Science.gov

Sample records for personal genomics bioinformatics

  1. Bioinformatics for personal genome interpretation.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Emidio; Nehrt, Nathan L; Kann, Maricel G; Bromberg, Yana

    2012-07-01

    An international consortium released the first draft sequence of the human genome 10 years ago. Although the analysis of this data has suggested the genetic underpinnings of many diseases, we have not yet been able to fully quantify the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Thus, a major current effort of the scientific community focuses on evaluating individual predispositions to specific phenotypic traits given their genetic backgrounds. Many resources aim to identify and annotate the specific genes responsible for the observed phenotypes. Some of these use intra-species genetic variability as a means for better understanding this relationship. In addition, several online resources are now dedicated to collecting single nucleotide variants and other types of variants, and annotating their functional effects and associations with phenotypic traits. This information has enabled researchers to develop bioinformatics tools to analyze the rapidly increasing amount of newly extracted variation data and to predict the effect of uncharacterized variants. In this work, we review the most important developments in the field--the databases and bioinformatics tools that will be of utmost importance in our concerted effort to interpret the human variome.

  2. Opportunities for community awareness platforms in personal genomics and bioinformatics education.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Lucia; Liò, Pietro

    2016-08-30

    Precision and personalized medicine will be increasingly based on the integration of various type of information, particularly electronic health records and genome sequences. The availability of cheap genome sequencing services and the information interoperability will increase the role of online bioinformatics analysis. Being on the Internet poses constant threats to security and privacy. While we are connected and we share information, websites and internet services collect various types of personal data with or without the user consent. It is likely that genomics will merge with the internet culture of connectivity. This process will increase incidental findings, exposure and vulnerability. Here we discuss the social vulnerability owing to the genome and Internet combined security and privacy weaknesses. This urges more efforts in education and social awareness on how biomedical data are analysed and transferred through the internet and how inferential methods could integrate information from different sources. We propose that digital social platforms, used for raising collective awareness in different fields, could be developed for collaborative and bottom-up efforts in education. In this context, bioinformaticians could play a meaningful role in mitigating the future risk of digital-genomic divide. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Getting personalized cancer genome analysis into the clinic: the challenges in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Alfonso; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Progress in genomics has raised expectations in many fields, and particularly in personalized cancer research. The new technologies available make it possible to combine information about potential disease markers, altered function and accessible drug targets, which, coupled with pathological and medical information, will help produce more appropriate clinical decisions. The accessibility of such experimental techniques makes it all the more necessary to improve and adapt computational strategies to the new challenges. This review focuses on the critical issues associated with the standard pipeline, which includes: DNA sequencing analysis; analysis of mutations in coding regions; the study of genome rearrangements; extrapolating information on mutations to the functional and signaling level; and predicting the effects of therapies using mouse tumor models. We describe the possibilities, limitations and future challenges of current bioinformatics strategies for each of these issues. Furthermore, we emphasize the need for the collaboration between the bioinformaticians who implement the software and use the data resources, the computational biologists who develop the analytical methods, and the clinicians, the systems' end users and those ultimately responsible for taking medical decisions. Finally, the different steps in cancer genome analysis are illustrated through examples of applications in cancer genome analysis.

  4. Genome Exploitation and Bioinformatics Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Anne; van Heel, Auke J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    Bioinformatic tools can greatly improve the efficiency of bacteriocin screening efforts by limiting the amount of strains. Different classes of bacteriocins can be detected in genomes by looking at different features. Finding small bacteriocins can be especially challenging due to low homology and because small open reading frames (ORFs) are often omitted from annotations. In this chapter, several bioinformatic tools/strategies to identify bacteriocins in genomes are discussed.

  5. Genomics, molecular imaging, bioinformatics, and bio-nano-info integration are synergistic components of translational medicine and personalized healthcare research.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu; Arabnia, Hamid R; Deng, Youping

    2008-09-16

    Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (ISIBM), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, IEEE 7th Bioinformatics and Bioengineering attracted more than 600 papers and 500 researchers and medical doctors. It was the only synergistic inter/multidisciplinary IEEE conference with 24 Keynote Lectures, 7 Tutorials, 5 Cutting-Edge Research Workshops and 32 Scientific Sessions including 11 Special Research Interest Sessions that were designed dynamically at Harvard in response to the current research trends and advances. The committee was very grateful for the IEEE Plenary Keynote Lectures given by: Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Jun Liu (Harvard), Dr. Brian Athey (Michigan), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech and President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid Arabnia (Georgia and Vice-President of ISIBM), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (Berkeley and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Andy Baxevanis (United States National Institutes of Health), Dr. Arif Ghafoor (Purdue), Dr. John Quackenbush (Harvard), Dr. Eric Jakobsson (UIUC), Dr. Vladimir Uversky (Indiana), Dr. Laura Elnitski (United States National Institutes of Health) and other world-class scientific leaders. The Harvard meeting was a large academic event 100% full-sponsored by IEEE financially and academically. After a rigorous peer-review process, the committee selected 27 high-quality research papers from 600 submissions. The committee is grateful for contributions from keynote speakers Dr. Russ Altman (IEEE BIBM conference keynote lecturer on combining simulation and machine

  6. Genomics, molecular imaging, bioinformatics, and bio-nano-info integration are synergistic components of translational medicine and personalized healthcare research

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (ISIBM), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, IEEE 7th Bioinformatics and Bioengineering attracted more than 600 papers and 500 researchers and medical doctors. It was the only synergistic inter/multidisciplinary IEEE conference with 24 Keynote Lectures, 7 Tutorials, 5 Cutting-Edge Research Workshops and 32 Scientific Sessions including 11 Special Research Interest Sessions that were designed dynamically at Harvard in response to the current research trends and advances. The committee was very grateful for the IEEE Plenary Keynote Lectures given by: Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Jun Liu (Harvard), Dr. Brian Athey (Michigan), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech and President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid Arabnia (Georgia and Vice-President of ISIBM), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (Berkeley and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Andy Baxevanis (United States National Institutes of Health), Dr. Arif Ghafoor (Purdue), Dr. John Quackenbush (Harvard), Dr. Eric Jakobsson (UIUC), Dr. Vladimir Uversky (Indiana), Dr. Laura Elnitski (United States National Institutes of Health) and other world-class scientific leaders. The Harvard meeting was a large academic event 100% full-sponsored by IEEE financially and academically. After a rigorous peer-review process, the committee selected 27 high-quality research papers from 600 submissions. The committee is grateful for contributions from keynote speakers Dr. Russ Altman (IEEE BIBM conference keynote lecturer on combining simulation and machine

  7. Bioinformatics Approach in Plant Genomic Research

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Quang; Nguyen, Phuc; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Le, Ly

    2016-01-01

    The advance in genomics technology leads to the dramatic change in plant biology research. Plant biologists now easily access to enormous genomic data to deeply study plant high-density genetic variation at molecular level. Therefore, fully understanding and well manipulating bioinformatics tools to manage and analyze these data are essential in current plant genome research. Many plant genome databases have been established and continued expanding recently. Meanwhile, analytical methods based on bioinformatics are also well developed in many aspects of plant genomic research including comparative genomic analysis, phylogenomics and evolutionary analysis, and genome-wide association study. However, constantly upgrading in computational infrastructures, such as high capacity data storage and high performing analysis software, is the real challenge for plant genome research. This review paper focuses on challenges and opportunities which knowledge and skills in bioinformatics can bring to plant scientists in present plant genomics era as well as future aspects in critical need for effective tools to facilitate the translation of knowledge from new sequencing data to enhancement of plant productivity. PMID:27499685

  8. Development of Bioinformatics Infrastructure for Genomics Research.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Nicola J; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Adebiyi, Marion; Adeyemi, Seun; Ahmed, Azza; Ahmed, Rehab; Akanle, Bola; Alibi, Mohamed; Armstrong, Don L; Aron, Shaun; Ashano, Efejiro; Baichoo, Shakuntala; Benkahla, Alia; Brown, David K; Chimusa, Emile R; Fadlelmola, Faisal M; Falola, Dare; Fatumo, Segun; Ghedira, Kais; Ghouila, Amel; Hazelhurst, Scott; Isewon, Itunuoluwa; Jung, Segun; Kassim, Samar Kamal; Kayondo, Jonathan K; Mbiyavanga, Mamana; Meintjes, Ayton; Mohammed, Somia; Mosaku, Abayomi; Moussa, Ahmed; Muhammd, Mustafa; Mungloo-Dilmohamud, Zahra; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Odia, Trust; Okafor, Adaobi; Oladipo, Olaleye; Osamor, Victor; Oyelade, Jellili; Sadki, Khalid; Salifu, Samson Pandam; Soyemi, Jumoke; Panji, Sumir; Radouani, Fouzia; Souiai, Oussama; Tastan Bishop, Özlem

    2017-06-01

    Although pockets of bioinformatics excellence have developed in Africa, generally, large-scale genomic data analysis has been limited by the availability of expertise and infrastructure. H3ABioNet, a pan-African bioinformatics network, was established to build capacity specifically to enable H3Africa (Human Heredity and Health in Africa) researchers to analyze their data in Africa. Since the inception of the H3Africa initiative, H3ABioNet's role has evolved in response to changing needs from the consortium and the African bioinformatics community. H3ABioNet set out to develop core bioinformatics infrastructure and capacity for genomics research in various aspects of data collection, transfer, storage, and analysis. Various resources have been developed to address genomic data management and analysis needs of H3Africa researchers and other scientific communities on the continent. NetMap was developed and used to build an accurate picture of network performance within Africa and between Africa and the rest of the world, and Globus Online has been rolled out to facilitate data transfer. A participant recruitment database was developed to monitor participant enrollment, and data is being harmonized through the use of ontologies and controlled vocabularies. The standardized metadata will be integrated to provide a search facility for H3Africa data and biospecimens. Because H3Africa projects are generating large-scale genomic data, facilities for analysis and interpretation are critical. H3ABioNet is implementing several data analysis platforms that provide a large range of bioinformatics tools or workflows, such as Galaxy, the Job Management System, and eBiokits. A set of reproducible, portable, and cloud-scalable pipelines to support the multiple H3Africa data types are also being developed and dockerized to enable execution on multiple computing infrastructures. In addition, new tools have been developed for analysis of the uniquely divergent African data and for

  9. Genomics and Bioinformatics of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Sonja W.; Mhyre, Tim; Ressom, Habtom; Shah, Salim; Federoff, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    Within the last two decades, genomics and bioinformatics have profoundly impacted our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of Parkinson's disease (PD). From the description of the first PD gene in 1997 until today, we have witnessed the emergence of new technologies that have revolutionized our concepts to identify genetic mechanisms implicated in human health and disease. Driven by the publication of the human genome sequence and followed by the description of detailed maps for common genetic variability, novel applications to rapidly scrutinize the entire genome in a systematic, cost-effective manner have become a reality. As a consequence, about 30 genetic loci have been unequivocally linked to the pathogenesis of PD highlighting essential molecular pathways underlying this common disorder. Herein we discuss how neurogenomics and bioinformatics are applied to dissect the nature of this complex disease with the overall aim of developing rational therapeutic interventions. PMID:22762024

  10. Bioinformatics tools for analysing viral genomic data.

    PubMed

    Orton, R J; Gu, Q; Hughes, J; Maabar, M; Modha, S; Vattipally, S B; Wilkie, G S; Davison, A J

    2016-04-01

    The field of viral genomics and bioinformatics is experiencing a strong resurgence due to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, which enables the rapid and cost-effective sequencing and subsequent assembly of large numbers of viral genomes. In addition, the unprecedented power of HTS technologies has enabled the analysis of intra-host viral diversity and quasispecies dynamics in relation to important biological questions on viral transmission, vaccine resistance and host jumping. HTS also enables the rapid identification of both known and potentially new viruses from field and clinical samples, thus adding new tools to the fields of viral discovery and metagenomics. Bioinformatics has been central to the rise of HTS applications because new algorithms and software tools are continually needed to process and analyse the large, complex datasets generated in this rapidly evolving area. In this paper, the authors give a brief overview of the main bioinformatics tools available for viral genomic research, with a particular emphasis on HTS technologies and their main applications. They summarise the major steps in various HTS analyses, starting with quality control of raw reads and encompassing activities ranging from consensus and de novo genome assembly to variant calling and metagenomics, as well as RNA sequencing.

