Additionally, the stacks are subjected to high stress and in some applications need to operate with a very long lifetime durability.Many of these requirements are beyond the current industry design margins for nominal terrestrial applications. In order to investigate some of the properties that will indicate the durability of such actuators and their limitations we have developed a new type of test fixture that can be easily integrated in various test chambers for simulating environmental conditions, can provide access for multiple measurements while being exposed to adjustable stress levels. We designed and built two test fixtures and these fixtures were made to be adjustable for testing stacks with different dimensions and can be easily used in small or large numbers. The properties that were measured using these fixtures include impedance, capacitance, dielectric loss factor, leakage current, displacement, breakdown voltage, and lifetime performance. The fixtures characteristics and the test capabilities are presented in this paper.

  3. Hydrothermal epitaxy of perovskite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Allen T.

    1998-12-01

    This work details the discovery and study of a new process for the growth of epitaxial single crystal thin films which we call hydrothermal epitaxy. Hydrothermal epitaxy is a low temperature solution route for producing heteroepitaxial thin films through the use of solution chemistry and structurally similar substrates. The application of this synthesis route has led to the growth of a variety of epitaxial perovskite (BaTiOsb3, SrTiOsb3, and Pb(Zr,Ti)Osb3 (PZT)) thin films which provides a simple processing pathway for the formation of other materials of technological interest. BaTiOsb3 and PZT heteroepitaxial thin films and powders were produced by the hydrothermal method at 90-200sp°C using various alkali bases. XRD and TEM analysis shows that, in each case, the films and powders form epitaxially with a composition nearly identical to that of the starting precursors. Sequential growth experiments show that film formation initiates by the nucleation of submicron faceted islands at the step edges of the SrTiOsb3 substrates followed by coalescence after longer growth periods. A Ba-rich interfacial layer between the BaTiOsb3 islands and the SrTiOsb3 surface is seen by cross-section TEM during early growth periods. Electrophoretic and Basp{2+} adsorption data provide a chemical basis for the existence of the interfacial layer. Homoepitaxial growth of SrTiOsb3 on SrTiOsb3 also occurs by island growth, suggesting that the growth mode may be a consequence of the aqueous surface chemistry inherent in the process. Film formation is shown to be affected by any number of factors including type of base, pH, temperature, and substrate pretreatments. Different cation bases (Na-, K-, Rb-, Cs-, TMA-OH) demonstrated pronounced changes in powder and film morphology. For example, smaller cation bases (e.g., NaOH, KOH and RbOH) resulted the formation of 1.5 mum \\{100\\} faceted perovskite PbTiOsb3 blocks while larger cation bases (e.g., CsOH and TMA-OH) produced 500 nm sized

  4. Employing Lead Thiocyanate Additive to Reduce the Hysteresis and Boost the Fill Factor of Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijun; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Zhao, Dewei; Xiao, Zewen; Schulz, Philip; Harvey, Steven P; Liao, Weiqiang; Meng, Weiwei; Yu, Yue; Cimaroli, Alexander J; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Zhu, Kai; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Fang, Guojia; Mitzi, David B; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-07-01

    Lead thiocyanate in the perovskite precursor can increase the grain size of a perovskite thin film and reduce the conductivity of the grain boundaries, leading to perovskite solar cells with reduced hysteresis and enhanced fill factor. A planar perovskite solar cell with grain boundary and interface passivation achieves a steady-state efficiency of 18.42%.

  5. Elusive Presence of Chloride in Mixed Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Colella, Silvia; Mosconi, Edoardo; Pellegrino, Giovanna; Alberti, Alessandra; Guerra, Valentino L P; Masi, Sofia; Listorti, Andrea; Rizzo, Aurora; Condorelli, Guglielmo Guido; De Angelis, Filippo; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2014-10-16

    The role of chloride in the MAPbI3-xClx perovskite is still limitedly understood, albeit subjected of much debate. Here, we present a combined angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) and first-principles DFT modeling to investigate the MAPbI3-xClx/TiO2 interface. AR-XPS analyses carried out on ad hoc designed bilayers of MAPbI3-xClx perovskite deposited onto a flat TiO2 substrate reveal that the chloride is preferentially located in close proximity to the perovskite/TiO2 interface. DFT calculations indicate the preferential location of chloride at the TiO2 interface compared to the bulk perovskite due to an increased chloride-TiO2 surface affinity. Furthermore, our calculations clearly demonstrate an interfacial chloride-induced band bending, creating a directional "electron funnel" that may improve the charge collection efficiency of the device and possibly affecting also recombination pathways. Our findings represent a step forward to the rationalization of the peculiar properties of mixed halide perovskite, allowing one to further address material and device design issues. PMID:26278605

  6. Interface and Composition Analysis on Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Matteocci, Fabio; Busby, Yan; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques; Divitini, Giorgio; Cacovich, Stefania; Ducati, Caterina; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    Organometal halide (hybrid) perovskite solar cells have been fabricated following four different deposition procedures and investigated in order to find correlations between the solar cell characteristics/performance and their structure and composition as determined by combining depth-resolved imaging with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The interface quality is found to be strongly affected by the perovskite deposition procedure, and in particular from the environment where the conversion of the starting precursors into the final perovskite is performed (air, nitrogen, or vacuum). The conversion efficiency of the precursors into the hybrid perovskite layer is compared between the different solar cells by looking at the ToF-SIMS intensities of the characteristic molecular fragments from the perovskite and the precursor materials. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the STEM confirms the macroscopic ToF-SIMS findings and allows elemental mapping with nanometer resolution. Clear evidence for iodine diffusion has been observed and related to the fabrication procedure.

  7. Robust high-κ response in molecularly thin perovskite nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Osada, Minoru; Akatsuka, Kosho; Ebina, Yasuo; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Ono, Kanta; Takada, Kazunori; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2010-09-28

    Size-induced suppression of permittivity in perovskite thin films is a fundamental problem that has remained unresolved for decades. This size-effect issue becomes increasingly important due to the integration of perovskite nanofilms into high-κ capacitors, as well as concerns that intrinsic size effects may limit their device performance. Here, we report a new approach to produce robust high-κ nanodielectrics using perovskite nanosheet (Ca2Nb3O10), a new class of nanomaterials that is derived from layered compounds by exfoliation. By a solution-based bottom-up approach using perovskite nanosheets, we have successfully fabricated multilayer nanofilms directly on SrRuO3 or Pt substrates without any interfacial dead layers. These nanofilms exhibit high dielectric constant (>200), the largest value seen so far in perovskite films with a thickness down to 10 nm. Furthermore, the superior high-κ properties are a size-effect-free characteristic with low leakage current density (<10(-7) A cm(-2)). Our work provides a key for understanding the size effect and also represents a step toward a bottom-up paradigm for future high-κ devices.

  8. Halide Perovskites: Poor Man's High-Performance Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-07-01

    Halide perovskites are a rapidly developing class of medium-bandgap semiconductors which, to date, have been popularized on account of their remarkable success in solid-state heterojunction solar cells raising the photovoltaic efficiency to 20% within the last 5 years. As the physical properties of the materials are being explored, it is becoming apparent that the photovoltaic performance of the halide perovskites is just but one aspect of the wealth of opportunities that these compounds offer as high-performance semiconductors. From unique optical and electrical properties stemming from their characteristic electronic structure to highly efficient real-life technological applications, halide perovskites constitute a brand new class of materials with exotic properties awaiting discovery. The nature of halide perovskites from the materials' viewpoint is discussed here, enlisting the most important classes of the compounds and describing their most exciting properties. The topics covered focus on the optical and electrical properties highlighting some of the milestone achievements reported to date but also addressing controversies in the vastly expanding halide perovskite literature. PMID:27174223

  9. Electron–phonon coupling in hybrid lead halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam D.; Verdi, Carla; Milot, Rebecca L.; Eperon, Giles E.; Pérez-Osorio, Miguel A.; Snaith, Henry J.; Giustino, Feliciano; Johnston, Michael B.; Herz, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Phonon scattering limits charge-carrier mobilities and governs emission line broadening in hybrid metal halide perovskites. Establishing how charge carriers interact with phonons in these materials is therefore essential for the development of high-efficiency perovskite photovoltaics and low-cost lasers. Here we investigate the temperature dependence of emission line broadening in the four commonly studied formamidinium and methylammonium perovskites, HC(NH2)2PbI3, HC(NH2)2PbBr3, CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3, and discover that scattering from longitudinal optical phonons via the Fröhlich interaction is the dominant source of electron–phonon coupling near room temperature, with scattering off acoustic phonons negligible. We determine energies for the interacting longitudinal optical phonon modes to be 11.5 and 15.3 meV, and Fröhlich coupling constants of ∼40 and 60 meV for the lead iodide and bromide perovskites, respectively. Our findings correlate well with first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory, which underlines the suitability of an electronic band-structure picture for describing charge carriers in hybrid perovskites. PMID:27225329

  10. Perovskite-fullerene hybrid materials suppress hysteresis in planar diodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jixian; Buin, Andrei; Ip, Alexander H; Li, Wei; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Yuan, Mingjian; Jeon, Seokmin; Ning, Zhijun; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Sun, Jon-Paul; Lan, Xinzheng; Quan, Li Na; Kim, Dong Ha; Hill, Ian G; Maksymovych, Peter; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    Solution-processed planar perovskite devices are highly desirable in a wide variety of optoelectronic applications; however, they are prone to hysteresis and current instabilities. Here we report the first perovskite-PCBM hybrid solid with significantly reduced hysteresis and recombination loss achieved in a single step. This new material displays an efficient electrically coupled microstructure: PCBM is homogeneously distributed throughout the film at perovskite grain boundaries. The PCBM passivates the key PbI3(-) antisite defects during the perovskite self-assembly, as revealed by theory and experiment. Photoluminescence transient spectroscopy proves that the PCBM phase promotes electron extraction. We showcase this mixed material in planar solar cells that feature low hysteresis and enhanced photovoltage. Using conductive AFM studies, we reveal the memristive properties of perovskite films. We close by positing that PCBM, by tying up both halide-rich antisites and unincorporated halides, reduces electric field-induced anion migration that may give rise to hysteresis and unstable diode behaviour. PMID:25953105

  11. Novel materials for stable perovskite solar cells (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites are quickly overrunning research activities in new materials for cost-effective and high-efficiency photovoltaic technologies. Since the first demonstration from Kojima and co-workers in 2009, several perovskite-based solar cells have been reported and certified with rapidly improving power conversion efficiency. Recent reports demonstrate that perovskites can compete with the most efficient inorganic materials, while they still allow processing from solution as potential advantage to deliver a cost-effective solar technology. Compare to the impressive progress in power conversion efficiency, stability studies are rather poor and often controversial. An intrinsic complication comes from the fact that the stability of perovskite solar cells is strongly affected by any small difference in the device architecture, preparation procedure, materials composition and testing procedure. In the present talk we will focus on the stability of perovskite solar cells in working condition. We will discuss a measuring protocol to extract reliable and reproducible ageing data. We will present new materials and preparation procedures which improve the device lifetime without giving up on high power conversion efficiency.

