Science.gov

Sample records for peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal

  1. Metabolism of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal by isolated hepatocytes and by liver cytosolic fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Esterbauer, H; Zollner, H; Lang, J

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal and of several other related aldehydes by isolated hepatocytes and rat liver subcellular fractions has been investigated. Hepatocytes rapidly metabolize 4-hydroxynonenal in an oxygen-independent process with a maximum rate (depending on cell preparation) ranging from 130 to 230 nmol/min per 10(6) cells (average 193 +/- 50). The aldehyde is also rapidly utilized by whole rat liver homogenate and the cytosolic fraction (140 000 g supernatant) supplemented with NADH, whereas purified nuclei, mitochondria and microsomes supplemented with NADH show no noteworthy consumption of the aldehyde. In cytosol, the NADH-mediated metabolism of the aldehyde exhibits a 1:1 stoichiometry, i.e. 1 mol of NADH oxidized/mol of hydroxynonenal consumed, and the apparent Km value for the aldehyde is 0.1 mM. Addition of pyrazole (10 mM) or heat inactivation of the cytosol completely abolishes aldehyde metabolism. The various findings strongly suggest that hepatocytes and rat liver cytosol respectively convert 4-hydroxynonenal enzymically is the corresponding alcohol, non-2-ene-1,4-diol, according to the equation: CH3-[CH2]4-CH(OH)-CH = CH-CHO + NADH + H+----CH3-[CH2]4-CH(OH)-CH = CH-CH2OH + NAD+. The alcohol non-2-ene-1,4-diol has not yet been isolated from incubations with hepatocytes and liver cytosolic fractions, but was isolated in pure form from an incubation mixture containing 4-hydroxynonenal, isolated liver alcohol dehydrogenase and NADH and its chemical structure was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Compared with liver, all other tissues possess only little ability to metabolize 4-hydroxynonenal, ranging from 0% (fat pads) to a maximal 10% (kidney) of the activity present in liver. The structure of the aldehyde has a strong influence on the rate and extent of its enzymic NADH-dependent reduction to the alcohol. The saturated analogue nonanal is a poor substrate and only a small proportion of it is converted to the

  2. Production of lipid peroxidation products in osteoarthritic tissues: new evidence linking 4-hydroxynonenal to cartilage degradation.

    PubMed

    Morquette, Barbara; Shi, Qin; Lavigne, Patrick; Ranger, Pierre; Fernandes, Julio C; Benderdour, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is prominently produced in osteoarthritic (OA) synovial cells, but its specific contribution to cartilage destruction is not understood. This study was designed to test whether HNE signaling and binding are involved in OA cartilage degradation through type II collagen (CII) and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13) modulation. HNE levels in synovial fluid and in isolated OA chondrocytes treated with free radical donors were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The formation of the HNE/CII adducts was measured in cartilage explants by immunoprecipitation. Levels of CII and MMP-13 messenger RNA and protein were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and by the use of commercial kits. Levels of HNE/protein adducts were higher in OA synovial fluid compared with normal synovial fluid and were higher in OA chondrocytes treated with free radical donors compared with untreated cells. In cartilage explants, HNE induced CII cleavage, as established by the generation of neoepitopes. The level of HNE/CII adducts was increased in OA cartilage explants incubated with free radical donors. Modification of CII by HNE accelerated its degradation by active MMP-13. In isolated OA chondrocytes, HNE inhibited the expression of CII and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 and induced MMP-13 mainly through activation of p38 MAPK. In vitro, HNE binding to MMP-13 activated this enzyme at a molar ratio of 1:100 (MMP-13 to HNE). The increased level of HNE in OA cartilage and the ability of HNE to induce transcriptional and posttranslational modifications of CII and MMP-13 suggest that this aldehyde could play a role in OA.

  3. Modulation of keratinocyte expression of antioxidants by 4-hydroxynonenal, a lipid peroxidation end product

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ruijin; Heck, Diane E.; Mishin, Vladimir; Black, Adrienne T.; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-03-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is a lipid peroxidation end product generated in response to oxidative stress in the skin. Keratinocytes contain an array of antioxidant enzymes which protect against oxidative stress. In these studies, we characterized 4-HNE-induced changes in antioxidant expression in mouse keratinocytes. Treatment of primary mouse keratinocytes and PAM 212 keratinocytes with 4-HNE increased mRNA expression for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), catalase, NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1-2, GSTA3 and GSTA4. In both cell types, HO-1 was the most sensitive, increasing 86–98 fold within 6 h. Further characterization of the effects of 4-HNE on HO-1 demonstrated concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression which were maximum after 6 h with 30 μM. 4-HNE stimulated keratinocyte Erk1/2, JNK and p38 MAP kinases, as well as PI3 kinase. Inhibition of these enzymes suppressed 4-HNE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. 4-HNE also activated Nrf2 by inducing its translocation to the nucleus. 4-HNE was markedly less effective in inducing HO-1 mRNA and protein in keratinocytes from Nrf2 −/− mice, when compared to wild type mice, indicating that Nrf2 also regulates 4-HNE-induced signaling. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that 4-HNE-induced HO-1 is localized in keratinocyte caveolae. Treatment of the cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which disrupts caveolar structure, suppressed 4-HNE-induced HO-1. These findings indicate that 4-HNE modulates expression of antioxidant enzymes in keratinocytes, and that this can occur by different mechanisms. Changes in expression of keratinocyte antioxidants may be important in protecting the skin from oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a reactive aldehyde. • 4-HNE induces antioxidant proteins in mouse keratinocytes. • Induction of

  4. Modulation of keratinocyte expression of antioxidants by 4-hydroxynonenal, a lipid peroxidation end product.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ruijin; Heck, Diane E; Mishin, Vladimir; Black, Adrienne T; Shakarjian, Michael P; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2014-03-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is a lipid peroxidation end product generated in response to oxidative stress in the skin. Keratinocytes contain an array of antioxidant enzymes which protect against oxidative stress. In these studies, we characterized 4-HNE-induced changes in antioxidant expression in mouse keratinocytes. Treatment of primary mouse keratinocytes and PAM 212 keratinocytes with 4-HNE increased mRNA expression for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), catalase, NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1-2, GSTA3 and GSTA4. In both cell types, HO-1 was the most sensitive, increasing 86-98 fold within 6h. Further characterization of the effects of 4-HNE on HO-1 demonstrated concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression which were maximum after 6h with 30 μM. 4-HNE stimulated keratinocyte Erk1/2, JNK and p38 MAP kinases, as well as PI3 kinase. Inhibition of these enzymes suppressed 4-HNE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. 4-HNE also activated Nrf2 by inducing its translocation to the nucleus. 4-HNE was markedly less effective in inducing HO-1 mRNA and protein in keratinocytes from Nrf2-/- mice, when compared to wild type mice, indicating that Nrf2 also regulates 4-HNE-induced signaling. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that 4-HNE-induced HO-1 is localized in keratinocyte caveolae. Treatment of the cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which disrupts caveolar structure, suppressed 4-HNE-induced HO-1. These findings indicate that 4-HNE modulates expression of antioxidant enzymes in keratinocytes, and that this can occur by different mechanisms. Changes in expression of keratinocyte antioxidants may be important in protecting the skin from oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Alterations of metabolic activity in human osteoarthritic osteoblasts by lipid peroxidation end product 4-hydroxynonenal

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qin; Vaillancourt, France; Côté, Véronique; Fahmi, Hassan; Lavigne, Patrick; Afif, Hassan; Di Battista, John A; Fernandes, Julio C; Benderdour, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE), a lipid peroxidation end product, is produced abundantly in osteoarthritic (OA) articular tissues, but its role in bone metabolism is ill-defined. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that alterations in OA osteoblast metabolism are attributed, in part, to increased levels of HNE. Our data showed that HNE/protein adduct levels were higher in OA osteoblasts compared to normal and when OA osteoblasts were treated with H2O2. Investigating osteoblast markers, we found that HNE increased osteocalcin and type I collagen synthesis but inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. We next examined the effects of HNE on the signaling pathways controlling cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in view of their putative role in OA pathophysiology. HNE dose-dependently decreased basal and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced IL-6 expression while inducing COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release. In a similar pattern, HNE induces changes in osteoblast markers as well as PGE2 and IL-6 release in normal osteoblasts. Upon examination of signaling pathways involved in PGE2 and IL-6 production, we found that HNE-induced PGE2 release was abrogated by SB202190, a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor. Overexpression of p38 MAPK enhanced HNE-induced PGE2 release. In this connection, HNE markedly increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, JNK2, and transcription factors (CREB-1, ATF-2) with a concomitant increase in the DNA-binding activity of CRE/ATF. Transfection experiments with a human COX-2 promoter construct revealed that the CRE element (-58/-53 bp) was essential for HNE-induced COX-2 promoter activity. However, HNE inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα and subsequently the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB. Overexpression of IKKα increased TNF-α-induced IL-6 production. This induction was inhibited when TNF-α was combined with HNE. These findings suggest that HNE may exert multiple

  6. The lipid peroxidation end-product and oxidant 4-hydroxynonenal induces insulin resistance in rat slow-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Prasannarong, Mujalin; Santos, Fernando R; Hooshmand, Payam; Hooshmand, Paria; Giovannini, Franchesca J; Henriksen, Erik J

    2014-02-01

    The lipid peroxidation end-product and oxidant 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) impairs cell function. However, the impact of 4-HNE on the glucose transport system in mammalian slow-twitch skeletal muscle is not known. We assessed the effects of 4-HNE on insulin signalling and glucose transport activity in slow-twitch muscle by incubating soleus strips from lean Zucker rats with 4-HNE (50 µM) in the absence or presence of insulin (5 mU/ml) for up to 6 hr. Insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity was significantly (p<0.05) decreased by 4-HNE at 2 hr. AS160 Thr(642) phosphorylation was decreased at 2 hr, whereas Akt Ser473 phosphorylation and IRS-1 protein expression were not substantially changed until 4 hr. IRS-2 protein expression was slightly decreased only at 6 hr. The lipid peroxidation end-product and oxidant 4-HNE induces insulin resistance of glucose transport activity in rat slow-twitch skeletal muscle, initially associated with impaired phosphorylation of AS160.

  7. Roles of the Lipid Peroxidation Product 4-Hydroxynonenal in Obesity, the Metabolic Syndrome, and Associated Vascular and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    A rising tide of obesity and type 2 diabetes has resulted from the development of technologies that have made inexpensive high calorie foods readily available and exercise unnecessary for many people. Obesity and the metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, visceral adiposity and dyslipidemia) wreak havoc on cells throughout the body thereby promoting cardiovascular and kidney disease, and degenerative diseases of the brain and body. Obesity and insulin resistance promote disease by increasing oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA as the result of a combination of increased free radical production and an impaired ability of cells to detoxify the radicals and repair damaged molecules. By covalently modifying membrane-associated proteins, the membrane lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) may play particularly sinister roles in the metabolic syndrome and associated disease processes. HNE can damage pancreatic β cells and can impair the ability of muscle and liver cells to respond to insulin. HNE may promote atherosclerosis by modifying lipoproteins and can cause cardiac cell damage by impairing metabolic enzymes. An adverse role for HNE in the brain in obesity and the metabolic syndrome is suggested by studies showing that HNE levels are increased in brain cells with aging and Alzheimer’s disease. HNE can cause the dysfunction and degeneration of neurons by modifying membrane-associated glucose and glutamate transporters, ion-motive ATPases, enzymes involved in amyloid metabolism, and cytoskeletal proteins. Exercise and dietary energy restriction reduce HNE production and may also increase cellular systems for HNE detoxification including glutathione and oxidoreductases. The recent development of low molecular weight molecules that scavenge HNE suggests that HNE can be targeted in the design of drugs for the treatment of obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and associated disorders. PMID:19622391

  8. Early involvement of lysosome dysfunction in the degeneration of cerebral cortical neurons caused by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi; Eitan, Erez; Mattson, Mark P

    2017-03-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA occurs in neurons during acute brain injuries and in neurodegenerative disorders. Membrane lipid peroxidation contributes to neuronal dysfunction and death, in part by disrupting neuronal ion homeostasis and cellular bioenergetics. Emerging findings suggest that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehyde produced during lipid peroxidation, impairs the function of various proteins involved in neuronal homeostasis. Here we tested the hypothesis that HNE impairs the cellular system that removes damaged proteins and organelles, the autophagy-lysosome pathway in rat primary cortical neurons. We found that HNE, at a concentration that causes apoptosis over a 48-72 h period, increases protein levels of LC3 II and p62 and within 1 and 4 h of exposure, respectively; LC3 II and p62 immunoreactive puncta were observed in the cytoplasm of HNE-treated neurons at 6 h. The extent of up-regulation of p62 and LC3 II in response to HNE was not affected by co-treatment with the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1, suggesting that the effects of HNE on autophagy were secondary to lysosome inhibition. Indeed, we found that neurons exposed to HNE exhibit elevated pH levels, and decreased protein substrate hydrolysis and cathepsin B activity. Neurons exposed to HNE also exhibited the accumulation of K63-linked polyubiquitinated proteins, which are substrates targeted for lysosomal degradation. Moreover, we found that the levels of LAMP2a and constitutively active heat-shock protein 70, and numbers of LAMP2a-positive lysosomes, are decreased in neurons exposed to HNE. Our findings demonstrate that the lipid peroxidation product HNE causes early impairment of lysosomes which may contribute to the accumulation of damaged and dysfunctional proteins and organelles and consequent neuronal death. Because impaired lysosome function is increasingly recognized as an early event in the neuronal death that occurs in neurodegenerative

  9. Site-specific synthesis and reactivity of oligonucleotides containing stereochemically defined 1,N2-deoxyguanosine adducts of the lipid peroxidation product trans-4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Kozekov, Ivan D; Harris, Thomas M; Rizzo, Carmelo J

    2003-05-14

    trans-4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is a major peroxidation product of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The reaction of HNE with DNA gives four diastereomeric 1,N(2)-gamma-hydroxypropano adducts of deoxyguanosine; background levels of these adducts have been detected in animal tissue. Stereospecific syntheses of these four adducts at the nucleoside level have been accomplished. In addition, a versatile strategy for their site-specific incorporation into oligonucleotides has been developed. These adducts are destabilizing as measured by melting temperature when compared to an unadducted strand. The thermal destablization of the adducted 12-mers ranged from 5 to 16 degrees C and is dependent on the absolute stereochemistry of the adduct. The HNE adducts were also examined for their ability to form interstrand DNA-DNA cross-links when incorporated into a CpG sequence. We find that only one of the HNE stereoisomers formed interstrand DNA-DNA cross-links.

  10. Evaluation of the 1-methyl-2-phenylindole colorimetric assay for aldehydic lipid peroxidation products in plants: malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jason W; Horne, Susan; Harding, Keith; Benson, Erica E

    2007-02-01

    The 1-methyl-2-phenylindole colorimetric assay is considered specific for malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) in mammalian systems, but its specificity in plant tissues is unknown. This study demonstrates that the assay produces a purple/blue chromophore with an absorbance peak at 586 nm for a malondialdehyde standard, while aqueous extractions from Ribes spp. Beta vulgaris, and Lycopersicon esculentum tissues produce an orange chromophore with an absorbance maximum at 450 nm and a large shoulder that extends to 700 nm. No distinctive MDA peak was discernable in plant samples at lambda=586 nm and absorbance was attributed to background interference. The reaction between sucrose and 1-methyl-2-phenylindole produced an orange chromophore with a spectrum similar to those obtained from plant extractions, suggesting that simple sugars are the likely source of background interference. This study demonstrates that the 1-methyl-2-phenylindole colorimetric assay is non-specific for detecting MDA and HNE in plants and its use is cautioned due to interference, particularly from sugars.

  11. The generation of 4-hydroxynonenal, an electrophilic lipid peroxidation end product, in rabbit cornea organ cultures treated with UVB light and nitrogen mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ruijin; Po, Iris; Mishin, Vladimir; Black, Adrienne T.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Gordon, Marion K.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2013-10-15

    The cornea is highly sensitive to oxidative stress, a process that can lead to lipid peroxidation. Ultraviolet light B (UVB) and nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine) are corneal toxicants known to induce oxidative stress. Using a rabbit air-lifted corneal organ culture model, the oxidative stress responses to these toxicants in the corneal epithelium was characterized. Treatment of the cornea with UVB (0.5 J/cm{sup 2}) or nitrogen mustard (100 nmol) resulted in the generation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a reactive lipid peroxidation end product. This was associated with increased expression of the antioxidant, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In human corneal epithelial cells in culture, addition of 4-HNE or 9-nitrooleic acid, a reactive nitrolipid formed during nitrosative stress, caused a time-dependent induction of HO-1 mRNA and protein; maximal responses were evident after 10 h with 30 μM 4-HNE or 6 h with 10 μM 9-nitrooleic acid. 4-HNE and 9-nitrooleic acid were also found to activate Erk1/2, JNK and p38 MAP kinases, as well as phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3)/Akt. Inhibition of p38 blocked 4-HNE- and 9-nitrooleic acid-induced HO-1 expression. Inhibition of Erk1/2, and to a lesser extent, JNK and PI3K/Akt, suppressed only 4-HNE-induced HO-1, while inhibition of JNK and PI3K/Akt, but not Erk1/2, partly reduced 9-nitrooleic acid-induced HO-1. These data indicate that the actions of 4-HNE and 9-nitrooleic acid on corneal epithelial cells are distinct. The sensitivity of corneal epithelial cells to oxidative stress may be an important mechanism mediating tissue injury induced by UVB or nitrogen mustard. - Highlights: • UVB or nitrogen mustard causes rabbit corneal epithelial injury. • 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) was formed and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was increased. • 4-HNE induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in human corneal epithelial cells. • The induction of HO-1 by 4-HNE was through MAP kinase activation.

  12. The generation of 4-hydroxynonenal, an electrophilic lipid peroxidation end product, in rabbit cornea organ cultures treated with UVB light and nitrogen mustard

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ruijin; Po, Iris; Mishin, Vladimir; Black, Adrienne T.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Gordon, Marion K.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The cornea is highly sensitive to oxidative stress, a process that can lead to lipid peroxidation. Ultraviolet light B (UVB) and nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine) are corneal toxicants known to induce oxidative stress. Using a rabbit air-lifted corneal organ culture model, the oxidative stress responses to these toxicants in the corneal epithelium was characterized. Treatment of the cornea with UVB (0.5 J/cm2) or nitrogen mustard (100 nmol) resulted in the generation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a reactive lipid peroxidation end product. This was associated with increased expression of the antioxidant, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In human corneal epithelial cells in culture, addition of 4-HNE or 9-nitrooleic acid, a reactive nitrolipid formed during nitrosative stress, caused a time-dependent induction of HO-1 mRNA and protein; maximal responses were evident after 10 hr with 30 μM 4-HNE or 6 hr with 10 μM 9-nitrooleic acid. 4-HNE and 9-nitrooleic acid were also found to activate Erk1/2, JNK and p38 MAP kinases, as well as phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3)/Akt. Inhibition of p38 blocked 4-HNE- and 9-nitrooleic acid-induced HO-1 expression. Inhibition of Erk1/2, and to a lesser extent, JNK and PI3K/Akt, suppressed only 4-HNE-induced HO-1, while inhibition of JNK and PI3K/Akt, but not Erk1/2, partly reduced 9-nitrooleic acid-induced HO-1. These data indicate that the actions of 4-HNE and 9-nitrooleic acid on corneal epithelial cells are distinct. The sensitivity of corneal epithelial cells to oxidative stress may be an important mechanism mediating tissue injury induced by UVB or nitrogen mustard. PMID:23845594

  13. Down-regulation of Notch1 expression is involved in HL-60 cell growth inhibition induced by 4-hydroxynonenal, a product of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Pizzimenti, Stefania; Barrera, Giuseppina; Calzavara, Elisabetta; Mirandola, Leonardo; Toaldo, Cristina; Dianzani, Mario Umberto; Comi, Paola; Chiaramonte, Raffaella

    2008-11-01

    The role of the Notch1 pathway has been well assessed in leukemia. Notch1 mutations are the most common ones in T acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients which carry either oncogenic Notch1 forms or ineffective ubiquitin ligase implicated in Notch1 turnover. Abnormalities in the Notch1-Jagged1 system have been reported also in acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) patients where Jagged1 is frequently over-expressed. Moreover, activating Notch1 mutations, as well, can occur in human AML and in leukemia cases with lineage infidelity. As a result, Notch1 signalling inhibition is an attractive goal in leukaemia therapy. Blockage/delay in cell differentiation and/or increase of proliferation are the main results of Notch1 signalling activation in several leukemic cell lines. Moreover, specific genes involved in cell growth control have been identified as Notch1 transcriptional targets, i.e. Cyclin D1 and c-Myc. 4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehyde produced during lipid peroxidation, is involved in several pathological and physiological conditions, including inflammation; atherosclerosis; and neurodegenerative and chronic liver diseases. Moreover HNE has an antiproliferative/ differentiative effect in several cell lines, by affecting the expression of key genes, such as oncogenes (e.g. c-Myc, c-Myb), cyclins and telomerase. This prompted us to study the effect of HNE on Notch1 expression and its related signalling in HL-60 cells, a leukemic cell line widely used for differentiation studies. RT-PCR as well as Western blot assay showed Notch1down-regulation in HNE-treated HL-60 cells. The expression of Hes1, a Notch1 target gene, was concomitantly down-regulated by HNE treatment, reflecting Notch1 signalling inhibition. DAPT, an inhibitor of Notch activity, when added contemporary to HNE, further increased cell growth inhibition, without affecting apoptosis. Moreover, DAPT treatment reversed the HNE-induced differentiation. Overall these results suggest that Notch1 is a target

  14. Role of lipid peroxidation derived 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) in cancer: Focusing on mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Huiqin; Yin, Huiyong

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation has been associated with human physiology and diseases including cancer. Overwhelming data suggest that reactive lipid mediators generated from this process, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), are biomarkers for oxidative stress and important players for mediating a number of signaling pathways. The biological effects of 4-HNE are primarily due to covalent modification of important biomolecules including proteins, DNA, and phospholipids containing amino group. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the role of 4-HNE in pathogenesis of cancer and focus on the involvement of mitochondria: generation of 4-HNE from oxidation of mitochondria-specific phospholipid cardiolipin; covalent modification of mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA; potential therapeutic strategies for targeting mitochondrial ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, and 4-HNE. PMID:25598486

  15. Lipid peroxidation-derived 4-hydroxynonenal-modified proteins accumulate in human facial skin fibroblasts during ageing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Peter; Milkovic, Lidija; Zarkovic, Neven; Waeg, Georg; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2014-02-01

    The reactive aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), is recognized as a product of lipid peroxidation, which binds to macromolecules, in particular proteins. HNE-modified proteins (HNE-MP) have been shown to accumulate during ageing, generally by using polyclonal antibodies, which increase the possibility of detecting false positives. Therefore, we have used a genuine monoclonal antibody specific for HNE-His adducts of proteins/peptides, which were revealed by immunoblotting method for whole-cell HNE-MP measurements in serially passaged human facial skin fibroblasts undergoing ageing in vitro. There was a significant increase in the levels of HNE-MP in serially passaged cells approaching a near senescent state at high passage level (P-61), as compared with low passage level (P-11) young and middle-aged (P-27) cells. However, if the cells were analyzed soon after re-initiation from the frozen samples with little further passaging, the amount of HNE-MP was low even in relatively high passage level (P-37) cells, which is an indication of selective elimination of cells with high molecular damage during the process of thawing and re-initiation in culture. This pilot study on normal human facial skin fibroblasts shows that HNE-MP detection by monoclonal antibody-based dot blot method can be used as a marker for age-related accumulation of lipid peroxidative molecular damage, and could be useful for testing and monitoring the effects of potential skin care products on ageing parameters.

  16. Structure-activity analysis of diffusible lipid electrophiles associated with phospholipid peroxidation: 4-hydroxynonenal and 4-oxononenal analogues.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Colleen E; Tallman, Keri A; Porter, Ned A; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2011-03-21

    Electrophile-mediated disruption of cell signal-ing is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including atherosclerosis and cancer. Diffusible and membrane bound lipid electrophiles are known to modify DNA and protein substrates and modulate cellular pathways including ER stress, antioxidant response, DNA damage, heat shock, and apoptosis. Herein we report on a structure-activity relationship for several electrophilic analogues of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 4-oxononenal (ONE) with regard to toxicity and anti-inflammatory activity. The analogues studied were the oxidation products of HNE and ONE, HNEA/ONEA, the in vivo hydrolysis products of oxidized phosphatidylcholine, COOH-HNE/COOH-ONE, and their methyl esters, COOMe-HNE/ONE. The reactivity of each compound toward N-acetylcysteine was determined and compared to the toxicity toward a human colorectal carcinoma cell line (RKO) and a human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Further analysis was performed in differentiated THP-1 macrophages to assess changes in macrophage activation and pro-inflammatory signaling in response to each lipid electrophile. HNE/ONE analogues inhibited THP-1 macrophage production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/IFNγ activation. Inhibition of cytokine production was observed at submicromolar concentrations of several analogues with as little as 30 min of exposure. Phagocytosis of fluorescent beads was also inhibited by lipid electrophile treatment. Lipid electrophiles related to HNE/ONE are both toxic and anti-inflammatory, but the anti-inflammatory effects in human macrophages are observed at nontoxic concentrations. Neither toxicity nor anti-inflammatory activity are strongly correlated to the reactivity of the model nucleophile, N-acetylcysteine.

  17. 4-Hydroxynonenal, a lipid peroxidation byproduct of spinal cord injury, is cytotoxic for oligodendrocyte progenitors and inhibits their responsiveness to PDGF.

    PubMed

    Gard, A L; Solodushko, V G; Waeg, G; Majic, T

    2001-03-15

    Oligodendroglial reactions to compression injury of spinal cord include apoptosis, secondary demyelination, and remyelination failure. Within hours after contusion, the membrane lipid peroxidation (MLP) byproduct, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), increases rapidly in gray matter and thereafter in white matter tracts beyond the initial lesion level. Considering that HNE is a mediator and marker of neuronal MLP toxicity in various neurodegenerative conditions, the present study examined its effect on the regeneration potential of oligodendrocyte progenitors, as defined by their capacity to survive, proliferate and migrate in primary culture. Treatment of oligodendroblasts with HNE evoked a time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity resembling apoptosis at aldehyde concentrations known to be produced by neurons and achieved in tissue undergoing peroxidative injury. In addition, sublethal concentrations of HNE inhibited the mitogenic and chemotactic responses of more immature progenitors to platelet-derived growth factor. These effects appear to be mediated in part by the formation of HNE adducts with progenitor proteins located within the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic compartments. Our data are the first to show that HNE can have direct, deleterious effects on oligodendrocyte precursors. The present study also suggests a mechanism by which the striking accumulation of HNE in white matter tracts surrounding the site of spinal cord compression injury and in other ischemic-hypoxic insults associated with MLP could suppress the potential regenerative response of endogenous oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

  18. Role of the Lipoperoxidation Product 4-Hydroxynonenal in the Pathogenesis of Severe Malaria Anemia and Malaria Immunodepression

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Evelin; Arese, Paolo; Skorokhod, Oleksii A.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of falciparum malaria, a disease still claiming close to 1 million deaths and 200 million new cases per year. Most frequent complications are severe anemia, cerebral malaria, and immunodepression, the latter being constantly present in all forms of malaria. Complications are associated with oxidative stress and lipoperoxidation. Its final product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a stable yet very reactive and diffusible molecule, forms covalent conjugates with proteins, DNA, and phospholipids and modulates important cell functions at very low concentrations. Since oxidative stress plays important roles in the pathogenesis of severe malaria, it appears important to explore the role of 4-HNE in two important malaria complications such as malaria anemia and malaria immunodepression where oxidative stress is considered to be involved. In this review we will summarize data about 4-HNE chemistry, its biologically relevant chemical properties, and its role as regulator of physiologic processes and as pathogenic factor. We will review studies documenting the role of 4-HNE in severe malaria with emphasis on malaria anemia and immunodepression. Data from other diseases qualify 4-HNE both as oxidative stress marker and as pathomechanistically important molecule. Further studies are needed to establish 4-HNE as accepted pathogenic factor in severe malaria. PMID:25969702

  19. Inhibition of hydrogen peroxide signaling by 4-hydroxynonenal due to differential regulation of Akt1 and Akt2 contributes to decreases in cell survival and proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shearn, Colin T; Reigan, Philip; Petersen, Dennis R

    2012-07-01

    Dysregulation of cell signaling by electrophiles such as 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is a key component in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory liver disease. Another consequence of inflammation is the perpetuation of oxidative damage by the production of reactive oxidative species such as hydrogen peroxide. Previously, we have demonstrated Akt2 as a direct target of 4-HNE in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In the present study, we used the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 as model to understand the combinatorial effects of 4-HNE and hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrate that 4-HNE inhibits hydrogen peroxide-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 but not Akt2. Pretreatment of HepG2 cells with 4-HNE prevented hydrogen peroxide stimulation of Akt-dependent phosphorylation of downstream targets and intracellular Akt activity compared with untreated control cells. Using biotin hydrazide capture, it was confirmed that 4-HNE treatment resulted in carbonylation of Akt1, which was not observed in untreated control cells. Using a synthetic GSK3α/β peptide as a substrate, treatment of recombinant human myristoylated Akt1 (rAkt1) with 20 or 40 μΜ 4-HNE inhibited rAkt1 activity by 29 and 60%, respectively. We further demonstrate that 4-HNE activates Erk via a PI3 kinase and PP2A-dependent mechanism leading to increased Jnk phosphorylation. At higher concentrations, 4-HNE decreased both cell survival and proliferation as evidenced by MTT assays and EdU incorporation as well as decreased expression of cyclin D1 and β-catenin, an effect only moderately increased by the addition of hydrogen peroxide. The ability of 4-HNE to exert combinatorial effects on Erk, Jnk, and Akt-dependent cell survival pathways provides additional insight into the mechanisms of cellular damage associated with chronic inflammation.

  20. Depletion of Intracellular Thiols and Increased Production of 4-Hydroxynonenal that Occur During Cryopreservation of Stallion Spermatozoa Lead to Caspase Activation, Loss of Motility, and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Martin Muñoz, Patricia; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Vizuete, Guillermo; Plaza Dávila, Maria; Rodriguez Martinez, Heriberto; Peña, Fernando J

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to sperm death and the accelerated senescence of cryopreserved spermatozoa. However, the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered relevant signaling molecules for sperm function, only becoming detrimental when ROS homeostasis is lost. We hereby hypothesize that a major component of the alteration of ROS homeostasis in cryopreserved spermatozoa is the exhaustion of intrinsic antioxidant defense mechanisms. To test this hypothesis, semen from seven stallions was frozen using a standard technique. The parameters of sperm quality (motility, velocity, and membrane integrity) and markers of sperm senescence (caspase 3, 4-hydroxynonenal, and mitochondrial membrane potential) were assessed before and after cryopreservation. Changes in the intracellular thiol content were also monitored. Cryopreservation caused significant increases in senescence markers as well as dramatic depletion of intracellular thiols to less than half of the initial values (P < 0.001) postthaw. Interestingly, very high and positive correlations were observed among thiol levels with sperm functionality postthaw: total motility (r = 0.931, P < 0.001), progressive motility (r = 0.904, P < 0.001), and percentage of live spermatozoa without active caspase 3 (r = 0.996, P < 0.001). In contrast, negative correlations were detected between active caspase 3 and thiol content both in living (r = -0.896) and dead (r = -0.940) spermatozoa; additionally, 4-hydroxynonenal levels were negatively correlated with thiol levels (r = -0.856). In conclusion, sperm functionality postthaw correlates with the maintenance of adequate levels of intracellular thiols. The accelerated senescence of thawed spermatozoa is related to oxidative and electrophilic stress induced by increased production of 4-hydroxynoneal in thawed samples once intracellular thiols are depleted.

  1. Antiatherogenic and antitumoral properties of Opuntia cladodes: inhibition of low density lipoprotein oxidation by vascular cells, and protection against the cytotoxicity of lipid oxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal in a colorectal cancer cellular model.

    PubMed

    Keller, Julia; Camaré, Caroline; Bernis, Corinne; Astello-García, Marizel; de la Rosa, Ana-Paulina Barba; Rossignol, Michel; del Socorro Santos Díaz, María; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Guéraud, Françoise

    2015-09-01

    Opuntia species have been used for thousands of years as a folk medicine in the treatment of diseases. However, the components and protective mechanisms are still unclear. We make the hypothesis that Opuntia species may protect the development of oxidative stress-associated diseases, such as atherosclerosis or colon cancer, via their antioxidant properties. We investigated the protective effect of Opuntia cladode powder against the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) evoked by vascular endothelial cells, an important risk factor for atherosclerosis development, and the toxicity of 4-hydroxynonenal (a major lipid peroxidation product) on normal (Apc +/+) and preneoplastic (Apc min/+) immortalized epithelial colon cells. Various Opuntia species classified according to their degree of domestication, from the wildest (Opuntia streptacantha, Opuntia hyptiacantha, Opuntia megacantha), medium (Opuntia albicarpa), to the most domesticated (Opuntia ficus-indica) were tested. Cladode powders prepared from these Opuntia species significantly inhibited LDL oxidation induced by incubation with murine endothelial cells and the subsequent foam cell formation of RAW 264.7 murine macrophages and cytotoxicity on murine endothelial cells. Moreover, Opuntia cladode powder blocked the promotion of colon cancer development on an in vitro model of colonocytes. It may be noted that the phenolic acid and flavonoids content, the antioxidant capacity, and the protective effect were relatively similar in all the cladode powders from wild (O. streptacantha) and domesticated Opuntia. Altogether, these data confirm the therapeutic potential of Opuntia cladodes in diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  2. 4-Hydroxynonenal enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via 5-lipoxygenase-mediated activation of ERK and p38 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung J.; Kim, Chae E.; Yun, Mi R.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Shin, Hwa K.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-01-15

    Exaggerated levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) co-exist in macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions, and activated macrophages produce MMP-9 that degrades atherosclerotic plaque constituents. This study investigated the effects of HNE on MMP-9 production, and the potential role for 5-LO derivatives in MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with HNE led to activation of 5-LO, as measured by leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) production. This was associated with an increased production of MMP-9, which was blunted by inhibition of 5-LO with MK886, a 5-LO inhibitor or with 5-LO siRNA. A cysteinyl-LT{sub 1} (cysLT{sub 1}) receptor antagonist, REV-5901 as well as a BLT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, U-75302, also attenuated MMP-9 production induced by HNE. Furthermore, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT (LTC{sub 4} and LTD{sub 4}) enhanced MMP-9 production in macrophages, suggesting a pivotal role for 5-LO in HNE-mediated production of MMP-9. Among the MAPK pathways, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK, but not JNK. Linked to these results, a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as an ERK inhibitor blunted MMP-9 production induced by LT. Collectively, these data suggest that 5-LO-derived LT mediates HNE-induced MMP-9 production via activation of ERK and p38 MAPK pathways, consequently leading to plaque instability in atherosclerosis.

  3. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-08-15

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.

  4. 4-Hydroxynonenal induces a DNA-binding protein similar to the heat-shock factor.

    PubMed Central

    Cajone, F; Salina, M; Benelli-Zazzera, A

    1989-01-01

    By using a gel mobility assay, we have shown that treatment of HeLa cells with 4-hydroxynonenal, a major product of the peroxidation of membrane lipids and an inducer of heat-shock proteins, has the same effect as heat shock in causing the appearance of a protein which binds to the sequence of DNA specific for the induction of heat-shock genes. Lipoperoxidation and heat exposure seem to share a common mechanism of specific gene activation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2590181

  5. The oxidant role of 4-hydroxynonenal in corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longlong; Zong, Rongrong; Zhou, Jing; Ge, Lianping; Zhou, Tong; Ma, Jian-xing; Liu, Zuguo; Zhou, Yueping

    2015-05-29

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE or HNE) is a main endogenous product of cellular lipid peroxidation in tissues and is reported to play pathogenic roles in eye diseases. Here we investigated the association between 4-HNE and oxidative stress in the corneal epithelium. 4-HNE suppressed the cell viability of human corneal epithelial cells (HCE) in a concentration dependent manner. 4-HNE significantly increased the level of 3-Nitrotyrosine (3-NT), a marker of oxidative stress, in HCE cells and corneal epithelium of rats by immunofluorescent staining and Western blot analysis. To its underlying mechanistic on ROS system, 4-HNE elevated the ROS generation enzyme NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and induced the activation of NF-E2-related factor-2 (NRF2) and its downstream effectors: NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone 1) (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP). Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant and ROS scavenger, antagonized the inhibitory and oxidant effects of 4-HNE on the corneal epithelial cells. In conclusion, 4-HNE plays an oxidant role in the corneal epithelium and this work provides a new strategy for the pathogenesis and treatment of corneal diseases.

  6. Role of 4-hydroxynonenal in chemopreventive activities of sulforaphane

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajendra; Sharma, Abha; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Sahu, Mukesh; Jaiswal, Shailesh; Awasthi, Sanjay; Awasthi, Yogesh C.

    2012-01-01

    Chemoprevention of cancer via herbal and dietary supplements is a logical approach to combat cancer and presently it is an attractive area of research investigations. Over the years, the use of isothiocyanates, such as sulforaphane (SFN) found in cruciferous vegetables, has been advocated as chemopreventive agents and their efficacy has been demonstrated in cell lines and animal models. In-vivo studies with SFN suggest that besides protecting normal healthy cells from environmental carcinogens it also exhibits cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects against various cancer cell types. Among several mechanisms for the chemopreventive activity of SFN against chemical carcinogenesis, its effect on drug metabolizing enzymes that causes activation/ neutralization of carcinogenic metabolites is well established. Recent studies suggest that SFN exerts its selective cytotoxicity to cancer cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated generation of lipid peroxidation (LPO) products particularly 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). Against the background of the known biochemical effects of SFN on normal and cancer cells, in this article we have reviewed the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the overall chemopreventive effects of SFN focusing on the role of HNE in these mechanisms that may also contribute to its selective cytotoxicity to cancer cells. PMID:22579574

  7. Metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal by the rat hepatoma cell line MH1C1.

    PubMed

    Ferro, M; Marinari, U M; Poli, G; Dianzani, M U; Fauler, G; Zollner, H; Esterbauer, H

    1988-10-01

    The metabolism of the toxic lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal was investigated in the well-differentiated rat heptoma cell line MH1C1. When exposed to 0.1 mM 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), MH1C1 cells consumed it in a time-dependent manner. There was a linear relationship between the amount of aldehyde consumed and cell number in the range 0.5 - 4 X 10(6) cells ml-1. This process was unaffected by pyrazole, suggesting that alcohol dehydrogenase is not involved. The whole homogenate of MH1C1 cells consumed added HNE at a rate similar to that in intact cells. Fractionation of the homogenate showed that the highest HNE-metabolizing activity is in the cytosol. The dialysed cytosol had almost no capacity to metabolize HNE, but this was restored by supplementation with NAD, NADH, NADP and NADPH. The metabolism of HNE in MH1C1 cells is thus different from that in hepatocytes, which were shown to utilize cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase for this process. Both reductive and oxidative pathways could be implicated in the metabolic activity of MH1C1 cells towards HNE as well as binding by glutathione.

  8. Preferential recognition of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal modified DNA in the cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Shahab, Uzma; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Ahmad, Saheem

    2017-01-20

    The structural perturbations in DNA molecule may be caused by a break in a strand, a missing base from the backbone, or a chemically changed base. These alterations in DNA that occurs naturally can result from metabolic or hydrolytic processes. DNA damage plays a major role in the mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging and various other patho-physiological conditions. DNA damage can be induced through hydrolysis, exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other reactive carbonyl metabolites including 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). 4-HNE is an important lipid peroxidation product which has been implicated in the mutagenesis and carcinogenesis processes. The present study examines to probe the presence of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal damaged DNA (HNE-DNA) in various cancer subjects. In this study, the purified calf thymus DNA was damaged by the action of 4-HNE. The DNA was incubated with 4-HNE for 24 h at 37°C temperature. The binding characteristics of cancer auto-antibodies were assessed by direct binding and competitive inhibition ELISA. DNA modifications produced hyperchromicity in UV spectrum and decreased fluorescence intensity. Cancer sera exhibited enhanced binding with the 4-HNE modified calf thymus DNA as compared to its native conformer. The 4-HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the auto-antibody induction in cancer patients. The HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the autoantibody induction in cancer patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Retinal proteins modified by 4-hydroxynonenal: identification of molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kapphahn, Rebecca J; Giwa, Babatomiwa M; Berg, Kristin M; Roehrich, Heidi; Feng, Xiao; Olsen, Timothy W; Ferrington, Deborah A

    2006-07-01

    The reactive aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), is a product of lipid peroxidation that can covalently modify and inactivate proteins. Previously, we reported increased HNE modification of select retinal proteins resolved by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis in aged Fisher 344 x Brown Norway rats (Louie, J.L., Kapphahn, R.J., Ferrington, D.A., 2002. Proteasome function and protein oxidation in the aged retina. Exp. Eye Res. 75, 271-284). In the current study, quantitative assessment of HNE molar content using slot blot immunoassays showed HNE content is increased 30% in aged rat retina. In contrast, there was no age-related difference in HNE content in individual spots resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis suggesting the increased modification is likely on membrane proteins that are missing on 2D gels. The HNE-immunoreactive proteins resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. These proteins are involved in metabolism, chaperone function, and fatty acid transport. Proteins that were frequently modified and had the highest molar content of HNE included triosephosphate isomerase, alpha enolase, heat shock cognate 70 and betaB2 crystallin. Immunochemical detection of HNE adducts on retinal sections showed greater immune reaction in ganglion cells, photoreceptor inner segment, and the inner plexiform layer. Identification of HNE modified proteins in two alternative model systems, human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture (ARPE19) and human donor eyes, indicated that triosephosphate isomerase and alpha enolase are generally modified. These results identify a common subset of proteins that contain HNE adducts and suggest that select retinal proteins are molecular targets for HNE modification.

  10. Differential regulation of c-jun and CREB by acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Phansalkar, Ketaki; Audesirk, Gerald; West, Anne; Cabell, Leigh

    2006-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation leads to accumulation of unsaturated aldehydes including acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) in brain. In this study, we examined the effects of these lipid peroxidation products on apoptotic pathways in cultured neurons. Acrolein and 4HNE increased the levels of active phosphorylated forms of c-jun and CREB, the transcription factors that promote apoptosis and cell survival, respectively. However, they decreased the activity of CREB-dependent BDNF promoter while they increased the activity of promoters responsive to c-jun. We hypothesized that this differential regulation could be due to competition between proapoptotic c-jun and cytoprotective CREB for CBP (CREB-binding protein), a coactivator shared by several transcription factors. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that the decrease of BDNF promoter activity by acrolein and 4HNE could be restored (i) by cotransfection with CBP, (ii) by cotransfection with VP 16-CREB, a constitutively active form of CREB that does not depend on CBP for its activation, or (iii) by inhibiting JNK-mediated c-jun activation. Finally, adenoviral transduction of hippocampal neurons with VP 16-CREB resulted in significant reduction in caspase-3 activation by acrolein and 4HNE. These observations suggest that lipid peroxidation-induced differential regulation of CREB and c-jun might play a role in neurodegeneration in AD.

  11. 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts: Key mediator in Rett syndrome oxinflammation.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Carlo; Hayek, Joussef

    2017-01-05

    In the last 15 years a strong correlation between oxidative stress (OxS) and Rett syndrome (RTT), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder known to be caused in 95% of the cases, by a mutation in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene, has been well documented. Here, we revised, summarized and discussed the current knowledge on the role of lipid peroxidation byproducts, with special emphasis on 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE), in RTT pathophysiology. The posttranslational modifications of proteins via 4HNE, known as 4HNE protein adducts (4NHE-PAs), causing detrimental effects on protein functions, appear to contribute to the clinical severity of the syndrome, since their levels increase significantly during the subsequent 4 clinical stages, reaching the maximum degree at stage 4, represented by a late motor deterioration. In addition, 4HNE-PA are only partially removed due to the compromised functionality of the proteasome activity, contributing therefore to the cellular damage in RTT. All this will lead to a characteristic subclinical inflammation, defined "OxInflammation", derived by a positive feedback loop between OxS byproducts and inflammatory mediators that in a long run further aggravates the clinical features of RTT patients. Therefore, in a pathology completely orphan of any therapy, aiming 4HNE as a therapeutic target could represent a coadjuvant treatment with some beneficial impact in these patients.‬‬‬.

  12. Selective cleavage of thioether linkage in proteins modified with 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, K; Stadtman, E R

    1992-01-01

    The peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids leads to numerous products, including 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). That 4-hydroxy-2-alkenal compounds react with sulfhydryl groups of proteins to form thioether adducts possessing a carbonyl function has been established [Schauenstein, E. & Esterbauer, H. (1979) Ciba Found. Symp. 67, 225-244]. Taking advantage of the fact that Raney nickel catalyzes cleavage of thioether bonds, we have developed a procedure to quantitate the amount of HNE moiety bound to protein by means of a thioether linkage. Adducts of HNE with N-acetylcysteine and glutathione were prepared, labeled with NaB[3H]H4, and then treated with Raney nickel. The 3H-labeled product was recovered in 85-90% yield from both HNE-N-acetylcysteine and HNE-glutathione adducts in a solvent [10% (vol/vol) methanol/chloroform]-estractable form. Treatment of proteins with HNE led to the disappearance of protein sulfhydryl groups. However, less than 10% of the labeled adducts obtained after subsequent reduction with NaB[3H]H4 could be released in a solvent-extractable form upon treatment with Raney nickel. This and the observation that HNE reacts with proteins lacking a sulfhydryl group attests to the fact that HNE can react with amino acid residues other than cysteinyl residues. Images PMID:1608970

  13. Inactivation of glutathione reductase by 4-hydroxynonenal and other endogenous aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Vander Jagt, D L; Hunsaker, L A; Vander Jagt, T J; Gomez, M S; Gonzales, D M; Deck, L M; Royer, R E

    1997-04-25

    4-Hydroxynonenal, a product of oxidative degradation of unsaturated lipids, is an endogenous reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde with numerous biological activities. 4-Hydroxynonenal rapidly inactivated glutathione reductase in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Inactivation appears to involve the initial formation of an enzyme-inactivator complex, K(D) = 0.5 microM, followed by the inactivation reaction, k = 1.3 x 10(-2) min(-1). alpha,beta-Unsaturated aldehydes such as acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and cinnamaldehyde also inactivated glutathione reductase, although rates varied widely. Inactivation of glutathione reductase by alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes was followed by slower NADPH-independent reactions that led to formation of nonfluorescent cross-linked products, accompanied by loss of lysine and histidine residues. Other reactive endogenous aldehydes such as methylglyoxal, 3-deoxyglucosone, and xylosone inactivated glutathione reductase by an NADPH-independent mechanism, with methylglyoxal being the most reactive. However, 2-oxoaldehydes were much less effective than 4-hydroxynonenal. Inactivation of glutathione reductase by these 2-oxoaldehydes was followed by slower reactions that led to the formation of fluorescent cross-linked products over a period of several weeks. These changes were accompanied by loss of arginine residues. Thus, the sequence of events is different for inactivation and modification of glutathione reductase by alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes compared with 2-oxoaldehydes with respect to kinetics, NADPH requirements, fluorescence changes, and loss of amino acid residues. The ability of 4-hydroxynonenal at low concentrations to inactivate glutathione reductase, a central antioxidant enzyme, suggests that oxidative degradation of unsaturated lipids may initiate a positive feedback loop that enhances the potential for oxidative damage.

  14. Proteomic analysis of 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine modified proteins in RTT fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Carlo; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Cervellati, Franco; Sticozzi, Claudia; Mirasole, Cristiana; Guerranti, Roberto; Trentini, Alessandro; Zolla, Lello; Savelli, Vinno; Hayek, Joussef; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive developmental disorder, primarily affecting girls with a prevalence of 1 in every 10,000 births. A clear etiological factor present in more than 90% of classical RTT cases is the mutation of the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Recent work from our group was able to shown a systemic oxidative stress (OxS) in these patients that correlates with the gravity of the clinical features. Using freshly isolated skin fibroblasts from RTT patients and healthy subjects, we have performed a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in order to evidence the oxidative modifications of proteins with special focus on the formation of protein adducts with 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE PAs)-a major secondary product of lipid peroxidation- and Nitrotyrosine, a marker derived from the biochemical interaction of nitric oxide (NO) or nitric oxide-derived secondary products with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Then, oxidatively modified spots were identified by mass spectrometry, LC-ESI-CID-MS/MS. Our results showed that 15 protein spots presented 4-HNE PAs and/or nitrotyrosine adducts in fibroblasts proteome from RTT patients compared to healthy control cells. Post-translationally modified proteins were related to several functional categories, in particular to cytoskeleton structure and protein folding. In addition, clear upregulated expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) with high nitrite levels were observed in RTT fibroblasts, justifying the increased nitrotyrosine protein modifications. The present work describes not only the proteomic profile in RTT fibroblasts, but also identifies the modified proteins by 4-HNE and nitrotyrosine. Of note, for the first time, it appears that a dysregulation of NO pathway can be associated to RTT pathophysiology. In conclusion, the evidence of a wide range of proteins able to forms adducts with 4-HNE, Nitrotyrosine or with both confirms the possible alteration of several aspects of cellular functions

  15. Formation of Malondialdehyde, 4-Hydroxynonenal, and 4-Hydroxyhexenal during in Vitro Digestion of Cooked Beef, Pork, Chicken, and Salmon.

    PubMed

    Steppeler, Christina; Haugen, John-Erik; Rødbotten, Rune; Kirkhus, Bente

    2016-01-20

    Red meat high in heme iron may promote the formation of potentially genotoxic aldehydes during lipid peroxidation in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA) equivalents measured by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) method was determined during in vitro digestion of cooked red meat (beef and pork), as well as white meat (chicken) and fish (salmon), whereas analysis of 4-hydroxyhexenal (HHE) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) was performed during in vitro digestion of cooked beef and salmon. Comparing products with similar fat contents indicated that the amount of unsaturated fat and not total iron content was the dominating factor influencing the formation of aldehydes. It was also shown that increasing fat content in beef products caused increasing concentrations of MDA equivalents. The highest levels, however, were found in minced beef with added fish oil high in unsaturated fat. This study indicates that when ingested alone, red meat products low in unsaturated fat and low in total fat content contribute to relatively low levels of potentially genotoxic aldehydes in the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. “Twin peaks”: Searching for 4-hydroxynonenal urinary metabolites after oral administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Julia; Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Debrauwer, Laurent; Guéraud, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is a cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation secondary product which is formed endogenously upon peroxidation of cellular n-6 fatty acids. However, it can also be formed in food or during digestion, upon peroxidation of dietary lipids. Several studies have evidenced that we are exposed through food to significant concentrations of HNE that could pose a toxicological concern. It is then of importance to known how HNE is metabolized after oral administration. Although its metabolism has been studied after intravenous administration in order to mimick endogenous formation, its in vivo fate after oral administration had never been studied. In order to identify and quantify urinary HNE metabolites after oral administration in rats, radioactive and stable isotopes of HNE were used and urine was analyzed by radio-chromatography (radio-HPLC) and chromatography coupled with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HPLC–HRMS). Radioactivity distribution revealed that 48% of the administered radioactivity was excreted into urine and 15% into feces after 24 h, while 3% were measured in intestinal contents and 2% in major organs, mostly in the liver. Urinary radio-HPLC profiles revealed 22 major peaks accounting for 88% of the urinary radioactivity. For identification purpose, HNE and its stable isotope [1,2-13C]-HNE were given at equimolar dose to be able to univocally identify HNE metabolites by tracking twin peaks on HPLC–HRMS spectra. The major peak was identified as 9-hydroxy-nonenoic acid (27% of the urinary radioactivity) followed by classical HNE mercapturic acid derivatives (the mercapturic acid conjugate of di-hydroxynonane (DHN-MA), the mercapturic acid conjugate of 4-hydroxynonenoic acid (HNA-MA) in its opened and lactone form) and by metabolites that are oxidized in the terminal position. New urinary metabolites as thiomethyl and glucuronide conjugates were also evidenced. Some analyses were also performed on feces and gastro

  17. Pathophysiology of mitochondrial lipid oxidation: Role of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and other bioactive lipids in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Mengqing; Zhong, Huiqin; Xia, Lin; Tao, Yongzhen; Yin, Huiyong

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial lipids are essential for maintaining the integrity of mitochondrial membranes and the proper functions of mitochondria. As the "powerhouse" of a cell, mitochondria are also the major cellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress occurs when the antioxidant system is overwhelmed by overproduction of ROS. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in mitochondrial membranes are primary targets for ROS attack, which may lead to lipid peroxidation (LPO) and generation of reactive lipids, such as 4-hydroxynonenal. When mitochondrial lipids are oxidized, the integrity and function of mitochondria may be compromised and this may eventually lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, which has been associated with many human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. How mitochondrial lipids are oxidized and the underlying molecular mechanisms and pathophysiological consequences associated with mitochondrial LPO remain poorly defined. Oxidation of the mitochondria-specific phospholipid cardiolipin and generation of bioactive lipids through mitochondrial LPO has been increasingly recognized as an important event orchestrating apoptosis, metabolic reprogramming of energy production, mitophagy, and immune responses. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of how mitochondrial LPO and generation of bioactive lipid mediators in mitochondria are involved in the modulation of mitochondrial functions in the context of relevant human diseases associated with oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Two dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE to identify mitochondrial complex I subunits modified by 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE).

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinzi; Luo, Xiaoting; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) can form protein-linked HNE adducts, thereby impacting protein structure and function. Mitochondrial complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase), containing at least 45 subunits in mammalian cells, sits in a lipid-rich environment and is thus very susceptible to HNE modifications. In this paper, a procedure for the identification of HNE-modified complex I subunits is described. Complex I was isolated by first dimensional non-gradient blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). The isolated complex I band, visualized by either Coomassie blue staining or silver staining, was further analyzed by second dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). HNE-modified proteins were visualized by Western blotting probed with anti-HNE antibodies. HNE-positive bands were then excised and the proteins contained in them were identified by mass spectrometric peptide sequencing. The method was successfully applied for the identification of two complex I subunits that showed enhanced HNE-modifications in diabetic kidney mitochondria.

  19. 4-Hydroxynonenal differentially regulates adiponectin gene expression and secretion via activating PPARγ and accelerating ubiquitin–proteasome degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wanga, Zhigang; Dou, Xiaobing; Gu, Dongfang; Shen, Chen; Yao, Tong; Nguyen, Van; Braunschweig, Carol; Song, Zhenyuan

    2011-01-01

    Although well-established, the underlying mechanisms involved in obesity-related plasma adiponectin decline remain elusive. Oxidative stress is associated with obesity and insulin resistance and considered to contribute to the progression toward obesity-related metabolic disorders. In this study, we investigated the effects of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), the most abundant lipid peroxidation end product, on adiponectin production and its potential implication in obesity-related adiponectin decrease. Long-term high-fat diet feeding led to obesity in mouse, accompanied by decreased plasma adiponectin and increased adipose tissue 4-HNE content. Exposure of adipocytes to exogenous 4-HNE resulted in decreased adiponectin secretion in a dose-dependent manner, which was consistent with significantly decreased intracellular adiponectin protein abundance. In contrast, adiponectin gene expression was significantly elevated by 4-HNE treatment, which was concomitant with increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) gene expression and transactivity. The effect was abolished by T0070907, a PPAR-γ antagonist, suggesting that PPAR-γ activation plays a critical role in this process. To gain insight into mechanisms involved in adiponectin protein decrease, we examined the effects of 4-HNE on adiponectin protein degradation. Cycloheximide (CHX)-chase assay revealed that 4-HNE exposure accelerated adiponectin protein degradation, which was prevented by MG132, a potent proteasome inhibitor. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that 4-HNE exposure increased ubiquitinated adiponectin protein levels. These data altogether indicated that 4-HNE enhanced adiponectin protein degradation via ubiquitin–proteasome system. Finally, we demonstrated that supplementation of HF diet with betaine, an antioxidant and methyl donor, alleviated high-fat-induced adipose tissue 4-HNE increase and attenuated plasma adiponectin decline. Taken together, our findings suggest that the lipid

  20. Olive leaf extracts protect cardiomyocytes against 4-hydroxynonenal-induced toxicity in vitro: comparison with oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, and quercetin.

    PubMed

    Bali, Elif Burcu; Ergin, Volkan; Rackova, Lucia; Bayraktar, Oğuz; Küçükboyaci, Nurgün; Karasu, Çimen

    2014-08-01

    Olive (Olea europaea) leaf, an important traditional herbal medicine, displays cardioprotection that may be related to the cellular redox modulating effects of its polyphenolic constituents. This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of the ethanolic and methanolic extracts of olive leaves compared to the effects of oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, and quercetin as a positive standard in a carbonyl compound (4-hydroxynonenal)-induced model of oxidative damage to rat cardiomyocytes (H9c2). Cell viability was detected by the MTT assay; reactive oxygen species production was assessed by the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate method, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was determined using a JC-1 dye kit. Phospho-Hsp27 (Ser82), phospho-MAPKAPK-2 (Thr334), phospho-c-Jun (Ser73), cleaved-caspase-3 (cl-CASP3) (Asp175), and phospho-SAPK/JNK (Thr183/Tyr185) were measured by Western blotting. The ethanolic and methanolic extracts of olive leaves inhibited 4-hydroxynonenal-induced apoptosis, characterized by increased reactive oxygen species production, impaired viability (LD50: 25 µM), mitochondrial dysfunction, and activation of pro-apoptotic cl-CASP3. The ethanolic and methanolic extracts of olive leaves also inhibited 4-hydroxynonenal-induced phosphorylation of stress-activated transcription factors, and the effects of extracts on p-SAPK/JNK, p-Hsp27, and p-MAPKAPK-2 were found to be concentration-dependent and comparable with oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, and quercetin. While the methanolic extract downregulated 4-hydroxynonenal-induced p-MAPKAPK-2 and p-c-Jun more than the ethanolic extract, it exerted a less inhibitory effect than the ethanolic extract on 4-hydroxynonenal-induced p-SAPK/JNK and p-Hsp27. cl-CASP3 and p-Hsp27 were attenuated, especially by quercetin. Experiments showed a predominant reactive oxygen species inhibitory and mitochondrial protecting ability at a concentration of 1-10 µg/mL of each extract, oleuropein

  1. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic detoxification of 4-hydroxynonenal: Methodological aspects and biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Mol, Marco; Regazzoni, Luca; Altomare, Alessandra; Degani, Genny; Carini, Marina; Vistoli, Giulio; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2017-02-02

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE), an electrophilic end-product deriving from lipid peroxidation, undergoes a heterogeneous set of biotransformations including enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions. The former mostly involve red-ox reactions on the HNE oxygenated functions (phase I metabolism) and GSH conjugations (phase II) while the latter are due to the HNE capacity to spontaneously condense with nucleophilic sites within endogenous molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids and phospholipids. The overall metabolic fate of HNE has recently attracted great interest not only because it clearly determines the HNE disposal, but especially because the generated metabolites and adducts are not inactive molecules (as initially believed) but show biological activities even more pronounced than those of the parent compound as exemplified by potent pro-inflammatory stimulus induced by GSH conjugates. Similarly, several studies revealed that the non-enzymatic reactions, initially considered as damaging processes randomly involving all endogenous nucleophilic reactants, are in fact quite selective in terms of both reactivity of the nucleophilic sites and stability of the generated adducts. Even though many formed adducts retain the expected toxic consequences, some adducts exhibit well-defined beneficial roles as documented by the protective effects of sublethal concentrations of HNE against toxic concentrations of HNE. Clearly, future investigations are required to gain a more detailed understanding of the metabolic fate of HNE as well as to identify novel targets involved in the biological activity of the HNE metabolites. These studies are and will be permitted by the continuous progress in the analytical methods for the identification and quantitation of novel HNE metabolites as well as for proteomic analyses able to offer a comprehensive picture of the HNE-induced adducted targets. On these grounds, the present review will focus on the major enzymatic and non-enzymatic HNE

  2. 4-Hydroxynonenal induces apoptosis in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes: the protective role of glutathione-S-transferase

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, France; Fahmi, Hassan; Shi, Qin; Lavigne, Patrick; Ranger, Pierre; Fernandes, Julio C; Benderdour, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Introduction 4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is one of the most abundant and reactive aldehydes of lipid peroxidation products and exerts various effects on intracellular and extracellular signalling cascades. We have previously shown that HNE at low concentrations could be considered as an important mediator of catabolic and inflammatory processes in osteoarthritis (OA). In the present study, we focused on characterizing the signalling cascade induced by high HNE concentration involved in cell death in human OA chondrocytes. Methods Markers of apoptosis were quantified with commercial kits. Protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting. Glutathione (GSH) and ATP levels were measured with commercial kits. Glucose uptake was assessed by 2-deoxy-D-[3H]-glucose. The role of GSH-S-transferase A4-4 (GSTA4-4) in controlling HNE-induced chondrocyte apoptosis was investigated by chondrocyte transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or with the expression vector of GSTA4-4. Results Our data showed that HNE at concentrations of up to 10 μM did not alter cell viability but was cytotoxic at concentrations of greater than or equal to 20 μM. HNE-induced chondrocyte death exhibited several classical hallmarks of apoptosis, including caspase activation, cytochrome c and apoptosis-induced factor release from mitochondria, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, Bcl-2 downregulation, Bax upregulation, and DNA fragmentation. Our study of signalling pathways revealed that HNE suppressed pro-survival Akt kinase activity but, in contrast, induced Fas/CD95 and p53 expression in chondrocytes. All of these effects were inhibited by an antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Analysis of cellular energy and redox status showed that HNE induced ATP, NADPH, and GSH depletion and inhibited glucose uptake and citric acid cycle activity. GSTA4-4 ablation by the siRNA method augmented HNE cytotoxicity, but, conversely, its overexpression efficiently protected chondrocytes from HNE-induced cell death

  3. Dietary regulation of catabolic disposal of 4-hydroxynonenal analogs in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingling; Tomcik, Kristyen; Zhang, Shenghui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2012-03-15

    Our previous work in perfused rat livers has demonstrated that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is catabolized predominantly via β oxidation. Therefore, we hypothesized that perturbations in β oxidation, such as diet-altered fatty acid oxidation activity, could lead to changes in HNE levels. To test our hypothesis, we (i) developed a simple and sensitive GC/MS method combined with mass isotopomer analysis to measure HNE and HNE analogs, 4-oxononenal (ONE) and 1,4-dihydroxynonene (DHN), and (ii) investigated the effects of four diets (standard, low-fat, ketogenic, and high-fat mix) on HNE, ONE, and DHN concentrations in rat livers. Our results showed that livers from rats fed the ketogenic diet or high-fat mix diet had high ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations and markers of oxidative stress. However, high concentrations of HNE (1.6 ± 0.5 nmol/g) and ONE (0.9 ± 0.2 nmol/g) were found only in livers from rats fed the high-fat mix diet. Livers from rats fed the ketogenic diet had low HNE (0.8 ± 0.1 nmol/g) and ONE (0.4 ± 0.07 nmol/g), similar to rats fed the standard diet. A possible explanation is that the predominant pathway of HNE catabolism (i.e., β oxidation) is activated in the liver by the ketogenic diet. This is consistent with a 10-fold decrease in malonyl-CoA in livers from rats fed a ketogenic diet compared to a standard diet. The accelerated catabolism of HNE lowers HNE and HNE analog concentrations in livers from rats fed the ketogenic diet. On the other hand, rats fed the high-fat mix diet had high rates of lipid synthesis and low rates of fatty acid oxidation, resulting in the slowing down of the catabolic disposal of HNE and HNE analogs. Thus, decreased HNE catabolism from a high-fat mix diet induces high concentrations of HNE and HNE analogs. The results of this work suggest a potential causal relationship to metabolic syndrome induced by Western diets (i.e., high-fat mix), as well as the effects of a ketogenic diet on the catabolism of lipid

  4. Dietary-regulation of catabolic disposal of 4-hydroxynonenal analogs in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Tomcik, Kristyen; Zhang, Shenghui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Our previous work in perfused rat livers has demonstrated that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is catabolized predominantly via beta oxidation. Therefore, we hypothesized that perturbations of beta oxidation, such as diet-altered fatty acid oxidation activity, could lead to changes in HNE levels. To test our hypothesis, we (i) developed a simple and sensitive GC/MS method combined with mass isotopomer analysis to measure HNE and HNE analogs, 4-oxononenal (ONE) and 1,4-dihydroxynonene (DHN), and (ii) investigated the effects of four diets (standard, low fat, ketogenic, and high fat mix diets) on HNE, ONE, and DHN concentrations in rat livers. Our results showed that livers from rats fed ketogenic diet or high fat mix diet had high ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations and markers of oxidative stress. However, high concentrations of HNE (1.6 ± 0.5 nmol/g) and ONE (0.9 ± 0.2 nmol/g) were only found in livers from rats fed the high fat mix diet. Livers from rats fed the ketogenic diet had low HNE (0.8 ± 0.1 nmol/g) and ONE (0.4 ± 0.07 nmol/g), similar to rats fed the standard diet. A possible explanation is that the predominant pathway of HNE catabolism (i.e. beta oxidation) is activated in the liver by the ketogenic diet. This is consistent with a 10 fold decrease in malonyl-CoA in livers from rats fed a ketogenic diet compared to a standard diet. The accelerated catabolism of HNE lowers HNE and HNE analog concentrations in livers from rats fed the ketogenic diet. On the other hand, rats fed the high fat mix diet had high rates of lipid synthesis and low rates of fatty acid oxidation, resulting in the slowing down of the catabolic disposal of HNE and HNE analogs. Thus, decreased HNE catabolism by a high fat mix diet induces high concentrations of HNE and HNE analogs. The results of the present work suggested a potential causal relationship to metabolic syndrome induced by western diets (i.e. high fat mix), as well as the effects of the ketogenic diet on the

  5. Rapamycin improves motor function, reduces 4-hydroxynonenal adducted protein in brain, and attenuates synaptic injury in a mouse model of synucleinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiang; Wey, Margaret Chia-Ying; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Hart, Matthew J.; Gelfond, Jonathan; Bokov, Alex F.; Rani, Sheela; Strong, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Background Synucleinopathy is any of a group of age-related neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and dementia with Lewy Bodies, which is characterized by α-synuclein inclusions and parkinsonian motor deficits affecting millions of patients worldwide. But there is no cure at present for synucleinopathy. Rapamycin has been shown to be neuroprotective in several in vitro and in vivo synucleinopathy models. However, there are no reports on the long-term effects of RAPA on motor function or measures of neurodegeneration in models of synucleinopathy. Methods We determined whether long-term feeding a rapamycin diet (14 ppm in diet; 2.25 mg/kg body weight/day) improves motor function in neuronal A53T α-synuclein transgenic mice (TG) and explored underlying mechanisms using a variety of behavioral and biochemical approaches. Results After 24 weeks of treatment, rapamycin improved performance on the forepaw stepping adjustment test, accelerating rotarod and pole test. Rapamycin did not alter A53T α-synuclein content. There was no effect of rapamycin treatment on midbrain or striatal monoamines or their metabolites. Proteins adducted to the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal were decreased in brain regions of both wild-type and TG mice treated with rapamycin. Reduced levels of the presynaptic marker synaptophysin were found in several brain regions of TG mice. Rapamycin attenuated the loss of synaptophysin protein in the affected brain regions. Rapamycin also attenuated the loss of synaptophysin protein and prevented the decrease of neurite length in SH-SY5Y cells treated with 4-hydroxynonenal. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that rapamycin, an FDA approved drug, may prove useful in the treatment of synucleinopathy. PMID:26306821

  6. Stereoselective Effects of 4-Hydroxynonenal in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski, Michael J.; Zolnerciks, Joseph K.; Balogh, Larissa M.; Greene, Robert J.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Atkins, William M.