  11. Translational bioinformatics applications in genome medicine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Although investigators using methodologies in bioinformatics have always been useful in genomic experimentation in analytic, engineering, and infrastructure support roles, only recently have bioinformaticians been able to have a primary scientific role in asking and answering questions on human health and disease. Here, I argue that this shift in role towards asking questions in medicine is now the next step needed for the field of bioinformatics. I outline four reasons why bioinformaticians are newly enabled to drive the questions in primary medical discovery: public availability of data, intersection of data across experiments, commoditization of methods, and streamlined validation. I also list four recommendations for bioinformaticians wishing to get more involved in translational research. PMID:19566916

  12. Bioinformatics for analysis of poxvirus genomes.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Melissa; Upton, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there have been numerous unprecedented technological advances in the field of molecular biology; these include DNA sequencing, mass spectrometry of proteins, and microarray analysis of mRNA transcripts. Perhaps, however, it is the area of genomics, which has now generated the complete genome sequences of more than 100 poxviruses, that has had the greatest impact on the average virology researcher because the DNA sequence data is in constant use in many different ways by almost all molecular virologists. As this data resource grows, so does the importance of the availability of databases and software tools to enable the bench virologist to work with and make use of this (valuable/expensive) DNA sequence information. Thus, providing researchers with intuitive software to first select and reformat genomics data from large databases, second, to compare/analyze genomics data, and third, to view and interpret large and complex sets of results has become pivotal in enabling progress to be made in modern virology. This chapter is directed at the bench virologist and describes the software required for a number of common bioinformatics techniques that are useful for comparing and analyzing poxvirus genomes. In a number of examples, we also highlight the Viral Orthologous Clusters database system and integrated tools that we developed for the management and analysis of complete viral genomes.

  13. Genomics and Bioinformatics Resources for Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, Keiichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Recent remarkable innovations in platforms for omics-based research and application development provide crucial resources to promote research in model and applied plant species. A combinatorial approach using multiple omics platforms and integration of their outcomes is now an effective strategy for clarifying molecular systems integral to improving plant productivity. Furthermore, promotion of comparative genomics among model and applied plants allows us to grasp the biological properties of each species and to accelerate gene discovery and functional analyses of genes. Bioinformatics platforms and their associated databases are also essential for the effective design of approaches making the best use of genomic resources, including resource integration. We review recent advances in research platforms and resources in plant omics together with related databases and advances in technology. PMID:20208064

  14. Advances in translational bioinformatics and population genomics in the Asia-Pacific.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Shoba; Tongsima, Sissades; Chan, Jonathan; Tan, Tin Wee; Schönbach, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The theme of the 2012 International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB) in Bangkok, Thailand was "From Biological Data to Knowledge to Technological Breakthroughs." Besides providing a forum for life scientists and bioinformatics researchers in the Asia-Pacific region to meet and interact, the conference also hosted thematic sessions on the Pan-Asian Pacific Genome Initiative and immunoinformatics. Over the seven years of conference papers published in BMC Bioinformatics and four years in BMC Genomics, we note that there is increasing interest in the applications of -omics technologies to the understanding of diseases, as a forerunner to personalized genomic medicine.

  15. Promoting synergistic research and education in genomics and bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Bioinformatics and Genomics are closely related disciplines that hold great promises for the advancement of research and development in complex biomedical systems, as well as public health, drug design, comparative genomics, personalized medicine and so on. Research and development in these two important areas are impacting the science and technology. High throughput sequencing and molecular imaging technologies marked the beginning of a new era for modern translational medicine and personalized healthcare. The impact of having the human sequence and personalized digital images in hand has also created tremendous demands of developing powerful supercomputing, statistical learning and artificial intelligence approaches to handle the massive bioinformatics and personalized healthcare data, which will obviously have a profound effect on how biomedical research will be conducted toward the improvement of human health and prolonging of human life in the future. The International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (http://www.isibm.org) and its official journals, the International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine (http://www.inderscience.com/ijfipm) and the International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (http://www.inderscience.com/ijcbdd) in collaboration with International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Biocomp), touch tomorrow's bioinformatics and personalized medicine throughout today's efforts in promoting the research, education and awareness of the upcoming integrated inter/multidisciplinary field. The 2007 international conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP07) was held in Las Vegas, the United States of American on June 25-28, 2007. The conference attracted over 400 papers, covering broad research areas in the genomics, biomedicine and bioinformatics. The Biocomp 2007 provides a common platform for the cross fertilization of ideas, and to help shape knowledge and

  16. Promoting synergistic research and education in genomics and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu; Zhu, Mengxia Michelle; Arabnia, Hamid R; Deng, Youping

    2008-01-01

    Bioinformatics and Genomics are closely related disciplines that hold great promises for the advancement of research and development in complex biomedical systems, as well as public health, drug design, comparative genomics, personalized medicine and so on. Research and development in these two important areas are impacting the science and technology.High throughput sequencing and molecular imaging technologies marked the beginning of a new era for modern translational medicine and personalized healthcare. The impact of having the human sequence and personalized digital images in hand has also created tremendous demands of developing powerful supercomputing, statistical learning and artificial intelligence approaches to handle the massive bioinformatics and personalized healthcare data, which will obviously have a profound effect on how biomedical research will be conducted toward the improvement of human health and prolonging of human life in the future. The International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (http://www.isibm.org) and its official journals, the International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine (http://www.inderscience.com/ijfipm) and the International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (http://www.inderscience.com/ijcbdd) in collaboration with International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Biocomp), touch tomorrow's bioinformatics and personalized medicine throughout today's efforts in promoting the research, education and awareness of the upcoming integrated inter/multidisciplinary field. The 2007 international conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP07) was held in Las Vegas, the United States of American on June 25-28, 2007. The conference attracted over 400 papers, covering broad research areas in the genomics, biomedicine and bioinformatics. The Biocomp 2007 provides a common platform for the cross fertilization of ideas, and to help shape knowledge and

  17. 2K09 and thereafter : the coming era of integrative bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing for functional genomics and personalized medicine research.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jack Y; Niemierko, Andrzej; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Xu, Dong; Athey, Brian D; Zhang, Aidong; Ersoy, Okan K; Li, Guo-Zheng; Borodovsky, Mark; Zhang, Joe C; Arabnia, Hamid R; Deng, Youping; Dunker, A Keith; Liu, Yunlong; Ghafoor, Arif

    2010-12-01

    Significant interest exists in establishing synergistic research in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. Supported by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (http://www.ISIBM.org), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (IJCBDD) and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, the ISIBM International Joint Conferences on Bioinformatics, Systems Biology and Intelligent Computing (ISIBM IJCBS 2009) attracted more than 300 papers and 400 researchers and medical doctors world-wide. It was the only inter/multidisciplinary conference aimed to promote synergistic research and education in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. The conference committee was very grateful for the valuable advice and suggestions from honorary chairs, steering committee members and scientific leaders including Dr. Michael S. Waterman (USC, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Wing H. Wong (Stanford, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (UC Berkeley, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Qu Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Andrzej Niemierko (Harvard), Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Brian D. Athey (Michigan), Dr. Weida Tong (FDA, United States Department of Health and Human Services), Dr. Cathy H. Wu (Georgetown), Dr. Dong Xu (Missouri), Drs. Arif Ghafoor and Okan K Ersoy (Purdue), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech, President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid R. Arabnia (UGA, Vice-President of ISIBM), and other scientific leaders. The committee presented the 2009 ISIBM Outstanding Achievement Awards to Dr. Joydeep Ghosh (UT

  18. 2K09 and thereafter : the coming era of integrative bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing for functional genomics and personalized medicine research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Significant interest exists in establishing synergistic research in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. Supported by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (http://www.ISIBM.org), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (IJCBDD) and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, the ISIBM International Joint Conferences on Bioinformatics, Systems Biology and Intelligent Computing (ISIBM IJCBS 2009) attracted more than 300 papers and 400 researchers and medical doctors world-wide. It was the only inter/multidisciplinary conference aimed to promote synergistic research and education in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. The conference committee was very grateful for the valuable advice and suggestions from honorary chairs, steering committee members and scientific leaders including Dr. Michael S. Waterman (USC, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Wing H. Wong (Stanford, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (UC Berkeley, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Qu Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Andrzej Niemierko (Harvard), Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Brian D. Athey (Michigan), Dr. Weida Tong (FDA, United States Department of Health and Human Services), Dr. Cathy H. Wu (Georgetown), Dr. Dong Xu (Missouri), Drs. Arif Ghafoor and Okan K Ersoy (Purdue), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech, President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid R. Arabnia (UGA, Vice-President of ISIBM), and other scientific leaders. The committee presented the 2009 ISIBM Outstanding Achievement Awards to Dr. Joydeep Ghosh (UT

  19. Online Bioinformatics Tutorials | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Bioinformatics is a scientific discipline that applies computer science and information technology to help understand biological processes. The NIH provides a list of free online bioinformatics tutorials, either generated by the NIH Library or other institutes, which includes introductory lectures and "how to" videos on using various tools.

  20. Bioinformatics for cancer management in the post-genome era.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-04-01

    Human cancer is caused by multiple factors, such as genetic predisposition, chronic persistent inflammation, environmental factors, life style, and aging. Dysregulated proliferation, dysregulated adhesion, resistance to apoptosis, resistance to senescence, and resistance to anti-cancer drugs are features of cancer cells. Accumulation of multiple epigenetic changes and genetic alterations of cancer-associated genes during multi-stage carcinogenesis results in more malignant phenotypes. Post-genome science is characterized by omics data related to genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, interactome, and epigenome as well as by high-throughput technology, such as whole-genome tiling oligonucleotide array, array CGH with 32,433 overlapping BAC clones, transcriptome microarray, mass spectrometry, tissue-based expression array, and cell-based transfection array. Benchtop oncology supplies Desktop oncology with large amounts of omics data produced by high-throughput technology. Desktop oncology establishes knowledge on cancer-related biomarkers, such as predisposition markers, diagnostic markers, prognostic markers, and therapeutic markers, by using bioinformatics and human intelligence of experts for data mining and text mining. Bedside oncology applies the knowledge established by Desktop oncology to determine therapeutics for cancer patients. Antibody drugs (Trastuzumab/Herceptin, Cetuximab/Erbitux, Bevacizumab/Avastin, et cetera), small molecule inhibitors for tyrosine kinases (Gefitinib/Iressa, Erlotinib/Tarceva, Imatinib/Gleevec, et cetera), conventional cytotoxic drugs, and anti-hormonal drugs are used for cancer chemotherapy. Biomarker monitoring contributes to therapeutic optional choice and drug dosage determination for cancer patients. Knowledge on biomarkers is feedforwarded from desktop to bedside in the translational research, and then biomarker monitoring is feedbacked from bedside to desktop in the reverse translational research. Desktop oncology is

  1. The bioinformatics of psychosocial genomics in alternative and complementary medicine.

    PubMed

    Rossi, E

    2003-06-01

    The bioinformatics of alternative and complementary medicine is outlined in 3 hypotheses that extend the molecular-genomic revolution initiated by Watson and Crick 50 years ago to include psychology in the new discipline of psychosocial and cultural genomics. Stress-induced changes in the alternative splicing of genes demonstrate how psychosomatic stress in humans modulates activity-dependent gene expression, protein formation, physiological function, and psychological experience. The molecular messengers generated by stress, injury, and disease can activate immediate early genes within stem cells so that they then signal the target genes required to synthesize the proteins that will transform (differentiate) stem cells into mature well-functioning tissues. Such activity-dependent gene expression and its consequent activity-dependent neurogenesis and stem cell healing is proposed as the molecular-genomic-cellular basis of rehabilitative medicine, physical, and occupational therapy as well as the many alternative and complementary approaches to mind-body healing. The therapeutic replaying of enriching life experiences that evoke the novelty-numinosum-neurogenesis effect during creative moments of art, music, dance, drama, humor, literature, poetry, and spirituality, as well as cultural rituals of life transitions (birth, puberty, marriage, illness, healing, and death) can optimize consciousness, personal relationships, and healing in a manner that has much in common with the psychogenomic foundations of naturalistic and complementary medicine. The entire history of alternative and complementary approaches to healing is consistent with this new neuroscience world view about the role of psychological arousal and fascination in modulating gene expression, neurogenesis, and healing via the psychosocial and cultural rites of human societies.