  12. Interface and Composition Analysis on Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Matteocci, Fabio; Busby, Yan; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques; Divitini, Giorgio; Cacovich, Stefania; Ducati, Caterina; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    Organometal halide (hybrid) perovskite solar cells have been fabricated following four different deposition procedures and investigated in order to find correlations between the solar cell characteristics/performance and their structure and composition as determined by combining depth-resolved imaging with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The interface quality is found to be strongly affected by the perovskite deposition procedure, and in particular from the environment where the conversion of the starting precursors into the final perovskite is performed (air, nitrogen, or vacuum). The conversion efficiency of the precursors into the hybrid perovskite layer is compared between the different solar cells by looking at the ToF-SIMS intensities of the characteristic molecular fragments from the perovskite and the precursor materials. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the STEM confirms the macroscopic ToF-SIMS findings and allows elemental mapping with nanometer resolution. Clear evidence for iodine diffusion has been observed and related to the fabrication procedure. PMID:26523427

  13. Halide Perovskites: Poor Man's High-Performance Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-07-01

    Halide perovskites are a rapidly developing class of medium-bandgap semiconductors which, to date, have been popularized on account of their remarkable success in solid-state heterojunction solar cells raising the photovoltaic efficiency to 20% within the last 5 years. As the physical properties of the materials are being explored, it is becoming apparent that the photovoltaic performance of the halide perovskites is just but one aspect of the wealth of opportunities that these compounds offer as high-performance semiconductors. From unique optical and electrical properties stemming from their characteristic electronic structure to highly efficient real-life technological applications, halide perovskites constitute a brand new class of materials with exotic properties awaiting discovery. The nature of halide perovskites from the materials' viewpoint is discussed here, enlisting the most important classes of the compounds and describing their most exciting properties. The topics covered focus on the optical and electrical properties highlighting some of the milestone achievements reported to date but also addressing controversies in the vastly expanding halide perovskite literature.

  14. The aromatic stacking interactions between proteins and their macromolecular ligands.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Mizanur; Muhseen, Ziyad Tariq; Junaid, Muhammad; Zhang, Houjin

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic stacking interactions arise from the attractive force between the π-electron clouds in the neighboring aromatic groups. The aromatic stacking is common between proteins and small molecules. The stacking interactions at the interfaces of proteins and other macromolecules are relatively rare. However it contributes to a significant portion of the stabilizing forces. In the proteinprotein complexes, aromatic interactions are involved in the protein oligomerization, such as dimer, trimer and tetramer formation. Also, aromatic residues can bind to nanoparticles through stacking interactions which offer them stronger affinity than other residues. These interactions play crucial roles in proteinnanoparticle conjugation. In the protein-nucleotide complexes, the specific recognitions are realized through stacking interactions between aromatic residues and the bases in the nucleotides. Many nucleoproteins use aromatic stacking to recognize binding site on DNA or RNA. Stacking interactions are involved in the process of mismatch repair, strand separation, deadenylation, degradation and RNA cap binding. They are proved to be important for the stability of complexes. The aromatic stacking is also the underlying reasons of many fatal diseases such as Alzheimer, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The chemicals that can block the stacking interactions could have potential pharmaceutical values. In this review, we summarize recent finding regarding the functions of aromatic stacking interactions in the protein-macromolecule complexes. Our aim is to understand the mechanisms underlying the stacking-mediated complex formation and facilitate the development of drugs and other bio-products.

  15. Horizontal high speed stacking for batteries with prismatic cans

    DOEpatents

    Bartos, Andrew L.; Lin, Yhu-Tin; Turner, III, Raymond D.

    2016-06-14

    A system and method for stacking battery cells or related assembled components. Generally planar, rectangular (prismatic-shaped) battery cells are moved from an as-received generally vertical stacking orientation to a generally horizontal stacking orientation without the need for robotic pick-and-place equipment. The system includes numerous conveyor belts that work in cooperation with one another to deliver, rotate and stack the cells or their affiliated assemblies. The belts are outfitted with components to facilitate the cell transport and rotation. The coordinated movement between the belts and the components promote the orderly transport and rotation of the cells from a substantially vertical stacking orientation into a substantially horizontal stacking orientation. The approach of the present invention helps keep the stacked assemblies stable so that subsequent assembly steps--such as compressing the cells or attaching electrical leads or thermal management components--may proceed with a reduced chance of error.

  16. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Murray; Schroll, Craig R.

    1985-10-22

    Electrical short protection is provided in an electrolytic cell stack by the combination of a thin, nonporous ceramic shield and a noble metal foil disposed on opposite sides of the sealing medium in a gas manifold gasket. The thin ceramic shield, such as alumina, is placed between the porous gasket and the cell stack face at the margins of the negative end plate to the most negative cells to impede ion current flow. The noble metal foil, for instance gold, is electrically coupled to the negative potential of the stack to collect positive ions at a harmless location away from the stack face. Consequently, corrosion products from the stack structure deposit on the foil rather than on the stack face to eliminate electrical shorting of cells at the negative end of the stack.

  17. Spectroscopic Signature of Stacking Disorder in Ice I.

    PubMed

    Carr, Thomas H G; Shephard, Jacob J; Salzmann, Christoph G

    2014-07-17

    There is a growing realization that the presence of stacking disorder in ice I strongly influences its physical and chemical properties. Using Raman spectroscopy, we gain new fundamental insights into the spectroscopic properties of ice. We show that stacking disorder can be detected and quantified by comparing the spectra of stacking disordered ice with spectra of the "ordinary" hexagonal ice Ih. The spectral signature of stacking disorder is thought to arise from a greater structural diversity on the local length scale, vibrational modes that appear due to the lower-symmetry environments, and a strengthening of the covalent bonds. Our findings are compared to results from diffraction and calorimetry, and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the three techniques with respect to detecting stacking disorder in ice I. Apart from characterizing stacking disordered ice in the research lab, our new method is perfectly suited for remote or telescopic applications aiming at the identification of stacking disordered ice in nature. PMID:26277817

  18. Spectroscopic Signature of Stacking Disorder in Ice I.

    PubMed

    Carr, Thomas H G; Shephard, Jacob J; Salzmann, Christoph G

    2014-07-17

    There is a growing realization that the presence of stacking disorder in ice I strongly influences its physical and chemical properties. Using Raman spectroscopy, we gain new fundamental insights into the spectroscopic properties of ice. We show that stacking disorder can be detected and quantified by comparing the spectra of stacking disordered ice with spectra of the "ordinary" hexagonal ice Ih. The spectral signature of stacking disorder is thought to arise from a greater structural diversity on the local length scale, vibrational modes that appear due to the lower-symmetry environments, and a strengthening of the covalent bonds. Our findings are compared to results from diffraction and calorimetry, and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the three techniques with respect to detecting stacking disorder in ice I. Apart from characterizing stacking disordered ice in the research lab, our new method is perfectly suited for remote or telescopic applications aiming at the identification of stacking disordered ice in nature.

  19. Size-Dependent Photon Emission from Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals Embedded in an Organic Matrix

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, organometal halide perovskite materials have attracted significant research interest in the field of optoelectronics. Here, we introduce a simple and low-temperature route for the formation of self-assembled perovskite nanocrystals in a solid organic matrix. We demonstrate that the size and photoluminescence peak of the perovskite nanocrystals can be tuned by varying the concentration of perovskite in the matrix material. The physical origin of the blue shift of the perovskite nanocrystals’ emission compared to its bulk phase is also discussed. PMID:25949773

  20. Review on palladium-containing perovskites: synthesis, physico-chemical properties and applications in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Essoumhi, Abdellatif; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Bousmina, Mosto

    2014-02-01

    This review reports on the recent advances in the synthesis and physico-chemical properties of palladium-containing perovskites. Initially, the perovskite structure is briefly reviewed, then palladium-containing perovskites synthesis and physico-chemical properties are detailed. The applications of palladium-containing perovskites in catalysis; namely, NO reduction, methane combustion, methanol as well as ethanol oxidation, are briefly highlighted. The involvement and the important contribution of palladium-containing perovskites in cross-coupling reactions, especially Suzuki-Miyaura, Sonogashira, Ulmann and Grignard, are discussed. PMID:24749470

  1. Charge carrier mobility in hybrid halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Carlo; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The charge transport properties of hybrid halide perovskites are investigated with a combination of density functional theory including van der Waals interaction and the Boltzmann theory for diffusive transport in the relaxation time approximation. We find the mobility of electrons to be in the range 5–10 cm2V−1s−1 and that for holes within 1–5 cm2V−1s−1, where the variations depend on the crystal structure investigated and the level of doping. Such results, in good agreement with recent experiments, set the relaxation time to about 1 ps, which is the time-scale for the molecular rotation at room temperature. For the room temperature tetragonal phase we explore two possible orientations of the organic cations and find that the mobility has a significant asymmetry depending on the direction of the current with respect to the molecular axis. This is due mostly to the way the PbI3 octahedral symmetry is broken. Interestingly we find that substituting I with Cl has minor effects on the mobilities. Our analysis suggests that the carrier mobility is probably not a key factor in determining the high solar-harvesting efficiency of this class of materials. PMID:26235910

  2. Exciton localization in solution-processed organolead trihalide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haiping; Yu, Qianqian; Li, Hui; Li, Jing; Si, Junjie; Jin, Yizheng; Wang, Nana; Wang, Jianpu; He, Jingwen; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Zhizhen

    2016-03-01

    Organolead trihalide perovskites have attracted great attention due to the stunning advances in both photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. However, the photophysical properties, especially the recombination dynamics of photogenerated carriers, of this class of materials are controversial. Here we report that under an excitation level close to the working regime of solar cells, the recombination of photogenerated carriers in solution-processed methylammonium-lead-halide films is dominated by excitons weakly localized in band tail states. This scenario is evidenced by experiments of spectral-dependent luminescence decay, excitation density-dependent luminescence and frequency-dependent terahertz photoconductivity. The exciton localization effect is found to be general for several solution-processed hybrid perovskite films prepared by different methods. Our results provide insights into the charge transport and recombination mechanism in perovskite films and help to unravel their potential for high-performance optoelectronic devices.

  3. A polymer scaffold for self-healing perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yicheng; Wei, Jing; Li, Heng; Yan, Yin; Zhou, Wenke; Yu, Dapeng; Zhao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Advancing of the lead halide perovskite solar cells towards photovoltaic market demands large-scale devices of high-power conversion efficiency, high reproducibility and stability via low-cost fabrication technology, and in particular resistance to humid environment for long-time operation. Here we achieve uniform perovskite film based on a novel polymer-scaffold architecture via a mild-temperature process. These solar cells exhibit efficiency of up to ~16% with small variation. The unencapsulated devices retain high output for up to 300 h in highly humid environment (70% relative humidity). Moreover, they show strong humidity resistant and self-healing behaviour, recovering rapidly after removing from water vapour. Not only the film can self-heal in this case, but the corresponding devices can present power conversion efficiency recovery after the water vapour is removed. Our work demonstrates the value of cheap, long chain and hygroscopic polymer scaffold in perovskite solar cells towards commercialization.

  4. Atomistic mechanism leading to complex antiferroelectric and incommensurate perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Kinnary; Prosandeev, Sergey; Yang, Yurong; Xu, Bin; Íñiguez, Jorge; Bellaiche, L.

    2016-08-01

    An atomic interaction is identified in all perovskite compounds, such as A B O3 oxides, that can potentially result in unconventional structures. The term is harmonic in nature and couples the motions of the A cations with the rotations of the oxygen octahedra in the perovskite lattice. When strong enough, this coupling leads to hybrid normal modes that present both (anti)polar and rotational characters, which are keys to understand a variety of exotic phases. For example, we show that not only does this new coupling explain the long-period soft phonons characterizing prototype antiferroelectric PbZrO3, but it also provides us with an unified description of the complex antipolar structures of a variety of perovskites, including the possible occurrence of incommensurate phases. This coupling is further demonstrated to result, in the continuum limit, in an energy invariant adopting an analytical form that has been previously overlooked, to the best of our knowledge.

  5. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mohite, Aditya; Nie, Wanyi

    2015-01-29

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

  6. Photon recycling in lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos-Outón, Luis M.; Szumilo, Monika; Lamboll, Robin; Richter, Johannes M.; Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Abdi-Jalebi, Mojtaba; Beeson, Harry J.; Vrućinić, Milan; Alsari, Mejd; Snaith, Henry J.; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H.; Deschler, Felix

    2016-03-01

    Lead-halide perovskites have emerged as high-performance photovoltaic materials. We mapped the propagation of photogenerated luminescence and charges from a local photoexcitation spot in thin films of lead tri-iodide perovskites. We observed light emission at distances of ≥50 micrometers and found that the peak of the internal photon spectrum red-shifts from 765 to ≥800 nanometers. We used a lateral-contact solar cell with selective electron- and hole-collecting contacts and observed that charge extraction for photoexcitation >50 micrometers away from the contacts arose from repeated recycling between photons and electron-hole pairs. Thus, energy transport is not limited by diffusive charge transport but can occur over long distances through multiple absorption-diffusion-emission events. This process creates high excitation densities within the perovskite layer and allows high open-circuit voltages.