    2010-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is produced from arachidonic acid or linoleic acid during oxidative stress. Although HNE is formed in tissues as a racemate, enantiospecific HNE effects have not been widely documented, nor considered. Therefore, a panel of cellular responses was compared after treatment with (R)-HNE, (S)-HNE, or racemic HNE. The phosphorylation status of Jun kinase (JNK) or Akt increased 28-fold or 2-3-fold, respectively, after treatment with 100 μM (S)-HNE and racemic HNE compared to (R)-HNE. In contrast, the increase in phosphorylation of MAPK was greatest for (R)-HNE. caspase-3-dependent cleavage of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were greater in cells treated with (S)-HNE at 48 hrs. (S)-HNE also caused a greater number of subG1 nuclei, a hallmark of apoptosis, at 30 hours after treatment. Together, the results demonstrate different dose- and time-dependent responses to (R)-HNE and (S)-HNE. The results further suggest that HNE enantiomers could differentially contribute to the progression of different diseases or contribute by different mechanisms. PMID:20873854

  7. Immunochemical detection of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts in oxidized hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Szweda, L I; Chae, H Z; Stadtman, E R

    1993-09-15

    We report here the development of an immunochemical procedure that uses an antibody specific to the 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) moiety for the detection of HNE-protein adducts. The HNE-specific antibody was prepared by immunizing rabbits with a HNE-keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate and purifying the rabbit serum on an affinity gel prepared by covalent attachment of a HNE-conjugated heptapeptide. When various preparations of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase containing 0-7.0 equivalent of HNE-histidine residues per subunit were obtained by incubating samples of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase with increased amounts of HNE and subjected to immunoblotting with the HNE-specific antibody, the intensities of the blots were directly proportional to the number of HNE-histidine adducts as measured directly by amino acid analysis. Binding of the HNE-conjugated glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase to the HNE-specific antibody could be completely inhibited by HNE-N-acetylhistidine, HNE-N-acetyllysine, or HNE-glutathione, suggesting that the antigenic determinant recognized by the antibody is the HNE moiety, not the HNE-amino acid conjugates, such as HNE-histidine, HNE-lysine, and HNE-cysteine. The utility of the HNE-specific antibody was demonstrated by its ability to react selectively with a number of HNE-protein adducts in immunoblot analyses of crude homogenates of rat liver hepatocytes that had been exposed to HNE or oxidative stresses with tert-butylhydroperoxide or metal-ion-catalyzed oxidation systems.

  8. Mass Spectrometric Evidence of Malonaldehyde and 4-Hydroxynonenal Adductions to Radical-Scavenging Soy Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Haining; Xiong, Youling L.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidative peptides in food systems are potential targets of lipid oxidation-generated reactive aldehydes, such as malonaldehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). In this study, covalent modifications on radical-scavenging peptides prepared from soy protein hydrolysate by MDA and HNE were characterized by liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). MS/MS analyses detected the formation of Schiff base type adducts of MDA on the side chain groups of lysine, histidine, arginine, glutamine, and asparagine residues as well as the N-termini of peptides. MDA also formed a fluorescent product with lysine residues. HNE adducted on lysine residues through Schiff base formation and on histidine, arginine, glutamine, and asparagine residues mainly through Michael addition. In spite of the extensive MDA modification, peptide cross-linking by this potential mechanism was undetectable. PMID:22946674

  9. Immunochemical detection of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts in oxidized hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, K; Szweda, L I; Chae, H Z; Stadtman, E R

    1993-01-01

    We report here the development of an immunochemical procedure that uses an antibody specific to the 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) moiety for the detection of HNE-protein adducts. The HNE-specific antibody was prepared by immunizing rabbits with a HNE-keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate and purifying the rabbit serum on an affinity gel prepared by covalent attachment of a HNE-conjugated heptapeptide. When various preparations of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase containing 0-7.0 equivalent of HNE-histidine residues per subunit were obtained by incubating samples of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase with increased amounts of HNE and subjected to immunoblotting with the HNE-specific antibody, the intensities of the blots were directly proportional to the number of HNE-histidine adducts as measured directly by amino acid analysis. Binding of the HNE-conjugated glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase to the HNE-specific antibody could be completely inhibited by HNE-N-acetylhistidine, HNE-N-acetyllysine, or HNE-glutathione, suggesting that the antigenic determinant recognized by the antibody is the HNE moiety, not the HNE-amino acid conjugates, such as HNE-histidine, HNE-lysine, and HNE-cysteine. The utility of the HNE-specific antibody was demonstrated by its ability to react selectively with a number of HNE-protein adducts in immunoblot analyses of crude homogenates of rat liver hepatocytes that had been exposed to HNE or oxidative stresses with tert-butylhydroperoxide or metal-ion-catalyzed oxidation systems. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8378358

  10. 4-hydroxynonenal in the pathogenesis and progression of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shoeb, Mohammad; Ansari, Naseem H; Srivastava, Satish K; Ramana, Kota V

    2014-01-01

    Metastable aldehydes produced by lipid peroxidation act as 'toxic second messengers' that extend the injurious potential of free radicals. 4-hydroxy 2-nonenal (HNE), a highly toxic and most abundant stable end product of lipid peroxidation, has been implicated in the tissue damage, dysfunction, injury associated with aging and other pathological states such as cancer, Alzheimer, diabetes, cardiovascular and inflammatory complications. Further, HNE has been considered as a oxidative stress marker and it act as a secondary signaling molecule to regulates a number of cell signaling pathways. Biological activity of HNE depends on its intracellular concentration, which can differentially modulate cell death, growth and differentiation. Therefore, the mechanisms responsible for maintaining the intracellular levels of HNE are most important, not only in the defense against oxidative stress but also in the pathophysiology of a number of disease processes. In this review, we discusse the significance of HNE in mediating various disease processes and how regulation of its metabolism could be therapeutically effective. PMID:23848536

  11. Macrophage uptake of low-density lipoprotein modified by 4-hydroxynonenal. An ultrastructural study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, H.F.; Cole, T.B. )

    1991-02-01

    We have documented the ultrastructural characteristics of the uptake and processing by mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) modified with 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an intermediate of lipid peroxidation. This was performed as part of a larger biochemical study assessing the role of LDL oxidation in lipid loading of macrophages during atherogenesis. Gold-labeled LDL that was modified with HNE leading to particle aggregation represented the morphologic probe used. When incubated with MPM, the probe became associated with short segments of cell membrane, probably derived from blebs or from lysed cells. At 37 degrees C there was a time-dependent increase in uptake by MPM, and at 4 hours the increase paralleled the degradation by MPM of 125I-labeled HNE-LDL-cAu. Clathrin-coated pits on the cell surface were consistently associated with probe. Uptake of probe appeared to occur via phagocytosis, because pseudopods frequently surrounded probe, and cytochalasin D quantitatively prevented probe uptake. A time-dependent increase was found in the number of gold particles per unit area within vacuoles, some of which were secondary lysosomes, based on acid phosphatase-positive staining. Thus, HNE-induced aggregation of LDL during oxidation, binding of aggregates to clathrin-coated pits on MPM, and subsequent phagocytosis may represent one of the ways lipid-laden foam cells are formed in vivo.

  12. Acetaldehyde-modified and 4-hydroxynonenal-modified proteins in the livers of rats with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Li, C J; Nanji, A A; Siakotos, A N; Lin, R C

    1997-09-01

    Liver proteins form adducts with acetaldehyde and are modified by products of lipid peroxidation in alcohol-fed animals. It has been hypothesized that the formation of these modified liver proteins may contribute to liver injury in alcoholic liver disease. The present work was performed to determine the extent of protein modification in rats with experimental alcoholic liver disease. Rats were fed ethanol intragastrically with medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), palm oil, corn oil, or fish oil. The group fed MCTs and ethanol showed no liver injury, rats fed palm oil and ethanol showed only fatty liver, rats fed corn oil and ethanol showed fatty liver with moderate necrosis and inflammation, and rats fed fish oil and ethanol showed fatty liver with severe necrosis and inflammation. Antibodies were raised by using keyhole limpet hemocyanin modified in vitro by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) or acetaldehyde as immunogens. When liver extracts were examined by Western blot analysis, the intensities of the acetaldehyde-modified protein band (37 kd) in the alcohol-fed animals were significantly different among the ethanol-treated groups and correlated with plasma acetaldehyde concentrations. It was strongest in rats fed fish oil and ethanol, followed by rats fed palm oil and ethanol and rats fed corn oil and ethanol, whereas rats fed MCTs and ethanol showed the weakest intensity. The 37-kd protein-adetaldehyde adduct was located mainly in the pericentral region of the liver. No acetaldehyde adduct was detected in the control rats that were pair-fed with isocaloric amounts of dextrose. Western blot analysis using the anti-4-HNE antibody showed four distinctive bands (48, 45, 40, and 38 kd) in the liver extracts of alcohol-fed rats. Control animals showed only a weak 38-kd band. Although the intensities of the 48-, 40-, and 38-kd bands were similar among the different ethanol-treated groups, the intensity of the 45-kd band decreased from MCTs and ethanol > palm oil and ethanol

  13. On the role of 4-hydroxynonenal in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Csala, Miklós; Kardon, Tamás; Legeza, Balázs; Lizák, Beáta; Mandl, József; Margittai, Éva; Puskás, Ferenc; Száraz, Péter; Szelényi, Péter; Bánhegyi, Gábor

    2015-05-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are susceptible to peroxidation and they yield various degradation products, including the main α,β-unsaturated hydroxyalkenal, 4-hydroxy-2,3-trans-nonenal (HNE) in oxidative stress. Due to its high reactivity, HNE interacts with various macromolecules of the cell, and this general toxicity clearly contributes to a wide variety of pathological conditions. In addition, growing evidence suggests a more specific function of HNE in electrophilic signaling as a second messenger of oxidative/electrophilic stress. It can induce antioxidant defense mechanisms to restrain its own production and to enhance the cellular protection against oxidative stress. Moreover, HNE-mediated signaling can largely influence the fate of the cell through modulating major cellular processes, such as autophagy, proliferation and apoptosis. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms underlying the signaling and regulatory functions of HNE. The role of HNE in the pathophysiology of cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases is also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhanced 4-Hydroxynonenal Resistance in KEAP1 Silenced Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyeong-Ah; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is the transcription factor that regulates an array of antioxidant/detoxifying genes for cellular defense. The conformational changes of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1), a cytosolic repressor protein of NRF2, by various stimuli result in NRF2 liberation and accumulation in the nucleus. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of KEAP1 knockdown on NRF2 target gene expression and its toxicological implication using human colon cancer cells. The stable KEAP1-knockdown HT29 cells exhibit elevated levels of NRF2 and its target gene expressions. In particular, the mRNA levels of aldo-keto reductases (AKR1C1, 1C2, 1C3, 1B1, and 1B10) were substantially increased in KEAP1 silenced HT29 cells. These differential AKRs expressions appear to contribute to protection against oxidative stress. The KEAP1-knockdown cells were relatively more resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) compared to the control cells. Accordantly, we observed accumulation of 4HNE protein adducts in H2O2- or 4HNE-treated control cells, whereas KEAP1-knockdown cells did not increase adduct formation. The treatment of KEAP1-silenced cells with AKR1C inhibitor flufenamic acid increased 4HNE-induced cellular toxicity and protein adduct formation. Taken together, these results indicate that AKRs, which are NRF2-dependent highly inducible gene clusters, play a role in NRF2-mediated cytoprotection against lipid peroxide toxicity. PMID:23766854

  15. Non-protein-bound iron and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts in classic autism.

    PubMed

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Leoncini, Silvia; De Felice, Claudio; Signorini, Cinzia; Cerrone, Cosimina; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2013-02-01

    A link between oxidative stress and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) remains controversial with opposing views on its role in the pathogenesis of the disease. We investigated for the first time the levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), a pro-oxidant factor, and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts (4-HNE PAs), as a marker of lipid peroxidation-induced protein damage, in classic autism. Patients with classic autism (n=20, mean age 12.0±6.2years) and healthy controls (n=18, mean age 11.7±6.5years) were examined. Intraerythrocyte and plasma NPBI were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and 4-HNE PAs in erythrocyte membranes and plasma were detected by Western blotting. The antioxidant defences were evaluated as erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) levels using a spectrophotometric assay. Intraerythrocyte and plasma NPBI levels were significantly increased (1.98- and 3.56-folds) in autistic patients, as compared to controls (p=0.0019 and p<0.0001, respectively); likewise, 4-HNE PAs were significantly higher in erythrocyte membranes and in plasma (1.58- and 1.6-folds, respectively) from autistic patients than controls (p=0.0043 and p=0.0001, respectively). Erythrocyte GSH was slightly decreased (-10.34%) in patients compared to controls (p=0.0215). Our findings indicate an impairment of the redox status in classic autism patients, with a consequent imbalance between oxidative stress and antioxidant defences. Increased levels of NPBI could contribute to lipid peroxidation and, consequently, to increased plasma and erythrocyte membranes 4-HNE PAs thus amplifying the oxidative damage, potentially contributing to the autistic phenotype.

  16. Alterations in mitochondrial respiratory functions, redox metabolism and apoptosis by oxidant 4-hydroxynonenal and antioxidants curcumin and melatonin in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, Haider John, Annie; Brown, Eric M.; Benedict, Sheela; Kambal, Amr

    2008-01-15

    Cellular oxidative stress and alterations in redox metabolisms have been implicated in the etiology and pathology of many diseases including cancer. Antioxidant treatments have been proven beneficial in controlling these diseases. We have recently shown that 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a by-product of lipid peroxidation, induces oxidative stress in PC12 cells by compromising the mitochondrial redox metabolism. In this study, we have further investigated the deleterious effects of 4-HNE on mitochondrial respiratory functions and apoptosis using the same cell line. In addition, we have also compared the effects of two antioxidants, curcumin and melatonin, used as chemopreventive agents, on mitochondrial redox metabolism and respiratory functions in these cells. 4-HNE treatment has been shown to cause a reduction in glutathione (GSH) pool, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein carbonylation and apoptosis. A marked inhibition in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase was observed after 4-HNE treatment. Increased nuclear translocation of NF-kB/p65 protein was also observed after 4-HNE treatment. Curcumin and melatonin treatments, on the other hand, maintained the mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions without a marked effect on ROS production and cell viability. These results suggest that 4-HNE-induced cytotoxicity may be associated, at least in part, with the altered mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions. The alterations in mitochondrial energy metabolism and redox functions may therefore be critical in determining the difference between cell death and survival.

  17. Src Tyrosine Kinase Activation by 4-Hydroxynonenal Upregulates p38, ERK/AP-1 Signaling and COX-2 Expression in YPEN-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Ji; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Park, Daeui; Kim, Dae Hyun; Choi, Yeon Ja; Chung, Ki Wung; Park, Min Hi; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2015-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major end product of lipid peroxidation, is highly reactive and involved in various cellular processes, such as inflammatory signaling. However, to date, the mechanistic roles of 4-HNE in inflammatory signaling related to protein tyrosine kinases have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between 4-HNE and Src (a non-receptor tyrosine kinase) for its involvement in the molecular modulation of the inflammatory signaling pathway utilizing the YPEN-1 cell system. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that 4-HNE phosphorylates (activates) Src at Tyr416 via adduct formation. In addition, LC-MS/MS and a docking simulation model revealed an addiction site at the Cys248 residue of Src, resulting in the stimulation of downstream p38, ERK/AP-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) signaling in YPEN-1 cells. The role of 4-HNE-activated Src in downstream inflammatory signaling was further investigated using dasatinib (a Src inhibitor) and by siRNA knockdown of Src. p38 and ERK were directly regulated by Src, as revealed by immunoblotting of the phosphorylated forms of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are key elements in the signaling transduction pathway initiated by Src. The study also shows that Src modulates the HNE-enhanced activation of AP-1 and the expression of COX-2 (a target gene of AP-1). Together, the results of this study show that 4-HNE stimulates Src tyrosine kinase in activation of the inflammation process.

  18. Age-related increase in 4-hydroxynonenal adduction to rat heart alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase does not cause loss of its catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Régis; Heath, Shi-Hua D; Doneanu, Catalin E; Lindsay, J Gordon; Hagen, Tory M

    2003-10-01

    4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a product of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation, impairs mitochondrial respiration in vitro by adducting the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDC) and inhibiting its activity. The present study seeks to define whether aging increases HNE adduction to rat heart KGDC, and whether such adduction impacts KGDC activity. We found that hearts from old rats exhibit significantly (p< or =0.01) higher HNE-modified mitochondrial proteins when compared with those from young rats. Among these proteins, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, the E2k component of KGDC, was most markedly modified (p< or =0.01) by HNE with age. As opposed to that seen in vitro, no significant change in electrophoretic mobility or impairment in enzyme activity was observed. On the contrary, KGDC activity increased onefold (p< or =0.01) in old rats, suggesting that the aging myocardium is not affected by HNE adduction or compensates for such damage. Further analysis revealed that heightened KGDC activity was not due to increased protein content or gene expression, but correlates with a lower Km for alpha-ketoglutarate. Thus, contrary to that observed in vitro, the measurement of HNE-KGDC adduct in rat heart is more relevant as a marker of age-related protein oxidation than a factor of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. 4-Hydroxynonenal dependent alteration of TRPV1-mediated coronary microvascular signaling.

    PubMed

    DelloStritto, Daniel J; Sinharoy, Pritam; Connell, Patrick J; Fahmy, Joseph N; Cappelli, Holly C; Thodeti, Charles K; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Damron, Derek S; Bratz, Ian N

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated previously that TRPV1-dependent regulation of coronary blood flow (CBF) is disrupted in diabetes. Further, we have shown that endothelial TRPV1 is differentially regulated, ultimately leading to the inactivation of TRPV1, when exposed to a prolonged pathophysiological oxidative environment. This environment has been shown to increase lipid peroxidation byproducts including 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). 4-HNE is notorious for producing protein post-translation modification (PTM) via reactions with the amino acids: cysteine, histidine and lysine. Thus, we sought to determine if 4-HNE mediated post-translational modification of TRPV1 could account for dysfunctional TRPV1-mediated signaling observed in diabetes. Our initial studies demonstrate 4-HNE infusion decreases TRPV1-dependent coronary blood flow in C57BKS/J (WT) mice. Further, we found that TRPV1-dependent vasorelaxation was suppressed after 4-HNE treatment in isolated mouse coronary arterioles. Moreover, we demonstrate 4-HNE significantly inhibited TRPV1 currents and Ca(2+) entry utilizing patch-clamp electrophysiology and calcium imaging respectively. Using molecular modeling, we identified potential pore cysteines residues that, when mutated, could restore TRPV1 function in the presence of 4-HNE. Specifically, complete rescue of capsaicin-mediated activation of TRPV1 was obtained following mutation of pore Cysteine 621. Finally, His tag pull-down of TRPV1 in HEK cells treated with 4-HNE demonstrated a significant increase in 4-HNE binding to TRPV1, which was reduced in the TRPV1 C621G mutant. Taken together these data suggest that 4-HNE decreases TRPV1-mediated responses, at both the in vivo and in vitro levels and this dysfunction can be rescued via mutation of the pore Cysteine 621. Our results show the first evidence of an amino acid specific modification of TRPV1 by 4-HNE suggesting this 4-HNE-dependent modification of TRPV1 may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue perfusion

  20. Malarial pigment hemozoin impairs chemotactic motility and transendothelial migration of monocytes via 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Skorokhod, Oleksii A; Barrera, Valentina; Heller, Regine; Carta, Franco; Turrini, Franco; Arese, Paolo; Schwarzer, Evelin

    2014-10-01

    Natural hemozoin, nHZ, is avidly phagocytosed in vivo and in vitro by human monocytes. The persistence of the undigested β-hematin core of nHZ in the phagocyte lysosome for long periods of time modifies several cellular immune functions. Here we show that nHZ phagocytosis by human primary monocytes severely impaired their chemotactic motility toward MCP-1, TNF, and FMLP, by approximately 80% each, and their diapedesis across a confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cell layer toward MCP-1 by 45±5%. No inhibition was observed with latex-fed or unfed monocytes. Microscopic inspection revealed polarization defects in nHZ-fed monocytes due to irregular actin polymerization. Phagocytosed nHZ catalyzes the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and generation of the highly reactive derivative 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Similar to nHZ phagocytosis, the exposure of monocytes to in vivo-compatible 4-HNE concentrations inhibited cell motility in both the presence and the absence of chemotactic stimuli, suggesting severe impairment of cytoskeleton dynamics. Consequently, 4-HNE conjugates with the cytoskeleton proteins β-actin and coronin-1A were immunochemically identified in nHZ-fed monocytes and mass spectrometrically localized in domains of protein-protein interactions involved in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell motility. The molecular and functional modifications of actin and coronin by nHZ/4-HNE may also explain impaired phagocytosis, another motility-dependent process previously described in nHZ-fed monocytes. Further studies will show whether impaired monocyte motility may contribute to the immunodepression and the frequent occurrence of secondary infections observed in malaria patients.

  1. 4-Hydroxyhexenal and 4-hydroxynonenal are mediators of the anti-cachectic effect of n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids on human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Muzio, G; Ricci, M; Traverso, N; Monacelli, F; Oraldi, M; Maggiora, M; Canuto, R A

    2016-10-01

    Cachexia, the most severe paraneoplastic syndrome, occurs in about 80% of patients with advanced cancer; it cannot be reverted by conventional, enteral, or parenteral nutrition. For this reason, nutritional interventions must be based on the use of substances possessing, alongside nutritional and energetic properties, the ability to modulate production of the pro-inflammatory factors responsible for the metabolic changes characterising cancer cachexia. In light of their nutritional and anti-inflammatory properties, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and in particular n-3, have been investigated for treating cachexia; however, the results have been contradictory. Since both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs can affect cell functions in several ways, this research investigated the possibility that the effects of both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs could be mediated by their major aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxyhexenal (HHE) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), and by their anti-inflammatory properties. An "in vitro" cancer cachexia model, consisting of human lung cancer cells (A427) and murine myoblasts (C2C12), was used. The results showed that: 1) both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs reduced the growth of lung cancer cells without causing cell death, increased lipid peroxidation and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR)α, and decreased TNFα; 2) culture medium conditioned by A427 cells grown in the absence of PUFAs blocked myosin production and the differentiation of C2C12 muscle cells; conversely, muscle cells grown in culture medium conditioned by the same cells in the presence of PUFAs showed myosin expression and formed myotubes; 3) adding HHE or HNE directly to C2C12 cells maintained in culture medium conditioned by A427 cells in the absence of PUFAs stimulated myosin production and myotube formation; 4) putative consensus sequences for (PPARs) have been found in genes encoding fast isoforms of myosin heavy chain, by a bioinformatics approach. The overall results show, first

  2. Reduced cellular redox status induces 4-hydroxynonenal-mediated caspase 3 activation leading to erythrocyte death during chronic arsenic exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Biswas, Tuli

    2010-05-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in rats led to gradual accumulation of the toxicant in erythrocytes causing oxidative stress in these cells. 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major aldehyde product of lipid peroxidation, contributed significantly to the cytopathological events observed during oxidative stress in the erythrocytes of exposed rats. 4-HNE triggered death signal cascade that was initiated with the formation of HNE-protein adducts in cytosol. HNE-protein adduct formation resulted in depletion of cytosolic antioxidants followed by increased generation of ROS. Results showed accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) from the early stages of arsenic exposure, while superoxide (O(2)(*-)) and hydroxyl radical ((*)OH) also contributed to the oxidative stress during longer period of exposure. Suppression of antioxidant system coupled with increased generation of ROS eventually led to activation of caspase 3 during arsenic exposure. Attenuation of HNE-mediated activation of caspase 3 in presence of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) indicated the involvement of GSH in the process. Prevention of HNE-mediated degradation of membrane proteins in presence of Z-DEVD-FMK identified caspase 3 as the principal mediator of HNE-induced cellular damage during arsenic exposure. Degradation of band 3 followed by its aggregation on the red cell surface promoted immunologic recognition of redistributed band 3 by autologous IgG with subsequent attachment of C3b. Finally, the formation of C3b-IgG-band 3 immune complex accelerated the elimination of affected cells from circulation and led to the decline of erythrocyte life span during chronic arsenic toxicity. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduced cellular redox status induces 4-hydroxynonenal-mediated caspase 3 activation leading to erythrocyte death during chronic arsenic exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Biswas, Tuli

    2010-05-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in rats led to gradual accumulation of the toxicant in erythrocytes causing oxidative stress in these cells. 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major aldehyde product of lipid peroxidation, contributed significantly to the cytopathological events observed during oxidative stress in the erythrocytes of exposed rats. 4-HNE triggered death signal cascade that was initiated with the formation of HNE-protein adducts in cytosol. HNE-protein adduct formation resulted in depletion of cytosolic antioxidants followed by increased generation of ROS. Results showed accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) from the early stages of arsenic exposure, while superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup c}entre dot{sup -}) and hydroxyl radical ({sup c}entre dotOH) also contributed to the oxidative stress during longer period of exposure. Suppression of antioxidant system coupled with increased generation of ROS eventually led to activation of caspase 3 during arsenic exposure. Attenuation of HNE-mediated activation of caspase 3 in presence of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) indicated the involvement of GSH in the process. Prevention of HNE-mediated degradation of membrane proteins in presence of Z-DEVD-FMK identified caspase 3 as the principal mediator of HNE-induced cellular damage during arsenic exposure. Degradation of band 3 followed by its aggregation on the red cell surface promoted immunologic recognition of redistributed band 3 by autologous IgG with subsequent attachment of C3b. Finally, the formation of C3b-IgG-band 3 immune complex accelerated the elimination of affected cells from circulation and led to the decline of erythrocyte life span during chronic arsenic toxicity.

  4. Carcinine has 4-hydroxynonenal scavenging property and neuroprotective effect in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Marchette, Lea D; Wang, Huaiwen; Li, Feng; Babizhayev, Mark A; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne

    2012-06-20

    Oxidative stress induces retinal damage and contributes to vision loss in progressive retinopathies. Carcinine (β-alanyl-histamine) is a natural imidazole-containing peptide derivative with antioxidant activity. It is predicted to scavenge 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a toxic product of lipid oxidation. The aim of this study was to confirm the 4-HNE scavenging effect and evaluate the neuroprotective effect of carcinine in mouse retina subjected to oxidative stress. HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry was used to analyze carcinine and 4-HNE-carcinine adduct. Protection of retinal proteins from modification by 4-HNE was tested by incubating carcinine with retinal protein extract and 4-HNE. Modified retinal proteins were quantified by dot-blot analysis. Mice were treated with carcinine (intravitreal injection and gavage) and exposed to bright light to induce oxidative damage in the retina. Photoreceptor degeneration was measured by histology and electroretinography. Retinal levels of retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) were measured by immunoblot analysis, after exposure to bright light and in retinal explants after exposure to 4-HNE. The ability of carcinine to form an adduct with 4-HNE, as well as to prevent and even reverse the adduction of retinal proteins by the toxic aldehyde was demonstrated in vitro. Carcinine, administered by intravitreal injection or gavage, strongly protected mouse retina against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration and had a protective effect on RHD12, a protein found specifically in photoreceptor cells. This study suggests that carcinine can be administered noninvasively to efficiently protect photoreceptor cells from oxidative damage. Carcinine could be administered daily to prevent vision loss in progressive retinopathies.

  5. Carcinine Has 4-Hydroxynonenal Scavenging Property and Neuroprotective Effect in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Marchette, Lea D.; Wang, Huaiwen; Li, Feng; Babizhayev, Mark A.; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Oxidative stress induces retinal damage and contributes to vision loss in progressive retinopathies. Carcinine (β-alanyl-histamine) is a natural imidazole-containing peptide derivative with antioxidant activity. It is predicted to scavenge 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a toxic product of lipid oxidation. The aim of this study was to confirm the 4-HNE scavenging effect and evaluate the neuroprotective effect of carcinine in mouse retina subjected to oxidative stress. Methods. HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry was used to analyze carcinine and 4-HNE-carcinine adduct. Protection of retinal proteins from modification by 4-HNE was tested by incubating carcinine with retinal protein extract and 4-HNE. Modified retinal proteins were quantified by dot-blot analysis. Mice were treated with carcinine (intravitreal injection and gavage) and exposed to bright light to induce oxidative damage in the retina. Photoreceptor degeneration was measured by histology and electroretinography. Retinal levels of retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) were measured by immunoblot analysis, after exposure to bright light and in retinal explants after exposure to 4-HNE. Results. The ability of carcinine to form an adduct with 4-HNE, as well as to prevent and even reverse the adduction of retinal proteins by the toxic aldehyde was demonstrated in vitro. Carcinine, administered by intravitreal injection or gavage, strongly protected mouse retina against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration and had a protective effect on RHD12, a protein found specifically in photoreceptor cells. Conclusions. This study suggests that carcinine can be administered noninvasively to efficiently protect photoreceptor cells from oxidative damage. Carcinine could be administered daily to prevent vision loss in progressive retinopathies. PMID:22577078

  6. Site-specific mutagenicity of stereochemically defined 1,N2-deoxyguanosine adducts of trans-4-hydroxynonenal in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Priscilla H; Wang, Hao; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Trans-4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is a toxic compound produced endogenously during lipid peroxidation. HNE is a potent electrophile that is reactive with both proteins and nucleic acids. HNE preferentially reacts with deoxyguanosine to form four stereoisomeric HNE-deoxyguanosine (HNE-dG) adducts: (6R, 8S, 11R), (6S, 8R, 11S), (6R, 8S, 11S), and (6S, 8R, 11R). These adducts were synthesized into 12-mer oligodeoxynucleotides, inserted into a DNA shuttle vector and evaluated for the ability of each stereoisomer to induce mutagenesis when replicated through mammalian cells. The resultant mutagenicity of these adducts was related to their stereochemistry, in that two of the HNE-dG adducts, (6R, 8S, 11R) and (6S, 8R, 11S), were significantly more mutagenic than the (6R, 8S, 11S) and (6S, 8R, 11R) HNE-dG adducts. These data conclusively demonstrate that HNE-derived DNA adducts can be mutagenic in mammalian cells and their ability to cause mutations is dictated by their stereochemistry. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Cumene hydroperoxide, an agent inducing lipid peroxidation, and 4-hydroxy-2,3-nonenal, a peroxidation product, cause coronary vasodilatation in perfused rat hearts by a cyclic nucleotide independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    van der Kraaij, A M; de Jonge, H R; Esterbauer, H; de Vente, J; Steinbusch, H W; Koster, J F

    1990-02-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE - The aim of the study was to determine whether cumene hydroperoxide, a substance known to induce lipid peroxidation through free radical action, and 4-hydroxy-2,3-nonenal (4-hydroxynonenal), a major aldehyde formed during lipid peroxidation, induce coronary vasodilatation by changing cyclic nucleotide levels. DESIGN - The study involved Langendorff perfused rat hearts, using different concentrations of cumene hydroperoxide and 4-hydroxynonenal, with sodium nitroprusside for comparison. Coronary flow was measured indirectly as retrograde aortic flow, with constant perfusion pressure. Information about the precise localisation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the heart was obtained by immunocytochemistry, using a new cGMP antiserum. EXPERIMENTAL MATERIAL - Hearts were from male Wistar rats, body weight 200-250 g. MEASUREMENTS and RESULTS - Both cumene hydroperoxide and 4-hydroxynonenal caused a dose dependent and reversible increase in coronary flow comparable with sodium nitroprusside. With sodium nitroprusside there was a good correlation between extent of vasodilatation and total heart cGMP concentration. Vasodilatation induced by cumene hydroperoxide or 4-hydroxynonenal was not accompanied by increase in total heart cGMP or cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) concentration. Isoprenaline was used as a positive control for cAMP. cGMP immunostaining was found in coronary vascular smooth muscle after vasodilatation with sodium nitroprusside, but no immunostaining was found in vascular smooth muscle after vasodilatation with cumene hydroperoxide or 4-hydroxynonenal. CONCLUSIONS - Cumene hydroperoxide and 4-hydroxynonenal can provoke reversible coronary vasodilatation in isolated perfused rat hearts by a cyclic nucleotide independent mechanism.

  8. Lipid Peroxidation and Its Toxicological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Tae-gyu

    2011-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a free radical oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid or arachidonic acid. This process has been related with various pathologies and disease status mainly because of the oxidation products formed during the process. The oxidation products include reactive aldehydes such as malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. These reactive aldehydes can form adducts with DNAs and proteins, leading to the alterations in their functions to cause various diseases. This review will provide a short summary on the implication of lipid peroxidation on cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegeneration as well as chemical and biochemical mechanisms by which these adducts affect the pathological conditions. In addition, select examples will be presented where antioxidants were used to counteract oxidative damage caused by lipid peroxidation. At the end, isoprostanes are discussed as a gold standard for the assessment of oxidative damages. PMID:24278542

  9. Lipid peroxidation and its toxicological implications.

    PubMed

    Nam, Tae-Gyu

    2011-03-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a free radical oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid or arachidonic acid. This process has been related with various pathologies and disease status mainly because of the oxidation products formed during the process. The oxidation products include reactive aldehydes such as malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. These reactive aldehydes can form adducts with DNAs and proteins, leading to the alterations in their functions to cause various diseases. This review will provide a short summary on the implication of lipid peroxidation on cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegeneration as well as chemical and biochemical mechanisms by which these adducts affect the pathological conditions. In addition, select examples will be presented where antioxidants were used to counteract oxidative damage caused by lipid peroxidation. At the end, isoprostanes are discussed as a gold standard for the assessment of oxidative damages.

  10. Separation and characterization of the aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation stimulated by ADP-Fe2+ in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Esterbauer, H; Cheeseman, K H; Dianzani, M U; Poli, G; Slater, T F

    1982-01-01

    1. Methods using t.l.c. and high-pressure liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.) have been used to separate the complex variety of substances possessing a carbonyl function that are produced during lipid peroxidation. 2. The major type of lipid peroxidation studied was the ADP-Fe2+-stimulated peroxidation of rat liver microsomal phospholipids. Preliminary separation of the polar and non-polar products was achieved by t.l.c.: further separation and identification of individual components was performed by h.p.l.c. Estimations were performed on microsomal pellets and the supernatant mixture after incubation of microsomes for 30 min at 37 degrees C. 3. The polar fraction was larger than the non-polar fraction when expressed as nmol of carbonyl groups/g of liver. In the non-polar supernatant fraction the major contributors were n-alkanals (31% of the total), alpha-dicarbonyl compounds (22%) and 4-hydroxyalkenals (37%) with the extraction method used. 4. Major individual contributors to the non-polar fraction were found to be propanal, 4-hydroxynonenal, hexanal and oct-2-enal. Other components identified include butanal, pent-2-enal, hex-2-enal, hept-2-enal, 4-hydroxyoctenal and 4-hydroxyundecenal. The polar carbonyl fraction was less complex than the non-polar fraction, although the identities of the individual components have not yet been established. 5. Since these carbonyl compounds do not react significantly in the thiobarbituric acid reaction, which largely demonstrates the presence of malonaldehyde, it is concluded that considerable amounts of biologically reactive carbonyl derivatives are released in lipid peroxidation and yet may not be picked up by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. PMID:7159389

  11. Differential regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase by 4-hydroxynonenal in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes through ATF-2/CREB-1 transactivation and concomitant inhibition of NF-kappaB signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, France; Morquette, Barbara; Shi, Qin; Fahmi, Hassan; Lavigne, Patrick; Di Battista, John A; Fernandes, Julio C; Benderdour, Mohamed

    2007-04-01

    4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a lipid peroxidation end product, is produced abundantly in osteoarthritic (OA) articular tissues and was recently identified as a potent catabolic factor in OA cartilage. In this study, we provide additional evidence that HNE acts as an inflammatory mediator by elucidating the signaling cascades targeted in OA chondrocytes leading to cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression. HNE induced COX-2 protein and mRNA levels with accompanying increases in prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) production. In contrast, HNE had no effect on basal iNOS expression or nitric oxide (NO) release. However, HNE strongly inhibited IL-1beta-induced iNOS or NO production. Transient transfection experiments revealed that the ATF/CRE site (-58/-53) is essential for HNE-induced COX-2 promoter activation and indeed HNE induced ATF-2 and CREB-1 phosphorylation as well as ATF/CRE binding activity. Overexpression of p38 MAPK enhanced the HNE-induced ATF/CRE luciferase reporter plasmid activation, COX-2 synthesis and promoter activity. HNE abrogated IL-1beta-induced iNOS expression and promoter activity mainly through NF-kappaB site (-5,817/-5,808) possibly via suppression of IKKalpha-induced IkappaBalpha phosphorylation and NF-kappaB/p65 nuclear translocation. Upon examination of upstream signaling components, we found that IKKalpha was inactivated through HNE/IKKalpha adduct formation. Taken together, these findings illustrate the central role played by HNE in the regulation of COX-2 and iNOS in OA. The aldehyde induced selectively COX-2 expression via ATF/CRE activation and inhibited iNOS via IKKalpha inactivation. c 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation in rat frontal cortex by chronic NMDA administration can be partially prevented by lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Helena K; Isaacs-Trepanier, Cameron; Elmi, Nika; Rapoport, Stanley I; Andreazza, Ana C

    2016-05-01

    Chronic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) administration to rats may be a model to investigate excitotoxicity mediated by glutamatergic hyperactivity, and lithium has been reported to be neuroprotective. We hypothesized that glutamatergic hyperactivity in chronic NMDA injected rats would cause mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation in the brain, and that chronic lithium treatment would ameliorate some of these NMDA-induced alterations. Rats treated with lithium for 6 weeks were injected i.p. 25 mg/kg NMDA on a daily basis for the last 21 days of lithium treatment. Brain was removed and frontal cortex was analyzed. Chronic NMDA decreased brain levels of mitochondrial complex I and III, and increased levels of the lipid oxidation products, 8-isoprostane and 4-hydroxynonenal, compared with non-NMDA injected rats. Lithium treatment prevented the NMDA-induced increments in 8-isoprostane and 4-hydroxynonenal. Our findings suggest that increased chronic activation of NMDA receptors can induce alterations in electron transport chain complexes I and III and in lipid peroxidation in brain. The NMDA-induced changes may contribute to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, which plays a role in brain diseases such as bipolar disorder. Lithium treatment prevented changes in 8-isoprostane and 4-hydroxynonenal, which may contribute to lithium's reported neuroprotective effect and efficacy in bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Protective effects of red wine flavonols on 4-hydroxynonenal-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Jin; Kang, Nam Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2009-08-01

    There is accumulating evidence that a moderate consumption of red wine has health benefits, such as the inhibition of neurodegenerative diseases. Although this is generally attributed to resveratrol, the protective mechanisms and the active substance(s) remain unclear. We examined whether and how red wine extract (RWE) and red wine flavonols quercetin and myricetin inhibited 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-induced apoptosis of rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. RWE attenuated HNE-induced PC12 cell death in a dose-dependent manner. HNE induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, which is involved in DNA repair in the nucleus, and this was inhibited by RWE treatment. Treatment with RWE also inhibited HNE-induced nuclear condensation in PC12 cells. Data of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate showed that RWE protected against apoptosis of PC12 cells by attenuating intracellular reactive oxygen species. The cytoprotective effects on HNE-induced cell death were stronger for quercetin and myricetin than for resveratrol. HNE-induced nuclear condensation was attenuated by quercetin and myricetin. These results suggest that the neuroprotective potential of red wine is attributable to flavonols rather than to resveratrol.

  14. Increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal and acrolein in the brain in preclinical Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bradley, M A; Markesbery, W R; Lovell, M A

    2010-06-15

    Previous studies demonstrate increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and acrolein in vulnerable brain regions of subjects with mild cognitive impairment and late-stage Alzheimer disease (LAD). Recently preclinical AD (PCAD) subjects, who demonstrate normal antemortem neuropsychological test scores but abundant AD pathology at autopsy, have become the focus of increased study. Levels of extractable HNE and acrolein were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization, and protein-bound HNE and acrolein were quantified by dot-blot immunohistochemistry in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus (HPG), superior and middle temporal gyri (SMTG), and cerebellum (CER) of 10 PCAD and 10 age-matched normal control (NC) subjects. Results of the analyses show a significant (P<0.05) increase in levels of extractable acrolein in the HPG of PCAD subjects compared to age-matched NC subjects and a significant decrease in extractable acrolein in PCAD CER. Significant increases in protein-bound HNE in HPG and a significant decrease in CER of PCAD subjects compared to NC subjects were observed. No significant alterations were observed in either extractable or protein-bound HNE or acrolein in the SMTG of PCAD subjects. Additionally, no significant differences in levels of protein carbonyls were observed in the HPG, SMTG, or CER of PCAD subjects compared to NC subjects.

  15. Geldanamycin increases 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-induced cell death in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Ryhänen, Tuomas; Karjalainen, Hannu M; Lammi, Mikko J; Suuronen, Tiina; Huhtala, Anne; Kontkanen, Matti; Teräsvirta, Markku; Uusitalo, Hannu; Salminen, Antero

    Development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with functional abnormalities and cell death in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells attributable to oxidative stress. To minimize the adverse effects of oxidative stress, cells activate their defence systems, e.g., via increased expression of heat shock protein (Hsp), activation of stress sensitive AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription factors. In this study, we examined the accumulation of Hsp70 protein, activation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription factors in human ARPE-19 cells subjected to a 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-induced oxidative stress. In addition, the influence of Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) was studied in HNE-treated cells. Mitochondrial metabolic activity and apoptosis were determined to evaluate cell death in the ARPE-19 cells. The ARPE-19 cells showed increased accumulation of Hsp70 protein before of the cytotoxic hallmarks appearing in response to HNE. In contrast, increased DNA-binding activities of AP-1 or NF-kappaB transcription factors were not seen under HNE insults. Interestingly, GA significantly increased cell death in the HNE-treated cells, which was involved in caspase-3 independent apoptosis. This study reveals that the Hsps have an important role in the cytoprotection of RPE cells subjected to HNE-derived oxidative stress.

  16. Modification of Platelet Proteins by 4-hydroxynonenal: Potential Mechanisms for Inhibition of Aggregation and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Saranya; Johnson, Michelle S.; Chacko, Balu K.; Kramer, Philip A.; Sawada, Hirotaka; Locy, Morgan L.; Wilson, Landon. S.; Barnes, Stephen; Marques, Marisa B.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet aggregation is an essential response to tissue injury and is associated with activation of pro-oxidant enzymes, such as cyclooxygenase, and is also a highly energetic process. The two central energetic pathways in the cell, glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, are susceptible to damage by reactive lipid species. Interestingly, how platelet metabolism is affected by the oxidative stress associated with aggregation is largely unexplored. To address this issue, we examined the response of human platelets to 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a reactive lipid species which is generated during thrombus formation and during oxidative stress. Elevated plasma 4-HNE has been associated with renal failure, septic shock and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. In this study, we found that 4-HNE decreased thrombin stimulated platelet aggregation by approximately 60%. The metabolomics analysis demonstrated that underlying our previous observation of a stimulation of platelet energetics by thrombin glycolysis and TCA (Tricarboxylic acid) metabolites were increased. Next, we assessed the effect of both 4-HNE and alkyne HNE (A-HNE) on bioenergetics and targeted metabolomics, and found a stimulatory effect on glycolysis, associated with inhibition of bioenergetic parameters. In the presence of HNE and thrombin glycolysis was further stimulated but the levels of the TCA metabolites were markedly suppressed. Identification of proteins modified by A-HNE followed by click chemistry and mass spectrometry revealed essential targets in platelet activation including proteins involved in metabolism, adhesion, cytoskeletal reorganization, aggregation, vesicular transport, protein folding, antioxidant proteins, and small GTPases. In summary, the biological effects of 4-HNE can be more effectively explained in platelets by the integrated effects of the modification of an electrophile responsive proteome rather than the isolated effects of candidate proteins. PMID:26475426

  17. Studies on epitopes on low-density lipoprotein modified by 4-hydroxynonenal. Biochemical characterization and determination.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Q; Esterbauer, H; Jürgens, G

    1992-01-01

    Oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was found to be accompanied by the generation of various reactive aldehydes. One of them, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), was shown to modify LDL to a form which represents a good model of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). In order to investigate the epitopes newly formed on HNE-modified LDL, a polyvalent antiserum to HNE-LDL [anti-(HNE-LDL)] was raised in rabbits and the non-specific components were removed with native LDL coupled to CNBr-Sepharose 4B. Competitive fluorescence immunoassay analysis showed that anti-(HNE-LDL) recognized HNE-LDL, copper-oxidized LDL, HNE-albumin and to a lower extent HNE-modified high-density lipoprotein 3 (HNE-HDL3) and ox-HDL3 but not native LDL. A certain degree of cross-reactivity of the antibody with LDLs modified by either hexanal or 2,4-heptadienal was found. No reaction was obtained with LDL labelled with malondialdehyde. From the abilities of HNE-modified poly(L-amino acids) to compete with HNE-LDL for binding to anti-(HNE-LDL), it is postulated that lysine, tyrosine, arginine and histidine are involved in the formation of HNE-derived epitopes on apolipoprotein B (apo B). Using a double-sandwich fluorescence immunoassay [capture antibody: anti-(apo B); detection antibody: anti-(HNE-LDL)] we found that the HNE-derived epitopes were expressed at a far higher degree in ox-LDL and HNE-LDL than in native LDL. PMID:1280111

  18. Replication Bypass of the trans-4-Hydroxynonenal-Derived (6S,8R,11S)-1,N2-Deoxyguanosine DNA Adduct by the Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Polymerase IV

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    trans-4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is the major peroxidation product of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in vivo. Michael addition of the N2-amino group of dGuo to HNE followed by ring closure of N1 onto the aldehyde results in four diastereomeric 1,N2-dGuo (1,N2-HNE-dGuo) adducts. The (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N2-dGuo adduct was incorporated into the 18-mer templates 5′-d(TCATXGAATCCTTCCCCC)-3′ and d(TCACXGAATCCTTCCCCC)-3′, where X = (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N2-dGuo adduct. These differed in the identity of the template 5′-neighbor base, which was either Thy or Cyt, respectively. Each of these templates was annealed with either a 13-mer primer 5′-d(GGGGGAAGGATTC)-3′ or a 14-mer primer 5′-d(GGGGGAAGGATTCC)-3′. The addition of dNTPs to the 13-mer primer allowed analysis of dNTP insertion opposite to the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N2-dGuo adduct, whereas the 14-mer primer allowed analysis of dNTP extension past a primed (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N2-dGuo:dCyd pair. The Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) belongs to the Y-family of error-prone polymerases. Replication bypass studies in vitro reveal that this polymerase inserted dNTPs opposite the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N2-dGuo adduct in a sequence-specific manner. If the template 5′-neighbor base was dCyt, the polymerase inserted primarily dGTP, whereas if the template 5′-neighbor base was dThy, the polymerase inserted primarily dATP. The latter event would predict low levels of Gua → Thy mutations during replication bypass when the template 5′-neighbor base is dThy. When presented with a primed (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N2-dGuo:dCyd pair, the polymerase conducted full-length primer extension. Structures for ternary (Dpo4-DNA-dNTP) complexes with all four template-primers were obtained. For the 18-mer:13-mer template-primers in which the polymerase was confronted with the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N2-dGuo adduct, the (6S,8R,11S)-1,N2-dGuo lesion remained in the ring-closed conformation at the active site. The incoming dNTP, either d

  19. The chemistry of cell signaling by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and 4-hydroxynonenal

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Henry Jay; Fukuto, Jon M.; Miller, Tom; Zhang, Hongqiao; Rinna, Alessandra; Levy, Smadar

    2008-01-01

    During the past several years, major advances have been made in understanding how reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) participate in signal transduction. Identification of the specific targets and the chemical reactions involved still remains to be resolved with many of the signaling pathways in which the involvement of reactive species has been determined. Our understanding is that ROS and RNS have second messenger roles. While cysteine residues in the thiolate (ionized) form found in several classes of signaling proteins can be specific targets for reaction with H2O2 and RNS, better understanding of the chemistry, particularly kinetics, suggests that for many signaling events in which ROS and RNS participate, enzymatic catalysis is more likely to be involved than non-enzymatic reaction. Due to increased interest in how oxidation products, particularly lipid peroxidation products, also are involved with signaling, a review of signaling by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is included. This article focuses on the chemistry of signaling by ROS, RNS, and HNE and will describe reactions with selected target proteins as representatives of the mechanisms rather attempt to comprehensively review the many signaling pathways in which the reactive species are involved. PMID:18602883

  20. SHP-1 inhibition by 4-hydroxynonenal activates Jun N-terminal kinase and glutamate cysteine ligase.

    PubMed

    Rinna, Alessandra; Forman, Henry Jay

    2008-07-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major lipid peroxidation product, is toxic at high concentrations, but at near-physiological concentrations it induces detoxifying enzymes. Previous data established that in human bronchial epithelial (HBE1) cells, both genes for glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) are induced by HNE through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. The protein-tyrosine phosphatase SH2 domain containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) is thought to play a role as a negative regulator of cell signaling, and has been implicated as such in the JNK pathway. In the present study, SHP-1 was demonstrated to contribute to HNE-induced-gclc expression via regulation of the JNK pathway in HBE1 cells. Treatment of HBE1 cells with HNE induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4), JNK, and c-Jun. HNE was able to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase activity of SHP-1 through increased degradation of the protein. Furthermore, transfection with small interference RNA SHP-1 showed an enhancement of JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation, but not of MKK4, leading to increased gclc expression. These results demonstrate that SHP-1 plays a role as a negative regulator of the JNK pathway and that HNE activated the JNK pathway by inhibiting SHP-1. Thus, SHP-1 acts as a sensor for HNE and is responsible for an important adaptive response to oxidative stress.

  1. Structural definition of early lysine and histidine adduction chemistry of 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, D V; Sayre, L M

    1995-03-01

    The lipid peroxidation product trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) has been implicated in the covalent modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) thought to contribute to the over-accumulation of LDL in the arterial wall in the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Proposals for the exact structures of "early" protein side-chain modifications until now have been based on indirect evidence. In this paper, the structures of first-formed His- and Lys-based adducts were elucidated by correlating NMR spectral properties with those obtained on models with reduced chiral center content, in some cases following hydride reduction. In this manner, we could confirm unambiguously the structure of a HNE-His imidazole(N tau) Michael adduct, stabilized as a cyclic hemiacetal and isolated from a neutral aqueous 1:1 stoichiometry reaction mixture. In the case of Lys/amine reactivity, where an excess of amine is needed to avert HNE aldol condensation, the predominance of a 1:1 Michael adduct in homogeneous aqueous solution and a 1:2 Michael-Schiff base adduct under two-phase aqueous-organic conditions could be verified by isolation of the respective borohydride-reduced forms. The 1:2 adduct, shown to exist as the cyclic hemiaminal, could represent a stable lysine-based cross-link in certain protein microenvironments.

  2. Nutrient deprivation in neuroblastoma cells alters 4-hydroxynonenal-induced stress response.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Lars; Moldzio, Rudolf; Vazdar, Katarina; Krewenka, Christopher; Pohl, Elena E

    2017-01-31

    4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a toxic lipid peroxidation product, is associated with oxidative damage in cells and involved in various diseases including the initiation and progression of cancer. Cancer cells have a high, adaptable metabolism with a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and rely on high levels of glucose and glutamine as essential nutrients for cell growth. Here we investigated whether the toxic effects of HNE on the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of cancer cells depends on their metabolic state by deprivation of glucose and/or glutamine. The addition of 16 μM HNE to N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells incubated in glucose medium led to a severe reduction of MMP, which was similar to the MMP of cells fed with both glucose and glutamine. In contrast, HNE addition to cells starved in glutamine medium increased their MMP slightly for a prolonged time period and this was accompanied by increased cellular survival. We found that ß-oxidation of HNE did not cause the increased MMP, since the aldehyde dehydrogenase was distinctly more active in cells with glucose medium. However, after blocking fatty acid ß-oxidation in cells starved in glutamine medium with etomoxir, which inhibits carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, HNE addition induced a strong reduction of MMP similar to cells in glucose medium. Surprisingly, the effect of more toxic 4-oxo-2-nonenal was less pronounced. Our results suggest that in contrast to cells fed with glucose, glutamine-fed cancer cells are capable of ß-oxidizing fatty acids to maintain their MMP to combat the toxic effects of HNE.

  3. Foam cell-derived 4-hydroxynonenal induces endothelial cell senescence in a TXNIP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Yael; Kaiser, Nurit; Cohen, Guy; Abd-Elrahman, Ihab; Blum, Galia; Shapira, Oz M; Koler, Tomer; Simionescu, Maya; Sima, Anca V; Zarkovic, Neven; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Orioli, Marica; Aldini, Giancarlo; Cerasi, Erol; Leibowitz, Gil; Sasson, Shlomo

    2015-08-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) senescence is considered an early event in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Stressful stimuli, in particular oxidative stress, have been linked to premature senescence in the vasculature. Foam cells are a major source of reactive oxygen species and may play a role in the induction of VEC senescence; hence, we investigated their involvement in the induction of VEC senescence in a co-culture transwell system. Primary bovine aortic endothelial cells, exposed to the secretome of THP-1 monocyte-derived foam cells, were analysed for the induction of senescence. Senescence associated β-galactosidase activity and the expression of p16 and p21 were increased, whereas phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein was reduced. This senescent phenotype was mediated by 4-hydroxnonenal (4-HNE), a lipid peroxidation product secreted from foam cells; scavenging of 4-HNE in the co-culture medium blunted this effect. Furthermore, both foam cells and 4-HNE increased the expression of the pro-oxidant thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). Molecular manipulation of TXNIP expression confirmed its involvement in foam cell-induced senescence. Previous studies showed that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)δ was activated by 4-hydroalkenals, such as 4-HNE. Pharmacological interventions supported the involvement of the 4-HNE-PPARδ axis in the induction of TXNIP and VEC senescence. The association of TXNIP with VEC senescence was further supported by immunofluorescent staining of human carotid plaques in which the expression of both TXNIP and p21 was augmented in endothelial cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that foam cell-released 4-HNE activates PPARδ in VEC, leading to increased TXNIP expression and consequently to senescence.

  4. Increased levels of urinary biomarkers of lipid peroxidation products among workers occupationally exposed to diesel engine exhaust.

    PubMed

    Bin, Ping; Shen, Meili; Li, Haibin; Sun, Xin; Niu, Yong; Meng, Tao; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Xiao; Dai, Yufei; Gao, Weimin; Gu, Guizhen; Yu, Shanfa; Zheng, Yuxin

    2016-08-01

    Diesel engine exhaust (DEE) was found to induce lipid peroxidation (LPO) in animal exposure studies. LPO is a class of oxidative stress and can be reflected by detecting the levels of its production, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), and etheno-DNA adducts including 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (ɛdA) and 3,N(4)-etheno-2'-deoxycytidine (ɛdC). However, the impact of DEE exposure on LPO has not been explored in humans. In this study, we evaluated urinary MDA, 4-HNE, ɛdA, and ɛdC levels as biomarkers of LPO among 108 workers with exclusive exposure to DEE and 109 non-DEE-exposed workers. Results showed that increased levels of urinary MDA and ɛdA were observed in subjects occupationally exposed to DEE before and after age, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, and alcohol use were adjusted (all p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant relationship between the internal exposure dose (urinary ΣOH-PAHs) and MDA, 4-HNE, and ɛdA (all p < 0.001). Furthermore, significant increased relations between urinary etheno-DNA adduct and MDA, 4-HNE were observed (all p < 0.05). The findings of this study suggested that the level of LPO products (MDA and ɛdA) was increased in DEE-exposed workers, and urinary MDA and ɛdA might be feasible biomarkers for DEE exposure. LPO induced DNA damage might be involved and further motivated the genomic instability could be one of the pathogeneses of cancer induced by DEE-exposure. However, additional investigations should be performed to understand these observations.

  5. Increased 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts in male GSTA4-4/PPAR-α double knockout mice enhance injury during early stages of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin J J; Mercer, Kelly E; Gannon, Brenda; Engi, Bridgette; Zimniak, Piotr; Shearn, Colin T; Orlicky, David J; Albano, Emanuele; Badger, Thomas M; Petersen, Dennis R

    2015-03-01

    To test the significance of lipid peroxidation in the development of alcoholic liver injury, an ethanol (EtOH) liquid diet was fed to male 129/SvJ mice (wild-type, WT) and glutathione S-transferase A4-4-null (GSTA4-/-) mice for 40 days. GSTA4-/- mice were crossed with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-null mice (PPAR-α-/-), and the effects of EtOH in the resulting double knockout (dKO) mice were compared with the other strains. EtOH increased lipid peroxidation in all except WT mice (P < 0.05). Increased steatosis and mRNA expression of the inflammatory markers CXCL2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were observed in EtOH GSTA4-/- compared with EtOH WT mice (P < 0.05). EtOH PPAR-α-/- mice had increased steatosis, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and hepatic CD3+ T cell populations and elevated mRNA encoding CD14, CXCL2, TNF-α, IL-6, CD138, transforming growth factor-β, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-13, α-SMA, and collagen type 1 compared with EtOH WT mice. EtOH-fed dKO mice displayed elevation of periportal hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal adducts and serum antibodies against malondialdehyde adducts compared with EtOH feeding of GSTA4-/-, PPAR-α-/-, and WT mice (P < 0.05). ALT was higher in EtOH dKO mice compared with all other groups (P < 0.001). EtOH-fed dKO mice displayed elevated mRNAs for TNF-α and CD14, histological evidence of fibrosis, and increased PDGFR, MMP-9, and MMP-13 mRNAs compared with the EtOH GSTA4-/- or EtOH PPAR-α-/- genotype (P < 0.05). These findings demonstrate the central role lipid peroxidation plays in mediating progression of alcohol-induced necroinflammatory liver injury, stellate cell activation, matrix remodeling, and fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Exposure of HL-60 human leukaemic cells to 4-hydroxynonenal promotes the formation of adduct(s) with alpha-enolase devoid of plasminogen binding activity.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Fabrizio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Arcaro, Alessia; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Minelli, Rosalba; D'Angelo, Daniela; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Toaldo, Cristina; Cetrangolo, Gianpaolo; Formisano, Silvestro; Dianzani, Mario U; Uchida, Koji; Dianzani, Chiara; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2009-08-13

    HNE (4-hydroxynonenal), the major product of lipoperoxidation, easily reacts with proteins through adduct formation between its three main functional groups and lysyl, histidyl and cysteinyl residues of proteins. HNE is considered to be an ultimate mediator of toxic effects elicited by oxidative stress. It can be detected in several patho-physiological conditions, in which it affects cellular processes by addition to functional proteins. We demonstrated in the present study, by MS and confirmed by immunoblotting experiments, the formation of HNE-alpha-enolase adduct(s) in HL-60 human leukaemic cells. Alpha-enolase is a multifunctional protein that acts as a glycolytic enzyme, transcription factor [MBP-1 (c-myc binding protein-1)] and plasminogen receptor. HNE did not affect alpha-enolase enzymatic activity, expression or intracellular localization, and did not change the expression and localization of MBP-1 either. Confocal and electronic microscopy results confirmed the plasma membrane, cytosolic and nuclear localization of alpha-enolase in HL-60 cells and demonstrated that HNE was colocalized with alpha-enolase at the surface of cells early after its addition. HNE caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction of the binding of plasminogen to alpha-enolase. As a consequence, HNE reduced adhesion of HL-60 cells to HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells). These results could suggest a new role for HNE in the control of tumour growth and invasion.

  7. Adduct formation of 4-hydroxynonenal and malondialdehyde with elongation factor-2 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Argüelles, Sandro; Machado, Alberto; Ayala, Antonio

    2009-08-01

    Protein synthesis is universally affected by aging in all organisms. There is no clear consensus about the mechanism underlying the decline of translation with aging. Previous reports from our laboratory have shown that the elongation step is especially affected with aging as a consequence of alterations in elongation factor-2 (eEF-2), the monomeric protein that catalyzes the movement of the ribosome along the mRNA during protein synthesis. eEF-2 seems to be specifically affected by lipid peroxidant compounds, which concomitantly produce several reactive, toxic aldehydes, such as MDA and HNE. These aldehydes are able to form adducts with proteins that lead to their inactivation. In this paper we studied the formation of adducts between MDA or HNE and eEF-2. The study was performed both in vitro, using liver homogenates treated with cumene hydroperoxide, and in vivo using young control rats, treated with the same oxidant, and 12-and 24-month-old rats. In all cases we found a decrease in the levels of eEF-2, an increase in the amount of lipid peroxidation, and a concomitant formation of adducts between eEF-2 and MDA or HNE. The results suggest that one possible mechanism responsible for the decline of protein synthesis during aging could be the alteration in eEF-2 levels, secondary to lipid peroxidation and adduct formation with these aldehydes.

  8. Increased accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts in female GSTA4/PPAR alpha double knockout mice enhance steatosis and inflammation in a model of pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hepatocellular injury resulting from increased lipid peroxidation products and oxidative stress is considered a potential mechanism driving the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitsis (NASH). To test the significance of lipid peroxidation and protein...

  9. Structure of a Drosophila sigma class glutathione S-transferase reveals a novel active site topography suited for lipid peroxidation products.

    PubMed

    Agianian, Bogos; Tucker, Paul A; Schouten, Arie; Leonard, Kevin; Bullard, Belinda; Gros, Piet

    2003-02-07

    Insect glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are grouped in three classes, I, II and recently III; class I (Delta class) enzymes together with class III members are implicated in conferring resistance to insecticides. Class II (Sigma class) GSTs, however, are poorly characterized and their exact biological function remains elusive. Drosophila glutathione S-transferase-2 (GST-2) (DmGSTS1-1) is a class II enzyme previously found associated specifically with the insect indirect flight muscle. It was recently shown that GST-2 exhibits considerable conjugation activity for 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a lipid peroxidation product, raising the possibility that it has a major anti-oxidant role in the flight muscle. Here, we report the crystal structure of GST-2 at 1.75A resolution. The GST-2 dimer shows the canonical GST fold with glutathione (GSH) ordered in only one of the two binding sites. While the GSH-binding mode is similar to other GST structures, a distinct orientation of helix alpha6 creates a novel electrophilic substrate-binding site (H-site) topography, largely flat and without a prominent hydrophobic-binding pocket, which characterizes the H-sites of other GSTs. The H-site displays directionality in the distribution of charged/polar and hydrophobic residues creating a binding surface that explains the selectivity for amphipolar peroxidation products, with the polar-binding region formed by residues Y208, Y153 and R145 and the hydrophobic-binding region by residues V57, A59, Y211 and the C-terminal V249. A structure-based model of 4-HNE binding is presented. The model suggest that residues Y208, R145 and possibly Y153 may be key residues involved in catalysis.

  10. Resveratrol and 4-hydroxynonenal act in concert to increase glutamate cysteine ligase expression and glutathione in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongqiao; Shih, Albert; Rinna, Alessandra; Forman, Henry Jay

    2009-01-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to protect against oxidative stress through modulating antioxidant capacity. In this study, we investigated resveratrol-mediated induction of glutathione (GSH) and glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), and the combined effect of resveratrol and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) on GSH synthesis in cultured HBE1 human bronchial epithelial cells. Resveratrol increased GSH and the mRNA contents of both the catalytic (GCLC) and modulatory subunit (GCLM) of GCL. Combined HNE and resveratrol treatment increased GSH content and GCL mRNAs to a greater extent than either compound did alone. Compared to individual agent, combining exposure to HNE and resveratrol also showed more protection against cell death caused by oxidative stress. These effects of combined exposure were additive rather than synergistic. In addition, Nrf2 silencing significantly decreased the combined effect of HNE and resveratrol on GCL induction. Our data suggest that resveratrol increases GSH and GCL gene expression and that there is an additive effect on GSH synthesis between resveratrol and HNE. The results also reveal that Nrf2-EpRE signaling was involved in the combined effects. PMID:18983812

  11. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  12. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Rathin; Randhava, Sarabjit S.; Tsai, Shih-Perng

    1997-01-01

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

  13. FORMATION OF 4-HYDROXYNONENAL FROM CARDIOLIPIN OXIDATION: INTRAMOLECULAR PEROXYL RADICAL ADDITION AND DECOMPOSITION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Porter, Ned A.; Schneider, Claus; Brash, Alan R.; Yin, Huiyong

    2010-01-01

    We report herein that oxidation of a mitochondria-specific phospholipid tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin (L4CL) by cytochrome c and H2O2 leads to the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) via a novel chemical mechanism which involves cross-chain peroxyl radical addition and decomposition. As one of the most bioactive lipid electrophiles, 4-HNE possesses diverse biological activities ranging from modulation of multiple signal transduction pathways to the induction of intrinsic apoptosis. However, where and how 4-HNE is formed in vivo is much less understood. Recently a novel chemical mechanism has been proposed that involves inter-molecular dimerization of fatty acids by peroxyl bond formation; but the biological relevance of this mechanism is unknown because a majority of the fatty acids are esterified in phospholipids in the cellular membrane. We hypothesize that oxidation of cardiolipins, especially L4CL, may lead to the formation of 4-HNE via this novel mechanism. We employed L4CL and di-linoleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DLPC) as model compounds to test this hypothesis. Indeed, in experiments designed to assess the intramolecular mechanism, more 4-HNE is formed from L4CL and DLPC oxidation than 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-phosphatydylcholine (PLPC). The key products and intermediates that are consistent with this proposed mechanism of 4-HNE formation have been identified using liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods. Identical products from cardiolipin oxidation were identified in vivo in rat liver tissue after carbon tetrachloride treatment. Our studies provide the first evidence in vitro and in vivo for the formation 4-HNE from cardiolipin oxidation via cross-chain peroxyl radical addition and decomposition, which may have implications in apoptosis and other biological activities of 4-HNE. PMID:21047551

  14. PARP inhibition alleviates diabetes-induced systemic oxidative stress and neural tissue 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation: correlation with peripheral nerve function.

    PubMed

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Shevalye, Hanna; Maksimchyk, Yury; Drel, Viktor R; Obrosova, Irina G

    2011-05-15

    This study evaluated the role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in systemic oxidative stress and 4-hydoxynonenal adduct accumulation in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats were maintained with or without treatment with the PARP inhibitor, 1,5-isoquinolinediol, 3 mg kg(-1) day(-1), for 10 weeks after an initial 2 weeks. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated protein content in peripheral nerve and spinal cord (Western blot analysis) and dorsal root ganglion neurons and nonneuronal cells (fluorescence immunohistochemistry), as well as by indices of peripheral nerve function. Diabetic rats displayed increased urinary isoprostane and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine excretion (ELISA) and 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation in endothelial and Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes of the spinal cord and neurons and glial cells of the dorsal root ganglia (double-label fluorescence immunohistochemistry), as well as motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity deficits, thermal hypoalgesia, and tactile allodynia. PARP inhibition counteracted diabetes-induced systemic oxidative stress and 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation in peripheral nerve and spinal cord (Western blot analysis) and dorsal root ganglion neurons (perikarya, fluorescence immunohistochemistry), which correlated with improvement of large and small nerve fiber function. The findings reveal the important role of PARP activation in systemic oxidative stress and 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. PARP INHIBITION ALLEVIATES DIABETES-INDUCED SYSTEMIC OXIDATIVE STRESS AND NEURAL TISSUE 4-HYDROXYNONENAL ADDUCT ACCUMULATION: CORRELATION WITH PERIPHERAL NERVE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Shevalye, Hanna; Maksimchyk, Yury; Drel, Viktor R.; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in systemic oxidative stress and 4-hydoxynonenal adduct accumulation in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats were maintained with or without treatment with the PARP inhibitor, 1,5-isoquinolinediol, 3 mg kg−1d−1, for 10 weeks after initial 2 weeks. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated protein content in peripheral nerve and spinal cord (Western blot analysis) and dorsal root ganglion neurons and non-neuronal cells (fluorescent immunohistochemistry), as well as by indices of peripheral nerve function. Diabetic rats displayed increased urinary isoprostane and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine excretion (ELISA), 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation in endothelial and Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes of the spinal cord, and neurons and glial cells of the dorsal root ganglia (double-label fluorescent immunohistochemistry) as well as motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity deficits, thermal hypoalgesia, and tactile allodynia. PARP inhibition counteracted diabetes-induced systemic oxidative stress and 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation in peripheral nerve and spinal cord (Western blot analysis) and dorsal root ganglion neurons (perikarya, fluorescent immunohistochemistry) which correlated with improvement of large and small nerve fiber function. The findings reveal the important role of PARP activation in systemic oxidative stress and 4-hydroxynonenal adduct accumulation in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:21300148

  16. Identification of Protein Targets of 4-Hydroxynonenal Using Click Chemistry for Ex Vivo Biotinylation of Azido and Alkynyl Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Andrew; Tallman, Keri A.; Jacobs, Aaron T.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Porter, Ned A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2009-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are primary targets of free radical damage during oxidative stress. Diffusible electrophilic α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), have been shown to modify proteins that mediate cell signaling (e.g. IKK and Keap1) and alter gene expression pathways responsible for inducing antioxidant genes, heat shock proteins, and the DNA damage response. To fully understand cellular responses to HNE, it is important to determine its protein targets in an unbiased fashion. This requires a strategy for detecting and isolating HNE-modified proteins regardless of the nature of the chemical linkage between HNE and its targets. Azido or alkynyl derivatives of HNE were synthesized and demonstrated to be equivalent to HNE in their ability to induce heme oxygenase induction and induce apoptosis in colon cancer (RKO) cells. Cells exposed to the tagged HNE derivatives were lysed and exposed to reagents to effect Staudinger ligation or copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3 dipolar cycloaddition reaction (click chemistry) to conjugate HNE-adducted proteins with biotin for subsequent affinity purification. Both strategies yielded efficient biotinylation of tagged HNE-protein conjugates but click chemistry was found to be superior for recovery of biotinylated proteins from streptavidin-coated beads. Biotinylated proteins were detected in lysates from RKO cell incubations with azido-HNE at concentrations as low as 1 μM. These proteins were affinity purified with streptavidin beads and proteomic analysis was performed by linear ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteomic analysis revealed a dose-dependent increase in labeled proteins with increased sequence coverage at higher concentrations. Several proteins involved in stress signaling (heat shock proteins 70 and 90, and the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein) were selectively adducted by azido- and alkynyl-HNE. The use of azido and alkynyl derivatives in conjunction with click chemistry appears to be

  17. Sodium acetate enhances hydrogen peroxide production in Weissella cibaria.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Futagawa-Endo, Y; Kawasaki, S; Dicks, L M T; Niimura, Y; Okada, S

    2009-07-01

    To investigate hydrogen peroxide production by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and to determine the key factors involved. Six strains of Weissella cibaria produced large amounts (2.2-3.2 mmol l(-1)) of hydrogen peroxide in GYP broth supplemented with sodium acetate, but very low accumulations in glucose yeast peptone broth without sodium acetate. Increased production of hydrogen peroxide was also recorded when strains of W. cibaria were cultured in the presence of potassium acetate, sodium isocitrate and sodium citrate. Oxidases and peroxidases were not detected, or were present at low levels in W. cibaria. However, strong nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidase activity was recorded, suggesting that the enzyme plays a key role in production of hydrogen peroxide by W. cibaria. Weissella cibaria produces large quantities of hydrogen peroxide in aerated cultures, in a process that is dependent on the presence of acetate in the culture medium. NADH oxidase is likely the key enzyme in this process. This is the first study showing that sodium acetate, normally present in culture media of LAB, is a key factor for hydrogen peroxide production by W. cibaria. The exact mechanisms involved are not known.