  2. Incorporating Genomics and Bioinformatics across the Life Sciences Curriculum

    SciTech Connect

    Ditty, Jayna L.; Kvaal, Christopher A.; Goodner, Brad; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Bailey, Cheryl; Britton, Robert A.; Gordon, Stuart G.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Reed, Kelynne; Xu, Zhaohui; Sanders-Lorenz, Erin R.; Axen, Seth; Kim, Edwin; Johns, Mitrick; Scott, Kathleen; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2011-08-01

    Undergraduate life sciences education needs an overhaul, as clearly described in the National Research Council of the National Academies publication BIO 2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. Among BIO 2010's top recommendations is the need to involve students in working with real data and tools that reflect the nature of life sciences research in the 21st century. Education research studies support the importance of utilizing primary literature, designing and implementing experiments, and analyzing results in the context of a bona fide scientific question in cultivating the analytical skills necessary to become a scientist. Incorporating these basic scientific methodologies in undergraduate education leads to increased undergraduate and post-graduate retention in the sciences. Toward this end, many undergraduate teaching organizations offer training and suggestions for faculty to update and improve their teaching approaches to help students learn as scientists, through design and discovery (e.g., Council of Undergraduate Research [www.cur.org] and Project Kaleidoscope [www.pkal.org]). With the advent of genome sequencing and bioinformatics, many scientists now formulate biological questions and interpret research results in the context of genomic information. Just as the use of bioinformatic tools and databases changed the way scientists investigate problems, it must change how scientists teach to create new opportunities for students to gain experiences reflecting the influence of genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics on modern life sciences research. Educators have responded by incorporating bioinformatics into diverse life science curricula. While these published exercises in, and guidelines for, bioinformatics curricula are helpful and inspirational, faculty new to the area of bioinformatics inevitably need training in the theoretical underpinnings of the algorithms. Moreover, effectively integrating bioinformatics into

  3. Bioinformatics tools for small genomes, such as hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Bell, Trevor G; Kramvis, Anna

    2015-02-16

    DNA sequence analysis is undertaken in many biological research laboratories. The workflow consists of several steps involving the bioinformatic processing of biological data. We have developed a suite of web-based online bioinformatic tools to assist with processing, analysis and curation of DNA sequence data. Most of these tools are genome-agnostic, with two tools specifically designed for hepatitis B virus sequence data. Tools in the suite are able to process sequence data from Sanger sequencing, ultra-deep amplicon resequencing (pyrosequencing) and chromatograph (trace files), as appropriate. The tools are available online at no cost and are aimed at researchers without specialist technical computer knowledge. The tools can be accessed at http://hvdr.bioinf.wits.ac.za/SmallGenomeTools, and the source code is available online at https://github.com/DrTrevorBell/SmallGenomeTools.

  4. Bioinformatics Tools for Small Genomes, Such as Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Trevor G.; Kramvis, Anna

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis is undertaken in many biological research laboratories. The workflow consists of several steps involving the bioinformatic processing of biological data. We have developed a suite of web-based online bioinformatic tools to assist with processing, analysis and curation of DNA sequence data. Most of these tools are genome-agnostic, with two tools specifically designed for hepatitis B virus sequence data. Tools in the suite are able to process sequence data from Sanger sequencing, ultra-deep amplicon resequencing (pyrosequencing) and chromatograph (trace files), as appropriate. The tools are available online at no cost and are aimed at researchers without specialist technical computer knowledge. The tools can be accessed at http://hvdr.bioinf.wits.ac.za/SmallGenomeTools, and the source code is available online at https://github.com/DrTrevorBell/SmallGenomeTools. PMID:25690798

  5. Personal genomics services: whose genomes?

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, David; Bregman-Eschet, Yael

    2009-01-01

    New companies offering personal whole-genome information services over the internet are dynamic and highly visible players in the personal genomics field. For fees currently ranging from US$399 to US$2500 and a vial of saliva, individuals can now purchase online access to their individual genetic information regarding susceptibility to a range of chronic diseases and phenotypic traits based on a genome-wide SNP scan. Most of the companies offering such services are based in the United States, but their clients may come from nearly anywhere in the world. Although the scientific validity, clinical utility and potential future implications of such services are being hotly debated, several ethical and regulatory questions related to direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing strategies of genetic tests have not yet received sufficient attention. For example, how can we minimize the risk of unauthorized third parties from submitting other people's DNA for testing? Another pressing question concerns the ownership of (genotypic and phenotypic) information, as well as the unclear legal status of customers regarding their own personal information. Current legislation in the US and Europe falls short of providing clear answers to these questions. Until the regulation of personal genomics services catches up with the technology, we call upon commercial providers to self-regulate and coordinate their activities to minimize potential risks to individual privacy. We also point out some specific steps, along the trustee model, that providers of DTC personal genomics services as well as regulators and policy makers could consider for addressing some of the concerns raised below. PMID:19259127

  6. Public access for teaching genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A Malcolm

    2003-01-01

    When the human genome project was conceived, its leaders wanted all researchers to have equal access to the data and associated research tools. Their vision of equal access provides an unprecedented teaching opportunity. Teachers and students have free access to the same databases that researchers are using. Furthermore, the recent movement to deliver scientific publications freely has presented a second source of current information for teaching. I have developed a genomics course that incorporates many of the public-domain databases, research tools, and peer-reviewed journals. These online resources provide students with exciting entree into the new fields of genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics. In this essay, I outline how these fields are especially well suited for inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum. Assessment data indicate that my students were able to utilize online information to achieve the educational goals of the course and that the experience positively influenced their perceptions of how they might contribute to biology.

  7. Recent developments in genomics, bioinformatics and drug discovery to combat emerging drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Palaniappan, Alangudi Natarajan; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2016-12-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a big challenge in TB control. The delay in diagnosis of DR-TB leads to its increased transmission, and therefore prevalence. Recent developments in genomics have enabled whole genome sequencing (WGS) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) from 3-day-old liquid culture and directly from uncultured sputa, while new bioinformatics tools facilitate to determine DR mutations rapidly from the resulting sequences. The present drug discovery and development pipeline is filled with candidate drugs which have shown efficacy against DR-TB. Furthermore, some of the FDA-approved drugs are being evaluated for repurposing, and this approach appears promising as several drugs are reported to enhance efficacy of the standard TB drugs, reduce drug tolerance, or modulate the host immune response to control the growth of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Recent developments in genomics and bioinformatics along with new drug discovery collectively have the potential to result in synergistic impact leading to the development of a rapid protocol to determine the drug resistance profile of the infecting strain so as to provide personalized medicine. Hence, in this review, we discuss recent developments in WGS, bioinformatics and drug discovery to perceive how they would transform the management of tuberculosis in a timely manner.

  8. A Required Course in Human Genomics, Pharmacogenomics, and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Brazeau, Daniel A.; Brazeau, Gayle A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To provide students with an understanding of the principles and applications of human genetics and genomics in drug therapy optimization, patient care, and counseling. Design A 2-credit hour course entitled Principles of the Human Genome, Pharmacogenomics, and Bioinformatics was offered to third-professional year PharmD students. Written examinations, in-class exercises, and a written paper evaluating the current literature were used to evaluate student learning. Assessment Student course ratings on the pedagogical format of the course and the relevance of course material to professional practice have improved significantly since first implementation in 2002. Conclusion This course provided pharmacy students with an understanding of pharmacogenetics ranging from genetic principles and the inheritance of complex traits to specific examples of pharmacogenomics in drug therapy. PMID:17332851

  9. MEMOSys: Bioinformatics platform for genome-scale metabolic models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent advances in genomic sequencing have enabled the use of genome sequencing in standard biological and biotechnological research projects. The challenge is how to integrate the large amount of data in order to gain novel biological insights. One way to leverage sequence data is to use genome-scale metabolic models. We have therefore designed and implemented a bioinformatics platform which supports the development of such metabolic models. Results MEMOSys (MEtabolic MOdel research and development System) is a versatile platform for the management, storage, and development of genome-scale metabolic models. It supports the development of new models by providing a built-in version control system which offers access to the complete developmental history. Moreover, the integrated web board, the authorization system, and the definition of user roles allow collaborations across departments and institutions. Research on existing models is facilitated by a search system, references to external databases, and a feature-rich comparison mechanism. MEMOSys provides customizable data exchange mechanisms using the SBML format to enable analysis in external tools. The web application is based on the Java EE framework and offers an intuitive user interface. It currently contains six annotated microbial metabolic models. Conclusions We have developed a web-based system designed to provide researchers a novel application facilitating the management and development of metabolic models. The system is freely available at http://www.icbi.at/MEMOSys. PMID:21276275

  10. Recent progress on bioinformatics, functional genomics, and metabolomics research of cytochrome P450 and its impact on drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Mingzhu; Pang, Yushu; Zhang, Wen; Angela Liu, Limin; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2012-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 superfamily is responsible primarily for human drug metabolism, which is of critical importance for the drug discovery and development. Rapid advancement of bioinformatics, functional genomics and metabolomics has been made over the last decade. These disciplines are essential in target identification, lead discovery and optimization. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on cytochrome P450 and its role on drug metabolism in the context of bioinformatics, functional genomics and metabolomics. Data are integrated into various databases and web-based platforms on cytochrome P450. These research tools and resources are playing an increasingly important role in drug discovery, and are helping in achieving the ultimate goal of personalized medicine, that is, to prescribe personalized drugs according to each person's genetic makeup, metabolic level, and drug disposition.

  11. Genomics Virtual Laboratory: A Practical Bioinformatics Workbench for the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Afgan, Enis; Sloggett, Clare; Goonasekera, Nuwan; Makunin, Igor; Benson, Derek; Crowe, Mark; Gladman, Simon; Kowsar, Yousef; Pheasant, Michael; Horst, Ron; Lonie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing high throughput genomics data is a complex and compute intensive task, generally requiring numerous software tools and large reference data sets, tied together in successive stages of data transformation and visualisation. A computational platform enabling best practice genomics analysis ideally meets a number of requirements, including: a wide range of analysis and visualisation tools, closely linked to large user and reference data sets; workflow platform(s) enabling accessible, reproducible, portable analyses, through a flexible set of interfaces; highly available, scalable computational resources; and flexibility and versatility in the use of these resources to meet demands and expertise of a variety of users. Access to an appropriate computational platform can be a significant barrier to researchers, as establishing such a platform requires a large upfront investment in hardware, experience, and expertise. We designed and implemented the Genomics Virtual Laboratory (GVL) as a middleware layer of machine images, cloud management tools, and online services that enable researchers to build arbitrarily sized compute clusters on demand, pre-populated with fully configured bioinformatics tools, reference datasets and workflow and visualisation options. The platform is flexible in that users can conduct analyses through web-based (Galaxy, RStudio, IPython Notebook) or command-line interfaces, and add/remove compute nodes and data resources as required. Best-practice tutorials and protocols provide a path from introductory training to practice. The GVL is available on the OpenStack-based Australian Research Cloud (http://nectar.org.au) and the Amazon Web Services cloud. The principles, implementation and build process are designed to be cloud-agnostic. This paper provides a blueprint for the design and implementation of a cloud-based Genomics Virtual Laboratory. We discuss scope, design considerations and technical and logistical constraints, and explore the

  12. Genomics Virtual Laboratory: A Practical Bioinformatics Workbench for the Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Afgan, Enis; Sloggett, Clare; Goonasekera, Nuwan; Makunin, Igor; Benson, Derek; Crowe, Mark; Gladman, Simon; Kowsar, Yousef; Pheasant, Michael; Horst, Ron; Lonie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Analyzing high throughput genomics data is a complex and compute intensive task, generally requiring numerous software tools and large reference data sets, tied together in successive stages of data transformation and visualisation. A computational platform enabling best practice genomics analysis ideally meets a number of requirements, including: a wide range of analysis and visualisation tools, closely linked to large user and reference data sets; workflow platform(s) enabling accessible, reproducible, portable analyses, through a flexible set of interfaces; highly available, scalable computational resources; and flexibility and versatility in the use of these resources to meet demands and expertise of a variety of users. Access to an appropriate computational platform can be a significant barrier to researchers, as establishing such a platform requires a large upfront investment in hardware, experience, and expertise. Results We designed and implemented the Genomics Virtual Laboratory (GVL) as a middleware layer of machine images, cloud management tools, and online services that enable researchers to build arbitrarily sized compute clusters on demand, pre-populated with fully configured bioinformatics tools, reference datasets and workflow and visualisation options. The platform is flexible in that users can conduct analyses through web-based (Galaxy, RStudio, IPython Notebook) or command-line interfaces, and add/remove compute nodes and data resources as required. Best-practice tutorials and protocols provide a path from introductory training to practice. The GVL is available on the OpenStack-based Australian Research Cloud (http://nectar.org.au) and the Amazon Web Services cloud. The principles, implementation and build process are designed to be cloud-agnostic. Conclusions This paper provides a blueprint for the design and implementation of a cloud-based Genomics Virtual Laboratory. We discuss scope, design considerations and technical and

  13. PGWD: Integrating Personal Genome for Warfarin Dosing.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yidan; Cheng, Ronghai; Li, Zhoufang; Zhao, Yujun; He, Jiankui

    2016-03-01

    Warfarin is a drug normally used in the prevention of thrombosis and the formation of blood clots. The dosage of warfarin is strongly affected by genetic variants of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genes. Current technologies for detecting the variants of these genes are mainly based on real-time PCR. In recent years, due to the rapidly dropping cost of whole genome sequencing and genotyping, more and more people get their whole genome sequenced or genotyped. However, current software for warfarin dosing prediction is based on low-throughput genetic information from either real-time PCR or melting curve methods. There is no bioinformatics tool available that can take the high-throughput genome sequencing data as input and determine the accurate dosage of warfarin. Here, we present PGWD, a web tool that analyzes personal genome sequencing data and integrates with clinical information for warfarin dosing.