  7. Transparent conducting oxide free backside illuminated perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Yao, Jiexiong; Xia, Huarong; Sun, Wentao; Liu, Jian; Peng, Lianmao

    2015-07-01

    Recently, hybrid perovskites have attracted great attention because of their promising applications in solar cells. However, perovskite solar devices reported till now are mostly based on transparent conducting oxide (TCO) substrates which account for a large proportion in the total cost. Herein, TCO-free perovskite solar cells are fabricated. A photo-electricity conversion efficiency of 5.27% is obtained with short circuit current density (Jsc) of 10.7 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.837 V, and fill factor of 0.588. This study points a feasible way of replacing TCO substrate by low cost substrates, indicating promising potentials in solar energy conversion applications.

  8. Mixture interlayer for high performance organic-inorganic perovskite photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Feng; Chen, Qi; Chen, Lei; Ye, Fengye; Cai, Jinhua; Chen, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites are promising light absorbing active materials for photodetectors; however, the performance of current organic-inorganic perovskite-based photodetectors are limited by the high dark current due to hole injection at the cathode interlayer typically composed of fullerene derivatives. We have developed a mixture interlayer by simply blending polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acidmethyl ester (PCBM). Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy imaging reveals that the presence of PMMA reduced the work function of the PCBM:PMMA interlayer, which leads to increased energy barrier for hole injection and better hole-blocking property. Optimized perovskite photodetector with PCBM:PMMA hole-blocking interlayer exhibits a high detectivity of 1.1 × 1013 Jones, a broad linear dynamic range of 112 dB, and a fast response time of 2.2 μs.

  9. Specific features of nonvalent interactions in orthorhombic perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serezhkin, V. N.; Pushkin, D. V.; Serezhkina, L. B.

    2014-07-01

    It is established that isostructural orthorhombic perovskites ABO3 (sp. gr. Pnma in different systems, no. 62, Z = 4), depending on the specificity of nonvalent interactions (which determine the combinatorial-topological type of the Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra (VDPs) of four basis atoms), are divided into ten different stereotypes. It is shown by the example of 259 perovskites belonging to the DyCrO3 stereotype that VDP characteristics can be used to quantitatively estimate the distortion of BO6 octahedra, including that caused by the Jahn-Teller effect. It is found that one of the causes of the distortion of the coordination polyhedra of atoms in the structure of orthorhombic perovskites is heteroatomic metal-metal interactions, for which the interatomic distances are much shorter than the sum of the Slater radii of A and B atoms.

  10. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkamp, Max A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2016-06-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide (perovskite) is a leading candidate for use in next-generation solar cell devices. However, the photophysics responsible for its strong photovoltaic qualities are not fully understood. Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) absorption was used to investigate electron and hole dynamics in perovskite by observing transitions from a common inner-shell level (I 4d) to the valence and conduction bands. Ultrashort (30 fs) pulses of XUV radiation with a broad spectrum (40-70 eV) were generated via high-harmonic generation using a tabletop instrument. Transient absorption measurements with visible pump and XUV probe directly observed the relaxation of charge carriers in perovskite after above-band excitation in the femtosecond and picosecond time ranges.

  11. Photon recycling in lead iodide perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Pazos-Outón, Luis M; Szumilo, Monika; Lamboll, Robin; Richter, Johannes M; Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Abdi-Jalebi, Mojtaba; Beeson, Harry J; Vrućinić, Milan; Alsari, Mejd; Snaith, Henry J; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H; Deschler, Felix

    2016-03-25

    Lead-halide perovskites have emerged as high-performance photovoltaic materials. We mapped the propagation of photogenerated luminescence and charges from a local photoexcitation spot in thin films of lead tri-iodide perovskites. We observed light emission at distances of ≥50 micrometers and found that the peak of the internal photon spectrum red-shifts from 765 to ≥800 nanometers. We used a lateral-contact solar cell with selective electron- and hole-collecting contacts and observed that charge extraction for photoexcitation >50 micrometers away from the contacts arose from repeated recycling between photons and electron-hole pairs. Thus, energy transport is not limited by diffusive charge transport but can occur over long distances through multiple absorption-diffusion-emission events. This process creates high excitation densities within the perovskite layer and allows high open-circuit voltages.

  12. Exciton localization in solution-processed organolead trihalide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    He, Haiping; Yu, Qianqian; Li, Hui; Li, Jing; Si, Junjie; Jin, Yizheng; Wang, Nana; Wang, Jianpu; He, Jingwen; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Zhizhen

    2016-01-01

    Organolead trihalide perovskites have attracted great attention due to the stunning advances in both photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. However, the photophysical properties, especially the recombination dynamics of photogenerated carriers, of this class of materials are controversial. Here we report that under an excitation level close to the working regime of solar cells, the recombination of photogenerated carriers in solution-processed methylammonium–lead–halide films is dominated by excitons weakly localized in band tail states. This scenario is evidenced by experiments of spectral-dependent luminescence decay, excitation density-dependent luminescence and frequency-dependent terahertz photoconductivity. The exciton localization effect is found to be general for several solution-processed hybrid perovskite films prepared by different methods. Our results provide insights into the charge transport and recombination mechanism in perovskite films and help to unravel their potential for high-performance optoelectronic devices. PMID:26996605

  13. A polymer scaffold for self-healing perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yicheng; Wei, Jing; Li, Heng; Yan, Yin; Zhou, Wenke; Yu, Dapeng; Zhao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Advancing of the lead halide perovskite solar cells towards photovoltaic market demands large-scale devices of high-power conversion efficiency, high reproducibility and stability via low-cost fabrication technology, and in particular resistance to humid environment for long-time operation. Here we achieve uniform perovskite film based on a novel polymer-scaffold architecture via a mild-temperature process. These solar cells exhibit efficiency of up to ∼ 16% with small variation. The unencapsulated devices retain high output for up to 300 h in highly humid environment (70% relative humidity). Moreover, they show strong humidity resistant and self-healing behaviour, recovering rapidly after removing from water vapour. Not only the film can self-heal in this case, but the corresponding devices can present power conversion efficiency recovery after the water vapour is removed. Our work demonstrates the value of cheap, long chain and hygroscopic polymer scaffold in perovskite solar cells towards commercialization. PMID:26732479

  14. A polymer scaffold for self-healing perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yicheng; Wei, Jing; Li, Heng; Yan, Yin; Zhou, Wenke; Yu, Dapeng; Zhao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Advancing of the lead halide perovskite solar cells towards photovoltaic market demands large-scale devices of high-power conversion efficiency, high reproducibility and stability via low-cost fabrication technology, and in particular resistance to humid environment for long-time operation. Here we achieve uniform perovskite film based on a novel polymer-scaffold architecture via a mild-temperature process. These solar cells exhibit efficiency of up to ∼16% with small variation. The unencapsulated devices retain high output for up to 300 h in highly humid environment (70% relative humidity). Moreover, they show strong humidity resistant and self-healing behaviour, recovering rapidly after removing from water vapour. Not only the film can self-heal in this case, but the corresponding devices can present power conversion efficiency recovery after the water vapour is removed. Our work demonstrates the value of cheap, long chain and hygroscopic polymer scaffold in perovskite solar cells towards commercialization. PMID:26732479

  15. Tracking the formation of methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijia E-mail: jmcleod@suda.edu.cn; McLeod, John A. E-mail: jmcleod@suda.edu.cn; Wang, Rongbin; Shen, Pengfei; Duhm, Steffen

    2015-08-10

    The formation mechanism of perovskite methylammonium lead triiodide (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) was studied with in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on successive depositions of thermally evaporated methylammonium iodide (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I) on a lead iodide (PbI{sub 2}) film. This deposition method mimics the “two-step” synthesis method commonly used in device fabrication. We find that several competing processes occur during the formation of perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}. Our most important finding is that during vapour deposition of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I onto PbI{sub 2}, at least two carbon species are present in the resulting material, while only one nitrogen species is present. This suggests that CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I can dissociate during the transition to a perovskite phase, and some of the resulting molecules can be incorporated into the perovskite. The effect of partial CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3} substitution with CH{sub 3} was evaluated, and electronic structure calculations show that CH{sub 3} defects would impact the photovoltaic performance in perovskite solar cells. The possibility that not all A sites in the APbI{sub 3} perovskite are occupied by CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3} is therefore an important consideration when evaluating the performance of organometallic trihalide solar cells synthesized using typical approaches.

  16. Two-Dimensional Layered Oxide Structures Tailored by Self-Assembled Layer Stacking via Interfacial Strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Mingtao; Chen, Aiping; Li, Leigang; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Xia, Zhenhai; Lu, Ping; Boullay, Philippe; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Jia, Quanxi; Zhou, Honghui; Narayan, Jagdish; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-07-01

    Study of layered complex oxides emerge as one of leading topics in fundamental materials science because of the strong interplay among intrinsic charge, spin, orbital, and lattice. As a fundamental basis of heteroepitaxial thin film growth, interfacial strain can be used to design materials that exhibit new phenomena beyond their conventional forms. Here, we report a strain-driven self-assembly of bismuth-based supercell (SC) with a two-dimensional (2D) layered structure. With combined experimental analysis and first-principles calculations, we investigated the full SC structure and elucidated the fundamental growth mechanism achieved by the strain-enabled self-assembled atomic layer stacking. The unique SC structure exhibits room-temperature ferroelectricity, enhanced magnetic responses, and a distinct optical bandgap from the conventional double perovskite structure. This study reveals the important role of interfacial strain modulation and atomic rearrangement in self-assembling a layered singe-phase multiferroic thin film, which opens up a promising avenue in the search for and design of novel 2D layered complex oxides with enormous promise. PMID:27295399

  17. Two-Dimensional Layered Oxide Structures Tailored by Self-Assembled Layer Stacking via Interfacial Strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Mingtao; Chen, Aiping; Li, Leigang; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Xia, Zhenhai; Lu, Ping; Boullay, Philippe; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Jia, Quanxi; Zhou, Honghui; Narayan, Jagdish; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-07-01

    Study of layered complex oxides emerge as one of leading topics in fundamental materials science because of the strong interplay among intrinsic charge, spin, orbital, and lattice. As a fundamental basis of heteroepitaxial thin film growth, interfacial strain can be used to design materials that exhibit new phenomena beyond their conventional forms. Here, we report a strain-driven self-assembly of bismuth-based supercell (SC) with a two-dimensional (2D) layered structure. With combined experimental analysis and first-principles calculations, we investigated the full SC structure and elucidated the fundamental growth mechanism achieved by the strain-enabled self-assembled atomic layer stacking. The unique SC structure exhibits room-temperature ferroelectricity, enhanced magnetic responses, and a distinct optical bandgap from the conventional double perovskite structure. This study reveals the important role of interfacial strain modulation and atomic rearrangement in self-assembling a layered singe-phase multiferroic thin film, which opens up a promising avenue in the search for and design of novel 2D layered complex oxides with enormous promise.