  18. Replication Bypass of the trans-4-Hydroxynonenal-Derived (6S,8R,11S)-1,N[superscript 2]-Deoxyguanosine DNA Adduct by the Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Polymerase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Surajit; Christov, Plamen P.; Kozekova, Albena; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Egli, Martin; Stone, Michael P.

    2014-10-02

    trans-4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is the major peroxidation product of {omega}-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in vivo. Michael addition of the N{sub 2}-amino group of dGuo to HNE followed by ring closure of N1 onto the aldehyde results in four diastereomeric 1,N{sub 2}-dGuo (1,N{sub 2}-HNE-dGuo) adducts. The (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct was incorporated into the 18-mer templates 5'-d(TCATXGAATCCTTCCCCC)-3' and d(TCACXGAATCCTTCCCCC)-3', where X = (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct. These differed in the identity of the template 5'-neighbor base, which was either Thy or Cyt, respectively. Each of these templates was annealed with either a 13-mer primer 5'-d(GGGGGAAGGATTC)-3' or a 14-mer primer 5'-d(GGGGGAAGGATTCC)-3'. The addition of dNTPs to the 13-mer primer allowed analysis of dNTP insertion opposite to the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct, whereas the 14-mer primer allowed analysis of dNTP extension past a primed (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo:dCyd pair. The Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) belongs to the Y-family of error-prone polymerases. Replication bypass studies in vitro reveal that this polymerase inserted dNTPs opposite the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct in a sequence-specific manner. If the template 5'-neighbor base was dCyt, the polymerase inserted primarily dGTP, whereas if the template 5'-neighbor base was dThy, the polymerase inserted primarily dATP. The latter event would predict low levels of Gua {yields} Thy mutations during replication bypass when the template 5'-neighbor base is dThy. When presented with a primed (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo:dCyd pair, the polymerase conducted full-length primer extension. Structures for ternary (Dpo4-DNA-dNTP) complexes with all four template-primers were obtained. For the 18-mer:13-mer template-primers in which the polymerase was confronted with the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct, the (6S,8R,11S)-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo lesion remained in the ring

  19. Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Deleted on Chromosome 10 (PTEN) Inhibition by 4-Hydroxynonenal Leads to Increased Akt Activation in HepatocytesS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Colin T.; Smathers, Rebecca L.; Stewart, Benjamin J.; Fritz, Kristofer S.; Galligan, James J.; Hail, Numsen

    2011-01-01

    The production of reactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is proposed to be an important factor in the etiology of alcoholic liver disease. To understand the effects of 4-HNE on homeostatic signaling pathways in hepatocytes, cellular models consisting of the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and primary rat hepatocytes were evaluated. Treatment of both HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes with subcytotoxic concentrations of 4-HNE resulted in the activation of Akt within 30 min as demonstrated by increased phosphorylation of residues Ser473 and Thr308. Quantification and subsequent immunocytochemistry of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3[rsqb] resulted in a 6-fold increase in total PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and increased immunostaining at the plasma membrane after 4-HNE treatment. Cotreatment of HepG2 cells with 4-HNE and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (Ly294002) or the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor okadaic acid revealed that the mechanism of activation of Akt is PI3K-dependent and PP2A-independent. Using biotin hydrazide detection, it was established that the incubation of HepG2 cells with 4-HNE resulted in increased carbonylation of the lipid phosphatase known as “phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10” (PTEN), a key regulator of Akt activation. Activity assays both in HepG2 cells and recombinant PTEN revealed a decrease in PTEN lipid phosphatase activity after 4-HNE application. Mass spectral analysis of 4-HNE-treated recombinant PTEN detected a single 4-HNE adduct. Subsequent analysis of Akt dependent physiological consequences of 4-HNE in HepG2 cells revealed significant increases in the accumulation of neutral lipids. These results provide a potential mechanism of Akt activation and cellular consequences of 4-HNE in hepatocytes. PMID:21415306

  20. S-adenosyl-L-methionine protection of acetaminophen mediated oxidative stress and identification of hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, James Mike; Kuhlman, Christopher; Terneus, Marcus V.; Labenski, Matthew T.; Lamyaithong, Andre Benja; Ball, John G.; Lau, Serrine S.; Valentovic, Monica A.

    2014-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is protected by S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) treatment 1 hour (h) after APAP in C57/Bl6 mice. This study examined protein carbonylation as well as mitochondrial and cytosolic protein adduction by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) using mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Additional studies investigated the leakage of mitochondrial proteins and 4-HNE adduction of these proteins. Male C57/Bl6 mice (n = 5/group) were divided into the following groups and treated as indicated: Veh (15 ml/kg water, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg, ip), APAP (250 mg/kg), and SAMe given 1 h after APAP (S + A). APAP toxicity was confirmed by an increase (p < 0.05) in plasma ALT (U/l) and liver weight/10 g body weight relative to the Veh, SAMe and S + A groups 4 h following APAP treatment. SAMe administered 1 h post-APAP partially corrected APAP hepatotoxicity as ALT and liver weight/10 g body weights were lower in the S + A group compared the APAP group. APAP induced leakage of the mitochondrial protein, carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1) into the cytosol and which was reduced in the S + A group. SAMe further reduced the extent of APAP mediated 4-HNE adduction of CPS-1. MS analysis of hepatic and mitochondrial subcellular fractions identified proteins from APAP treated mice. Site specific 4-HNE adducts were identified on mitochondrial proteins sarcosine dehydrogenase and carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1). In summary, APAP is associated with 4-HNE adduction of proteins as identified by MS analysis and that CPS-1 leakage was greater in APAP treated mice. SAMe reduced the extent of 4-HNE adduction of proteins as well as leakage of CPS-1. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity protected by S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) • 4-Hydroxynonenal adducted to sarcosine dehydrogenase • 4-Hydroxynonenal adducted to carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 • SAMe reduced APAP mediated CPS-1 mitochondrial leakage.

  1. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an endogenous aldehyde, causes pain and neurogenic inflammation through activation of the irritant receptor TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Trevisani, Marcello; Siemens, Jan; Materazzi, Serena; Bautista, Diana M; Nassini, Romina; Campi, Barbara; Imamachi, Noritaka; Andrè, Eunice; Patacchini, Riccardo; Cottrell, Graeme S; Gatti, Raffaele; Basbaum, Allan I; Bunnett, Nigel W; Julius, David; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2007-08-14

    TRPA1 is an excitatory ion channel expressed by a subpopulation of primary afferent somatosensory neurons that contain substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Environmental irritants such as mustard oil, allicin, and acrolein activate TRPA1, causing acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Genetic studies indicate that TRPA1 is also activated downstream of one or more proalgesic agents that stimulate phospholipase C signaling pathways, thereby implicating this channel in peripheral mechanisms controlling pain hypersensitivity. However, it is not known whether tissue injury also produces endogenous proalgesic factors that activate TRPA1 directly to augment inflammatory pain. Here, we report that recombinant or native TRPA1 channels are activated by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), an endogenous alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde that is produced when reactive oxygen species peroxidate membrane phospholipids in response to tissue injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress. HNE provokes release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide from central (spinal cord) and peripheral (esophagus) nerve endings, resulting in neurogenic plasma protein extravasation in peripheral tissues. Moreover, injection of HNE into the rodent hind paw elicits pain-related behaviors that are inhibited by TRPA1 antagonists and absent in animals lacking functional TRPA1 channels. These findings demonstrate that HNE activates TRPA1 on nociceptive neurons to promote acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Our results also provide a mechanism-based rationale for developing novel analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents that target HNE production or TRPA1 activation.

  2. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an endogenous aldehyde, causes pain and neurogenic inflammation through activation of the irritant receptor TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Trevisani, Marcello; Siemens, Jan; Materazzi, Serena; Bautista, Diana M.; Nassini, Romina; Campi, Barbara; Imamachi, Noritaka; Andrè, Eunice; Patacchini, Riccardo; Cottrell, Graeme S.; Gatti, Raffaele; Basbaum, Allan I.; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Julius, David; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2007-01-01

    TRPA1 is an excitatory ion channel expressed by a subpopulation of primary afferent somatosensory neurons that contain substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Environmental irritants such as mustard oil, allicin, and acrolein activate TRPA1, causing acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Genetic studies indicate that TRPA1 is also activated downstream of one or more proalgesic agents that stimulate phospholipase C signaling pathways, thereby implicating this channel in peripheral mechanisms controlling pain hypersensitivity. However, it is not known whether tissue injury also produces endogenous proalgesic factors that activate TRPA1 directly to augment inflammatory pain. Here, we report that recombinant or native TRPA1 channels are activated by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), an endogenous α,β-unsaturated aldehyde that is produced when reactive oxygen species peroxidate membrane phospholipids in response to tissue injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress. HNE provokes release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide from central (spinal cord) and peripheral (esophagus) nerve endings, resulting in neurogenic plasma protein extravasation in peripheral tissues. Moreover, injection of HNE into the rodent hind paw elicits pain-related behaviors that are inhibited by TRPA1 antagonists and absent in animals lacking functional TRPA1 channels. These findings demonstrate that HNE activates TRPA1 on nociceptive neurons to promote acute pain, neuropeptide release, and neurogenic inflammation. Our results also provide a mechanism-based rationale for developing novel analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents that target HNE production or TRPA1 activation. PMID:17684094

  3. Electrochemical production of ozone and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods of using ozone have been developed which sterilize instruments and medical wastes, oxidize organics found in wastewater, clean laundry, break down contaminants in soil into a form more readily digested by microbes, kill microorganisms present in food products, and destroy toxins present in food products. The preferred methods for killing microorganisms and destroying toxins use pressurized, humidified, and concentrated ozone produced by an electrochemical cell.

  4. Glycerophosphate-dependent peroxide production by brown fat mitochondria from newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Drahota, Z; Rauchova, H; Jesina, P; Vojtísková, A; Houstek, J

    2003-03-01

    Glycerophosphate (GP)-dependent, ferricyanide-induced hydrogen peroxide production was studied in brown adipose tissue mitochondria from newborn rats. Relations between the rate of hydrogen peroxide production and total amount of hydrogen peroxide produced at different GP and ferricyanide concentrations were determined. It was found that the rate of hydrogen peroxide production increases with increasing GP concentration and decreases with increasing ferricyanide concentration. Total amount of hydrogen peroxide produced increases with increasing ferricyanide concentration, however, not proportionally, and the efficiency of this process (oxygen/ferricyanide ratio) strongly declines. Data presented provide further information on the character and kinetics of hydrogen peroxide production by mammalian mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase.

  5. Methods to create thermally oxidized lipids and comparison of analytical procedures to characterize peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Liu, P; Kerr, B J; Chen, C; Weber, T E; Johnston, L J; Shurson, G C

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate peroxidation in 4 lipids, each with 3 levels of peroxidation. Lipid sources were corn oil (CN), canola oil (CA), poultry fat, and tallow. Peroxidation levels were original lipids (OL), slow-oxidized lipids (SO), and rapid-oxidized lipids (RO). To produce peroxidized lipids, OL were either heated at 95°C for 72 h to produce SO or heated at 185°C for 7 h to produce RO. Five indicative measurements (peroxide value [PV], p-anisidine value [AnV], thiobarbituric acid reactive substances [TBARS] concentration, hexanal concentration, 4-hydroxynonenal [HNE] concentration, and 2,4-decadienal [DDE]) and 2 predictive tests (active oxygen method [AOM] stability and oxidative stability index [OSI]) were performed to quantify the level of oxidation of the subsequent 12 lipids with varying levels of peroxidation. Analysis showed that a high PV accurately indicated the high level of lipid peroxidation, but a moderate or low PV may be misleading due to the unstable characteristics of hydroperoxides as indicated by the unchanged PV of rapidly oxidized CN and CA compared to their original state (OL). However, additional tests, which measure secondary peroxidation products such as AnV, TBARS, hexanal, HNE, and DDE, may provide a better indication of lipid peroxidation than PV for lipids subjected to a high level of peroxidation. Similar to PV analysis, these tests may also not provide irrefutable information regarding the extent of peroxidation because of the volatile characteristics of secondary peroxidation products and the changing stage of lipid peroxidation. For the predictive tests, AOM accurately reflected the increased lipid peroxidation caused by SO and RO as indicated by the increased AOM value in CN and CA but not in poultry fat and tallow, which indicated a potential disadvantage of the AOM test. Oxidative stability index successfully showed the increased lipid peroxidation caused by SO and RO in all lipids, but it too may

  6. Glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production by rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jesina, P; Kholová, D; Bolehovská, R; Cervinková, Z; Drahota, Z; Houstek, J

    2004-01-01

    We studied the extent to which hormonally-induced mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) activity contributes to the supply of reducing equivalents to the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the rat liver. The activity of glycerophosphate oxidase was compared with those of NADH oxidase and/or succinate oxidase. It was found that triiodothyronine-activated mGPDH represents almost the same capacity for the saturation of the respiratory chain as Complex II. Furthermore, the increase of mGPDH activity induced by triiodothyronine correlated with an increase of capacity for glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production. As a result of hormonal treatment, a 3-fold increase in glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production by liver mitochondria was detected by polarographic and luminometric measurements.

  7. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  8. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  9. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  10. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  11. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  12. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM, PROTACTINIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS BY PEROXIDE DISSOLUTION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is described for separating U/sup 233/ from thorium and fission products. The separation is effected by forming a thorium-nitric acid solution of about 3 pH, adding hydrogen peroxide to precipitate uranium and thorium peroxide, treating the peroxides with sodium hydroxide to selectively precipitate the uranium peroxide, and reacting the separated solution with nitric acid to re- precipitate the uranium peroxide.

  13. Synthesis of five- and six-membered cyclic organic peroxides: Key transformations into peroxide ring-retaining products.

    PubMed

    Terent'ev, Alexander O; Borisov, Dmitry A; Vil', Vera A; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2014-01-08

    The present review describes the current status of synthetic five and six-membered cyclic peroxides such as 1,2-dioxolanes, 1,2,4-trioxolanes (ozonides), 1,2-dioxanes, 1,2-dioxenes, 1,2,4-trioxanes, and 1,2,4,5-tetraoxanes. The literature from 2000 onwards is surveyed to provide an update on synthesis of cyclic peroxides. The indicated period of time is, on the whole, characterized by the development of new efficient and scale-up methods for the preparation of these cyclic compounds. It was shown that cyclic peroxides remain unchanged throughout the course of a wide range of fundamental organic reactions. Due to these properties, the molecular structures can be greatly modified to give peroxide ring-retaining products. The chemistry of cyclic peroxides has attracted considerable attention, because these compounds are used in medicine for the design of antimalarial, antihelminthic, and antitumor agents.

  14. Synthesis of five- and six-membered cyclic organic peroxides: Key transformations into peroxide ring-retaining products

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Dmitry A; Vil’, Vera A; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2014-01-01

    Summary The present review describes the current status of synthetic five and six-membered cyclic peroxides such as 1,2-dioxolanes, 1,2,4-trioxolanes (ozonides), 1,2-dioxanes, 1,2-dioxenes, 1,2,4-trioxanes, and 1,2,4,5-tetraoxanes. The literature from 2000 onwards is surveyed to provide an update on synthesis of cyclic peroxides. The indicated period of time is, on the whole, characterized by the development of new efficient and scale-up methods for the preparation of these cyclic compounds. It was shown that cyclic peroxides remain unchanged throughout the course of a wide range of fundamental organic reactions. Due to these properties, the molecular structures can be greatly modified to give peroxide ring-retaining products. The chemistry of cyclic peroxides has attracted considerable attention, because these compounds are used in medicine for the design of antimalarial, antihelminthic, and antitumor agents. PMID:24454562

  15. 4-Hydroxy-nonenal—A Bioactive Lipid Peroxidation Product

    PubMed Central

    Schaur, Rudolf J.; Siems, Werner; Bresgen, Nikolaus; Eckl, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    This review on recent research advances of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-nonenal (HNE) has four major topics: I. the formation of HNE in various organs and tissues, II. the diverse biochemical reactions with Michael adduct formation as the most prominent one, III. the endogenous targets of HNE, primarily peptides and proteins (here the mechanisms of covalent adduct formation are described and the (patho-) physiological consequences discussed), and IV. the metabolism of HNE leading to a great number of degradation products, some of which are excreted in urine and may serve as non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress. PMID:26437435

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  17. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  18. Reactions of 1-methyl-2-phenylindole with malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkenals. Analytical applications to a colorimetric assay of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Gérard-Monnier, D; Erdelmeier, I; Régnard, K; Moze-Henry, N; Yadan, J C; Chaudière, J

    1998-10-01

    Under acidic and mild-temperature conditions, 1-methyl-2-phenylindole was found to react with malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenals to yield a stable chromophore with intense maximal absorbance at 586 nm. The use of methanesulfonic acid results in optimal yields of chromophore produced from MDA as well as from 4-hydroxynonenal. By contrast, the use of hydrochloric acid results in an optimal yield of chromophore produced from MDA and a negligible reaction of 4-hydroxynonenal. Taking advantage of such chromogenic reactions, we developed a new colorimetric assay of lipid peroxidation. Using a methanesulfonic acid-based medium, MDA and 4-hydroxyalkenals can be measured at the 586 nm wavelength. However, the presence of endogenous inhibitors of the reaction with 4-hydroxyalkenals is common, and this means that the latter may be underestimated in some biological samples. The assay performed in a hydrochloric acid-based medium enables the specific measurement of MDA in the presence of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Upon hydrolysis of Schiff bases in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5), either assay can be used to specifically measure the amount of total MDA in biological samples because 4-hydroxyalkenals undergo an irreversible cyclization reaction under the hydrochloric acid-based conditions of hydrolysis. The two assays were applied to the determination of the amount of MDA alone and of MDA and 4-hydroxyalkenals in an in vitro model of lipid peroxidation. This methodology was also used to clarify complex patterns of tissue-specific MDA production in vivo, following hydrolysis of Schiff bases, in rodents treated with doxorubicin.

  19. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of the effect of 4-hydroxynonenal on endogenous NAD(P)H in living cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvatova, Alzbeta; Aneba, Swida; Mateasik, Anton; Chorvat, Dusan; Comte, Blandine

    2013-06-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a major biochemical consequence of the oxidative deterioration of polyunsaturated lipids in cell membranes and causes damage to membrane integrity and loss of protein function. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), one of the most reactive products of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation of membrane phospholipids, has been shown to be capable of affecting both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) reduced [NAD(P)H] as well as NADH production. However, the understanding of its effects in living cardiac cells is still lacking. Our goal was to therefore investigate HNE effects on NAD(P)H noninvasively in living cardiomyocytes. Spectrally resolved lifetime detection of endogenous fluorescence, an innovative noninvasive technique, was employed. Individual fluorescence components were resolved by spectral linear unmixing approach. Gathered results revealed that HNE reduced the amplitude of both resolved NAD(P)H components in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, HNE increased flavoprotein fluorescence and responsiveness of the NAD(P)H component ratio to glutathione reductase (GR) inhibitor. HNE also increased the percentage of oxidized nucleotides and decreased maximal NADH production. Presented data indicate that HNE provoked an important cell oxidation by acting on NAD(P)H regulating systems in cardiomyocytes. Understanding the precise role of oxidative processes and their products in living cells is crucial for finding new noninvasive tools for biomedical diagnostics of pathophysiological states.

  20. Identification of novel bioactive aldehyde-modified phosphatidylethanolamines formed by lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lilu; Chen, Zhongyi; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Davies, Sean S

    2012-09-15

    Lipid aldehydes generated by lipid peroxidation induce cell damage and inflammation. Recent evidence indicates that γ-ketoaldehydes (isolevuglandins, IsoLGs) form inflammatory mediators by modifying the ethanolamine headgroup of phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs). To determine if other species of aldehyde-modified PEs (al-PEs) with inflammatory bioactivity were generated by lipid peroxidation, we oxidized liposomes containing arachidonic acid and characterized the resulting products. We detected PE modified by IsoLGs, malondialdehyde (MDA), and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), as well as a novel series of N-acyl-PEs and N-carboxyacyl-PEs in these oxidized liposomes. These al-PEs were also detected in high-density lipoproteins exposed to myeloperoxidase. When we tested the ability of al-PEs to induce THP-1 monocyte adhesion to cultured endothelial cells, we found that PEs modified by MDA, HNE, and 4-oxononenal induced adhesion with potencies similar to those of PEs modified by IsoLGs (∼2μM). A commercially available medium-chain N-carboxyacyl-PE (C11:0CAPE) also stimulated adhesion, whereas C4:0CAPE and N-acyl-PEs did not. PEs modified by acrolein or by glucose were only partial agonists for adhesion. These studies indicate that lipid peroxidation generates a large family of al-PEs, many of which have the potential to drive inflammation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Melatonin affects conjugation of 4-hydroxynonenal with glutathione in liver of pacu, a hypoxia-tolerant fish.

    PubMed

    Bastos, F F; Tobar, S A L; Dantas, R F; Silva, E S; Nogueira, N P A; Paes, M C; Righi, B D P; Bastos, J Cunha; Bastos, V L F Cunha

    2013-10-01

    In cytosol from liver of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, a hypoxia-tolerant fish that dwells in Pantanal, we found an enzyme activity capable of modulating the alkenal 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) by conjugating it with glutathione (GST-HNE activity). HNE is a downstream metabolite from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids by reactive oxygen species arisen from mitochondria of animal cells. HNE production may increase more intensively under oxidative stress. Harmful effects to cell survival may occur when HNE increases over 10(-4) M. Pacus submitted to hypoxia in July (cold season in Pantanal) showed 40% less of this GST-HNE conjugating activity in their liver cytosol. Injecting pacus subjected to hypoxia during the cold season with a summer physiological dose of melatonin caused their liver cytosolic GST-HNE activity to increase up to the levels found in the warm season. From October to March (warm season in Pantanal), pacus are prone to oxidative stress particularly during potamodromous active oxygen-demanding swimming, when they migrate up rivers to spawn. Thus, our findings point out that the higher levels of melatonin in circulation during the summer are important to avoid the increase of 4-HNE inside liver cells of this fish species.

  2. 4-Hydroxynonenal self-limits Fas-mediated DISC independent apoptosis by promoting export of Daxx from nucleus to cytosol and its binding to Fas†

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajendra; Sharma, Abha; Dwivedi, Seema; Zimniak, Piotr; Awasthi, Sanjay; Awasthi, Yogesh C.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) induces Fas-mediated apoptosis in HLE B-3 cells through a pathway which is independent of FasL, FADD, procaspase8-and DISC (Li, J. et al. Biochemistry, 45, 12253-12264). The involvement of Daxx has also been suggested in this pathway but its role is not clear. Here, we report that Daxx plays an important regulatory role during 4-HNE induced, Fas-mediated apoptosis in Jurkat cells. 4-HNE induces Fas-dependent apoptosis in procaspase8 deficient Jurkat cells via the activation of ASK1, JNK and caspase3 and the apoptosis can be inhibited by masking Fas with the antagonistic anti-Fas antibodies. We demonstrate that 4-HNE exposure to Jurkat cells leads to the induction of both Fas and Daxx. 4-HNE binds to both Fas and Daxx and promotes the export of Daxx from nucleus to cytosol where it binds to Fas and inhibits apoptosis. Depletion of Daxx results in increase in the activation of ASK1, JNK, and caspase3 along with exacerbation of 4-HNE-induced apoptosis suggesting that Daxx inhibits apoptosis by binding to Fas. 4-HNE-induced translocation of the Daxx is also accompanied with the activation of the transcription factor HSF1. Results of these studies are consistent with a model in which by interacting with Fas, 4-HNE promotes pro-apoptotic signaling via ASK1, JNK and caspase3. In parallel, 4-HNE induces Daxx and promotes its export from the nucleus to cytosol where it interacts with Fas to self-limit the extent of apoptosis by inhibiting the downstream pro-apoptotic signaling. Cytoplasmic translocation of Daxx also results in up-regulation of HSF1 associated stress responsive genes. PMID:18069800

  3. Tetrahydrohyperforin decreases cholinergic markers associated with amyloid-β plaques, 4-hydroxynonenal formation, and caspase-3 activation in AβPP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Francisco J; Zolezzi, Juan M; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Godoy, Juan A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities, amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangle deposition, synaptic alterations, and oxidative injury. In AD patients, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is low in most regions of the brain, but increased within and around amyloid plaques, where it accelerates the Aβ assembly into oligomers and fibrils, increasing its neurotoxicity. Tetrahydrohyperforin (THH), a semi-synthetic derivative of hyperforin, reduces tau phosphorylation and Aβ accumulation in AD mouse models. In the present study, we examined the effects of THH on Aβ-AChE complexes, α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChR), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) adducts, caspase-3 activation, and spatial memory in young AβPPSwe/PSEN1ΔE9 (AβPP/PS1) transgenic mice, in order to evaluate its potential preventive effects on the development of the disease. We report here that treatment with THH prevents the association of AChE to different types of amyloid plaques; partially restores the brain distribution of AChE molecular forms; increases α7-nAChR levels in the hippocampus of treated mice; decreases the amount of these receptors in amyloid plaques; and reduces the oxidative damage, evidenced by 4-HNE adduct formation and caspase-3 activation on AβPP/PS1 mice brain; demonstrating the neuroprotective properties of THH. Finally, we found that the acute treatment of hippocampal neurons with THH, in the presence of Aβ-AChE complexes, prevents 4-HNE adduct formation and caspase-3 activation. Our data support a therapeutic potential of THH for the treatment of AD.

  4. Isoleukotrienes are biologically active free radical products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, K A; Murphy, R C

    1995-07-21

    The free radical oxidation of arachidonic acid esterified to glycerophospholipids is known to generate complex metabolites, termed isoprostanes, that share structural features of prostaglandins derived from prostaglandin H2 synthase. Furthermore, certain isoprostanes have been found to exert biological activity through endogenous receptors on cell surfaces. Using mass spectrometry and ancillary techniques, the free radical oxidation of 1-hexadecanoyl-2-arachidonoyl-glycerophosphocholine was studied in the search for products of arachidonic acid isomeric to the leukotrienes that are derived from 5-lipoxygenase-catalyzed metabolism of arachidonic acid. Several conjugated triene metabolites were chromatographically separated from known 5-lipoxygenase products and structures characterized as 5,12-dihydroxy-6,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid esterified to the glycerophosphocholine backbone. We have termed these products as B4-isoleukotrienes. Following saponification some, but not all, B4-isoleukotrienes were found to exert biological activity in elevating intracellular calcium in Indo-1-loaded human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. This activity could be blocked by a leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist. An EC50 of approximately 30 nM was determined for one unique B4-isoleukotriene with a relative retention index of 2.54. We have shown that free radical processes can lead to the formation of biologically active isoleukotrienes in glycerophosphocholine liposomes, and we propose that B4-isoleukotrienes may also be formed in membrane glycerophospholipids as a result of lipid peroxidation during tissue injury. Such B4-isoleukotrienes could then mediate events of tissue damage through activation of leukotriene B4 receptors on target cells.

  5. Palm olein oil produces less lipid peroxidation products than soya bean oil.

    PubMed

    Zaiton, Z; Merican, Z; Khalid, B A; Mohamed, J B; Baharom, S

    1997-06-01

    The soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats were used to investigate the effect of palm olein oil and soya bean oil on the production of lipid peroxidation products. It was found that palm olein oil but not soya bean oil significantly decreased malonaldehyde and conjugated diene levels of the soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats. These findings suggest that palm olein per se produces less lipid peroxidation products than soya bean oil. Such an assay method gives a composite net picture of the propensity of an oil to produce lipid peroxidation products.

  6. Singlet oxygen production in the reaction of superoxide with organic peroxides.

    PubMed

    MacManus-Spencer, Laura A; Edhlund, Betsy L; McNeill, Kristopher

    2006-01-20

    [reaction: see text] A selective chemiluminescent probe for singlet oxygen has been employed to detect and quantify singlet oxygen in the reactions of superoxide with organic peroxides. The production of singlet oxygen has been quantified in the reaction of superoxide with benzoyl peroxide (BP). No singlet oxygen was detected in the reactions of superoxide with cumyl peroxide, tert-butyl peroxide, or tert-butyl hydroperoxide. On the basis of these results and on the temperature dependence of the reaction, we proposed a mechanism for singlet oxygen formation in the reaction of superoxide with BP.

  7. THE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BY HIGH OXYGEN PRESSURES

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Daniel L.; Gerschman, Rebeca; Ruhm, K. Barclay; Price, William E.

    1958-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is formed in solutions of glutathione exposed to oxygen. This hydrogen peroxide or its precursors will decrease the viscosity of polymers like desoxyribonucleic acid and sodium alginate. Further knowledge of the mechanism of these chemical effects of oxygen might further the understanding of the biological effects of oxygen. This study deals with the rate of solution of oxygen and with the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in chemical systems exposed to high oxygen pressures. At 6 atmospheres, the absorption coefficient for oxygen into water was about 1 cm./hour and at 143 atmospheres, it was about 2 cm./hour; the difference probably being due to the modus operandi. The addition of cobalt (II), manganese (II), nickel (II), or zinc ions in glutathione (GSH) solutions exposed to high oxygen pressure decreased the net formation of hydrogen peroxide and also the reduced glutathione remaining in the solution. Studies on hydrogen peroxide decomposition indicated that these ions act probably by accelerating the hydrogen perioxide oxidation of glutathione. The chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt, inhibited the oxidation of GSH exposed to high oxygen pressure for 14 hours. However, indication that oxidation still occurred, though at a much slower rate, was found in experiments lasting 10 weeks. Thiourea decomposed hydrogen peroxide very rapidly. When GSH solutions were exposed to high oxygen pressure, there was oxidation of the GSH, which became relatively smaller with increasing concentrations of GSH. PMID:13525677

  8. Production of hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in the gas phase reactions of ozone with natural alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonaitis, R.; Olszyna, K. J.; Meagher, J. F.

    The formation of H2O2 and organic peroxides in the reaction of O3 with trans-2-butene and naturally occurring alkenes has been studied using a 31 m3 reaction chamber. H2O2 and organic peroxides were found to be products of the O3 reaction with trans-2-butene, isoprene, α and ß-pinene, and limonene. Water is necessary for the formation of H2O2 and most of the H2O2 is formed via a route that does not involve HO2 radicals. Our results indicate that the reaction of O3 with natural alkenes may be a significant source of atmospheric H2O2, particularly in forest and rural areas.

  9. Production of hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in the gas phase reactions of ozone with natural alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Simonaitis, R.; Olszyna, K.J.; Meagher, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and organic peroxides in the reaction of O{sub 3} with trans-2-butene and naturally occurring alkenes has been studied using a 31 m{sup 3} reaction chamber. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and organic peroxides were found to be products of the O{sub 3} reaction with trans-2-butene, isoprene, {alpha} and {beta}-pinene, and limonene. Water is necessary for the formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and most of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed via a route that does not involve HO{sub 2} radicals. These results indicate that the reaction of O{sub 3} with natural alkenes may be a significant source of atmospheric H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, particularly in forest and rural areas.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen peroxide is used in these products: Hydrogen peroxide Hair bleach Some contact lens cleaners Note: Household hydrogen peroxide has a 3% concentration. That means it contains 97% water and 3% hydrogen peroxide. Hair ...

  11. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices.

  12. Modular Advanced Oxidation Process Enabled by Cathodic Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO•) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d–1. The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO• scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m–3, with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  13. The effects of angiotensin II and the oxidative stress mediator 4-hydroxynonenal on human osteoblast-like cell growth: possible relevance to otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rudić, Milan; Milković, Lidija; Žarković, Kamelija; Borović-Šunjić, Suzana; Sterkers, Olivier; Waeg, Georg; Ferrary, Evelyne; Bozorg Grayeli, Alexis; Žarković, Neven

    2013-04-01

    Otosclerosis is a complex disease characterized by an abnormal bone turnover of the otic capsule resulting in conductive hearing loss. Recent findings have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II), a major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of otosclerosis, most likely by its proinflammatory effects on the bone cells. Because reactive oxygen species play a role both in inflammation and in the cellular signaling pathway of Ang II, the appearance of protein adducts of the "second messenger of free radicals," the aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), in otosclerotic bone has been analyzed. Immunohistochemical analysis of HNE-modified proteins in tissue samples of the stapedial bones performed on 15 otosclerotic patients and 6 controls revealed regular HNE-protein adducts present in the subperiosteal parts of control bone specimens, whereas irregular areas of a pronounced HNE-protein adduct presence were found within stapedial bone in cases of otosclerosis. To study possible interference by HNE and Ang II in human bone cell proliferation, differentiation, and induction of apoptosis we used an in vitro model of osteoblast-like cells. HNE interacted with Ang II in a dose-dependent manner, both by forming HNE-Ang II adducts, as revealed by immunoblotting, and by modifying its effects on cultured cells. Namely, treatment with 0.1 nM Ang II and 2.5 μM HNE stimulated proliferation, whereas treatment with 10 μM HNE or in combination with Ang II (0.1, 0.5, and 1 nM) decreased cell proliferation. Moreover, 10 μM HNE alone and with Ang II (except if 1 nM Ang II was used) increased cellular differentiation and apoptosis. HNE at 5 μM did not affect differentiation nor significantly change apoptosis. On the other hand, when cells were treated with lower concentrations of HNE and Ang II we observed a decrease in cellular differentiation (combination of 1.0 or 2.5 μM HNE with 0.1 nM Ang II) and decrease in apoptosis (0.1 and 0

  14. Peroxide-induced cell death and lipid peroxidation in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Linden, Arne; Gülden, Michael; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund; Seibert, Hasso

    2008-08-01

    Peroxides are often used as models to induce oxidative damage in cells in vitro. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation in peroxide-induced cell death. To this end (i) the ability to induce lipid peroxidation in C6 rat astroglioma cells of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) (ii) the relation between peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death in terms of time and concentration dependency and (iii) the capability of the lipid peroxidation chain breaking alpha-tocopherol to prevent peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and/or cell death were investigated. Lipid peroxidation was characterised by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and, by HPLC, malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and hexanal. Within 2 h CHP, t-BuOOH and H2O2 induced cell death with EC50 values of 59+/-9 microM, 290+/-30 microM and 12+/-1.1 mM, respectively. CHP and t-BuOOH, but not H2O2 induced lipid peroxidation in C6 cells with EC50 values of 15+/-14 microM and 130+/-33 microM, respectively. The TBARS measured almost exclusively consisted of MDA. 4-HNE was mostly not detectable. The concentration of hexanal slightly increased with increasing concentrations of organic peroxides. Regarding time and concentration dependency lipid peroxidation preceded cell death. Pretreatment with alpha-tocopherol (10 microM, 24 h) prevented both, peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death. The results strongly indicate a major role of lipid peroxidation in the killing of C6 cells by organic peroxides but also that lipid peroxidation is not involved in H2O2 induced cell death.

  15. Fluorescent products in high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and their association with other lipid peroxide products (LPPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavinski, Swiatoslav L.; Kuznetsov, Alexandr S.; Kopilevich, Yurij I.; Svetlykh, Alexander A.; Melnikov, Nikita O.

    1998-01-01

    The lipid peroxidation products of the lipofuscin type can be measured in plasma with the help of fluorimeters. Such products are increasing during whole plasm oxidation in parallel with other indices of lipid peroxidation damage. Preformed fluorescent products are located in all lipoprotein classes. The study of lipofuscin-type pigments fluorescence in HDL showed, that they contain substantial amounts of fluorescent compounds and that it rises in parallel with concentration of other lipid peroxidation products, especially thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances. Neither total plasma cholesterol, nor triglycerides influenced content of fluorescent products in HDL. The HDL subfractions contained different types of the fluorescent products but the bulk of these lipoproteins were almost free of them. The obtained data show that measurement of lipofuscin-type fluorescence in HDL gives a good and sensitive index of these lipoproteins damage by peroxidation.

  16. Benzoyl Peroxide Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... Up® (as a combination product containing Benzoyl Peroxide, Sulfur) ... NuOx® (as a combination product containing Benzoyl Peroxide, Sulfur) ... Sulfoxyl® (as a combination product containing Benzoyl Peroxide, Sulfur)

  17. Increased accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts in male GSTA4/PPAR alpha double knockout mice enhances injury during early stages of alcoholic liver disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hepatic lipid peroxidation and accumulation of aldehyde-adducted proteins occur early in alcohol-mediated injury and are postulated to mediate the subsequent pro-inflammatory and fibrotic responses observed in alcoholic liver disease. To test the significance of lipid peroxidation formation in the ...

  18. Lipid peroxidation: production, metabolism, and signaling mechanisms of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Antonio; Muñoz, Mario F; Argüelles, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation can be described generally as a process under which oxidants such as free radicals attack lipids containing carbon-carbon double bond(s), especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Over the last four decades, an extensive body of literature regarding lipid peroxidation has shown its important role in cell biology and human health. Since the early 1970s, the total published research articles on the topic of lipid peroxidation was 98 (1970-1974) and has been increasing at almost 135-fold, by up to 13165 in last 4 years (2010-2013). New discoveries about the involvement in cellular physiology and pathology, as well as the control of lipid peroxidation, continue to emerge every day. Given the enormity of this field, this review focuses on biochemical concepts of lipid peroxidation, production, metabolism, and signaling mechanisms of two main omega-6 fatty acids lipid peroxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA) and, in particular, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), summarizing not only its physiological and protective function as signaling molecule stimulating gene expression and cell survival, but also its cytotoxic role inhibiting gene expression and promoting cell death. Finally, overviews of in vivo mammalian model systems used to study the lipid peroxidation process, and common pathological processes linked to MDA and 4-HNE are shown.

  19. Lipid Peroxidation: Production, Metabolism, and Signaling Mechanisms of Malondialdehyde and 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Mario F.; Argüelles, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation can be described generally as a process under which oxidants such as free radicals attack lipids containing carbon-carbon double bond(s), especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Over the last four decades, an extensive body of literature regarding lipid peroxidation has shown its important role in cell biology and human health. Since the early 1970s, the total published research articles on the topic of lipid peroxidation was 98 (1970–1974) and has been increasing at almost 135-fold, by up to 13165 in last 4 years (2010–2013). New discoveries about the involvement in cellular physiology and pathology, as well as the control of lipid peroxidation, continue to emerge every day. Given the enormity of this field, this review focuses on biochemical concepts of lipid peroxidation, production, metabolism, and signaling mechanisms of two main omega-6 fatty acids lipid peroxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA) and, in particular, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), summarizing not only its physiological and protective function as signaling molecule stimulating gene expression and cell survival, but also its cytotoxic role inhibiting gene expression and promoting cell death. Finally, overviews of in vivo mammalian model systems used to study the lipid peroxidation process, and common pathological processes linked to MDA and 4-HNE are shown. PMID:24999379

  20. Glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production by brown adipose tissue mitochondria and its activation by ferricyanide.

    PubMed

    Drahota, Zdenek; Chowdhury, Subir K R; Floryk, Daniel; Mrácek, Tomás; Wilhelm, Jirí; Rauchová, Hana; Lenaz, Giorgio; Houstek, Josef

    2002-04-01

    Oxidation of glycerophosphate (GP) by brown adipose tissue mitochondria in the presence of antimycin A was found to be accompanied by significant production of hydrogen peroxide. GP-dependent hydrogen peroxide production could be detected by p-hydroxyphenylacetate fluorescence changes or as an antimycin A-insensitive oxygen consumption. One-electron acceptor, potassium ferricyanide, highly stimulated the rate of GP-dependent antimycin A-insensitive oxygen uptake, which was prevented by inhibitors of mitochondrial GP dehydrogenase (mGPDH) or by coenzyme Q (CoQ). GP-dependent ferricyanide-induced peroxide production was also determined luminometrically, using mitochondria or partially purified mGPDH. Ferricyanide-induced peroxide production was negligible, when succinate or NADH was used as a substrate. These results indicate that hydrogen peroxide is produced directly by mGPDH and reflect the differences in the transport of reducing equivalents from mGPDH and succinate dehydrogenase to the CoQ pool. The data suggest that more intensive production of reactive oxygen species may be present in mammalian cells with active mGPDH.

  1. Protective effect of phytic acid hydrolysis products on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, S; Kuwata, G; Imai, M; Nagao, A; Terao, J

    2000-12-01

    Beneficial effects of dietary phytic acid (myo-inositol hexaphosphate; IP6) have often been explained by its strong iron ion-chelating ability, which possibly suppresses iron ion-induced oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal tract. Because phytic acid is hydrolyzed during digestion, this work aimed to know whether its hydrolysis products (IP2, IP3, IP4, and IP5) could still prevent iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation. Studies using liposomal membranes demonstrated that hydrolysis products containing three or more phosphate groups are able to inhibit iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation although their effectiveness decreased with dephosphorylation. Similarly, they also prevented iron ion-induced decomposition of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide. These results demonstrate that intermediate products of phytic acid hydrolysis still possess iron ion-chelating ability, and thus they can probably prevent iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  2. Measurement of lipid peroxidation products in rabbit brain and organs (response to aluminum exposure).

    PubMed

    Bertholf, R L; Nicholson, J R; Wills, M R; Savory, J

    1987-01-01

    A method was developed for measuring the concentration of lipid peroxidation products in rabbit brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidney tissue. Specimens were homogenized in cold buffer, acidified, and heated to near boiling in the presence of thiobarbituric acid in order to form the malondialdehyde-thiobarbiturate adduct. After centrifugation, the supernatant was injected onto a reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) column, and the effluent was monitored for absorbance at 532 nm. Absorbances were compared to a standard curve constructed from absorbance data for tetraethoxypropane standards, which yield stoichiometric amounts of the malondialdehyde-thiobarbiturate adduct. Results were expressed as nmol of adduct per gram (dry weight) of tissue. Hippocampus had significantly greater concentrations of lipid peroxidation products (79.0 +/- 15.7 nmol per g) than did brainstem (52.1 +/- 13.8 nmol per g), but there was no significant increase in lipid peroxidation in aluminum treated rabbit brains when compared with controls. Aluminum intoxication appeared, however, to stimulate lipid peroxidation in heart, lung, liver, and kidney. Aluminum accumulation in brain and organ tissue of treated rabbits was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry of an acid digest of the homogenate. These results are in contrast to previous studies which demonstrated an increase in lipid peroxidation products in rat brains following oral administration of aluminum hydroxide.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide tooth-whitening (bleaching) products: review of adverse effects and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Tredwin, C J; Naik, S; Lewis, N J; Scully, C

    2006-04-08

    Hydrogen peroxide in the form of carbamide peroxide is widely used for tooth whitening (bleaching), both in professionally- and in self-administered products. Adverse effects have become evident. Cervical root resorption is a possible consequence of internal bleaching and is more frequently observed in teeth treated with the thermo-catalytic procedure. Tooth sensitivity is experienced in 15-78% of patients undergoing external tooth bleaching. However, clinical studies addressing other adverse effects are lacking. Direct contact with hydrogen peroxide induces genotoxic effects in bacteria and cultured epithelial cells, but the effect is reduced or totally abolished in the presence of metabolising enzymes. Several carcinogenesis studies, including the hamster cheek pouch model, indicate that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) might possibly act as a promoter. Until further clinical research is concluded to address the question of possible carcinogenicity, it is recommended that: tooth-bleaching products using concentrated H(2)O(2) should not be used without gingival protection; that H(2)O(2) containing products should be avoided in patients with damaged or diseased soft tissues. For nightguard vital bleaching, minimal amounts of low dose H(2)O(2) (including in the form of carbamide peroxide) are preferred, thereby avoiding prolonged and concentrated exposures.

  4. Electrocatalytic synthesis of hydrogen peroxide on Au-Pd nanoparticles: From fundamentals to continuous production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzutilo, Enrico; Kasian, Olga; Choi, Chang Hyuck; Cherevko, Serhiy; Hutchings, Graham J.; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Freakley, Simon J.

    2017-09-01

    The electrochemical synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) represents a promising alternative to the anthraquinone process, as it combines on-site chemical and electrical production. The design of selective electrocatalysts is challenging and is commonly based on the alloying of elements to generate a synergistic effect and increase activity. In the present work, we report the electrochemical activity of Au-Pd nanoparticles immobilized directly onto an electrode as a model to study H2O2 electrochemical synthesis from fundamentals to continuous production. The impact of composition on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the selectivity, as well as the peroxide reduction and oxidation reactions (PROR) are studied.

  5. On the role of microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase in metabolism of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Antonenkov, V D; Pirozhkov, S V; Panchenko, L F

    1987-11-30

    To elucidate a possible role of membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase in the detoxication of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation, the substrate specificity of the highly purified microsomal enzyme was investigated. The aldehyde dehydrogenase was active with different aliphatic aldehydes including 4-hydroxyalkenals, but did not react with malonic dialdehyde. When Fe/ADP-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid was carried out in an in vitro system, the formation of products which react with microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed parallel with malonic dialdehyde accumulation.

  6. Increased 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts in male GSTA4–4/PPAR-alpha double knockout mice enhance injury during early stages of alcoholic liver disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To test the significance of lipid peroxidation in the development of alcoholic liver injury, an ethanol (EtOH) liquid diet was fed to male wild type 129/SvJ mice, and glutathione S-transferase A4-4 null (GSTA4-/-) mice for 40 d. GSTA4-/- mice were also crossed with peroxisome proliferator-activated ...

  7. Effects of diffusible products of peroxidation of rat liver microsomal lipids

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Angelo; Casini, Alessandro F.; Ferrali, Marco; Comporti, Mario

    1979-01-01

    The effects on cellular structures of products of peroxidation of rat liver microsomal lipids were investigated. A system containing actively peroxidizing liver microsomal fraction was separated from a revealing or target system by a dialysis membrane. The target system, contained in the dialysis tube, consisted of either intact cells (erythrocytes) or subcellular fractions (liver microsomal fraction). When liver microsomal fractions were incubated with NADPH (or an NADPH-generating system), lipid peroxidation, as measured by the amount of malonaldehyde formed, occurred very rapidly. The malon-aldehyde concentration tended to equilibrate across the dialysis membrane. When the target system consisted of erythrocytes, haemolysis occurred abruptly after a lag phase. The lysis was greatly accelerated when erythrocytes from vitamin E-deficient rats were used, but no haemolysis was observed when erythrocytes from vitamin E-treated rats were used. When, in the same system, freshly prepared liver microsomal fractions were exposed to diffusible factors produced by lipid peroxidation, the glucose 6-phosphatase activity markedly decreased. A similar decrease in glucose 6-phosphatase activity, as well as a smaller but significant decrease in cytochrome P-450, was observed when the target microsomal fractions were exposed to diffusible factors derived from the peroxidation of liver microsomal lipids in a separate preincubation step. These and additional experiments indicated that the toxicological activity is relatively stable. Experiments in which the hepatic microsomal fractions destined for lipid peroxidation contained radioactively labelled arachidonic acid, previously incorporated into the membranes, showed that part of the radioactivity released from the microsomal fraction into the incubation medium entered the dialysis tube and was recovered bound to the constituents of the microsomal fractions of the target system. These results indicate that during the course of the

  8. Solar-Driven Hydrogen Peroxide Production Using Polymer-Supported Carbon Dots as Heterogeneous Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Satyabrat; Karak, Niranjan

    2017-10-01

    Safe, sustainable, and green production of hydrogen peroxide is an exciting proposition due to the role of hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant and energy carrier for fuel cells. The current work reports the development of carbon dot-impregnated waterborne hyperbranched polyurethane as a heterogeneous photo-catalyst for solar-driven production of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the carbon dots possess a suitable band-gap of 2.98 eV, which facilitates effective splitting of both water and ethanol under solar irradiation. Inclusion of the carbon dots within the eco-friendly polymeric material ensures their catalytic activity and also provides a facile route for easy catalyst separation, especially from a solubilizing medium. The overall process was performed in accordance with the principles of green chemistry using bio-based precursors and aqueous medium. This work highlights the potential of carbon dots as an effective photo-catalyst.

  9. Trends in Selective Hydrogen Peroxide Production on Transition Metal Surfaces from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Rees B.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.

    2012-10-19

    We present a comprehensive, Density Functional Theory-based analysis of the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, on twelve transition metal surfaces. We determine the full thermodynamics and selected kinetics of the reaction network on these metals, and we analyze these energetics with simple, microkinetically motivated rate theories to assess the activity and selectivity of hydrogen peroxide production on the surfaces of interest. By further exploiting Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationships and scaling relationships between the binding energies of different adsorbates, we express the results in the form of a two dimensional contour volcano plot, with the activity and selectivity being determined as functions of two independent descriptors, the atomic hydrogen and oxygen adsorption free energies. We identify both a region of maximum predicted catalytic activity, which is near Pt and Pd in descriptor space, and a region of selective hydrogen peroxide production, which includes Au. The optimal catalysts represent a compromise between activity and selectivity and are predicted to fall approximately between Au and Pd in descriptor space, providing a compact explanation for the experimentally known performance of Au-Pd alloys for hydrogen peroxide synthesis, and suggesting a target for future computational screening efforts to identify improved direct hydrogen peroxide synthesis catalysts. Related methods of combining activity and selectivity analysis into a single volcano plot may be applicable to, and useful for, other aqueous phase heterogeneous catalytic reactions where selectivity is a key catalytic criterion.

  10. Products of alkaline peroxide attack on wheat straw, oak, and keraf

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, T.; Peterson, R.

    1985-07-01

    Wheat straw, oak, and kenaf were partially delignified by treatment with hydrogen peroxide at pH 11.0, and the water-soluble degradation products were characterized. Forty to sixty percent of the solubilized products were larger than 1000 molecular weight (MW), as determined by membrane ultrafiltration. Lignin degradation products in the low-molecular-weight fraction (is less than 1000) consisted primarily of aromatic and aliphatic carboxylic acids. 14 references.

  11. [Inhibition of hydrogen peroxide production on chondrocytes induced by fulvic acid by ginger volatile oil].

    PubMed

    Guo, P; Xu, J; Xu, S; Wang, K

    1997-09-01

    In order to investigate the effect of ginger on Kashin-Beck disease (KBD), the ginger volatile oil was taken as a scavenger and proved effective in inhibiting the production of hydrogen peroxide in chondrocytes induced by fulvic acid from KBD area.

  12. Coupling of Solar Energy to Hydrogen Peroxide Production in the Cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Roncel, Mercedes; Navarro, José A.; De la Rosa, Miguel A.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide production by blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) under photoautotrophic conditions is of great interest as a model system for the bioconversion of solar energy. Our experimental system was based on the photosynthetic reduction of molecular oxygen with electrons from water by Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 as the biophotocatalyst and methyl viologen as a redox intermediate. It has been demonstrated that the metabolic conditions of the algae in their different growth stages strongly influence the capacity for hydrogen peroxide photoproduction, and so the initial formation rate and net peroxide yield became maximum in the mid-log phase of growth. The overall process can be optimized in the presence of certain metabolic inhibitors such as iodoacetamide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, as well as by permeabilization of the cellular membrane after drastic temperature changes and by immobilization of the cells in inert supports such as agar and alginate. PMID:16347855

  13. Hydrogen peroxide production is affected by oxygen levels in mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Maddalena, Lucas A; Selim, Shehab M; Fonseca, Joao; Messner, Holt; McGowan, Shannon; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2017-11-04

    Although oxygen levels in the extracellular space of most mammalian tissues are just a few percent, under standard cell culture conditions they are not regulated and are often substantially higher. Some cellular sources of reactive oxygen species, like NADPH oxidase 4, are sensitive to oxygen levels in the range between 'normal' physiological (typically 1-5%) and standard cell culture (up to 18%). Hydrogen peroxide in particular participates in signal transduction pathways via protein redox modifications, so the potential increase in its production under standard cell culture conditions is important to understand. We measured the rates of cellular hydrogen peroxide production in some common cell lines, including C2C12, PC-3, HeLa, SH-SY5Y, MCF-7, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) maintained at 18% or 5% oxygen. In all instances the rate of hydrogen peroxide production by these cells was significantly greater at 18% oxygen than at 5%. The increase in hydrogen peroxide production at higher oxygen levels was either abolished or substantially reduced by treatment with GKT 137831, a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase subunits 1 and 4. These data indicate that oxygen levels experienced by cells in culture influence hydrogen peroxide production via NADPH oxidase 1/4, highlighting the importance of regulating oxygen levels in culture near physiological values. However, we measured pericellular oxygen levels adjacent to cell monolayers under a variety of conditions and with different cell lines and found that, particularly when growing at 5% incubator oxygen levels, pericellular oxygen was often lower and variable. Together, these observations indicate the importance, and difficulty, of regulating oxygen levels experienced by cells in culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide prevents vascular calcification induced ROS production by regulating Nrf-2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wensong; Li, Yi; Ding, Hanlu; Du, Yaqin; Wang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Although vascular calcification in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) represents a ubiquitous human health problem, effective therapies with limited side effects are still lacking, and the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. The Nrf-2/ARE pathway is a pivotal to regulate anti-oxidative responses in vascular calcification upon ESRD. Although Nrf-2 plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis, pulmonary fibrosis, and brain ischemia, the effect of Nrf-2 and oxidative stress on vascular calcification in ESRD patients is still unclear. The aim of this research was to study the protective role of hydrogen peroxide in vascular calcification and the mechanism of Nrf-2 and oxidative stress on vascular calcification. Here we used the rat vascular smooth muscle cell model of β-glycerophosphate-induced calcification resembling vascular calcification in ESRD to investigate the therapeutic effect of 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide on vascular calcification and further explores the possible underlying mechanisms. Our current report shows the in vitro role of 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide in protecting against intracellular ROS accumulation upon vascular calcification. Both hydrogen peroxide and sulforaphane pretreatment reduced ROS production, increased the expression of Nrf-2, and decreased the expression of Runx2 following calcification. Our study demonstrates that 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide can effectively protect rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells against oxidative stress by preventing vascular calcification induced ROS production through Nrf-2 pathway. These data might define an antioxidant role of hydrogen peroxide in vascular calcification upon ESRD.

  15. Development of a sterilizing in-place application for a production machine using Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Mau, T; Hartmann, V; Burmeister, J; Langguth, P; Häusler, H

    2004-01-01

    The use of steam in sterilization processes is limited by the implementation of heat-sensitive components inside the machines to be sterilized. Alternative low-temperature sterilization methods need to be found and their suitability evaluated. Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) technology was adapted for a production machine consisting of highly sensitive pressure sensors and thermo-labile air tube systems. This new kind of "cold" surface sterilization, known from the Barrier Isolator Technology, is based on the controlled release of hydrogen peroxide vapour into sealed enclosures. A mobile VHP generator was used to generate the hydrogen peroxide vapour. The unit was combined with the air conduction system of the production machine. Terminal vacuum pumps were installed to distribute the gas within the production machine and for its elimination. In order to control the sterilization process, different physical process monitors were incorporated. The validation of the process was based on biological indicators (Geobacillus stearothermophilus). The Limited Spearman Karber Method (LSKM) was used to statistically evaluate the sterilization process. The results show that it is possible to sterilize surfaces in a complex tube system with the use of gaseous hydrogen peroxide. A total microbial reduction of 6 log units was reached.

  16. Artificial photosynthesis for production of hydrogen peroxide and its fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-05-01

    The reducing power released from photosystem I (PSI) via ferredoxin enables the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH, which is essential in the Calvin-Benson cycle to make sugars in photosynthesis. Alternatively, PSI can reduce O2 to produce hydrogen peroxide as a fuel. This article describes the artificial version of the photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from water and O2 using solar energy. Hydrogen peroxide is used as a fuel in hydrogen peroxide fuel cells to make electricity. The combination of the photocatalytic H2O2 production from water and O2 using solar energy with one-compartment H2O2 fuel cells provides on-site production and usage of H2O2 as a more useful and promising solar fuel than hydrogen. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--The design and engineering of electronc transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lung edema due to hydrogen peroxide is independent of cyclooxygenase products

    SciTech Connect

    Burghuber, O.; Mathias, M.M.; McMurtry, I.F.; Reeves, J.T.; Voelkel, N.F.

    1984-01-01

    Active oxygen species can cause lung injury. Although a direct action on endothelial cells is proposed, the possibility exists that they might cause injury via mediators. We considered that active oxygen species would stimulate the generation of cyclooxygenase metabolites, which then alter pulmonary vasoreactivity and cause edema. We chemically produced hydrogen peroxide by adding glucose oxidase to a plasma- and cell-free, but ..beta..-D-glucose-containing, solution, which perfused isolated rat lungs. Addition of glucose oxidase to the perfusate caused a marked decrease in pulmonary vasoreactivity, accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of prostacyclin, thromboxane A/sub 2/, and prostaglandin F/sub 2..cap alpha../. Pretreatment with catalase, a specific scavenger of hydrogen peroxide, preserved pulomonary vasoreactivity, inhibited the increase of the concentration of the measured prostaglandins, and prevented edema formation. Indomethacin effectively blocked lung prostaglandin production but neither prevented the decrease in vasoreactivity nor inhibited edema formation. From these data we conclude the hydrogen peroxide impaired pulmonary vasoreactivity and subsequently caused edema. Depsite the fact that hydrogen peroxide stimulated lung prostaglandin production, cyclooxygenase-derived products neither caused the decrease in vasoreactivity nor the development of edema.

  18. Role of hydrogen peroxide in hypoxia-induced erythropoietin production.

    PubMed Central

    Fandrey, J; Frede, S; Jelkmann, W

    1994-01-01

    The addition of exogenous H2O2 inhibited hypoxia-induced erythropoietin (Epo) production in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Likewise, elevation of endogenous H2O2 levels by the addition of menadione or the catalase inhibitor, aminotriazole, dose-dependently lowered Epo production. The inhibitory effect of exogenous H2O2 on Epo formation could be completely overcome by co-incubation with catalase. When GSH levels in HepG2 cells were lowered, Epo production was more susceptible to H2O2-induced inhibition, indicating that H2O2 might affect thiol groups in regulatory proteins. Endogenous production of H2O2 in HepG2 cells was dependent on the pericellular O2 tension, being lowest under conditions of hypoxia. Our results support the hypothesis that an H2O2-generating haem protein might be part of the O2 sensor that controls Epo production. High H2O2 levels under conditions of normoxia suppress, whereas lower levels in hypoxic cells allow epo gene expression. Images Figure 1 PMID:7980410

  19. Involvement of inducible nitric oxide synthase in hydroxyl radical-mediated lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dallas, Shannon; Jiang, JinJie; Radi, Rafael; Mason, Ronald P.; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2008-01-01

    Free radical production is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, where several pathways and different mechanisms were suggested in the pathophysiology of the complications. In this study, we used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with in vivo spin-trapping techniques to investigate the sources and mechanisms of free radical formation in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Free radical production was directly detected in the diabetic bile, which correlated with lipid peroxidation in the liver and kidney. EPR spectra showed the trapping of a lipid-derived radical. Such radicals were demonstrated to be induced by hydroxyl radical through isotope labeling experiments. Multiple enzymes and metabolic pathways were examined as the potential source of the hydroxyl radicals using specific inhibitors. Neither xanthine oxidase, cytochrome P450s, the Fenton reaction, nor macrophage activation were required for the production of radical adducts. Interestingly, inducible nitric oxide synthase (apparently uncoupled) was identified as the major source of radical generation. The specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W as well as l-arginine pretreatment reduced the EPR signals to baseline levels, implicating peroxynitrite as the source of hydroxyl radical production. Applying immunological techniques, we localized iNOS overexpression in the liver and kidney of diabetic animals, which was closely correlated with the lipid radical generation and 4-hydroxynonenal-adducted protein formation, indicating lipid peroxidation. In addition, protein oxidation to protein free radicals occurred in the diabetic target organs. Taken together, our studies support inducible nitric oxide synthase as a significant source of EPR-detectable reactive intermediates, which leads to lipid peroxidation and may contribute to disease progression as well. PMID:18620046

  20. Fuel ethanol production from alkaline peroxide pretreated corn stover

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn stover (CS) has the potential to serve as an abundant low-cost feedstock for production of fuel ethanol. Due to heterogeneous complexity and recalcitrance of lignocellulosic feedstocks, pretreatment is required to break the lignin seal and/or disrupt the structure of crystalline cellulose to in...

  1. Anti-atherosclerotic actions of azelaic acid, an end product of linoleic acid peroxidation, in mice.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Dmitry; Selvarajan, Krithika; Garelnabi, Mahdi; Brophy, Larissa; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2010-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with the accumulation of oxidized lipids in arterial lesions. Recently we studied the degradation of peroxidized linoleic acid and suggested that oxidation is an essential process that results in the generation of terminal products, namely mono- and dicarboxylic acids that may lack the pro-atherogenic effects of peroxidized lipids. In continuation of that study, we tested the effects of azelaic acid (AzA), one of the end products of linoleic acid peroxidation, on the development of atherosclerosis using low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-)) mice. LDLr(-/-) mice were fed with a high fat and high cholesterol Western diet (WD group). Another group of animals were fed the same diet with AzA supplementation (WD+AzA group). After 4 months of feeding, mice were sacrificed and atherosclerotic lesions were measured. The results showed that the average lesion area in WD+AzA group was 38% (p<0.001) less as compared to WD group. The athero-protective effect of AzA was not related to changes in plasma lipid content. AzA supplementation decreased the level of CD68 macrophage marker by 34% (p<0.05). The finding that AzA exhibits an anti-atherogenic effect suggests that oxidation of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes into carboxylic acids could be an important step in the body's defense against oxidative damage. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-Atherosclerotic Actions of Azelaic acid, an End Product of Linoleic Acid Peroxidation, in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Litvinov, Dmitry; Selvarajan, Krithika; Garelnabi, Mahdi; Brophy, Larissa; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2009-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with the accumulation of oxidized lipids in arterial lesions. Recently we studied the degradation of peroxidized linoleic acid and suggested that oxidation is an essential process that results in the generation of terminal products, namely mono- and dicarboxylic acids that may lack the pro-atherogenic effects of peroxidized lipids. In continuation of that study, we tested the effects of azelaic acid (AzA), one of the end products of linoleic acid peroxidation, on the development of atherosclerosis using low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/−) mice. Methods and results LDLr−/− mice were fed with a high fat and high cholesterol Western diet (WD group). Another group of animals were fed the same diet with AzA supplementation (WD+AzA group). After four months of feeding, mice were sacrificed and atherosclerotic lesions were measured. The results showed that the average lesion area in WD+AzA group was 38% (p<0.001) less as compared to WD group. The athero-protective effect of AzA was not related to changes in plasma lipid content. AzA supplementation decreased the level of CD68 macrophage marker by 34% (p<0.05). Conclusions The finding that AzA exhibits an anti-atherogenic effect suggests that oxidation of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes into carboxylic acids could be an important step in the body’s defense against oxidative damage. PMID:19880116

  3. Volatile fingerprints of seeds of four species indicate the involvement of alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions in seed deterioration during ageing and desiccation stress

    PubMed Central

    Colville, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The volatile compounds released by orthodox (desiccation-tolerant) seeds during ageing can be analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Comparison of three legume species (Pisum sativum, Lathyrus pratensis, and Cytisus scoparius) during artificial ageing at 60% relative humidity and 50 °C revealed variation in the seed volatile fingerprint between species, although in all species the overall volatile concentration increased with storage period, and changes could be detected prior to the onset of viability loss. The volatile compounds are proposed to derive from three main sources: alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions. Lipid peroxidation was confirmed in P. sativum seeds through analysis of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. Volatile production by ageing orthodox seeds was compared with that of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) seeds of Quercus robur during desiccation. Many of the volatiles were common to both ageing orthodox seeds and desiccating recalcitrant seeds, with alcoholic fermentation forming the major source of volatiles. Finally, comparison was made between two methods of analysis; the first used a Tenax adsorbent to trap volatiles, whilst the second used solid phase microextraction to extract volatiles from the headspace of vials containing powdered seeds. Solid phase microextraction was found to be more sensitive, detecting a far greater number of compounds. Seed volatile analysis provides a non-invasive means of characterizing the processes involved in seed deterioration, and potentially identifying volatile marker compounds for the diagnosis of seed viability loss. PMID:23175670

  4. Volatile fingerprints of seeds of four species indicate the involvement of alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions in seed deterioration during ageing and desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    Colville, Louise; Bradley, Emma L; Lloyd, Antony S; Pritchard, Hugh W; Castle, Laurence; Kranner, Ilse

    2012-11-01

    The volatile compounds released by orthodox (desiccation-tolerant) seeds during ageing can be analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Comparison of three legume species (Pisum sativum, Lathyrus pratensis, and Cytisus scoparius) during artificial ageing at 60% relative humidity and 50 °C revealed variation in the seed volatile fingerprint between species, although in all species the overall volatile concentration increased with storage period, and changes could be detected prior to the onset of viability loss. The volatile compounds are proposed to derive from three main sources: alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions. Lipid peroxidation was confirmed in P. sativum seeds through analysis of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. Volatile production by ageing orthodox seeds was compared with that of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) seeds of Quercus robur during desiccation. Many of the volatiles were common to both ageing orthodox seeds and desiccating recalcitrant seeds, with alcoholic fermentation forming the major source of volatiles. Finally, comparison was made between two methods of analysis; the first used a Tenax adsorbent to trap volatiles, whilst the second used solid phase microextraction to extract volatiles from the headspace of vials containing powdered seeds. Solid phase microextraction was found to be more sensitive, detecting a far greater number of compounds. Seed volatile analysis provides a non-invasive means of characterizing the processes involved in seed deterioration, and potentially identifying volatile marker compounds for the diagnosis of seed viability loss.

  5. Effects of Cu-doped 45S5 bioactive glass on the lipid peroxidation-associated growth of human osteoblast-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Milkovic, Lidija; Hoppe, Alexander; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Zarkovic, Neven

    2014-10-01

    Bioactive glass (BG) is a highly attractive material, exhibiting both osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties, which is known to provide a growth enhancing surface for bone cells. Previous studies have shown that lipid peroxidation and in particular generation of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is involved in the growth of human osteoblast-like cells, HOS, on BG. Copper (Cu), which is an essential cofactor of several enzymes as well as a proangiogenic and an antimicrobial agent, is known to induce lipid peroxidation. Therefore, the enrichment of BG with Cu could potentially have beneficial effects on the growth of the bone cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of copper-doped 45S5 BG on the growth of HOS cells and the generation of HNE. Our results confirmed the association of HNE with the growth of HOS cells. The effects of added Cu were dose-dependent. Specifically, low concentrations (i.e., 0.1% w/w) of Cu improved viability and enhanced HOS cell growth, whereas higher Cu concentrations [i.e., 2.5% and 1% (w/w)] were cytotoxic. The observed effects of Cu concentration on cell growth correlated with the level of HNE production. Therefore, Cu containing BG may represent a useful biomaterial for research and development studies of bone regeneration.