  14. Integrative genomic analysis by interoperation of bioinformatics tools in GenomeSpace

    PubMed Central

    Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Liefeld, Ted; Ocana, Marco; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Pochet, Nathalie; Robinson, James T.; Demchak, Barry; Hull, Tim; Ben-Artzi, Gil; Blankenberg, Daniel; Barber, Galt P.; Lee, Brian T.; Kuhn, Robert M.; Nekrutenko, Anton; Segal, Eran; Ideker, Trey; Reich, Michael; Regev, Aviv; Chang, Howard Y.; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2015-01-01

    Integrative analysis of multiple data types to address complex biomedical questions requires the use of multiple software tools in concert and remains an enormous challenge for most of the biomedical research community. Here we introduce GenomeSpace (http://www.genomespace.org), a cloud-based, cooperative community resource. Seeded as a collaboration of six of the most popular genomics analysis tools, GenomeSpace now supports the streamlined interaction of 20 bioinformatics tools and data resources. To facilitate the ability of non-programming users’ to leverage GenomeSpace in integrative analysis, it offers a growing set of ‘recipes’, short workflows involving a few tools and steps to guide investigators through high utility analysis tasks. PMID:26780094

  15. Genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics of human heart failure

    PubMed Central

    DOS REMEDIOS, C.G.; LIEW, C.C.; ALLEN, P.D.; WINSLOW, R.L.; VAN EYK, J.E.; DUNN, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Unraveling the molecular complexities of human heart failure, particularly end-stage failure, can be achieved by combining multiple investigative approaches. There are several parts to the problem. Each patient is the product of a complex set of genetic variations, different degrees of influence of diets and lifestyles, and usually heart transplantation patients are treated with multiple drugs. The genomic status of the myocardium of any one transplant patient can be analysed using gene arrays (cDNA- or oligonucleotide-based) each with its own strengths and weaknesses. The proteins expressed by these failing hearts (myocardial proteomics) were first investigated over a decade ago using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DGE) which promised to resolve several thousand proteins in a single sample of failing heart. However, while 2DGE is very successful for the abundant and moderately expressed proteins, it struggles to identify proteins expressed at low levels. Highly focused first dimension separations combined with recent advances in mass spectrometry now provide new hope for solving this difficulty. Protein arrays are a more recent form of proteomics that hold great promise but, like the above methods, they have their own drawbacks. Our approach to solving the problems inherent in the genomics and proteomics of heart failure is to provide experts in each analytical method with a sample from the same human failing heart. This requires a sufficiently large number of samples from a sufficiently large pool of heart transplant patients as well as a large pool of non-diseased, non-failing human hearts. We have collected more than 200 hearts from patients undergoing heart transplantations and a further 50 non-failing hearts. By combining our expertise we expect to reduce and possibly eliminate the inherent difficulties of each analytical approach. Finally, we recognise the need for bioinformatics to make sense of the large quantities of data that will

  16. Genomics and natural products: role of bioinformatics and recent patents.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Charles; Das, Malay K; Pathak, Yashwant V

    2014-01-01

    The post genomic era has promised major breakthroughs in personalized medicine which will improve a patient's health by selecting treatments including diet based on the patient's unique DNA sequence. The post genomic era is allowing scientists and clinicians to examine an individuals' DNA and then recommend the best diet in order to remain healthy and attenuate disease processes which the individual might be predisposed to because of their genetic make-up, e.g., cardiovascular disease. Nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics are related terms to pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics with an emphasis on diet or nutrition. There has been an increasing interest in consumers on natural medicines or Nutraceuticals in order to remain healthy. The post genomic era will allow a patient to visit their physician who will screen the patients DNA on a silicon chip. This will indicate which of the patient's genes have polymorphisms, e.g., a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that might lead the patient to be more susceptible to certain diseases and then the physician could prescribe the appropriate dietary supplements to prevent or diminish these potential diseases. Several recently published patents are discussed in the article covering recent developments in the field.

  17. Computational Challenges of Personal Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Bolouri, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    It is widely predicted that cost and efficiency gains in sequencing will usher in an era of personal genomics and personalized, predictive, preventive, and participatory medicine within a decade. I review the computational challenges ahead and propose general and specific directions for research and development. There is an urgent need to develop semantic ontologies that span genomics, molecular systems biology, and medical data. Although the development of such ontologies would be costly and difficult, the benefits will far outweigh the costs. I argue that availability of such ontologies would allow a revolution in web-services for personal genomics and medicine. PMID:19440448

  18. FDA Bioinformatics Tool for Microbial Genomics Research on Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens Using Microarrays

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Advances in microbial genomics and bioinformatics are offering greater insights into the emergence and spread of foodborne pathogens in outbreak scenarios. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed the genomics tool ArrayTrackTM, which provides extensive functionalities to man...

  19. Evolutionary genomics of animal personality.

    PubMed

    van Oers, Kees; Mueller, Jakob C

    2010-12-27

    Research on animal personality can be approached from both a phenotypic and a genetic perspective. While using a phenotypic approach one can measure present selection on personality traits and their combinations. However, this approach cannot reconstruct the historical trajectory that was taken by evolution. Therefore, it is essential for our understanding of the causes and consequences of personality diversity to link phenotypic variation in personality traits with polymorphisms in genomic regions that code for this trait variation. Identifying genes or genome regions that underlie personality traits will open exciting possibilities to study natural selection at the molecular level, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, pleiotropic effects and how gene expression shapes personality phenotypes. In this paper, we will discuss how genome information revealed by already established approaches and some more recent techniques such as high-throughput sequencing of genomic regions in a large number of individuals can be used to infer micro-evolutionary processes, historical selection and finally the maintenance of personality trait variation. We will do this by reviewing recent advances in molecular genetics of animal personality, but will also use advanced human personality studies as case studies of how molecular information may be used in animal personality research in the near future.

  20. Analysing the performance of personal computers based on Intel microprocessors for sequence aligning bioinformatics applications.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pradeep S; John, Eugene B

    2007-01-01

    Aligning specific sequences against a very large number of other sequences is a central aspect of bioinformatics. With the widespread availability of personal computers in biology laboratories, sequence alignment is now often performed locally. This makes it necessary to analyse the performance of personal computers for sequence aligning bioinformatics benchmarks. In this paper, we analyse the performance of a personal computer for the popular BLAST and FASTA sequence alignment suites. Results indicate that these benchmarks have a large number of recurring operations and use memory operations extensively. It seems that the performance can be improved with a bigger L1-cache.

  1. Bioinformatic Analyses of Whole-Genome Sequence Data in a Public Health Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Oakeson, Kelly F; Wagner, Jennifer Marie; Mendenhall, Michelle; Rohrwasser, Andreas; Atkinson-Dunn, Robyn

    2017-09-01

    The ability to generate high-quality sequence data in a public health laboratory enables the identification of pathogenic strains, the determination of relatedness among outbreak strains, and the analysis of genetic information regarding virulence and antimicrobial-resistance genes. However, the analysis of whole-genome sequence data depends on bioinformatic analysis tools and processes. Many public health laboratories do not have the bioinformatic capabilities to analyze the data generated from sequencing and therefore are unable to take full advantage of the power of whole-genome sequencing. The goal of this perspective is to provide a guide for laboratories to understand the bioinformatic analyses that are needed to interpret whole-genome sequence data and how these in silico analyses can be implemented in a public health laboratory setting easily, affordably, and, in some cases, without the need for intensive computing resources and infrastructure.

  2. The Revolution in Viral Genomics as Exemplified by the Bioinformatic Analysis of Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sarah; Chodosh, James; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, genomic and bioinformatic analysis of human adenoviruses has been achieved using a variety of DNA sequencing methods; initially with the use of restriction enzymes and more currently with the use of the GS FLX pyrosequencing technology. Following the conception of DNA sequencing in the 1970s, analysis of adenoviruses has evolved from 100 base pair mRNA fragments to entire genomes. Comparative genomics of adenoviruses made its debut in 1984 when nucleotides and amino acids of coding sequences within the hexon genes of two human adenoviruses (HAdV), HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5, were compared and analyzed. It was determined that there were three different zones (1–393, 394–1410, 1411–2910) within the hexon gene, of which HAdV–C2 and HAdV–C5 shared zones 1 and 3 with 95% and 89.5% nucleotide identity, respectively. In 1992, HAdV-C5 became the first adenovirus genome to be fully sequenced using the Sanger method. Over the next seven years, whole genome analysis and characterization was completed using bioinformatic tools such as blastn, tblastx, ClustalV and FASTA, in order to determine key proteins in species HAdV-A through HAdV-F. The bioinformatic revolution was initiated with the introduction of a novel species, HAdV-G, that was typed and named by the use of whole genome sequencing and phylogenetics as opposed to traditional serology. HAdV bioinformatics will continue to advance as the latest sequencing technology enables scientists to add to and expand the resource databases. As a result of these advancements, how novel HAdVs are typed has changed. Bioinformatic analysis has become the revolutionary tool that has significantly accelerated the in-depth study of HAdV microevolution through comparative genomics. PMID:21994684

  3. Genomics Politics through Space and Time: The Case of Bioinformatics in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bicudo, Edison

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of scientific disciplines, as well as the policies aimed to steer them, have geographical implications. This becomes visible in areas such as genomics and related fields. In this paper, the relation between scientific evolution, political decisions and geographical configuration is studied. The recent formation of bioinformatics in Brazil is focused on. The study involves an analysis of data collected on the website of CNPq, a funding agency attached to the Ministry of Science and Technology. Furthermore, I conducted fieldwork in four cities, interviewing 15 bioinformaticians. In the history of Brazilian bioinformatics, three periods can be identified. In the first period (1900-1996), bioinformatics was actually absent, but biology research groups were formed which would subsequently explore bioinformatics. The second period (1997-2006) was marked by the emergence of the discipline and geographical concentration of major research groups in the southern part of Brazil. A third period can be pointed to (2007-2014), in which political choices have turned geographical diffusion and institutional equality into a national target. As a consequence of the recent shifts, genomics and bioinformatics researchers have been involved in a debate, some defending the existence of few specialized research and sequencing platforms, whereas others welcoming the constitution of a scientific scenario based on decentralized platforms. I defend an intermediate solution, whereby some places would be selected to be genomics hubs. This would fit the regional diversity of this vast country, in addition to tackling the scientific weaknesses of the northern area.

  4. Community annotation and bioinformatics workforce development in concert--Little Skate Genome Annotation Workshops and Jamborees.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghua; Arighi, Cecilia N; King, Benjamin L; Polson, Shawn W; Vincent, James; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Kingham, Brewster F; Page, Shallee T; Rendino, Marc Farnum; Thomas, William Kelley; Udwary, Daniel W; Wu, Cathy H

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have equipped biologists with a powerful new set of tools for advancing research goals. The resulting flood of sequence data has made it critically important to train the next generation of scientists to handle the inherent bioinformatic challenges. The North East Bioinformatics Collaborative (NEBC) is undertaking the genome sequencing and annotation of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) to promote advancement of bioinformatics infrastructure in our region, with an emphasis on practical education to create a critical mass of informatically savvy life scientists. In support of the Little Skate Genome Project, the NEBC members have developed several annotation workshops and jamborees to provide training in genome sequencing, annotation and analysis. Acting as a nexus for both curation activities and dissemination of project data, a project web portal, SkateBase (http://skatebase.org) has been developed. As a case study to illustrate effective coupling of community annotation with workforce development, we report the results of the Mitochondrial Genome Annotation Jamborees organized to annotate the first completely assembled element of the Little Skate Genome Project, as a culminating experience for participants from our three prior annotation workshops. We are applying the physical/virtual infrastructure and lessons learned from these activities to enhance and streamline the genome annotation workflow, as we look toward our continuing efforts for larger-scale functional and structural community annotation of the L. erinacea genome.