  18. Plasmonic-enhanced perovskite-graphene hybrid photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenhua; Aigouy, Lionel; Chen, Zhuoying

    2016-03-01

    The surface plasmonic effect of metal nanostructures is a promising method to boost the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and photodetectors. In this report, gold nanoparticles with surface plasmon resonance localized at about 530 nm were synthesized and integrated into graphene/methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) hybrid photodetectors. Compared with pristine graphene-CH3NH3PbI3 devices, a device with gold nanoparticles embedded has a doubly higher photo-responsivity as well as a faster photoresponse speed. The present devices adopt a unique configuration with gold nanoparticles physically separated from the light harvesting component, i.e., the perovskite layer by graphene. Advantages are revealed through a series of characterization techniques and analyses. First, thanks to the tiny thickness of graphene, the plasmonic effect of gold nanoparticles can effectively enhance the near-field of perovskite and thus facilitate light-harvesting. Second, the enhanced light-harvesting in perovskite happens very close to this interface where photo-induced carriers have relatively short paths to diffuse toward graphene, favoring a fast photo-response. This work demonstrates a feasible and inspiring strategy to improve the performance of photodetectors through the surface plasmonic effect of metallic nanostructures.The surface plasmonic effect of metal nanostructures is a promising method to boost the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and photodetectors. In this report, gold nanoparticles with surface plasmon resonance localized at about 530 nm were synthesized and integrated into graphene/methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) hybrid photodetectors. Compared with pristine graphene-CH3NH3PbI3 devices, a device with gold nanoparticles embedded has a doubly higher photo-responsivity as well as a faster photoresponse speed. The present devices adopt a unique configuration with gold nanoparticles physically

  19. The Effect of Al on the Compressibility of Silicate Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M. J.; Kubo, A.; Yoshino, T.; Koga, K. T.; Ohishi, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Experimental data on compressibility of aluminous silicate perovskite show widely disparate results. Several studies show that Al causes a dramatic increase in compressibility1-3, while another study indicates a mild decrease in compressibility4. Here we report new results for the effect of Al on the room-temperature compressibility of perovskite using in situ X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell from 30 to 100 GPa. We studied compressibility of perovskite in the system MgSiO3-Al2O3 in compositions with 0 to 25 mol% Al. Perovskite was synthesized from starting glasses using laser-heating in the DAC, with KBr as a pressure medium. Diffraction patterns were obtained using monochromatic radiation and an imaging plate detector at beamline BL10XU, SPring8, Japan. Addition of Al into the perovskite structure causes systematic increases in orthorhombic distortion and unit cell volume at ambient conditions (V0). Compression of the perovskite unit cell is anisotropic, with the a axis about 25% and 3% more compressive than the b and c axes, respectively. The magnitude of orthorhombic distortion increases with pressure, but aluminous perovskite remains stable to at least 100 GPa. Our results show that Al causes only a mild increase in compressibility, with the bulk modulus (K0) decreasing at a rate of 0.7 GPa/0.01 XAl. This increase in compressibility is consistent with recent ab initio calculations if Al mixes into both the 6- and 8-coordinated sites by coupled substitution5, where 2 Al3+ = Mg2+ + Si4+. Our results together with those of [4] indicate that this substitution mechanism predominates throughout the lower mantle. Previous mineralogic models indicating the upper and lower mantle are compositionally similar in terms of major elements remain effectively unchanged because solution of 5 mol% Al into perovskite has a minor effect on density. 1. Zhang & Weidner (1999). Science 284, 782-784. 2. Kubo et al. (2000) Proc. Jap. Acad. 76B, 103-107. 3. Daniel et al

  20. Guest-Activated Forbidden Tilts in a Molecular Perovskite Analogue.

    PubMed

    Duyker, Samuel G; Hill, Joshua A; Howard, Christopher J; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2016-09-01

    The manipulation of distortions in perovskite structures is critical to tailoring the properties of these materials for a variety of applications. Here we demonstrate a violation of established octahedral tilt rules in the double perovskite analogue (NH4)2SrFe(CN)6·2H2O. The forbidden tilt pattern we observe arises through coupling to hydration-driven Jahn-Teller-like distortions of the Sr coordination environment. Access to novel distortion mechanisms and the ability to switch these distortions on and off through chemical modification fundamentally expands the toolbox of techniques available for engineering symmetry-breaking processes in solid materials. PMID:27533044

  1. Trait stacking via targeted genome editing.

    PubMed

    Ainley, William M; Sastry-Dent, Lakshmi; Welter, Mary E; Murray, Michael G; Zeitler, Bryan; Amora, Rainier; Corbin, David R; Miles, Rebecca R; Arnold, Nicole L; Strange, Tonya L; Simpson, Matthew A; Cao, Zehui; Carroll, Carley; Pawelczak, Katherine S; Blue, Ryan; West, Kim; Rowland, Lynn M; Perkins, Douglas; Samuel, Pon; Dewes, Cristie M; Shen, Liu; Sriram, Shreedharan; Evans, Steven L; Rebar, Edward J; Zhang, Lei; Gregory, Phillip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Webb, Steven R; Petolino, Joseph F

    2013-12-01

    Modern agriculture demands crops carrying multiple traits. The current paradigm of randomly integrating and sorting independently segregating transgenes creates severe downstream breeding challenges. A versatile, generally applicable solution is hereby provided: the combination of high-efficiency targeted genome editing driven by engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) with modular 'trait landing pads' (TLPs) that allow 'mix-and-match', on-demand transgene integration and trait stacking in crop plants. We illustrate the utility of nuclease-driven TLP technology by applying it to the stacking of herbicide resistance traits. We first integrated into the maize genome an herbicide resistance gene, pat, flanked with a TLP (ZFN target sites and sequences homologous to incoming DNA) using WHISKERS™-mediated transformation of embryogenic suspension cultures. We established a method for targeted transgene integration based on microparticle bombardment of immature embryos and used it to deliver a second trait precisely into the TLP via cotransformation with a donor DNA containing a second herbicide resistance gene, aad1, flanked by sequences homologous to the integrated TLP along with a corresponding ZFN expression construct. Remarkably, up to 5% of the embryo-derived transgenic events integrated the aad1 transgene precisely at the TLP, that is, directly adjacent to the pat transgene. Importantly and consistent with the juxtaposition achieved via nuclease-driven TLP technology, both herbicide resistance traits cosegregated in subsequent generations, thereby demonstrating linkage of the two independently transformed transgenes. Because ZFN-mediated targeted transgene integration is becoming applicable across an increasing number of crop species, this work exemplifies a simple, facile and rapid approach to trait stacking.

  2. Pathways toward high-performance perovskite solar cells: review of recent advances in organo-metal halide perovskites for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhaoning; Watthage, Suneth C.; Phillips, Adam B.; Heben, Michael J.

    2016-04-01

    Organo-metal halide perovskite-based solar cells have been the focus of intense research over the past five years, and power conversion efficiencies have rapidly been improved from 3.8 to >21%. This article reviews major advances in perovskite solar cells that have contributed to the recent efficiency enhancements, including the evolution of device architecture, the development of material deposition processes, and the advanced device engineering techniques aiming to improve control over morphology, crystallinity, composition, and the interface properties of the perovskite thin films. The challenges and future directions for perovskite solar cell research and development are also discussed.

  3. Performance of low resistance microchannel plate stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Stock, J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an evaluation of three sets of low resistance microchannel plate (MCP) stacks; the tests encompassed gain, pulse-height distribution, background rate, event rate capacity as a function of illuminated area, and performance changes due to high temperature bakeout and high flux UV scrub. The MCPs are found to heat up, requiring from minutes to hours to reach stabilization. The event rate is strongly dependent on the size of the area being illuminated, with larger areas experiencing a gain drop onset at lower rates than smaller areas.

  4. New calculational technique for multilayer stacks.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Desandre, L F

    1987-08-01

    We introduce a new calculational technique for multilayer stacks that avoids numerical instability problems inherent in the well-known characteristic matrix technique when evanescent waves are present. The new technique is based on R matrix propagation algorithms in which the impedance of the multilayer rather than the admittance is propagated. The relation between the new R matrix and the characteristic matrix techniques is given as well as the criteria for choosing which technique to employ in a given problem. Several simple examples are given to illustrate how the R matrix propagation technique is implemented.

  5. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-04-01

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  6. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  7. Fuel cell stack with passive air supply

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-01-17

    A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

  8. Electrical conductivity of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 Perovskite and a Perovskite-dominated assemblage at lower mantle conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements of Perovskite and a Perovskite-dominated assemblage synthesized from pyroxene and olivine demonstrate that these high-pressure phases are insulating to pressures of 82 GPa and temperatures of 4500 K. Assuming an anhydrous upper mantle composition, the result provides an upper bound of 0.01 S/m for the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle between depths of 700 and 1900 km. This is 2 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than previous estimates of lower-mantle conductivity derived from studies of geomagnetic secular variations.

  9. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Neutzler, Jay K.

    1997-01-01

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. The fuel distribution manifold is formed from a hydrophilic-like material to redistribute water produced by fuel and oxygen reacting at the cathode. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  10. High performance zinc air fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xizhong; Song, Mancun; Xu, Huachi

    2014-03-01

    A zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) stack with inexpensive manganese dioxide (MnO2) as the catalyst is designed, in which the circulation flowing potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte carries the reaction product away and acts as a coolant. Experiments are carried out to investigate the characteristics of polarization, constant current discharge and dynamic response, as well as the factors affecting the performance and uniformity of individual cells in the stack. The results reveal that the peak power density can be as high as 435 mW cm-2 according to the area of the air cathode sheet, and the influence factors on cell performance and uniformity are cell locations, filled state of zinc pellets, contact resistance, flow rates of electrolyte and air. It is also shown that the time needed for voltages to reach steady state and that for current step-up or current step-down are both in milliseconds, indicating the ZAFC can be excellently applied to vehicles with rapid dynamic response demands.

  11. PBFA-2 vacuum insulator stack failure mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, M. A.

    The BPFA-II accelerator includes a large-radius, vertical-axis vacuum insulator stack. The possible failure of the acrylic rings in the stack from electron- or gamma-induced charge buildup is being evaluated. The induced static charges could remain for many hours, and either type of irradiation might cause dendrites to form. Aluminum grading rings sandwiched between the acrylic affect charge accumulation; the acrylic would preferentially break down to these grading rings. The charge buildup and the bremsstrahlung dose could depend critically upon the directionality and position of the electron loss. The effects of electron loss that occurs in the vicinity of the ion diode, where the electrons have energies of about 30 MeV are considered. Monte Carlo electron-photon transport calculations indicate that the bremsstrahlung dose expected in an acrylic ring once diode experiments begin in 1986 could be as much as 5 krads per shot, with roughly half of the photon energy above 5 MeV. Moreover, the calculation indicate that the charge deposition in an individual acrylic ring might exceed 2x10 to the 11 electrons/sq cm.

  12. Macroscopic Velocity Amplification in Stacked Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Srividya; White, Gary

    2015-04-01

    When a small sphere rests atop a larger sphere (for example, a basketball with a tennis ball balanced on top), and both are released from a height, the resulting ``velocity amplification'' of the small sphere when the pair rebound from a hard floor, is a staple of the physics demonstration toolkit--usually impressive, sometimes dangerous. While this phenomenon has been studied in the literature in some detail, we set out to explore this effect by constructing a device involving stacked disks falling in a plane, fashioned after an online design by Wayne Peterson of Brigham Young University. When two disks, stacked edge to edge atop one another and confined to a vertical plane, are dropped, the top disk rebounds to a much greater height than it started from, as expected. In this talk, we report on experiments conducted by dropping the disks and recording the heights to which they rise on rebound, and the comparison of these results with our theoretical predictions and computer simulations. Frances E. Walker Fellowship.

  13. Sr{sub 9}Ni{sub 6.64}O{sub 21}: A new member (n = 2) of the perovskite-related A{sub 3n+3}A{sub n}{prime}B{sub 3+n}O{sub 9+6n} family

    SciTech Connect

    Campa, J.; Gutierrez-Puebla, E.; Monge, A.