  6. Effects of submicrometer particle compositions on cytokine production and lipid peroxidation of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Song-Lih; Hsu, Miao-Kan; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2003-01-01

    To identify the size and components related to toxicity of ambient particles, we used a trichotomous impactor to collect 17 sets of particles in three size ranges--submicrometer (diameters < 1 microm; PM1.0, fine (diameters between 1 and 2.5 microm; PM1.0-2.5, and coarse (diameters between 2.5 and 10 microm; PM2.5-10--at stations monitoring background, urban, traffic, and industrial air in Taiwan. Elemental contents, carbon contents, soluble ions, and endotoxin content of particles were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, thermal analysis, ion chromatography, and the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay, respectively. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to particle extracts at 100 micro g/mL for 8 hr, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) concentrations in the medium and lipid peroxidation products were measured. Particle-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells was also measured. PM1.0 stimulation resulted in significantly higher IL-8 production and lipid peroxidation than PM2.5-10, whereas the responses elicited by PM1.0-2.5 were not significantly higher than blank filters. Untreated and polymyxin B-pretreated PM1.0 also stimulated more TNF-alpha production by RAW 264.7 cells than PM2.5-10 and PM1.0-2.5. Cytokine production was significantly associated with metal contents of PM1.0: IL-8 correlated with Cr and Mn, and TNF-alpha correlated with Fe and Cr. Lipid peroxidation in BEAS-2B cells correlated with elemental and organic carbon contents. Our study found that size and composition of ambient particles were both important factors in inducing cytokine production and lipid peroxidation. PMID:12676602

  7. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  8. Production of Hydrogen Peroxide in Groundwater at Rifle, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu; Nico, Peter S; Huang, Xiang; Liu, Tongxu; Ulrich, Craig; Williams, Kenneth H; Davis, James A

    2017-07-18

    The commonly held assumption that photodependent processes dominate H2O2 production in natural waters has been recently questioned. Here, we present evidence for the unrecognized and light-independent generation of H2O2 in groundwater of an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO. In situ detection using a sensitive chemiluminescent method suggests H2O2 concentrations ranging from lower than the detection limit (<1 nM) to 54 nM along the vertical profiles obtained at various locations across the aquifer. Our results also suggest dark formation of H2O2 is more likely to occur in transitional redox environments where reduced elements (e.g., reduced metals and NOM) meet oxygen, such as oxic-anoxic interfaces. A simplified kinetic model involving interactions among iron, reduced NOM, and oxygen was able to reproduce roughly many, but not all, of the features in our detected H2O2 profiles, and therefore there are other minor biological and/or chemical controls on H2O2 steady-state concentrations in such aquifer. Because of its transient nature, the widespread presence of H2O2 in groundwater suggests the existence of a balance between H2O2 sources and sinks, which potentially involves a cascade of various biogeochemically important processes that could have significant impacts on metal/nutrient cycling in groundwater-dependent ecosystems, such as wetlands and springs. More importantly, our results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species are not only widespread in oceanic and atmospheric systems but also in the subsurface domain, possibly the least understood component of biogeochemical cycles.

  9. Optimization study on the hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and production of bioethanol from seaweed Ulva prolifera biomass.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinping; Cui, Jiefen; Zhang, Gaoli; Liu, Zhengkun; Guan, Huashi; Hwang, Hueymin; Aker, Winfred G; Wang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The seaweed Ulva prolifera, distributed in inter-tidal zones worldwide, contains a large percentage of cellulosic materials. The technical feasibility of using U. prolifera residue (UPR) obtained after extraction of polysaccharides as a renewable energy resource was investigated. An environment-friendly and economical pretreatment process was conducted using hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide pretreatment improved the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. The resulting yield of reducing sugar reached a maximum of 0.42g/g UPR under the optimal pretreatment condition (hydrogen peroxide 0.2%, 50°C, pH 4.0, 12h). The rate of conversion of reducing sugar in the concentrated hydrolysates to bioethanol reached 31.4% by Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation, which corresponds to 61.7% of the theoretical maximum yield. Compared with other reported traditional processes on Ulva biomass, the reducing sugar and bioethanol yield are substantially higher. Thus, hydrogen peroxide pretreatment is an effective enhancement of the process of bioethanol production from the seaweed U. prolifera. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phenazine production enhances extracellular DNA release via hydrogen peroxide generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Manefield, Mike

    2013-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa eDNA is a crucial component essential for biofilm formation and stability. In this study we report that release of eDNA is influenced by the production of phenazine in P. aeruginosa. A ∆phzA-G mutant of P. aeruginosa PA14 deficient in phenazine production generated significantly less eDNA in comparison with the phenazine producing strains. The relationship between eDNA release and phenazine production is bridged via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation and subsequent H2O2 mediated cell lysis and ultimately release of chromosomal DNA into the extracellular environment as eDNA. PMID:23710274

  11. Methods and apparatus for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschmann, Wayne E. (Inventor); James, Patrick I. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods, apparatus, and applications for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide are described. An embodiment of the apparatus comprises at least one anolyte chamber coupled to at least one anode, at least one catholyte chamber, wherein the at least one catholyte chamber is coupled to at least one cathode, at least one anode membrane and at least one cathode membrane, wherein the anode membrane is adjacent to the at least one anode, wherein the cathode membrane is adjacent to the at least one cathode, at least one central chamber disposed between the at least one anolyte chamber and the at least one catholyte chamber. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by reduction of an oxygen-containing gas at the cathode.

  12. Advanced oxidation protein products are more related to metabolic syndrome components than biomarkers of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Danielle; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Dichi, Isaias

    2015-09-01

    Although advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been reported as the most appropriate parameter for determination of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a direct comparison between protein and lipid peroxidation has not been performed yet. The aim of this study was to compare protein peroxidation with lipid peroxidation measured by 2 different methodologies (tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence and ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange assay). The hypothesis of this study was that AOPPs would be more related to MetS than to oxidative markers of lipid peroxidation. This cross-sectional study evaluated 76 patients with MetS and 20 healthy subjects. Prooxidant-antioxidant index (PAI) assessed as AOPP/total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter ratio progressively increased (P < .05) according to the number of MetS components, whereas AOPPs and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter increased (P < .05) when 5 components were compared with 3 components. Spearman test showed a positive correlation between AOPPs and waist circumference (r = 0.318, P < .01), fasting glucose (r = 0.250, P < .05), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (r = 0.043, P < .01), triacylglycerol (r = 0.713, P < .0001), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (r = 0.275, P < .05), and uric acid (r = 0.356, P < .01), whereas there was an inverse correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.399, P < .001). Prooxidant-antioxidant index demonstrated a positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.386, P < .01), fasting glucose (r = 0.388, P < .01), fasting insulin (r = 0.344, P < .05), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (r = 0.519, P < .001), triacylglycerol (r = 0.687, P < .0001), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (r = 0.278, P < .05), and uric acid (r = 0.557, P < .0001), whereas there was an inverse correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.480, P < .0001). In conclusion, protein

  13. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  14. Penetration of hydrogen peroxide and degradation rate of different bleaching products.

    PubMed

    Marson, F C; Gonçalves, R S; Silva, C O; Cintra, L T Â; Pascotto, R C; Santos, P H Dos; Briso, A L F

    2015-01-01

    This study's aim was to evaluate the degradation rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and to quantify its penetration in tooth structure, considering the residence time of bleaching products on the dental enamel. For this study, bovine teeth were randomly divided according to the bleaching product received: Opalescence Xtra Boost 38%, White Gold Office 35%, Whiteness HP Blue 35%, Whiteness HP Maxx 35%, and Lase Peroxide Sensy 35%. To analyze the degradation of H2O2, the titration of bleaching agents with potassium permanganate was used, while the penetration of H2O2 was measured via spectrophotometric analysis of the acetate buffer solution, collected from the artificial pulp chamber. The analyses were performed immediately as well as 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 45 minutes after product application. The data of degradation rate of H2O2 were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests, while ANOVA and Fisher tests were used for the quantification of H2O2, at the 5% level. The results showed that all products significantly reduced the concentration of H2O2 activates at the end of 45 minutes. It was also verified that the penetration of H2O2 was enhanced by increasing the residence time of the product on the tooth surface. It was concluded that the bleaching gels retained substantial concentrations of H2O2 after 45 minutes of application, and penetration of H2O2 in the dental structure is time-dependent.

  15. Copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of oxidizing agents, including chlorine, bromine, ozone and other peroxides, were allowed to act on copper solutions with the intention of forming copper peroxide. The only successful agent appears to be hydrogen peroxide. It must be used in a neutral 50 to 30 percent solution at a temperature near zero. Other methods described in the literature apparently do not work. The excess of hydrogen must be quickly sucked out of the brown precipitate, which it is best to wash with alcohol and ether. The product, crystalline under a microscope, can be analyzed only approximately. It approaches the formula CuO2H2O. In alkaline solution it appears to act catalytically in causing the decomposition of other peroxides, so that Na2O2 cannot be used to prepare it. On the addition of acids the H2O2 is regenerated. The dry substance decomposes much more slowly than the moist but is not very stable.

  16. A Comparison between Lime and Alkaline Hydrogen Peroxide Pretreatments of Sugarcane Bagasse for Ethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabelo, Sarita C.; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Costa, Aline C.

    Pretreatment procedures of sugarcane bagasse with lime (calcium hydroxide) or alkaline hydrogen peroxide were evaluated and compared. Analyses were performed using 2 × 2 × 2 factorial designs, with pretreatment time, temperature, and lime loading and hydrogen peroxide concentration as factors. The responses evaluated were the yield of total reducing sugars (TRS) and glucose released from pretreated bagasse after enzymatic hydrolysis. Experiments were performed using the bagasse as it comes from an alcohol/ sugar factory and bagasse in the size range of 0.248 to 1.397 mm (12-60 mesh). The results show that when hexoses and pentoses are of interest, lime should be the pretreatment agent chosen, as high TRS yields are obtained for nonscreened bagasse using 0.40 g lime/g dry biomass at 70 °C for 36 h. When the product of interest is glucose, the best results were obtained with lime pretreatment of screened bagasse. However, the results for alkaline peroxide and lime pretreatments of nonscreened bagasse are not very different.

  17. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Spotlight on Fatty Acid Oxidation and Lipoperoxidation Products

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Giuseppina; Gentile, Fabrizio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Canuto, Rosa Angela; Daga, Martina; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Lepore, Alessio; Ferretti, Carlo; Dianzani, Chiara; Muzio, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    In several human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced mainly by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, is increased. In cancer cells, the increase of ROS production has been associated with mtDNA mutations that, in turn, seem to be functional in the alterations of the bioenergetics and the biosynthetic state of cancer cells. Moreover, ROS overproduction can enhance the peroxidation of fatty acids in mitochondrial membranes. In particular, the peroxidation of mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin leads to the formation of reactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and malondialdehyde (MDA), which are able to react with proteins and DNA. Covalent modifications of mitochondrial proteins by the products of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the course of oxidative cell stress are involved in the mitochondrial dysfunctions observed in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Such modifications appear to affect negatively mitochondrial integrity and function, in particular energy metabolism, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, antioxidant defenses and stress responses. In neurodegenerative diseases, indirect confirmation for the pathogenetic relevance of LPO-dependent modifications of mitochondrial proteins comes from the disease phenotypes associated with their genetic alterations. PMID:26907355

  18. Ultrastructural localization of hydrogen peroxide production in ligninolytic Phanerochaete chrysosporium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Forney, L.J.; Reddy, C.A.; Pankratz, H.S.

    1982-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that the hydroxyl radical derived from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is involved in lignin degradation by Phanerochaete chrysosporium. In the present study, the ultrastructural sites of H2O2 production in ligninolytic cells of P. chrysosporium were demonstrated by cytochemically staining cells with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB). Hydrogen peroxide production, as evidenced by the presence of oxidized DAB deposits, appeared to be localized in the periplasmic space of cells from ligninolytic cultures grown for 14 days in nitrogen-limited medium. When identical cells were treated with DAB in the presence of aminotriazole, periplasmic deposits of oxidized DAB were not observed, suggesting that the deposits resulted from H2O2-dependent peroxidatic oxidation of DAB by catalase. Cells from cultures grown for 3 or 6 days in nitrogen-limited medium or for 14 days in nitrogen- sufficient medium had little ligninolytic activity and low specific activity for H202 production and did not contain periplasmic oxidized DAB deposits. The results suggest that in cultures grown in nitrogen- limited medium, there is a positive correlation between the occurrence of oxidized DAB deposits, the specific activity for H2O2 production in cell extracts, and ligninolytic activity. (Refs. 25).

  19. In vitro production and scavenging of hydrogen peroxide by D-penicillamine. Relationship to copper availability.

    PubMed

    Staite, N D; Messner, R P; Zoschke, D C

    1985-08-01

    The capacity of D-penicillamine (DP) to produce or scavenge hydrogen peroxide was investigated. DP added to copper produced H2O2. Greater production was observed with copper sulfate than with copper bound to ceruloplasmin. In contrast, DP in the absence of copper scavenged H2O2, as measured in a direct assay. Furthermore, DP or D-cysteine alone reversed H2O2-mediated inhibition of concanavalin A-stimulated mononuclear cell proliferation. These opposing immunomodulating properties of DP may be relevant to its toxic or therapeutic actions in rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Simultaneous high-resolution measurement of mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Fontana-Ayoub, Mona; Sumbalova, Zuzana; Heidler, Juliana; Gauper, Kathrin; Fasching, Mario; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species, primarily in the form of superoxide (O2 (•-)) and particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Since H2O2 plays important roles in physiology and pathology, measurement of hydrogen peroxide has received considerable attention over many years. Here we describe how the well-established Amplex Red assay can be used to detect H2O2 production in combination with the simultaneous assessment of mitochondrial bioenergetics by high-resolution respirometry. Fundamental instrumental and methodological parameters were optimized for analysis of the effects of various substrate, uncoupler, and inhibitor titrations (SUIT) on respiration versus H2O2 production. The sensitivity of the H2O2 assay was strongly influenced by compounds contained in different mitochondrial respiration media, which also exerted significant effects on chemical background fluorescence changes. Near linearity of the fluorescence signal was restricted to narrow ranges of accumulating resorufin concentrations independent of the nature of mitochondrial respiration media. Finally, we show an application example using isolated mouse brain mitochondria as an experimental model for the simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 production in SUIT protocols.

  1. Mutagenicity of ω-3 fatty acid peroxidation products in the Ames test.

    PubMed

    Grúz, Petr; Shimizu, Masatomi; Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Honma, Masamitsu

    2017-07-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) represent one of the main building blocks of cellular membranes and their varying composition impacts lifespan as well as susceptibility to cancer and other degenerative diseases. Increased intake of ω-3 PUFA is taught to compensate for the abundance of ω-6 PUFA in modern human diet and prevent cardiocirculatory diseases. However, highly unsaturated PUFA of marine and seed origin easily oxidize to aldehydic products which form DNA adducts. With increased PUFA consumption it is prudent to re-evaluate ω-3 PUFA safety and the genotoxic hazards of their metabolites. We have used the standard Ames test to examine the mutagenicity of 2 hexenals derived from lipid peroxidation of the common ω-3 PUFA in human diet and tissues. Both 4-hydroxyhexenal and 2-hexenal derived from the ω-3 docosahexaenoic and α-linolenic acid, respectively, induced base substitutions in the TA104 and TA100 Ames strains in a dose dependent manner. Their mutagenicity was dependent on the Y-family DNA polymerase RI and they did not induce other types of mutations such as the -2 and -1 frameshifts in the TA98 and TA97 strains. Our results expand previous findings about the mutagenicity of related ω-3 peroxidation product 4-oxohexenal and raise alert that overuse of ω-3 rich oils may have adverse effect on genome stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Solar energy conversion by green microalgae: a photosystem for hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, F F; Montes, O; Galván, F

    2001-09-20

    A photosystem for solar energy conversion, comprised of a culture of green microalgae supplemented with methyl viologen, is proposed. The capture of solar energy is based on the Mehler reaction. The reduction of methyl viologen by the photosynthetic apparatus and its subsequent reoxidation by oxygen produces hydrogen peroxide. This is a rich-energy compound that can be used as a nonpollutant and efficient fuel. Four different species of green microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (21gr) C. reinhardtii (CW15), Chlorella fusca, and Monoraphidium braunii, were tested as a possible biocatalyst. Each species presented a different efficiency level in the transformation of energy. Azide was an efficient inhibitor of the hydrogen peroxide scavenging system while maintaining photosynthetic activity of the microalgae, and thus significantly increasing the production of the photosystem. The strain C. reinhardtii (21gr), among the species studied, was the most efficient with an initial production rate of 185 micromol H(2)O(2)/h x mg Chl and reaching a maximum of 42.5 micromol H(2)O(2)/mg Chl when assayed in the presence of azide inhibitor. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide production, chemiluminescence, and the respiratory burst of fertilization: Interrelated events in early sea urchin development

    PubMed Central

    Foerder, Charles A.; Klebanoff, Seymour J.; Shapiro, Bennett M.

    1978-01-01

    After fertilization of the sea urchin, Strongyl-ocentrotus purpuratus, a crosslinked fertilization membrane is formed; the crosslinks (dityrosine residues) are synthesized in a reaction catalyzed by an ovoperoxidase that is released from the cortical granules during fertilization. The substrate for ovoperoxidase activity, hydrogen peroxide, is generated by the egg coincident with the “respiratory burst” that follows parthenogenetic activation by the divalent ionophore A23187 or fertilization. This burst of oxygen consumption may be almost quantitatively accounted for by hydrogen peroxide evolution, as measured by the peroxidase-catalyzed quenching of scopoletin fluorescence. Neither the burst of oxygen consumption nor hydrogen peroxide production occurs when the inhibitor of cortical granule discharge, procaine, is present at fertilization. Fertilization or parthenogenetic activation with A23187 also is associated with a burst of light emission. This chemiluminescence is inhibited in vivo by inhibitors of the ovoperoxidase, such as 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, phenylhydrazine, sulfite, or azide. A crude ovoperoxidase preparation catalyzes hydrogen peroxide-dependent chemiluminescence that is similarly inhibited. Thus, the bursts of oxygen uptake, peroxide production, and chemiluminescence appear to be several manifestations of the peroxidative system released at fertilization. This system may additionally be responsible for spermicidal activity and thus may act as a component of the block to polyspermy. PMID:277920

  4. 4-Hydroxynonenal Induces G2/M Phase Cell Cycle Arrest by Activation of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated and Rad3-related Protein (ATR)/Checkpoint Kinase 1 (Chk1) Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Sharma, Rajendra; Sahu, Mukesh; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.; Awasthi, Sanjay; Awasthi, Yogesh C.

    2013-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) has been widely implicated in the mechanisms of oxidant-induced toxicity, but the detrimental effects of HNE associated with DNA damage or cell cycle arrest have not been thoroughly studied. Here we demonstrate for the first time that HNE caused G2/M cell cycle arrest of hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 (p53 wild type) and Hep3B (p53 null) cells that was accompanied with decreased expression of CDK1 and cyclin B1 and activation of p21 in a p53-independent manner. HNE treatment suppressed the Cdc25C level, which led to inactivation of CDK1. HNE-induced phosphorylation of Cdc25C at Ser-216 resulted in its translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm, thereby facilitating its degradation via the ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal pathway. This phosphorylation of Cdc25C was regulated by activation of the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR)/checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) pathway. The role of HNE in the DNA double strand break was strongly suggested by a remarkable increase in comet tail formation and H2A.X phosphorylation in HNE-treated cells in vitro. This was supported by increased in vivo phosphorylation of H2A.X in mGsta4 null mice that have impaired HNE metabolism and increased HNE levels in tissues. HNE-mediated ATR/Chk1 signaling was inhibited by ATR kinase inhibitor (caffeine). Additionally, most of the signaling effects of HNE on cell cycle arrest were attenuated in hGSTA4 transfected cells, thereby indicating the involvement of HNE in these events. A novel role of GSTA4-4 in the maintenance of genomic integrity is also suggested. PMID:23733185

  5. Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using aminoindazole, diaminopyridine, and phenylenediamine solid polymer complexes of Zn(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Jennifer A.; Schubert, David M.; Amonette, James E.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Disselkamp, Robert S.

    2008-06-25

    Hydrogen peroxide is a valuable chemical commodity whose production relies on expensive methods. If an efficient, sustainable, and inexpensive solar-mediated production method could be developed from the reaction between dioxygen and water then its use as a fuel may be possible and gain acceptance. Hydrogen peroxide at greater than 10 M possesses a high specific energy, is environmentally clean, and is easily stored. However, the current method of manufacturing H2O2 via the anthraquinone process is environmentally unfriendly making the unexplored nature of its photochemical production from solar irradiation of interest. Here the concentration and quantum yield of hydrogen peroxide produced in an ultraviolet (UV-B) irradiated environment using aromatic and nitrogen-heterocyclic ring complexes of zinc(II) as solid substrates was studied. The amino-substituted isomers of the substrates indazole, pyridine, and phenylenediamine solid polymer complexes are examined. Samples exposed to the ambient atmosphere (e.g., aerated) were irradiated with a low power lamp with emission from 280-360 nm. Irradiation of various zinc complexes revealed Zn-5-aminoindazole to have the greatest first-day production of 63 mM/day with a 37% quantum yield. Para-phenylenediamine (PPAM) showed the greatest long-term stability and thus suggests H2O2 is produced photocatalytically. Isomeric forms of the catalyst’s organic components (e.g., amino groups) did have an effect on the production. Irradiation of diaminopyridine isomers indicated 2,3-diamino and 3,4-diamino structures were the most productive, each generating 32 mM/day hydrogen peroxide. However, the 2,5-diamino isomer showed no peroxide production. A significant decrease in hydrogen peroxide production in all but PPAM was noticed in the samples, suggesting the possibility of a catalyst poisoning mechanism. The samples ability to produce H2O2 is rationalized by proposing a reaction mechanism and examining the stability of the resonance

  6. Hydrogen peroxide production by Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 and its role in anti-Salmonella activity.

    PubMed

    Pridmore, Raymond David; Pittet, Anne-Cécile; Praplan, Fabienne; Cavadini, Christoph

    2008-06-01

    The human intestinal isolate Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (La1) is a probiotic strain with well-documented antimicrobial properties. Previous research has identified the production of lactic acid and bacteriocins as important factors, but that other unidentified factors are also involved. We used the recently published genome sequence of L. johnsonii NCC 533 to search for novel antipathogen factors and identified three potential gene products that may catalyze the synthesis of the known antimicrobial factor hydrogen peroxide, H(2)O(2). In this work, we confirmed the ability of NCC 533 as well as eight different L. johnsonii strains and Lactobacillus gasseri to produce H(2)O(2) when resting cells were incubated in the presence of oxygen, and that culture supernatant containing NCC 533-produced H(2)O(2) was effective in killing the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 in vitro.

  7. A Prototypical Small-Molecule Modulator Uncouples Mitochondria in Response to Endogenous Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    McQuaker, Stephen J; Quinlan, Casey L; Caldwell, Stuart T; Brand, Martin D; Hartley, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    A high membrane potential across the mitochondrial inner membrane leads to the production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) implicated in aging and age-related diseases. A prototypical drug for the correction of this type of mitochondrial dysfunction is presented. MitoDNP-SUM accumulates in mitochondria in response to the membrane potential due to its mitochondria-targeting alkyltriphenylphosphonium (TPP) cation and is uncaged by endogenous hydrogen peroxide to release the mitochondrial uncoupler, 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). DNP is known to reduce the high membrane potential responsible for the production of ROS. The approach potentially represents a general method for the delivery of drugs to the mitochondrial matrix through mitochondria targeting and H2O2-induced uncaging. PMID:23640856

  8. Improving 3'-Hydroxygenistein Production in Recombinant Pichia pastoris Using Periodic Hydrogen Peroxide-Shocking Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Yu, I-Zen; Chang, Te-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    3'-Hydroxygenistein can be obtained from the biotransformation of genistein by the engineered Pichia pastoris X-33 strain, which harbors a fusion gene composed of CYP57B3 from Aspergillus oryzae and a cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase gene (sCPR) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. P. pastoris X-33 mutants with higher 3'-hydroxygenistein production were selected using a periodic hydrogen peroxide-shocking strategy. One mutant (P2-D14-5) produced 23.0 mg/l of 3'-hydroxygenistein, representing 1.87-fold more than that produced by the recombinant X-33. When using a 5 L fermenter, the P2-D14-5 mutant produced 20.3 mg/l of 3'- hydroxygenistein, indicating a high potential for industrial-scale 3'-hydroxygenistein production.

  9. Why does SOD overexpression sometimes enhance, sometimes decrease, hydrogen peroxide production? A minimalist explanation.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Rui; Salvador, Armindo; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro

    2002-06-15

    Toxic effects of superoxide dismutase (SOD) overexpression are commonly attributed to increased hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production. Still, published experiments yield contradictory evidence on whether SOD overexpression increases or decreases H(2)O(2) production. We analyzed this issue using a minimal mathematical model. The most relevant mechanisms of superoxide consumption are treated as pseudo first-order processes, and both superoxide production and the activity of enzymes other than SOD were considered constant. Even within this simple framework, SOD overexpression may increase, hold constant, or decrease H(2)O(2) production. At normal SOD levels, the outcome depends on the ratio between the rate of processes that consume superoxide without forming H(2)O(2) and the rate of processes that consume superoxide with high (>/= 1) H(2)O(2) yield. In cells or cellular compartments where this ratio is exceptionally low (< 1), a modest decrease in H(2)O(2) production upon SOD overexpression is expected. Where the ratio is higher than unity, H(2)O(2) production should increase, but at most linearly, with SOD activity. The results are consistent with the available experimental observations. According to the minimal model, only where most superoxide is eliminated through H(2)O(2)-free processes does SOD activity have the moderately large influence on H(2)O(2) production observed in some experiments.

  10. Photochemical production of hydrogen peroxide in size-fractionated Southern California coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Clark, Catherine D; De Bruyn, Warren J; Jones, Joshua G

    2009-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) photochemical production was measured in bulk and size-fractionated surf zone and source waters (Orange County, California, USA). Post-irradiation (60 min; 300 W ozone-free xenon lamp), maximum H(2)O(2) concentrations were approximately 10000 nM (source) and approximately 1500 nM (surf zone). Average initial hydrogen peroxide production rates (HPPR) were higher in bulk source waters (11+/-7.0 nM s(-1)) than the surf zone (2.5+/-1 nM s(-1)). A linear relationship was observed between non-purgeable dissolved organic carbon and absorbance coefficient (m(-1) (300 nm)). HPPR increased with increasing absorbance coefficient for bulk and size-fractionated source waters, consistent with photochemical production from CDOM. However, HPPR varied significantly (5x) for surf zone samples with the same absorbance coefficients, even though optical properties suggested CDOM from salt marsh source waters dominates the surf zone. To compare samples with varying CDOM levels, apparent quantum yields (Phi) for H(2)O(2) photochemical production were calculated. Source waters showed no significant difference in Phi between bulk, large (>1000 Da (>1 kDa)) and small (<1 kDa) size fractions, suggesting H(2)O(2) production efficiency is homogeneously distributed across CDOM size. However, surf zone waters had significantly higher Phi than source (bulk 0.086+/-0.04 vs. 0.034+/-0.013; <1 kDa 0.183+/-0.012 vs. 0.027+/-0.018; >1 kDa 0.151+/-0.090 vs. 0.016+/-0.009), suggesting additional production from non-CDOM sources. H(2)O(2) photochemical production was significant for intertidal beach sand and senescent kelp (sunlight; approximately 42 nM h(-1) vs. approximately 5 nM h(-1)), on the order of CDOM production rates previously measured in coastal and oceanic waters. This is the first study of H(2)O(2) photochemical production in size-fractionated coastal waters showing significant production from non-CDOM sources in the surf zone.

  11. Sensitivity of plant mitochondrial terminal oxidases to the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the lipid peroxidation product, HNE (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal), on plant mitochondrial electron transport. In mitochondria isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures, HNE inhibited succinate-dependent oxygen consumption via the Aox (alternative oxidase), but had minimal effect on respiration via Cox (cytochrome c oxidase). Maximal Cox activity, measured with reduced cytochrome c as substrate, was only slightly inhibited by high concentrations of HNE, at which Aox was completely inhibited. Incubation with HNE prevented dimerization of the Aox protein, suggesting that one site of modification was the conserved cysteine residue involved in dimerization and activation of this enzyme (CysI). However, a naturally occurring isoform of Aox lacking CysI and unable to be dimerized, LeAox1b from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), was equally sensitive to HNE inhibition, showing that other amino acid residues in Aox also interact with HNE. The presence of HNE in vivo in Arabidopsis cell cultures was also investigated. Induction of oxidative stress in the cell cultures by the addition of hydrogen peroxide, antimycin A or menadione, caused a significant increase in hydroxyalkenals (of which HNE is the most prominent). Western blotting of mitochondrial proteins with antibodies against HNE adducts, demonstrated significant modification of proteins during these treatments. The implications of these results for the response of plants to reactive oxygen species are discussed. PMID:15689186

  12. Heme degradation upon production of endogenous hydrogen peroxide via interaction of hemoglobin with sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Salehi, N; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Fotouhi, L; Yousefinejad, S; Shourian, M; Hosseinzadeh, R; Sheibani, N; Habibi-Rezaei, M

    2014-04-05

    In this study the hemoglobin heme degradation upon interaction with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was investigated using UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate curve resolution analysis, and chemiluminescence method. Our results showed that heme degradation occurred during interaction of hemoglobin with SDS producing three fluorescent components. We showed that the hydrogen peroxide, produced during this interaction, caused heme degradation. In addition, the endogenous hydrogen peroxide was more effective in hemoglobin heme degradation compared to exogenously added hydrogen peroxide. The endogenous form of hydrogen peroxide altered oxyHb to aquamethemoglobin and hemichrome at low concentration. In contrast, the exogenous hydrogen peroxide lacked this ability under same conditions.

  13. Peroxidated squalene induces the production of inflammatory mediators in HaCaT keratinocytes: a possible role in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Monica; Alestas, Theodosis; Flori, Enrica; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Zouboulis, Christos C; Picardo, Mauro

    2006-11-01

    In order to investigate whether products derived from the oxidation of sebum can be responsible for the induction of inflammatory processes, HaCaT keratinocytes were treated with peroxidated squalene. NF-kappaB activation, secretion, and expression of IL-6, as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) mRNA and protein levels, were measured at the end of the treatment and after 24 and 48 hours of recovery. Squalene peroxidation products were administered in amounts able to elicit significant hyperproliferation and to induce lipoxygenase (LOX) activity. The results showed an early activation of NF-kappaB followed by an increase in PPARalpha mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, squalene peroxides induced an initial upregulation of IL-6 production and secretion that was counteracted by PPARalpha activation, as suggested by the subsequent decrease of NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and IL-6 levels. Inflammatory processes play an important role in the development of acne vulgaris. In combination with our own previous findings, which indicated an association between LOX stimulation and increased percentage of proinflammatory lipids in acne as well as a correlation between increased cytokine levels in the infundibulum, pilosebaceous duct hyperkeratinization, and augmented sebogenesis, the present data further support the involvement of lipid peroxides, in particular squalene peroxides, in establishing an inflammatory process in acne.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide induces a rapid production of nitric oxide in mung bean (Phaseolus aureus).

    PubMed

    Lum, H K; Butt, Y K C; Lo, S C L

    2002-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has recently been identified as an important signaling molecule in plant immune response. The present study aims to investigate the signaling pathway that leads to NO production. Using the NO specific fluorescent dye DAF-2DA, we observed rapid production of NO in mung bean leaves after the addition of 10 mM hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). NO was probably produced by a NOS-like enzyme in plants, as the NO production was inhibited by l-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. The NOS-like activity in the total leaf protein preparation of mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) was elevated 8.3-fold after 10 mM H(2)O(2) treatment, as demonstrated using the chemiluminescence NOS assay. The NOS-like activity was BH(4) dependent: omitting BH(4) in the reaction mixture of NOS assay reduced the NOS activity by 76%. We also found that the H(2)O(2) induced NO production was mediated via calcium ion flux, as it was blocked in the presence of a calcium ion channel blocker, verapamil. Results from the present study identified H(2)O(2) as an upstream signal that leads to NO production in plants. H(2)O(2) and NO, besides acting as two independent signaling molecules in plant immune response, may interrelate to form an oxidative cell death (OCD) cycle.

  15. Acetate induced enhancement of photocatalytic hydrogen peroxide production from oxalic acid and dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yusuke; Nomura, Akifumi; Miyahigashi, Takamitsu; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-05-09

    The addition of acetate ion to an O2-saturated mixed solution of acetonitrile and water containing oxalic acid as a reductant and 2-phenyl-4-(1-naphthyl)quinolinium ion (QuPh(+)-NA) as a photocatalyst dramatically enhanced the turnover number of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production. In this photocatalytic H2O2 production, a base is required to facilitate deprotonation of oxalic acid forming oxalate dianion, which acts as an actual electron donor, whereas a Brønsted acid is also necessary to protonate O2(•-) for production of H2O2 by disproportionation. The addition of acetate ion to a reaction solution facilitates both the deprotonation of oxalic acid and the protonation of O2(•-) owing to a pH buffer effect. The quantum yield of the photocatalytic H2O2 production under photoirradiation (λ = 334 nm) of an O2-saturated acetonitrile-water mixed solution containing acetate ion, oxalic acid and QuPh(+)-NA was determined to be as high as 0.34, which is more than double the quantum yield obtained by using oxalate salt as an electron donor without acetate ion (0.14). In addition, the turnover number of QuPh(+)-NA reached more than 340. The reaction mechanism and the effect of solvent composition on the photocatalytic H2O2 production were scrutinized by using nanosecond laser flash photolysis.

  16. Epidermal growth factor-induced hydrogen peroxide production is mediated by dual oxidase 1.

    PubMed

    Sirokmány, Gábor; Pató, Anna; Zana, Melinda; Donkó, Ágnes; Bíró, Adrienn; Nagy, Péter; Geiszt, Miklós

    2016-08-01

    Stimulation of mammalian cells by epidermal growth factor (EGF) elicits complex signaling events, including an increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production. Understanding the significance of this response is limited by the fact that the source of EGF-induced H2O2 production is unknown. Here we show that EGF-induced H2O2 production in epidermal cell lines is dependent on the agonist-induced calcium signal. We analyzed the expression of NADPH oxidase isoforms and found both A431 and HaCaT cells to express the calcium-sensitive NADPH oxidase, Dual oxidase 1 (Duox1) and its protein partner Duox activator 1 (DuoxA1). Inhibition of Duox1 expression by small interfering RNAs eliminated EGF-induced H2O2 production in both cell lines. We also demonstrate that H2O2 production by Duox1 leads to the oxidation of thioredoxin-1 and the cytosolic peroxiredoxins. Our observations provide evidence for a new signaling paradigm in which changes of intracellular calcium concentration are transformed into redox signals through the calcium-dependent activation of Duox1. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Concurrent calcium peroxide pretreatment and wet storage of water hyacinth for fermentable sugar production.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chou, Tzung-Han

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a novel concurrent process of pretreatment and wet storage was developed and investigated by applying calcium peroxide for preservation and conversion of fresh water hyacinth biomass to fermentable sugars. The effects of CaO2 loading concentration and moisture content on the lignin reduction, carbohydrate preservation and enzymatic saccharification of water hyacinth biomass were evaluated by experimental design using a response surface methodology. The data showed that the concurrent process could conserve 70% carbohydrates and remove 40% lignin from biomass of water hyacinth at the best condition in this study. The enzymatic digestibility and reducing sugar yield from the best condition of concurrent process were around 93% and 325mg/g (dry weight) of fresh biomass, respectively. The result suggested that the concurrent process developed in this work could be a potential alternative to consolidate the pretreatment and storage of aquatic plant biomass for fermentable sugar production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Apparent Quorum-Sensing Inhibitory Activity of Pyrogallol Is a Side Effect of Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro; Baruah, Kartik; Bossier, Peter

    2013-01-01

    There currently is more and more interest in the use of natural products, such as tea polyphenols, as therapeutic agents. The polyphenol compound pyrogallol has been reported before to inhibit quorum-sensing-regulated bioluminescence in Vibrio harveyi. Here, we report that the addition of 10 mg · liter−1 pyrogallol protects both brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) and giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) larvae from pathogenic Vibrio harveyi, whereas the compound showed relatively low toxicity (therapeutic index of 10). We further demonstrate that the apparent quorum-sensing-disrupting activity is a side effect of the peroxide-producing activity of this compound rather than true quorum-sensing inhibition. Our results emphasize that verification of minor toxic effects by using sensitive methods and the use of appropriate controls are essential when characterizing compounds as being able to disrupt quorum sensing. PMID:23545532

  19. [Dipeptide nootropic agent GVS-111 prevents accumulation of the lipid peroxidation products during immobilization].

    PubMed

    Lysenko, A V; Uskova, N I; Ostrovskaia, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Voronina, T A

    1997-01-01

    Immobilization of rats in a narrow plastic chamber for 24 h caused a sharp increase in the level of diene conjugates and the content of schiff bases in the synaptosomes of the brain cortex as well as accumulation of extraerythrocytic hemoglobin in blood serum. The dipeptide nootropic agent GVS-111 (ethyl ether of phenylacetylprolylglycine), when administered 15 and particularly 60 min before immobilization reduced the accumulation of these products of lipid peroxidation in the brain and blood. GVS-111 demonstrated these signs of its antioxidant effect after a single i.p. injection in doses of 0.12 and 0.5 mg/kg. Pyracetam produced a similar effect on the listed parameters in injection in a dose of 300 mg/kg for three successive days. The protective effect of the new pyracetam dipeptide analog GVS-111 in relation to activation of free-radical processes induced by immobilization is additional proof of the antistress action of this dipeptide.

  20. Production of Hydroxyl Radical via the Activation of Hydrogen Peroxide by Hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liwei; Li, Xuchun; Zhang, Jing; Fang, Jingyun; Huang, Yanmin; Wang, Ping; Ma, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The production of the hydroxyl radical (HO·) is important in environmental chemistry. This study reports a new source of HO· generated solely from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) activated by hydroxylamine (HA). Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis and the oxidation of a HO· probe, benzoic acid, were used to confirm the production of HO·. The production of HO· increased with increasing concentrations of either HA or H2O2 as well as decreasing pH. The second-order rate constant for the reaction was (2.2 ± 0.2) × 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1). HO· was probably produced in two steps: the activation of H2O2 by protonated HA and then reaction between the H2O2 and the intermediate protonated aminoxyl radical generated in the first step. Such a two-step oxidation can possibly be ascribed to the ionizable hydroxyl moiety in the molecular structure of HA, as is suggested by comparing the reactivity of a series of HA derivatives in HO· production. The results shed light on a previously unknown source of HO· formation, which broadens the understanding of its role in environmental processes.

  1. Chemistry of lipid peroxidation products and their use as biomarkers in early detection of diseases.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yasukazu; Umeno, Aya; Akazawa, Yoko; Shichiri, Mototada; Murotomi, Kazutoshi; Horie, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel method to measure hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE) levels in biological fluids and tissue samples. This method can be used to measure the oxidation products of linoleic acid. Reduction and saponification enabled us to measure hydroperoxides and hydroxides of both free and esterified forms of linoleic acid as total HODE, which includes the enzymatic and non-enzymatic products 9- and 13-(Z, E)-HODEs; the non-enzymatic free radical-mediated products 9- and 13-(E, E)-HODEs; and the specific non-enzymatic singlet oxygen-mediated products 10- and 12-(Z, E)-HODEs. We have recently reported HODE levels in plasma and erythrocytes from healthy volunteers and patients with several diseases and determined that its levels are much higher in patients with lifestyle-related diseases than in healthy volunteers. Furthermore, 10- and 12-(Z, E)-HODE plasma levels can serve as promising biomarkers for the early detection of diabetes. Thus, HODE is a useful biomarker for the assessment of oxidative status, and its efficiency as a biomarker can be improved by using it in combination with other typical biomarkers. This review article focuses on lipid peroxidation biomarkers, including HODE, and discusses their potential in practical and clinical applications in disease prediction.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial function in insulin resistant muscle cells: effect of catalase overexpression.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marina R; Sampaio, Igor H; Teodoro, Bruno G; Sousa, Thais A; Zoppi, Claudio C; Queiroz, André L; Passos, Madla A; Alberici, Luciane C; Teixeira, Felipe R; Manfiolli, Adriana O; Batista, Thiago M; Cappelli, Ana Paula Gameiro; Reis, Rosana I; Frasson, Danúbia; Kettelhut, Isis C; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T; Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Carneiro, Everardo M; Curi, Rui; Silveira, Leonardo R

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial redox state plays a central role in the link between mitochondrial overloading and insulin resistance. However, the mechanism by which the ROS induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells is not completely understood. We examined the association between mitochondrial function and H2O2 production in insulin resistant cells. Our hypothesis is that the low mitochondrial oxygen consumption leads to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with reduced PGC1α transcription and low content of phosphorylated CREB. The cells were transfected with either the encoded sequence for catalase overexpression or the specific siRNA for catalase inhibition. After transfection, myotubes were incubated with palmitic acid (500μM) and the insulin response, as well as mitochondrial function and fatty acid metabolism, was determined. The low mitochondrial oxygen consumption led to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with β-oxidation of fatty acids. Rotenone was observed to reduce the ratio of ROS production. The elevated H2O2 production markedly decreased the PGC1α transcription, an effect that was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of Akt and CREB. The catalase transfection prevented the reduction in the phosphorylated level of Akt and upregulated the levels of phosphorylated CREB. The mitochondrial function was elevated and H2O2 production reduced, thus increasing the insulin sensitivity. The catalase overexpression improved mitochondrial respiration protecting the cells from fatty acid-induced, insulin resistance. This effect indicates that control of hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial respiration preventing the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells by a mechanism associated with CREB phosphorylation and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  3. The Stereochemistry of trans-4-Hydroxynonenal-Derived Exocyclic 1,N2-2′-Deoxyguanosine Adducts Modulates Formation of Interstrand Cross-Links in the 5′-CpG-3′ Sequence†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The trans-4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-derived exocyclic 1,N2-dG adduct with (6S,8R,11S) stereochemistry forms interstrand N2-dG−N2-dG cross-links in the 5′-CpG-3′ DNA sequence context, but the corresponding adduct possessing (6R,8S,11R) stereochemistry does not. Both exist primarily as diastereomeric cyclic hemiacetals when placed into duplex DNA [Huang, H., Wang, H., Qi, N., Kozekova, A., Rizzo, C. J., and Stone, M. P. (2008) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 10898−10906]. To explore the structural basis for this difference, the HNE-derived diastereomeric (6S,8R,11S) and (6R,8S,11R) cyclic hemiacetals were examined with respect to conformation when incorporated into 5′-d(GCTAGCXAGTCC)-3′·5′-d(GGACTCGCTAGC)-3′, containing the 5′-CpX-3′ sequence [X = (6S,8R,11S)- or (6R,8S,11R)-HNE−dG]. At neutral pH, both adducts exhibited minimal structural perturbations to the DNA duplex that were localized to the site of the adduction at X7·C18 and its neighboring base pair, A8·T17. Both the (6S,8R,11S) and (6R,8S,11R) cyclic hemiacetals were located within the minor groove of the duplex. However, the respective orientations of the two cyclic hemiacetals within the minor groove were dependent upon (6S) versus (6R) stereochemistry. The (6S,8R,11S) cyclic hemiacetal was oriented in the 5′-direction, while the (6R,8S,11R) cyclic hemiacetal was oriented in the 3′-direction. These cyclic hemiacetals effectively mask the reactive aldehydes necessary for initiation of interstrand cross-link formation. From the refined structures of the two cyclic hemiacetals, the conformations of the corresponding diastereomeric aldehydes were predicted, using molecular mechanics calculations. Potential energy minimizations of the duplexes containing the two diastereomeric aldehydes predicted that the (6S,8R,11S) aldehyde was oriented in the 5′-direction while the (6R,8S,11R) aldehyde was oriented in the 3′-direction. These stereochemical differences in orientation suggest a kinetic

  4. The expression and function of vascular endothelial growth factor in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is regulated by 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and glutathione S-transferaseA4-4

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsyayan, Rit; Lelsani, Poorna Chandra Rao; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Kumar, Sushil; Awasthi, Sanjay; Awasthi, Yogesh C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low concentration of HNE (0.1-1.0 {mu}M) induced secretion of VEGF in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF secreted medium of RPE cells promoted proliferation of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGFR2 expression was attenuated with increasing concentrations of HNE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These effects of HNE could be blocked by the over expression of GSTA4-4 in cells. -- Abstract: It is well established that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) plays a major role in oxidative stress-induced signaling and the toxicity of oxidants. Surprisingly our recent studies also demonstrate that low levels of HNE generated during oxidative stress promote cell survival mechanisms and proliferation. Since the expression and secretion of VEGF is known to be affected by Oxidative stress, during present studies, we have examined dose dependent effect of HNE on VEGF expression and secretion in a model of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in culture. Results of these studies showed that while inclusion of 0.1 {mu}M HNE in the medium caused increased secretion of VEGF, its secretion and expression was significantly suppressed in the presence of >5 {mu}M HNE in the media. These concentration dependent hormetic effects of HNE on VEGF secretion could be blocked by the over expression of GSTA4-4 indicating that these effects were specifically attributed to HNE and regulated by GSTA4-4. VEGF secreted into the media showed angiogenic properties as indicated by increased migration and tube formation of HUVEC in matrigel when grown in media from RPE cells treated with 1 {mu}M HNE. The corresponding media from GSTA4-4 over expressing RPE cells had no effect on migration and tube formation of HUVEC in matrigel. These results are consistent with earlier studies showing that at low concentrations, HNE promotes proliferative mechanisms and suggest that HNE induces VEGF secretion from RPE cells that acts in a paracrine fashion to induce

  5. 2-Methoxyestradiol induces apoptosis in Ewing sarcoma cells through mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; Wietzerbin, Juana; Besançon, Françoise

    2003-05-01

    The Ewing sarcoma is the second most common bone tumor in children and young adults. Despite the advances in therapy, the 5-year survival rate for patients with metastatic disease is poor, indicating the need for alternative treatments. Here, we report that 2-methoxy-estradiol (2-Me), a natural estrogen metabolite, induced a caspase-dependent apoptosis of Ewing sarcoma-derived cells independently of their p53 status. 2-Me-induced apoptosis occurred through the mitochondrial death pathway as evidenced by reduction of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Treatment of cells with 2-Me resulted in generation of intracellular H(2)O(2), which occurred earlier than caspase-9 activation. The H(2)O(2)-reducing agent Ebselen and the lipid peroxidation inhibitor vitamin E decreased both 2-Me-induced caspase-9 activation and cell death, thus providing evidence for a role of H(2)O(2) and lipid peroxides in the initiation of this process. Rotenone, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, abolished both apoptosis and H(2)O(2) production, thereby identifying mitochondria as the source of H(2)O(2). Moreover, we observed that treatment of cells with 2-Me or H(2)O(2) induced activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of JNK1 reduced 2-Me-induced apoptosis indicating that JNK participates in this process. Altogether, our results provide evidence that 2-Me triggers apoptosis of Ewing sarcoma cells through induction of a mitochondria redox-dependent mechanism and suggest that this compound or other agents that selectively increase the level of reactive oxygen species may prove useful to the development of novel strategies for treatment of Ewing tumors.

  6. Addition versus radiolytic production effects of hydrogen peroxide on aqueous corrosion of UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, C.; Sattonnay, G.; Guilbert, S.; Garrido, F.; Barthe, M.-F.; Jegou, C.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide, H 2O 2, on UO 2 corrosion is investigated in aerated deionized water in two types of situations. The H 2O 2 species is either added to water or produced by radiolysis at UO 2/H 2O interfaces. The concentrations vary in the range 10 -5-10 -1 mol l -1. The radiolysis is induced by irradiating the UO 2/H 2O interfaces with a He 2+-beam emerging from the UO 2 discs into the solutions. Both the evolution of the aqueous solutions and the UO 2 surfaces are characterised. In both types of experiments, the alteration of UO 2 results in the formation of the same secondary phase, an hydrated uranium peroxide called studtite (UO 2(O) 2 · 4H 2O). However, the uranium release at the interface differs strikingly. It is much higher when H 2O 2 is produced by irradiation than when it is simply added. Furthermore, it varies in opposite direction as a function of the H 2O 2 concentration. This gives evidence that the chemistry at the UO 2 interface under irradiation differs significantly from the chemistry induced by simply adding H 2O 2 to the solution. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry is used to determine the growth rate of the corrosion layer. For H 2O 2 addition, the layer thickness increases with increasing leaching time, although as time increases, the U release tends towards zero. It is possible to establish the first empirical equation relating the corrosion rates to the added H 2O 2 concentrations. For H 2O 2 radiolytic production, the growth is continuous as irradiation time increases but the growth rate seems to decrease as the layer grows and to reach a limit.

  7. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production from cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Jessyca Aline; Marques, José Edvan; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte

    2015-03-01

    The effect of combinations and ratios between different enzymes has been investigated in order to assess the optimal conditions for hydrolysis of cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (the solids named CAB-AHP). The separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes were evaluated in the ethanol production. The enzymatic hydrolysis conducted with cellulase complex and β-glucosidase in a ratio of 0.61:0.39, enzyme loading of 30FPU/g(CAB-AHP) and 66CBU/g(CAB-AHP), respectively, using 4% cellulose from CAB-AHP, turned out to be the most effective conditions, with glucose and xylose yields of 511.68 mg/g(CAB-AHP) and 237.8 mg/g(CAB-AHP), respectively. Fermentation of the pure hydrolysate by Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 led to an ethanol yield of 61.8kg/ton(CAB), corresponding to 15 g/L ethanol and productivity of 3.75 g/( Lh). The ethanol production obtained for SSF process using K. marxianus ATCC 36907 was 18 g/L corresponding to 80% yield and 74.2kg/ton(CAB).

  8. Chemistry of peroxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volnov, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The history of Soviet research from 1866 to 1967 on peroxide compounds is reviewed. This research dealt mainly with peroxide kinetics, reactivity and characteristics, peroxide production processes, and more recently with superoxides and ozonides and emphasis on the higher oxides of group 1 and 2 elements. Solid state fluidized bed synthesis and production of high purity products based on the relative solubilities of the initial, intermediate, and final compounds and elements in liquid ammonia are discussed.

  9. The generation of oxidation products of benzo(a)pyrene by lipid peroxidation: a study using gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gower, J.D.; Wills, E.D.

    1984-09-01

    The role which active oxygen and radicals generated by the peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids could play in the oxidation of benzo(a)pyrene has been studied using gamma-irradiation. Irradiation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in the formation of benzo(a)pyrene 1,6-, 3,6- and 6,12-quinones and other more polar products which were analysed by h.p.l.c. OH. radicals are believed to be involved in this oxidation. The presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated lipids stimulated the formation of benzo(a)pyrene products following gamma-irradiation. Oxidation of benzo(a)pyrene also occurred over a period of days in the presence of autoxidising mackerel oil. The rate of benzo(a)pyrene oxidation was related to the extent of lipid peroxidation as determined by malonaldehyde formation. Malonaldehyde production as a result of peroxidising lipids was inhibited by benzo(a)pyrene which suggested that benzo(a)pyrene reacted directly with lipid peroxy radicals or hydroperoxides generated in the process of lipid peroxidation. These results demonstrate that oxidation products of the peroxidation of lipids and fatty acids are able to react directly with benzo(a)pyrene to form products including benzo(a)pyrene quinones without the presence of enzymes such as the cytochrome P-450 mixed function oxidase system and prostaglandin synthetase. It is possible that benzo(a)pyrene may be activated by these types of reactions in vivo or in vitro when benzo(a)pyrene is in contact with polyunsaturated lipids in foodstuffs or the intestinal lumen and peroxidation of unsaturated fats may play an important role in human carcinogenesis.

  10. Toxicity of two carbamide peroxide products used in nightguard vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Woolverton, C J; Haywood, V B; Heymann, H O

    1993-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two generic classes of 10% carbamide-peroxide (CP) oxygenating agents (currently under clinical assessment for nightguard vital tooth bleaching) for lethality and genetic mutation after oral administration to mice, and for cellular cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblasts in vitro. The single dose LD50 values for a non-carbopol-containing CP (Gly-Oxide) and a carbopol-containing CP (Proxigel) in mice were found to be 143.8 mg/kg and 87.2 mg/kg, respectively. Genotoxicity, as measured by the Mouse Micronucleus test for mutagenicity, was negative for both 10% CP agents in comparison with positive and negative controls. Cytotoxicity as measured in the L929 fibroblast lysis assay resulted in 50% killing of L929 fibroblasts at 0.62 for the non-carbopol-containing CP and 1.88 mmol/L for the carbopol-containing CP. Both 10% CP agents were compared with seven widely-used dental products in the L929 fibroblast lysis assay and found to be no more toxic than these products.

  11. The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal: Advances in chemistry and analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Spickett, Corinne M.

    2013-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of the most studied products of phospholipid peroxidation, owing to its reactivity and cytotoxicity. It can be formed by several radical-dependent oxidative routes involving the formation of hydroperoxides, alkoxyl radicals, epoxides, and fatty acyl cross-linking reactions. Cleavage of the oxidized fatty acyl chain results in formation of HNE from the methyl end, and 9-oxo-nonanoic acid from the carboxylate or esterified end of the chain, although many other products are also possible. HNE can be metabolized in tissues by a variety of pathways, leading to detoxification and excretion. HNE-adducts to proteins have been detected in inflammatory situations such as atherosclerotic lesions using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, which have also been applied in ELISAs and western blotting. However, in order to identify the proteins modified and the exact sites and nature of the modifications, mass spectrometry approaches are required. Combinations of enrichment strategies with targetted mass spectrometry routines such as neutral loss scanning are now facilitating detection of HNE-modified proteins in complex biological samples. This is important for characterizing the interactions of HNE with redox sensitive cell signalling proteins and understanding how it may modulate their activities either physiologically or in disease. PMID:24024147

  12. Proton leak and hydrogen peroxide production in liver mitochondria from energy-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Jon J; Hagopian, Kevork; Kenny, Teresa M; Koomson, Edward K; Bevilacqua, Lisa; Weindruch, Richard; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2004-01-01

    Energy restriction (ER), without malnutrition, is the only environmental intervention that consistently increases maximum life span in laboratory rodents. One theory proposes that a reduction in energy expenditure and reactive oxygen species production is the mechanism responsible for this action of ER. To further test this theory, proton leak, H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonyls were measured in mitochondria from FBNF1 rats fed either a control or 40% ER diet (onset at 6 mo of age). Liver mitochondria were isolated at 7 and 12 mo of age. Liver weight decreased 25 and 36% at 1 and 6 mo of ER, respectively (P < 0.05). ER resulted in an increase (P < 0.05) in percent total polyunsaturates, n-6 polyunsaturates, and total unsaturates (6 mo only) in mitochondrial lipids. These changes, however, were not associated with significant alterations in mitochondrial function. State 4 respiration and membrane potential were not different (P > 0.05) between groups at either assessment period. Similarly, proton leak kinetics were not different between control and ER animals. Top-down metabolic control analysis and its extension, elasticity analysis, were used at the 6-mo assessment and revealed no difference in control of the oxidative phosphorylation system between control and ER rats. H2O2 production with either succinate or pyruvate/malate substrates was also not different (P > 0.05) between groups at either time point. In conclusion, ER did not alter proton leak or H2O2 production at this age or stage of restriction in liver.

  13. Production of hydrogen peroxide in the atmosphere of a Snowball Earth and the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mao-Chang; Hartman, Hyman; Kopp, Robert E.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2006-01-01

    During Proterozoic time, Earth experienced two intervals with one or more episodes of low-latitude glaciation, which are probable “Snowball Earth” events. Although the severity of the historical glaciations is debated, theoretical “hard Snowball” conditions are associated with the nearly complete shutdown of the hydrological cycle. We show here that, during such long and severe glacial intervals, a weak hydrological cycle coupled with photochemical reactions involving water vapor would give rise to the sustained production of hydrogen peroxide. The photochemical production of hydrogen peroxide has been proposed previously as the primary mechanism for oxidizing the surface of Mars. During a Snowball, hydrogen peroxide could be stored in the ice; it would then be released directly into the ocean and the atmosphere upon melting and could mediate global oxidation events in the aftermath of the Snowball, such as that recorded in the Fe and Mn oxides of the Kalahari Manganese Field, deposited after the Paleoproterozoic low-latitude Makganyene glaciation. Low levels of peroxides and molecular oxygen generated during Archean and earliest Proterozoic non-Snowball glacial intervals could have driven the evolution of oxygen-mediating and -using enzymes and thereby paved the way for the eventual appearance of oxygenic photosynthesis. PMID:17138669

  14. Processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production -- Dissolution of metal foil targets by alkaline hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, D.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Amini, S.; Hersubeno, J.B.; Nasution, H.; Nampira, Y.

    1995-09-01

    In FY 1995, the authors started studies on a new process for dissolution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for {sup 99}Mo production. In this process, an LEU metal foil target is dissolved in a mixture of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide, then {sup 99}Mo is recovered from the dissolved solution. They focused on the dissolution kinetics to develop a mechanistic model for predicting the products and the rate of uranium dissolution under process conditions. They thoroughly studied the effects of hydrogen peroxide concentration, sodium hydroxide concentration, and temperature on the rate of uranium dissolution. It was found that uranium dissolution can be classified into a low-base (< 0.2M) and a high-base (> 0.2M) process. In the low-base process, both the equilibrium hydrogen peroxide and hydroxide concentrations affect the rate of uranium dissolution; in the high base process, uranium dissolution is a 0.25th order reaction with respect to the equilibrium hydrogen peroxide. The dissolution activation energy was experimentally determined to be 48.8 kJ/mol. Generally, the rate of uranium dissolution increases to a maximum as the hydroxide concentration is increased from 0.01 to about 1.5M, then it decreases as the hydroxide concentration is further increased. The alkalinity of the dissolution solution is an important factor that affects not only the dissolution rate, but also the amount of radioactive waste.

  15. Production of hydrogen peroxide in the atmosphere of a Snowball Earth and the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mao-Chang; Hartman, Hyman; Kopp, Robert E; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Yung, Yuk L

    2006-12-12

    During Proterozoic time, Earth experienced two intervals with one or more episodes of low-latitude glaciation, which are probable "Snowball Earth" events. Although the severity of the historical glaciations is debated, theoretical "hard Snowball" conditions are associated with the nearly complete shutdown of the hydrological cycle. We show here that, during such long and severe glacial intervals, a weak hydrological cycle coupled with photochemical reactions involving water vapor would give rise to the sustained production of hydrogen peroxide. The photochemical production of hydrogen peroxide has been proposed previously as the primary mechanism for oxidizing the surface of Mars. During a Snowball, hydrogen peroxide could be stored in the ice; it would then be released directly into the ocean and the atmosphere upon melting and could mediate global oxidation events in the aftermath of the Snowball, such as that recorded in the Fe and Mn oxides of the Kalahari Manganese Field, deposited after the Paleoproterozoic low-latitude Makganyene glaciation. Low levels of peroxides and molecular oxygen generated during Archean and earliest Proterozoic non-Snowball glacial intervals could have driven the evolution of oxygen-mediating and -using enzymes and thereby paved the way for the eventual appearance of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  16. Photochemical production of hydrogen peroxide from natural algicides: decomposition organic matter from straw.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hua; Zhang, Jie; Tong, Liyin; Yang, Jixiang

    2015-08-01

    The ability of decomposition organic matter from three natural algicides (barley, rice, and wheat straw) and natural organic matter (NOM) isolates to generate hydrogen peroxide under simulated solar irradiation was evaluated in order to understand the mechanism of indirect algae inhibition through a photochemical pathway. Specific optical properties (higher phenolic hydroxyl group contents and lower E2/E3) of barley straw organic matter (BSOM) reveal its outstanding ability to produce H2O2 as a photosensitizer. The appearance of a protein-like structure in BSOM indicated that bacteria or fungi probably transformed the structure of BSOM and brought other organic matter, which may account for its distinct optical properties. The ΦH2O2 of BSOM obtained through aerobic decomposition is 14.73 × 10(-5), which is three times the value of SRHA, whereas the ΦH2O2 value of BSOM obtained for non-aerobic decomposition was 5.30 × 10(-5), still higher than that of SRHA. The ΦH2O2 of rice straw organic matter was slightly lower than those of SRHA and SRFA, but much higher than that of wheat straw organic matter. The superior ability of BSOM to generate H2O2 was partly responsible for the outstanding potential and prior choice of barley straw for cyanobacteria or algae inhibition in various plant decomposition products.

  17. Seawater usable for production and consumption of hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel.

    PubMed

    Mase, Kentaro; Yoneda, Masaki; Yamada, Yusuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-05-04

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water has been proposed as a promising solar fuel instead of gaseous hydrogen because of advantages on easy storage and high energy density, being used as a fuel of a one-compartment H2O2 fuel cell for producing electricity on demand with emitting only dioxygen (O2) and water. It is highly desired to utilize the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water for the practical use of H2O2 as a solar fuel. Here we have achieved efficient photocatalytic production of H2O2 from the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water and O2 in a two-compartment photoelectrochemical cell using WO3 as a photocatalyst for water oxidation and a cobalt complex supported on a glassy-carbon substrate for the selective two-electron reduction of O2. The concentration of H2O2 produced in seawater reached 48 mM, which was high enough to operate an H2O2 fuel cell.

  18. Seawater usable for production and consumption of hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Kentaro; Yoneda, Masaki; Yamada, Yusuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water has been proposed as a promising solar fuel instead of gaseous hydrogen because of advantages on easy storage and high energy density, being used as a fuel of a one-compartment H2O2 fuel cell for producing electricity on demand with emitting only dioxygen (O2) and water. It is highly desired to utilize the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water for the practical use of H2O2 as a solar fuel. Here we have achieved efficient photocatalytic production of H2O2 from the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water and O2 in a two-compartment photoelectrochemical cell using WO3 as a photocatalyst for water oxidation and a cobalt complex supported on a glassy-carbon substrate for the selective two-electron reduction of O2. The concentration of H2O2 produced in seawater reached 48 mM, which was high enough to operate an H2O2 fuel cell.

  19. Seawater usable for production and consumption of hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel

    PubMed Central

    Mase, Kentaro; Yoneda, Masaki; Yamada, Yusuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water has been proposed as a promising solar fuel instead of gaseous hydrogen because of advantages on easy storage and high energy density, being used as a fuel of a one-compartment H2O2 fuel cell for producing electricity on demand with emitting only dioxygen (O2) and water. It is highly desired to utilize the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water for the practical use of H2O2 as a solar fuel. Here we have achieved efficient photocatalytic production of H2O2 from the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water and O2 in a two-compartment photoelectrochemical cell using WO3 as a photocatalyst for water oxidation and a cobalt complex supported on a glassy-carbon substrate for the selective two-electron reduction of O2. The concentration of H2O2 produced in seawater reached 48 mM, which was high enough to operate an H2O2 fuel cell. PMID:27142725

  20. L-arginine regulates neuronal nitric oxide synthase production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei; Weaver, John; Cao, Guan Liang; Pou, Sovitj; Roman, Linda J; Starkov, Anatoly A; Rosen, Gerald M

    2005-03-15

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (H(4)B) in the absence of L-arginine has been shown to be an important factor in promoting the direct formation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) at the expense of superoxide (O(2)(*-)) by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) [Rosen GM, Tsai P, Weaver J, Porasuphatana S, Roman LJ, Starkov AA, et al. Role of tetrahydrobiopterin in the regulation of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase-generated superoxide. J Biol Chem 2002;277:40275-80]. Based on these findings, it is hypothesized that L-arginine also shifts the equilibrium between O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2). Experiments were designed to test this theory. As the concentration of L-arginine and N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine increases, the rate of NADPH consumption for H(4)B-bound NOS1 decreased resulting in lower rates of both O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2) generation, while increasing the rate of nitric oxide (*NO) production. At saturating concentrations of L-arginine or N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine (50microM), NOS1 still produced O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2). Both L-arginine and N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine have greater impact on the rate of generation of O(2)(*-) than on H(2)O(2).

  1. Combined acid/alkaline-peroxide pretreatment of olive tree biomass for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Patiño, José Carlos; Ruiz, Encarnación; Romero, Inmaculada; Cara, Cristóbal; López-Linares, Juan Carlos; Castro, Eulogio

    2017-09-01

    Olive tree biomass (OTB) can be used for producing second generation bioethanol. In this work, extracted OTB was subjected to fractionation using a sequential acid/alkaline oxidative pretreatment. In the first acid stage, the effects of sulfuric acid concentration and reaction times at 130°C were investigated. Up to 71% solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars was achieved under optimized conditions (2.4% H2SO4, 84min). In the second stage, the influence of hydrogen peroxide concentration and process time were evaluated at 80°C. Approximately 80% delignification was achieved under the best operational conditions (7% H2O2, 90min) within the experimental range studied. This pretreatment produced a substrate with 72% cellulose that was highly accessible to enzymatic attack, yielding 82g glucose/100g glucose in delignified OTB. Ethanol production from both hemicellulosic sugars solubilized in the acid pretreatment and glucose from enzymatic hydrolysis of delignified OTB yielded 15g ethanol/100g OTB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modification and inactivation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase by the lipid peroxidation product, acrolein

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Acrolein is the most reactive aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation and is found to be elevated in the brain when oxidative stress is high. The effects of acrolein on the structure and function of human Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) were examined. When Cu,Zn-SOD was incubated with acrolein, the covalent crosslinking of the protein was increased, and the loss of enzymatic activity was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers and copper chelators inhibited the acrolein-mediated Cu,Zn-SOD modification and the formation of carbonyl compound. The present study shows that ROS may play a critical role in acrolein-induced Cu,Zn-SOD modification and inactivation. When Cu,Zn-SOD that has been exposed to acrolein was subsequently analyzed by amino acid analysis, serine, histidine, arginine, threonine and lysine residues were particularly sensitive. It is suggested that the modification and inactivation of Cu,Zn-SOD by acrolein could be produced by more oxidative cell environments. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(11): 555-560] PMID:24152914

  3. Levels of purine, kynurenine and lipid peroxidation products in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Caroline M; Gould, Stuart R; Darlington, L Gail; Stone, Trevor W

    2003-01-01

    The factors affecting gut activity in inflammatory bowel disease are unclear, but purines and kynurenines may be involved in the regulation of neuronal activity and therefore gut motility and secretion. We have measured the serum levels of these compounds in patients and in sex- and age-matched controls. Purines and kynurenines were analysed using HPLC. The levels of tryptophan and its metabolites 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and xanthurenic acid were unchanged in all patients. However, the levels of kynurenine and kynurenic acid were significantly elevated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease when compared to control subjects. There were no significant differences between patients and controls for any of the purines analysed or for neopterin. In the inflammatory bowel disease patients serum lipid peroxidation products were significantly elevated when compared to control subjects, suggesting the presence of increased oxidative stress consistent with inflammatory activity. The elevated level of kynurenic acid may represent either a compensatory response to elevated activation of enteric neurones, or a primary abnormality, which induces a compensatory increase in gut activity, but may indicate a role for kynurenine modulation of glutamate receptors in the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. Active macromolecules of honey form colloidal particles essential for honey antibacterial activity and hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Miotto, Danielle; Kim, Linda; Sjaarda, Calvin; Maldonado-Alvarez, Liset; Fukś, Henryk

    2017-08-09

    Little is known about the global structure of honey and the arrangement of its main macromolecules. We hypothesized that the conditions in ripened honeys resemble macromolecular crowding in the cell and affect the concentration, reactivity, and conformation of honey macromolecules. Combined results from UV spectroscopy, DLS and SEM showed that the concentration of macromolecules was a determining factor in honey structure. The UV spectral scans in 200-400 nm visualized and allowed quantification of UV-absorbing compounds in the following order: dark > medium > light honeys (p < 0.0001). The high concentration of macromolecules promoted their self-assembly to micron-size superstructures, visible in SEM as two-phase system consisting of dense globules distributed in sugar solution. These particles showed increased conformational stability upon dilution. At the threshold concentration, the system underwent phase transition with concomitant fragmentation of large micron-size particles to nanoparticles in hierarchical order. Honey two-phase conformation was an essential requirement for antibacterial activity and hydrogen peroxide production. These activities disappeared beyond the phase transition point. The realization that active macromolecules of honey are arranged into compact, stable multicomponent assemblies with colloidal properties reframes our view on global structure of honey and emerges as a key property to be considered in investigating its biological activity.

  5. Modification and inactivation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase by the lipid peroxidation product, acrolein.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Hoon

    2013-11-01

    Acrolein is the most reactive aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation and is found to be elevated in the brain when oxidative stress is high. The effects of acrolein on the structure and function of human Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) were examined. When Cu,Zn-SOD was incubated with acrolein, the covalent crosslinking of the protein was increased, and the loss of enzymatic activity was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers and copper chelators inhibited the acrolein-mediated Cu,Zn-SOD modification and the formation of carbonyl compound. The present study shows that ROS may play a critical role in acrolein-induced Cu,Zn-SOD modification and inactivation. When Cu,Zn-SOD that has been exposed to acrolein was subsequently analyzed by amino acid analysis, serine, histidine, arginine, threonine and lysine residues were particularly sensitive. It is suggested that the modification and inactivation of Cu,Zn-SOD by acrolein could be produced by more oxidative cell environments.