  5. Bioinformatics tools and databases for whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Faksri, Kiatichai; Tan, Jun Hao; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Teo, Yik-Ying; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee

    2016-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease of global public health importance caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) in which M. tuberculosis (Mtb) is the major causative agent. Recent advancements in genomic technologies such as next generation sequencing have enabled high throughput cost-effective generation of whole genome sequence information from Mtb clinical isolates, providing new insights into the evolution, genomic diversity and transmission of the Mtb bacteria, including molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. The large volume of sequencing data generated however necessitated effective and efficient management, storage, analysis and visualization of the data and results through development of novel and customized bioinformatics software tools and databases. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive survey of the current freely available bioinformatics software tools and publicly accessible databases for genomic analysis of Mtb for identifying disease transmission in molecular epidemiology and in rapid determination of the antibiotic profiles of clinical isolates for prompt and optimal patient treatment.

  6. A Critical Analysis of Assessment Quality in Genomics and Bioinformatics Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Chad E.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of genomics and bioinformatics methods and paradigms in biology has been accompanied by an explosion of new curricula and pedagogies. An important question to ask about these educational innovations is whether they are having a meaningful impact on students' knowledge, attitudes, or skills. Although assessments are…

  7. IFPA meeting 2016 workshop report I: Genomic communication, bioinformatics, trophoblast biology and transport systems.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Christiane; Baker, Julie C; Blundell, Cassidy; Chavez, Shawn L; Carbone, Lucia; Chamley, Larry; Hannibal, Roberta L; Illsley, Nick; Kurre, Peter; Laurent, Louise C; McKenzie, Charles; Morales-Prieto, Diana; Pantham, Priyadarshini; Paquette, Alison; Powell, Katie; Price, Nathan; Rao, Balaji M; Sadovsky, Yoel; Salomon, Carlos; Tuteja, Geetu; Wilson, Samantha; O'Tierney-Ginn, P F

    2017-01-11

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2016 there were twelve themed workshops, four of which are summarized in this report. These workshops covered innovative technologies applied to new and traditional areas of placental research: 1) genomic communication; 2) bioinformatics; 3) trophoblast biology and pathology; 4) placental transport systems.

  8. A Critical Analysis of Assessment Quality in Genomics and Bioinformatics Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Chad E.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of genomics and bioinformatics methods and paradigms in biology has been accompanied by an explosion of new curricula and pedagogies. An important question to ask about these educational innovations is whether they are having a meaningful impact on students' knowledge, attitudes, or skills. Although assessments are…

  9. Research Techniques Made Simple: Bioinformatics for Genome-Scale Biology.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Amy C; Watson, David S; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Warren, Richard B; Huber, Wolfgang; Barnes, Michael R

    2017-09-01

    High-throughput biology presents unique opportunities and challenges for dermatological research. Drawing on a small handful of exemplary studies, we review some of the major lessons of these new technologies. We caution against several common errors and introduce helpful statistical concepts that may be unfamiliar to researchers without experience in bioinformatics. We recommend specific software tools that can aid dermatologists at varying levels of computational literacy, including platforms with command line and graphical user interfaces. The future of dermatology lies in integrative research, in which clinicians, laboratory scientists, and data analysts come together to plan, execute, and publish their work in open forums that promote critical discussion and reproducibility. In this article, we offer guidelines that we hope will steer researchers toward best practices for this new and dynamic era of data intensive dermatology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The discrepancies in the results of bioinformatics tools for genomic structural annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Nowak, Robert; Osipowski, Paweł; Rymuszka, Jacek; Świerkula, Katarzyna; Wojcieszek, Michał; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2014-11-01

    A major focus of sequencing project is to identify genes in genomes. However it is necessary to define the variety of genes and the criteria for identifying them. In this work we present discrepancies and dependencies from the application of different bioinformatic programs for structural annotation performed on the cucumber data set from Polish Consortium of Cucumber Genome Sequencing. We use Fgenesh, GenScan and GeneMark to automated structural annotation, the results have been compared to reference annotation.

  11. FLAGdb(++): A Bioinformatic Environment to Study and Compare Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Tamby, Jean Philippe; Brunaud, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    Today, the growing knowledge and data accumulation on plant genomes do not solve in a simple way the task of gene function inference. Because data of different types are coming from various sources, we need to integrate and analyze them to help biologists in this task. We created FLAGdb(++) ( http://tools.ips2.u-psud.fr/FLAGdb ) to take up this challenge for a selection of plant genomes. In order to enrich gene function predictions, structural and functional annotations of the genomes are explored to generate meta-data and to compare them. Since data are numerous and complex, we focused on accessibility and visualization with an original and user-friendly interface. In this chapter we present the main tools of FLAGdb(++) and a use-case to explore a gene family: structural and functional properties of this family and research of orthologous genes in the other plant genomes.

  12. A brief history of genome research and bioinformatics in France.

    PubMed

    Danchin, A

    2000-01-01

    The development of in silico genomics has progressed slowly in France for a number of political reasons. Two administrative organizations, the Groupement de Recherche sur les Génomes (GREG) and the Groupement de Recherche 1029 (GDR 1029) of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) have been established. These organizations have created the dynamics that hopefully will place France (which coordinated consortia that completed several of the first large microbial genomes) among the developed nations that support Large-Scale Biology.

  13. Exploring laccase genes from plant pathogen genomes: a bioinformatic approach.

    PubMed

    Feng, B Z; Li, P Q; Fu, L; Yu, X M

    2015-10-30

    To date, research on laccases has mostly been focused on plant and fungal laccases and their current use in biotechnological applications. In contrast, little is known about laccases from plant pathogens, although recent rapid progress in whole genome sequencing of an increasing number of organisms has facilitated their identification and ascertainment of their origins. In this study, a comparative analysis was performed to elucidate the distribution of laccases among bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes, and, through comparison of their amino acids, to determine the relationships between them. We retrieved the laccase genes for the 20 publicly available plant pathogen genomes. From these, 125 laccase genes were identified in total, including seven in bacterial genomes, 101 in fungal genomes, and 17 in oomycete genomes. Most of the predicted protein models of these genes shared typical fungal laccase characteristics, possessing four conserved domains with one cysteine and ten histidine residues at these domains. Phylogenetic analysis illustrated that laccases from bacteria and oomycetes were grouped into two distinct clades, whereas fungal laccases clustered in three main clades. These results provide the theoretical groundwork regarding the role of laccases in plant pathogens and might be used to guide future research into these enzymes.

  14. Public Access for Teaching Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2003-01-01

    When the human genome project was conceived, its leaders wanted all researchers to have equal access to the data and associated research tools. Their vision of equal access provides an unprecedented teaching opportunity. Teachers and students have free access to the same databases that researchers are using. Furthermore, the recent movement to…

  15. Public Access for Teaching Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2003-01-01

    When the human genome project was conceived, its leaders wanted all researchers to have equal access to the data and associated research tools. Their vision of equal access provides an unprecedented teaching opportunity. Teachers and students have free access to the same databases that researchers are using. Furthermore, the recent movement to…

  16. Silicon Era of Carbon-Based Life: Application of Genomics and Bioinformatics in Crop Stress Research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man-Wah; Qi, Xinpeng; Ni, Meng; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic and biotic stresses lead to massive reprogramming of different life processes and are the major limiting factors hampering crop productivity. Omics-based research platforms allow for a holistic and comprehensive survey on crop stress responses and hence may bring forth better crop improvement strategies. Since high-throughput approaches generate considerable amounts of data, bioinformatics tools will play an essential role in storing, retrieving, sharing, processing, and analyzing them. Genomic and functional genomic studies in crops still lag far behind similar studies in humans and other animals. In this review, we summarize some useful genomics and bioinformatics resources available to crop scientists. In addition, we also discuss the major challenges and advancements in the “-omics” studies, with an emphasis on their possible impacts on crop stress research and crop improvement. PMID:23759993

  17. Silicon era of carbon-based life: application of genomics and bioinformatics in crop stress research.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Wah; Qi, Xinpeng; Ni, Meng; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2013-05-29

    Abiotic and biotic stresses lead to massive reprogramming of different life processes and are the major limiting factors hampering crop productivity. Omics-based research platforms allow for a holistic and comprehensive survey on crop stress responses and hence may bring forth better crop improvement strategies. Since high-throughput approaches generate considerable amounts of data, bioinformatics tools will play an essential role in storing, retrieving, sharing, processing, and analyzing them. Genomic and functional genomic studies in crops still lag far behind similar studies in humans and other animals. In this review, we summarize some useful genomics and bioinformatics resources available to crop scientists. In addition, we also discuss the major challenges and advancements in the "-omics" studies, with an emphasis on their possible impacts on crop stress research and crop improvement.

  18. Controlling new knowledge: Genomic science, governance and the politics of bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Salter, Brian; Salter, Charlotte

    2017-04-01

    The rise of bioinformatics is a direct response to the political difficulties faced by genomics in its quest to be a new biomedical innovation, and the value of bioinformatics lies in its role as the bridge between the promise of genomics and its realization in the form of health benefits. Western scientific elites are able to use their close relationship with the state to control and facilitate the emergence of new domains compatible with the existing distribution of epistemic power - all within the embrace of public trust. The incorporation of bioinformatics as the saviour of genomics had to be integrated with the operation of two key aspects of governance in this field: the definition and ownership of the new knowledge. This was achieved mainly by the development of common standards and by the promotion of the values of communality, open access and the public ownership of data to legitimize and maintain the governance power of publicly funded genomic science. Opposition from industry advocating the private ownership of knowledge has been largely neutered through the institutions supporting the science-state concordat. However, in order for translation into health benefits to occur and public trust to be assured, genomic and clinical data have to be integrated and knowledge ownership agreed upon across the separate and distinct governance territories of scientist, clinical medicine and society. Tensions abound as science seeks ways of maintaining its control of knowledge production through the negotiation of new forms of governance with the institutions and values of clinicians and patients.

  19. Controlling new knowledge: Genomic science, governance and the politics of bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Brian; Salter, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    The rise of bioinformatics is a direct response to the political difficulties faced by genomics in its quest to be a new biomedical innovation, and the value of bioinformatics lies in its role as the bridge between the promise of genomics and its realization in the form of health benefits. Western scientific elites are able to use their close relationship with the state to control and facilitate the emergence of new domains compatible with the existing distribution of epistemic power – all within the embrace of public trust. The incorporation of bioinformatics as the saviour of genomics had to be integrated with the operation of two key aspects of governance in this field: the definition and ownership of the new knowledge. This was achieved mainly by the development of common standards and by the promotion of the values of communality, open access and the public ownership of data to legitimize and maintain the governance power of publicly funded genomic science. Opposition from industry advocating the private ownership of knowledge has been largely neutered through the institutions supporting the science-state concordat. However, in order for translation into health benefits to occur and public trust to be assured, genomic and clinical data have to be integrated and knowledge ownership agreed upon across the separate and distinct governance territories of scientist, clinical medicine and society. Tensions abound as science seeks ways of maintaining its control of knowledge production through the negotiation of new forms of governance with the institutions and values of clinicians and patients. PMID:28056721

  20. Bioinformatics challenges in genome-wide association studies (GWAS).

    PubMed

    De, Rishika; Bush, William S; Moore, Jason H

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for investigators to examine the human genome to detect genetic risk factors, reveal the genetic architecture of diseases and open up new opportunities for treatment and prevention. However, despite its successes, GWAS have not been able to identify genetic loci that are effective classifiers of disease, limiting their value for genetic testing. This chapter highlights the challenges that lie ahead for GWAS in better identifying disease risk predictors, and how we may address them. In this regard, we review basic concepts regarding GWAS, the technologies used for capturing genetic variation, the missing heritability problem, the need for efficient study design especially for replication efforts, reducing the bias introduced into a dataset, and how to utilize new resources available, such as electronic medical records. We also look to what lies ahead for the field, and the approaches that can be taken to realize the full potential of GWAS.