    1996-10-01

    Crystals of a new phase Sr{sub 9}Ni{sub 6.64}O{sub 21} were grown. This compound in the n = 2 member of the A{sub 3n+3}A{sub n}{prime}B{sub n+3}O{sub 6n+9} series. The composition and the crystal structure have been established form X-ray single crystal diffraction data. The structure contains face-shared chains of NiO{sub 6} polyhedra parallel to the c axis and is related with hexagonal 2H polytype perovskite. Sr{sub 9}Ni{sub 6.64}O{sub 21} crystallizes in the space group R3c (No. 167) with a = 9.467(2) {angstrom}, c = 35.87(5) {angstrom}, V = 2784.(4) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 6. A comparison is made between the structure of the title compound and the other members of the series.

  14. Synthesis and structure of Ba{sub 6}Co{sub 6}ClO{sub 16}, a new cobalt oxychloride with a layered perovskite-related structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tancret, Nathalie; Roussel, Pascal; Abraham, Francis . E-mail: francis.abraham@ensc-lille.fr

    2005-10-15

    Well-developed single crystals of the title compound were prepared using a BaCl{sub 2} flux and investigated by X-ray diffraction methods using Mo(K{alpha}) radiation and a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) detector. The crystal structure was solved and refined in the hexagonal symmetry with P6-bar m2 space group, a=5.6698(2)A and c=14.4654(5)A to a final R{sub 1}=0.022 for 44 parameters with 1418 individual reflections. The structure of Ba{sub 6}Co{sub 6}ClO{sub 16}, which is related to the 6H-perovkite-type structure of BaMnO{sub 2.88}, is formed by the periodic stacking along [001] of five [BaO{sub 3}] layers separated by a [BaOCl] with a (hhhchc) stacking sequence. The [BaO{sub 3}] stacking creates tetranuclear face sharing octahedra units Co{sub 4}O{sub 15} containing Co(III) connected by dimers of corner-sharing CoO{sub 4} tetrahedra. This new oxychloride belongs to the family of compounds formulated as [BaOCl]M'{sub 2}[Ba{sub n+1}M{sub n}O{sub 3n+3}] where n represents the thickness of the octahedral string in hexagonal perovskite slabs.

  15. Emission Enhancement and Intermittency in Polycrystalline Organolead Halide Perovskite Films.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Zhong, Yu; Luna, Carlos Andres Melo; Unger, Thomas; Deichsel, Konstantin; Gräser, Anna; Köhler, Jürgen; Köhler, Anna; Hildner, Richard; Huettner, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic-organic halide organometal perovskites have demonstrated very promising performance for opto-electronic applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, lasers, single-photon sources, etc. However, the little knowledge on the underlying photophysics, especially on a microscopic scale, hampers the further improvement of devices based on this material. In this communication, correlated conventional photoluminescence (PL) characterization and wide-field PL imaging as a function of time are employed to investigate the spatially- and temporally-resolved PL in CH₃NH₃PbI3-xClx perovskite films. Along with a continuous increase of the PL intensity during light soaking, we also observe PL blinking or PL intermittency behavior in individual grains of these films. Combined with significant suppression of PL blinking in perovskite films coated with a phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer, it suggests that this PL intermittency is attributed to Auger recombination induced by photoionized defects/traps or mobile ions within grains. These defects/traps are detrimental for light conversion and can be effectively passivated by the PCBM layer. This finding paves the way to provide a guideline on the further improvement of perovskite opto-electronic devices. PMID:27548128

  16. Materials processing routes to trap-free halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Buin, Andrei; Pietsch, Patrick; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ip, Alexander H; Comin, Riccardo; Sargent, Edward H

    2014-11-12

    Photovoltaic devices based on lead iodide perovskite films have seen rapid advancements, recently achieving an impressive 17.9% certified solar power conversion efficiency. Reports have consistently emphasized that the specific choice of growth conditions and chemical precursors is central to achieving superior performance from these materials; yet the roles and mechanisms underlying the selection of materials processing route is poorly understood. Here we show that films grown under iodine-rich conditions are prone to a high density of deep electronic traps (recombination centers), while the use of a chloride precursor avoids the formation of key defects (Pb atom substituted by I) responsible for short diffusion lengths and poor photovoltaic performance. Furthermore, the lowest-energy surfaces of perovskite crystals are found to be entirely trap-free, preserving both electron and hole delocalization to a remarkable degree, helping to account for explaining the success of polycrystalline perovskite films. We construct perovskite films from I-poor conditions using a lead acetate precursor, and our measurement of a long (600 ± 40 nm) diffusion length confirms this new picture of the importance of growth conditions.

  17. Controlling Octahedral Rotations in a Perovskite via Strain Doping

    PubMed Central

    Herklotz, A.; Wong, A. T.; Meyer, T.; Biegalski, M. D.; Lee, H. N.; Ward, T. Z.

    2016-01-01

    The perovskite unit cell is the fundamental building block of many functional materials. The manipulation of this crystal structure is known to be of central importance to controlling many technologically promising phenomena related to superconductivity, multiferroicity, mangetoresistivity, and photovoltaics. The broad range of properties that this structure can exhibit is in part due to the centrally coordinated octahedra bond flexibility, which allows for a multitude of distortions from the ideal highly symmetric structure. However, continuous and fine manipulation of these distortions has never been possible. Here, we show that controlled insertion of He atoms into an epitaxial perovskite film can be used to finely tune the lattice symmetry by modifying the local distortions, i.e., octahedral bonding angle and length. Orthorhombic SrRuO3 films coherently grown on SrTiO3 substrates are used as a model system. Implanted He atoms are confirmed to induce out-of-plane strain, which provides the ability to controllably shift the bulk-like orthorhombically distorted phase to a tetragonal structure by shifting the oxygen octahedra rotation pattern. These results demonstrate that He implantation offers an entirely new pathway to strain engineering of perovskite-based complex oxide thin films, useful for creating new functionalities or properties in perovskite materials. PMID:27215804

  18. Controlling octahedral rotations in a perovskite via strain doping

    DOE PAGES

    Herklotz, Andreas; Biegalski, Michael D.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Ward, Thomas Zac; Wong, A. T.; Meyer, T.

    2016-05-24

    The perovskite unit cell is the fundamental building block of many functional materials. The manipulation of this crystal structure is known to be of central importance to controlling many technologically promising phenomena related to superconductivity, multiferroicity, mangetoresistivity, and photovoltaics. The broad range of properties that this structure can exhibit is in part due to the centrally coordinated octahedra bond flexibility, which allows for a multitude of distortions from the ideal highly symmetric structure. However, continuous and fine manipulation of these distortions has never been possible. Here, we show that controlled insertion of He atoms into an epitaxial perovskite film canmore » be used to finely tune the lattice symmetry by modifying the local distortions, i.e., octahedral bonding angle and length. Orthorhombic SrRuO3 films coherently grown on SrTiO3 substrates are used as a model system. Implanted He atoms are confirmed to induce out-of-plane strain, which provides the ability to controllably shift the bulk-like orthorhombically distorted phase to a tetragonal structure by shifting the oxygen octahedra rotation pattern. Lastly, these results demonstrate that He implantation offers an entirely new pathway to strain engineering of perovskite-based complex oxide thin films, useful for creating new functionalities or properties in perovskite materials.« less

  19. Oxide perovskite crystals for HTSC film substrates microwave applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhalla, A. S.; Guo, Ruyan

    1995-01-01

    The research focused upon generating new substrate materials for the deposition of superconducting yttrium barium cuprate (YBCO) has yielded several new hosts in complex perovskites, modified perovskites, and other structure families. New substrate candidates such as Sr(Al(1/2)Ta(1/2))O3 and Sr(Al(1/2)Nb(1/2))O3, Ba(Mg(1/3)Ta(2/3))O3 in complex oxide perovskite structure family and their solid solutions with ternary perovskite LaAlO3 and NdGaO3 are reported. Conventional ceramic processing techniques were used to fabricate dense ceramic samples. A laser heated molten zone growth system was utilized for the test-growth of these candidate materials in single crystal fiber form to determine crystallographic structure, melting point, thermal, and dielectric properties as well as to make positive identification of twin free systems. Some of those candidate materials present an excellent combination of properties suitable for microwave HTSC substrate applications.

  20. Comprehensive design of omnidirectional high-performance perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yutao; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-07-01

    The comprehensive design approach is established with coupled optical-electrical simulation for perovskite-based solar cell, which emerged as one of the most promising competitors to silicon solar cell for its low-cost fabrication and high PCE. The selection of structured surface, effect of geometry parameters, incident angle-dependence and polarization-sensitivity are considered in the simulation. The optical modeling is performed via the finite-difference time-domain method whilst the electrical properties are obtained by solving the coupled nonlinear equations of Poisson, continuity, and drift-diffusion equations. The optical and electrical performances of five different structured surfaces are compared to select a best structured surface for perovskite solar cell. The effects of the geometry parameters on the optical and electrical properties of the perovskite cell are analyzed. The results indicate that the light harvesting is obviously enhanced by the structured surface. The electrical performance can be remarkably improved due to the enhanced light harvesting of the designed best structured surface. The angle-dependence for s- and p-polarizations is investigated. The structured surface exhibits omnidirectional behavior and favorable polarization-insensitive feature within a wide incident angle range. Such a comprehensive design approach can highlight the potential of perovskite cell for power conversion in the full daylight.

  1. Degradation mechanism for planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kouhei; Furumoto, Yoshikazu; Shahiduzzaman, M.; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kohshin; Taima, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials have recently emerged as a promising cost- and energy-efficient light absorber material for photovoltaic applications. Unfortunately, perovskite solar cells have a problem with decreasing power conversion efficiency owing to their degradation in air. To clarify the cause of the degradation of perovskite solar cells, we exposed deposited CH3NH3PbI3 and HC(NH2)2PbI3 films to an O2 or (H2O+N2) atmosphere condition. Analysis of these films revealed that a large energy band gap was observed as a result of the influence of the H2O molecule in CH3NH3PbI3 and HC(NH2)2PbI3. Under the (H2O+N2) atmosphere condition, the existence of CH3NH3I and HC(NH2)2I molecules was found to affect the morphology and as well as the crystalline diffraction peak. The resultant perovskite crystalline structure was degraded by H2O molecules under the air exposure condition.

  2. Controlling Octahedral Rotations in a Perovskite via Strain Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herklotz, A.; Wong, A. T.; Meyer, T.; Biegalski, M. D.; Lee, H. N.; Ward, T. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The perovskite unit cell is the fundamental building block of many functional materials. The manipulation of this crystal structure is known to be of central importance to controlling many technologically promising phenomena related to superconductivity, multiferroicity, mangetoresistivity, and photovoltaics. The broad range of properties that this structure can exhibit is in part due to the centrally coordinated octahedra bond flexibility, which allows for a multitude of distortions from the ideal highly symmetric structure. However, continuous and fine manipulation of these distortions has never been possible. Here, we show that controlled insertion of He atoms into an epitaxial perovskite film can be used to finely tune the lattice symmetry by modifying the local distortions, i.e., octahedral bonding angle and length. Orthorhombic SrRuO3 films coherently grown on SrTiO3 substrates are used as a model system. Implanted He atoms are confirmed to induce out-of-plane strain, which provides the ability to controllably shift the bulk-like orthorhombically distorted phase to a tetragonal structure by shifting the oxygen octahedra rotation pattern. These results demonstrate that He implantation offers an entirely new pathway to strain engineering of perovskite-based complex oxide thin films, useful for creating new functionalities or properties in perovskite materials.