  6. In vitro evaluation of variances between real and declared concentration of hydrogen peroxide in various tooth-whitening products.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Moola, M H

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the real hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentration in various commercially available tooth-whitening products containing HP and/or carbamide peroxide (CP). Sixteen commercially available tooth-whitening products containing various concentrations of CP or HP were investigated. The products were divided into four groups: dentist-supervised home bleaching products (Group 1, n = 5), in-office bleaching products (Group 2, n = 4), over-the-counter bleaching products (Group 3, n = 3) and whitening toothpastes and rinses (Group 4, n = 4). The peroxide concentration was determined using the oxy-reduction titration method. All the reagents used in the study were of analytic grade and freshly prepared before the experiment. The HP concentration in various dentist-supervised home bleaching products and in-office bleaching products ranged from 3.02-37.08% (expected range = 3-38%). The HP concentration of over-the-counter whitening products ranged from 1.24-5.57% (expected range cannot be estimated as no concentration of active ingredient was provided). Among whitening toothpastes and rinses, Colgate Plax whitening rinse showed more than 1% HP concentration, whereas it was lower than 0.05% in other whitening toothpastes and oral rinses (expected range cannot be estimated as no active ingredient was mentioned). HP concentration of most of the professional tooth-whitening products was different from the expected concentrations, although the deviations were small and most of the products were close to the expected concentration. No concentration of active ingredient was provided for over-the-counter whitening products and no active ingredient was mentioned for whitening toothpastes and rinses.

  7. Formation of a N2-dG:N2-dG Carbinolamine DNA Cross-link by the trans-4-Hydroxynonenal-Derived (6S,8R,11S) 1,N2-dG Adduct

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Michael addition of trans-4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) to deoxyguanosine yields diastereomeric 1,N2-dG adducts in DNA. When placed opposite dC in the 5′-CpG-3′ sequence, the (6S,8R,11S) diastereomer forms a N2-dG:N2-dG interstrand cross-link [Wang, H.; Kozekov, I. D.; Harris, T. M.; Rizzo, C. J. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2003, 125, 5687–5700]. We refined its structure in 5′-d(G1C2T3A4G5C6X7A8G9T10C11C12)-3′·5′-d(G13G14A15C16T17C18Y19C20T21A22G23C24)-3′ [X7 is the dG adjacent to the C6 carbon of the cross-link or the α-carbon of the (6S,8R,11S) 1,N2-dG adduct, and Y19 is the dG adjacent to the C8 carbon of the cross-link or the γ-carbon of the HNE-derived (6S,8R,11S) 1,N2-dG adduct; the cross-link is in the 5′-CpG-3′ sequence]. Introduction of 13C at the C8 carbon of the cross-link revealed one 13C8→H8 correlation, indicating that the cross-link existed predominantly as a carbinolamine linkage. The H8 proton exhibited NOEs to Y19 H1′, C20 H1′, and C20 H4′, orienting it toward the complementary strand, consistent with the (6S,8R,11S) configuration. An NOE was also observed between the HNE H11 proton and Y19 H1′, orienting the former toward the complementary strand. Imine and pyrimidopurinone linkages were excluded by observation of the Y19N2H and X7 N1H protons, respectively. A strong H8→H11 NOE and no 3J(13C→H) coupling for the 13C8–O–C11–H11 eliminated the tetrahydrofuran species derived from the (6S,8R,11S) 1,N2-dG adduct. The (6S,8R,11S) carbinolamine linkage and the HNE side chain were located in the minor groove. The X7N2 and Y19N2 atoms were in the gauche conformation with respect to the linkage, maintaining Watson–Crick hydrogen bonds at the cross-linked base pairs. A solvated molecular dynamics simulation indicated that the anti conformation of the hydroxyl group with respect to C6 of the tether minimized steric interaction and predicted hydrogen bonds involving O8H with C20O2 of the 5′-neighbor base pair G5·C20 and O11H with C

  8. Inhibition of ROS production through mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and mitochondrial uncoupling increases post-thaw sperm viability in yellow catfish.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lu; Bai, Chenglian; Chen, Yuanhong; Dai, Jun; Xiang, Yang; Ji, Xiaoping; Huang, Changjiang; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the main causes for decreased viability in cryopreserved sperm. Many studies have reported the beneficial effect of antioxidant supplements in freezing media for post-thaw sperm quality. In the present study, we explored two new approaches of ROS inhibition in sperm cryopreservation of yellow catfish, namely mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant and metabolic modulator targeting mitochondrial uncoupling pathways. Our study revealed that addition of MitoQ, a compound designed to deliver ubiquinone into mitochondria, significantly decreased ROS production, as well as lipid peroxidation, and increased post-thaw viability. Similarly, sperm incubated with 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a chemical protonophore that induces mitochondrial uncoupling, also had reduced ROS production, as well as lipid peroxidation, and increased post-thaw sperm viability. Conversely, activation of uncoupling protein (UCP2) by 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) neither reduced ROS production nor increased post-thaw sperm viability. Our findings indicate that ROS inhibition through mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant or mild mitochondrial uncoupling is beneficial for sperm cryopreservation in yellow catfish. Our study provides novel methods to mitigate oxidative stress induced damage in cryopreserved sperm for future applications.

  9. Effects of renal perfusion pressure on renal medullary hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunhua; Hu, Chunyan; Polichnowski, Aaron; Mori, Takefumi; Skelton, Meredith; Ito, Sadayoshi; Cowley, Allen W

    2009-06-01

    Studies were designed to determine the effects of increases of renal perfusion pressure on the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-) within the renal outer medulla. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied with either the renal capsule intact or removed to ascertain the contribution of changes of medullary blood flow and renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure on H(2)O(2) and NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-) production. Responses to three 30-minute step changes of renal perfusion pressure (from approximately 85 to approximately 115 to approximately 145 mm Hg) were studied using adjustable aortic occluders proximal and distal to the left renal artery. Medullary interstitial H(2)O(2) determined by microdialysis increased at each level of renal perfusion pressure from 640 to 874 to 1593 nmol/L, as did H(2)O(2) urinary excretion rates, and these responses were significantly attenuated by decapsulation. Medullary interstitial NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-) increased from 9.2 to 13.8 to 16.1 mumol/L, with parallel changes in urine NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-), but decapsulation did not significantly blunt these responses. Over the range of renal perfusion pressure, medullary blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) rose approximately 30% and renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure rose from 7.8 to 19.7 cm H(2)O. Renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure and the natriuretic and diuretic responses were significantly attenuated with decapsulation, but medullary blood flow was not affected. The data indicate that pressure-induced increases of H(2)O(2) emanated largely from increased tubular flow rates to the medullary thick-ascending limbs of Henle and NO largely from increased medullary blood flow to the vasa recta. The parallel pressure-induced increases of H(2)O(2) and NO indicate a participation in shaping the "normal" pressure-natriuresis relationship and explain why an imbalance in either would affect the blood pressure salt sensitivity.

  10. [Nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation].

    PubMed

    Cristol, J P; Maggi, M F; Guérin, M C; Torreilles, J; Descomps, B

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical produced enzymatically in biological systems from the guanidino group of L-arginine. Its large spectrum of biological effects is achieved through chemical interactions with different targets including oxygen (O2), superoxide (O2o-) and other oxygen reactive species (ROS), transition metals and thiols. Superoxide anions and other ROS have been reported to react with NO to produce peroxynitrite anions that can decompose to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and hydroxyl radial (OHo). Thus, NO has been reported to have a dual effect on lipid peroxidation (prooxidant via the peroxynitrite or antioxydant via the chelation of ROS). In the present study we have investigated in different models the in vitro and in vivo action of NO on lipid peroxidation. Copper-induced LDL oxidation were used as an in vitro model. Human LDL (100 micrograms ApoB/ml) were incubated in oxygene-saturated PBS buffer in presence or absence of Cu2+ (2.5 microM) with increasing concentrations of NO donnors (sodium nitroprussiate or nitroso-glutathione). LDL oxidation was monitored continuously for conjugated diene formation (234 nm) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation. Exogenous NO prevents in a dose dependent manner the progress of copper-induced oxidation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), characterized by an overproduction of ROS, is used as an in vivo model. Anaesthetized rats were submitted to 1 hour renal ischaemia following by 2 hours of reperfusion. Sham-operated rats (SOP) were used as control. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring the HNE accumulated in rats kidneys in presence or absence of L-arginine or D-arginine infusion. L-arginine, but not D-arginine, enhances HNE accumulation in I/R but not in SOP (< 0.050 pmol/g tissue in SOP versus 0.6 nmol/g tissue in I/R), showing that, in this experimental conditions, NO produced from L-arginine, enhances the toxicity of ROS. This study shows that the pro- or antioxydant effects of NO are different

  11. Blending remote sensing data products to estimate photochemical production of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide in the surface ocean.

    PubMed

    Powers, Leanne C; Miller, William L

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and its precursor, superoxide (O₂(-)), are well-studied photochemical products that are pivotal in regulating redox transformations of trace metals and organic matter in the surface ocean. In attempts to understand the magnitude of both H₂O₂ and O₂(-) photoproduction on a global scale, we implemented a model to calculate photochemical fluxes of these products from remotely sensed ocean color and modeled solar irradiances. We generated monthly climatologies for open ocean H₂O₂ photoproduction rates using an average apparent quantum yield (AQY) spectrum determined from laboratory irradiations of oligotrophic water collected in the Gulf of Alaska. Because the formation of H₂O₂ depends on secondary thermal reactions involving O₂(-), we also implemented a temperature correction for the H₂O₂ AQY using remotely sensed sea surface temperature and an Arrhenius relationship for H₂O₂ photoproduction. Daily photoproduction rates of H₂O₂ ranged from <1 to over 100 nM per day, amounting to ∼30 μM per year in highly productive regions. When production rates were calculated without the temperature correction, maximum daily rates were underestimated by 15-25%, highlighting the importance of including the temperature modification for H₂O₂ in these models. By making assumptions about the relationship between H₂O₂ and O₂(-) photoproduction rates and O₂(-) decay kinetics, we present a method for calculating midday O₂(-) steady-state concentrations ([O₂(-)]ss) in the open ocean. Estimated [O₂(-)]ss ranged from 0.1-5 nM assuming biomolecular dismutation was the only sink for O₂(-), but were reduced to 0.1-290 pM when catalytic pathways were included. While the approach presented here provides the first global scale estimates of marine [O₂(-)]ss from remote sensing, the potential of this model to quantify O₂(-) photoproduction rates and [O₂(-)]ss will not be fully realized until the mechanisms

  12. Chronic iron overload induces gender-dependent changes in iron homeostasis, lipid peroxidation and clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ćurko-Cofek, Božena; Kezele, Tanja Grubić; Marinić, Jelena; Tota, Marin; Čizmarević, Nada Starčević; Milin, Čedomila; Ristić, Smiljana; Radošević-Stašić, Biserka; Barac-Latas, Vesna

    2016-12-01

    To analyze iron- and gender-dependent mechanisms possibly involved in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in this study we evaluated the effects of iron overload (IO) on iron status and lipid peroxidation processes (LPO) in tissues of female and male DA rats during chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a well-established MS animal model. Rats were treated by iron sucrose (75mg/kg bw/day) or with saline solution during two weeks before the sensitization with bovine brain homogenate in complete Freund's adjuvant. Clinical signs of EAE were monitored during 29 days. Serum and tissues of CNS and liver were sampled before immunization and at day 13th post immunization (during acute phase of EAE). The determination of ferritin, iron, malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and evaluation of histopathology were performed by ELISA, ICP spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. Results showed that IO in female EAE rats accelerated the onset of disease. In contrast, in male rats it accelerated the progression of disease and increased the mortality rate. During acute phase of EAE female IO rats sequestered more Fe in the liver, spinal cord and in the brain and produced more ferritin than male EAE rats. Male rats, however, reacted on IO by higher production of MDA or 4-HNE in the neural tissues and showed greater signs of plaque formation and gliosis in spinal cord. The data point to sexual dimorphism in mechanisms that regulate peripheral and brain iron homeostasis and imply that men and women during MS might be differentially vulnerable to exogenous iron overload. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhancing methane production from waste activated sludge using a novel indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment process.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu; Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming

    2015-04-01

    Methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor methane potential of WAS. This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy based on indigenous iron (in WAS) activated peroxidation to enhance methane production from WAS. Pre-treatment of WAS for 30 min at 50mg H2O2/g total solids (dry weight) and pH 2.0 (iron concentration in WAS was 7 mg/g TS) substantially enhanced WAS solubilization. Biochemical methane potential tests demonstrated that methane production was improved by 10% at a digestion time of 16d after incorporating the indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment. Model-based analysis indicated that indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment improved the methane potential by 13%, whereas the hydrolysis rate was not significantly affected. The economic analysis showed that the proposed pre-treatment method can save the cost by $112,000 per year in a treatment plant with a population equivalent of 300,000. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Advanced lipid peroxidation end products in oxidative damage to proteins. Potential role in diseases and therapeutic prospects for the inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Negre-Salvayre, A; Coatrieux, C; Ingueneau, C; Salvayre, R

    2007-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl compounds (RCCs) formed during lipid peroxidation and sugar glycoxidation, namely Advanced lipid peroxidation end products (ALEs) and Advanced Glycation end products (AGEs), accumulate with ageing and oxidative stress-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes or neurodegenerative diseases. RCCs induce the ‘carbonyl stress' characterized by the formation of adducts and cross-links on proteins, which progressively leads to impaired protein function and damages in all tissues, and pathological consequences including cell dysfunction, inflammatory response and apoptosis. The prevention of carbonyl stress involves the use of free radical scavengers and antioxidants that prevent the generation of lipid peroxidation products, but are inefficient on pre-formed RCCs. Conversely, carbonyl scavengers prevent carbonyl stress by inhibiting the formation of protein cross-links. While a large variety of AGE inhibitors has been developed, only few carbonyl scavengers have been tested on ALE-mediated effects. This review summarizes the signalling properties of ALEs and ALE-precursors, their role in the pathogenesis of oxidative stress-associated diseases, and the different agents efficient in neutralizing ALEs effects in vitro and in vivo. The generation of drugs sharing both antioxidant and carbonyl scavenger properties represents a new therapeutic challenge in the treatment of carbonyl stress-associated diseases. PMID:17643134

  15. Fluorescent molecular peroxidation products: a prognostic biomarker of early neurologic deterioration after thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Llombart, Víctor; Dominguez, Carmen; Bustamante, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sureda, Victor; Martín-Gallán, Pilar; Vilches, Angel; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Penalba, Anna; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Rubiera, Marta; Ribó, Marc; Eschenfelder, Christoph; Giralt, Dolors; Molina, Carlos A; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Rosell, Anna; Montaner, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Fluorescent molecular peroxidation products (FMPPs) are considered potential markers of molecular oxidative damage and may provoke increased permeability and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. This study aimed to determine the value of FMPPs as a biomarker to predict neurological worsening related to early hemorrhagic transformation. Baseline FMPP levels were measured in 186 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients before tissue plasminogen activator treatment was administered. A serial FMPP profile (baseline before tissue plasminogen activator treatment, and 1, 2, 12, and 24 hours from treatment) was determined in a subset of 100 patients. Computed tomographic scans were performed at admission and repeated at 24 to 48 hours or after neurological worsening occurred. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was defined as blood at any site in the brain associated with neurological deterioration. Patients who worsened had higher median FMPP levels compared with those who did not (59.68 [48.63-85.73] versus 44.87 [36.37-58.90] Uf/mL; P=0.035) at baseline. After logistic regression multivariate analysis, FMPP >48.2 Uf/mL together with age, hypertension, and systolic blood pressure remained baseline predictors of worsening at 48 hours. Moreover, baseline FMPP determination helped to distinguish between patients who worsened and those who did not (Integrated Discrimination Improvement index, 5.7%; P=0.0004). Finally, within patients who had worsened at 48 hours, those with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage had higher FMPP levels (P=0.038). FMPPs might be a valuable biomarker of poor early neurological outcome and be related to the appearance of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in tissue plasminogen activator-treated patients, one of the most feared neurological complications after thrombolytic treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  16. High-performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide present or released in teeth bleaching kits and hair cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Pascal; Bousquet, Claudine; Lassu, Nelly; Maggio, Annie-Françoise; Civade, Corinne; Brenier, Charlotte; Lempereur, Laurent

    2015-03-25

    This manuscript presents an HPLC/UV method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide present or released in teeth bleaching products and hair products. The method is based on an oxidation of triphenylphosphine into triphenylphosphine oxide by hydrogen peroxide. Triphenylphosphine oxide formed is quantified by HPLC/UV. Validation data were obtained using the ISO 12787 standard approach, particularly adapted when it is not possible to make reconstituted sample matrices. For comparative purpose, hydrogen peroxide was also determined using ceric sulfate titrimetry for both types of products. For hair products, a cross validation of both ceric titrimetric method and HPLC/UV method using the cosmetic 82/434/EEC directive (official iodometric titration method) was performed. Results obtained for 6 commercialized teeth whitening products and 5 hair products point out similar hydrogen peroxide contain using either the HPLC/UV method or ceric sulfate titrimetric method. For hair products, results were similar to the hydrogen peroxide content using the cosmetic 82/434/EEC directive method and for the HPLC/UV method, mean recoveries obtained on spiked samples, using the ISO 12787 standard, ranges from 100% to 110% with a RSD<3.0%. To assess the analytical method proposed, the HPLC method was used to control 35 teeth bleaching products during a market survey and highlight for 5 products, hydrogen peroxide contents higher than the regulated limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological and Chemical Adaptation to Endogenous Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Streptococcus pneumoniae D39

    PubMed Central

    Lisher, John P.; Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Ramos-Montañez, Smirla; Hentchel, Kristy L.; Martin, Julia E.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The catalase-negative, facultative anaerobe Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 is naturally resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced endogenously by pyruvate oxidase (SpxB). Here, we investigate the adaptive response to endogenously produced H2O2. We show that lactate oxidase, which converts lactate to pyruvate, positively impacts pyruvate flux through SpxB and that ΔlctO mutants produce significantly lower H2O2. In addition, both the SpxB pathway and a candidate pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) pathway contribute to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) production during aerobic growth, and the pyruvate format lyase (PFL) pathway is the major acetyl-CoA pathway during anaerobic growth. Microarray analysis of the D39 strain cultured under aerobic versus strict anaerobic conditions shows upregulation of spxB, a gene encoding a rhodanese-like protein (locus tag spd0091), tpxD, sodA, piuB, piuD, and an Fe-S protein biogenesis operon under H2O2-producing conditions. Proteome profiling of H2O2-induced sulfenylation reveals that sulfenylation levels correlate with cellular H2O2 production, with endogenous sulfenylation of ≈50 proteins. Deletion of tpxD increases cellular sulfenylation 5-fold and has an inhibitory effect on ATP generation. Two major targets of protein sulfenylation are glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA) and SpxB itself, but targets also include pyruvate kinase, LctO, AdhE, and acetate kinase (AckA). Sulfenylation of GapA is inhibitory, while the effect on SpxB activity is negligible. Strikingly, four enzymes of capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis are sulfenylated, as are enzymes associated with nucleotide biosynthesis via ribulose-5-phosphate. We propose that LctO/SpxB-generated H2O2 functions as a signaling molecule to downregulate capsule production and drive altered flux through sugar utilization pathways. IMPORTANCE Adaptation to endogenous oxidative stress is an integral aspect of Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization and

  18. Detection of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide production by cellular NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Nauseef, William M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The recent recognition that isoforms of the cellular NADPH-dependent oxidases, collectively known as the NOX protein family, participate in a wide range of physiologic and pathophysiologic processes in both the animal and plant kingdoms has stimulated interest in the identification, localization, and quantitation of their products in biological settings. Although several tools for reassuring oxidants released extracellularly are available, the specificity and selectivity of the methods for reliable analysis of intracellular oxidants have not matched the enthusiasm for studying NOX proteins. SCOPE OF REVIEW Focusing exclusively on superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide produced by NOX proteins, this review describes the ideal probe for analysis of O2· and H2O2 generated extracellularly and intracellularly by NOX proteins. An overview of the components, organization, and topology of NOX proteins provides a rationale for applying specific probes for use and a context in which to interpret results and thereby construct plausible models linking NOX-derived oxidants to biological responses. The merits and shortcomings of methods currently in use to assess NOX activity are highlighted, and those assays that provide quantitation of superoxide or H2O2 are contrasted with those intended to examine spatial and temporal aspects of NOX activity. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS Although interest in measuring the extracellular and intracellular products of the NOX protein family is great, robust analytical probes are limited. Several reliable methods for measurement of extracellular O2· and H2O2 by NOX proteins are available. Chemiluminescent probes for both extracellular and intracellular O2· and H2O2 detection have shortcomings that limit their use Options for quantitation of intracellular O2· and H2O2 are very limited However, non-redox sensitive probes and genetically encoded reporters promise to provide spatial and temporal detection of O2· and H2O2 GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE

  19. Products of binary complex compounds thermolysis: Catalysts for hydrogen peroxide decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domonov, D. P.; Pechenyuk, S. I.; Gosteva, A. N.

    2014-06-01

    Samples are obtained via the thermolysis of binary complex compounds in a hydrogen atmosphere. Their catalytic activity in hydrogen peroxide decomposition is studied. The values of the rate constants and activation energies for the catalytic reaction are estimated. The correlation between catalytic activity, composition, specific surface area ( S sp), and particle size of the samples is analyzed.

  20. Alkaline peroxide pretreatment of corn stover for enzymatic saccharification and ethanol production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification were evaluated for conversion of corn stover cellulose and hemicellulose to fermentable sugars. Corn stover used in this study contained 37.0±0.2% cellulose, 26.8±0.2% hemicellulose and 18.0±0.1% lignin on dry basis. Unde...

  1. Peroxide detoxification by brain cells.

    PubMed

    Dringen, Ralf; Pawlowski, Petra G; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    Peroxides are generated continuously in cells that consume oxygen. Among the different peroxides, hydrogen peroxide is the molecule that is formed in highest quantities. In addition, organic hydroperoxides are synthesized as products of cellular metabolism. Generation and disposal of peroxides is a very important process in the human brain, because cells of this organ consume 20% of the oxygen used by the body. To prevent cellular accumulation of peroxides and damage generated by peroxide-derived radicals, brain cells contain efficient antioxidative defense mechanisms that dispose of peroxides and protect against oxidative damage. Cultured brain cells have been used frequently to investigate peroxide metabolism of neural cells. Efficient disposal of exogenous hydrogen peroxide was found for cultured astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglial cells, and neurons. Comparison of specific peroxide clearance rates revealed that cultured oligodendrocytes dispose of the peroxide quicker than the other neural cell cultures. Both catalase and the glutathione system contribute to the clearance of hydrogen peroxide by brain cells. For efficient glutathione-dependent reduction of peroxides, neural cells contain glutathione in high concentration and have substantial activity of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and enzymes that supply the NADPH required for the glutathione reductase reaction. This article gives an overview on the mechanisms involved in peroxide detoxification in brain cells and on the capacity of the different types of neural cells to dispose of peroxides.

  2. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment of cashew apple bagasse for ethanol production: study of parameters.

    PubMed

    Correia, Jessyca Aline da Costa; Júnior, José Edvan Marques; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha B; Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte

    2013-07-01

    The alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment of cashew apple bagasse (CAB) was evaluated based on the conversion of the resultant cellulose into glucose. The effects of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide at pH 11.5, the biomass loading and the pretreatment duration performed at 35°C and 250 rpm were evaluated after the subsequent enzymatic saccharification of the pretreated biomass using a commercial cellulase enzyme. The CAB used in this study contained 20.56 ± 2.19% cellulose, 10.17 ± 0.89% hemicellulose and 35.26 ± 0.90% lignin. The pretreatment resulted in a reduced lignin content in the residual solids. Increasing the H2O2 concentration (0-4.3% v/v) resulted in a higher rate of enzymatic hydrolysis. Lower biomass loadings gave higher glucose yields. In addition, no measurable furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural were produced in the liquid fraction during the pretreatment. The results show that alkaline hydrogen peroxide is effective for the pretreatment of CAB.

  3. Benzene-Induced Uncoupling of Naphthalene Dioxygenase Activity and Enzyme Inactivation by Production of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung

    1999-01-01

    Naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) is a multicomponent enzyme system that oxidizes naphthalene to (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene with consumption of O2 and two electrons from NAD(P)H. In the presence of benzene, NADH oxidation and O2 utilization were partially uncoupled from substrate oxidation. Approximately 40 to 50% of the consumed O2 was detected as hydrogen peroxide. The rate of benzene-dependent O2 consumption decreased with time, but it was partially increased by the addition of catalase in the course of the O2 consumption by NDO. Detailed experiments showed that the total amount of O2 consumed and the rate of benzene-induced O2 consumption increased in the presence of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging agents, and further addition of the terminal oxygenase component (ISPNAP) of NDO. Kinetic studies showed that ISPNAP was irreversibly inactivated in the reaction that contained benzene, but the inactivation was relieved to a high degree in the presence of catalase and partially relieved in the presence of 0.1 mM ferrous ion. Benzene- and naphthalene-reacted ISPNAP gave almost identical visible absorption spectra. In addition, hydrogen peroxide added at a range of 0.1 to 0.6 mM to the reaction mixtures inactivated the reduced ISPNAP containing mononuclear iron. These results show that hydrogen peroxide released during the uncoupling reaction acts both as an inhibitor of benzene-dependent O2 consumption and as an inactivator of ISPNAP. It is proposed that the irreversible inactivation of ISPNAP occurs by a Fenton-type reaction which forms a strong oxidizing agent, hydroxyl radicals (·OH), from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrous mononuclear iron at the active site. Furthermore, when [14C]benzene was used as the substrate, cis-benzene 1,2-dihydrodiol formed by NDO was detected. This result shows that NDO also couples a trace amount of benzene to both O2 consumption and NADH oxidation. PMID:10217759

  4. Microbial production of low molecular weight hyaluronic acid by adding hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate in batch culture of Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Zhu, Yang; Wang, Miao; Sun, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Microbial production of low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA) by the addition of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate during the batch culture of Streptococcus zooepidemicus was investigated. Hydrogen peroxide (1.0 mmol/g HA) and ascorbate (0.5 mmol/g HA) were added at 8h and 12h to degrade HA. With the redox depolymerization of HA, the HA molecular weight decreased from 1,300 kDa for the control to 80 kDa, and the average broth viscosity during 8-16 h decreased from 360 mPa s for the control to 290 mPa s. The average oxygen mass transfer coefficient K(L)a increased from 10h(-1) for the control to 35 h(-1) and the average dissolved oxygen level increased from 1% of air saturation in the control to 10%. HA production increased from 5.0 g/L for the control to 6.5 g/L, and contributed to the increased redox potential and energy charge. This novel process not only significantly enhanced production of low molecular weight HA, but also improved purification efficiency due to a decreased broth viscosity. Low molecular weight HA finds applications in biomedical and healthcare fields.

  5. Prostaglandin D2 Uses Components of ROS Signaling to Enhance Testosterone Production in Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Mantel, Alon; McDonald, J Tyson; Goldsborough, Kennedy; Harvey, Valerie M; Chan, Joanne

    2017-10-01

    Elevated levels of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) have been shown to be present in the bald scalp of androgenic alopecia (AGA) patients and to functionally inhibit hair growth. However, its precise mechanism in AGA has yet to be clearly defined. Although testosterone plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of AGA, the existence of a possible link between PGD2 and testosterone in skin has not been investigated. Here we show that human keratinocytes treated with PGD2 show enhanced capacity to convert the weak androgen, androstenedione, to testosterone. At the same time, treatment with PGD2 induced reactive oxygen species as indicated by generation of the lipid peroxidation product, 4-hydroxynonenal. To determine whether these two events are linked, we used the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine, which blocked the enhanced testosterone production from PGD2-treated keratinocytes. Our study suggests the existence of a possible crosstalk between the PGD2-reactive oxygen species axis and testosterone metabolism in keratinocytes. Thus, we propose that AGA patients might benefit from the use of N-acetyl-cysteine or other antioxidants as a supplement to currently available or emerging AGA therapies such as finasteride, minoxidil, and PGD2 receptor blockers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Products of oxidative stress inhibit aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways in dopamine catabolism yielding elevated levels of a reactive intermediate.

    PubMed

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Florang, Virginia R; Rees, Jennifer N; Anderson, David G; Strack, Stefan; Doorn, Jonathan A

    2009-05-01

    Dopamine (DA) has been implicated as an endogenous neurotoxin to explain the selective neurodegeneration as observed for Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation are hypothesized culprits in PD pathogenesis. DA undergoes catabolism by monoamine oxidase (MAO) to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), which is further oxidized to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) via aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). As a minor and compensatory metabolic pathway, DOPAL can be reduced to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) via cytosolic aldehyde or aldose reductase (AR). Previous studies have found DOPAL to be significantly more toxic to DA cells than DA and that the major lipid peroxidation products, that is, 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) and malondialdehyde (MDA), potently inhibit DOPAL oxidation via ALDH. The hypothesis of this work is that lipid peroxidation products inhibit DOPAL oxidation, yielding aberrant levels of the toxic aldehyde intermediate. To test this hypothesis, nerve growth factor-differentiated PC6-3 cells were used as a model for DA neurons. Cell viability in the presence of 4HNE and MDA (2-100 microM) was measured by MTT assay, and it was found that only 100 microM 4HNE exhibited significant cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with varying concentrations of 4HNE and MDA resulted in reduced DOPAC production and significant elevation of DOPAL levels, suggesting inhibition of ALDH. In cells treated with 4HNE that exhibited elevated DOPAL, there was a significant increase in DOPET. However, elevated DOPET was not observed for the cells treated with MDA, suggesting MDA to be an inhibitor of AR. Using isolated cytosolic AR, it was found that MDA but not 4HNE inhibited reductase activity toward DOPAL, surprisingly. These data demonstrate that the oxidative stress products 4HNE and MDA inhibit the aldehyde biotransformation step of DA catabolism yielding elevated levels of the endogenous neurotoxin DOPAL, which may link oxidative stress to

  7. Comparison of two at-home whitening products of similar peroxide concentration and different delivery methods.

    PubMed

    da Costa, J B; McPharlin, R; Hilton, T; Ferracane, J I; Wang, M

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the whitening efficacy, side effects, and patients' preferences/perceptions of two whitening systems of similar peroxide concentration but different formulation and delivery methods. The tooth color change of 24 participants was measured using a shade guide (BSG) and a spectrophotometer (ES). Color difference was calculated: ΔE* = [(ΔL*)(2) + (Δa*)(2) + (Δb*)(2)](1/2). One whitening treatment was randomly applied to the right or left maxillary anterior teeth and the other was applied to the contralateral teeth, at-home with 35% carbamide peroxide in a tray (TW) or with 14% hydrogen peroxide in strips (WS). The tooth color was evaluated at baseline, 15 and 30 days (15 days postwhitening). Participants rated their tooth and soft tissue sensitivity (1-10 scale) and completed a questionnaire on their preferences. Results were analyzed by repeated measurement regression analysis/Tukey and Mann-Whitney (p<0.05). At 15 days, the teeth treated with TW and WS presented ΔE* = 7 and 6, respectively (ΔBSG=3 for both), and at 30 days, they presented ΔE* = 7.5 and 6.5, respectively (ΔBSG=3 for both). There was no significant difference in tooth and soft tissue sensitivity between treatments. No participant reported tooth and gingival sensitivity at the postwhitening appointment. Of the participants, 83% preferred the TW over WS. Both ΔE* and ΔBSG showed no significant difference in tooth color change between TW and SW at either time point. By the end of the study no participants reported tooth and gingival sensitivity. Participants preferred TW over SW.

  8. Efficient oxidative hydrogen peroxide production and accumulation in photoelectrochemical water splitting using a tungsten trioxide/bismuth vanadate photoanode.

    PubMed

    Fuku, Kojiro; Sayama, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-07

    An aqueous solution of hydrogen carbonate (HCO3(-)) facilitated oxidative hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production from water on a WO3/BiVO4 photoanode with the simultaneous production of hydrogen (H2) on a Pt cathode even at an applied voltage far lower than the theoretical electrolysis voltage (+1.77 V vs. RHE) under simulated solar light. The unprecedentedly efficient simultaneous production and accumulation of H2O2 and H2 was achieved in 2.0 M KHCO3 at low temperature, and the maximum selectivity, accumulated concentration and turnover number (TON) of H2O2 generated reached ca. 54%, more than 2 mM and 108, respectively.

  9. Cellulosic bioethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) using hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid (HPAC) pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Song, Younho; Wi, Seung Gon; Kim, Ho Myeong; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2016-08-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (JA) is recognized as a suitable candidate biomass crop for bioethanol production because it has a rapid growth rate and high biomass productivity. In this study, hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid (HPAC) pretreatment was used to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis and to effectively remove the lignin of JA. With optimized enzyme doses, synergy was observed from the combination of three different enzymes (RUT-C30, pectinase, and xylanase) which provided a conversion rate was approximately 30% higher than the rate with from treatment with RUT-C30 alone. Fermentation of the JA hydrolyzates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced a fermentation yield of approximately 84%. Therefore, Jerusalem artichoke has potential as a bioenergy crop for bioethanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Thai banana (Musa AA group) in reducing accumulation of oxidation end products in UVB-irradiated mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Leerach, Nontaphat; Yakaew, Swanya; Phimnuan, Preeyawass; Soimee, Wichuda; Nakyai, Wongnapa; Luangbudnark, Witoo; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2017-03-01

    Chronic UVB exposure causes skin disorders and cancer through DNA strand breaks and oxidation of numerous functional groups of proteins and lipids in the skin. In this study, we investigated the effects of Thai banana (Musa AA group, "Khai," and Musa ABB group, "Namwa") on the prevention of UVB-induced skin damage when fed to male ICR mice. Mice were orally fed banana (Khai or Namwa) fruit pulps at dose of 1mg/g body weight/day for 12weeks. The shaved backs of the mice were irradiated with UVB for 12weeks. The intensity dose of UVB-exposure was increased from 54mJ/cm(2)/exposure at week 1 to 126mJ/cm(2)/exposure at week 12. A significant increase in skin thickness, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation end products, and expression of MMP-1 was observed in UVB-irradiated mouse skin. A reduction in the accumulation of oxidation end products was found in the skin of UVB-irradiated mice receiving Khai. This occurred in conjunction with a reduction in MMP-1 expression, inhibition of epidermal thickening, and induction of γ-GCS expression. The dietary intake of Khai prevented skin damage from chronic UVB exposure by increased γ-GCS expression and reduced oxidation end products included carbonyls, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of products formed in the reaction of ozone with alpha-pinene: case for organic peroxides.

    PubMed

    Venkatachari, Prasanna; Hopke, Philip K

    2008-08-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their subsequent induced pulmonary and systemic oxidative stress has been implicated as an important molecular mechanism of PM-mediated toxicity. However, recent work has shown that there is significant ROS associated with ambient PM. In order to understand the formation mechanisms as well as understand the potential health effects of particle-bound oxidative species, the alpha-pinene-O(3) oxidation chemical system was studied to elucidate the structures of reaction products using liquid chromatography-multiple stage mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)). The classes of compounds identified based on their multiple stage-MS fragmentation patterns, mechanistic considerations of alpha-pinene-O(3) oxidation, and general fragmentation rules, of the products from this reaction system were highly oxygenated species, predominantly containing hydroperoxide and peroxide functional groups. The oxidant species observed were clearly stable for the 1-3 h that elapsed during aerosol collection and analysis, and probably for much longer, thus rendering it possible for these species to bind onto particles forming fine particulate organic peroxides that concentrate on the particles and could deliver concentrated doses of ROS in vivo to tissue.

  12. Elevated levels of urinary hydrogen peroxide, advanced oxidative protein product (AOPP) and malondialdehyde in humans infected with intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Chandramathi, S; Suresh, K; Anita, Z B; Kuppusamy, U R

    2009-03-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated as an important pathogenic factor in the pathophysiology of various life-threatening diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. It occurs when the production of free radicals (generated during aerobic metabolism, inflammation, and infections) overcome the antioxidant defences in the body. Although previous studies have implied that oxidative stress is present in serum of patients with parasitic infection there have been no studies confirming oxidative stress levels in the Malaysian population infected with intestinal parasites. Three biochemical assays namely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), lipid peroxidation (LP) and advanced oxidative protein product (AOPP) assays were carried out to measure oxidative stress levels in the urine of human subjects whose stools were infected with parasites such as Blastocystis hominis, Ascaris, Trichuris, hookworm and microsporidia. The levels of H2O2, AOPP and LP were significantly higher (P<0.001, P<0.05 and P<0.05 respectively) in the parasite-infected subjects (n=75) compared to the controls (n=95). In conclusion, the study provides evidence that oxidative stress is elevated in humans infected by intestinal parasites. This study may influence future researchers to consider free radical-related pathways to be a target in the interventions of new drugs against parasitic infection and related diseases.

  13. Ethanol production from bamboo using mild alkaline pre-extraction followed by alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhaoyang; Wen, Yangbing; Kapu, Nuwan Sella

    2017-09-14

    A sequential two-stage pretreatment process comprising alkaline pre-extraction and alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment (AHP) was investigated to convert bamboo carbohydrates into bioethanol. The results showed that mild alkaline pre-extraction using 8% (w/w) sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 100°C for 180min followed by AHP pretreatment with 4% (w/w) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was sufficient to generate a substrate that could be efficiently digested with low enzyme loadings. Moreover, alkali pre-extraction enabled the use of lower H2O2 charges in AHP treatment. Two-stage pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis with only 9FPU/g cellulose led to the recovery of 87% of the original sugars in the raw feedstock. The use of the pentose-hexose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae SR8u strain enabled the utilization of 95.7% sugars in the hydrolysate to reach 4.6%w/v ethanol titer. The overall process also enabled the recovery of 62.9% lignin and 93.8% silica at high levels of purity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy and Tolerability of a Three-Step Acne System Containing a Solubilized Benzoyl Peroxide Lotion versus a Benzoyl Peroxide/Clindamycin Combination Product

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2008-01-01

    A brand three-step acne treatment system containing a solubilized 5% benzoyl lotion and a designated cleanser and moisturizer was compared with a brand benzoyl peroxide 5%/clindamycin 1% gel in subjects with acne vulgaris. The single-center, four-week study was investigator-blinded and randomized. The three-step acne treatment system proved to be comparable in efficacy and tolerability. PMID:21203357

  15. Inhibition of cellular proliferation and enhancement of hydrogen peroxide production in fibrosarcoma cell line by weak radio frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Castello, Pablo R; Hill, Iain; Sivo, Frank; Portelli, Lucas; Barnes, Frank; Usselman, Robert; Martino, Carlos F

    2014-12-01

    This study presents experimental data for the effects of weak radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and cellular growth rates of fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells in vitro. Cells were exposed either to 45 µT static magnetic fields (SMFs)-oriented vertical to the plane of growth or to SMFs combined with weak 5 and 10 MHz RF magnetic fields of 10 µTRMS intensity perpendicular to the static field. Cell numbers were reduced up to 30% on Day 2 for the cells exposed to the combination of SMF and a 10 MHz RF magnetic field compared with the SMF control cells. In addition, cells exposed to 10 MHz RF magnetic fields for 8 h increased H2O2 production by 55%. The results demonstrate an overall magnetic field-induced biological effect that shows elevated H2O2 levels with accompanying decrease in cellular growth rates.

  16. Mass-spectrometric characterization of phospholipids and their primary peroxidation products in rat cortical neurons during staurosporine-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Vladimir A; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Feng, Weihong; Mnuskin, Alexandra; Jiang, Jianfei; Tang, Minke; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zhao, Qing; Kochanek, Patrick M; Clark, Robert S B; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E

    2008-12-01

    The molecular diversity of phospholipids is essential for their structural and signaling functions in cell membranes. In the current work, we present, the results of mass spectrometric characterization of individual molecular species in major classes of phospholipids -- phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn), phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), sphingomyelin (CerPCho), and cardiolipin (Ptd(2)Gro) -- and their oxidation products during apoptosis induced in neurons by staurosporine (STS). The diversity of molecular species of phospholipids in rat cortical neurons followed the order Ptd(2)Gro > PtdEtn > PtdCho > PtdSer > PtdIns > CerPCho. The number of polyunsaturated oxidizable species decreased in the order Ptd(2)Gro > PtdEtn > PtdCho > PtdSer > PtdIns > CerPCho. Thus a relatively minor class of phospholipids, Ptd(2)Gro, was represented in cortical neurons by the greatest variety of both total and peroxidizable molecular species. Quantitative fluorescence HPLC analysis employed to assess the oxidation of different classes of phospholipids in neuronal cells during intrinsic apoptosis induced by STS revealed that three anionic phospholipids -- Ptd(2)Gro > PtdSer > PtdIns -- underwent robust oxidation. No significant oxidation in the most dominant phospholipid classes -- PtdCho and PtdEtn -- was detected. MS-studies revealed the presence of hydroxy-, hydroperoxy- as well as hydroxy-/hydroperoxy-species of Ptd(2)Gro, PtdSer, and PtdIns. Experiments in model systems where total cortex Ptd(2)Gro and PtdSer fractions were incubated in the presence of cytochrome c (cyt c) and H(2)O(2), confirmed that molecular identities of the products formed were similar to the ones generated during STS-induced neuronal apoptosis. The temporal sequence of biomarkers of STS-induced apoptosis and phospholipid peroxidation combined with recently demonstrated redox catalytic properties of cyt c realized through its interactions with Ptd(2)Gro

  17. [RAD18 gene product of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae controls mutagenesis induced by hydrogen peroxide].

    PubMed

    Kozhina, T N; Korolev, V G

    2012-04-01

    Within eukaryotes, tolerance to DNA damage is determined primarily by the repair pathway controlled by the members of the RAD6 epistasis group. Genetic studies on a yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model showed that the initial stage of postreplication repair (PRR), i.e., initiation of replication through DNA damage, is controlled by Rad6-Rad18 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex. Mutants of these genes are highly sensitive to various genotoxic agents and reduce the level of induced mutagenesis. In this case, the efficiency of mutagenesis suppression depends on the type of damage. In this study we showed that DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide at the same mutagen doses causes significantly more mutations and lethal events in the rad18 mutant cells compared to control wild-type cells.

  18. Production of singlet oxygen by the reaction of non-basic hydrogen peroxide with chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wenming; Shi, Wenbo; Yang, Heping; Cui, Rongrong; Deng, Liezheng

    2012-10-14

    Non-basic hydrogen peroxide was found to be very easy to react with Cl(2) to produce singlet oxygen O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) (i.e. the molecular oxygen in its first electronic excited state) when an H(+) absorbent such as C(5)H(5)N, CH(3)COONH(4), HCOONH(4) or NH(4)F was added into H(2)O(2) aqueous solution, and the long concealed fact that molecular H(2)O(2) can react with Cl(2) to produce O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) was then uncovered. It is only when an H(+) absorbent has provided a stronger base than H(2)O to absorb the H(+) produced during the reaction that O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) can be produced.

  19. Oxidative stress induction by nanoparticles in THP-1 cells with 4-HNE production: stress biomarker or oxidative stress signalling molecule?

    PubMed

    Foucaud, L; Goulaouic, S; Bennasroune, A; Laval-Gilly, P; Brown, D; Stone, V; Falla, J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether carbon black (CB) nanoparticles might induce toxicity to monocytic cells in vitro via an oxidative stress mechanism involving formation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the subsequent role of 4-HNE in inducing further cytotoxic effects. ROS production in cells by CB nanoparticles was shown by the oxidation of DCFH after a short time exposure. These particles induced the formation of 4-HNE-protein adducts and significant modification of glutathione content corresponding to an increase of oxidized glutathione form (GSSG) and a decrease of total glutathione (GSX) content. These results attest to an oxidative stress induced by the carbon black nanoparticles, although no induction of HO-1 protein expression was detected. Concerning the effects of a direct exposure to 4-HNE, our results showed that 4-HNE is not cytotoxic for concentrations lower than 12.5 microM. By contrast, it provokes a very high cytotoxicity for concentrations above 25 microM. An induction of HO-1 expression was observed from concentrations above 5 microM of 4-HNE. Finally, glutathione content decreased significantly from 5 microM of 4-HNE but no modification was observed under this concentration. The discrepancy between effects of carbon black nanoparticles and 4-HNE on the intracellular markers of oxidative stress suggests that 4-HNE is not directly implied in the signalling of oxidative toxicity of nanoparticles but is an effective biomarker of oxidative effects of nanoparticles.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide production and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the fusaric acid-induced programmed cell death in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Sun, Ling; Zhou, Benguo; Gao, Zhengliang; Hao, Yu; Zhu, Xiaoping; Liang, Yuancun

    2014-08-15

    Fusaric acid (FA), a non-specific toxin produced mainly by Fusarium spp., can cause programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells. The mechanism underlying the FA-induced PCD was not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the roles of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and mitochondrial function in the FA-induced PCD. Tobacco suspension cells were treated with 100 μM FA and then analyzed for H2O2 accumulation and mitochondrial functions. Here we demonstrate that cells undergoing FA-induced PCD exhibited H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, and a decrease of the catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities. Pre-treatment of tobacco suspension cells with antioxidant ascorbic acid and NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyl iodonium significantly reduced the rate of FA-induced cell death as well as the caspase-3-like protease activity. Moreover, FA treatment of tobacco cells decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content. Oligomycin and cyclosporine A, inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATP synthase and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, respectively, could also reduce the rate of FA-induced cell death significantly. Taken together, the results presented in this paper demonstrate that H2O2 accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction are the crucial events during the FA-induced PCD in tobacco suspension cells.

  1. Oxidative stress responses and lipid peroxidation damage are induced during dehydration in the production of dry active wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Garre, Elena; Raginel, Françoise; Palacios, Antonio; Julien, Anne; Matallana, Emilia

    2010-01-01

    The tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to desiccation is important for the use of this microorganism in the wine industry, since active dry wine yeast is routinely used as starter for must fermentations. Many studies have shown the complexity of the cellular effects caused by water loss, including oxidative injuries on macromolecular components. However the technological interest of yeast drying was not addressed in those studies, and the dehydration conditions were far from the industrial practice. In the present study a molecular approach was used to characterize the relevant injuring conditions during pilot plant dehydration under two different drying temperatures (i.e., 35 and 41 degrees C). We have analyzed expression changes for several stress gene markers and we have determined two biochemical redox indicators (glutathione and lipid peroxidation levels) during pilot plant dehydration to produce active dry biomass, according to the standard practice in industry. The main gene expression response involves the induction of genes TRR1 and GRX5, corresponding to the two main redox balance systems, thioredoxins and glutathione/glutaredoxins. Elevated glutathione content and significant lipid peroxidation damage indicate the physiological impact of the oxidative stress on cellular components. The comparison between commercial stocks and pilot plant samples demonstrate the suitability of the molecular approach at the pilot plant scale to study physiological traits of industrial yeast products.

  2. Influence of cadmium on metallothionein expression and products of lipid peroxidation in the organs of hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas).

    PubMed

    Linšak, Dijana Tomić; Linšak, Zeljko; Spirić, Zdravko; Srebočan, Emil; Glad, Marin; Cenov, Arijana; Jakovac, Hrvoje; Milin, Cedomila

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium occurs naturally in the environment and as an anthropogenic pollutant. Exposure to low concentrations of cadmium is inevitable and may produce toxic effects. Another important aspect of cadmium toxicity is its interaction, often antagonistic, with essential elements such as selenium. The aim of this study was to highlight the risks of long-term exposure to low cadmium concentrations, using a scientific and chemical approach and hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas) as model organisms in a field study. Two study areas were monitored. Levels of cadmium and selenium were quantified in the organs of hares, the expression of metallothioneins I + II and the products of lipid peroxidation were determined. The median cadmium concentrations (wet weight) in the muscle, liver, kidney and brain of hares from an exposed group ranged from 0.033 to 0.037, 0.763 to 1.054, 3.090 to 16.594 and 0.016 to 0.087 µg g(-1), respectively; whereas, the median selenium concentrations (wet weight) ranged from 0.100 to 0.108, 0.153 to 0.332, 0.677 to 0.701 and 0.078 to 0.116 µg g(-1), respectively. Expression of the metallothioneins I + II proteins was observed in tissues. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels, measured as malondialdehyde (MDA) equivalents, increased with the cadmium concentration. Further research on long-term exposure to low concentrations of cadmium in the environment is needed.

  3. Characterization of peroxides formed by riboflavin and light exposure of milk. Detection of urate hydroperoxide as a novel oxidation product.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Morten R; Huvaere, Kevin; Skibsted, Leif H; Stagsted, Jan

    2010-01-13

    Characterization of peroxides by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of milk following exposure to riboflavin and light showed that hydrogen peroxide was the most abundant peroxide formed since it could be removed by catalase. Formation of peroxides after separation by SEC showed that hydrogen peroxide formation was primarily increased in the presence of caseins and ascorbate, although whey proteins also were found to contribute. Caseins and beta-lactoglobulin also formed catalase-resistant peroxides, presumably protein hydroperoxides. A catalase-resistant and unstable peroxide was observed in fractions containing urate. Experiments performed with pure urate suggested that urate radicals reacted further with superoxide leading to a urate hydroperoxide. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using spin-traps showed that the presence of oxygen was required for urate radical formation, which could be assigned as nitrogen-centered radicals. These results suggest a new route during light-induced oxidation sensitized by flavins, in effect making urate pro-oxidative.

  4. High hydrogen peroxide concentration in the feed-zone affects bioreactor cell productivity with liquid phase oxygen supply strategy.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Pritish; Ghosh, Kaushik; Suraishkumar, G K

    2008-06-01

    Liquid phase oxygen supply strategy (LPOS), in which hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is used to supply oxygen to the bioreactor, leads to low cell productivity despite high specific productivities of relevant metabolites. We hypothesized that high H(2)O(2) concentrations in the feed-zone led to local cell death, which in turn, lead to lower cell productivity. To test the hypothesis, a mathematical model was developed. Bacillus subtilis 168 was used as the model system in this study. The model simulations of cell concentrations in the bioreactor-zone were verified with the experimental results. The feed-zone H(2)O(2) concentrations remained 12-14 times higher than bulk bioreactor concentrations. The high local concentrations are expected to cause local cell killing, which explains the decrease in overall cell production by 50% at 300 rpm compared to conventional cultivation. Further, among the four different feed strategies studied using the model, dissolved oxygen (DO) controlled H(2)O(2) feed strategy caused least local cell killing and improved overall cell production by 34%.

  5. Effect of sodium metabisulfite on hydrogen peroxide production in light-exposed pediatric parenteral amino acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Brawley, V; Bhatia, J; Karp, W B

    1998-06-15

    The effect of sodium metabisulfite (MBS) on hydrogen peroxide (HP) production in model and commercial amino acid solutions exposed to phototherapy light was studied. Model and commercial pediatric amino acid solutions were prepared such that the amino acid concentration was 1%. MBS concentration, riboflavin concentration, and duration of exposure to phototherapy light were varied to determine the effect on HP production. Control solutions were kept in the dark. HP production was assayed in the model amino acid solutions by using potassium iodide in the presence of ammonium molybdate. In all experiments, HP production was measured at 360 nm in the presence and absence of catalase. In light-exposed solutions, HP production increased linearly for several hours and reached a plateau by eight hours. A mean maximum of 940 microM was produced (data pooled for all solutions). No detectable HP was generated in the solutions kept in the dark. After two hours of light exposure, it was necessary to add at least 10 times more MBS than is typically found in commercial total parenteral nutrient solutions to scavenge all the HP produced. An average of up to 940 microM of HP was produced in model and commercial pediatric parenteral 1% amino acid solutions in the presence of phototherapy light and clinically relevant concentrations of riboflavin and MBS. Light exposure decreased the antioxidant effect of MBS.

  6. Radical production from peroxide and peracid tumour promoters: EPR spin trapping studies.

    PubMed

    Greenley, T L; Davies, M J

    1993-05-07

    EPR spin trapping using the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) and 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulphonic acid (DBNBS) has been employed to examine the generation of radicals from a number of organic peroxides and peracids which are known or suspected tumour promoters. All of the compounds when incubated with rat liver microsomal fractions in the presence of NADPH or NADH are metabolised to radical species which can be detected, and in most cases identified definitively, as the corresponding spin adducts; the assignment of particular signals to certain spin adducts has been confirmed by photolytic experiments. In the majority of cases, the predominant species are the arenecarbonyloxyl [RC(O)O.] and hydroxyl radical adducts. The mechanism of formation of the former species is shown to be enzymatic and cytochrome P-450 dependent and requires the presence of reducing equivalents. This type of radical is shown to undergo ready decarboxylation to give aryl radicals in agreement with previous chemical studies. The detection of these radical species, which are known to cause DNA strand breaks and be cytotoxic, with all the compounds tested, provides strong supportive evidence for the theory that it is the generation of radical species from these compounds which is the cause of their tumour-promoting activity.

  7. Sunscreens as a source of hydrogen peroxide production in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quiles, David; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio

    2014-08-19

    Sunscreens have been shown to give the most effective protection for human skin from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Chemicals from sunscreens (i.e., UV filters) accumulate in the sea and have toxic effects on marine organisms. In this report, we demonstrate that photoexcitation of inorganic UV filters (i.e., TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles) under solar radiation produces significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a strong oxidizing agent that generates high levels of stress on marine phytoplankton. Our results indicate that the inorganic oxide nanoparticle content in 1 g of commercial sunscreen produces rates of H2O2 in seawater of up to 463 nM/h, directly affecting the growth of phytoplankton. Conservative estimates for a Mediterranean beach reveal that tourism activities during a summer day may release on the order of 4 kg of TiO2 nanoparticles to the water and produce an increment in the concentration of H2O2 of 270 nM/day. Our results, together with the data provided by tourism records in the Mediterranean, point to TiO2 nanoparticles as the major oxidizing agent entering coastal waters, with direct ecological consequences on the ecosystem.

  8. Sporicidal performance induced by photocatalytic production of organic peroxide under visible light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yuichi; Shimodo, Takahito; Chikamori, Noriyasu; Usuki, Sho; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Endo, Takeshi; Katsumata, Ken-ichi; Terashima, Chiaki; Ikekita, Masahiko; Fujishima, Akira; Suzuki, Tomonori; Sakai, Hideki; Nakata, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria that cause serious food poisoning are known to sporulate under conditions of nutrient and water shortage. The resulting spores have much greater resistance to common sterilization methods, such as heating at 100 °C and exposure to various chemical agents. Because such bacteria cannot be inactivated with typical alcohol disinfectants, peroxyacetic acid (PAA) often is used, but PAA is a harmful agent that can seriously damage human health. Furthermore, concentrated hydrogen peroxide, which is also dangerous, must be used to prepare PAA. Thus, the development of a facile and safe sporicidal disinfectant is strongly required. In this study, we have developed an innovative sporicidal disinfection method that employs the combination of an aqueous ethanol solution, visible light irradiation, and a photocatalyst. We successfully produced a sporicidal disinfectant one hundred times as effective as commercially available PAA, while also resolving the hazards and odor problems associated with PAA. The method presented here can potentially be used as a replacement for the general disinfectants employed in the food and health industries. PMID:27666195

  9. Sporicidal performance induced by photocatalytic production of organic peroxide under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuichi; Shimodo, Takahito; Chikamori, Noriyasu; Usuki, Sho; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Endo, Takeshi; Katsumata, Ken-Ichi; Terashima, Chiaki; Ikekita, Masahiko; Fujishima, Akira; Suzuki, Tomonori; Sakai, Hideki; Nakata, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria that cause serious food poisoning are known to sporulate under conditions of nutrient and water shortage. The resulting spores have much greater resistance to common sterilization methods, such as heating at 100 °C and exposure to various chemical agents. Because such bacteria cannot be inactivated with typical alcohol disinfectants, peroxyacetic acid (PAA) often is used, but PAA is a harmful agent that can seriously damage human health. Furthermore, concentrated hydrogen peroxide, which is also dangerous, must be used to prepare PAA. Thus, the development of a facile and safe sporicidal disinfectant is strongly required. In this study, we have developed an innovative sporicidal disinfection method that employs the combination of an aqueous ethanol solution, visible light irradiation, and a photocatalyst. We successfully produced a sporicidal disinfectant one hundred times as effective as commercially available PAA, while also resolving the hazards and odor problems associated with PAA. The method presented here can potentially be used as a replacement for the general disinfectants employed in the food and health industries.

  10. Destruction of rat pancreatic islet beta-cells by cytokines involves the production of cytotoxic aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Pinzon, W L; Strynadka, K; Rabinovitch, A

    1996-12-01

    Cytokines produced by mononuclear leukocytes infiltrating pancreatic islets are candidate mediators of islet beta-cell destruction in autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Cytokines may damage islet beta-cells by inducing oxygen free radical production in the beta-cells. Lipid peroxidation and aldehyde production are measures of oxygen free radical-mediated cell injury. In the current study, we used a HPLC technique to measure levels of different aldehydes produced in rat islets incubated with cytokines. The cytokine combination of interleukin-1beta (10 U/ml), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (10(3) U/ml), and interferon-gamma (10(3) U/ml), and the oxidant, t-butylhydroperoxide, induced significant increases in islet levels of the same aldehydes: butanal, pentanal, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), and hexanal. Cytokine-induced aldehyde production was associated with islet beta-cell destruction. Thus, cytokine-induced increases in malondialdehyde (MDA; at 4 h) and 4-HNE (at 8 h) preceded islet cell destruction (at 16 h), and the addition of 4-HNE, hexanal, MDA, and pentanal (1-200 microM) to th islets, but not other aldehydes at similar concentrations, produced dose-dependent destruction of islet beta-cells. Furthermore, an antioxidant (lazaroid U78518E) prevented cytokine-induced increases in 4-HNE, hexanal, and MDA and significantly inhibited cytokine-induced decreases in insulin and DNA in the islets. In contrast, N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, prevented cytokine-induced nitrite production, but did not prevent cytokine-induced increases in 4-HNE, hexanal, and MDA or decreases in insulin and DNA in the islets. These results suggest that cytokines may damage islet beta-cells by inducing oxygen free radicals, lipid peroxidation, and, consequently, the formation of cytotoxic aldehydes in the islet cells.

  11. Hydrogen Peroxide Is Involved in Salicylic Acid-Elicited Rosmarinic Acid Production in Salvia miltiorrhiza Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenfang; Zhang, Jingyi; Hu, Gege; Yao, Yaqin; Dong, Juane

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an elicitor to induce the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in plant cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays an important role as a key signaling molecule in response to various stimuli and is involved in the accumulation of secondary metabolites. However, the relationship between them is unclear and their synergetic functions on accumulation of secondary metabolites are unknown. In this paper, the roles of SA and H2O2 in rosmarinic acid (RA) production in Salvia miltiorrhiza cell cultures were investigated. The results showed that SA significantly enhanced H2O2 production, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity, and RA accumulation. Exogenous H2O2 could also promote PAL activity and enhance RA production. If H2O2 production was inhibited by NADPH oxidase inhibitor (IMD) or scavenged by quencher (DMTU), RA accumulation would be blocked. These results indicated that H2O2 is secondary messenger for signal transduction, which can be induced by SA, significantly and promotes RA accumulation. PMID:24995364

  12. THE SUITABILITY OF SODIUM PEROXIDE FUSION FOR PRODUCTION-SCALE PLUTONIUM PROCESSING OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Edwards, T.

    2010-10-26

    Sodium peroxide (Na{sub 2}O{sub 2}) fusion is a method that offers significant benefits to the processing of high-fired plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) materials. Those benefits include reduction in dissolution cycle time, decrease in residual solids, and reduction of the potential for generation of a flammable gas mixture during dissolution. Implementation of Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} fusion may also increase the PuO{sub 2} throughput in the HB-Line dissolving lines. To fuse a material, Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} is mixed with the feed material in a crucible and heated to 600-700 C. For low-fired and high-fired PuO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} reacts with PuO{sub 2} to form a compound that readily dissolves in ambient-temperature nitric acid without the use of potassium fluoride. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) demonstrated the feasibility of Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} fusion and subsequent dissolution for the processing of high-fired PuO{sub 2} materials in HB-Line. Testing evaluated critical dissolution characteristics and defined preliminary process parameters. Based on experimental measurements, a dissolution cycle can be complete in less than one hour, compared to the current processing time of 6-10 hours for solution heating and dissolution. Final Pu concentrations of 30-35 g/L were produced without the formation of precipitates in the final solution.

  13. Streptococcus sanguinis induces neutrophil cell death by production of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Sumioka, Ryuichi; Nakata, Masanobu; Okahashi, Nobuo; Li, Yixuan; Wada, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Hayashi, Mikako; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus is the dominant bacterial genus in the human oral cavity and a leading cause of infective endocarditis. Streptococcus sanguinis belongs to the mitis group of streptococci and produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by the action of SpxB, a pyruvate oxidase. In this study, we investigated the involvement of SpxB in survival of S. sanguinis in human blood and whether bacterial H2O2 exhibits cytotoxicity against human neutrophils. Results of a bactericidal test with human whole blood revealed that the spxB mutation in S. sanguinis is detrimental to its survival in blood. When S. sanguinis strains were exposed to isolated neutrophils, the bacterial survival rate was significantly decreased by spxB deletion. Furthermore, human neutrophils exposed to the S. sanguinis wild-type strain, in contrast to those exposed to an spxB mutant strain, underwent cell death with chromatin de-condensation and release of web-like extracellular DNA, reflecting induction of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Since reactive oxygen species-mediated NET induction requires citrullination of arginine residues in histone proteins and subsequent chromatin de-condensation, we examined citrullination levels of histone in infected neutrophils. It is important to note that the citrullinated histone H3 was readily detected in neutrophils infected with the wild-type strain, as compared to infection with the spxB mutant strain. Moreover, decomposition of streptococcal H2O2 with catalase reduced NET induction. These results suggest that H2O2 produced by S. sanguinis provokes cell death of neutrophils and NET formation, thus potentially affecting bacterial survival in the bloodstream. PMID:28222125

  14. Root growth inhibition by aluminum is probably caused by cell death due to peroxidase-mediated hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Simonovicová, M; Huttová, J; Mistrík, I; Siroká, B; Tamás, L

    2004-10-01

    The effect of aluminum on hydrogen peroxide production and peroxidase-catalyzed NADH oxidation was studied in barley roots germinated and grown between two layers of moistened filter paper. Guaiacol peroxidase activity significantly increased after 48 h and was approximately two times higher after 72 h in Al-treated roots. The oxidation of NADH was also significantly increased and, like guaiacol peroxidase activity, it was two times higher in A1-treated roots than in controls. Elevated H2O2 production was observed both 48 and 72 h after the onset of imbibition in the presence of A1. Separation on a cation exchange column allowed the detection of two peaks with NADH peroxidase and H2O2 production activity. However, a difference between control and Al-treated plants was found only in one fraction, in which four times higher guaiacol peroxidase activity and five times higher NADH peroxidase activity were expressed and about three times more H2O2 was produced. One anionic peroxidase and three cationic peroxidases were detected in this fraction by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The anionic peroxidase was activated in the Al-treated root tips and also oxidized NADH but was detectable only after a long incubation time. Two of the cationic peroxidases were capable of oxidizing NADH and producing a significant amount of H2O2, but only one of these was activated by A1 stress. The role of these peroxidases during A1 stress in barley root tips is discussed.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide production from fibrous pectic cellulose analogs and effect on dermal fibroblasts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Naturally derived products with folklore remedies have in recent years been reconsidered for their benefit to wound healing i.e., honey’s application to chronic wound dressing products. Similarly, we have undertaken an evaluation of Fibrous pectin-cellulose (FPC) (cellulose blended with primary cel...

  16. A six-month study of two self-applied tooth whitening products containing carbamide peroxide.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Paul A; Ellwood, Roger; Davies, Robin

    2004-01-01

    Bleaching offers a non-interventive way of improving the appearance of sound, yet discolored anterior teeth. Until recently, the whitening agent was applied using a tray, but now other methods of delivering whitening agents, such as those using brush applicators, are available. This study investigated the tooth whitening efficacy of two novel, self-applied tooth whitening systems containing either 18% (Group 1) or 16.4% (Group 2) carbamide peroxide. Ninety-five subjects, ranging in age from 18 to 70 with anterior teeth A3 or darker, were recruited and randomly allocated to a group. The subjects were instructed to apply the formulation to all maxillary anterior teeth after brushing in the morning and evening. At baseline, two weeks and six months the upper six anterior teeth of the subjects were measured using the Vita shade guide tab system. In addition, the gingival health of the labial surfaces of the upper six anterior teeth was assessed using the Loee and Silness Gingival index (Loee & Silness, 1963) at baseline and at two weeks. The mean (SD) reduction in shade guide scores was 4.1 (2.4) shade guide tabs for subjects in Group 1, compared to 3.7 (2.6) shades for those in Group 2. This difference was not statistically significant (p=0.5). During the course of study, the gingivitis scores reduced from a mean (SD) of 0.91 (0.62) at baseline to 0.44 (0.55) at final examination (48% reduction). At the six-month recall, the mean (SD) reduction in shade guide scores was 2.3 (2.7) shade guide tabs for subjects in Group 1, compared to 2.5 (2.5) shades for those in Group 2. The different concentrations tested were found to be equally effective in improving the whiteness of upper anterior teeth by approximately four shades over a two-week period and the majority of the whitening benefit (c.60%) was sustained at six-month recall.

  17. Processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production: Dissolution of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} targets by alkaline hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-09-01

    Low-enriched uranium silicide targets designed to recover fission product {sup 99}Mo were dissolved in alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} plus NaOH) at about 90C. Sintering of matrix aluminum powder during irradiation and heat treatment retarded aluminum dissolution and prevented silicide particle dispersion. Gas evolved during dissolution is suspected to adhere to particles and block hydroxide ion contact with aluminum. Reduction of base concentrations from 5M to O.lM NaOH yielded similar silicide dissolution and peroxide destruction rates, simplifying later processing. Future work in particle dispersion enhancement, {sup 99}Mo separation, and waste disposal is also discussed.

  18. QUENCHING OF CHLORINATION DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION IN DRINKING WATER BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. (R825362)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactions between chlorine disinfectants, dissolved organic matter, and other chemicals in water form a series of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), that are toxic and subject to increasingly stringent regulations. Th...

  19. QUENCHING OF CHLORINATION DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION IN DRINKING WATER BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. (R825362)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactions between chlorine disinfectants, dissolved organic matter, and other chemicals in water form a series of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), that are toxic and subject to increasingly stringent regulations. Th...

  20. Hydrogen peroxide as sustainable fuel: electrocatalysts for production with a solar cell and decomposition with a fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yusuke; Fukunishi, Yurie; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2010-10-21

    Hydrogen peroxide was electrochemically produced by reducing oxygen in an aqueous solution with [Co(TCPP)] as a catalyst and photovoltaic solar cell operating at 0.5 V. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced is utilized as a fuel for a one-compartment fuel cell with Ag-Pb alloy nanoparticles as the cathode.