  1. Bioinformatics tools for genome mining of polyketide and non-ribosomal peptides.

    PubMed

    Boddy, Christopher N

    2014-02-01

    Microbial natural products have played a key role in the development of clinical agents in nearly all therapeutic areas. Recent advances in genome sequencing have revealed that there is an incredible wealth of new polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide natural product diversity to be mined from genetic data. The diversity and complexity of polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide biosynthesis has required the development of unique bioinformatics tools to identify, annotate, and predict the structures of these natural products from their biosynthetic gene clusters. This review highlights and evaluates web-based bioinformatics tools currently available to the natural product community for genome mining to discover new polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides.

  2. VectorBase: improvements to a bioinformatics resource for invertebrate vector genomics.

    PubMed

    Megy, Karine; Emrich, Scott J; Lawson, Daniel; Campbell, David; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Hughes, Daniel S T; Koscielny, Gautier; Louis, Christos; Maccallum, Robert M; Redmond, Seth N; Sheehan, Andrew; Topalis, Pantelis; Wilson, Derek

    2012-01-01

    VectorBase (http://www.vectorbase.org) is a NIAID-supported bioinformatics resource for invertebrate vectors of human pathogens. It hosts data for nine genomes: mosquitoes (three Anopheles gambiae genomes, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus), tick (Ixodes scapularis), body louse (Pediculus humanus), kissing bug (Rhodnius prolixus) and tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans). Hosted data range from genomic features and expression data to population genetics and ontologies. We describe improvements and integration of new data that expand our taxonomic coverage. Releases are bi-monthly and include the delivery of preliminary data for emerging genomes. Frequent updates of the genome browser provide VectorBase users with increasing options for visualizing their own high-throughput data. One major development is a new population biology resource for storing genomic variations, insecticide resistance data and their associated metadata. It takes advantage of improved ontologies and controlled vocabularies. Combined, these new features ensure timely release of multiple types of data in the public domain while helping overcome the bottlenecks of bioinformatics and annotation by engaging with our user community.

  3. proBAMsuite, a Bioinformatics Framework for Genome-Based Representation and Analysis of Proteomics Data*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojing; Slebos, Robbert J. C.; Chambers, Matthew C.; Tabb, David L.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate genome-based representation and analysis of proteomics data, we developed a new bioinformatics framework, proBAMsuite, in which a central component is the protein BAM (proBAM) file format for organizing peptide spectrum matches (PSMs)1 within the context of the genome. proBAMsuite also includes two R packages, proBAMr and proBAMtools, for generating and analyzing proBAM files, respectively. Applying proBAMsuite to three recently published proteomics datasets, we demonstrated its utility in facilitating efficient genome-based sharing, interpretation, and integration of proteomics data. First, the interpretation of proteomics data is significantly enhanced with the rich genomic annotation information. Second, PSMs can be easily reannotated using user-specified gene annotation schemes and assembled into both protein and gene identifications. Third, using the genome as a common reference, proBAMsuite facilitates seamless proteomics and proteogenomics data integration. Finally, proBAM files can be readily visualized in genome browsers and thus bring proteomics data analysis to a general audience beyond the proteomics community. Results from this study establish proBAMsuite as a useful bioinformatics framework for proteomics and proteogenomics research. PMID:26657539

  4. Genome-wide variant analysis of simplex autism families with an integrative clinical-bioinformatics pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Barrón, Laura T.; O'Rawe, Jason A.; Wu, Yiyang; Yoon, Margaret; Fang, Han; Iossifov, Ivan; Lyon, Gholson J.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of developmental disabilities that affect social interaction and communication and are characterized by repetitive behaviors. There is now a large body of evidence that suggests a complex role of genetics in ASDs, in which many different loci are involved. Although many current population-scale genomic studies have been demonstrably fruitful, these studies generally focus on analyzing a limited part of the genome or use a limited set of bioinformatics tools. These limitations preclude the analysis of genome-wide perturbations that may contribute to the development and severity of ASD-related phenotypes. To overcome these limitations, we have developed and utilized an integrative clinical and bioinformatics pipeline for generating a more complete and reliable set of genomic variants for downstream analyses. Our study focuses on the analysis of three simplex autism families consisting of one affected child, unaffected parents, and one unaffected sibling. All members were clinically evaluated and widely phenotyped. Genotyping arrays and whole-genome sequencing were performed on each member, and the resulting sequencing data were analyzed using a variety of available bioinformatics tools. We searched for rare variants of putative functional impact that were found to be segregating according to de novo, autosomal recessive, X-linked, mitochondrial, and compound heterozygote transmission models. The resulting candidate variants included three small heterozygous copy-number variations (CNVs), a rare heterozygous de novo nonsense mutation in MYBBP1A located within exon 1, and a novel de novo missense variant in LAMB3. Our work demonstrates how more comprehensive analyses that include rich clinical data and whole-genome sequencing data can generate reliable results for use in downstream investigations. PMID:27148569

  5. CaPSID: A bioinformatics platform for computational pathogen sequence identification in human genomes and transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is now well established that nearly 20% of human cancers are caused by infectious agents, and the list of human oncogenic pathogens will grow in the future for a variety of cancer types. Whole tumor transcriptome and genome sequencing by next-generation sequencing technologies presents an unparalleled opportunity for pathogen detection and discovery in human tissues but requires development of new genome-wide bioinformatics tools. Results Here we present CaPSID (Computational Pathogen Sequence IDentification), a comprehensive bioinformatics platform for identifying, querying and visualizing both exogenous and endogenous pathogen nucleotide sequences in tumor genomes and transcriptomes. CaPSID includes a scalable, high performance database for data storage and a web application that integrates the genome browser JBrowse. CaPSID also provides useful metrics for sequence analysis of pre-aligned BAM files, such as gene and genome coverage, and is optimized to run efficiently on multiprocessor computers with low memory usage. Conclusions To demonstrate the usefulness and efficiency of CaPSID, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of both a simulated dataset and transcriptome samples from ovarian cancer. CaPSID correctly identified all of the human and pathogen sequences in the simulated dataset, while in the ovarian dataset CaPSID’s predictions were successfully validated in vitro. PMID:22901030

  6. Tissue Banking, Bioinformatics, and Electronic Medical Records: The Front-End Requirements for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Suh, K. Stephen; Sarojini, Sreeja; Youssif, Maher; Nalley, Kip; Milinovikj, Natasha; Elloumi, Fathi; Russell, Steven; Pecora, Andrew; Schecter, Elyssa; Goy, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises patient-tailored treatments that enhance patient care and decrease overall treatment costs by focusing on genetics and “-omics” data obtained from patient biospecimens and records to guide therapy choices that generate good clinical outcomes. The approach relies on diagnostic and prognostic use of novel biomarkers discovered through combinations of tissue banking, bioinformatics, and electronic medical records (EMRs). The analytical power of bioinformatic platforms combined with patient clinical data from EMRs can reveal potential biomarkers and clinical phenotypes that allow researchers to develop experimental strategies using selected patient biospecimens stored in tissue banks. For cancer, high-quality biospecimens collected at diagnosis, first relapse, and various treatment stages provide crucial resources for study designs. To enlarge biospecimen collections, patient education regarding the value of specimen donation is vital. One approach for increasing consent is to offer publically available illustrations and game-like engagements demonstrating how wider sample availability facilitates development of novel therapies. The critical value of tissue bank samples, bioinformatics, and EMR in the early stages of the biomarker discovery process for personalized medicine is often overlooked. The data obtained also require cross-disciplinary collaborations to translate experimental results into clinical practice and diagnostic and prognostic use in personalized medicine. PMID:23818899

  7. The application of genomics and bioinformatics to accelerate crop improvement in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David

    2016-04-01

    The changing climate and growing global population will increase pressure on our ability to produce sufficient food. The breeding of novel crops and the adaptation of current crops to the new environment are required to ensure continued food production. Advances in genomics offer the potential to accelerate the genomics based breeding of crop plants. However, relating genomic data to climate related agronomic traits for use in breeding remains a huge challenge, and one which will require coordination of diverse skills and expertise. Bioinformatics, when combined with genomics has the potential to help maintain food security in the face of climate change through the accelerated production of climate ready crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. AphidBase: A centralized bioinformatic resource for annotation of the pea aphid genome

    PubMed Central

    Legeai, Fabrice; Shigenobu, Shuji; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Colbourne, John; Rispe, Claude; Collin, Olivier; Richards, Stephen; Wilson, Alex C. C.; Tagu, Denis

    2015-01-01

    AphidBase is a centralized bioinformatic resource that was developed to facilitate community annotation of the pea aphid genome by the International Aphid Genomics Consortium (IAGC). The AphidBase Information System designed to organize and distribute genomic data and annotations for a large international community was constructed using open source software tools from the Generic Model Organism Database (GMOD). The system includes Apollo and GBrowse utilities as well as a wiki, blast search capabilities and a full text search engine. AphidBase strongly supported community cooperation and coordination in the curation of gene models during community annotation of the pea aphid genome. AphidBase can be accessed at http://www.aphidbase.com. PMID:20482635

  9. [Bioinformatics Analysis of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats in the Genomes of Shigella].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Yingfang; Duan, Guangcai; Xue, Zerun; Wang, Linlin; Guo, Xiangjiao; Yang, Haiyan; Xi, Yuanlin

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to explore the features of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) structures in Shigella by using bioinformatics. We used bioinformatics methods, including BLAST, alignment and RNA structure prediction, to analyze the CRISPR structures of Shigella genomes. The results showed that the CRISPRs existed in the four groups of Shigella, and the flanking sequences of upstream CRISPRs could be classified into the same group with those of the downstream. We also found some relatively conserved palindromic motifs in the leader sequences. Repeat sequences had the same group with corresponding flanking sequences, and could be classified into two different types by their RNA secondary structures, which contain "stem" and "ring". Some spacers were found to homologize with part sequences of plasmids or phages. The study indicated that there were correlations between repeat sequences and flanking sequences, and the repeats might act as a kind of recognition mechanism to mediate the interaction between foreign genetic elements and Cas proteins.

  10. Integrating genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics in translational studies of molecular medicine.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Jerzy; Wyrwicz, Lucjan S

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of disease requires the introduction of molecular diagnostics into medical practice. Current medicine employs only elements of molecular diagnostics, which are usually applied on the scale of single genes. Medicine in the postgenomic era will utilize thousands of disease-associated molecular markers provided by high-throughput sequencing and functional genomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies. Such a spectrum of techniques will link clinical medicine based on molecularly oriented diagnostics with the prediction and prevention of disease. To achieve this task, large-scale and genome-wide biological and medical data must be combined with biostatistical and bioinformatic analyses to model biological systems. Collecting, cataloging and comparing data from molecular studies, and the subsequent development of conclusions, creates the fundamentals of systems biology. This highly complex analytical process reflects a new scientific paradigm known as integrative genomics.

  11. Widening participation would be key in enhancing bioinformatics and genomics research in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Karikari, Thomas K.; Quansah, Emmanuel; Mohamed, Wael M.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatics and genome science (BGS) are gradually gaining roots in Africa, contributing to studies that are leading to improved understanding of health, disease, agriculture and food security. While a few African countries have established foundations for research and training in these areas, BGS appear to be limited to only a few institutions in specific African countries. However, improving the disciplines in Africa will require pragmatic efforts to expand training and research partnerships to scientists in yet-unreached institutions. Here, we discuss the need to expand BGS programmes in Africa, and propose mechanisms to do so. PMID:26767163

  12. Bioinformatic Genome Comparisons for Taxonomic and Phylogenetic Assignments Using Aeromonas as a Test Case

    PubMed Central

    Colston, Sophie M.; Fullmer, Matthew S.; Beka, Lidia; Lamy, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prokaryotic taxonomy is the underpinning of microbiology, as it provides a framework for the proper identification and naming of organisms. The “gold standard” of bacterial species delineation is the overall genome similarity determined by DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH), a technically rigorous yet sometimes variable method that may produce inconsistent results. Improvements in next-generation sequencing have resulted in an upsurge of bacterial genome sequences and bioinformatic tools that compare genomic data, such as average nucleotide identity (ANI), correlation of tetranucleotide frequencies, and the genome-to-genome distance calculator, or in silico DDH (isDDH). Here, we evaluate ANI and isDDH in combination with phylogenetic studies using Aeromonas, a taxonomically challenging genus with many described species and several strains that were reassigned to different species as a test case. We generated improved, high-quality draft genome sequences for 33 Aeromonas strains and combined them with 23 publicly available genomes. ANI and isDDH distances were determined and compared to phylogenies from multilocus sequence analysis of housekeeping genes, ribosomal proteins, and expanded core genes. The expanded core phylogenetic analysis suggested relationships between distant Aeromonas clades that were inconsistent with studies using fewer genes. ANI values of ≥96% and isDDH values of ≥70% consistently grouped genomes originating from strains of the same species together. Our study confirmed known misidentifications, validated the recent revisions in the nomenclature, and revealed that a number of genomes deposited in GenBank are misnamed. In addition, two strains were identified that may represent novel Aeromonas species. PMID:25406383

  13. Importance of databases of nucleic acids for bioinformatic analysis focused to genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Gutierrez, L. R.; Barrios-Hernández, C. J.; Pedraza-Ferreira, G. R.; Vera-Cala, L.; Martinez-Perez, F.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, bioinformatics has become a new field of science, indispensable in the analysis of millions of nucleic acids sequences, which are currently deposited in international databases (public or private); these databases contain information of genes, RNA, ORF, proteins, intergenic regions, including entire genomes from some species. The analysis of this information requires computer programs; which were renewed in the use of new mathematical methods, and the introduction of the use of artificial intelligence. In addition to the constant creation of supercomputing units trained to withstand the heavy workload of sequence analysis. However, it is still necessary the innovation on platforms that allow genomic analyses, faster and more effectively, with a technological understanding of all biological processes.