  3. Comprehensive design of omnidirectional high-performance perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yutao; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive design approach is established with coupled optical-electrical simulation for perovskite-based solar cell, which emerged as one of the most promising competitors to silicon solar cell for its low-cost fabrication and high PCE. The selection of structured surface, effect of geometry parameters, incident angle-dependence and polarization-sensitivity are considered in the simulation. The optical modeling is performed via the finite-difference time-domain method whilst the electrical properties are obtained by solving the coupled nonlinear equations of Poisson, continuity, and drift-diffusion equations. The optical and electrical performances of five different structured surfaces are compared to select a best structured surface for perovskite solar cell. The effects of the geometry parameters on the optical and electrical properties of the perovskite cell are analyzed. The results indicate that the light harvesting is obviously enhanced by the structured surface. The electrical performance can be remarkably improved due to the enhanced light harvesting of the designed best structured surface. The angle-dependence for s- and p-polarizations is investigated. The structured surface exhibits omnidirectional behavior and favorable polarization-insensitive feature within a wide incident angle range. Such a comprehensive design approach can highlight the potential of perovskite cell for power conversion in the full daylight. PMID:27405419

  4. Perovskite-Fullerene Hybrid Materials Eliminate Hysteresis In Planar Diodes

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Jixian; Buin, Andrei; Ip, Alexander H.; Li, Wei; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Yuan, Mingjian; Jeon, Seokmin; Ning, Zhijun; McDowell, Jeffrey; et al

    2015-03-31

    Solution-processed planar perovskite devices are highly desirable in a wide variety of optoelectronic applications; however, they are prone to hysteresis and current instabilities. Here we report the first perovskite–PCBM hybrid solid with significantly reduced hysteresis and recombination loss achieved in a single step. This new material displays an efficient electrically coupled microstructure: PCBM is homogeneously distributed throughout the film at perovskite grain boundaries. The PCBM passivates the key PbI3 antisite defects during the perovskite self-assembly, as revealed by theory and experiment. Photoluminescence transient spectroscopy proves that the PCBM phase promotes electron extraction. We showcase this mixed material in planar solarmore » cells that feature low hysteresis and enhanced photovoltage. Using conductive AFM studies, we reveal the memristive properties of perovskite films. We close by positing that PCBM, by tying up both halide-rich antisites and unincorporated halides, reduces electric field-induced anion migration that may give rise to hysteresis and unstable diode behaviour.« less

  5. Comprehensive design of omnidirectional high-performance perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yutao; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive design approach is established with coupled optical-electrical simulation for perovskite-based solar cell, which emerged as one of the most promising competitors to silicon solar cell for its low-cost fabrication and high PCE. The selection of structured surface, effect of geometry parameters, incident angle-dependence and polarization-sensitivity are considered in the simulation. The optical modeling is performed via the finite-difference time-domain method whilst the electrical properties are obtained by solving the coupled nonlinear equations of Poisson, continuity, and drift-diffusion equations. The optical and electrical performances of five different structured surfaces are compared to select a best structured surface for perovskite solar cell. The effects of the geometry parameters on the optical and electrical properties of the perovskite cell are analyzed. The results indicate that the light harvesting is obviously enhanced by the structured surface. The electrical performance can be remarkably improved due to the enhanced light harvesting of the designed best structured surface. The angle-dependence for s- and p-polarizations is investigated. The structured surface exhibits omnidirectional behavior and favorable polarization-insensitive feature within a wide incident angle range. Such a comprehensive design approach can highlight the potential of perovskite cell for power conversion in the full daylight. PMID:27405419

  6. Hysteresis, Stability, and Ion Migration in Lead Halide Perovskite Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Kenjiro; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Tripathi, Neeti; Shirai, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-16

    Ion migration has been suspected as the origin of various irreproducible and unstable properties, most notably the hysteresis, of lead halide perovskite photovoltaic (PV) cells since the early stage of the research. Although many evidence of ionic movement have been presented both numerically and experimentally, a coherent and quantitative picture that accounts for the observed irreproducible phenomena is still lacking. At the same time, however, it has been noticed that in certain types of PV cells, the hysteresis is absent or at least within the measurement reproducibility. We have previously shown that the electronic properties of hysteresis-free cells are well represented in terms of the conventional inorganic semiconductors. The reproducibility of these measurements was confirmed typically within tens of minutes under the biasing field of -1 V to +1.5 V. In order to probe the effect of ionic motion in the hysteresis-free cells, we extended the time scale and the biasing rage in the electronic measurements, from which we conclude the following: (1) From various evidence, it appears that ion migration is inevitable. However, it does not cause detrimental effects to the PV operation. (2) We propose, based on the quantitative characterization, that the degradation is more likely due to the chemical change at the interfaces between the carrier selective layers and perovskite rather than the compositional change of the lead iodide perovskite bulk. Together, they give much hope in the use of the lead iodide perovskite in the use of actual application.

  7. Krypton irradiation damage in Nd-doped zirconolite and perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoisne, C.; Stennett, M. C.; Hyatt, N. C.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.; Lee, W. E.

    2011-08-01

    Understanding the effect of radiation damage and noble gas accommodation in potential ceramic hosts for plutonium disposition is necessary to evaluate their long-term behaviour during geological disposal. Polycrystalline samples of Nd-doped zirconolite and Nd-doped perovskite were irradiated ex situ with 2 MeV Kr + at a dose of 5 × 10 15 ions cm -2 to simulate recoil of Pu nuclei during alpha decay. The feasibility of thin section preparation of both pristine and irradiated samples by Focused Ion Beam sectioning was demonstrated. After irradiation, the Nd-doped zirconolite revealed a well defined amorphous region separated from the pristine material by a thin (40-60 nm) damaged interface. The zirconolite lattice was lost in the damaged interface, but the fluorite sublattice was retained. The Nd-doped perovskite contained a defined irradiated layer composed of an amorphous region surrounded by damaged but still crystalline layers. The structural evolution of the damaged regions is consistent with a change from orthorhombic to cubic symmetry. In addition in Nd-doped perovskite, the amorphisation dose depended on crystallographic orientation and possibly sample configuration (thin section or bulk). Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy revealed Ti remained in the 4+ oxidation state but there was a change in Ti coordination in both Nd-doped perovskite and Nd-doped zirconolite associated with the crystalline to amorphous transition.

  8. Multifunctional MgO Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xudong; Dong, Haopeng; Li, Wenzhe; Li, Nan; Wang, Liduo

    2015-06-01

    A multifunctional magnesium oxide (MgO) layer was successfully introduced into perovskite solar cells (PSCs) to enhance their performance. MgO was coated onto the surface of mesoporous TiO(2) by the decomposition of magnesium acetate and, therefore, could block contact between the perovskite and TiO(2). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy showed that the amount of H(2)O/hydroxyl absorbed on the TiO(2) decreased after MgO modification. The UV/Vis absorption spectra of the perovskite with MgO modification revealed an enhanced photoelectric performance compared with that of unmodified perovskite after UV illumination. In addition to the photocurrent, the photovoltage and fill factor also showed an enhancement after modification, which resulted in an increase in the overall efficiency of the cell from 9.6 to 13.9 %. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirmed that MgO acts as an insulating layer to reduce charge recombination. PMID:25851999

  9. High-performance perovskite-graphene hybrid photodetector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngbin; Kwon, Jeong; Hwang, Euyheon; Ra, Chang-Ho; Yoo, Won Jong; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Park, Jong Hyeok; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-01-01

    A high-performance novel photodetector is demonstrated, which consists of graphene and CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite layers. The resulting hybrid photodetector exhibits a dramatically enhanced photo responsivity (180 A/W) and effective quantum efficiency (5× 10(4) %) over a broad bandwidth within the UV and visible ranges.

  10. Hysteresis, Stability, and Ion Migration in Lead Halide Perovskite Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Kenjiro; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Tripathi, Neeti; Shirai, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-16

    Ion migration has been suspected as the origin of various irreproducible and unstable properties, most notably the hysteresis, of lead halide perovskite photovoltaic (PV) cells since the early stage of the research. Although many evidence of ionic movement have been presented both numerically and experimentally, a coherent and quantitative picture that accounts for the observed irreproducible phenomena is still lacking. At the same time, however, it has been noticed that in certain types of PV cells, the hysteresis is absent or at least within the measurement reproducibility. We have previously shown that the electronic properties of hysteresis-free cells are well represented in terms of the conventional inorganic semiconductors. The reproducibility of these measurements was confirmed typically within tens of minutes under the biasing field of -1 V to +1.5 V. In order to probe the effect of ionic motion in the hysteresis-free cells, we extended the time scale and the biasing rage in the electronic measurements, from which we conclude the following: (1) From various evidence, it appears that ion migration is inevitable. However, it does not cause detrimental effects to the PV operation. (2) We propose, based on the quantitative characterization, that the degradation is more likely due to the chemical change at the interfaces between the carrier selective layers and perovskite rather than the compositional change of the lead iodide perovskite bulk. Together, they give much hope in the use of the lead iodide perovskite in the use of actual application. PMID:27227427

  11. Multifunctional MgO Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xudong; Dong, Haopeng; Li, Wenzhe; Li, Nan; Wang, Liduo

    2015-06-01

    A multifunctional magnesium oxide (MgO) layer was successfully introduced into perovskite solar cells (PSCs) to enhance their performance. MgO was coated onto the surface of mesoporous TiO(2) by the decomposition of magnesium acetate and, therefore, could block contact between the perovskite and TiO(2). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy showed that the amount of H(2)O/hydroxyl absorbed on the TiO(2) decreased after MgO modification. The UV/Vis absorption spectra of the perovskite with MgO modification revealed an enhanced photoelectric performance compared with that of unmodified perovskite after UV illumination. In addition to the photocurrent, the photovoltage and fill factor also showed an enhancement after modification, which resulted in an increase in the overall efficiency of the cell from 9.6 to 13.9 %. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirmed that MgO acts as an insulating layer to reduce charge recombination.

  12. Two-Dimensional Halide Perovskites: Tuning Electronic Activities of Defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2016-05-11

    Two-dimensional (2D) halide perovskites are emerging as promising candidates for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. To realize their full potential, it is important to understand the role of those defects that can strongly impact material properties. In contrast to other popular 2D semiconductors (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenides MX2) for which defects typically induce harmful traps, we show that the electronic activities of defects in 2D perovskites are significantly tunable. For example, even with a fixed lattice orientation one can change the synthesis conditions to convert a line defect (edge or grain boundary) from electron acceptor to inactive site without deep gap states. We show that this difference originates from the enhanced ionic bonding in these perovskites compared with MX2. The donors tend to have high formation energies and the harmful defects are difficult to form at a low halide chemical potential. Thus, we unveil unique properties of defects in 2D perovskites and suggest practical routes to improve them.

  13. Cassette less SOFC stack and method of assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhardt, Kerry D

    2014-11-18

    A cassette less SOFC assembly and a method for creating such an assembly. The SOFC stack is characterized by an electrically isolated stack current path which allows welded interconnection between frame portions of the stack. In one embodiment electrically isolating a current path comprises the step of sealing a interconnect plate to a interconnect plate frame with an insulating seal. This enables the current path portion to be isolated from the structural frame an enables the cell frame to be welded together.

  14. Co-flow planar SOFC fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-30

    A co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell stack with an integral, internal manifold and a casing/holder to separately seal the cell. This construction improves sealing and gas flow, and provides for easy manifolding of cell stacks. In addition, the stack construction has the potential for an improved durability and operation with an additional increase in cell efficiency. The co-flow arrangement can be effectively utilized in other electrochemical systems requiring gas-proof separation of gases.

  15. Development of the electric utility dispersed use PAFC stack

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Kotani, Ikuo; Morotomi, Isamu

    1996-12-31

    Kansai Electric Power Co. and Mitsubishi Electric Co. have been developing the electric utility dispersed use PAFC stack operated under the ambient pressure. The new cell design have been developed, so that the large scale cell (1 m{sup 2} size) was adopted for the stack. To confirm the performance and the stability of the 1 m{sup 2} scale cell design, the short stack study had been performed.