  1. High light-induced hydrogen peroxide production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is increased by high CO2 availability.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Na, Chae Sun; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2015-03-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an unavoidable part of photosynthesis. Stress that accompanies high light levels and low CO2 availability putatively includes enhanced ROS production in the so-called Mehler reaction. Such conditions are thought to encourage O2 to become an electron acceptor at photosystem I, producing the ROS superoxide anion radical (O2·-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). In contrast, here it is shown in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that CO2 depletion under high light levels lowered cellular H2 O2 production, and that elevated CO2 levels increased H2 O2 production. Using various photosynthetic and mitochondrial mutants of C. reinhardtii, the chloroplast was identified as the main source of elevated H2 O2 production under high CO2 availability. High light levels under low CO2 availability induced photoprotective mechanisms called non-photochemical quenching, or NPQ, including state transitions (qT) and high energy state quenching (qE). The qE-deficient mutant npq4 produced more H2 O2 than wild-type cells under high light levels, although less so under high CO2 availability, whereas it demonstrated equal or greater enzymatic H2 O2 -degrading capacity. The qT-deficient mutant stt7-9 produced the same H2 O2 as wild-type cells under high CO2 availability. Physiological levels of H2 O2 were able to hinder qT and the induction of state 2, providing an explanation for why under high light levels and high CO2 availability wild-type cells behaved like stt7-9 cells stuck in state 1. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Chlorinated phenol treatment and in situ hydrogen peroxide production in a sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Miran, Waheed; Nawaz, Mohsin; Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2017-04-05

    Wastewaters are increasingly being considered as renewable resources for the sustainable production of electricity, fuels, and chemicals. In recent years, bioelectrochemical treatment has come to light as a prospective technology for the production of energy from wastewaters. In this study, a bioelectrochemical system (BES) enriched with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the anodic chamber was proposed and evaluated for the biodegradation of recalcitrant chlorinated phenol, electricity generation (in the microbial fuel cell (MFC)), and production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (in the microbial electrolysis cell (MEC)), which is a very strong oxidizing agent and often used for the degradation of complex organics. Maximum power generation of 253.5 mW/m(2), corresponding to a current density of 712.0 mA/m(2), was achieved in the presence of a chlorinated phenol pollutant (4-chlorophenol (4-CP) at 100 mg/L (0.78 mM)) and lactate (COD of 500 mg/L). In the anodic chamber, biodegradation of 4-CP was not limited to dechlorination, and further degradation of one of its metabolic products (phenol) was observed. In MEC operation mode, external voltage (0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 V) was added via a power supply, with 0.4 V producing the highest concentration of H2O2 (13.3 g/L-m(2) or 974 μM) in the cathodic chamber after 6 h of operation. Consequently, SRB-based bioelectrochemical technology can be applied for chlorinated pollutant biodegradation in the anodic chamber and either net current or H2O2 production in the cathodic chamber by applying an optimum external voltage.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide induced by the fungicide prothioconazole triggers deoxynivalenol (DON) production by Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fusarium head blight is a very important disease of small grain cereals with F. graminearum as one of the most important causal agents. It not only causes reduction in yield and quality but from a human and animal healthcare point of view, it produces mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) which can accumulate to toxic levels. Little is known about external triggers influencing DON production. Results In the present work, a combined in vivo/in vitro approach was used to test the effect of sub lethal fungicide treatments on DON production. Using a dilution series of prothioconazole, azoxystrobin and prothioconazole + fluoxastrobin, we demonstrated that sub lethal doses of prothioconazole coincide with an increase in DON production 48 h after fungicide treatment. In an artificial infection trial using wheat plants, the in vitro results of increased DON levels upon sub lethal prothioconazole application were confirmed illustrating the significance of these results from a practical point of view. In addition, further in vitro experiments revealed a timely hyperinduction of H2O2 production as fast as 4 h after amending cultures with prothioconazole. When applying H2O2 directly to germinating conidia, a similar induction of DON-production by F. graminearum was observed. The effect of sub lethal prothioconazole concentrations on DON production completely disappeared when applying catalase together with the fungicide. Conclusions These cumulative results suggest that H2O2 induced by sub lethal doses of the triazole fungicide prothioconazole acts as a trigger of DON biosynthesis. In a broader framework, this work clearly shows that DON production by the plant pathogen F. graminearum is the result of the interaction of fungal genomics and external environmental triggers. PMID:20398299

  4. Quantitative determination of trace levels of hydrogen peroxide in crospovidone and a pharmaceutical product using high performance liquid chromatography with coulometric detection.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongfei; Bu, Xin; Huang, Ming-Hsing; Young, Joel; Raglione, Thomas

    2009-06-22

    A reliable and reproducible high performance liquid chromatography method with coulometric detection was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of trace-levels of hydrogen peroxide in crospovidone, a pharmaceutical excipient, and a capsule pharmaceutical product. The method conditions included: a reproducible extraction procedure to provide a concentrated extract, aqueous extraction solvent; a simple HPLC mobile phase (aqueous 50 mM ammonium acetate) compatible with the coulometric detection; a reserve-phase HPLC column that did not collapse under 100% aqueous mobile phase conditions providing sufficient retention and separation of hydrogen peroxide from interferences; and a coulometric detector with a multi-electrode array providing sensitive and selective detection. The method validation results, including those for specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, and recovery, were acceptable for the determination of trace levels of hydrogen peroxide. The method was shown to be linear over the range of 0.6-4.5 ppm (microg/g) and 6-90 ppm (microg/g) for the pharmaceutical product and crospovidone, respectively. The described method was applied to the determination of trace levels of hydrogen peroxide in different batches of crospovidone and the corresponding pharmaceutical product batches manufactured from these batches of this excipient.

  5. SpxA1 involved in hydrogen peroxide production, stress tolerance and endocarditis virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Ge, Xiuchun; Wang, Xiaojing; Patel, Jenishkumar R; Xu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is one of the most common agents of infective endocarditis. Spx proteins are a group of global regulators that negatively or positively control global transcription initiation. In this study, we characterized the spxA1 gene in S. sanguinis SK36. The spxA1 null mutant displayed opaque colony morphology, reduced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production, and reduced antagonistic activity against Streptococcus mutans UA159 relative to the wild type strain. The ΔspxA1 mutant also demonstrated decreased tolerance to high temperature, acidic and oxidative stresses. Further analysis revealed that ΔspxA1 also exhibited a ∼5-fold reduction in competitiveness in an animal model of endocarditis. Microarray studies indicated that expression of several oxidative stress genes was downregulated in the ΔspxA1 mutant. The expression of spxB and nox was significantly decreased in the ΔspxA1 mutant compared with the wild type. These results indicate that spxA1 plays a major role in H(2)O(2) production, stress tolerance and endocarditis virulence in S. sanguinis SK36. The second spx gene, spxA2, was also found in S. sanguinis SK36. The spxA2 null mutant was found to be defective for growth under normal conditions and showed sensitivity to high temperature, acidic and oxidative stresses.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide release kinetics into saliva from different whitening products: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva; da Mata, António Duarte Sola Pereira; Silveira, João Miguel Lourenço; Marques, Joana Rita Oliveira Faria; Amaral, João Pedro de Almeida Rato; Guilherme, Nuno Filipe Rito Parada Marques

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare salivary hydrogen peroxide (HP) release kinetics and potential toxicity of systemic exposure of four different whitening products. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a Portuguese dental faculty clinic. Two hundred forty volunteers were randomized to eight intervention groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive active or placebo applications of one of four different products: Opalescence 10% PF™ (OPL), Vivastyle® 10%™ (VS10%), Vivadent Paint On Plus™ (PO+), and Trés White Supreme™ (TWS). Saliva collection was obtained by established methods at different times. The HP salivary content was determined by a photometric method. Salivary HP variations, total amount of salivary HP, and counts of subjects above the safe daily HP dose were the main outcome measures. All whitening systems significantly released HP to the saliva when compared to placebo, and all showed different release kinetics. The adaptable tray system (TWS) presented a risk increase of 37% [20-54%, 95% confidence interval] when compared to the other systems. The use of an adaptable tray whitening system with higher concentration of HP increases the toxicity potential.

  7. Aldehydes in cigarette smoke react with the lipid peroxidation product malonaldehyde to form fluorescent protein adducts on lysines.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Thomas L; Haver, Alvin; Duryee, Michael J; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W; Hamel, Frederick G; White, Ronda L; Rennard, Stephen I; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2005-05-01

    Cigarette smoke is a risk factor for the development of several diseases, but the exact mechanism responsible has not been well-characterized. Because modification, or adducting, of biomolecules is thought to mediate the toxic effects observed from exposure to a wide variety of harmful chemicals, this study investigated the ability of cigarette smoke to produce specific adducts on a peptide to gain insight into the likely effect on cellular proteins. We describe the modification of the epsilon-amino group of lysine contained in a test peptide with stable fluorescent adducts derived from monofunctional aldehydes occurring in cigarette smoke and malonaldehyde, a product of lipid peroxidation. Utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography, fluorescent measurements, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, the 1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarbaldehyde and 4-methyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarbaldehyde derivatives of lysine were identified as products of exposure to cigarette smoke extract and malonaldehyde. These data suggest that cigarette smoke may promote the modification of proteins, like those associated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and may contribute to smoking-related disease.

  8. SpxA1 Involved in Hydrogen Peroxide Production, Stress Tolerance and Endocarditis Virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Ge, Xiuchun; Wang, Xiaojing; Patel, Jenishkumar R.; Xu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is one of the most common agents of infective endocarditis. Spx proteins are a group of global regulators that negatively or positively control global transcription initiation. In this study, we characterized the spxA1 gene in S. sanguinis SK36. The spxA1 null mutant displayed opaque colony morphology, reduced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, and reduced antagonistic activity against Streptococcus mutans UA159 relative to the wild type strain. The ΔspxA1 mutant also demonstrated decreased tolerance to high temperature, acidic and oxidative stresses. Further analysis revealed that ΔspxA1 also exhibited a ∼5-fold reduction in competitiveness in an animal model of endocarditis. Microarray studies indicated that expression of several oxidative stress genes was downregulated in the ΔspxA1 mutant. The expression of spxB and nox was significantly decreased in the ΔspxA1 mutant compared with the wild type. These results indicate that spxA1 plays a major role in H2O2 production, stress tolerance and endocarditis virulence in S. sanguinis SK36. The second spx gene, spxA2, was also found in S. sanguinis SK36. The spxA2 null mutant was found to be defective for growth under normal conditions and showed sensitivity to high temperature, acidic and oxidative stresses. PMID:22768210

  9. Ferulic Acid Suppresses Amyloid β Production in the Human Lens Epithelial Cell Stimulated with Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Noriaki; Kotani, Sachiyo; Mano, Yu; Ueno, Akina; Ito, Yoshimasa; Kitaba, Toshio; Takata, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that oxidative stresses induce the production of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain, lens, and retina, leading to age-related diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ferulic acid on the Aβ levels in H2O2-stimulated human lens epithelial (HLE) SRA 01/04 cells. Three types of Aβ peptides (Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and Aβ1-43) were measured by ELISA, and the levels of mRNA for the expressed proteins related to Aβ production (APP, BACE1, and PS proteins) and degradation (ADAM10, NEP, and ECE1 proteins) were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. H2O2 stimulation augmented gene expression of the proteins related to Aβ production, resulting in the production of three types of Aβ peptides. Treatment with 0.1 μM ferulic acid attenuated the augmentations of gene expression and production of the proteins related to the secretion of three types of Aβ peptides in the H2O2-stimulated HLE cells. These results provided evidence of antioxidative functions of ferulic acid for lens epithelial cells. PMID:28409157

  10. Hydrogen peroxide efflux from muscle mitochondria underestimates matrix superoxide production: a correction using glutathione depletion

    PubMed Central

    TREBERG, Jason R.; QUINLAN, Casey L.; BRAND, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The production of H2O2 by isolated mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of mitochondrial superoxide formation. Matrix superoxide dismutase quantitatively converts matrix superoxide to H2O2. However, matrix enzymes such as the glutathione peroxidases can consume H2O2 and compete with efflux of H2O2, causing an underestimate of superoxide production. To assess this underestimate we depleted matrix glutathione in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria by more than 90% by pretreatment with 1-chloro-2,4-dintrobenzene (CDNB). The pretreatment protocol strongly diminished the mitochondrial capacity to consume exogenous H2O2, consistent with decreased peroxidase capacity, but avoided direct stimulation of superoxide production from complex I. It elevated the observed rates of H2O2 formation from matrix-directed superoxide up to two-fold from several sites of production, defined by substrates and electron transport inhibitors, over a wide range of control rates, from 0.2 to 2.5 nmol H2O2 • min−1 • mg protein−1. Similar results were obtained when glutathione was depleted using monochlorobimane or when soluble matrix peroxidase activity was removed by preparation of submitochondrial particles. The data indicate that the increased H2O2 efflux observed with CDNB pretreatment was a result of glutathione depletion and compromised peroxidase activity. A hyperbolic correction curve was constructed, making H2O2 efflux a more quantitative measure of matrix superoxide production. For rat muscle mitochondria, the correction equation was: [CDNB pretreated rate = control rate + (1.43*(control rate))/(0.55+control rate)]. These results have significant ramifications for the rates and topology of superoxide production by isolated mitochondria. PMID:20491900

  11. Long-term calorie restriction reduces proton leak and hydrogen peroxide production in liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Kevork; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Ram, Jesmon J; Humble, Stephen J; Weindruch, Richard; Ramsey, Jon J

    2005-04-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) without malnutrition increases maximal life span in diverse species. It has been proposed that reduction in energy expenditure and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production could be a mechanism for life span extension with CR. As a step toward testing this theory, mitochondrial proton leak, H2O2 production, and markers of oxidative stress were measured in liver from FBNF1 rats fed control or 40% CR diets for 12 or 18 mo. CR was initiated at 6 mo of age. Proton leak kinetics curves, generated from simultaneous measures of oxygen consumption and membrane potential, indicated a decrease in proton leak after 18 mo of CR, while only a trend toward a proton leak decrease was observed after 12 mo. Significant shifts in phosphorylation and substrate oxidation curves also occurred with CR; however, these changes occurred in concert with the proton leak changes. Metabolic control analysis indicated no difference in the overall pattern of control of the oxidative phosphorylation system between control and CR animals. At 12 mo, no significant differences were observed between groups for H2O2 production or markers of oxidative stress. However, at 18 mo, protein carbonyl content was lower in CR animals, as was H2O2 production when mitochondria were respiring on either succinate alone or pyruvate plus malate in the presence of rotenone. These results indicate that long-term CR lowers mitochondrial proton leak and H2O2 production, and this is consistent with the idea that CR may act by decreasing energy expenditure and ROS production.

  12. A biomass derived N/C-catalyst for the electrochemical production of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiran; He, Fei; Shen, Yanfei; Chen, Xinghua; Mei, Hao; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2017-09-16

    Pomelo peel, a waste biomass, was used as an all-in-one (carbon source, self-template, and heteroatom) precursor to develop a nanoporous N/C-electrocatalyst for highly selective and energy-saving H2O2 production, in which disordered carbonous defects and five-membered rings (pyrrolic-N) played vital roles.

  13. Endogenous hydrogen peroxide increases biofilm formation by inducing exopolysaccharide production in Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1

    PubMed Central

    Jang, In-Ae; Kim, Jisun; Park, Woojun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated differentially expressed proteins in Acinetobacter oleivorans cells during planktonic and biofilm growth by using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We focused on the role of oxidative stress resistance during biofilm formation using mutants defective in alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) because its production in aged biofilms was enhanced compared to that in planktonic cells. Results obtained using an ahpC promoter-gfp reporter vector showed that aged biofilms expressed higher ahpC levels than planktonic cells at 48 h. However, at 24 h, ahpC expression was higher in planktonic cells than in biofilms. Deletion of ahpC led to a severe growth defect in rich media that was not observed in minimal media and promoted early biofilm formation through increased production of exopolysaccharide (EPS) and EPS gene expression. Increased endogenous H2O2 production in the ahpC mutant in rich media enhanced biofilm formation, and this enhancement was not observed in the presence of antioxidants. Exogenous addition of H2O2 promoted biofilm formation in wild type cells, which suggested that biofilm development is linked to defense against H2O2. Collectively, our data showed that EPS production caused by H2O2 stress enhances biofilm formation in A. oleivorans. PMID:26884212

  14. Lipid peroxidation-derived aldehyde-protein adducts contribute to trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity via activation of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; König, Rolf; Ansari, G A S; Khan, M Firoze

    2008-04-01

    Lipid peroxidation is implicated in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. Lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) are highly reactive and bind to proteins, but their role in eliciting an autoimmune response and their contribution to disease pathogenesis remain unclear. To investigate the role of lipid peroxidation in the induction and/or exacerbation of autoimmune response, 6-week-old autoimmune-prone female MRL+/+ mice were treated for 4 weeks with trichloroethene (TCE; 10 mmol/kg, ip, once a week), an environmental contaminant known to induce lipid peroxidation. Sera from TCE-treated mice showed significant levels of antibodies against MDA-and HNE-adducted proteins along with antinuclear antibodies. This suggested that TCE exposure not only caused increased lipid peroxidation, but also accelerated autoimmune responses. Furthermore, stimulation of cultured splenic lymphocytes from both control and TCE-treated mice with MDA-adducted mouse serum albumin (MDA-MSA) or HNE-MSA for 72 h showed significant proliferation of CD4+ T cells in TCE-treated mice as analyzed by flow cytometry. Also, splenic lymphocytes from TCE-treated mice released more IL-2 and IFN-gamma into cultures when stimulated with MDA-MSA or HNE-MSA, suggesting a Th1 cell activation. Thus, our data suggest a role for lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes in TCE-mediated autoimmune responses and involvement of Th1 cell activation.

  15. LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) triggers hydrogen peroxide production by canine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Ballantyne, C; Smith, C W

    2000-07-01

    The respiratory burst of neutrophils stimulated by chemotactic factors is markedly augmented by Mac-1-dependent adhesion such as the interaction of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) with intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1; CD54) expressed on the surface of parenchymal cells (e.g., cardiac myocytes). In the current study, we evaluate the hypothesis that lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18) can also trigger the respiratory burst in neutrophils. To isolate LFA-1/ICAM-1 interactions from Mac-1/ ICAM-1 interactions, full-length chimeric ICAM-1 was developed and expressed in L cells with domains 1 and 2 from canine ICAM-1 and domains 3-5 from human ICAM-1 (C1,2;H3-5). We have shown that canine neutrophils do not bind to human ICAM-1. We demonstrated that chimeric ICAM-1 C1,2;H3-5 supported only LFA-1-dependent adhesion of canine neutrophils and that such adhesion triggered rapid onset of H2O2 production from canine neutrophils. The following seven experimental conditions distinguished LFA-1-dependent H2O2 production from Mac-1-dependent production: It did not require exogenous chemotactic stimulation; H2O2 release was more rapid, but the amount released was <40% of that mediated by Mac-1 adhesion; it was inhibited by anti-CD11a and anti-ICAM-1 antibodies; in contrast to that mediated by Mac-1, it was not inhibited by anti-CD11b antibody, neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF), or cytochalasin B or H7. Thus, canine neutrophils seem to be able to utilize two members of the beta2 integrin family to interact with ICAM-1 and signal H2O2 production, with LFA-1 at an early stage without prior chemotactic stimulation and Mac-1 at a later stage requiring chemotactic stimulation.

  16. Regulation of hydrogen peroxide production by brain mitochondria by calcium and Bax.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Polster, Brian M; Fiskum, Gary

    2002-10-01

    Abnormal accumulation of Ca2+ and exposure to pro-apoptotic proteins, such as Bax, is believed to stimulate mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and contribute to neural cell death during acute ischemic and traumatic brain injury, and in neurodegenerative diseases, e.g. Parkinson's disease. However, the mechanism by which Ca2+ or apoptotic proteins stimulate mitochondrial ROS production is unclear. We used a sensitive fluorescent probe to compare the effects of Ca2+ on H2O2 emission by isolated rat brain mitochondria in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP and Mg2+ and different respiratory substrates. In the absence of respiratory chain inhibitors, Ca2+ suppressed H2O2 generation and reduced the membrane potential of mitochondria oxidizing succinate, or glutamate plus malate. In the presence of the respiratory chain Complex I inhibitor rotenone, accumulation of Ca2+ stimulated H2O2 production by mitochondria oxidizing succinate, and this stimulation was associated with release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. In the presence of glutamate plus malate, or succinate, cytochrome c release and H2O2 formation were stimulated by human recombinant full-length Bax in the presence of a BH3 cell death domain peptide. These results indicate that in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, Ca2+ accumulation either inhibits or stimulates mitochondrial H2O2 production, depending on the respiratory substrate and the effect of Ca2+ on the mitochondrial membrane potential. Bax plus a BH3 domain peptide stimulate H2O2 production by brain mitochondria due to release of cytochrome c and this stimulation is insensitive to changes in membrane potential.

  17. Reactions connecting autoxidation with oxy radical production, lipid peroxidation, and cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive scheme of autoxidative cytotoxicity is presented. Clarification of the direct reactions of O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O with lipids and new evidence for copper-dependent catalysis of OH production is taken into account. The question is raised as to whether metal-independent reaction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ might be significant in vivo. Emphasis is placed on the likely modes of propagating cytotoxicity at a distance. (ACR)

  18. Quantification of the production of hydrogen peroxide H2O2 during accelerated wine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Héritier, Julien; Bach, Benoît; Schönenberger, Patrik; Gaillard, Vanessa; Ducruet, Julien; Segura, Jean-Manuel

    2016-11-15

    Understanding how wines react towards oxidation is of primary importance. Here, a novel approach was developed based on the quantitative determination of the key intermediate H2O2 produced during accelerated oxidation by ambient oxygen. The assay makes use of the conversion of the non-fluorescent Amplex Red substrate into a fluorescent product in presence of H2O2. The total production of H2O2 during 30min was quantified with low within-day and between-day variabilities. Polymerized pigments, but not total polyphenols, played a major role in the determination of H2O2 levels, which were lower in white wines than red wines. H2O2 amounts also increased with temperature and the addition of metal ions, but did not depend on the concentration of many other wine constituents such as SO2. H2O2 levels did not correlate with anti-oxidant properties. We believe that this novel methodology might be generically used to decipher the oxidation mechanisms in wines and food products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A photochemical microreactor used to analyze hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Gabi; Hess, Werner; Waite, Lee R; Balcavage, Walter X

    2005-01-01

    In this report we describe a new photochemical reactor and its use in the study of ultraviolet-B light (UVB) dependent H2O2 production by T lymphocytes. In the reactor multiple biological samples rotate around a luminescent tube and thus simultaneously absorb a uniform light-flux. The reactor was developed to expand our earlier studies where we showed that UVB activates T lymphocytes so that 10(7) cells produce about 60 nmol H2O2 per minute. H2O2 has increasingly become recognized as a cell signaling molecule regulating immune reactions mediated by T lymphocytes. Our laboratory is researching the potential of such immune regulators as potential future therapeutic agents. To study photochemical H2O2 production in small samples such as suspensions of T lymphocyte cultures or cell extracts, we designed a reactor in which 12 samples (each 50 - 500 microliters) can be exposed to light under temperature-controlled conditions. The samples are mounted on a rotating platform equidistant from the axis of rotation, where the light source of the photoreactor is located. Rotating the samples helps assure that all samples receive a uniform amount of light energy over time. A cooling fan is integrated in the base of the reactor to help minimize convective heat transfer between the lamp and the samples. We simultaneously operate two identical systems to be able to compare data that are obtained from light exposed samples under control and experimental conditions. Data on the influence of therapeutically relevant electromagnetic fields on H2O2 production of T lymphocytes are presented. H2O2 was quantified using the Amplex Red dye.

  20. Production of superoxide/hydrogen peroxide by the mitochondrial 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Renata L S; Bunik, Victoria I; Brand, Martin D

    2016-02-01

    In humans, mutations in dehydrogenase E1 and transketolase domain containing 1 (DHTKD1) are associated with neurological abnormalities and accumulation of 2-oxoadipate, 2-aminoadipate, and reactive oxygen species. The protein encoded by DHTKD1 has sequence and structural similarities to 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, and the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex can produce superoxide/H2O2 at high rates. The DHTKD1 enzyme is hypothesized to catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoadipate, a shared intermediate of the degradative pathways for tryptophan, lysine and hydroxylysine. Here, we show that rat skeletal muscle mitochondria can produce superoxide/H2O2 at high rates when given 2-oxoadipate. We identify the putative mitochondrial 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex as one of the sources and characterize the conditions that favor its superoxide/H2O2 production. Rates increased at higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratios and were higher at each NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio when 2-oxoadipate was present, showing that superoxide/H2O2 was produced during the forward reaction from 2-oxoadipate, but not in the reverse reaction from NADH in the absence of 2-oxoadipate. The maximum capacity of the 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex for production of superoxide/H2O2 is comparable to that of site IF of complex I, and seven, four and almost two-fold lower than the capacities of the 2-oxoglutarate, pyruvate and branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes, respectively. Regulation by ADP and ATP of H2O2 production driven by 2-oxoadipate was very different from that driven by 2-oxoglutarate, suggesting that site AF of the 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex is a new source of superoxide/H2O2 associated with the NADH isopotential pool in mitochondria.

  1. N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) prevents retinal degeneration by up-regulating reduced glutathione production and reversing lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Schimel, Andrew M; Abraham, Linu; Cox, Douglas; Sene, Abdoulaye; Kraus, Courtney; Dace, Dru S; Ercal, Nuran; Apte, Rajendra S

    2011-05-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in accelerating retinal pigment epithelial dysfunction and death in degenerative retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. Given the key role of oxidative stress-induced retinal pigment epithelial cell death and secondary photoreceptor loss in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration, we hypothesized that a novel thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), might ameliorate cellular damage and subsequent loss of vision. Treatment of human retinal pigment epithelial cells with NACA protected against oxidative stress-induced cellular injury and death. NACA acted mechanistically by scavenging existing reactive oxygen species while halting production of reactive oxygen species by reversing lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, NACA functioned by increasing the levels of reduced glutathione and the phase II detoxification enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Treatment of mice exposed to phototoxic doses of light with NACA maintained retinal pigment epithelial cell integrity and prevented outer nuclear layer cell death as examined by histopathologic methods and rescued photoreceptor function as measured by electroretinography. These observations indicate that NACA protects against oxidative stress-induced retinal pigment epithelial and photoreceptor cell death in vitro and in vivo. The data suggest that NACA may be a novel treatment in rescuing retinal function and preventing vision loss secondary to retinal degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. N-Acetylcysteine Amide (NACA) Prevents Retinal Degeneration by Up-Regulating Reduced Glutathione Production and Reversing Lipid Peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Schimel, Andrew M.; Abraham, Linu; Cox, Douglas; Sene, Abdoulaye; Kraus, Courtney; Dace, Dru S.; Ercal, Nuran; Apte, Rajendra S.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in accelerating retinal pigment epithelial dysfunction and death in degenerative retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. Given the key role of oxidative stress–induced retinal pigment epithelial cell death and secondary photoreceptor loss in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration, we hypothesized that a novel thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), might ameliorate cellular damage and subsequent loss of vision. Treatment of human retinal pigment epithelial cells with NACA protected against oxidative stress–induced cellular injury and death. NACA acted mechanistically by scavenging existing reactive oxygen species while halting production of reactive oxygen species by reversing lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, NACA functioned by increasing the levels of reduced glutathione and the phase II detoxification enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Treatment of mice exposed to phototoxic doses of light with NACA maintained retinal pigment epithelial cell integrity and prevented outer nuclear layer cell death as examined by histopathologic methods and rescued photoreceptor function as measured by electroretinography. These observations indicate that NACA protects against oxidative stress–induced retinal pigment epithelial and photoreceptor cell death in vitro and in vivo. The data suggest that NACA may be a novel treatment in rescuing retinal function and preventing vision loss secondary to retinal degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. PMID:21457933

  3. Enhancement of lipid production in Scenedesmus sp. by UV mutagenesis and hydrogen peroxide treatment.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Ramachandran; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2017-07-01

    The high potential UV mutagenized Scenedesmus sp. was obtained in which the cells had a higher biomass and lipid content than the wild type with an increase from 1.9 to 2.4g/L and from 40 to 55% of dry cell weight respectively after 12days. Oxidative stress imposed by H2O2 treatment decreased the biomass of both the wild type and the mutant. The H2O2 treated mutant when grown in BG11 medium showed an increase in biomass which was in contrast to a decreased biomass observed in the H2O2 treated wild type. A 3-fold increase in lipid yield of 1.63g/L was obtained in the oxidative stress-induced mutant compared to the wild type. Overall results indicate that prior treatment of UV-mutagenized Scenedesmus with oxidative stress can increase the total lipid production which, due to its derived methyl ester having acceptable biodiesel properties, can be potentially utilized for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Normotensive sepsis is associated with increased lipid peroxidation products in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, C.; Fox, G.; Neal, A.; Webb, C.; Rutledge, F.; Myers, M.; Sibbald, W. )

    1990-02-26

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the development of sepsis-induced multiple systems organ failure, possibly through biomembrane lipid perioxidation (BLP) which produces a loss of cell integrity and function. The authors examined the hypothesis that ROS activity contributes to non-pulmonary cell injury in hyperdynamic sepsis by measuring BLP products in skeletal muscle. The authors measured systemic flow (Q) by thermodilution and Q-gastrocnemius by the radioactive microsphere technique in 10 awake sheep, 48 hours following (i) the induction of hyperdynamic sepsis by cecal ligation and perforation or (ii) sham laparotomy. The animals were then anesthetized and biopsies from the gastrocnemius muscle were taken and flash frozen in liquid nitrogen for the determination of BLP products, which included conjugated dienes (CD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acid-soluble sulfhydryls (SH). At the 48 hours study, Q was increased in the septic compared to the sham group while mean BP and Q-gastrocnemius were not different between the groups. Both CD and SH were significantly increased in the septic group. It was concluded that normotensive sepsis in this animal model produces evidence of increased ROS mediated BLP in non-pulmonary organs distant from the site of inflammation.

  5. Optimization of media for detection of hydrogen peroxide production by Lactobacillus species.

    PubMed

    Rabe, L K; Hillier, S L

    2003-07-01

    A healthy vaginal ecosystem has been shown to be protective against the acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus and gonorrhea, and women who are colonized with H(2)O(2)-producing lactobacilli are more likely to maintain a normal vaginal flora than women with lactobacilli that do not produce H(2)O(2). The purpose of this study was to formulate a testing medium that better supports the growth and detection of H(2)O(2) by a broader range of lactobacilli than a published, widely used agar formulation (TMB). The new medium (TMB-Plus) consists of brucella agar base, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine, horseradish peroxidase, starch, vitamin K, hemin, magnesium sulfate, manganese sulfate, and horse serum. To validate the new formula, 256 vaginal isolates and ATCC strains were inoculated onto TMB-Plus and, for comparison, onto TMB. Growth was enhanced for 69% of the isolates on TMB-Plus, and 48% had enhanced color production. The percentage of H(2)O(2)-positive isolates increased from 71% on TMB to 79% on TMB-Plus. Formulations using Rogosa or MRS agar base in combination with peroxidase and a chromogen did not support the growth of all of the strains of Lactobacillus, and fewer H(2)O(2)-producing strains were detected on these formulations than on TMB-Plus. This new medium better supports the growth of a wider range of Lactobacillus strains isolated from the vagina and enhances the color production of H(2)O(2)-producing strains.

  6. Reinstate hydrogen peroxide as the product of alternative oxidase of plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bhate, Radha; Ramasarma, T

    2010-10-01

    Chill treatment of potato tubers for 8 days induced mitochondrial O2 consumption by cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase (AOX). About half of the total O2 consumption in such mitochondria was found to be sensitive to salicylhydroxamate (SHAM), a known inhibitor of AOX activity. Addition of catalase to the reaction mixture of AOX during the reaction decreased the rate of SHAM-sensitive O2 consumption by nearly half, and addition at the end of the reaction released half of the O2 consumed by AOX, both typical of catalase action on H2O2. This reaffirmed that the product of reduction of O2 by plant AOX was H2O2 as found earlier and not H2O as reported in some recent reviews.

  7. Overexpression of sweetpotato swpa4 peroxidase results in increased hydrogen peroxide production and enhances stress tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Cha Young; Song, Wan-Keun; Park, Doo-Sang; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Bang, Jae-Wook; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2008-03-01

    Plant peroxidases (POD) reduce hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the presence of an electron donor. Extracellular POD can also induce H(2)O(2) production and may perform a significant function in responses to environmental stresses via the regulation of H(2)O(2) in plants. We previously described the isolation of 10 POD cDNA clones from cell cultures of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas). Among them, the expression of the swpa4 gene was profoundly induced by a variety of abiotic stresses and pathogenic infections (Park et al. in Mol Gen Genome 269:542-552 2003; Jang et al. in Plant Physiol Biochem 42:451-455 2004). In the present study, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants overexpressing the swpa4 gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter were generated in order to assess the function of swpa4 in planta. The transgenic plants exhibited an approximately 50-fold higher POD specific activity than was observed in control plants. Both transient expression analysis with the swpa4-GFP fusion protein and POD activity assays in the apoplastic washing fluid revealed that the swpa4 protein is secreted into the apoplastic space. In addition, a significantly enhanced tolerance to a variety of abiotic and biotic stresses occurred in the transgenic plants. These plants harbored increased lignin and phenolic content, and H(2)O(2 )was also generated under normal conditions. Furthermore, they showed an increased expression level of a variety of apoplastic acidic pathogenesis-related (PR) genes following enhanced H(2)O(2) production. These results suggest that the expression of swpa4 in the apoplastic space may function as a positive defense signal in the H(2)O(2)-regulated stress response signaling pathway.

  8. Effect of Vitamin E and Zinc Supplementation on Energy Metabolites, Lipid Peroxidation, and Milk Production in Peripartum Sahiwal Cows

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, G.; Aggarwal, A.; Singh, A. K.; Kumar, M.; Upadhyay, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of vitamin E and zinc supplementation on energy metabolites, lipid peroxidation, and milk production in peripartum Sahiwal cows. For this, thirty-two pregnant dry Sahiwal cows were selected at sixty days prepartum and divided into four groups viz control, T1, T2, and T3 of eight each. Group T1 were supplemented with zinc at 60 ppm/d/cow, group T2 were supplemented with vitamin E at 1,000 IU/d/cow and group T3 were supplemented with combination of vitamin E at 1,000 IU/d/cow and zinc at 60 ppm/d/cow during d 60 prepartum to d 90 postpartum. Blood samples were collected on d −60, −45, −30, −15, −7, −3, 0, 3, 7, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 with respect to day of parturition and analysed for glucose, non esterified fatty acid, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance. Body condition score was maintained significantly better (p<0.05) in T3 than in the control, T1 and T2 groups. Overall glucose level was higher (p<0.05) in T3 than control, T1, and T2 groups. Levels of nonesterified fatty acid, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were lower (p<0.05) in T3 than control, T1, and T2 groups. Milk yield was higher (p<0.05) in T3 than control, T1, and T2 groups. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the supplementation of vitamin E and zinc in peripartum Sahiwal cows enhanced milk production by reducing negative energy balance. PMID:25049743

  9. Mechanistic study on ultrasound assisted pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse using metal salt with hydrogen peroxide for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Govindarajan; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the ultrasound assisted pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse (SCB) using metal salt with hydrogen peroxide for bioethanol production. Among the different metal salts used, maximum holocellulose recovery and delignification were achieved with ultrasound assisted titanium dioxide (TiO2) pretreatment (UATP) system. At optimum conditions (1% H2O2, 4 g SCB dosage, 60 min sonication time, 2:100 M ratio of metal salt and H2O2, 75°C, 50% ultrasound amplitude and 70% ultrasound duty cycle), 94.98 ± 1.11% holocellulose recovery and 78.72 ± 0.86% delignification were observed. The pretreated SCB was subjected to dilute acid hydrolysis using 0.25% H2SO4 and maximum xylose, glucose and arabinose concentration obtained were 10.94 ± 0.35 g/L, 14.86 ± 0.12 g/L and 2.52 ± 0.27 g/L, respectively. The inhibitors production was found to be very less (0.93 ± 0.11 g/L furfural and 0.76 ± 0.62 g/L acetic acid) and the maximum theoretical yield of glucose and hemicellulose conversion attained were 85.8% and 77%, respectively. The fermentation was carried out using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and at the end of 72 h, 0.468 g bioethanol/g holocellulose was achieved. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of pretreated SCB was made and its morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The compounds formed during the pretreatment were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ethylene mediates brassinosteroid-induced stomatal closure via Gα protein-activated hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide production in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chenyu; Qi, Cheng; Ren, Hongyan; Huang, Aixia; Hei, Shumei; She, Xiaoping

    2015-04-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential for plant growth and development; however, whether and how they promote stomatal closure is not fully clear. In this study, we report that 24-epibrassinolide (EBR), a bioactive BR, induces stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by triggering a signal transduction pathway including ethylene synthesis, the activation of Gα protein, and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) production. EBR initiated a marked rise in ethylene, H(2)O(2) and NO levels, necessary for stomatal closure in the wild type. These effects were abolished in mutant bri1-301, and EBR failed to close the stomata of gpa1 mutants. Next, we found that both ethylene and Gα mediate the inductive effects of EBR on H(2)O(2) and NO production. EBR-triggered H(2)O(2) and NO accumulation were canceled in the etr1 and gpa1 mutants, but were strengthened in the eto1-1 mutant and the cGα line (constitutively overexpressing the G protein α-subunit AtGPA1). Exogenously applied H(2)O(2) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) rescued the defects of etr1-3 and gpa1 or etr1 and gpa1 mutants in EBR-induced stomatal closure, whereas the stomata of eto1-1/AtrbohF and cGα/AtrbohF or eto1-1/nia1-2 and cGα/nia1-2 constructs had an analogous response to H(2)O(2) or SNP as those of AtrbohF or Nia1-2 mutants. Moreover, we provided evidence that Gα plays an important role in the responses of guard cells to ethylene. Gα activator CTX largely restored the lesion of the etr1-3 mutant, but ethylene precursor ACC failed to rescue the defects of gpa1 mutants in EBR-induced stomatal closure. Lastly, we demonstrated that Gα-activated H(2)O(2) production is required for NO synthesis. EBR failed to induce NO synthesis in mutant AtrbohF, but it led to H(2)O(2) production in mutant Nia1-2. Exogenously applied SNP rescued the defect of AtrbohF in EBR-induced stomatal closure, but H(2)O(2) did not reverse the lesion of EBR-induced stomatal closure in Nia1-2. Together, our

  11. Assessing the genotoxic effects of two lipid peroxidation products (4-oxo-2-nonenal and 4-hydroxy-hexenal) in haemocytes and midgut cells of Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Demir, Eşref; Marcos, Ricard

    2017-03-22

    Lipid peroxidation products can induce tissue damage and are implicated in diverse pathological conditions, including aging, atherosclerosis, brain disorders, cancer, lung and various liver disorders. Since in vivo studies produce relevant information, we have selected Drosophila melanogaster as a suitable in vivo model to characterise the potential risks associated to two lipid peroxidation products namely 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE) and 4-hydroxy-hexenal (4-HHE). Toxicity, intracellular reactive oxygen species production, and genotoxicity were the end-points evaluated. Haemocytes and midgut cells were the evaluated targets. Results showed that both compounds penetrate the intestine of the larvae, affecting midgut cells, and reaching haemocytes. Significant genotoxic effects, as determined by the comet assay, were observed in both selected cell targets in a concentration/time dependent manner. This study highlights the importance of D. melanogaster as a model organism in the study of the different biological effects caused by lipid peroxidation products entering via ingestion. This is the first study reporting genotoxicity data in haemocytes and midgut cells of D. melanogaster larvae for the two selected compounds.

  12. Physical stability and resistance to peroxidation of a range of liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule products on extreme long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Bowtle, William; Kanyowa, Lionel; Mackenzie, Mark; Higgins, Paul

    2011-06-01

    The industrial take-up of liquid-fill hard capsule technology is limited in part by lack of published long-term physical and chemical stability data which demonstrate the robustness of the system. To assess the effects of extreme long-term storage on liquid-fill capsule product quality and integrity, with respect to both the capsules per se and a standard blister-pack type (foil-film blister). Fourteen sets of stored peroxidation-sensitive liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule product samples, originating ~20 years from the current study, were examined with respect to physical and selected chemical properties, together with microbiological evaluation. All sets retained physical integrity of capsules and blister-packs. Capsules were free of leaks, gelatin cross-linking, and microbiological growth. Eight samples met a limit (anisidine value, 20) commonly used as an index of peroxidation for lipid-based products with shelf lives of 2-3 years. Foil-film blister-packs using PVC or PVC-PVdC as the thermoforming film were well-suited packaging components for the liquid-fill capsule format. The study confirms the long-term physical robustness of the liquid-fill hard capsule format, together with its manufacturing and banding processes. It also indicates that various peroxidation-sensitive products using the capsule format may be maintained satisfactorily over very prolonged storage periods.

  13. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  14. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  19. Quantification of DNA damage products resulting from deamination, oxidation and reaction with products of lipid peroxidation by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeh, Koli; McFaline, Jose L.; Pang, Bo; Sullivan, Matthew; Dong, Min; Plummer, Elaine; Dedon, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of damage products as biomarkers of inflammation has been hampered by a poor understanding of the chemical biology of inflammation, the lack of sensitive analytical methods, and a focus on single chemicals as surrogates for inflammation. To overcome these problems, we developed a general and sensitive liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) method to quantify, in a single DNA sample, the nucleoside forms of seven DNA lesions reflecting the range of chemistries associated with inflammation: 2′-deoxyuridine, 2′-deoxyxanthosine, and 2′-deoxyinosine from nitrosative deamination; 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine from oxidation; and 1,N2-etheno-2′-deoxyguanosine, 1,N6-etheno-2′-deoxyadenosine, and 3,N4-etheno-2′-deoxycytidine arising from reaction of DNA with lipid peroxidation products. Using DNA purified from cells or tissues under conditions that minimize artifacts, individual nucleosides are purified by HPLC and quantified by isotope-dilution, electrospray ionization LC/MS-MS. The method can be applied to other DNA damage products and requires 4-6 days to complete depending upon the number of samples. PMID:18714297

  20. [Interrelation between the composition of lipids and products of their peroxidation and the secretion of ligninolytic enzymes during growth of Lentinus (Panus) tigrinus].

    PubMed

    Kadimaliev, D A; Nadezhina, O S; Atykian, N A; Revin, V V; Samuilov, V D

    2006-01-01

    Lipid composition, intracellular products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), and the activities of extracellular enzymes were studied during submerged cultivation of the xylotrophic fungus Lentinus (Panus) tigrinus VKM F-3616D. The maximum secretion of ligninolytic enzymes during the phase of active mycelium growth correlated with increased content of readily oxidized phospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids and with low content of the LPO products. In the idiophase, which was characterized by lower excretion of extracellular ligninolytic enzymes, the content of more stable phospholipids, saturated fatty acids, and LPO products increased. A relationship between the composition of mycelial lipids and the secretion of ligninolytic enzymes was revealed.

  1. Degradation of trichloroethene by siderite-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide and persulfate: Investigation of reaction mechanisms and degradation products.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ni; Liu, Fei; Xue, Qiang; Brusseau, Mark L; Liu, Yali; Wang, Junjie

    2015-08-15

    A binary catalytic system, siderite-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) coupled with persulfate (S2O8(2-)), was investigated for the remediation of trichloroethene (TCE) contamination. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate reaction mechanisms, oxidant decomposition rates, and degradation products. By using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we identified four radicals (hydroxyl (HO·), sulfate (SO4(-)·), hydroperoxyl (HO2·), and superoxide (O2(-)·)) in the siderite-catalyzed H2O2-S2O8(2-) system. In the absence of S2O8(2-) (i.e., siderite-catalyzed H2O2), a majority of H2O2 was decomposed in the first hour of the experiment, resulting in the waste of HO·. The addition of S2O8(2-) moderated the H2O2 decomposition rate, producing a more sustainable release of hydroxyl radicals that improved the treatment efficiency. Furthermore, the heat released by H2O2 decomposition accelerated the activation of S2O8(2-), and the resultant SO4(-)· was the primary oxidative agent during the first two hours of the reaction. Dichloroacetic acid was firstly detected by ion chromatography (IC). The results of this study indicate a new insight to the reaction mechanism for the catalytic binary H2O2-S2O8(2-) oxidant system, and the delineation of radicals and the discovery of the chlorinated byproduct provide useful information for efficient treatment of chlorinated-solvent contamination in groundwater.

  2. Inhibition and Dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms by Combination Treatment with Escapin Intermediate Products and Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Marwa N. A.; Wang, Shu-Lin; Damera, Krishna; Wang, Binghe; Tai, Phang C.; Derby, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Escapin is an l-amino acid oxidase that acts on lysine to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ammonia, and equilibrium mixtures of several organic acids collectively called escapin intermediate products (EIP). Previous work showed that the combination of synthetic EIP and H2O2 functions synergistically as an antimicrobial toward diverse planktonic bacteria. We initiated the present study to investigate how the combination of EIP and H2O2 affected bacterial biofilms, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a model. Specifically, we examined concentrations of EIP and H2O2 that inhibited biofilm formation or fostered disruption of established biofilms. High-throughput assays of biofilm formation using microtiter plates and crystal violet staining showed a significant effect from pairing EIP and H2O2, resulting in inhibition of biofilm formation relative to biofilm formation in untreated controls or with EIP or H2O2 alone. Similarly, flow cell analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the EIP and H2O2 combination reduced the biomass of established biofilms relative to that of the controls. Area layer analysis of biofilms posttreatment indicated that disruption of biomass occurs down to the substratum. Only nanomolar to micromolar concentrations of EIP and H2O2 were required to impact biofilm formation or disruption, and these concentrations are significantly lower than those causing bactericidal effects on planktonic bacteria. Micromolar concentrations of EIP and H2O2 combined enhanced P. aeruginosa swimming motility compared to the effect of either EIP or H2O2 alone. Collectively, our results suggest that the combination of EIP and H2O2 may affect biofilms by interfering with bacterial attachment and destabilizing the biofilm matrix. PMID:27401562

  3. Degradation of trichloroethene by siderite-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide and persulfate: Investigation of reaction mechanisms and degradation products

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ni; Liu, Fei; Xue, Qiang; Brusseau, Mark L.; Liu, Yali; Wang, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    A binary catalytic system, siderite-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) coupled with persulfate (S2O82−), was investigated for the remediation of trichloroethene (TCE) contamination. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate reaction mechanisms, oxidant decomposition rates, and degradation products. By using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we identified four radicals (hydroxyl (HO·), sulfate (SO4−·), hydroperoxyl (HO2·), and superoxide (O2−·)) in the siderite-catalyzed H2O2-S2O82− system. In the absence of S2O82− (i.e., siderite-catalyzed H2O2), a majority of H2O2 was decomposed in the first hour of the experiment, resulting in the waste of HO·. The addition of S2O82− moderated the H2O2 decomposition rate, producing a more sustainable release of hydroxyl radicals that improved the treatment efficiency. Furthermore, the heat released by H2O2 decomposition accelerated the activation of S2O82−, and the resultant SO4−· was the primary oxidative agent during the first two hours of the reaction. Dichloroacetic acid was firstly detected by ion chromatography (IC). The results of this study indicate a new insight to the reaction mechanism for the catalytic binary H2O2-S2O82− oxidant system, and the delineation of radicals and the discovery of the chlorinated byproduct provide useful information for efficient treatment of chlorinated-solvent contamination in groundwater. PMID:26236152

  4. Involvement of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehyde-protein adducts in autoimmunity mediated by trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Ansari, G A S; Khan, M Firoze

    2007-12-01

    Lipid peroxidation, a major contributor to cellular damage, is also implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases (AD). The focus of this study was to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes in autoimmunity induced and/or exacerbated by chemical exposure. Previous studies showed that trichloroethene (TCE) is capable of inducing/accelerating autoimmunity. To test whether TCE-induced lipid peroxidation might be involved in the induction/exacerbation of autoimmune responses, groups of autoimmune-prone female MRL +/+ mice were treated with TCE (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day) for 6 or 12 wk. Significant increases of the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA)- and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-protein adducts were found in the livers of TCE-treated mice at both 6 and 12 wk, but the response was greater at 12 wk. Further characterization of these adducts in liver microsomes showed increased formation of MDA-protein adducts with molecular masses of 86, 65, 56, 44, and 32 kD, and of HNE-protein adducts with molecular masses of 87, 79, 46, and 17 kD in TCE-treated mice. In addition, significant induction of anti-MDA- and anti-HNE-protein adduct-specific antibodies was observed in the sera of TCE-treated mice, and showed a pattern similar to MDA- or HNE-protein adducts. The increases in anti-MDA- and anti-HNE-protein adduct antibodies were associated with significant elevation in serum anti-nuclear-, anti-ssDNA- and anti-dsDNA-antibodies at 6 wk and, to a greater extent, at 12 wk. These studies suggest that TCE-induced lipid peroxidation is associated with induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response in MRL+/+ mice, and thus may play an important role in disease pathogenesis. Further interventional studies are needed to establish a causal relationship between lipid peroxidation and TCE-induced autoimmune response.

  5. Signaling properties of 4-hydroxyalkenals formed by lipid peroxidation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Guy; Riahi, Yael; Sunda, Valentina; Deplano, Simone; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Ferreri, Carla; Kaiser, Nurit; Sasson, Shlomo

    2013-12-01

    Peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids is intensified in cells subjected to oxidative stress and results in the generation of various bioactive compounds, of which 4-hydroxyalkenals are prominent. During the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the ensuing hyperglycemia promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to the development of diabetic complications. It has been suggested that ROS-induced lipid peroxidation and the resulting 4-hydroxyalkenals markedly contribute to the development and progression of these pathologies. Recent findings, however, also suggest that noncytotoxic levels of 4-hydroxyalkenals play important signaling functions in the early phase of diabetes and act as hormetic factors to induce adaptive and protective responses in cells, enabling them to function in the hyperglycemic milieu. Our studies and others' have proposed such regulatory functions for 4-hydroxynonenal and 4-hydroxydodecadienal in insulin secreting β-cells and vascular endothelial cells, respectively. This review presents and discusses the mechanisms regulating the generation of 4-hydroxyalkenals under high glucose conditions and the molecular interactions underlying the reciprocal transition from hormetic to cytotoxic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lipid peroxidation of fish oils.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Angela; Prabhu, H Ramachandra

    2006-03-01

    Fish and fish oils are the richest sources of ω-3 fatty acids. However, they are susceptible to lipid peroxidation due to their high degree of unsaturation. In the present study, the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive material in various fish oils available in the market with and without added Vitamin E was determined. The peroxide levels in fish oil heated to food frying temperature of 180°C and the effect of addition of vitamin E has also been studied. The results indicate that the peroxide levels in almost all the products available in the market were abnormally high irrespective of their Vitamin E content. This might be due to the inefficient methods used for processing and storage of fish oils. Addition of vitamin E was found to have a significant effect in lowering the rate of peroxidation of fish oil during thermal stress, showing that association of antioxidants with ω-3 fatty acids lowers the rate of lipid peroxidation.

  7. Effect of Danofloxacin on Reactive Oxygen Species Production, Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities in Kidney Tubular Epithelial Cell Line, LLC-PK1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Hong; Liu, Zhao-Ying; Sun, Lei-Sheng; Li, Yu-Juan; Zhang, Da-Sheng; Pan, Ren-Tao; Sun, Zhi-Liang

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility that oxidative stress was involved in danofloxacin-induced toxicity in renal tubular cells epithelial cell line (LLC-PK1). Confluent LLC-PK1 cells were incubated with various concentrations of danofloxacin. The extent of oxidative damage was assessed by measuring the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, lipid peroxidation, cell apoptosis and antioxidative enzyme activities. Danofloxacin induced a concentration-dependent increase in the ROS production, not even cytotoxic conditions. Similarly, danofloxacin caused an about 4 times increase in the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances at the concentration of 400 μM for 24 hr, but it did not induce cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Antioxidant enzymes activities, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), were increased after treatment with 100, 200 and 400 μM of danofloxacin for 24 hr. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) was significantly decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, ROS production, lipid peroxidation and GPX decline were inhibited by additional glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine. These data suggested that danofloxacin could not induce oxidative stress in LLC-PK1 cells at the concentration (≤400 μM) for 24 hr. The increase levels of ROS and lipid peroxidation could be partly abated by the increase activities of SOD and CAT. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Promethazine inhibits the formation of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation but not covalent binding resulting from the exposure of rat liver fractions to CCl4.

    PubMed Central

    Poli, G; Cheeseman, K H; Biasi, F; Chiarpotto, E; Dianzani, M U; Esterbauer, H; Slater, T F

    1989-01-01

    Promethazine is known to have protective activity in relation to CCl4-induced liver necrosis. This hepatoprotective property has been investigated with regard to the free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties of promethazine using isolated hepatocytes and microsomal suspensions. CCl4 is activated in both systems to free radical metabolites that bind covalently to lipid and protein, and initiate lipid peroxidation. A large number of carbonyl products is produced during CCl4-induced lipid peroxidation; promethazine strongly inhibits the production of all classes of carbonyl compounds in both microsomal suspensions and isolated hepatocytes. In contrast, promethazine is a very weak inhibitor of the covalent binding of metabolites of CCl4. We conclude that promethazine acts by scavenging the trichloromethylperoxyl radical and lipid peroxyl radicals, and is a weak scavenger of the trichloromethyl radical. These data, when considered together with the hepatoprotective effects of promethazine, suggest that lipid peroxidation is of relatively more importance than covalent binding in the pathogenesis of CCl4-induced liver necrosis. PMID:2604730

  9. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells by the norsesterterpene peroxide, epimuqubilin A.

    PubMed

    Cheenpracha, Sarot; Park, Eun-Jung; Rostama, Bahman; Pezzuto, John M; Chang, Leng Chee

    2010-03-01

    Seven norsesterterpene peroxides: epimuqubilin A (1), muqubilone B (2), unnamed cyclic peroxide ester (3), epimuqubilin B (4), sigmosceptrellin A methyl ester (5), sigmosceptrellin A (6), and sigmosceptrellin B methyl ester (7), isolated from the marine sponge Latrunculia sp., were examined with regard to their effects on nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. The results indicated epimuqubilin A (1) possessed potent NO inhibitory activity against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide release with an IC(50) value of 7.4 microM, a level three times greater than the positive control, L-N(G)-monomethyl arginine citrate, followed by 6 (sigmosceptrellin A, IC(50) = 9.9 microM), whereas other compounds exhibited only modest activity (Table 1). These compounds did not show appreciable cytotoxicity at their IC(50) values for NO-inhibitory activity. The structure-activity upon NO inhibition could be summarized as follows: (1) a monocyclic carbon skeleton framework was essential for activity, (2) free acids gave higher activity, (3) the orientation of H3-22 with an equatorial position increased activity, and (4) a bicyclic structure reduced activity. This is the first report of a norsesterterpene peroxide with NO-inhibitory activity. In addition, compounds 1-7 were also evaluated for their inhibitory activities in the yeast glycogen synthase kinase-3beta assay. In summary, several norsesterterpene peroxides showed novel biological activities of inhibition in NO production, suggesting that these might provide leads for anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive agents.

  10. Inhibition of Nitric Oxide (NO) Production in Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Activated Murine Macrophage RAW 264.7 Cells by the Norsesterterpene Peroxide, Epimuqubilin A

    PubMed Central

    Cheenpracha, Sarot; Park, Eun-Jung; Rostama, Bahman; Pezzuto, John M.; Chang, Leng Chee

    2010-01-01

    Seven norsesterterpene peroxides: epimuqubilin A (1), muqubilone B (2), unnamed cyclic peroxide ester (3), epimuqubilin B (4), sigmosceptrellin A methyl ester (5), sigmosceptrellin A (6), and sigmosceptrellin B methyl ester (7), isolated from the marine sponge Latrunculia sp., were examined with regard to their effects on nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. The results indicated epimuqubilin A (1) possessed potent NO inhibitory activity against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide release with an IC50 value of 7.4 μM, a level three times greater than the positive control, L-NG-monomethyl arginine citrate, followed by 6 (sigmosceptrellin A, IC50 = 9.9 μM), whereas other compounds exhibited only modest activity (Table 1). These compounds did not show appreciable cytotoxicity at their IC50 values for NO–inhibitory activity. The structure–activity upon NO inhibition could be summarized as follows: (1) a monocyclic carbon skeleton framework was essential for activity, (2) free acids gave higher activity, (3) the orientation of H3-22 with an equatorial position increased activity, and (4) a bicyclic structure reduced activity. This is the first report of a norsesterterpene peroxide with NO–inhibitory activity. In addition, compounds 1–7 were also evaluated for their inhibitory activities in the yeast glycogen synthase kinase-3β assay. In summary, several norsesterterpene peroxides showed novel biological activities of inhibition in NO production, suggesting that these might provide leads for anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:20411107

  11. Separation and characterization of the aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation stimulated by carbon tetrachloride or ADP-iron in isolated rat hepatocytes and rat liver microsomal suspensions.

    PubMed Central

    Poli, G; Dianzani, M U; Cheeseman, K H; Slater, T F; Lang, J; Esterbauer, H

    1985-01-01

    Carbonyl products were separated and identified in suspensions of rat liver microsomal fractions and in isolated hepatocytes, after stimulation of lipid peroxidation by incubation with the pro-oxidants CCl4 and ADP-iron. The carbonyl products were allowed to react with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, and the derivatives were extracted and separated by t.l.c. into three zones of non-polar materials, and one fraction of polar derivatives that remained at the origin. Separation of the individual non-polar hydrazones in each zone by h.p.l.c. demonstrated that zone I prepared from microsomal fraction or hepatocytes incubated with CCl4 or ADP-iron contained mainly 4-hydroxyhex-2-enal, 4-hydroxynon-2-enal and 4-hydroxynona-2,5-dienal. Zone III consisted mainly of the alkanals propanal, pentanal and hexanal, the 2-alkenals propenal, pent-2-enal, hex-2-enal, hept-2-enal, oct-2-enal and non-2-enal, the ketones butanone, pentan-2-one and pentan-3-one, and deca-2,4-dienal. Incubation of a microsomal fraction with ADP-iron was much more effective in producing malonaldehyde and other carbonyl products than an incubation with CCl4. Despite such quantitative differences, there were no obvious qualitative differences in the h.p.l.c. spectra obtained from zones I and III. However, the stoichiometric evaluation of fatty acid loss and the production of malonaldehyde and other carbonyls suggests that the pathways of lipid peroxidation triggered by CCl4 and ADP-iron are different. The accumulation of carbonyl products of lipid peroxidation in isolated hepatocytes is strongly affected by their metabolism; in particular, 4-hydroxyalkenals were found to be metabolized very rapidly. Nonetheless, both CCl4 and ADP-iron produced stimulation in the production of malonaldehyde and non-polar carbonyl production. After incubation of rat hepatocytes with CCl4 or ADP-iron it was found that approx. 50% of the total amount of non-polar carbonyls produced during incubation escaped into the external medium

  12. Separation and characterization of the aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation stimulated by carbon tetrachloride or ADP-iron in isolated rat hepatocytes and rat liver microsomal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Poli, G; Dianzani, M U; Cheeseman, K H; Slater, T F; Lang, J; Esterbauer, H

    1985-04-15

    Carbonyl products were separated and identified in suspensions of rat liver microsomal fractions and in isolated hepatocytes, after stimulation of lipid peroxidation by incubation with the pro-oxidants CCl4 and ADP-iron. The carbonyl products were allowed to react with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, and the derivatives were extracted and separated by t.l.c. into three zones of non-polar materials, and one fraction of polar derivatives that remained at the origin. Separation of the individual non-polar hydrazones in each zone by h.p.l.c. demonstrated that zone I prepared from microsomal fraction or hepatocytes incubated with CCl4 or ADP-iron contained mainly 4-hydroxyhex-2-enal, 4-hydroxynon-2-enal and 4-hydroxynona-2,5-dienal. Zone III consisted mainly of the alkanals propanal, pentanal and hexanal, the 2-alkenals propenal, pent-2-enal, hex-2-enal, hept-2-enal, oct-2-enal and non-2-enal, the ketones butanone, pentan-2-one and pentan-3-one, and deca-2,4-dienal. Incubation of a microsomal fraction with ADP-iron was much more effective in producing malonaldehyde and other carbonyl products than an incubation with CCl4. Despite such quantitative differences, there were no obvious qualitative differences in the h.p.l.c. spectra obtained from zones I and III. However, the stoichiometric evaluation of fatty acid loss and the production of malonaldehyde and other carbonyls suggests that the pathways of lipid peroxidation triggered by CCl4 and ADP-iron are different. The accumulation of carbonyl products of lipid peroxidation in isolated hepatocytes is strongly affected by their metabolism; in particular, 4-hydroxyalkenals were found to be metabolized very rapidly. Nonetheless, both CCl4 and ADP-iron produced stimulation in the production of malonaldehyde and non-polar carbonyl production. After incubation of rat hepatocytes with CCl4 or ADP-iron it was found that approx. 50% of the total amount of non-polar carbonyls produced during incubation escaped into the external medium

  13. Action of UV-A and blue light on enzymes activity and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products in attached and detached frog retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapina, Victoria A.; Doutsov, Alexander E.

    1994-07-01

    The effect of the UV-A and blue light on the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and activities of succinate dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase in the retina was examined in eye cup model of dark and light adapted frogs R. temporaria. Retinas were exposed to UV-A radiation (8 mW/cm2) and blue light (10 to 150 mW/cm2) for periods from 5 min to 1 hr. We have measured TBA-active products both in the retina homogenates and in the reaction media. Enzyme activities was measured in the retina homogenates only. The measurements revealed a significant increase in the endogenous and exogenous forms of lipid peroxidation products in the retina of dark adapted frog (1.6+/- 0.4; 1.4+/- 0.3 nmole TBA-active products per mg protein, respectively) compared to light adapted (0.85+/- 0.16; 0.32+/- 0.06 nmole TBA-active products per mg protein, respectively). In the same conditions succinate dehydrogenase activity was decline more than 50% but superoxide dismutase activity didn't decrease. Disorganized inner and outer segments were observed after 40 min exposures. No light microscopic changes were detected after 5 min exposures. Light damage was significantly higher in the retina of dark adapted frog. The results indicate that the retina from eye cup of dark adapted frog is more susceptible to UV-A and blue light damages.

  14. The elucidation and quantification of the decomposition products of sodium dithionite and the detection of peroxide vapors with thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Travis Houston

    Sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4) is an oxidizable sulfur oxyanion often employed as a reducing agent in environmental and synthetic chemistry. When exposed to the atmosphere, dithionite degrades through a series of decomposition reactions to form a number of compounds, with the primary two being bisulfite (HSO32-) and thiosulfate (S 2O32-). Ten samples of sodium dithionite ranging from brand new to nearly fifty years old were analyzed using ion chromatography; from this, a new quantification method for dithionite and thiosulfate was achieved and statistically validated against the current three iodometric titration method used industrially. Additional sample analysis with Raman spectroscopy of solid and dissolved samples identified unique compounds in the oldest samples, including dithionate (S2O6 2-) and tetrathionate (S4O62-). Additionally, titania nanoparticles in a hydroxypropyl cellulose matrix were used to prepare films on polycarbonate slides and coatings on cellulose papers. The exposure of these materials to hydrogen peroxide gas led to the development of an intense yellow color. Using an inexpensive web camera and a tungsten lamp to measure the reflected light, first-order behavior in the color change was observed when exposed to peroxide vapor of less than 50 ppm. For 50 mass percent titania nanoparticles in hydroxypropyl cellulose films on polycarbonate, the detection limit was estimated to be 90 ppm after a 1-minute measurement and 1.5 ppm after a 1-hour integration. The coatings on the filter paper had a threefold higher sensitivity compared to the films, with a detection limit of 5.4 ppm peroxide for a 1-minute measurement and 0.09 ppm peroxide for a 1-hour integration period. Further experimentation with the effects of acid loading on the filter paper coatings identified these as possible sensors for organic peroxides. With the addition of sulfuric acid, the support was changed from cellulose to glass microfiber or silica. This coatings showing increased

  15. Folic acid protects against lead acetate-induced hepatotoxicity by decreasing NF-κB, IL-1β production and lipid peroxidation mediataed cell injury.

    PubMed

    Abd Allah, Eman S H; Badary, Dalia M

    2017-03-01

    Folic acid plays an important role in cellular metabolic activities. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of folic acid against lead acetate-induced hepatotoxicity. Twenty four male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four groups, six animals each. Negative control group received the vehicle, positive control group received 1mg/kg folic acid for five consecutive days/week for 4 weeks orally, lead-exposed group received 10mg/kg lead acetate intraperitoneally (IP) for five consecutive days/week for 4 weeks, and lead-treated group received 10mg/kg lead acetate IP and 1mg/kg folic acid orally for five consecutive days/week for 4 weeks concurrently. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and γ- glutamyltransferase (GGT) were measured. Hepatic total peroxide and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were also investigated. Histopathological studies using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and periodic acid shiff's (PAS) were carried out. The expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Serum AST, ALT and GGT and hepatic total peroxide and IL-1β were significantly increased in lead-exposed group and were positively correlated with hepatic lead level. Moreover, lead-exposed rats showed hydropic degeneration, nuclear vesiculation, high lymphocytic infiltration, depletion of glycogen content and NF-κB expression. Concomitant folic acid administration resulted in a significant alleviation of biochemical and structural alteration-induced by lead. This was associated with reduction of hepatic total peroxide and IL-1β and reduction of NF-κB expression. In conclusion, folic acid protects against lead acetate-induced hepatotoxicity by decreasing NF-κB, IL-1β production and lipid peroxidation mediataed cell injury.

  16. Investigation of the formation of benzoyl peroxide, benzoic anhydride, and other potential aerosol products from gas-phase reactions of benzoylperoxy radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strollo, Christen M.; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products of the reaction of benzaldehyde with Cl atoms and with OH radicals in air in the absence of NOx were investigated in an environmental chamber in order to better understand the possible role of organic peroxy radical self-reactions in SOA formation. SOA products and authentic standards were analyzed using mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography, and results show that the yields of benzoyl peroxide (C6H5C(O)OO(O)CC6H5) and benzoic anhydride (C6H5C(O)O(O)CC6H5), two potential products from the gas-phase self-reaction of benzoylperoxy radicals (C6H5C(O)OO·), were less than 0.1%. This is in contrast to results of recent studies that have shown that the gas-phase self-reactions of β-nitrooxyperoxy radicals formed from reactions of isoprene with NO3 radicals form dialkyl peroxides that contribute significantly to gas-phase and SOA products. Such reactions have also been proposed to explain the gas-phase formation of extremely low volatility dimers from autooxidation of terpenes. The results obtained here indicate that, at least for benzoylperoxy radicals, the self-reactions form only benzoyloxy radicals. Analyses of SOA composition and volatility were inconclusive, but it appears that the SOA may consist primarily of oligomers formed through heterogeneous/multiphase reactions possibly involving some combination of phenol, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, and peroxybenzoic acid.

  17. Production of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical in potato tuber during the necrotrophic phase of hemibiotrophic pathogen Phytophthora infestans infection.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2012-12-05

    In this study, evidence is provided on the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and hydroxyl radical (HO) in the potato tuber during the necrotrophic phase of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Phytophthora infestans infection. Using 3,3-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB) imaging technique, the formation of H(2)O(2) was demonstrated in P. infestans-infected potato tuber. For the first time, HO formation was demonstrated in P. infestans-infected potato tuber using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. An enhancement in spontaneous ultra-weak photon emission indicated the extent of lipid peroxidation in the P. infestans-infected potato tuber. The data presented in this study reveal that the formation of H(2)O(2) and HO in the P. infestans-infected potato tuber is associated with lipid peroxidation. It is proposed here that the ultra-weak photon emission can be used as a non-invasive indicator of the oxidative processes in the quality control at food industry.

  18. Stereochemistry of Reaction Involving Cyclic Peroxides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-25

    peroxides are formed. For example, squalene absorbs two moles of oxygen upon autoxidation and one of these oxygen molecules is incorporated as a...peroxide, rather than a hydroperoxide group. Although no rigorous structure proof was offered for the squalene oxidation product, it seem likely on the basis...of subsequent work that the principal product of squalene autoxidation is one of the cyclic peroxides (1 or 2) formed by the mechanism described

  19. Deferoxamine attenuates lipid peroxidation, blocks interleukin-6 production, ameliorates sepsis inflammatory response syndrome, and confers renoprotection after acute hepatic ischemia in pigs.

    PubMed

    Vlahakos, Demetrios; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Siasiakou, Sofia; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Degiannis, Dimitrios; Demonakou, Maria; Smyrniotis, Vassilios

    2012-04-01

    We have previously shown that deferoxamine (DFO) infusion protected myocardium against reperfusion injury in patients undergoing open heart surgery, and reduced brain edema, intracranial pressure, and lung injury in pigs with acute hepatic ischemia (AHI). The purpose of this research was to study if DFO could attenuate sepsis inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and confer renoprotection in the same model of AHI in anesthetized pigs. Fourteen animals were randomly allocated to two groups. In the Group DFO (n=7), 150mg/kg of DFO dissolved in normal saline was continuously infused in animals undergoing hepatic devascularization and portacaval anastomosis. The control group (Group C, n=7) underwent the same surgical procedure and received the same volume of normal saline infusion. Animals were euthanized after 24h. Hematological, biochemical parameters, malondialdehyde (MDA), and cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α) were determined from sera obtained at baseline, at 12h, and after euthanasia. Hematoxylin-eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling were used to evaluate necrosis and apoptosis, respectively, in kidney sections obtained after euthanasia. A rapid and substantial elevation (more than 100-fold) of serum IL-6 levels was observed in Group C reaching peak at the end of the experiment, associated with increased production of oxygen free radicals and lipid peroxidation (MDA 3.2±0.1nmol/mL at baseline and 5.5±0.9nmol/mL at the end of the experiment, P<0.05) and various manifestations of SIRS and multiple organ dysfunction (MOD), including elevation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, severe hypotension, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, hypoproteinemia, and increased serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (fourfold), alkaline phosphatase (fourfold), alanine aminotransferase (14-fold), and ammonia (sevenfold). In sharp contrast, IL-6 production and lipid

  20. Classification of benzoyl peroxide as safe and effective and revision of labeling to drug facts format; topical acne drug products for over-the-counter human use; final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-03-04

    We, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are issuing this final rule to include benzoyl peroxide as a generally recognized as safe and effective (GRASE) active ingredient in over-the-counter (OTC) topical acne drug products. In addition, this final rule includes new warnings and directions required for OTC acne drug products containing benzoyl peroxide. We are also revising labeling for OTC topical acne drug products containing resorcinol, resorcinol monoacetate, salicylic acid and/or sulfur to meet OTC drug labeling content and format requirements in a certain FDA regulation. This final rule is part of our ongoing review of OTC drug products and represents our conclusions on benzoyl peroxide in OTC acne drug products.