  14. A critical analysis of assessment quality in genomics and bioinformatics education research.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Chad E; Nehm, Ross H

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of genomics and bioinformatics methods and paradigms in biology has been accompanied by an explosion of new curricula and pedagogies. An important question to ask about these educational innovations is whether they are having a meaningful impact on students' knowledge, attitudes, or skills. Although assessments are necessary tools for answering this question, their outputs are dependent on their quality. Our study 1) reviews the central importance of reliability and construct validity evidence in the development and evaluation of science assessments and 2) examines the extent to which published assessments in genomics and bioinformatics education (GBE) have been developed using such evidence. We identified 95 GBE articles (out of 226) that contained claims of knowledge increases, affective changes, or skill acquisition. We found that 1) the purpose of most of these studies was to assess summative learning gains associated with curricular change at the undergraduate level, and 2) a minority (<10%) of studies provided any reliability or validity evidence, and only one study out of the 95 sampled mentioned both validity and reliability. Our findings raise concerns about the quality of evidence derived from these instruments. We end with recommendations for improving assessment quality in GBE.

  15. A Critical Analysis of Assessment Quality in Genomics and Bioinformatics Education Research

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Chad E.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of genomics and bioinformatics methods and paradigms in biology has been accompanied by an explosion of new curricula and pedagogies. An important question to ask about these educational innovations is whether they are having a meaningful impact on students’ knowledge, attitudes, or skills. Although assessments are necessary tools for answering this question, their outputs are dependent on their quality. Our study 1) reviews the central importance of reliability and construct validity evidence in the development and evaluation of science assessments and 2) examines the extent to which published assessments in genomics and bioinformatics education (GBE) have been developed using such evidence. We identified 95 GBE articles (out of 226) that contained claims of knowledge increases, affective changes, or skill acquisition. We found that 1) the purpose of most of these studies was to assess summative learning gains associated with curricular change at the undergraduate level, and 2) a minority (<10%) of studies provided any reliability or validity evidence, and only one study out of the 95 sampled mentioned both validity and reliability. Our findings raise concerns about the quality of evidence derived from these instruments. We end with recommendations for improving assessment quality in GBE. PMID:24006400

  16. A bioinformatics approach for identifying transgene insertion sites using whole genome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Park, Doori; Park, Su-Hyun; Ban, Yong Wook; Kim, Youn Shic; Park, Kyoung-Cheul; Kim, Nam-Soo; Kim, Ju-Kon; Choi, Ik-Young

    2017-08-15

    Genetically modified crops (GM crops) have been developed to improve the agricultural traits of modern crop cultivars. Safety assessments of GM crops are of paramount importance in research at developmental stages and before releasing transgenic plants into the marketplace. Sequencing technology is developing rapidly, with higher output and labor efficiencies, and will eventually replace existing methods for the molecular characterization of genetically modified organisms. To detect the transgenic insertion locations in the three GM rice gnomes, Illumina sequencing reads are mapped and classified to the rice genome and plasmid sequence. The both mapped reads are classified to characterize the junction site between plant and transgene sequence by sequence alignment. Herein, we present a next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular characterization method, using transgenic rice plants SNU-Bt9-5, SNU-Bt9-30, and SNU-Bt9-109. Specifically, using bioinformatics tools, we detected the precise insertion locations and copy numbers of transfer DNA, genetic rearrangements, and the absence of backbone sequences, which were equivalent to results obtained from Southern blot analyses. NGS methods have been suggested as an effective means of characterizing and detecting transgenic insertion locations in genomes. Our results demonstrate the use of a combination of NGS technology and bioinformatics approaches that offers cost- and time-effective methods for assessing the safety of transgenic plants.

  17. Watson for Genomics: Moving Personalized Medicine Forward.

    PubMed

    Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Koyama, Takahiko; Parida, Laxmi

    2016-08-01

    The confluence of genomic technologies and cognitive computing has brought us to the doorstep of widespread usage of personalized medicine. Cognitive systems, such as Watson for Genomics (WG), integrate massive amounts of new omic data with the current body of knowledge to assist physicians in analyzing and acting on patient's genomic profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Making room for new faces: evolution, genomics and the growth of bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Díaz, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Genomics poses challenges that are specific to historians of science. Such challenges are not necessarily met by most recent sociologically-oriented approaches. This paper argues that historians of genomics can draw some lessons from the history of molecular biology, in part because some of the actors, concepts, and tools have made a transition between the two fields. More importantly, historians face the marginalization of scientific fields and actors that played a role in the integration of both ultra-disciplines. While biochemistry and genetics played an underrated role in the rising of molecular biology, research on the molecular evolution of informational molecules (molecular phylogenetics) played a neglected but nevertheless central role in the development of conceptual and analytical bioinformatics tools for genomics. Even today genomic tools incorporate underlying assumptions that show their origins in problems of comparative biology. This is particularly true in the case of the algorithms for sequence alignment, first proposed by Needleman and Wunsch (1970). The present essay also makes reference to areas in the history of science that require further investigation for an understanding of the transformations brought about by genomics to biological research, namely, the role of automation--beyond sequencing--and the intersection of biology and mathematics.

  19. Neurogenomics: An opportunity to integrate neuroscience, genomics and bioinformatics research in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Karikari, Thomas K.; Aleksic, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Modern genomic approaches have made enormous contributions to improving our understanding of the function, development and evolution of the nervous system, and the diversity within and between species. However, most of these research advances have been recorded in countries with advanced scientific resources and funding support systems. On the contrary, little is known about, for example, the possible interplay between different genes, non-coding elements and environmental factors in modulating neurological diseases among populations in low-income countries, including many African countries. The unique ancestry of African populations suggests that improved inclusion of these populations in neuroscience-related genomic studies would significantly help to identify novel factors that might shape the future of neuroscience research and neurological healthcare. This perspective is strongly supported by the recent identification that diseased individuals and their kindred from specific sub-Saharan African populations lack common neurological disease-associated genetic mutations. This indicates that there may be population-specific causes of neurological diseases, necessitating further investigations into the contribution of additional, presently-unknown genomic factors. Here, we discuss how the development of neurogenomics research in Africa would help to elucidate disease-related genomic variants, and also provide a good basis to develop more effective therapies. Furthermore, neurogenomics would harness African scientists' expertise in neuroscience, genomics and bioinformatics to extend our understanding of the neural basis of behaviour, development and evolution. PMID:26937352

  20. Personal genome sequencing: current approaches and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Michael; Du, Jiang; Gerstein, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The revolution in DNA sequencing technologies has now made it feasible to determine the genome sequences of many individuals; i.e., “personal genomes.” Genome sequences of cells and tissues from both normal and disease states have been determined. Using current approaches, whole human genome sequences are not typically assembled and determined de novo, but, instead, variations relative to a reference sequence are identified. We discuss the current state of personal genome sequencing, the main steps involved in determining a genome sequence (i.e., identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] and structural variations [SVs], assembling new sequences, and phasing haplotypes), and the challenges and performance metrics for evaluating the accuracy of the reconstruction. Finally, we consider the possible individual and societal benefits of personal genome sequences. PMID:20194435

  1. Edge Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien-Chi

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in a genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance

  2. Basics of Genome Sequence Analysis in Bioinformatics -- its Fundamental Ideas and Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2009-02-01

    The genome sequences are one of the most fundamental data among various omics analyses. So far, basic bioinformatics tools have developing to treat genome sequences. First step of genome sequence analysis is to predict or assign "genes" on genome sequences. In the case of Eukaryotes, we can identify genes by use of full length cDNA sequences with local alignment tools such as search, blast and fasta, etc. However, it is difficult to catch mRNAs (transcripts) in Prokaryotes. Therefore, computational prediction for gene identification is first choice to start genome sequence analysis. In this review, we pick up methods for computational gene prediction first. Once genes are predicted, next step is to functions for proteins or RNAs encoded on a gene. Then, how we can define the distance between gene sequences is very important for the further analysis. So, we describe the basics of mathematical concept for gene comparison. And we also introduce our novel concept for biological sequence comparisons for the view point of informational theory. In the post genome era, many researchers are very interested in not only gene functions but also the gene regulations whose information is also on genome sequences. Cis-regulatory elements, however, is too short to find some mathematical rules. Therefore, computationally predicted cis-elements tend to include many false-positives. To reduce the ratio false-positives, we need reliable database of set of cis-regulatory elements called cis-regulatory modules for a gene. So, we are trying to develop the Cis-Regulatory Elements Module Reference Database. In the third section, we introduce you the procedure to construct the Cis-Regulatory Elements Module Reference Database and its user interfaces.

  3. Personalized pharmacogenomics profiling using whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mizzi, Clint; Peters, Brock; Mitropoulou, Christina; Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Katsila, Theodora; Agarwal, Misha R; van Schaik, Ron H N; Drmanac, Radoje; Borg, Joseph; Patrinos, George P

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacogenomics holds promise to rationalize drug use by minimizing drug toxicity and at the same time increase drug efficacy. There are currently several assays to screen for known pharmacogenomic biomarkers for the most commonly prescribed drugs. However, these genetic screening assays cannot account for other known or novel pharmacogenomic markers. We analyzed whole-genome sequences of 482 unrelated individuals of various ethnic backgrounds to obtain their personalized pharmacogenomics profiles. Bioinformatics analysis revealed 408,964 variants in 231 pharmacogenes, from which 26,807 were residing on exons and proximal regulatory sequences, whereas 16,487 were novel. In silico analyses indicated that 1012 novel pharmacogene-related variants possibly abolish protein function. We have also performed whole-genome sequencing analysis in a seven-member family of Greek origin in an effort to explain the variable response rate to acenocoumarol treatment in two family members. Overall, our data demonstrate that whole-genome sequencing, unlike conventional genetic screening methods, is necessary to determine an individual's pharmacogenomics profile in a more comprehensive manner, which, combined with the gradually decreasing whole-genome sequencing costs, would expedite bringing personalized medicine closer to reality.

  4. Enabling the democratization of the genomics revolution with a fully integrated web-based bioinformatics platform

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien-Chi; Anderson, Joseph J.; Davenport, Karen W.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Xu, Yan; Ahmed, Sanaa; Feng, Shihai; Mokashi, Vishwesh P.; Chain, Patrick S.G.

    2017-01-01

    Continued advancements in sequencing technologies have fueled the development of new sequencing applications and promise to flood current databases with raw data. A number of factors prevent the seamless and easy use of these data, including the breadth of project goals, the wide array of tools that individually perform fractions of any given analysis, the large number of associated software/hardware dependencies, and the detailed expertise required to perform these analyses. To address these issues, we have developed an intuitive web-based environment with a wide assortment of integrated and cutting-edge bioinformatics tools in pre-configured workflows. These workflows, coupled with the ease of use of the environment, provide even novice next-generation sequencing users with the ability to perform many complex analyses with only a few mouse clicks and, within the context of the same environment, to visualize and further interrogate their results. This bioinformatics platform is an initial attempt at Empowering the Development of Genomics Expertise (EDGE) in a wide range of applications for microbial research. PMID:27899609

  5. Enabling the democratization of the genomics revolution with a fully integrated web-based bioinformatics platform

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien -Chi; Anderson, Joseph J.; ...