  16. Compact bipolar plate-free direct methanol fuel cell stacks.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Takahashi, Motohiro; Nagao, Masahiro; Hibino, Takashi

    2011-05-14

    Fuel cells with a PtAu/C anode and a Pr-doped Mn(2)O(3)/C cathode were stacked without using a bipolar plate, and their discharge properties were investigated in a methanol aqueous solution bubbled with air. A three-cell stack exhibited a stack voltage of 2330 mV and a power output of 21 mW. PMID:21451850

  17. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOEpatents

    Katz, M.; Schroll, C.R.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention relates to a device for preventing the electrical shorting of a stack of electrolytic cells during an extended period of operation. The device has application to fuel cell and other electrolytic cell stacks operating in low or high temperature corrosive environments. It is of particular importance for use in a stack of fuel cells operating with molten metal carbonate electrolyte for the production of electric power. Also, the device may have application in similar technology involving stacks of electrolytic cells for electrolysis to decompose chemical compounds.

  18. Temperature-independent sensors based on perovskite-type oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaza, F.; Frangini, S.; Leoncini, J.; Luisetto, I.; Masci, A.; Pasquali, M.; Tuti, S.

    2014-06-01

    The need of energy security and environment sustainability drives toward the development of energy technology in order to enhance the performance of internal combustion engines. Gas sensors play a key role for controlling the fuel oxygen ratio and monitoring the pollution emissions. The perovskite-type oxides can be synthesized for an extremely wide variety of combinations of chemical elements, allowing to design materials with suitable properties for sensing application. Lanthanum strontium ferrites, such as La0.7Sr0.3FeO3, are suitable oxygen sensing materials with temperature-independence conductivity, but they have low chemical stability under reducing conditions. The addition of aluminum into the perovskite structure improves the material properties in order to develop suitable oxygen sensing probes for lean burn engine control systems. Perovskite-type oxides with formula (La0.7Sr0.3)(AlxFe1-x)O3 was synthesized by the citrate-nitrate combustion synthesis method. XRD analyses, show that it was synthesized a phase-pure powder belonging to the perovskite structure. Aluminum affects both the unit cell parameters, by shrinking the unit cell, and the powder morphology, by promoting the synthesis of particles with small crystallite size and large specific surface area. The partial substitution of iron with aluminum improves the chemical stability under reducing gas conditions and modulates the oxygen sensitivity by affecting the relative amount of Fe4+ and Fe3+, as confirmed from TPR profiles. In the same time, the addition of aluminum does not affects the temperature-independent properties of lanthanum strontium ferrites. Indeed, the electrical measurements show that (La0.7Sr0.3)(AlxFe1-x)O3 perovskites have temperature-independence conductivity from 900 K.

  19. Temperature-independent sensors based on perovskite-type oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Zaza, F.; Frangini, S.; Masci, A.; Leoncini, J.; Pasquali, M.; Luisetto, I.; Tuti, S.

    2014-06-19

    The need of energy security and environment sustainability drives toward the development of energy technology in order to enhance the performance of internal combustion engines. Gas sensors play a key role for controlling the fuel oxygen ratio and monitoring the pollution emissions. The perovskite-type oxides can be synthesized for an extremely wide variety of combinations of chemical elements, allowing to design materials with suitable properties for sensing application. Lanthanum strontium ferrites, such as La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}FeO{sub 3}, are suitable oxygen sensing materials with temperature-independence conductivity, but they have low chemical stability under reducing conditions. The addition of aluminum into the perovskite structure improves the material properties in order to develop suitable oxygen sensing probes for lean burn engine control systems. Perovskite-type oxides with formula (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3})(Al{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x})O{sub 3} was synthesized by the citrate-nitrate combustion synthesis method. XRD analyses, show that it was synthesized a phase-pure powder belonging to the perovskite structure. Aluminum affects both the unit cell parameters, by shrinking the unit cell, and the powder morphology, by promoting the synthesis of particles with small crystallite size and large specific surface area. The partial substitution of iron with aluminum improves the chemical stability under reducing gas conditions and modulates the oxygen sensitivity by affecting the relative amount of Fe{sup 4+} and Fe{sup 3+}, as confirmed from TPR profiles. In the same time, the addition of aluminum does not affects the temperature-independent properties of lanthanum strontium ferrites. Indeed, the electrical measurements show that (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3})(Al{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x})O{sub 3} perovskites have temperature-independence conductivity from 900 K.

  20. High-performance cadmium sulphide-based planar perovskite solar cell and the cadmium sulphide/perovskite interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haitao; Sun, Weihai; Li, Yunlong; Yan, Weibo; Yu, Pingrong; Zhou, Huanping; Bian, Zuqiang; Huang, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Planar heterojunction perovskite solar cell is one of the most competitive photovoltaic technologies, while charge transport materials play a crucial role. We successfully demonstrated an effective electron transport material, namely chemical bath deposited cadmium sulphide (CdS) film under low temperature, in perovskite-based solar cells. Power conversion efficiency of 16.1% has been achieved, which is comparable to that of devices based on TiO2 film prepared via low-temperature processes. Electronic impedance spectra reveal that the CdS-based device presents a higher recombination resistance than TiO2-based devices, which reduces carrier recombination and increases the open circuit voltage. The interface between CdS and perovskite was characterized with improved characteristics when compared to TiO2, e.g., efficient carrier extraction and reduced surface defect-associated degradation in the devices, which help to alleviate anomalous hysteresis and long-term instability. Furthermore, the entire device was fabricated via solution process with a processing temperature below 100°C, suggesting a promising method of further development of perovskite solar cells and commercial manufacturing.

  1. Elasticity of AlFeO3 and FeAlO3 perovskite and post-perovskite from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracas, R.

    2010-10-01

    We use state-of-the-art ab initio calculations based on the generalized gradient approximation of the density functional theory in the planar augmented wavefunction formalism to determine the elastic constants tensor of perovskite and post-perovskite with formulas AlFeO3 and FeAlO3 in which Fe or Al respectively occupy only octahedral sites, for the stable magnetic configurations. The phase transition between perovskite and post-perovskite is associated with a site exchange, during which Fe from the inter-octahedral site in perovskite moves into the octahedral site in post-perovskite. Following this transition path the elastic moduli show positive jumps, considerably larger than for MgSiO3. The phase transition is marked by a positive jump of 0.04 km/s (0.33%) in the velocity of the compressional waves and by a negative jump of -0.15 km/s (-1.87%) in shear wave velocity. We find that the effects of the Mg + Si <=> Al + Fe substitution on the seismic properties of MgSiO3 perovskite and post-perovskite depend on the crystallography of the substitution, namely the position the exchanged cations take in the structure.

  2. Simultaneous stack gas scrubbing wastewater purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Variations of a process for removing sulfur dioxide from stack gases and using it to treat municipal waste water are described. The once-through system lowers the pH of the scrubbing water from minor depressions to a pH of about 2.5 under certain conditions. A recycle system uses iron for catalytic oxidation of sulfurous acid to sulfuric acid allowing very large amounts of sulfur dioxide to be absorbed in a small portion of water. The partial recycle system uses municipal wastewater and iron as a scrubbing medium, followed by neutralization of the wastewater with lime to produce an iron hydroxide precipitation which, when removed, produces tertiary quality treated wastewater. The SO2 scrubber is described, test results are analyzed, and a preliminary capital cost estimate for the three processes is included.

  3. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation.

    PubMed

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo.

  4. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16231.001 PMID:27542195

  5. Considerations of Glass Sealing SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Paxton, Dean M.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-08-31

    Due to their TEC matching to PEN components, excellent oxidation resistance, low cost and good fabricability, stainless steels have been used as the interconnect materials in planar SOFC. For being hermetical, the stainless steel interconnect ought to be sealed to YSZ electrolyte and/or another piece of metallic interconnect, usually using a sealing glass. The seal performance, which is critical factor to determine the reliability and durability of SOFC stack, largely depends on the chemical compatibility between the sealing glass and stainless steel. In this work, the ferritic stainless steel 446 and a barium-aluminosilicate base glass have been taken as an example for metallic interconnects and sealing glass, respectively, and the corrosion at the interface of metal and sealing glass has been investigated and understood. The methodology and results of the microscopic analysis and thermodynamic modeling will be presented, and the mechanism of corrosion at the interface will be discussed as well.

  6. Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Keolian, Robert M.; Swift, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    A thermoacoustic stack for connecting two heat exchangers in a thermoacoustic energy converter provides a convex fluid-solid interface in a plane perpendicular to an axis for acoustic oscillation of fluid between the two heat exchangers. The convex surfaces increase the ratio of the fluid volume in the effective thermoacoustic volume that is displaced from the convex surface to the fluid volume that is adjacent the surface within which viscous energy losses occur. Increasing the volume ratio results in an increase in the ratio of transferred thermal energy to viscous energy losses, with a concomitant increase in operating efficiency of the thermoacoustic converter. The convex surfaces may be easily provided by a pin array having elements arranged parallel to the direction of acoustic oscillations and with effective radial dimensions much smaller than the thicknesses of the viscous energy loss and thermoacoustic energy transfer volumes.

  7. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation.

    PubMed

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo. PMID:27542195

  8. Roles, Stacks, Histories: A Triple for Hoare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgström, Johannes; Gordon, Andrew D.; Pucella, Riccardo

    Behavioural type and effect systems regulate properties such as adherence to object and communication protocols, dynamic security policies, avoidance of race conditions, and many others. Typically, each system is based on some specific syntax of constraints, and is checked with an ad hoc solver. Instead, weadvocate types refined with first-order logic formulas as a basis for behavioural type systems, and general purpose automated theorem provers as an effective means of checking programs. To illustrate this approach, we define a triple of security-related type systems: for role-based access control, for stack inspection, and for history-based access control. The three are all instances of a refined state monad. Our semantics allows a precise comparison of the similarities and differences of these mechanisms. In our examples, the benefit of behavioural type-checking is to rule out the possibility of unexpected security exceptions, a common problem with code-based access control.

  9. Manifold seal structure for fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Collins, William P.

    1988-01-01

    The seal between the sides of a fuel cell stack and the gas manifolds is improved by adding a mechanical interlock between the adhesive sealing strip and the abutting surface of the manifolds. The adhesive is a material which can flow to some extent when under compression, and the mechanical interlock is formed providing small openings in the portion of the manifold which abuts the adhesive strip. When the manifolds are pressed against the adhesive strips, the latter will flow into and through the manifold openings to form buttons or ribs which mechanically interlock with the manifolds. These buttons or ribs increase the bond between the manifolds and adhesive, which previously relied solely on the adhesive nature of the adhesive.

  10. Stacking of silicon pore optics for IXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collon, Maximilien J.; Guenther, Ramses; Ackermann, Marcelo; Partapsing, Rakesh; Kelly, Chris; Beijersbergen, Marco W.; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wallace, Kotska; Olde Riekerink, Mark; Mueller, Peter; Krumrey, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Silicon pore optics is a technology developed to enable future large area X-ray telescopes, such as the International Xray Observatory (IXO), a candidate mission in the ESA Space Science Programme 'Cosmic Visions 2015-2025'. IXO uses nested mirrors in Wolter-I configuration to focus grazing incidence X-ray photons on a detector plane. The IXO mirrors will have to meet stringent performance requirements including an effective area of ~3 m2 at 1.25 keV and ~1 m2 at 6 keV and angular resolution better than 5 arc seconds. To achieve the collecting area requires a total polished mirror surface area of ~1300 m2 with a surface roughness better than 0.5 nm rms. By using commercial high-quality 12" silicon wafers which are diced, structured, wedged, coated, bent and stacked the stringent performance requirements of IXO can be attained without any costly polishing steps. Two of these stacks are then assembled into a co-aligned mirror module, which is a complete X-ray imaging system. Included in the mirror module are the isostatic mounting points, providing a reliable interface to the telescope. Hundreds of such mirror modules are finally integrated into petals, and mounted onto the spacecraft to form an X-ray optic of four meters in diameter. In this paper we will present the silicon pore optics assembly process and latest X-ray results. The required metrology is described in detail and experimental methods are shown, which allow to assess the quality of the HPOs during production and to predict the performance when measured in synchrotron radiation facilities.