  1. Overexpression of Elsholtzia haichowensis metallothionein 1 (EhMT1) in tobacco plants enhances copper tolerance and accumulation in root cytoplasm and decreases hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Qi, Ying; Yuan, Yuxiang; Wang, Guiping; Cui, Jin; Chen, Yahua; Zhang, Hongsheng; Shen, Zhenguo

    2012-09-30

    To evaluate the functional roles of metallothionein (MT) in copper tolerance, we generated transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing EhMT1 from the Cu-accumulator Elsholtzia haichowensis Sun. Overexpression of EhMT1 in tobacco plants imparted increased copper (Cu) tolerance based on seedling dry biomass when compared to wild-type plants. Plants expressing EhMT1 accumulated more Cu in roots, which was mainly attributable to an increase of the soluble fraction. Levels of lipid peroxidation and production of hydrogen peroxide were lower in roots of transgenic tobacco than in wild-type plants. EhMT1 was suggested to bind Cu in the cytoplasm, thereby decreasing activity of free Cu(2+) ions and blocking Cu(2+) from interacting with cytoplasmic components, which in turn decreases the production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, our results also indicate that EhMT1-overexpressing tobacco has a more efficient antioxidant system, with improved peroxidase activity to better cope with oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  3. Myeloperoxidase-dependent Lipid Peroxidation Promotes the Oxidative Modification of Cytosolic Proteins in Phagocytic Neutrophils*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P.; Magon, Nicholas J.; Harwood, D. Tim; Kettle, Anthony J.; Vissers, Margreet C.; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Hampton, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation. PMID:25697357

  4. Myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation promotes the oxidative modification of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Magon, Nicholas J; Harwood, D Tim; Kettle, Anthony J; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-04-10

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, R.W.; Anderson, M.S.; Johnson, R.E.; Smythe, W.D.; Hendrix, A.R.; Barth, C.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hansen, G.B.; McCord, T.B.; Dalton, J.B.; Clark, R.N.; Shirley, J.H.; Ocampo, A.C.; Matson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R W; Anderson, M S; Johnson, R E; Smythe, W D; Hendrix, A R; Barth, C A; Soderblom, L A; Hansen, G B; McCord, T B; Dalton, J B; Clark, R N; Shirley, J H; Ocampo, A C; Matson, D L

    1999-03-26

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis.

  7. Polyphenols from Lonicera caerulea L. berry attenuate experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokines productions and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shusong; Yano, Satoshi; Hisanaga, Ayami; He, Xi; He, Jianhua; Sakao, Kozue; Hou, De-Xing

    2017-04-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common disease, which is closely associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, and Lonicera caerulea L. polyphenols (LCP) are reported to possess both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanisms of LCP on NASH in a high-fat diet plus carbon tetrachloride (CCL4 ) induced mouse model. Mice were fed with high-fat diet containing LCP (0.5-1%) or not, and then administrated with CCL4 to induce NASH. Liver sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin stain, serum transaminases and lipids were measured by clinical analyzer, insulin was examined by ELISA, cytokines were determined by multiplex technology, and hepatic proteins were detected by Western blotting. LCP improved histopathological features of NASH with lower levels of lipid peroxidation and cytokines including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, IL-3, IL-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, IL-6, IL-5, keratinocyte-derived cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-2, IL-1β, monocytes chemotactic protein-1, IL-13, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-12(p70), IL-1α, eotaxin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, IL-17, and RANTES. Further molecular analysis revealed that LCP increased the expression of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, but decreased forkhead box protein O1 and heme oxygenase-1 in the liver of NASH mice. Dietary supplementation of LCP ameliorates inflammation and lipid peroxidation by upregulating nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, and downregulating forkhead box protein O1 and heme oxygenase-1 in NASH. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide Alleviates Nickel-Inhibited Photosynthetic Responses through Increase in Use-Efficiency of Nitrogen and Sulfur, and Glutathione Production in Mustard.

    PubMed

    Khan, M I R; Khan, Nafees A; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S; Asgher, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    The response of two mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivars differing in photosynthetic capacity to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or nickel (Ni) was evaluated. Further, the effect of H2O2 on photosynthetic responses of the mustard cultivars grown with or without Ni stress was studied. Application of 50 μM H2O2 increased photosynthesis and growth more prominently in high photosynthetic capacity cultivar (Varuna) than low photosynthetic capacity cultivar (RH30) grown without Ni stress. The H2O2 application also resulted in alleviation of photosynthetic inhibition induced by 200 mg Ni kg(-1) soil through increased photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE), sulfur-use efficiency (SUE), and glutathione (GSH) reduced production together with decreased lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage in both the cultivars. However, the effect of H2O2 was more pronounced in Varuna than RH30. The greater increase in photosynthetic-NUE and SUE and GSH production with H2O2 in Varuna resulted from higher increase in activity of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) assimilation enzymes, nitrate reductase and ATP-sulfurylase, respectively resulting in enhanced N and S assimilation. The increased N and S content contributed to the higher activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase under Ni stress. Application of H2O2 also regulated PS II activity and stomatal movement under Ni stress for maintaining higher photosynthetic potential in Varuna. Thus, H2O2 may be considered as a potential signaling molecule for augmenting photosynthetic potential of mustard plants under optimal and Ni stress conditions. It alleviates Ni stress through the regulation of stomatal and non-stomotal limitations, and photosynthetic-NUE and -SUE and GSH production.

  9. Hydrogen Peroxide Alleviates Nickel-Inhibited Photosynthetic Responses through Increase in Use-Efficiency of Nitrogen and Sulfur, and Glutathione Production in Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. I. R.; Khan, Nafees A.; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S.; Asgher, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    The response of two mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivars differing in photosynthetic capacity to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or nickel (Ni) was evaluated. Further, the effect of H2O2 on photosynthetic responses of the mustard cultivars grown with or without Ni stress was studied. Application of 50 μM H2O2 increased photosynthesis and growth more prominently in high photosynthetic capacity cultivar (Varuna) than low photosynthetic capacity cultivar (RH30) grown without Ni stress. The H2O2 application also resulted in alleviation of photosynthetic inhibition induced by 200 mg Ni kg-1 soil through increased photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE), sulfur-use efficiency (SUE), and glutathione (GSH) reduced production together with decreased lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage in both the cultivars. However, the effect of H2O2 was more pronounced in Varuna than RH30. The greater increase in photosynthetic-NUE and SUE and GSH production with H2O2 in Varuna resulted from higher increase in activity of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) assimilation enzymes, nitrate reductase and ATP-sulfurylase, respectively resulting in enhanced N and S assimilation. The increased N and S content contributed to the higher activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase under Ni stress. Application of H2O2 also regulated PS II activity and stomatal movement under Ni stress for maintaining higher photosynthetic potential in Varuna. Thus, H2O2 may be considered as a potential signaling molecule for augmenting photosynthetic potential of mustard plants under optimal and Ni stress conditions. It alleviates Ni stress through the regulation of stomatal and non-stomotal limitations, and photosynthetic-NUE and -SUE and GSH production. PMID:26870064

  10. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  11. Reduction of lipid peroxidation products and advanced glycation end-product precursors by cyanobacterial aldo-keto reductase AKR3G1—a founding member of the AKR3G subfamily.

    PubMed

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Maser, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin and function of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily as enzymes involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics. We used the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a model organism and sequence alignments to find bacterial AKRs with highest identity to human enzymes. Disappearance of NADPH was monitored spectrophotometrically to calculate enzymatic activity. The molecular weight of the native protein was determined by size exclusion chromatography. Substrate docking was performed by SwissDock. Sequence alignments identified the NADPH-dependent AKR3G1 having 41.5 and 40% identity with the human enzymes AKR1B1 and AKR1B10, respectively. Highest enzymatic efficiency was observed with 4-oxonon-2-enal (4-ONE; k(cat)/K(m), 561 s(-1) mM(-1)) and 4-hydroxynonenal (k(cat)/K(m), 26.5 s(-1) mM(-1)), respectively. P74308 is the most efficient enzyme for 4-ONE discovered until now. Cooperativity of this monomeric enzyme was observed with some substrates. Enzyme inactivation or oligomerization as possible explanations for nonhyperbolic enzyme kinetics were ruled out by Selwyn's test and gel filtration. The role of the little investigated carbonyl-reducing enzymes in detoxification seems to be in fact a very old process with rarely observed nonhyperbolic enzyme kinetics as an adaptation mechanism to higher concentrations of reactive oxygen species.

  12. NAD(P)H oxidase-derived peroxide mediates elevated basal and impaired flow-induced NO production in SHR mesenteric arteries in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaosun; Bohlen, H Glenn; Miller, Steven J; Unthank, Joseph L

    2008-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have fundamentally important roles in the regulation of vascular tone and remodeling. Although arterial disease and endothelial dysfunction alter NO and ROS levels to impact vasodilation and vascular structure, direct measurements of these reactive species under in vivo conditions with flow alterations are unavailable. In this study, in vivo measurements of NO and H2O2 were made on mesenteric arteries to determine whether antioxidant therapies could restore normal NO production in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Flow was altered from approximately 50-200% of control in anesthetized Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) and SHR by selective placement of microvascular clamps on adjacent arteries while NO and H2O2 were directly measured with microelectrodes. Relative to WKY, SHR had significantly increased baseline NO and H2O2 concentrations (2,572 +/- 241 vs. 1,059 +/- 160 nM, P < 0.01; and 26 +/- 7 vs. 7 +/- 1 microM, P < 0.05, respectively). With flow elevation, H2O2 but not NO increased in SHR; NO but not H2O2 was elevated in WKY. Apocynin and polyethylene-glycolated catalase decreased baseline SHR NO and H2O2 to WKY levels and restored flow-mediated NO production. Suppression of NAD(P)H oxidase with gp91ds-tat decreased SHR H2O2 to WKY levels. Addition of topical H2O2 to increase peroxide to the basal concentration measured in SHR elevated WKY NO to levels observed in SHR. The results support the hypothesis that increased vascular peroxide in SHR is primarily derived from NAD(P)H oxidase and increases NO concentration to levels that cannot be further elevated with increased flow. Short-term and even acute administration of antioxidants are able to restore normal flow-mediated NO signaling in young SHR.

  13. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Production from Water on a WO3 /BiVO4 Photoanode and from O2 on an Au Cathode Without External Bias.

    PubMed

    Fuku, Kojiro; Miyase, Yuta; Miseki, Yugo; Funaki, Takashi; Gunji, Takahiro; Sayama, Kazuhiro

    2017-05-18

    The photoelectrochemical production and degradation properties of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) were investigated on a WO3 /BiVO4 photoanode in an aqueous electrolyte of hydrogen carbonate (HCO3(-) ). High concentrations of HCO3(-) species rather than CO3(2-) species inhibited the oxidative degradation of H2 O2 on the WO3 /BiVO4 photoanode, resulting in effective oxidative H2 O2 generation and accumulation from water (H2 O). Moreover, the Au cathode facilitated two-electron reduction of oxygen (O2 ), resulting in reductive H2 O2 production with high current efficiency. Combining the WO3 /BiVO4 photoanode with a HCO3(-) electrolyte and an Au cathode also produced a clean and promising design for a photoelectrode system specializing in H2 O2 production (ηanode (H2 O2 )≈50 %, ηcathode (H2 O2 )≈90 %) even without applied voltage between the photoanode and cathode under simulated solar light through a two-photon process; this achieved effective H2 O2 production when using an Au-supported porous BiVO4 photocatalyst sheet. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  15. Influence of age, hexobarbital, and aniline on NADPH/NADH dependent hydrogen peroxide production in rat hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Klinger, W; Freytag, A; Schmitt, W

    1986-01-01

    Hepatic microsomal H2O2 production (oxidase function of microsomal cytochrome P-450) is strongly dependent on NADPH or NADH concentration. NADH increases H2O2 production after the addition of a supraoptimal concentration of NADPH to the incubation mixture in all age groups. Maximum activities are found in 60-day-old male Wistar rats. Hexobarbital increased in a dose dependent manner both NADPH, NADH, and NADPH/NADH dependent H2O2 production. Aniline had no effect or slightly decreased H2O2 production. Hexobarbital enhanced NADPH/NADH dependent H2O2 production in all age groups (5-240 days of age) to the same degree. Hence it is concluded that H2O2 production is due to the decay of the peroxycytochrome P-450 complex after the second reduction step via cytochrome b5 and that in all age groups reducibility of cytochrome P-450, which is enhanced by hexobarbital, is rate limiting. As the age course of H2O2 production is similar to that of ethylmorphine N-demethylation, it is concluded that the phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome P-450 subspecies predominantly catalyse H2O2 production.

  16. Effect of Cd⁺² on phosphate solubilizing abilities and hydrogen peroxide production of soil-borne micromycetes isolated from Phragmites australis-rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Silva, Jose Roberto; Chan-Cupul, Wilberth; Kuschk, Peter; Loera, Octavio; Aguilar-López, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Refugio

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this work were to evaluate the phosphate-solubilization and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by the soil-borne micromycetes, Aspergillus japonicus, Penicillium italicum and Penicillium dipodomyicola, isolated from Phragmites australis rhizosphere and to study the effect of several concentrations of Cadmium (Cd(2+)) on both variables. Our results showed that P. italicum achieved a higher P-solubilization and H2O2 production than A. japonicus and P. dipodomyicola, as only P. italicum showed a positive correlation (R(2) = 0.71) between P-solubilization and H2O2 production. In dose-response assays, P. italicum was also more tolerant to Cd(2+) (0.31 mM) in comparison to A. japonicus (0.26 mM). Analysis of the 2(4) factorial experimental design showed that P-solubilization by P. italicum was negatively affected by increases in Cd(2+) (p = 0.04) and yeast extract (p = 0.02) in the culture medium. The production of H2O2 was positively affected only by glucose (p = 0.002). Fungal biomass production was reduced significantly (p = 0.0009) by Cd(2+) and increased (p = 0.0003) by high glucose concentration in the culture medium. The tolerance and correlation between P-solubilization and H2O2 production in the presence of Cd(2+) was strain and species dependent. The effects of Cd(2+), glucose, ammonium sulfate and yeast extract on those variables were evaluated through a two-level factorial design. P. italicum is promising for P-solubilization in soils contaminated with Cd(2+) and may be an alternative for manufacture of biofertilizers to replace chemical fertilizers.

  17. NADPH oxidase-dependent hydrogen peroxide production, induced by salinity stress, may be involved in the regulation of total calcium in roots of wheat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingli; Xu, Shijian; An, Lizhe; Chen, Nianlai

    2007-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is often generated by cells and tissues under environmental stress. In this work, we provide evidence that plasma membrane (PM) NADPH oxidase-dependent H(2)O(2) production might act as an intermediate step in the NaCl-induced elevation of calcium (Ca) in roots of wheat. Remarkable increases in the content of total Ca were observed not only in roots exposed to NaCl but also in roots of seedlings exposed to exogenous H(2)O(2). In roots, H(2)O(2) production increased upon exposure to salt stress. PM vesicles were isolated from roots, and NADPH oxidase activity was determined by measuring superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production. NADPH oxidase-dependent O(2)(-) production was 11.6nmolmg(-1)proteinmin(-1) in control vesicles, but 19.6nmol after NaCl treatment (24h), indicating that salt stress resulted in the activation of the PM NADPH oxidase. Furthermore, the NaCl-induced increase in total Ca was partially abolished by the addition of 150U/mL catalase (CAT), a H(2)O(2) scavenger, and also by 10microM diphenylane iodonium (DPI), a NADPH oxidase inhibitor. This data suggest that NADPH oxidase-dependent H(2)O(2) production might be involved in the modulation of the Ca content in wheat roots. In conclusion, our results show that salinity stress increases the total Ca content of wheat roots, which is partly due to PM NADPH oxidase-dependent H(2)O(2) generation.

  18. Beta-nodavirus B2 protein induces hydrogen peroxide production, leading to Drp1-recruited mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death via mitochondrial targeting.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu C; Chiu, Hsuan W; Hung, Jo C; Hong, Jiann R

    2014-10-01

    Because the role of the viral B2 protein in the pathogenesis of nervous necrosis virus infection remains unknown, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of B2 protein on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated cell death via mitochondrial targeting. Using a B2 deletion mutant, the B2 mitochondrial targeting signal sequence ((41)RTFVISAHAA(50)) correlated with mitochondrial free radical production and cell death in fish cells, embryonic zebrafish, and human cancer cells. After treatment of grouper fin cells (GF-1) overexpressing B2 protein with the anti-oxidant drug, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), and overexpression of the antioxidant enzymes, zfCu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and zfCatalase, decreased H2O2 production and cell death were observed. To investigate the correlation between B2 cytotoxicity and H2O2 production in vivo, B2 was injected into zebrafish embryos. Cell damage, as assessed by the acridine orange assay, gradually increased over 24 h post-fertilization, and was accompanied by marked increases in H2O2 production and embryonic death. Increased oxidative stress, as evidenced by the up-regulation of Mn SOD, catalase, and Nrf2, was also observed during this period. Finally, B2-induced dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-mediated mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death could be reversed by NAC and inhibitors of Drp1 and Mdivi in GF-1 cells. Taken together, betanodavirus B2 induces H2O2 production via targeting the mitochondria, where it inhibits complex II function. H2O2 activates Drp1, resulting in its association with the mitochondria, mitochondrial fission and cell death in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Comparison of protective effect of ascorbic acid on redox and endocannabinoid systems interactions in in vitro cultured human skin fibroblasts exposed to UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Gęgotek, Agnieszka; Bielawska, Katarzyna; Biernacki, Michał; Zaręba, Ilona; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta

    2017-03-11

    The mechanisms of biological activity of commonly used natural compounds are constantly examined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare ascorbic acid efficacy in counteracting the consequences of UV and hydrogen peroxide treatment on lipid mediators and their regulative action on antioxidant abilities. Skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA and UVB irradiation, treated with hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid. The redox system was estimated through reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (electron spin resonance spectrometer) and antioxidants level/activity (HPLC/spectrometry) which activity was evaluated by the level of phospholipid metabolites: 4-hydroxynonenal, malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostanes and endocannabinoids (GC/LC-MS) in the human skin fibroblasts. Protein and DNA oxidative modifications were also determined (LC). The expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), its activators and inhibitors as well as pro/anti-apoptotic proteins and endocannabinoid receptors was examined (Western blot) and collagen metabolism was evaluated by collagen biosynthesis and prolidase activity (spectrometry). UVA and UVB irradiation and hydrogen peroxide treatment enhanced activity of xanthine and NADPH oxidases resulting in ROS generation as well as diminution of antioxidant phospholipid protection (glutathione peroxidase-glutathione-vitamin E), what led to increased lipid peroxidation and decreased endocannabinoids level. Dysregulation of cannabinoid receptors expression and environment of transcription factor Nrf2 caused apoptosis induction. Ascorbic acid partially prevented ROS generation, antioxidant capacity diminution and endocannabinoid systems disturbances but only slightly protected macromolecules such as phospholipid, protein and DNA against oxidative modifications. However, ascorbic acid significantly prevented decrease in collagen type I biosynthesis. Ascorbic acid in similar degree prevents UV (UVA and UVB) and hydrogen peroxide

  20. Aspirin may promote mitochondrial biogenesis via the production of hydrogen peroxide and the induction of Sirtuin1/PGC-1α genes

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Pratibha; Selvarajan, Krithika; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Nandave, Mukesh; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2013-01-01

    Based on the rapid hydrolysis of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA, Aspirin) to salicylic acid (SA), the ability of SA to form dihydroxy benzoic acid (DBA), and the latter’s redox reactions to yield hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), we predicted that ASA may have the potential to induce Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) and its downstream effects. We observed that treatment of cultured liver cells with ASA resulted in the induction of Sirt1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator-1α (PGC-1α), and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) genes. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) siRNA transfections inhibited the induction of gene expressions by ASA suggesting the need for the acetyl ester hydrolysis and hydroxylation to DHBA. The latter also induced Sirt1, confirming the proposed pathway. As predicted, ASA and SA treatment resulted in the production of H2O2, a known inducer of Sirt1 and confirmed in the current studies. More importantly, ASA treatment resulted in an increase in mitochondria as seen by tracking dyes. We suggest that DHBA, generated from ASA, via its oxidation/reduction reactions mediated by Nqo1 might be involved in the production of O2-. and H2O2. As Sirt1 and PGC-1α profoundly affect mitochondrial metabolism and energy utilization, ASA may have therapeutic potential beyond its ability to inhibit cyclooxygenases. PMID:23228932

  1. Exposure to chrysotile asbestos causes carbonylation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase through a reaction with lipid peroxidation products in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yuki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2010-05-19

    Exposure to asbestos is known to lead to a reduction in glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity and to cause oxidative damage to cells. In the present study, we exposed the human lung carcinoma cell line A549 to chrysotile. We observed an increase in the production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS, the breakdown products of lipid peroxide) along with a significant decrease in G6PDH activity. Alternatively, when chrysotile was added directly to the cell extract obtained by removing the cell membrane, no loss of G6PDH activity was observed. To elucidate the mechanism of G6PDH inactivation due to exposure to chrysotile, we focused on the TBARS responsible for protein modification via carbonylation. When malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal was added to a membrane-free A549 cell extract, G6PDH activity was reduced markedly. However, when t-butylhydroperoxide was added to the extract, there was no significant decrease in G6PDH activity. Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitation of the carbonylated proteins in the A549 cell lysate that was prepared after exposure to chrysotile demonstrated that G6PDH had been carbonylated. Our findings indicate that the decrease in G6PDH activity that occurs after exposure of the cultured cells to chrysotile results from the carbonylation of G6PDH by TBARS.

  2. Ingestion of the anti-bacterial agent, gemifloxacin mesylate, leads to increased gst activity and peroxidation products in hemolymph of Galleria mellonella l. (lepidoptera: pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Erdem, Meltem; Küçük, Ceyhun; Büyükgüzel, Ender; Büyükgüzel, Kemal

    2016-12-01

    Gemifloxacin mesylate (GEM) is a synthetic, fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibacterial antibiotic that has a broad spectrum of activity against bacteria. GEM inhibits DNA synthesis by inhibiting DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activities. Recent research into insect nutrition and mass-rearing programs, in which antibiotics are incorporated into the culture media to maintain diet quality, raised a question of whether clinical antibiotics influence the health or biological performance of the insects that ingest these compounds. Because some antibiotics are pro-oxidant compounds, we addressed the question with experiments designed to assess the effects of GEM (mesylate salt) on oxidative stress indicators, using Galleria mellonella larvae. The insects were reared from first-instar larvae to adulthood on artificial diets amended with GEM at 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0%. Feeding on the 1% diets led to significantly increased hemolymph contents of the lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde and protein oxidation products, protein carbonyl. All GEM concentrations led to increased hemolymph glutathione S-transferase activity. We inferred that although it was not directly lethal to G. mellonella larvae, dietary exposure to GEM exerts measurable oxidative damage, possibly on insects generally. Long-term, multigenerational effects remain unknown. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Aspirin may promote mitochondrial biogenesis via the production of hydrogen peroxide and the induction of Sirtuin1/PGC-1α genes.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Pratibha; Selvarajan, Krithika; Aluganti Narasimhulu, Chandrakala; Nandave, Mukesh; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2013-01-15

    Based on the rapid hydrolysis of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA, Aspirin) to salicylic acid (SA), the ability of SA to form dihydroxy benzoic acid (DBA), and the latter's redox reactions to yield hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), we predicted that ASA may have the potential to induce Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) and its downstream effects. We observed that treatment of cultured liver cells with ASA resulted in the induction of Sirt1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator-1α (PGC-1α), and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) genes. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) siRNA transfections inhibited the induction of gene expressions by ASA suggesting the need for the acetyl ester hydrolysis and hydroxylation to DHBA. The latter also induced Sirt1, confirming the proposed pathway. As predicted, ASA and SA treatment resulted in the production of H(2)O(2), a known inducer of Sirt1 and confirmed in the current studies. More importantly, ASA treatment resulted in an increase in mitochondria as seen by tracking dyes. We suggest that DHBA, generated from ASA, via its oxidation/reduction reactions mediated by Nqo1 might be involved in the production of O(2)(-.) and H(2)O(2). As Sirt1 and PGC-1α profoundly affect mitochondrial metabolism and energy utilization, ASA may have therapeutic potential beyond its ability to inhibit cyclooxygenases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Overexpression of a tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 causes salt sensitivity and hydrogen peroxide production in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Cao, YangRong; Li, ZhiGang; Chen, Tao; Zhang, ZhiGang; Zhang, JinSong; Chen, ShouYi

    2008-05-01

    The small GTPases of Rop/Rho family is central regulators of important cellular processes in plants. Tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 has been isolated; however, its roles in stress responses were unknown. In the present study, the genomic sequence of NtRop1 was cloned, which has seven exons and six introns, similar to the Rop gene structure from Arabidopsis. The NtRop1 gene was constitutively expressed in the different organs whereas the other six Rop genes from tobacco had differential expression patterns. The expression of the NtRop1 gene was moderately induced by methyl viologen, NaCl, and ACC treatments, but slightly inhibited by ABA treatment, with no significant induction by NAA treatment. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the NtRop1 showed increased salt sensitivity as can be seen from the reduced root growth and elevated relative electrolyte leakage. The hydrogen peroxide production was also promoted in the NtRop1-trangenic plants in comparison with wild type plants. These results imply that the NtRop1 may confer salt sensitivity through activation of H2O2 production during plant response to salt stress.

  5. Pilot randomized-control trial to assess the effect product sampling has on adherence using adapalene/benzoyl peroxide gel in acne patients.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Laura F; Semble, Ashley; Gustafson, Cheryl J; Huang, Karen E; Levender, Michelle M; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of acne can be difficult, with suboptimal adherence resulting in poor treatment outcomes. To determine whether demonstrating to patients how to properly apply a topical acne medication through the use of a sample product will improve adherence. Subjects with mild to moderate acne were instructed to use adapalene/benzoyl peroxide gel once daily for six weeks. Subjects were randomized into sample or no sample group. Sample group received a demonstration on how to apply the medication using a product sample. The primary outcome was median adherence, recorded using electronic monitoring, and secondary outcomes were efficacy measures including the Acne Global Assessment (AGA) and lesion counts and the Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale (PMCSMS). Data from 17 patients was collected and analyzed. Median adherence rates were 50% in the sample group and 35% in the no sample group (p=0.67). The median percent improvement in non-inflammatory lesions were 46% for the sample group and 33% for the no-sample group (p=0.10). The small size of this pilot study limited the extent of subgroup analyses. Objective electronic monitoring expanded our previous observations of poor adherence in the treatment of acne. There is a considerable potential effect size on adherence for the use of samples, supporting the need for future, well powered studies to assess the value of using samples in the treatment of acne and other dermatologic skin diseases.

  6. Induction of antroquinonol production by addition of hydrogen peroxide in the fermentation of Antrodia camphorata S-29.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yongjun; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Guangqiang; Zhang, Bobo; Xu, Ganrong; Ai, Lianzhong

    2017-01-01

    Antroquinonol have significantly anti-tumour effects on various cancer cells. There is still lack of reports on regulation of environmental factors on antroquinonol production by Antrodia camphorata. An effective submerged fermentation method was employed to induce antroquinonol with adding H2 O2 . The production of antroquinonol was 57.81 mg L(-1) after fermentation for 10 days when adding 25 mmol L(-1) H2 O2 at day 4 of the fermentation process. Then, antroquinonol was further increased to 80.10 mg L(-1) with cell productivity of 14.94 mg g(-1) dry mycelium when the feeding rate of H2 O2 was adjusted to 0.2 mmol L(-1) h(-1) in the 7 L fermentation bioreactor. After inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species with the inhibitor diphenyleneiodoium, the synthesis of antroquinonol from A. camphorata was significantly reduced, and the yield was only 3.3 mg L(-1) . The results demonstrated that addition of H2 O2 was a very effective strategy to induce and regulate the synthesis of antroquinonol in submerged fermentation. Reactive oxygen species generated by H2 O2 during fermentation caused oxidative stress, which induced the synthesis of antroquinonol and other chemical compounds. Moreover, it is very beneficial process to improve production and diversity of the active compounds during liquid fermentation of A. camphorata mycelium. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide production protects Chlamydomonas reinhardtii against light-induced cell death by preventing singlet oxygen accumulation through enhanced carotenoid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsueh-Ling; Kang, Cheng-Yang; Lee, Tse-Min

    2013-07-15

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) on carotenoid synthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under light-induced stress at 3000 μmol m⁻² s⁻¹ has been investigated. This very high light (VHL) illumination triggered a transient increase in H₂O₂ production during the initial 30 min of light stress, followed by singlet oxygen (¹O₂) production, growth inhibition and necrotic cell death. The carotenoid content was slightly reduced during the first 30 min of VHL illumination and strongly diminished after 60 min, while the expression of the transcripts of enzymes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis, including phytoene synthase (PSY), phytoene desaturase (PDS), and lycopene ɛ-cyclase (LCYE), initially increased and then decreased. Lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) transcripts did not change. Treatment with dimethylthiourea, a H₂O₂ scavenger, under VHL conditions reduced H₂O₂ production and PSY and PDS transcript levels and accelerated the reduction of carotenoids, the production of ¹O₂, viability loss and necrotic cell death. Pretreatment with 0.1 μM methyl viologen or 0.2 mM H₂O₂ under 50 μmol m⁻² s⁻¹ low light for 60 min increased VHL tolerance, carotenoid content, and PSY and PDS transcripts, while LCYB and LCYE transcripts were not affected. These results suggest that H₂O₂, produced under VHL stress, ameliorates the ¹O₂-mediated oxidative damage to C. reinhardtii through a reduction in the degree of carotenoid breakdown by activation of de novo carotenoid synthesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Liquid-liquid reaction of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite for the production of singlet oxygen in a centrifugal flow singlet oxygen generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Rong-rong; Deng, Lie-zheng; Shi, Wen-bo; Yang, He-ping; Sha, Guo-he; Zhang, Cun-hao

    2011-02-01

    An attempt is made to produce gas-phase singlet oxygen O2(a1Δg) in a liquid-liquid reaction between acidic hydrogen peroxide (AHP) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The attempt arises from the fact that basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) has long been the prime source for producing singlet delta oxygen through its reaction with chlorine. However, BHP suffers from the defect of being unstable during storage. Exploratory experiments were performed in a centrifugal flow singlet oxygen generator (CF-SOG) with two streams of solutions, AHP and NaOCl, mixed in a slit nozzle and then injected into the arc-shaped concavity in the CF-SOG to form a rotating liquid flow with a remarkable centrifugal force. With the help of this centrifugal force, the product of the O2(1Δ) reaction was quickly separated from the liquid phase. The gas-phase O2(1Δ) was detected via the spectrum of O2(1Δ) cooperative dimolecular emission with a CCD spectrograph. Experimental results show that it is feasible to produce gas-phase O2(1Δ) from the AHP + NaOCl reaction, and the stronger the acidity, the more efficient the O2(1Δ) production. However, since in the AHP + NaOCl reaction, Cl2 unavoidably appears as a byproduct, its catalytic action on the decomposition of H2O2 into ground-state O2 remains a major obstacle to utilising the AHP + NaOCl reaction in producing gas-phase O2(1Δ). Qualitative interpretation shows that the AHP + NaOCl reaction is virtually the reaction of interaction of molecular H2O2 with molecular HOCl, its mechanism being analogous to that of reaction of BHP with Cl2, where HOOCl is the key intermediate. It is difficult to form the intermediate HOOCl via the H2O2 + NaOCl reaction in a basic medium, thus gas-phase O2(1Δ) cannot be obtained in appreciable quantities.

  9. Abscisic acid is a key inducer of hydrogen peroxide production in leaves of maize plants exposed to water stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiuli; Zhang, Aying; Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Mingyi

    2006-11-01

    The histochemical and cytochemical localization of water stress-induced H(2)O(2) production in the leaves of ABA-deficient vp5 mutant and wild-type maize (Zea mays L.) plants were examined, using 3,3-diaminobenzidine and CeCl(3) staining, respectively, and the roles of endogenous ABA in the production of H(2)O(2) induced by water stress were assessed. Water stress induced by polyethylene glycol resulted in the accumulation of H(2)O(2) in mesophyll cells, bundle-sheath cells and vascular bundles of wild-type maize leaves, and the accumulation was substantially blocked in the mutant maize leaves exposed to water stress. Pre-treatments with several apoplastic H(2)O(2) manipulators abolished the majority of H(2)O(2) accumulation induced by water stress in the wild-type leaves. The subcellular localization of H(2)O(2) production was demonstrated in the cell walls, xylem vessels, chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes in the leaves of wild-type maize plants exposed to water stress, and the accumulation of H(2)O(2) induced by water stress in the cell walls and xylem vessels, but not in the chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes, was arrested in the leaves of the ABA mutant or the ABA biosynthesis inhibitor (tungstate)-pre-treated maize plants. Pre-treatments with the apoplastic H(2)O(2) manipulators also blocked the apoplastic but not the intracellular H(2)O(2) accumulation induced by water stress in the leaves of wild-type plants. These data indicate that under water stress, the apoplast is the major source of H(2)O(2) production and ABA is a key inducer of apoplastic H(2)O(2) production. These data also suggest that H(2)O(2) generated in the apoplast could not diffuse freely into subcellular compartments.

  10. High membrane potential promotes alkenal-induced mitochondrial uncoupling and influences adenine nucleotide translocase conformation.

    PubMed

    Azzu, Vian; Parker, Nadeene; Brand, Martin D

    2008-07-15

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species, whose downstream lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxynonenal, induce uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by increasing proton leak through mitochondrial inner membrane proteins such as the uncoupling proteins and adenine nucleotide translocase. Using mitochondria from rat liver, which lack uncoupling proteins, in the present study we show that energization (specifically, high membrane potential) is required for 4-hydroxynonenal to activate proton conductance mediated by adenine nucleotide translocase. Prolonging the time at high membrane potential promotes greater uncoupling. 4-Hydroxynonenal-induced uncoupling via adenine nucleotide translocase is prevented but not readily reversed by addition of carboxyatractylate, suggesting a permanent change (such as adduct formation) that renders the translocase leaky to protons. In contrast with the irreversibility of proton conductance, carboxyatractylate added after 4-hydroxynonenal still inhibits nucleotide translocation, implying that the proton conductance and nucleotide translocation pathways are different. We propose a model to relate adenine nucleotide translocase conformation to proton conductance in the presence or absence of 4-hydroxynonenal and/or carboxyatractylate.

  11. [Indices of oxidative stress. 2. Lipid peroxides].

    PubMed

    Lushchak, V I; Bahniukova, T V; Luzhna, L I

    2006-01-01

    Two methods of the determination of lipid peroxidation products have been compared which are based on Fe(II) oxidation by them at acid pH values in the presence of xylenol orange which binds Fe(III) have been compared. The first method uses cumene hydropeoxide as an internal standard. In the second one, lipid peroxides are previously reduced by triphenylphosphine and these substances content is measured as a difference of the production of complexes with xylenol orange and iron ions in the control (with reduction) and experimental sample (without reduction). The optimization of measurement conditions is described. The levels of lipid peroxides in goldfish tissues assayed simultaneously by two methods were similar. The method with cumene hydroperoxide needs less amounts of biological material; moreover, there is no necessity in a calibration curve. Effects of hyperoxia on lipid peroxide levels in goldfish tissues were studied with the cumene method. Within the first hours of hyperoxia this index increased 13-times in the liver and 2-times in the brain and muscle. The further exposure rebounded this parameter to the initial level. Levels of lipid peroxides positively correlated with levels of end products of lipid peroxidation (thiobarbiturate acid reactive substances) in the goldfish tissues. The method of quantification of lipid peroxides with cumene is recommended for wide using in biological investigations.

  12. Effects of flavonoid-containing preparation Extralife on hydrogen peroxide production and functioning of mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Murzaeva, S V; Belova, S P; Lezhnev, E I; Luk'yanova, L D; Mironova, G D

    2013-10-01

    Extralife, a Pentaphylloides fruticos extract, in concentrations of 0.005-10 μg/ml dose-dependently increased H2O2 production in rat heart mitochondria in the presence of respiration substrates. Extralife decreased ATP-induced accumulation of H2O2 related to inhibition of mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channel. This effect was observed only at low doses of the adaptogen (0.05-3 μg/ml). High doses of the substance (5-10 μg/ml) did not abolish ATP-dependent production of H2O2 and increased the rate of H2O2 generation by the mitochondria. We concluded that Extralife in trace concentrations could activate mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channel and decrease H2O2 accumulation in the mitochondria.

  13. Positive influence of a natural product as propolis on antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation in senescent rats.

    PubMed

    Lisbona, Cristina; Díaz-Castro, Javier; Alférez, María J M; Guisado, Isabel M; Guisado, Rafael; López-Aliaga, Inmaculada

    2013-12-01

    Given the importance of oxidative stress associated to aging, it would be interesting to assess the effect of oral supplementation with antioxidant substances capable of diminishing oxidative aggression and free radicals generation associated to this condition. This study investigated the effects of AIN-93 M diet supplemented either with 2 % of propolis, or with 4 % of a natural product obtained from lyophilizate vegetables, selected by its antioxidant properties, in senescent healthy Wistar rats fed ad libitum over 3 months. Propolis supplementation leads to a lower level of glucose and cholesterol concentrations together with a reduction in protein oxidation. Plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels were lower in the rats consuming the natural vegetable product and propolis possibly due to its antioxidant components, neutralizing the free radical produced, and thus preventing cellular damage. The results of the present study suggest a synergic effect of overall propolis compounds reducing the oxidative stress and glucose and cholesterol plasma levels associated with aging.

  14. Sites of Superoxide and Hydrogen Peroxide Production by Muscle Mitochondria Assessed ex Vivo under Conditions Mimicking Rest and Exercise*

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Renata L. S.; Quinlan, Casey L.; Perevoshchikova, Irina V.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Brand, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    The sites and rates of mitochondrial production of superoxide and H2O2 in vivo are not yet defined. At least 10 different mitochondrial sites can generate these species. Each site has a different maximum capacity (e.g. the outer quinol site in complex III (site IIIQo) has a very high capacity in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria, whereas the flavin site in complex I (site IF) has a very low capacity). The maximum capacities can greatly exceed the actual rates observed in the absence of electron transport chain inhibitors, so maximum capacities are a poor guide to actual rates. Here, we use new approaches to measure the rates at which different mitochondrial sites produce superoxide/H2O2 using isolated muscle mitochondria incubated in media mimicking the cytoplasmic substrate and effector mix of skeletal muscle during rest and exercise. We find that four or five sites dominate during rest in this ex vivo system. Remarkably, the quinol site in complex I (site IQ) and the flavin site in complex II (site IIF) each account for about a quarter of the total measured rate of H2O2 production. Site IF, site IIIQo, and perhaps site EF in the β-oxidation pathway account for most of the remainder. Under conditions mimicking mild and intense aerobic exercise, total production is much less, and the low capacity site IF dominates. These results give novel insights into which mitochondrial sites may produce superoxide/H2O2 in vivo. PMID:25389297

  15. Measurement of dark, particle-generated superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production and decay in the subtropical and temperate North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Kelly L.; Schneider, Robin J.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include the superoxide radical (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are thought to be generated mostly through photochemical reactions and biological activity in seawater and can influence trace metal speciation in the ocean. This study reports the results of an intercomparison of two methods to measure particle-generated [O2-] in seawater samples, as well as measurements of particle-generated O2- and H2O2 concentrations, decay kinetics, and dark production rates in seawater samples at Station ALOHA and (O2- only) in the southern California Current Ecosystem. O2- was measured using two different methods relying on chemiluminescence detection. The first method measured the difference between steady-state [O2-] in filtered and unfiltered seawater, while the second method (standard method) measured O2- decay to baseline in freshly filtered seawater. Because both methods detected [O2-] relative to the background signal from filtered seawater, both should have measured [O2-] generated by particles (presumably biota). However, the O2- concentrations determined by the first method were always much smaller than those obtained from the second (standard) method. Follow-up laboratory and field experiments showed that the increased signal in the standard method was due to a filtration artifact that could neither be eliminated nor consistently accounted for under the tested conditions. We therefore recommend the first method for measuring particle-generated [O2-]. Measured by this method, Station ALOHA had particle-generated O2- concentrations that ranged from undetectable to 0.02 nM, with production rates less than 0.6 nM hr-1 and decay rate coefficients from 0.003 to 0.014 s-1. The southern California Current Ecosystem had particle-generated O2- concentrations that ranged from undetectable to 0.05 nM, with production rates up to 4.7 nM hr-1 and decay rate coefficients from 0.006 to 0.017 s-1. H2O2 concentrations were measured by

  16. Effects of temperature on the production of hydrogen peroxide and volatile halocarbons by brackish-water algae.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Katarina; Choo, Kyung Sil; Pedersén, Marianne; Johansson, Gustav; Snoeijs, Pauli

    2003-10-01

    Marine algae produce volatile halocarbons, which have an ozone-depleting potential. The formation of these compounds is thought to be related to oxidative stress, involving H2O2 and algal peroxidases. In our study we found strong correlations between the releases of H2O2 and brominated and some iodinated compounds to the seawater medium, but no such correlation was found for CHCl3, suggesting the involvement of other formation mechanisms as well. Little is known about the effects of environmental factors on the production of volatile halocarbons by algae and in the present study we focused on the influence of temperature. Algae were sampled in an area of the brackish Baltic Sea that receives thermal discharge, allowing us to collect specimens of the same species that were adapted to different field temperature regimes. We exposed six algal species (the diatom Pleurosira laevis, the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus and four filamentous green algae, Cladophora glomerata, Enteromorpha ahlneriana, E. flexuosa and E. intestinalis) to temperature changes of 0-11 degrees C under high irradiation to invoke oxidative stress. The production rates, as well as the quantitative composition of 16 volatile halocarbons, were strongly species-dependent and different types of responses to temperature were recorded. However, no response patterns to temperature change were found that were consistent for all species or for all halocarbons. We conclude that the production of certain halocarbons may increase with temperature in certain algal species, but that the amount and composition of the volatile halocarbons released by algal communities are probably more affected by temperature-associated species shifts. These results may have implications for climatic change scenarios.

  17. Analysis of released products from oxidized ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene incubated with hydrogen peroxide and salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Lee, A W; Santerre, J P; Boynton, E

    2000-04-01

    The wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) implants generates polymeric and metallic particulate, which can be phagocytosed by human macrophages. The generation of these UHMWPE particles has been attributed to wear mechanisms and oxidation of the material. Many cell/particle studies have focused specifically on investigating particles of virgin materials themselves (i.e. virgin UHMWPE), while in fact, there is a strong likelihood that the oxidation processes encountered by the materials will yield particles with very different surface chemistries. Therefore, it is conceivable that chemical changes in the material would lead to altered cellular responses, as measured in the various cell study models. This paper has focused on the characterization of UHMWPE particulates that have been exposed to various conditions simulating processing steps and some of the oxidative and hydrolytic agents related to inflammatory responses. These include gamma-irradiation, thermal treatment and chemical oxidation by H2O2 and saline solutions. Oxidation of the particles was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Degradation products were isolated from the incubation solutions using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). UHMWPE particulates underwent extensive oxidation after gamma-irradiation and thermal treatments. There were marked differences following treatments of film samples taken from bar stock and the virgin particle samples. Polymer-related products, containing alkenes, alkanes and hydroxyl groups, were found in the incubation solutions. The study concluded that future work must consider both the particulates' surface chemistry and the possibility of soluble degradation products when assessing UHMWPE/cellular interactions.

  18. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on MAPK activation, IL-8 production and cell viability in primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pelaia, Girolamo; Cuda, Giovanni; Vatrella, Alessandro; Gallelli, Luca; Fratto, Donatella; Gioffrè, Vincenza; D'Agostino, Bruno; Caputi, Mario; Maselli, Rosario; Rossi, Francesco; Costanzo, Francesco S; Marsico, Serafino A

    2004-09-01

    The airway epithelium is continuously exposed to inhaled oxidants, including airborne pollutants and cigarette smoke, which can exert harmful proinflammatory and cytotoxic effects. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate, in primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC), the signal transduction pathways activated by increasing concentrations (0.25, 0.5, and 1 mM) of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), as well as their effects on IL-8 production and cell viability. The reported results show that H(2)O(2) elicited, in a concentration-dependent fashion, a remarkable increase in phosphorylation-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), associated with a significant induction of IL-8 synthesis and a dramatically enhanced cell death. Pre-treatment of HBEC with MAPK inhibitors was able to significantly inhibit the effects of H(2)O(2) on IL-8 secretion, and to effectively prevent cell death. Therefore, these findings suggest that MAPKs play a key role as molecular transducers of the airway epithelial injury triggered by oxidative stress, as well as potential pharmacologic targets for indirect antioxidant intervention.

  19. Cr(VI) reduction by gluconolactone and hydrogen peroxide, the reaction products of fungal glucose oxidase: Cooperative interaction with organic acids in the biotransformation of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Romo-Rodríguez, Pamela; Acevedo-Aguilar, Francisco Javier; Lopez-Torres, Adolfo; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Gutiérrez-Corona, J Félix

    2015-09-01

    The Cr(VI) reducing capability of growing cells of the environmental A. tubingensis Ed8 strain is remarkably efficient compared to reference strains A. niger FGSC322 and A. tubingensis NRRL593. Extracellular glucose oxidase (GOX) activity levels were clearly higher in colonies developed in solid medium and in concentrated extracts of the spent medium of liquid cultures of the Ed8 strain in comparison with the reference strains. In addition, concentrated extracts of the spent medium of A. tubingensis Ed8, but not those of the reference strains, exhibited the ability to reduce Cr(VI). In line with this observation, it was found that A. niger purified GOX is capable of mediating the conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in a reaction dependent on the presence of glucose that is stimulated by organic acids. Furthermore, it was found that a decrease in Cr(VI) may occur in the absence of the GOX enzyme, as long as the reaction products gluconolactone and hydrogen peroxide are present; this conversion of Cr(VI) is stimulated by organic acids in a reaction that generates hydroxyl radicals, which may involve the formation of an intermediate peroxichromate(V) complex. These findings indicated that fungal glucose oxidase acts an indirect chromate reductase through the formation of Cr(VI) reducing molecules, which interact cooperatively with other fungal metabolites in the biotransformation of Cr(VI). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Combined free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide pre-treatment of waste activated sludge enhances methane production via organic molecule breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Batstone, Damien; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy using combined free nitrous acid (FNA i.e. HNO2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to enhance methane production from WAS, with the mechanisms investigated bio-molecularly. WAS from a full-scale plant was treated with FNA alone (1.54 mg N/L), H2O2 alone (10-80 mg/g TS), and their combinations followed by biochemical methane potential tests. Combined FNA and H2O2 pre-treatment substantially enhanced methane potential of WAS by 59-83%, compared to 13-23% and 56% with H2O2 pre-treatment alone and FNA pre-treatment alone respectively. Model-based analysis indicated the increased methane potential was mainly associated with up to 163% increase in rapidly biodegradable fraction with combined pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and chemical structure analyses revealed the breakdown of soluble macromolecules with the combined pre-treatment caused by the deamination and oxidation of the typical functional groups in proteins, polysaccharides and phosphodiesters. These changes likely improved the biodegradability of WAS.

  1. Combined free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide pre-treatment of waste activated sludge enhances methane production via organic molecule breakdown.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Batstone, Damien; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-11-13

    This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy using combined free nitrous acid (FNA i.e. HNO2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to enhance methane production from WAS, with the mechanisms investigated bio-molecularly. WAS from a full-scale plant was treated with FNA alone (1.54 mg N/L), H2O2 alone (10-80 mg/g TS), and their combinations followed by biochemical methane potential tests. Combined FNA and H2O2 pre-treatment substantially enhanced methane potential of WAS by 59-83%, compared to 13-23% and 56% with H2O2 pre-treatment alone and FNA pre-treatment alone respectively. Model-based analysis indicated the increased methane potential was mainly associated with up to 163% increase in rapidly biodegradable fraction with combined pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and chemical structure analyses revealed the breakdown of soluble macromolecules with the combined pre-treatment caused by the deamination and oxidation of the typical functional groups in proteins, polysaccharides and phosphodiesters. These changes likely improved the biodegradability of WAS.

  2. Oxidative Damaged Products, Level of Hydrogen Peroxide, and Antioxidant Protection in Diapausing Pupa of Tasar Silk Worm, Antheraea mylitta: A Comparative Study in Two Voltine Groups.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Alpana; Dandapat, Jagneshwar; Samanta, Luna

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates tissue-specific (hemolymph and fat body) and inter-voltine [bivoltine (BV) and trivoltine (TV)] differences in oxidatively damaged products, H2O2 content, and the relative level of antioxidant protection in the diapausing pupae of Antheraea mylitta. Results suggest that fat body (FB) of both the voltine groups has oxidative predominance, as evident from the high value of lipid peroxidation and H2O2 content, despite better enzymatic defenses in comparison to hemolymph (HL). This may be attributed to the higher metabolic rate of the tissue concerned, concomitant with high lipid content and abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Nondetectable catalase activity in the pupal hemolymph of both strains apparently suggests an additional mechanism for H2O2 metabolism in the tissue. Inter-voltine comparison of the oxidative stress indices and antioxidant defense potential revealed that the TV group has a higher oxidative burden, lower activities for the antioxidant enzymes, and compensatory nonenzymatic protection from reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid.

  3. Combined free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide pre-treatment of waste activated sludge enhances methane production via organic molecule breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Batstone, Damien; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy using combined free nitrous acid (FNA i.e. HNO2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to enhance methane production from WAS, with the mechanisms investigated bio-molecularly. WAS from a full-scale plant was treated with FNA alone (1.54 mg N/L), H2O2 alone (10–80 mg/g TS), and their combinations followed by biochemical methane potential tests. Combined FNA and H2O2 pre-treatment substantially enhanced methane potential of WAS by 59–83%, compared to 13–23% and 56% with H2O2 pre-treatment alone and FNA pre-treatment alone respectively. Model-based analysis indicated the increased methane potential was mainly associated with up to 163% increase in rapidly biodegradable fraction with combined pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and chemical structure analyses revealed the breakdown of soluble macromolecules with the combined pre-treatment caused by the deamination and oxidation of the typical functional groups in proteins, polysaccharides and phosphodiesters. These changes likely improved the biodegradability of WAS. PMID:26565653

  4. A double-blind, randomized, bilateral comparison of skin irritancy following application of the combination acne products clindamycin/tretinoin and benzoyl peroxide/adapalene.

    PubMed

    Goreshi, Renato; Samrao, Aman; Ehst, Benjamin D

    2012-12-01

    The use of topical medications for acne vulgaris is often limited by their irritant properties. Newer combination preparations are available and offer convenience, but irritant potential may still be a hindrance, perhaps more so with the combination of 2 agents. Few studies have compared these formulations directly for tolerability. We sought to compare the tolerability of 2 combination topical acne products, clindamycin 1.2%-tretinoin 0.025% (CLIN/RA) gel and benzoyl peroxide 2.5%-adapalene 0.1% (BPO/ADA) gel. CLIN/RA and BPO/ADA were applied daily to opposite sides of a subject's face for 21 days in a double-blinded fashion. Investigators' Global Assessments and study subject self-assessments of burning/stinging, itching, erythema, and dryness/scaling were collected. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured as an objective measure of skin irritation. A mixed model analysis and repeated-measures analysis of variance were used to compare outcomes for both acne formulations. CLIN/RA produced significantly less burning/stinging than BPO/ADA (P<.001) as well as significantly less pruritus than BPO/ ADA (P<.001). BPO/ADA caused significantly more TEWL than CLIN/RA (P=.005). There was no significant difference in the amount of erythema or the amount of dryness/scaling caused by either formulation. CLIN/RA produced significantly less skin irritancy and TEWL than BPO/ADA.

  5. Metal-independent production of hydroxyl radicals by halogenated quinones and hydrogen peroxide: an ESR spin trapping study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Zhao, Hong-Tao; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Frei, Balz

    2002-03-01

    The metal-independent production of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) from H(2)O(2) and tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TCBQ), a carcinogenic metabolite of the widely used wood-preservative pentachlorophenol, was studied by electron spin resonance methods. When incubated with the spin trapping agent 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), TCBQ and H(2)O(2) produced the DMPO/*OH adduct. The formation of DMPO/*OH was markedly inhibited by the *OH scavenging agents dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, formate, and azide, with the concomitant formation of the characteristic DMPO spin trapping adducts with *CH(3), *CH(CH(3))OH, *COO(-), and *N(3), respectively. The formation of DMPO/*OH and DMPO/*CH(3) from TCBQ and H(2)O(2) in the absence and presence, respectively, of DMSO was inhibited by the trihydroxamate compound desferrioxamine, accompanied by the formation of the desferrioxamine-nitroxide radical. In contrast, DMPO/*OH and DMPO/*CH(3) formation from TCBQ and H(2)O(2) was not affected by the nonhydroxamate iron chelators bathophenanthroline disulfonate, ferrozine, and ferene, as well as the copper-specific chelator bathocuproine disulfonate. A comparative study with ferrous iron and H(2)O(2), the classic Fenton system, strongly supports our conclusion that *OH is produced by TCBQ and H(2)O(2) through a metal-independent mechanism. Metal-independent production of *OH from H(2)O(2) was also observed with several other halogenated quinones.

  6. [Space flight and peroxidative damage].

    PubMed

    Yang, Tang-bin; Zhong, Ping; Qu, Li-na; Yuan, Yan-hong

    2003-12-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase of peroxidative damage after returning to 1 g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight and can even last for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduced blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2alpha, and 8-oxo-7, 8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F2alpha and 8-oxo-7, 8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes are attributed to a combination of energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleted muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by studies in rodents, which showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity afterflight. The changes in rodents were attributed to the stress associated with re-entry into Earth's gravity. Reducing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply antioxidants in diet may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress.

  7. Lung cancer biomarkers for the assessment of modified risk tobacco products: an oxidative stress perspective.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Frazer J; Luettich, Karsta; Gregg, Evan O

    2013-05-01

    Manufacturers have developed prototype cigarettes yielding reduced levels of some tobacco smoke toxicants, when tested using laboratory machine smoking under standardised conditions. For the scientific assessment of modified risk tobacco products, tests that offer objective, reproducible data, which can be obtained in a much shorter time than the requirements of conventional epidemiology are needed. In this review, we consider whether biomarkers of biological effect related to oxidative stress can be used in this role. Based on published data, urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine, thymidine glycol, F2-isoprostanes, serum dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbic acid ratio and carotenoid concentrations show promise, while 4-hydroxynonenal requires further qualification.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide-independent production of α-alkenes by OleTJE P450 fatty acid decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 OleTJE from Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456, a new member of the CYP152 peroxygenase family, was recently found to catalyze the unusual decarboxylation of long-chain fatty acids to form α-alkenes using H2O2 as the sole electron and oxygen donor. Because aliphatic α-alkenes are important chemicals that can be used as biofuels to replace fossil fuels, or for making lubricants, polymers and detergents, studies on OleTJE fatty acid decarboxylase are significant and may lead to commercial production of biogenic α-alkenes in the future, which are renewable and more environmentally friendly than petroleum-derived equivalents. Results We report the H2O2-independent activity of OleTJE for the first time. In the presence of NADPH and O2, this P450 enzyme efficiently decarboxylates long-chain fatty acids (C12 to C20) in vitro when partnering with either the fused P450 reductase domain RhFRED from Rhodococcus sp. or the separate flavodoxin/flavodoxin reductase from Escherichia coli. In vivo, expression of OleTJE or OleTJE-RhFRED in different E. coli strains overproducing free fatty acids resulted in production of variant levels of multiple α-alkenes, with a highest total hydrocarbon titer of 97.6 mg·l-1. Conclusions The discovery of the H2O2-independent activity of OleTJE not only raises a number of fundamental questions on the monooxygenase-like mechanism of this peroxygenase, but also will direct the future metabolic engineering work toward improvement of O2/redox partner(s)/NADPH for overproduction of α-alkenes by OleTJE. PMID:24565055

  9. A novel carbon black graphite hybrid air-cathode for efficient hydrogen peroxide production in bioelectrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; An, Jingkun; Zhou, Lean; Li, Tian; Li, Junhui; Feng, Cuijuan; Wang, Xin

    2016-02-01

    Carbon black and graphite hybrid air-cathode is proved to be effective for H2O2 production in bioelectrochemical systems. The optimal mass ratio of carbon black to graphite is 1:5 with the highest H2O2 yield of 11.9 mg L-1 h-1 cm-2 (12.3 mA cm-2). Continuous flow is found to improve the current efficiency due to the avoidance of H2O2 accumulation. In the biological system, the highest H2O2 yield reaches 3.29 mg L-1h-1 (0.079 kg m-3day-1) with a current efficiency of 72%, which is higher than the abiotic system at the same current density. H2O2 produced in this system is mainly from the oxygen diffused through this air-cathode (>66%), especially when a more negative cathode potential is applied (94% at -1.0 V). This hybrid air-cathode has advantages of high H2O2 yield, high current density and no need of aeration, which make the synthesis of H2O2 more efficient and economical.

  10. The effect of activation of granulocytes on enzyme release and hydrogen peroxide and superoxide production in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Singh, V K; More, T; Singh, S

    1997-05-01

    Polymorphonuclear cells kill microorganisms by the stock of antibiotic proteins and peptides stored in their lysosomal granules and have the ability to produce reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) such as H2O2, O2-, and HOCl. Since the components involved in the microbicidal functions of buffalo (Bos bubalis) polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) have not been characterized, an assessment was made of the levels of various enzymes, the extent of extracellular release of these enzymes, and also their ability to produce H2O2/O2- upon activation with opsonized zymosan (OZ) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using GPC-HPLC, OZ was shown to be a more potent secretagogue than LPS, causing a significantly greater release of low-molecular-weight components. Varying levels of the enzymes (myeloperoxidase, lactate dehydrogenase, acid and alkaline phosphatases, beta-galactosidase, beta-D-glucuronidase, elastase and lysozyme) were recorded in the buffalo PMN and both the activators (OZ and LPS) caused significant release of all the enzymes except alkaline phosphatase. Both the activators also caused a significant increase in H2O2/O2- production by the PMN. However, OZ caused a more pronounced activation than LPS. The studies revealed the presence of oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent microbicidal systems with buffalo PMN, which responded more effectively to zymosan activation.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen activation by dinuclear copper complexes in aqueous solution: hydroxyl radical production initiated by internal electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Lian, Yuxiang; Thyagarajan, Sunita; Rokita, Steven E; Karlin, Kenneth D; Blough, Neil V

    2008-05-21

    Dinuclear Cu(II) complexes, CuII2Nn (n = 4 or 5), were recently found to specifically cleave DNA in the presence of a reducing thiol and O2 or in the presence of H2O2 alone. However, CuII2N3 and a closely related mononuclear Cu(II) complex exhibited no selective reaction under either condition. Spectroscopic studies indicate an intermediate is generated from CuII2Nn (n = 4 or 5) and mononuclear Cu(II) solutions in the presence of H2O2 or from CuI2Nn (n = 4 or 5) in the presence of O2. This intermediate decays to generate OH radicals and ligand degradation products at room temperature. The lack of reactivity of the intermediate with a series of added electron donors suggests the intermediate discharges through a rate-limiting intramolecular electron transfer from the ligand to the metal peroxo center to produce an OH radical and a ligand-based radical. These results imply that DNA cleavage does not result from direct reaction with a metal-peroxo intermediate but instead arises from reaction with either OH radicals or ligand-based radicals.

  12. Ultrasonically Induced Degradation of Microcystin-LR and -RR: Identification of Products, Effect of pH, Formation and Destruction of Peroxides

    PubMed Central

    SONG, WEIHUA; DE LA CRUZ, ARMAH A.; REIN, KATHLEEN; O'SHEA, KEVIN E.

    2008-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a family of toxic peptides produced by a number of cyanobacteria commonly found in lakes, water reservoirs, and recreational facilities. The increased eutrophication of freshwater supplies has led to an increase in the incidence of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms and concerns over the public health implications of these toxins in the water supply. Conventional water treatment methods are ineffective at removing low concentrations of cyanotoxins, hence specialized treatment is usually recommended for treatment of contaminated water. In this study, the products of ultrasonically induced degradation of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and microcystin-RR (MC-RR) were analyzed by LC–MS to elucidate the probable pathways of degradation of these toxins. Results indicate preliminary products of sonolysis of MCs are due to the hydroxyl radical attack on the benzene ring and diene of the Adda peptide residue and cleavage of the Mdha–Ala peptide bond. The effect of pH on the toxin degradation was evaluated since the pH of the solution changes upon ultrasonic irradiation and varies with the water quality of treatable waters. The initial rate of MC-LR degradation is greater at acidic pH and coincides with the change in hydrophobic character of MC-LR as a function of pH. Hydrogen and organic peroxides are formed during ultrasonic irradiation, but can be eliminated by adding Fe(II). The addition of Fe(II) also accelerates the degradation of MC-LR, presumably by promoting the formation of hydroxyl radicals via conversion of ultrasonically produced H2O2. These findings suggest that sonolysis can effectively degrade MCs in drinking water. PMID:16830565

  13. Ascorbic acid pre-treated quartz stimulates TNF-α release in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages through ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Scarfì, Sonia; Magnone, Mirko; Ferraris, Chiara; Pozzolini, Marina; Benvenuto, Federica; Benatti, Umberto; Giovine, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Background Inhalation of crystalline silica induces a pulmonary fibrotic degeneration called silicosis caused by the inability of alveolar macrophages to dissolve the crystalline structure of phagocytosed quartz particles. Ascorbic acid is capable of partially dissolving quartz crystals, leading to an increase of soluble silica concentration and to the generation of new radical sites on the quartz surface. The reaction is specific for the crystalline forms of silica. It has been already demonstrated an increased cytotoxicity and stronger induction of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by ascorbic acid pre-treated quartz (QA) compared to untreated quartz (Q) in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Methods Taking advantage of the enhanced macrophage response to QA as compared to Q particles, we investigated the first steps of cell activation and the contribution of early signals generated directly from the plasma membrane to the production of TNF-α, a cytokine that activates both inflammatory and fibrogenic pathways. Results Here we demonstrate that TNF-α mRNA synthesis and protein secretion are significantly increased in RAW 264.7 macrophages challenged with QA as compared to Q particles, and that the enhanced response is due to an increase of intracellular ROS. Plasma membrane-particle contact, in the absence of phagocytosis, is sufficient to trigger TNF-α production through a mechanism involving membrane lipid peroxidation and this appears to be even more detrimental to macrophage survival than particle phagocytosis itself. Conclusion Taken together these data suggest that an impairment of pulmonary macrophage phagocytosis, i.e. in the case of alcoholic subjects, could potentiate lung disease in silica-exposed individuals. PMID:19298665

  14. Production of hydrogen peroxide is responsible for the induction of apoptosis by hydroxytyrosol on HL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Roberto; Fuccelli, Raffaela; Pieravanti, Federica; De Bartolomeo, Angelo; Morozzi, Guido

    2009-07-01

    Hydroxytyrosol [3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (3,4-DHPEA)], a phenolic compound found exclusively in olive oil, exerts growth-suppressive and pro-apoptotic effects on different cancer cells. Although some molecular mechanisms involved in the pro-apoptotic activity of 3,4-DHPEA have been proposed, the initial stress signals responsible of this phenomenon are not known. Our aim was to assess the involvement of reactive oxygen species as mediators of apoptosis induced by 3,4-DHPEA on HL60 cells. Apoptosis was determined by analyzing the nuclear fragmentation by both fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The externalization of phosphatidylserine was evidenced using an Annexin V-FITC kit. The concentration of H(2)O(2) in the culture medium was measured by the ferrous ion oxidation-xylenol orange method. The pro-apoptotic effect of 3,4-DHPEA (100 muM) was prevented by N-acetyl-cysteine, ascorbate, and alpha-tocopherol. Catalase suppressed the 3,4-DHPEA-induced apoptosis, while the Fe(II)-chelating reagent o-phenantroline showed no effect, suggesting the involvement of H(2)O(2 )but not of OH(*). Indeed, 3,4-DHPEA caused accumulation of H(2)O(2) in the culture medium. Tyrosol (p-hydroxyphenylethanol) and caffeic acid, compounds structurally similar to 3,4-DHPEA but not able to generate H(2)O(2), did not induce an appreciable apoptotic effect. This is the first study demonstrating that apoptosis induction by 3,4-DHPEA is mediated by the extracellular production of H(2)O(2).

  15. In vitro percutaneous absorption of benzoyl peroxide from three fixed combination acne formulations.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A; Bhatt, Varsha; Pillai, Radhakrishnan

    2013-08-01

    Fixed combination therapy in acne is standard of care, and benzoyl peroxide is a common component of a number of fixed-dose combination products available today. Given that benzoyl peroxide can cause concentration-dependent irritation, newer combinations have been developed utilizing lower concentrations (2.5%) in their formulation. These formulations have been shown to provide better tolerability than products with higher benzoyl peroxide concentrations, while offering comparable efficacy. In vitro skin permeation studies can be used to determine the relative availability of benzoyl peroxide from different dosage forms. In this in vitro percutaneous absorption study, the authors compared three fixed combinations, two with 2.5% benzoyl peroxide and one with 5% benzoyl peroxide. Both 2.5% benzoyl peroxide products (1.2% clindamycin phosphate and 2.5% benzoyl peroxide, and 0.1% adapalene and 2.5% benzoyl peroxide) had similar benzoyl peroxide delivery profiles in terms of efficiency of deposition and total benzoyl peroxide tissue permeation. Although 1.2% clindamycin phosphate and 2.5% benzoyl peroxide delivered the same amount of benzoyl peroxide into the receptor fluid as 1.2% clindamycin phosphate and 5% benzoyl peroxide, it was statistically more efficient in terms of percent applied dose (P=0.002). This suggests a more advanced formulation, as it contains only half the concentration of benzoyl peroxide. All three products showed similar delivery characteristics in terms of the amount of benzoyl peroxide depositing into the dermis.

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  17. Effect of melatonin on the production of microsomal hydrogen peroxide and cytochrome P-450 content in rat treated with aflatoxin B(1).

    PubMed

    Awney, Hala A; Attih, Ahmed M; Habib, Sami L; Mostafa, Mostafa H

    2002-03-20

    Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) is a food contaminant fungal toxin that has been implicated as a causative agent in human hepatic and extrahepatic carcinogenesis. In this study we went on to show the effect of melatonin as a free radical scavenger on the production of microsomal hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) during the metabolic activation AFB(1). The production of microsomal H(2)O(2) in vitro during the metabolic activation of different chemical carcinogens has been reported previously. We also studied the effect of melatonin on the cytochrome P-450 content as a major microsomal monooxygenase isoenzymes system in rat liver responsible for the metabolic activation of AFB(1). The amounts of H(2)O(2) and cytochrome P-450 contents in rat treated with melatonin (0.2 mg/kg BW) and/or AFB(1) (0.2 mg/kg BW) at various time intervals has been measured. Animals treated with melatonin exhibited markedly inhibition in the amounts of H(2)O(2) after 1, 3, and 6 h. The highest level of inhibition (3.0 nmol H(2)O(2)/mg protein) was detected after 6 h. However, cytochrome P-450 contents were also decreased after the same period of time. The highest level of inhibition (2.1 nmol/mg protein) was detected after 3 h of injection. A pronounced augmentation of H(2)O(2) production was observed in rat treated with AFB(1) only. The highest level of H(2)O(2) (100 nmol/mg protein) was measured after 1 h. Cytochrome P-450 contents were also decreased in response to AFB(1) injection over the same time intervals. Contrary data was detected in animals received both AFB(1) and melatonin. The generation of H(2)O(2) was inhibited by melatonin after 1, 3 and 6 h. The highest level of inhibition (44.2 nmol/mg protein) was observed after 6 h. Finally, these data suggested that melatonin as a free radical scavenger inhibited the microsomal production of H(2)O(2) in rat treated with AFB(1).

  18. Distribution of Gaseous and Particulate Organic Peroxides Formed in the Ozonolysis of α-Pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Chen, Z.; Huang, L.; Huang, D.

    2015-12-01

    Organic peroxides, an important species in the atmosphere, will affect HOx cycling, promote SOA aging, and cause adverse health effect. However, the formation, distribution and evolution of organic peroxides are extremely complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigate in laboratory the production of peroxides and gas-particle partitioning in the ozonolysis of α-pinene. The molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydromethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA) and total peroxides (TPO, including unknown peroxides) and contribution of peroxides to SOA mass are carefully determined. Comparing the gaseous and particulate peroxides, we find that more than 75% peroxides formed in the ozonolysis remain in the gas phase, and water vapour will significantly influence the formation and distribution of peroxides. Such an unexpected large amount of gaseous peroxides deserves more attention, especially to their effect on HOx cycling.

  19. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Hornung, Steven D.; Baker, Dave L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with nontoxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because hydrogen peroxide is sensitive to contaminants and materials interactions, stability and shelf life are issues. A relatively new, ultrasensitive heat measurement technique, isothermal microcalorimetry, is being used at the White Sands Test Facility to monitor the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at near ambient temperatures. Isothermal microcalorimetry measures the beat flow from a reaction vessel into a surrounding heat sink. In these applications, microcalorimetry is approximately 1,000 times more sensitive than accelerating rate calorimetry or differential scanning calorimetry for measuring thermal events. Experimental procedures have been developed for the microcalorimetric measurement of the ultra-small beat effects caused by incompatible interactions of hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition rates of hydrogen peroxide at the picomole/sec/gram level have been measured showing the effects of stabilizers and peroxide concentration. Typical measurements are carried out at 40 C over a 24-hour period, This paper describes a method for the conversion of the heat flow measurements to chemical reaction rates based on thermochemical considerations. The reaction rates are used in a study of the effects of stabilizer levels on the decomposition of propellant grade hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Hornung, Steven D.; Baker, Dave L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with nontoxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because hydrogen peroxide is sensitive to contaminants and materials interactions, stability and shelf life are issues. A relatively new, ultrasensitive heat measurement technique, isothermal microcalorimetry, is being used at the White Sands Test Facility to monitor the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at near ambient temperatures. Isothermal microcalorimetry measures the beat flow from a reaction vessel into a surrounding heat sink. In these applications, microcalorimetry is approximately 1,000 times more sensitive than accelerating rate calorimetry or differential scanning calorimetry for measuring thermal events. Experimental procedures have been developed for the microcalorimetric measurement of the ultra-small beat effects caused by incompatible interactions of hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition rates of hydrogen peroxide at the picomole/sec/gram level have been measured showing the effects of stabilizers and peroxide concentration. Typical measurements are carried out at 40 C over a 24-hour period, This paper describes a method for the conversion of the heat flow measurements to chemical reaction rates based on thermochemical considerations. The reaction rates are used in a study of the effects of stabilizer levels on the decomposition of propellant grade hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Lack of initiation activity of 4-oxo-2-hexenal, a peroxidation product generated from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in an in vivo five-week liver assay.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Shinji; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Hirata, Akihiro; Kawai, Kazuaki; Toyoda, Takeshi; Ban, Hisayo; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma; Masegi, Toshiaki; Kasai, Hiroshi; Tatematsu, Masae

    2007-01-01

    Peroxidation products formed from polyunsaturated lipids have DNA damaging potential. 4-oxo-2-hexenal (4-OHE), generated by the oxidation of omega-3 fatty acids, has been demonstrated to be mutagenic in vitro as assessed in the Ames test. To examine the carcinogenic risk of 4-OHE in vivo, initiation activity was investigated in a five-week liver assay, established to be effective for screening of carcinogenic potential of mutagens. Seven-week-old male F344 rats underwent two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PH) and were administered 4-OHE intragastrically at doses of 128, 80, 64, 40, 32, 20, or 0 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) at 18 hours thereafter, then being fed on diet containing 0.015% 2-acetylaminofluorene from weeks 2 to 4. All rats were given with 0.8 ml/kg b.w. CCl4 at week 3. At week 5, all survivors were sacrificed and initiation activity was assessed with reference to induction of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci in the liver. Mortality was significantly increased to 72.7% in the 128 mg/kg b.w. dose group compared with 0.9% in the control group. However, the average number of GST-P positive foci in the "128" dose group was 3.26-/+1.66 foci/cm2, not significantly different from the control value (2.78?1.33). Areas of GST-P positive foci were also similar (1.11-/+0.5 and 1.53-/+1.33 mm2/cm2 in "128" and the control groups, respectively). These results showed 4-OHE to have no significant initiation activity in.

  2. [The influence of degenerative changes on the production of free radicals and the lipid peroxidation at the patients after alloplasty of the hip joint].

    PubMed

    Mrowicka, Małgorzata; Gałecka, Elzbieta; Miller, Elzbieta; Garncarek, Paweł

    2008-08-01

    Since now researches claimed that rheumatoid arthritis was not characterized with an inflammatory process due to the lack of vessel in the cartilaginous tissue. Nevertheless, an inflammation of synovial membrane and a reduction of activity of articulation co-exist with rheumatoid arthritis. Recent results have proved that the above disease is connected with an oxidative stress. The aim of this investigation was to estimate changes of nitric oxide (NO) in plasma and malondialdehyd (MDA) concentration in red blood cells of patients suffering from an alloplastic of the hip joint. We also measured how physical activity in a reduced motor activity influences the NO and MDA concentration. Malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) concentration in RBCs was assayed with Placer method, nitrogen concentration in blood plasma was determined using the Griess indirect method. Biochemical tests have been performed on a group of 36 patients with osteoarthritis hospitalised at the Traumatic-Orthopaedic Department of the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Administration Hospital in Lodz, Poland. A control group included 21 subjects with normal physical activity. The concentration of nitric oxide in plasma of patients that were operated was lower than in a healthy control group. Ten days after the operation it decreased, but after a month it was higher than before the operation. The concentration of MDA in red blood cells was higher before and after the alloplastic than in the healthy control group. Ten days after operation the concentration of MDA was lower about 15.8% but after 30 days it lowered up to about 26.3% in comparison to the concentration before the operation. Our results are not the same as those shown by other researches which suggest increased production of nitric oxide. Reduction of the motor activity due to degenerative joint disease and alloplastic causes reduction in lipid peroxidation of red blood cells.

  3. Rapid microassays for the measurement of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by macrophages in culture using an automatic enzyme immunoassay reader.

    PubMed

    Pick, E; Mizel, D

    1981-01-01

    Two simple semiautomated microassays for the measurement of superoxide (O-2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by cultured macrophages (MPs) are described. The measurement of O-2 is based on the reduction of ferricytochrome c as assayed by the increase in its absorbance at 550 nm. Quantitation of H2O2 is based on the horseradish peroxidase (HRPO)-dependent oxidation of phenol red which is assayed by its increased absorbance at 600 nm. MPs are cultured in monolayers in 96-well flat-bottom tissue culture plates and covered with 100 mul amounts per well of either a ferricytochrome c solution containing phenol red and HRPO. Following the addition of an agent eliciting an oxidative burst (OB) and incubation of the plates at 37 degrees C for various time intervals, the changes in the absorbance of ferricytochrome c and phenol red, respectively, are measured directly in the wells of the tissue culture plates with the cells in situ, by using an automatic 8-channel photometer which reads absorbances vertically through individual wells. This instrument, which was originally designed for reading enzyme immunoassays in microtitration plates, can be easily adapted for use in the above test, when fitted with interference filters with wave lengths of 550 nm (for the assay of O-2) and 600 nm (for the assay of H2O2). The principal advantages of this techniques are: the ability to perform the assays directly in the culture plates with cells in situ; the small amounts of cells and reagents needed; its sensitivity and reproducibility; the ease with which kinetic experiments can be done; the large number of samples which can be tested in parallel, and especially the speed and convenience offered by the automated reading and printout of absorbance values.

  4. Membrane lipid peroxidation in neurodegeneration: Role of thrombin and proteinase-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Citron, Bruce A; Ameenuddin, Syed; Uchida, K; Suo, William Z; SantaCruz, Karen; Festoff, Barry W

    2016-07-15

    Thrombin and membrane lipid peroxidation (MLP) have been implicated in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders from CNS trauma to stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Because thrombin also induces MLP in platelets and its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases we hypothesized that its deleterious effects might, in part, involve formation of MLP in neuronal cells. We previously showed that thrombin induced caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in motor neurons, via a proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1). We have now investigated thrombin's influence on the oxidative state of neurons leading to induction of MLP-protein adducts. Translational relevance of thrombin-induced MLP is supported by increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts (HNEPA) in AD and PD brains. We now report for the first time that thrombin dose-dependently induces formation of HNEPA in NSC34 mouse motor neuron cells using anti-HNE and anti-acrolein monoclonal antibodies. The most prominent immunoreactive band, in SDS-PAGE, was at ∼54kDa. Membrane fractions displayed higher amounts of the protein-adduct than cytosolic fractions. Thrombin induced MLP was mediated, at least in part, through PAR1 since a PAR1 active peptide, PAR1AP, also elevated HNEPA levels. Of interest, glutamate and Fe2SO4 also increased the ∼54kDa HNEPA band in these cells but to a lesser extent. Taken together our results implicate the involvement of thrombin and MLP in neuronal cell loss observed in various CNS degenerative and traumatic pathologies.

  5. PRODUCTION OF CONCENTRATED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    poisons for the second stage; HCN of the H ion (in diluted mineral acids ) serve in this capacity. HCN (10 to the -4th power normal) and HCl (0.05...temperature retarded the reaction rate but increased the yield of H2O2. Acidic catalyst carriers accounted for larger yields than amphoteric carriers.

  6. The NADPH oxidase-mediated production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and resistance to oxidative stress in the necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria alternata of citrus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Siwy Ling; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2012-10-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase (Nox) complex is vital for cellular differentiation and signalling in fungi. We cloned and characterized an AaNoxA gene of the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria alternata, which encodes a polypeptide analogous to mammalian gp91(phox) and fungal Noxs implicated in the generation of ROS. Genetic analysis confirmed that AaNoxA is responsible for the production of ROS. Moreover, deletion of AaNoxA in A. alternata resulted in an elevated hypersensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), menadione, potassium superoxide (KO(2)), diamide and many ROS-generating compounds. The results implicate the involvement of AaNoxA in cellular resistance to ROS stress. The impaired phenotypes strongly resemble those previously seen for the ap1 null mutant defective in a YAP1-like transcriptional regulator and for the hog1 mutant defective in a HOG1-like mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The noxA null mutant was also hypersensitive to Nox inhibitors, nitric oxide (NO(·)) donors and NO(·) synthase inhibitors, implying a role of AaNoxA in the NO(·) signalling pathway. Expression of AaNoxA was activated by H(2)O(2), menadione, KO(2), NO(·) donors and L-arginine (a substrate for NO(·) synthase). AaNoxA may be able to sense and respond to both ROS and nitric oxide. Moreover, AaNoxA is required for normal conidiation and full fungal virulence. AaNoxA promoted the expression of the AaAP1 and AaHOG1 genes in A. alternata. Inactivation of AaNoxA greatly reduced the transcriptional activation of AaAP1 in response to ROS stress. Thus, we conclude that the regulatory functions of AaNoxA conferring ROS resistance are modulated partially through the activation of the YAP1- and HOG1 MAP kinase-mediated signalling pathways. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  7. Simultaneous production of p-tolualdehyde and hydrogen peroxide in photocatalytic oxygenation of p-xylene and reduction of oxygen with 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium ion derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Kei; Mizushima, Kentaro; Iwata, Ryosuke; Souma, Kazunori; Suzuki, Nobuo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2010-01-28

    Photooxygenation of p-xylene by oxygen occurs efficiently under photoirradiation of 9-mesityl-2,7,10-trimethylacridinium ion (Me(2)Acr(+)-Mes) to yield p-tolualdehyde and hydrogen peroxide, which is initiated via photoinduced electron transfer of Me(2)Acr(+)-Mes to produce the electron-transfer state.

  8. A Modified Demonstration of the Catalytic Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Carlos Alexander

    2005-06-01

    A safer and cheaper version of the popular catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide demonstration commonly called the “Elephants’ Toothpaste” is presented. Hydrogen peroxide is decomposed in the presence of a surfactant by the enzyme catalase producing foam. Catalase has a higher activity compared with the traditional iodide and permits the use of diluted hydrogen peroxide solutions. The demonstration can be made with household products with similar amazing effects.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide inhibition of bicupin oxalate oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, John M.; Rana, Hassan; Ndungu, Joan; Chakrabarti, Gaurab

    2017-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase is a manganese containing enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of oxalate to carbon dioxide in a reaction that is coupled with the reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate oxidase from Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (CsOxOx) is the first fungal and bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes this reaction. Potential applications of oxalate oxidase for use in pancreatic cancer treatment, to prevent scaling in paper pulping, and in biofuel cells have highlighted the need to understand the extent of the hydrogen peroxide inhibition of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate. We apply a membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) assay to directly measure initial rates of carbon dioxide formation and oxygen consumption in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that hydrogen peroxide is both a reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate and an irreversible inactivator. The build-up of the turnover-generated hydrogen peroxide product leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. The introduction of catalase to reaction mixtures protects the enzyme from inactivation allowing reactions to proceed to completion. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that no changes in global protein structure take place in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Additionally, we show that the CsOxOx catalyzed reaction with the three carbon substrate mesoxalate consumes oxygen which is in contrast to previous proposals that it catalyzed a non-oxidative decarboxylation with this substrate. PMID:28486485

  10. Hydrogen peroxide inhibition of bicupin oxalate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, John M; Rana, Hassan; Ndungu, Joan; Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Moomaw, Ellen W

    2017-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase is a manganese containing enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of oxalate to carbon dioxide in a reaction that is coupled with the reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate oxidase from Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (CsOxOx) is the first fungal and bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes this reaction. Potential applications of oxalate oxidase for use in pancreatic cancer treatment, to prevent scaling in paper pulping, and in biofuel cells have highlighted the need to understand the extent of the hydrogen peroxide inhibition of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate. We apply a membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) assay to directly measure initial rates of carbon dioxide formation and oxygen consumption in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that hydrogen peroxide is both a reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate and an irreversible inactivator. The build-up of the turnover-generated hydrogen peroxide product leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. The introduction of catalase to reaction mixtures protects the enzyme from inactivation allowing reactions to proceed to completion. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that no changes in global protein structure take place in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Additionally, we show that the CsOxOx catalyzed reaction with the three carbon substrate mesoxalate consumes oxygen which is in contrast to previous proposals that it catalyzed a non-oxidative decarboxylation with this substrate.

  11. Mechanism of toxicity of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Imlay, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    We examined the capacity of hydrogen peroxide to injure E. coli. Externally applied hydrogen peroxide rapidly permeates the bacterial cell and causes at least two classes of potentially lethal damage. These classes were initially distinguished by the kinetics of their production. Additional distinctions have been made regarding the chemistry of cell injury and the details of the cell response. One class of cell damage consists of DNA lesions; if unrepaired, mode one killing results. Hydrogen peroxide does not directly attack the DNA. Instead, ferrous iron reduces the peroxide to generate a hydroxyl-radical-like species, which acts as a DNA oxidant. The peculiar kinetics of mode-one killing may reflect an high reaction rate between this radical and peroxide itself. Interestingly, NADH may chemically reduce ferric iron in order to start and maintain the sequence of redox reactions. The target of the other class of cell damage is unknown. This damage, unlike that associated with mode-one killing, does not rely upon Fenton chemistry. Scavenging enzymes, such as catalase and superoxide dismutase, contribute to resisting oxidative stress. Increases in catalase titer accelerate detoxification of peroxide and are responsible for the protective effects of oxyR induction. When oxidants elude this defense and nick DNA, a variety of enzymes-exonuclease III, endonuclease IV, and DNA polymerase I-repair the damage.

  12. Effect of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark oil on heat stress-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor density in developing Japanese quails.

    PubMed

    Türk, Gaffari; Şimşek, Ülkü G; Çeribaşı, Ali O; Çeribaşı, Songül; Özer Kaya, Şeyma; Güvenç, Mehmet; Çiftçi, Mehmet; Sönmez, Mustafa; Yüce, Abdurrauf; Bayrakdar, Ali; Yaman, Mine; Tonbak, Fadime

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cinnamon bark oil (CBO) on heat stress (HS)-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor (AR) density in developing Japanese quails. Fifteen-day-old 90 male chicks were assigned to two main groups. The first group (45 chicks) was kept in a thermoneutral room at 22 °C for 24 h/day. The second group (45 chicks) was kept in a room with high ambient temperature at 34 °C for 8 h/day (from 9 AM-5 PM) and at 22 °C for 16 h/day. Each of these two main groups was then divided into three subgroups (CBO groups 0, 250, 500 ppm) consisting of 15 chicks (six treatment groups in 2 × 3 factorial order). Each of subgroups was replicated for three times and each replicate included five chicks. Heat stress caused significant decreases in body weight, spermatid and testicular sperm numbers, the density of testicular Bcl-2 (antiapoptotic marker) and AR immunopositivity, and significant increases in testicular lipid peroxidation level, the density of testicular Bax (apoptotic marker) immunopositivity, and a Bax/Bcl-2 ratio along with some histopathologic damages. However, 250 and 500 ppm CBO supplementation provided significant improvements in HS-induced increased level of testicular lipid peroxidation, decreased number of spermatid and testicular sperm, decreased densities of Bcl-2 and AR immunopositivity, and some deteriorated testicular histopathologic lesions. In addition, although HS did not significantly affect the testicular glutathione level, addition of both 250 and 500 ppm CBO to diet of quails reared in both HS and thermoneutral conditions caused a significant increase when compared with quails without any consumption of CBO. In conclusion, HS-induced lipid peroxidation causes testicular damage in developing male Japanese quails and, consumption of CBO, which has antiperoxidative effect, protects their testes against HS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  13. Development of a thermally self-sustaining kWe-class diesel reformer using hydrogen peroxide for hydrogen production in low-oxygen environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Gwangwoo; Lee, Kwangho; Ha, Sanghyeon; Bae, Joongmyeon

    2016-09-01

    A novel technology of a diesel reformer that uses hydrogen peroxide is developed to obtain the hydrogen required for fuel cell air-independent propulsion for underwater applications, such as submarines and unmanned underwater vehicles. Diesel fuel could be a promising hydrogen source for underwater applications due to its high hydrogen density and its globally well-equipped infrastructure. An alternative oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), is applied to supply not only oxygen but also the water required for diesel autothermal (ATR) reforming. The proposed reformer does not require an additional heating device to supply heat for the vaporization of diesel or oxidant due to the exothermic nature of the ATR reaction and the heat of decomposition of H2O2. The effects of H2O2 on diesel reforming were confirmed based on operating the engineering-scale (kWe-class) diesel-H2O2 reformer. Undecomposed H2O2 caused an excessively high temperature in the mixing zone and a corrosion effect in the reformer wall. To overcome these phenomena, we introduced a catalytic H2O2 decomposer to fully decompose hydrogen peroxide into steam and oxygen. From this important step, we essentially eliminate side effects from undecomposed H2O2 and retain a high reforming efficiency by utilizing the heat of decomposition of H2O2.

  14. DHA reduces oxidative stress following hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets: a study of lipid peroxidation products in urine and plasma.

    PubMed

    Huun, Marianne Ullestad; Garberg, Håvard T; Escobar, Javier; Chafer, Consuelo; Vento, Maximo; Holme, Ingar M; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Solberg, Rønnaug

    2017-06-20

    Lipid peroxidation mediated by reactive oxygen species is a major contributor to oxidative stress. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has anti-oxidant and neuroprotective properties. Our objective was to assess how oxidative stress measured by lipid peroxidation was modified by DHA in a newborn piglet model of hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Fifty-five piglets were randomized to (i) hypoxia, (ii) DHA, (iii) hypothermia, (iv) hypothermia+DHA or (v) sham. All groups but sham were subjected to hypoxia by breathing 8% O2. DHA was administered 210 min after end of hypoxia and the piglets were euthanized 9.5 h after end of hypoxia. Urine and blood were harvested at these two time points and analyzed for F4-neuroprostanes, F2-isoprostanes, neurofuranes and isofuranes using UPLC-MS/MS. F4-neuroprostanes in urine were significantly reduced (P=0.006) in groups receiving DHA. Hypoxia (median, IQR 1652 nM, 610-4557) vs. DHA (440 nM, 367-738, P=0.016) and hypothermia (median, IQR 1338 nM, 744-3085) vs. hypothermia+DHA (356 nM, 264-1180, P=0.006). The isoprostane compound 8-iso-PGF2α was significantly lower (P=0.011) in the DHA group compared to the hypoxia group. No significant differences were found between the groups in blood. DHA significantly reduces oxidative stress by measures of lipid peroxidation following HI in both normothermic and hypothermic piglets.

  15. Involvement of lipid peroxidation and organic peroxides in UVA-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Polte, Tobias; Tyrrell, Rex M

    2004-06-15

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation causes human skin aging and skin cancer at least partially through the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMP-1, the interstitial collagenase, is responsible for the degradation of collagen and is involved in tumor progression in human skin. The present study uses human skin fibroblast cells (FEK4) to investigate the involvement of lipid peroxidation and the role of peroxides as possible mediators in MMP-1 activation by UVA. Preincubation with the antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox reduced UVA-dependent MMP-1 upregulation, suggesting that peroxidation of membrane lipids is involved. Blocking the iron-driven generation of lipid peroxides and hydroxyl radicals by different iron chelators led to a decrease in UVA-induced MMP-1 mRNA accumulation. Moreover, modulation of glutathione peroxidase activity by use of the specific inhibitor mercaptosuccinate (MS) or by the depletion of glutathione (using buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine, BSO), enhanced the UVA-dependent MMP-1 response. Finally, UVA irradiation generated a significant increase in intracellular peroxide levels which is augmented by pretreatment of the cells with BSO or MS. Our results demonstrate that lipid peroxidation and the production of peroxides are important events in the signalling pathway of MMP-1 activation by UVA.

  16. The Peroxide Pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeal, Curtis I., Jr.; Anderson, William

    1999-01-01

    NASA's current focus on technology roadmaps as a tool for guiding investment decisions leads naturally to a discussion of NASA's roadmap for peroxide propulsion system development. NASA's new Second Generation Space Transportation System roadmap calls for an integrated Reusable Upper-Stage (RUS) engine technology demonstration in the FY03/FY04 time period. Preceding this integrated demonstration are several years of component developments and subsystem technology demonstrations. NASA and the Air Force took the first steps at developing focused upper stage technologies with the initiation of the Upper Stage Flight Experiment with Orbital Sciences in December 1997. A review of this program's peroxide propulsion development is a useful first step in establishing the peroxide propulsion pathway that could lead to a RUS demonstration in 2004.

  17. Method for detection of hydrogen peroxide in HT22 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacewicz, Dagmara; Siedlecka-Kroplewska, Kamila; Drzeżdżon, Joanna; Piotrowska, Agnieszka; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Tesmar, Aleksandra; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed a new method which can be applied in assessing the intracellular production of hydrogen peroxide. Using this assay we have examined the hydrogen peroxide generation during the L-glutamate induced oxidative stress in the HT22 hippocampal cells. The detection of hydrogen peroxide is based on two crucial reagents cis-[Cr(C2O4)(pm)(OH2)2]+ (pm denotes pyridoxamine) and 2-ketobutyrate. The results obtained indicate that the presented method can be a promising tool to detect hydrogen peroxide in biological samples, particularly in cellular experimental models. PMID:28358356

  18. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  19. [Hydrogen peroxide in artificial photosynthesizing systems].

    PubMed

    Lobanov, A V; Komissarov, G G

    2014-01-01

    From the point of view of the concepts of hydrogen peroxide as a source of photosynthetic oxygen (hydrogen) coordination and photochemical properties of chlorophyll and its aggregates towards hydrogen peroxide were considered. The binding energy of H2O and H2O2 with chlorophyll and chlorophyllide depending on their form (monomers, dimers and trimers) was estimated by quantum chemical calculations. It is shown that at an increase of the degree of the pigment aggregation binding energy of H2O2 was more than the energy of H2O. Analysis of experimental results of the photochemical decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using chlorophyll was carried out. Estimates of the thermodynamic parameters (deltaG degrees and deltaH degrees) of the formation of organic compounds from CO2 with water and hydrogen peroxide were compared. The interaction of CO2 with H2O2 requires much less energy consumption than with water for all considered cases. The formation of organic products (formaldehyde, alcohols, carboxylic and carbonylic compounds) and simultaneous production of O2 under the influence of visible light in the systems of inorganic carbon--hydrogen peroxide--chlorophyll (phthalocyanine) is detected by GC/MS method, FTIR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis.

  20. Structural analysis of peroxide-soaked MnSOD crystals reveals side-on binding of peroxide to active-site manganese.

    PubMed

    Porta, Jason; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2010-06-11

    The superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes are important antioxidant agents that protect cells from reactive oxygen species. The SOD family is responsible for catalyzing the disproportionation of superoxide radical to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Manganese- and iron-containing SOD exhibit product inhibition whereas Cu/ZnSOD does not. Here, we report the crystal structure of Escherichia coli MnSOD with hydrogen peroxide cryotrapped in the active site. Crystallographic refinement to 1.55 A and close inspection revealed electron density for hydrogen peroxide in three of the four active sites in the asymmetric unit. The hydrogen peroxide molecules are in the position opposite His26 that is normally assumed by water in the trigonal bipyramidal resting state of the enzyme. Hydrogen peroxide is present in active sites B, C, and D and is side-on coordinated to the active-site manganese. In chains B and D, the peroxide is oriented in the plane formed by manganese and ligands Asp167 and His26. In chain C, the peroxide is bound, making a 70 degrees angle to the plane. Comparison of the peroxide-bound active site with the hydroxide-bound octahedral form shows a shifting of residue Tyr34 towards the active site when peroxide is bound. Comparison with peroxide-soaked Cu/ZnSOD indicates end-on binding of peroxide when the SOD does not exhibit inhibition by peroxide and side-on binding of peroxide in the product-inhibited state of MnSOD.

  1. Determination of peroxides in saliva--kinetics of peroxide release into saliva during home-bleaching with Whitestrips and Vivastyle.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Christian; Zech, Ronald; Henze, Elvira; Dorr-Tolui, Reza; Attin, Thomas

    2003-08-01

    Aim of the study was to determine peroxides in saliva, released during bleaching procedures. Upper incisors of five subjects were bleached with Whitestrips (5% H2O2) and Vivastyle (10% carbamide peroxide, tray charged with 225mg) for 30min, each on different days. Saliva was collected before and during the whole period of bleaching at different intervals. The amount of peroxide in the salivary samples was assessed with peroxidase, phenol and 4-aminoantipyrin in a photometric assay. Additionally the amount of peroxides in the bleaching material was determined before and after the bleaching, so that the peroxide release into saliva could be balanced. The amount of peroxides released into saliva was related to the bleaching system and only partially influenced by the individual salivary flow rate. Bleaching with Vivastyle led to lower release of peroxides into saliva compared to Whitestrips (Vivastyle: 0.8+/-0.17mg; Whitestrips: 1.5+/-0.84mg). Salivary flow rate was not correlated to release of peroxides from the bleaching products. It can be concluded that the enzymatic method adopting 4-aminoantipyrin and peroxidase is valid for the determination of peroxides in saliva. Furthermore distinctly more peroxides are released into the oral cavity from Whitestrips than from trays charged with Vivastyle .

  2. Erythromycin and Benzoyl Peroxide Topical

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide is used to treat acne. Erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide are in a class of medications called topical antibiotics. The combination of erythromycin ...

  3. Clindamycin and Benzoyl Peroxide Topical

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of clindamycin and benzoyl peroxide is used to treat acne. Clindamycin and benzoyl peroxide are in a class of medications called topical antibiotics. The combination of clindamycin ...

  4. Triplet quenching by diacyl peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingold, K. U.; Johnston, L. J.; Lusztyk, J.; Scaiano, J. C.

    1984-10-01

    Benzoyl and decanoyl peroxides are efficient quenchers of various triplet sensitizers: kinetic studies using laser photolysis techniques indicate that electronic energy transfer and charge transfer to the peroxide are important factors contributing to the quenching process.

  5. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex I Leads to Decreased Motility and Membrane Integrity Related to Increased Hydrogen Peroxide and Reduced ATP Production, while the Inhibition of Glycolysis Has Less Impact on Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Plaza Davila, María; Martin Muñoz, Patricia; Tapia, Jose A.; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Balao da Silva C, Carolina; Peña, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have been proposed as the major source of reactive oxygen species in somatic cells and human spermatozoa. However, no data regarding the role of mitochondrial ROS production in stallion spermatozoa are available. To shed light on the role of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in the origin of oxidative stress in stallion spermatozoa, specific inhibitors of complex I (rotenone) and III (antimycin-A) were used. Ejaculates from seven Andalusian stallions were collected and incubated in BWW media at 37°C in the presence of rotenone, antimycin-A or control vehicle. Incubation in the presence of these inhibitors reduced sperm motility and velocity (CASA analysis) (p<0.01), but the effect was more evident in the presence of rotenone (a complex I inhibitor). These inhibitors also decreased ATP content. The inhibition of complexes I and III decreased the production of reactive oxygen species (p<0.01) as assessed by flow cytometry after staining with CellRox deep red. This observation suggests that the CellRox probe mainly identifies superoxide and that superoxide production may reflect intense mitochondrial activity rather than oxidative stress. The inhibition of complex I resulted in increased hydrogen peroxide production (p<0.01). The inhibition of glycolysis resulted in reduced sperm velocities (p<0.01) without an effect on the percentage of total motile sperm. Weak and moderate (but statistically significant) positive correlations were observed between sperm motility, velocity and membrane integrity and the production of reactive oxygen species. These results indicate that stallion sperm rely heavily on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for the production of ATP for motility but also require glycolysis to maintain high velocities. These data also indicate that increased hydrogen peroxide originating in the mitochondria is a mechanism involved in stallion sperm senescence. PMID:26407142

  6. Hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikes, Brian G.; Miller, William L.; Lee, Meehye

    1991-05-01

    Aqueous fluorescence and chemiluminescence methods have been used to measure hydrogen peroxide in natural waters and in the atmosphere. Ambient hydrogen peroxide and soluble organic peroxide data is presented from the EMEX, MLOPEX and SAGA-3 experimental programs, experiments conducted in the remote marine environment. Methods to measure organic peroxide using conventional collection strategies and direct analysis by chemiluminescence or fluorescence method is approximately two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the fluorescence method. Species specific measurements of organic peroxides are also in development using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and fluorescence or chemiluminescence detection.

  7. Algal toxicity of the alternative disinfectants performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA), chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and their by-products hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite (ClO2(-)).

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Baun, Anders; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2016-12-01

    Environmental effect evaluation of disinfection of combined sewer overflow events with alternative chemical disinfectants requires that the environmental toxicity of the disinfectants and the main by-products of their use are known. Many disinfectants degrade quickly in water which should be included in the evaluation of both their toxicity as determined in standardized tests and their possible negative effect in the water environment. Here we evaluated according to the standardized ISO 8692 test the toxicity towards the green microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, of three disinfectants: performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as well as two by-products of their use: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite. All of the five chemicals investigated showed clear toxicity to the algae with well-defined dose response curves. The EC50 values ranged from 0.16 to 2.9mg/L based on nominal concentrations leading to the labeling of the chemicals as either toxic or very toxic. The five investigated chemicals decreased in toxicity in the order chlorine dioxide, performic acid, peracetic acid, chlorite and hydrogen peroxide. The stability of the chemicals increased in the same order as the toxicity decrease. This indicates that even though ClO2 has the highest environmental hazard potential, it may still be suitable as an alternative disinfectant due to its rapid degradation in water.

  8. To tag or not to tag: A comparative evaluation of immunoaffinity-labeling and tandem mass spectrometry for the identification and localization of posttranslational protein carbonylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, an end-product of lipid peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Prokai, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    Posttranslational carbonylation of proteins by the covalent attachment of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is a biomarker of oxidative stress. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has become an essential tool for characterization of this modification. Chemical tagging methods have been used to facilitate the immunoaffinity-based enrichment or even quantification of HNE-modified peptides and proteins. With MS/MS spectra of the untagged modified peptides considered as references, a comparative evaluation is presented focusing on the impact of affinity-tagging with four carbonyl-specific reagents (2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine, biotin hydrazide, biotinamidohexanoic acid hydrazide and N’-aminooxymethylcarbonylhydrazino D-biotin) on collision-induced dissociation of the tagged HNE-carbonylated peptides. Our study has shown that chemical labeling may not be carried out successfully for all the peptides and with all the reagents. The attachment of a tag usually cannot circumvent the occurrence of strong neutral losses observed with untagged species and, in addition, fragmentation of the introduced tag may also be introduced. Chemical tagging of certain peptides may, nevertheless, afford more sequence ions upon MS/MS than the untagged carbonylated peptide, especially when Michael addition of the lipid peroxidation product occurs on cysteine residues. Therefore, tagging may increase the confidence of identifications of HNE-modified peptides by database searches. PMID:21835276

  9. [Changes of fatty-acid structure of common lipids and contents of peroxidation products in tissues of embryos depending on the level of vitamins A, D3 and E in a diet of geese during the reproductive period].

    PubMed

    Moravs'ka, O V; Vovk, S O

    2010-01-01

    Results concerning the contents of retinol in the liver, residual yoke of 25-day embryos and yoke of eggs depending on the level of vitamins A, D3 and E in the diet of geese by grey Obroshin breeds in reproductive period are presented in the paper. It is established, that vitamin D3 reduces the level of retinol deposition in the tissues of embryos and yoke of eggs of geese, and addition of vitamins A and E to a diet of geese raises the level of retinol both in the liver and residual yoke of embryos, and in yokes of geese eggs. Besides the data about changes of fatty-acid spectrum of common lipids and contents of lipid peroxidations products in tissues of the liver and pectoral muscles of 25-day embryos are presented in the paper depending on the level of vitamins A, D3 and E in geese diet during their reproductive period. Introduction of vitamin A--in quantity of 10000 IU, vitamin D3--in quantity of 3000 IU, in the composition of mixed fodder of geese during the reproductive period and vitamin E in quantity 35 IU on 1 kg to mixed fodder optimizes fatty-acid structure of the common lipids and the level of peroxidations lipids products in the liver and pectoral muscles of embryos.

  10. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  11. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  12. Ferritin-stimulated lipid peroxidation, lysosomal leak, and macroautophagy promote lysosomal "metastability" in primary hepatocytes determining in vitro cell survival.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Margit A; Schürz, Melanie; Teufl, Bernhard; Uchida, Koji; Eckl, Peter M; Bresgen, Nikolaus

    2015-03-01

    Several pathologies are associated with elevated levels of serum ferritin, for which growth inhibitory properties have been reported; however, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly defined. Previously we have described cytotoxic properties of isoferritins released from primary hepatocytes in vitro, which induce apoptosis in an iron and oxidative stress-dependent mode. Here we show that this ferritin species stimulates endosome clustering and giant endosome formation in primary hepatocytes accompanied by enhanced lysosomal membrane permeability (LMP). In parallel, protein modification by lipid peroxidation-derived 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is strongly promoted by ferritin, the HNE-modified proteins (HNE-P) showing remarkable aggregation. Emphasizing the prooxidant context, GSH is rapidly depleted and the GSH/GSSG ratio is substantially declining in ferritin-treated cells. Furthermore, ferritin triggers a transient upregulation of macroautophagy which is abolished by iron chelation and apparently supports HNE-P clearance. Macroautophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine strongly amplifies ferritin cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent mode, suggesting an important role of macroautophagy on cellular responses to ferritin endocytosis. Moreover, pointing at an involvement of lysosomal proteolysis, ferritin cytotoxicity and lysosome fragility are aggravated by the protease inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, EGF which suppresses ferritin-induced cell death attenuates ferritin-mediated LMP. In conclusion, we propose that HNE-P accumulation, lysosome dysfunction, and macroautophagy stimulated by ferritin endocytosis provoke lysosomal "metastability" in primary hepatocytes which permits cell survival as long as in- and extrinsic determinants (e.g., antioxidant availability, damage repair, EGF signaling) keep the degree of lysosomal destabilization below cell death-inducing thresholds.

  13. The furofuran-ring selectivity, hydrogen peroxide-production and low Km value are the three elements for highly effective detoxification of aflatoxin oxidase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan-Zhen; Lu, Fu-Pu; Jiang, Hai-Lan; Tan, Cui-Ping; Yao, Dong-Sheng; Xie, Chun-Fang; Liu, Da-Ling

    2015-02-01

    AFO (aflatoxin oxidase), an enzyme from Armillariella tabescens previously named aflatoxin detoxifizyme, exhibits oxidative detoxification activity toward aflatoxin B1 and sterigmatocystin. Bioinformatics reveals that AFO is a newly discovered oxidase because AFO does not share any significant similarities with any known oxidase. It is critically important to understand how AFO acts on aflatoxin B1. In this study, in addition to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and sterigmatocystin (ST), five other chemicals that have furan or pyran structures were investigated. The results indicated that in addition to AFB1 and ST, AFO is also able to act on versicolorin A, 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran and furan. These results suggested that 8,9-unsaturated carboncarbon bond of aflatoxin B1 is the potential reactive site for AFO. Further findings indicated that the action of AFO is oxygen-dependent and hydrogen peroxide-producing. The simultaneously produced-hydrogen peroxide possibly plays the essential role in detoxification of AFO. In addition, the extremely low Km value of 0.33 µmol/l for AFO-AFB1 and 0.11 µmol/l for AFO-ST signifies that AFO is highly selective for AFB1 as well as ST.

  14. The Effect of High-Dose Insulin Analog Initiation Therapy on Lipid Peroxidation Products and Oxidative Stress Markers in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tuzcu, Hazal; Aslan, Ibrahim; Aslan, Mutay

    2013-01-01

    Effect of high-dose insulin analog initiation therapy was evaluated on lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Twenty-four T2DM patients with HbA1c levels above 10% despite ongoing therapy with sulphonylurea and metformin were selected. Former treatment regimen was continued for the first day followed by substitution of sulphonylurea therapy with different insulin analogs. Glycemic profiles were determined over 72 hours by Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS), and blood/urine samples were collected at 24 and 72 hours. Insulin analog plus metformin treatment significantly reduced glucose variability. Plasma and urine lipid peroxidation were markedly decreased following insulin analog plus metformin treatment. No correlation existed between glucose variability and levels of plasma and urine oxidative stress markers. Likewise, changes in mean blood glucose from baseline to end point showed no significant correlation with changes in markers of oxidative stress. On the contrary, decreased levels of oxidative stress markers following treatment with insulin analogs were significantly correlated with mean blood glucose levels. In conclusion, insulin plus metformin resulted in a significant reduction in oxidative stress markers compared with oral hypoglycemic agents alone. Data from this study suggests that insulin analogs irrespective of changes in blood glucose exert inhibitory effects on free radical formation. PMID:23577222

  15. Lithium peroxide primary element

    SciTech Connect

    Winsel, A.

    1982-05-04

    In a galvanic primary element of the system Li/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, the aqueous cathode depolarizer H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is fixated as a polyurethane gel. It can thereby be controlled and caused to react with the anode metal in accordance with the current drain requirements. This is accomplished using a ram to press the gel toward a conductor which covers the lithium anode, which may take the form of a metal grid and/or a gas diffusion electrode. The oxygen which forms in the working layer through catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide creates a gas bubble when the current is interrupted or the ram is stopped, thereby interrupting the further supply of hydrogen peroxide to the catalyst.

  16. Efficacy, efficiency and safety aspects of hydrogen peroxide vapour and aerosolized hydrogen peroxide room disinfection systems.

    PubMed

    Fu, T Y; Gent, P; Kumar, V

    2012-03-01

    This was a head-to-head comparison of two hydrogen-peroxide-based room decontamination systems. To compare the efficacy, efficiency and safety of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV; Clarus R, Bioquell, Andover, U.K.) and aerosolized hydrogen peroxide (aHP; SR2, Sterinis, now supplied as Glosair, Advanced Sterilization Products (ASP), Johnson & Johnson Medical Ltd, Wokingham, U.K.) room disinfection systems. Efficacy was tested using 4- and 6-log Geobacillus stearothermophilus biological indicators (BIs) and in-house prepared test discs containing approximately 10(6) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Clostridium difficile and Acinetobacter baumannii. Safety was assessed by detecting leakage of hydrogen peroxide using a hand-held detector. Efficiency was assessed by measuring the level of hydrogen peroxide using a hand-held sensor at three locations inside the room, 2 h after the start of the cycles. HPV generally achieved a 6-log reduction, whereas aHP generally achieved less than a 4-log reduction on the BIs and in-house prepared test discs. Uneven distribution was evident for the aHP system but not the HPV system. Hydrogen peroxide leakage during aHP cycles with the door unsealed, as per the manufacturer's operating manual, exceeded the short-term exposure limit (2 ppm) for more than 2 h. When the door was sealed with tape, as per the HPV system, hydrogen peroxide leakage was <1 ppm for both systems. The mean concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the room 2 h after the cycle started was 1.3 [standard deviation (SD) 0.4] ppm and 2.8 (SD 0.8) ppm for the four HPV and aHP cycles, respectively. None of the readings were <2 ppm for the aHP cycles. The HPV system was safer, faster and more effective for biological inactivation. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal, a Reactive Product of Lipid Peroxidation, and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Toxic Combination Illuminated by Redox Proteomics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Coccia, Raffaella; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Among different forms of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation comprises the interaction of free radicals with polyunsaturated fatty acids, which in turn leads to the formation of highly reactive electrophilic aldehydes. Among these, the most abundant aldehydes are 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and malondialdehyde, while acrolein is the most reactive. HNE is considered a robust marker of oxidative stress and a toxic compound for several cell types. Proteins are particularly susceptible to modification caused by HNE, and adduct formation plays a critical role in multiple cellular processes. Recent Advances: With the outstanding progress of proteomics, the identification of putative biomarkers for neurodegenerative disorders has been the main focus of several studies and will continue to be a difficult task. Critical Issues: The present review focuses on the role of lipid peroxidation, particularly of HNE-induced protein modification, in neurodegenerative diseases. By comparing results obtained in different neurodegenerative diseases, it may be possible to identify both similarities and specific differences in addition to better characterize selective neurodegenerative phenomena associated with protein dysfunction. Results obtained in our laboratory and others support the common deregulation of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function in neurodegeneration. Future Directions: Research towards a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration together with identification of specific targets of oxidative damage is urgently required. Redox proteomics will contribute to broaden the knowledge in regard to potential biomarkers for disease diagnosis and may also provide insight into damaged metabolic networks and potential targets for modulation of disease progression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1590–1609. PMID:22114878

  18. Pomegranate (Punicagranatum) juice decreases lipid peroxidation, but has no effect on plasma advanced glycated end-products in adults with type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sohrab, Golbon; Angoorani, Pooneh; Tohidi, Maryam; Tabibi, Hadi; Kimiagar, Masoud; Nasrollahzadeh, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes mellitus characterized by hyperglycemia could increase oxidative stress and formation of advanced glycated end-products (AGEs), which contribute to diabetic complications. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of pomegranate juice (PJ) containing natural antioxidant on lipid peroxidation and plasma AGEs in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Materials and methods In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 patients (age range 56±6.8 years), T2D were randomly assigned to one of two groups: group A (PJ, n=22) and group B (Placebo, n=22). At the baseline and the end of 12-week intervention, biochemical markers including fasting plasma glucose, insulin, oxidative stress, and AGE markers including carboxy methyl lysine (CML) and pentosidine were assayed. Results At baseline, there were no significant differences in plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels between the two groups, but malondialdehyde (MDA) decreased levels were significantly different (P<0.001). After 12 weeks of intervention, TAC increased (P<0.05) and MDA decreased (P<0.01) in the PJ group when compared with the placebo group. However, no significant differences were observed in plasma concentration of CML and pentosidine between the two groups. Conclusions The study showed that PJ decreases lipid peroxidation. Therefore, PJ consumption may delay onset of T2D complications related to oxidative stress. PMID:26355954

  19. Cumene peroxide and Fe(2+)-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and effect of phosphoglucose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Agadjanyan, Z S; Dugin, S F; Dmitriev, L F

    2006-09-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA) is one of cytotoxic aldehydes produced in cells as a result of lipid peroxidation and further MDA metabolism in cytoplasm is not known. In our experiments the liver fraction 10,000 g containing phosphoglucose isomerase and enzymes of the glyoxalase system was used and obtained experimental data shows that in this fraction there is an aggregate of reactions taking place both in membranes (lipid peroxidation) and outside membranes. MDA accumulation is relatively slow because MDA is a substrate of aldehyde isomerase (MDA <--> methylglyoxal). The well known enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase acts as an aldehyde isomerase (Michaelis constant for this enzyme Km = 133 +/- 8 microM). MDA conversion to methylglyoxal and further to neutral product D-lactate (with GSH as a cofactor) occurs in cytoplasm and D-lactate should be regarded as the end product of two different parametabolic reactions: lipid peroxidation or protein glycation.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide tooth-whitening (bleaching): review of safety in relation to possible carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Naik, Supritha; Tredwin, Christopher Jeremy; Scully, Crispian

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide in the form of carbamide peroxide is widely used in professionally and self-administered products for tooth whitening. Hydrogen peroxide is a highly reactive substance that can damage oral soft and hard tissues when present in high concentrations and with exposures of prolonged duration. This review examines the issue of oral mucosal damage and possible carcinogenicity relating to the use of hydrogen peroxide in the mouth for tooth whitening, with an emphasis on safety with prolonged exposure to low concentrations of peroxide products.

  1. Marine Photochemistry of Hydrogen Peroxide in the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.; Shiller, A. M.

    2002-12-01

    A systematical study of hydrogen peroxide in seawater, rainwater, and marine air in the Northwest Pacific Ocean was conducted during a transect from Osaka, Japan, to Hawaii, USA, in May and June of 2002. During the transect, surface seawater samples were analyzed continuously for peroxide which showed the effects of photochemical production, wet deposition, and terrestrial impact. In the surface waters, hydrogen peroxide decreased with latitude from a little over 25 nM in the north (50°N) to more than 150 nM in the south (22°N). This latitudinal variation of hydrogen peroxide followed a trend similar to shipboard measurement of ultraviolet radiation. Diel variations of surface hydrogen peroxide were observed at several locations, with surface water concentrations increasing during the day and decreasing at night. The concentration of surface water peroxide increased to over 200 nM following rain events. Higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (>150 nM) were also observed near Asia. The profiles of hydrogen peroxide were obtained at 10 stations that exhibited surface maxima of 24 to 120 nM. The rate constant of dark decay varied from 0.08 d-1 to 0.22 d-1. Rate of photo-production decreased from 10 nM hr-1 at noon to 0 at night. The concentration of hydrogen peroxide varied from 16 μM to 526 μM in rainwater. The data set permits a systematical analysis and modeling of factors regulating the dynamics of hydrogen peroxide in marine environment.

  2. Simultaneous Real-Time Monitoring of Oxygen Consumption and Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Cells Using Our Newly Developed Chip-Type Biosensor Device.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ankush; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Kumi Y; Suzuki, Makoto; Sugiura, Yamato; Sugai, Tomoya; Tomonori, Amano; Tada, Mika; Kobayashi, Masaki; Matsue, Tomokazu; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms bear its defense mechanism. Immune cells during invasion by foreign body undergoes phagocytosis during which monocyte and neutrophil produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS generated in animal cells are known to be involved in several diseases and ailments, when generated in excess. Therefore, if the ROS generated in cells can be measured and analyzed precisely, it can be employed in immune function evaluation and disease detection. The aim of the current study is to introduce our newly developed chip-type biosensor device with high specificity and sensitivity. It comprises of counter electrode and working electrodes I and II. The counter electrode is a platinum plate while the working electrodes I and II are platinum microelectrode and osmium-horseradish peroxidase modified gold electrode, respectively which acts as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection sensors. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and H2O2 generation were measured in animal cells under the effect of exogenous addition of differentiation inducer, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The results obtained showed considerable changes in reduction currents in the absence and presence of inducer. Our newly developed chip-type biosensor device is claimed to be a useful tool for real-time monitoring of the respiratory activity and precise detection of H2O2 in cells. It can thus be widely applied in biomedical research and in clinical trials being an advancement over other H2O2 detection techniques.

  3. Inactivation of Ascaris eggs in water using hydrogen peroxide and a Fenton type nanocatalyst (FeOx/C) synthesized by a novel hybrid production process.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ariadna A; Schouwenaars, Rafael; Pfeiffer, Heriberto; Ramírez-Zamora, Rosa María

    2013-09-01

    Inactivation tests of Ascaris eggs (Ae) were performed using hydrogen peroxide and a Fenton type nanocatalyst supported on activated carbon (AC) (FeOx/C). Blank inactivation tests were also carried out using H2O2 and H2O2/AC as oxidation systems. The FeOx/C nanocatalyst was synthesized through a novel hybrid method developed in this work. The method is based on the incipient impregnation technique, using isopropyl alcohol as dissolvent and chelating agent of the iron salt and the ultrasonic method. The supported nanocatalyst contained 2.61% w/w of total iron and the support 0.2% w/w. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) images permitted verification of the presence of finely dispersed FeOx nanoparticles, with sizes ranging from 19 to 63 nm. SEM-EDS analysis and TEM images also showed good dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles, most probably maghemite; γ-Fe2O3, able to produce hydroperoxyl radical as reported in the literature. The FeOx/C nanocatalyst-H2O2 system showed an average Ae inactivation efficiency of 4.46% Ae/mg H2O2. This value is significantly higher than the result obtained using the support-H2O2 system and H2O2 alone and it is also better than data reported for the classical Fenton process (homogeneous phase) with or without UV light.

  4. Isoprene Produced by Leaves Protects the Photosynthetic Apparatus against Ozone Damage, Quenches Ozone Products, and Reduces Lipid Peroxidation of Cellular Membranes1

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, Francesco; Velikova, Violeta

    2001-01-01

    Many plants invest carbon to form isoprene. The role of isoprene in plants is unclear, but many experiments showed that isoprene may have a role in protecting plants from thermal damage. A more general antioxidant action has been recently hypothesized on the basis of the protection offered by exogenous isoprene in nonemitting plants exposed to acute ozone doses. We inhibited the synthesis of endogenous isoprene by feeding fosmidomycin and observed that Phragmites australis leaves became more sensitive to ozone than those leaves forming isoprene. Photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and fluorescence parameters were significantly affected by ozone only in leaves on which isoprene was not formed. The protective effect of isoprene was more evident when the leaves were exposed for a long time (8 h) to relatively low (100 nL L−1) ozone levels than when the exposure was short and acute (3 h at 300 nL L−1). Isoprene quenched the amount of H2O2 formed in leaves and reduced lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes caused by ozone. These results indicate that isoprene may exert its protective action at the membrane level, although a similar effect could be obtained if isoprene reacted with ozone before forming active oxygen species. Irrespective of the mechanism, our results suggest that endogenous isoprene has an important antioxidant role in plants. PMID:11743121

  5. Simultaneous Real-Time Monitoring of Oxygen Consumption and Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Cells Using Our Newly Developed Chip-Type Biosensor Device

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Kumi Y.; Suzuki, Makoto; Sugiura, Yamato; Sugai, Tomoya; Tomonori, Amano; Tada, Mika; Kobayashi, Masaki; Matsue, Tomokazu; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms bear its defense mechanism. Immune cells during invasion by foreign body undergoes phagocytosis during which monocyte and neutrophil produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS generated in animal cells are known to be involved in several diseases and ailments, when generated in excess. Therefore, if the ROS generated in cells can be measured and analyzed precisely, it can be employed in immune function evaluation and disease detection. The aim of the current study is to introduce our newly developed chip-type biosensor device with high specificity and sensitivity. It comprises of counter electrode and working electrodes I and II. The counter electrode is a platinum plate while the working electrodes I and II are platinum microelectrode and osmium-horseradish peroxidase modified gold electrode, respectively which acts as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection sensors. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and H2O2 generation were measured in animal cells under the effect of exogenous addition of differentiation inducer, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The results obtained showed considerable changes in reduction currents in the absence and presence of inducer. Our newly developed chip-type biosensor device is claimed to be a useful tool for real-time monitoring of the respiratory activity and precise detection of H2O2 in cells. It can thus be widely applied in biomedical research and in clinical trials being an advancement over other H2O2 detection techniques. PMID:27065878

  6. [The effect of N-stearoylethanolamine on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, content of lipid peroxidation products and nitric oxide in the blood plasma and liver of rats with induced insulin-resistance].

    PubMed

    Onopchenko, O V; Kosiakova, H V; Horid'ko, T M; Berdyshev, A H; Mehed', O F; Hula, N M

    2013-01-01

    The influence of N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE) on the content of lipid peroxidation products, activity of antioxidant enzymes and the nitric oxide level in the liver and blood plasma of rats with insulin-resistance (IR) state was investigated. IR state was induced in rats by prolonged high-fat diet (58% of energy derived from fat) for 6 months combined with one injection of streptozotocin (15 mg/kg of body weight). The existence of IR state was estimated by results of glucoso-tolerance test and blood plasma insulin content. The level of lipid peroxides products was shown to be higher in the liver of insulin resistant animals as a result of reduced superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, however, glutathione peroxidase activity was increased. The increase of nitric-oxide content in the liver and blood plasma of high-fat diet rats compared with healthy control animals was also observed. The administration of the NSE suspension per os in a dose of 50 mg/kg during 2 weeks to the rats with induced insulin-resistance state contributed to the increase of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity. In consequence of antioxidant enzymes activation the intensity of POL process was decreased. The NSE administration caused normalization of nitric oxide level, restoring pro-/antioxidant balance in the liver and blood plasma of rats with IR state. In conclusion, the NSE administration to the rats with insulin-resistance state restored pro-/antioxidant balance and enhanced the content of nitric oxide, therefore, improving insulin sensitivity.

  7. Occupational skin injury by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Izu, K; Yamamoto, O; Asahi, M

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in products such as rocket fuel, bleaching preparations and topical disinfectants. Contact of hydrogen peroxide with the skin can cause severe skin damage. In this report, we describe a case of skin injury induced by hydrogen peroxide. The patient was a 34-year-old man working in a dry cleaning shop. While he was pouring 35% hydrogen peroxide, some of it accidentally splashed over his left shoulder and back, and then an erythema, purpura and vacuolar eruption, similar to bubble wrap, appeared on his left shoulder and down the left side of his back. Histologically, numerous vacuolar structures were observed in the epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Coupled with the clinical features, these vacuolar structures were considered as 'oxygen bubbles'. Subcutaneous emphysema was detected by chest X-ray examination. All skin eruptions rapidly healed without scarring by using a steroid ointment. As far as we know, this is the first time such clinical and histological features have been described Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Cholest-3,5-dien-7-one formation in peroxidized human plasma as an indicator of lipoprotein cholesterol peroxidation potential.

    PubMed

    Hahn, M; Tang, M; Subbiah, M T

    1995-04-06

    Lipoprotein peroxidation susceptibility is routinely evaluated using products of unsaturated fatty acids as markers (e.g., malonaldehyde). The significance and factors influencing peroxidation of cholesterol moiety of lipoproteins are relatively unknown due to lack of a reliable marker product which can be measured easily. Under the influence of Cu2+ ions, the major product of lipoprotein cholesterol peroxidation (isolated after saponification) was cholest-3-5-dien-7-one (CSD). Apart from gas-liquid chromatography, this compound lends itself for measurement by alternative methods. Due to lack of the 3 beta-hydroxyl group, CSD was separated from the rest of the oxysterols and cholesterol by passing through digitonin-coated silica-gel G and its concentration was determined by absorption at 283 nm. The recovery of CSD by this method exceeded by 87%. The formation of CSD was also sensitive to vitamin E and therefore could be used as an index of lipoprotein cholesterol susceptibility to peroxidation.

  9. Multi stage peroxide and activated peroxide bleaching of kenaf bast pulp.

    PubMed

    Zeinaly, Farhad; Shakhes, Jalal; Zeinali, Nooshin

    2013-02-15

    Soda-anthraquinone kenaf bast pulp (12.5 kappa number and 32% ISO brightness) has been bleached with multi stage peroxide bleaching process. Bleaching process was carried out in different sequences of peroxide stage without and with activator (tetraacetylethylenediamine, TAED) to about 80% ISO brightness. Full bleached pulp production with high brightness and viscosity and also, low chemical oxygen demand (COD) and no adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in effluent are the aims of this study. The effects of temperature, retention time, chemical charges, TAED/peroxide ratio and alkalinity have been studied in order to maximize the brightness gain at the lowest viscosity loss. H(2)O(2) was activated as bleaching agent under milder conditions, such as low alkalinity or low temperature, by TAED activator. Therefore, TAED charge caused to an improvement in viscosity, pulp yield and effluent COD load. Pre-treatment with EDTA for 30 min and in acidic condition gave 2-4% gain in ISO brightness.

  10. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide production at anode of proton exchange membrane fuel cell under open-circuit conditions using ruthenium-carbon catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Un Ho; Jeong, Seong Uk; Chun, Kook; Park, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyang Mee; Choi, Dong Woong; Kim, Sung Hyun

    This study examines the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) on the open-circuit voltage (OCV) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and the reduction of H 2O 2 in the membrane using a ruthenium/carbon catalyst (Ru/C) at the anode. Each cathode and anode potential of the PEMFC in the presence of H 2O 2 is examined by constructing a half-cell using 1.0 M H 2SO 4 solution as an electrolyte and Ag/AgCl as the reference electrode. H 2O 2 is added to the H 2SO 4 solution and the half-cell potential is measured at each H 2O 2 concentration. The cathode potential is affected by the H 2O 2 concentration while the anode potential remains stable. A Ru catalyst is used to reduce the level of H 2O 2 formation through O 2 cross-over at the interface of a membrane and the anode. The Ru catalyst is known to produce less H 2O 2 through oxygen reduction at the anode of PEMFC than a Pt catalyst. A Ru/C layer is placed between the Nafion ® 112 membrane and anode catalyst layer and the cell voltage under open-circuit condition is measured. A single cell is constructed to compare the OCV of the Pt/C only anode with that of the Ru/C-layered anode. The level of hydrogen cross-over and the OCV are determined after operation at a current density of 1 A cm -2 for 10 h and stabilization at open-circuit for 1 h to obtain an equilibrium state in the cell. Although there is an increase in the OCV of the cell with the Ru/C layer at the anode, excessive addition of Ru/C has an adverse effect on cell performance.

  11. The cyclopentenone product of lipid peroxidation, 15-A2t-isoprostane, is efficiently metabolized by HepG2 cells via conjugation with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Milne, Ginger L; Zanoni, Giuseppe; Porta, Alessio; Sasi, Soumya; Vidari, Giovanni; Musiek, Erik S; Freeman, Michael L; Morrow, Jason D

    2004-01-01

    Cyclopentenone isoprostanes (IsoPs), A(2)/J(2)-IsoPs, are one class of IsoPs formed via the free radical-initiated peroxidation of arachidonic acid. These compounds, which are structurally similar to cyclooxygenase-derived PGA(2) and PGJ(2), contain highly reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl moieties. A(2)/J(2)-IsoPs are generated in vivo in humans esterified in glycerophospholipids. Unlike other classes of IsoPs, however, cyclopentenone IsoPs cannot be detected in the free form; we postulated that this might be due to their rapid adduction to various thiol-containing biomolecules via Michael addition. Recently, we reported that the A-ring IsoP, 15-A(2t)-IsoP, is efficiently conjugated with glutathione in vitro by certain human and rat glutathione transferases (GSTs), with the isozyme GSTA4-4 displaying the highest activity. Herein, we examined the metabolic disposition of 15-A(2t)-IsoP in HepG2 cells. We report that 15-A(2t)-IsoP is primarily metabolized by these cells via conjugation to glutathione. Within 6 h, approximately 60% of 15-A(2t)-IsoP added to HepG2 cells was present in the form of a water soluble conjugate(s). Structural characterization of the adduct(s) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed four major conjugates. These include the intact 15-A(2t)-IsoP-GSH conjugate, the GSH conjugate in which the carbonyl at C-9 of 15-A(2t)-IsoP is reduced, and the corresponding cysteine conjugates. These studies thus show that the primary pathway of metabolic disposition of endogenously derived cyclopentenone IsoPs occurs via conjugation with thiols.

  12. Role of Peroxide in Phagocytic Killing of Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Jane; Bernheimer, Harriet P.

    1974-01-01

    Two mutants of a pneumococcus type I with diminished peroxide production were selected from a population of nitrosoguanidine-treated cells. White cells of normal patients killed the mutant pneumococci as well as the otherwise isogenic wild-type strain. In patients studied with chronic granulomatous disease, however, the peroxide-poor strain was killed far less well than the wild type. These studies indicate that the removal of a peroxide-generating system in the phagocytic vacuole specifically brings forth the killing defect in chronic granulomatous disease. PMID:4148725

  13. [Lipid peroxidation processes in chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Ignatova, G L; Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Volkova, E G; Kazachkov, E L; Kolesnikov, O L

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of the levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) products in condensate of the exhaled air (CEA) and in the biopsy samples from the inflammation focus. Extraction spectrophotometry was used to measure LPO products in CEA and biopsies from 30 males aged 30-60 years suffering from chronic bronchitis and 30 healthy controls of the same age. There was activation of local accumulation of isopropanol-soluble LPO products in the bronchopulmonary system accompanied by lowered content of lipoperoxides and high antioxidant activity in CEA. Chronic bronchitis is characterized by multidirectional shifts in LPO in the inflammation focus and CEA.

  14. Diffusion of hydrogen peroxide across DPPC large unilamellar liposomes.

    PubMed

    Abuin, Elsa; Lissi, Eduardo; Ahumada, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by catalase entrapped in the pool of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline unilamellar liposomes has been studied. The rate of the process was evaluated by following the production of oxygen as a function of time. Under the experimental conditions employed the rate of oxygen production was controlled by the diffusion of hydrogen peroxide, allowing for the estimation of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen peroxide across the liposome bilayer. The rate of diffusion across the bilayer increases with the temperature and the presence of fluidizers (n-nonanol), according with changes in the bilayer fluidity, as sensed by 1,6-diphenyl hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence anisotropy. A peculiar aspect of the data is the fast hydrogen peroxide diffusion observed at the bilayer phase transition temperature. This fast diffusion is associated to rafts fluctuations that take place in the partially melted bilayer. These fluctuations have no effect on the microviscosity sensed by DPH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Artifact peroxides produced during cryogenic sampling of ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staffelbach, Thomas; Neftel, Albrecht; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    Peroxides were found to be produced as artifacts during cryogenic sampling with Horibe traps. Cryogenic trap sampling was compared to collection with a wet effluent diffusion denuder and a Nafion membrane diffusion denuder. Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide measured in the cryogenic trap samples were significantly higher. In comparison, no evidence of artifact methyl hydroperoxide production was found. The amount of artifact H2O2 and HMHP produced increased with decreasing trap temperature. Spiking ambient air with ethene or isoprene showed that these hydrocarbons, in the presence of ozone, can be responsible for the artifact production of peroxides. Our results clearly suggest that the peroxide data obtained by cryogenic sampling and reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution.

  16. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens: substrate-like inhibitors both stimulate flavin reduction and stabilize the flavin-peroxo intermediate yet result in the production of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Crozier-Reabe, Karen R; Phillips, Robert S; Moran, Graham R

    2008-11-25

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a flavin-dependent hydroxylase that catalyzes the conversion of l-kynurenine (l-Kyn) to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3OHKyn) in the pathway for tryptophan catabolism. KMO inhibition has been widely suggested as an early treatment for stroke and other neurological disorders that involve ischemia. We have investigated the reductive and the oxidative half-reactions of a stable form of KMO from Pseudomonas fluorescens (KMO). The binding of l-Kyn by the enzyme is relatively slow and involves at least two reversible steps. The rate constant for reduction of the flavin cofactor by NADPH increases by a factor of approximately 2.5 x 10(3) when l-Kyn is bound. The rate of reduction of the KMO.l-Kyn complex is 160 s(-1), and the K(d) for the NADPH complex is 200 microM with charge-transfer absorption bands for the KMO(RED).l-Kyn.NADP(+) complex accumulating after reduction. The reduction potential of KMO is -188 mV and is unresponsive to the addition of l-Kyn or other inhibitory ligands. KMO inhibitors whose structures are reminiscent of l-Kyn such as m-nitrobenzoylalanine and benzoylalanine also stimulate reduction of flavin by NADPH and, in the presence of dioxygen, result in the stoichiometric liberation of hydrogen peroxide, diminishing the perceived therapeutic potential of inhibitors of this type. In the presence of the native substrate, the oxidative half-reaction exhibits triphasic absorbance data. A spectrum consistent with that of a peroxyflavin species accumulates and then decays to yield the oxidized enzyme. This species then undergoes minor spectral changes that, based on flavin difference spectra defined in the presence of 3OHKyn, can be correlated with product release. The oxidative half-reaction observed in the presence of saturating benzoylalanine or m-nitrobenzoylalanine also shows the accumulation of a peroxyflavin species that then decays to yield hydrogen peroxide without hydroxylation.

  17. Activation of proinflammatory signaling by 4-hydroxynonenal-Src adducts in aged kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bonggi; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Ki Wung; Moon, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Min Jo; An, Hye Jin; Jeong, Ji Won; Kim, Ye Ra; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, reactive 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) was shown to activate Src (a non-receptor tyrosine kinase) by forming an adduct on binding with a specific residue of Src, leading to the activation of proinflammatory signaling pathways in cultured cells. However, to date, the deleterious roles of 4-HNE in inflammatory signaling activation in kidneys during aging have not been explored. The purpose of the present study was to document the mechanisms by which 4-HNE induces inflammation in the kidney during aging. Initial experiments revealed that activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression was caused by 4-HNE activation, which suppressed transcriptional activity in the aged kidney. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 4-HNE revealed that Src caused senescence via NF-κB activation. Furthermore, our immunohistochemistry data showed that 4-HNE-adducted Src significantly increased in aged kidney tissues. The data showed age-related upregulation of downstream signaling molecules such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), activator protein-1 (AP-1), NF-κB, and COX-2 in a cell culture cell system. Taken together, the results of this study show that the formation of adducts between 4-HNE and Src activates inflammatory signaling pathways in the aged kidney, contributing to age-related nephropathy. PMID:27472463

  18. Alkene dihydroxylation with malonoyl peroxides: catalysis using fluorinated alcohols.

    PubMed

    Picon, Sylvain; Rawling, Michael; Campbell, Matthew; Tomkinson, Nicholas C O

    2012-12-21

    The effect of fluorinated alcohols on the dihydroxylation of alkenes using cyclopropyl malonoyl peroxide is described. Addition of perfluoro-tert-butyl alcohol to a toluene solution of alkene and peroxide increases the rate of product formation and the stereoselectivity observed, providing a simple and effective method for acceleration of this important class of reaction. Basic hydrolysis of the crude reaction mixture provides access to syn-diols in high yield and stereoselectivity.

  19. Biocompatibility of potential wound management products: hydrogen peroxide generation by fungal chitin/chitosans and their effects on the proliferation of murine L929 fibroblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    Chung, L Y; Schmidt, R J; Hamlyn, P F; Sagar, B F; Andrews, A M; Turner, T D

    1998-02-01

    Agaricus bisporus, Fusarium graminearum, Phycomyces blakesleeanus, unbleached and bleached, Rhizomucor miehei, and Rhizopus oryzae were examined as sources of fungal chitin/chitosan. The nitrogen content of the alkalitreated mycelia/sporangiophores obtained after optimization of culture conditions, and of similarly treated A. bisporus stipes, was 2.87, 1.29, 6.27, 6.50, 4.80, and 4.95% w/w, respectively, which relates to an estimated chitin content of 42, 19, 91, 94, 70, and 72%, respectively. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-generating ability of the treated fungal materials after 8 h at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C decreased in the order R. oryzae > P. blakesleeanus unbleached approximately R. miehi > F. graminearum > A. bisporus > P. blakesleeanus bleached. This did not correlate with estimated chitin content. The effect of these fungal materials on the rate of proliferation of murine L929 fibroblasts in culture also was examined. Both pro- and antiproliferant effects were observed. Significant (P < .05) proproliferant effects were observed on day 6 with R. miehei, R. oryzae, and P. blakesleeanus (unbleached and bleached) at 0.01% w/v. The greatest antiproliferant effect was observed with R. oryzae at 0.05% w/v on day 6 (-63% relative to the control, P < .05; cell viability, 95%). In contrast, A. bisporus failed to affect cell yield significantly at either 0.01 or 0.05% w/v. Addition of catalase to cultures containing R. oryzae or R. miehei at 0.05% w/v failed to abolish the antiproliferant effect on day 3, instead producing a small but significant (P < .05) increase in the effect. Catalase also failed to affect significantly the antiproliferant effect of F. graminearum at 0.05% w/v, but did abolish the proproliferant effect of P. blakesleeanus (unbleached and bleached) on day 3. Overall, our results suggest that the H2O2 being generated by the fungal materials modulates cell proliferation but that this effect is superimposed upon a H2O2-independent antiproliferant

  20. Organic peroxides' gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming; Huang, Liubin; Huang, Dao

    2016-02-01

    Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, promote secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigated in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides fr