  11. Dielectric elastomer generators that stack up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, T. G.; Rosset, S.; Anderson, I. A.; Shea, H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and testing of a soft dielectric elastomer power generator with a volume of less than 1 cm3. The generator is well suited to harvest energy from ambient and from human body motion as it can harvest from low frequency (sub-Hz) motions, and is compact and lightweight. Dielectric elastomers are highly stretchable variable capacitors. Electrical energy is produced when the deformation of a stretched, charged dielectric elastomer is relaxed; like-charges are compressed together and opposite-charges are pushed apart, resulting in an increased voltage. This technology provides an opportunity to produce soft, high energy density generators with unparalleled robustness. Two major issues block this goal: current configurations require rigid frames that maintain the dielectric elastomer in a prestretched state, and high energy densities have come at the expense of short lifetime. This paper presents a self-supporting stacked generator configuration which does not require rigid frames. The generator consists of 48 generator films stacked on top of each other, resulting in a structure that fits within an 11 mm diameter footprint while containing enough active material to produce useful power. To ensure sustainable power production, we also present a mathematical model for designing the electronic control of the generator which optimizes energy production while limiting the electrical stress on the generator below failure limits. When cyclically compressed at 1.6 Hz, our generator produced 1.8 mW of power, which is sufficient for many low-power wireless sensor nodes. This performance compares favorably with similarly scaled electromagnetic, piezoelectric, and electrostatic generators. The generator’s small form factor and ability to harvest useful energy from low frequency motions such as tree swaying or shoe impact provides an opportunity to deliver power to remote wireless sensor nodes or to distributed points in the human body

  12. Evaluating interaction techniques for stack mode viewing.

    PubMed

    Atkins, M Stella; Fernquist, Jennifer; Kirkpatrick, Arthur E; Forster, Bruce B

    2009-08-01

    Three interaction techniques were evaluated for scrolling stack mode displays of volumetric data. Two used a scroll-wheel mouse: one used only the wheel, while another used a "click and drag" technique for fast scrolling, leaving the wheel for fine adjustments. The third technique used a Shuttle Xpress jog wheel. In a within-subjects design, nine radiologists searched stacked images for simulated hyper-intense regions on brain, knee, and thigh MR studies. Dependent measures were speed, accuracy, navigation path, and user preference. The radiologists considered the task realistic. They had high inter-subject variability in completion times, far larger than the differences between techniques. Most radiologists (eight out of nine) preferred familiar mouse-based techniques. Most participants scanned the data in two passes, first locating anomalies, then scanning for omissions. Participants spent a mean 10.4 s/trial exploring anomalies, with only mild variation between participants. Their rates of forward navigation searching for anomalies varied much more. Interaction technique significantly affected forward navigation rate (scroll wheel 5.4 slices/s, click and drag 9.4, and jog wheel 6.9). It is not clear what constrained the slowest navigators. The fastest navigator used a unique strategy of moving quickly just beyond an anomaly, then backing up. Eight naïve students performed a similar protocol. Their times and variability were similar to the radiologists, but more (three out of eight) students preferred the jog wheel. It may be worthwhile to introduce techniques such as the jog wheel to radiologists during training, and several techniques might be provided on workstations, allowing individuals to choose their preferred method.

  13. Research Update: Challenges for high-efficiency hybrid lead-halide perovskite LEDs and the path towards electrically pumped lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangru; Price, Michael; Deschler, Felix

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid lead-halide perovskites have emerged as promising solution-processed semiconductor materials for thin-film optoelectronics. In this review, we discuss current challenges in perovskite LED performance, using thin-film and nano-crystalline perovskite as emitter layers, and look at device performance and stability. Fabrication of electrically pumped, optical-feedback devices with hybrid lead halide perovskites as gain medium is a future challenge, initiated by the demonstration of optically pumped lasing structures with low gain thresholds. We explain the material parameters affecting optical gain in perovskites and discuss the challenges towards electrically pumped perovskite lasers.

  14. Hydride VPE: the unexpected process for the fast growth of GaAs and GaN nanowires with record aspect ratio and polytypism-free crystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Yamina; Trassoudaine, Agnès.; Avit, Geoffrey; Lekhal, Kaddour; Ramdani, Mohammed R.; Leroux, Christine; Monier, Guillaume; Varenne, Christelle; Hoggan, Philip; Castelluci, Dominique; Bougerol, Catherine; Réveret, François; Leymarie, Joël.; Petit, Elodie; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Gil, Evelyne

    2013-12-01

    Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) makes use of chloride III-Cl and hydride V-H3 gaseous growth precursors. It is known as a near-equilibrium process, providing the widest range of growth rates from 1 to more than 100 μm/h. When it comes to metal catalyst-assisted VLS (vapor-liquid-solid) growth, the physics of HVPE growth is maintained: high dechlorination frequency, high axial growth rate of nanowires (NWs) up to 170 μm/h. The remarkable features of NWs grown by HVPE are the untapered morphology with constant diameter and the stacking fault-free crystalline phase. Record pure zinc blende cubic phase for 20 μm long GaAs NWs with radii of 10 and 5 nm is shown. The absence of wurtzite phase in GaAs NWs grown by HVPE whatever the diameter is discussed with respect to surface energetic grounds and kinetics. Ni assisted, Ni-Au assisted and catalyst-free HVPE growth of wurtzite GaN NWs is also addressed. Micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy analysis revealed GaN nanowires of great optical quality, with a FWHM of 1 meV at 10 K for the neutral donor bound exciton transition.

  15. Localized surface plasmon for enhanced lasing performance in solution-processed perovskites.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tsung Sheng; Hong, Kuo-Bin; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Huang, Jiong-Fu; Chen, Fang-Chung; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2016-09-01

    A promising method to promote the lasing performance of solution-processed organic-inorganic lead-halide perovskites has been demonstrated. With the adding Ag and PMMA thin films, the threshold excitation power for low-temperature lasing action in perovskites can be greatly reduced by over two orders of magnitude than that acquired in bare perovskite layers, ascribing to the strong exciton-plasmon coupling between the Ag and perovskite films. Also, the PMMA layer can be exploited to prevent the perovskite degradation from the hydrolysis in ambient environment, achieving long-lasting light-emitting performance. The advantages exhibited by the hybrid perovskite configuration would be very promising in making practical laser devices. PMID:27607673

  16. A two-step route to planar perovskite cells exhibiting reduced hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, Alexander H.; Adachi, Michael M.; McDowell, Jeffrey J.; Xu, Jixian; Sargent, Edward H.; Quan, Li Na; Kim, Dong Ha

    2015-04-06

    A simple two-step method was used to produce efficient planar organolead halide perovskite solar cells. Films produced using solely iodine containing precursors resulted in poor morphology and failed devices, whereas addition of chlorine to the process greatly improved morphology and resulted in dense, uniform perovskite films. This process was used to produce perovskite solar cells with a fullerene-based passivation layer. The hysteresis effect, to which planar perovskite devices are otherwise prone, was greatly suppressed through the use of this interface modifier. The combined techniques resulted in perovskite solar cells having a stable efficiency exceeding 11%. This straightforward fabrication procedure holds promise in development of various optoelectronic applications of planar perovskite films.

  17. Enhancing Stability of Perovskite Solar Cells to Moisture by the Facile Hydrophobic Passivation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Insung; Jeong, Inyoung; Lee, Jinwoo; Ko, Min Jae; Yong, Kijung

    2015-08-12

    In this study, a novel and facile passivation process for a perovskite solar cell is reported. Poor stability in ambient atmosphere, which is the most critical demerit of a perovskite solar cell, is overcome by a simple passivation process using a hydrophobic polymer layer. Teflon, the hydrophobic polymer, is deposited on the top of a perovskite solar cell by a spin-coating method. With the hydrophobic passivation, the perovskite solar cell shows negligible degradation after a 30 day storage in ambient atmosphere. Suppressed degradation of the perovskite film is proved in various ways: X-ray diffraction, light absorption spectrum, and quartz crystal microbalance. This simple but effective passivation process suggests new kind of approach to enhance stability of perovskite solar cells to moisture.

  18. Preface for Special Topic: Perovskite solar cells—A research update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Mende, Lukas; Herz, Laura M.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last few years, tremendous progress has been made in the research field of perovskite solar cells. Not only are record power conversion efficiencies now exceeding 20%, but our understanding about the different mechanisms leading to this extraordinary performance has improved phenomenally. The aim of this special issue is to review the current state-of-the-art understanding of perovskite solar cells. Most of the presented articles are research updates giving a succinct overview over different aspects concerning perovskite solar cells.

  19. Humidity versus photo-stability of metal halide perovskite films in a polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Manshor, Nurul Ain; Wali, Qamar; Wong, Ka Kan; Muzakir, Saifful Kamaluddin; Fakharuddin, Azhar; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas; Jose, Rajan

    2016-08-21

    Despite the high efficiency of over 21% reported for emerging thin film perovskite solar cells, one of the key issues prior to their commercial deployment is to attain their long term stability under ambient and outdoor conditions. The instability in perovskite is widely conceived to be humidity induced due to the water solubility of its initial precursors, which leads to decomposition of the perovskite crystal structure; however, we note that humidity alone is not the major degradation factor and it is rather the photon dose in combination with humidity exposure that triggers the instability. In our experiment, which is designed to decouple the effect of humidity and light on perovskite degradation, we investigate the shelf-lifetime of CH3NH3PbI3 films in the dark and under illumination under high humidity conditions (Rel. H. > 70%). We note minor degradation in perovskite films stored in a humid dark environment whereas upon exposure to light, the films undergo drastic degradation, primarily owing to the reactive TiO2/perovskite interface and also the surface defects of TiO2. To enhance its air-stability, we incorporate CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite in a polymer (poly-vinylpyrrolidone, PVP) matrix which retained its optical and structural characteristics in the dark for ∼2000 h and ∼800 h in room light soaking, significantly higher than a pristine perovskite film, which degraded completely in 600 h in the dark and in less than 100 h when exposed to light. We attribute the superior stability of PVP incorporated perovskite films to the improved structural stability of CH3NH3PbI3 and also to the improved TiO2/perovskite interface upon incorporating a polymer matrix. Charge injection from the polymer embedded perovskite films has also been confirmed by fabricating solar cells using them, thereby providing a promising future research pathway for stable and efficient perovskite solar cells. PMID:27432518

  20. Nondestructive cell evaluation techniques in SOFC stack manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, C.

    2016-04-01

    Independent from the specifics of the application, a cost efficient manufacturing of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), its electrolyte membranes and other stack components, leading to reliable long-life stacks is the key for the commercial viability of this fuel cell technology. Tensile and shear stresses are most critical for ceramic components and especially for thin electrolyte membranes as used in SOFC cells. Although stack developers try to reduce tensile stresses acting on the electrolyte by either matching CTE of interconnects and electrolytes or by putting SOFC cells under some pressure - at least during transient operation of SOFC stacks ceramic cells will experience some tensile stresses. Electrolytes are required to have a high Weibull characteristic fracture strength. Practical experiences in stack manufacturing have shown that statistical fracture strength data generated by tests of electrolyte samples give limited information on electrolyte or cell quality. In addition, the cutting process of SOFC electrolytes has a major influence on crack initiation. Typically, any single crack in one the 30 to 80 cells in series connection will lead to a premature stack failure drastically reducing stack service life. Thus, for statistical reasons only 100% defect free SOFC cells must be assembled in stacks. This underlines the need for an automated inspection. So far, only manual processes of visual or mechanical electrolyte inspection are established. Fraunhofer IKTS has qualified the method of optical coherence tomography for an automated high throughput inspection. Alternatives like laser speckle photometry and acoustical methods are still under investigation.