    2016-11-24

    Continued advancements in sequencing technologies have fueled the development of new sequencing applications and promise to flood current databases with raw data. A number of factors prevent the seamless and easy use of these data, including the breadth of project goals, the wide array of tools that individually perform fractions of any given analysis, the large number of associated software/hardware dependencies, and the detailed expertise required to perform these analyses. To address these issues, we have developed an intuitive web-based environment with a wide assortment of integrated and cutting-edge bioinformatics tools in pre-configured workflows. These workflows, coupled with the easemore » of use of the environment, provide even novice next-generation sequencing users with the ability to perform many complex analyses with only a few mouse clicks and, within the context of the same environment, to visualize and further interrogate their results. As a result, this bioinformatics platform is an initial attempt at Empowering the Development of Genomics Expertise (EDGE) in a wide range of applications for microbial research.« less

  6. Enabling the democratization of the genomics revolution with a fully integrated web-based bioinformatics platform

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien -Chi; Anderson, Joseph J.; Davenport, Karen W.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Xu, Yan; Ahmed, Sanaa; Feng, Shihai; Mokashi, Vishwesh P.; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2016-11-24

    Continued advancements in sequencing technologies have fueled the development of new sequencing applications and promise to flood current databases with raw data. A number of factors prevent the seamless and easy use of these data, including the breadth of project goals, the wide array of tools that individually perform fractions of any given analysis, the large number of associated software/hardware dependencies, and the detailed expertise required to perform these analyses. To address these issues, we have developed an intuitive web-based environment with a wide assortment of integrated and cutting-edge bioinformatics tools in pre-configured workflows. These workflows, coupled with the ease of use of the environment, provide even novice next-generation sequencing users with the ability to perform many complex analyses with only a few mouse clicks and, within the context of the same environment, to visualize and further interrogate their results. As a result, this bioinformatics platform is an initial attempt at Empowering the Development of Genomics Expertise (EDGE) in a wide range of applications for microbial research.

  7. Computational biology of genome expression and regulation--a review of microarray bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junbai

    2008-01-01

    Microarray technology is being used widely in various biomedical research areas; the corresponding microarray data analysis is an essential step toward the best utilizing of array technologies. Here we review two components of the microarray data analysis: a low level of microarray data analysis that emphasizes the designing, the quality control, and the preprocessing of microarray experiments, then a high level of microarray data analysis that focuses on the domain-specific microarray applications such as tumor classification, biomarker prediction, analyzing array CGH experiments, and reverse engineering of gene expression networks. Additionally, we will review the recent development of building a predictive model in genome expression and regulation studies. This review may help biologists grasp a basic knowledge of microarray bioinformatics as well as its potential impact on the future evolvement of biomedical research fields.

  8. Genomic and personalized medicine: foundations and applications.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Willard, Huntington F

    2009-12-01

    The last decade has witnessed a steady embrace of genomic and personalized medicine by senior government officials, industry leadership, health care providers, and the public. Genomic medicine, which is the use of information from genomes and their derivatives (RNA, proteins, and metabolites) to guide medical decision making-is a key component of personalized medicine, which is a rapidly advancing field of health care that is informed by each person's unique clinical, genetic, genomic, and environmental information. As medicine begins to embrace genomic tools that enable more precise prediction and treatment disease, which include "whole genome" interrogation of sequence variation, transcription, proteins, and metabolites, the fundamentals of genomic and personalized medicine will require the development, standardization, and integration of several important tools into health systems and clinical workflows. These tools include health risk assessment, family health history, and clinical decision support for complex risk and predictive information. Together with genomic information, these tools will enable a paradigm shift to a comprehensive approach that will identify individual risks and guide clinical management and decision making, all of which form the basis for a more informed and effective approach to patient care. DNA-based risk assessment for common complex disease, molecular signatures for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, and genome-guided therapy and dose selection are just among the few important examples for which genome information has already enabled personalized health care along the continuum from health to disease. In addition, information from individual genomes, which is a fast-moving area of technological development, is spawning a social and information revolution among consumers that will undoubtedly affect health care decision making. Although these and other scientific findings are making their way from the genome to the clinic, the full

  9. ARG-ANNOT, a New Bioinformatic Tool To Discover Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sushim Kumar; Padmanabhan, Babu Roshan; Diene, Seydina M.; Lopez-Rojas, Rafael; Kempf, Marie; Landraud, Luce

    2014-01-01

    ARG-ANNOT (Antibiotic Resistance Gene-ANNOTation) is a new bioinformatic tool that was created to detect existing and putative new antibiotic resistance (AR) genes in bacterial genomes. ARG-ANNOT uses a local BLAST program in Bio-Edit software that allows the user to analyze sequences without a Web interface. All AR genetic determinants were collected from published works and online resources; nucleotide and protein sequences were retrieved from the NCBI GenBank database. After building a database that includes 1,689 antibiotic resistance genes, the software was tested in a blind manner using 100 random sequences selected from the database to verify that the sensitivity and specificity were at 100% even when partial sequences were queried. Notably, BLAST analysis results obtained using the rmtF gene sequence (a new aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene sequence that is not included in the database) as a query revealed that the tool was able to link this sequence to short sequences (17 to 40 bp) found in other genes of the rmt family with significant E values. Finally, the analysis of 178 Acinetobacter baumannii and 20 Staphylococcus aureus genomes allowed the detection of a significantly higher number of AR genes than the Resfinder gene analyzer and 11 point mutations in target genes known to be associated with AR. The average time for the analysis of a genome was 3.35 ± 0.13 min. We have created a concise database for BLAST using a Bio-Edit interface that can detect AR genetic determinants in bacterial genomes and can rapidly and easily discover putative new AR genetic determinants. PMID:24145532

  10. Empowered genome community: leveraging a bioinformatics platform as a citizen-scientist collaboration tool.

    PubMed

    Wendelsdorf, Katherine; Shah, Sohela

    2015-09-01

    There is on-going effort in the biomedical research community to leverage Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to identify genetic variants that affect our health. The main challenge facing researchers is getting enough samples from individuals either sick or healthy - to be able to reliably identify the few variants that are causal for a phenotype among all other variants typically seen among individuals. At the same time, more and more individuals are having their genome sequenced either out of curiosity or to identify the cause of an illness. These individuals may benefit from of a way to view and understand their data. QIAGEN's Ingenuity Variant Analysis is an online application that allows users with and without extensive bioinformatics training to incorporate information from published experiments, genetic databases, and a variety of statistical models to identify variants, from a long list of candidates, that are most likely causal for a phenotype as well as annotate variants with what is already known about them in the literature and databases. Ingenuity Variant Analysis is also an information sharing platform where users may exchange samples and analyses. The Empowered Genome Community (EGC) is a new program in which QIAGEN is making this on-line tool freely available to any individual who wishes to analyze their own genetic sequence. EGC members are then able to make their data available to other Ingenuity Variant Analysis users to be used in research. Here we present and describe the Empowered Genome Community in detail. We also present a preliminary, proof-of-concept study that utilizes the 200 genomes currently available through the EGC. The goal of this program is to allow individuals to access and understand their own data as well as facilitate citizen-scientist collaborations that can drive research forward and spur quality scientific dialogue in the general public.

  11. Personalized cloud-based bioinformatics services for research and education: use cases and the elasticHPC package

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bioinformatics services have been traditionally provided in the form of a web-server that is hosted at institutional infrastructure and serves multiple users. This model, however, is not flexible enough to cope with the increasing number of users, increasing data size, and new requirements in terms of speed and availability of service. The advent of cloud computing suggests a new service model that provides an efficient solution to these problems, based on the concepts of "resources-on-demand" and "pay-as-you-go". However, cloud computing has not yet been introduced within bioinformatics servers due to the lack of usage scenarios and software layers that address the requirements of the bioinformatics domain. Results In this paper, we provide different use case scenarios for providing cloud computing based services, considering both the technical and financial aspects of the cloud computing service model. These scenarios are for individual users seeking computational power as well as bioinformatics service providers aiming at provision of personalized bioinformatics services to their users. We also present elasticHPC, a software package and a library that facilitates the use of high performance cloud computing resources in general and the implementation of the suggested bioinformatics scenarios in particular. Concrete examples that demonstrate the suggested use case scenarios with whole bioinformatics servers and major sequence analysis tools like BLAST are presented. Experimental results with large datasets are also included to show the advantages of the cloud model. Conclusions Our use case scenarios and the elasticHPC package are steps towards the provision of cloud based bioinformatics services, which would help in overcoming the data challenge of recent biological research. All resources related to elasticHPC and its web-interface are available at http://www.elasticHPC.org. PMID:23281941

  12. Bioinformatics and Data Mining Studies in Oral Genomics and Proteomics: New Trends and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, Luca; Covani, Ugo

    2010-01-01

    Genomics and proteomics have promised to change the practice of dentistry and oral pathology, allowing the identification and the characterization of risk factors and therapeutic targets at a molecular level. However, mass-scale molecular genomics and proteomics suffer from some pitfalls: gene/protein expression are significant only if inserted in a detailed network of molecular pathways and gene/gene, gene/protein and protein/protein interactions. The proper analysis of these complex pictures requires the contribution of theoretical disciplines, like bioinformatics and data mining. In particular, data-mining of existing information could become a strong starting point to formulate new targeted hypotheses and to plan ad hoc experimentation. In this review, advantages and disadvantages of the above-mentioned disciplines and their potential in oral pathology are discussed. The leader gene approach is a new data mining algorithm, recently applied to some oral diseases and their correlation with systemic conditions. The preliminary results of the application of the leader gene approach to the correlation between periodontitis and heart ischemia at a molecular level are presented for the first time. PMID:20871759

  13. Mi-DISCOVERER: A bioinformatics tool for the detection of mi-RNA in human genome

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Saadia; Mumtaz, Asia; Ahmad, Freed; Liaquat, Sadia; Nadeem, Shahid; Mehboob, Shahid; Afzal, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 22 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that play pivotal regulatory roles in diverse organisms including the humans and are difficult to be identified due to lack of either sequence features or robust algorithms to efficiently identify. Therefore, we made a tool that is Mi-Discoverer for the detection of miRNAs in human genome. The tools used for the development of software are Microsoft Office Access 2003, the JDK version 1.6.0, BioJava version 1.0, and the NetBeans IDE version 6.0. All already made miRNAs softwares were web based; so the advantage of our project was to make a desktop facility to the user for sequence alignment search with already identified miRNAs of human genome present in the database. The user can also insert and update the newly discovered human miRNA in the database. Mi-Discoverer, a bioinformatics tool successfully identifies human miRNAs based on multiple sequence alignment searches. It's a non redundant database containing a large collection of publicly available human miRNAs. PMID:21364831

  14. [Ethical issues in personal genome research].

    PubMed

    Kato, Kazuto; Minari, Jusaku

    2013-03-01

    The rapid expansion of techniques for studying human genomics has remarkably changed research and practice. It is expected that more progress will be made in the field of medical and biological research owing to the technological advances. Genomics researchers collect human genetic material, including DNA and cells, from a large number of individuals and carry out "personal genome analysis"; as a result, new types of ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) have arisen, including issues such as informed consent procedures, data sharing, protection of genetic information, and return of research results. To address these issues, many large research projects have established specialist groups that are devoted to manage ELSI of their research. The guidelines for genomics research set by the government are also expected to be revised accordingly. In this paper, we present an overview of ELSI of personal genome research and discuss necessary measures to tackle these issues.

  15. In the Spotlight: Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, May Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    During 2012, next generation sequencing (NGS) has attracted great attention in the biomedical research community, especially for personalized medicine. Also, third generation sequencing has become available. Therefore, state-of-art sequencing technology and analysis are reviewed in this Bioinformatics spotlight on 2012. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is high-throughput nucleic acid sequencing technology with wide dynamic range and single base resolution. The full promise of NGS depends on the optimization of NGS platforms, sequence alignment and assembly algorithms, data analytics, novel algorithms for integrating NGS data with existing genomic, proteomic, or metabolomic data, and quantitative assessment of NGS technology in comparing to more established technologies such as microarrays. NGS technology has been predicated to become a cornerstone of personalized medicine. It is argued that NGS is a promising field for motivated young researchers who are looking for opportunities in bioinformatics. PMID:23192635

  16. Using Informatics-, Bioinformatics- and Genomics-Based Approaches for the Molecular Surveillance and Detection of Biothreat Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Donald

    The convergence and wealth of informatics, bioinformatics and genomics methods and associated resources allow a comprehensive and rapid approach for the surveillance and detection of bacterial and viral organisms. Coupled with the continuing race for the fastest, most cost-efficient and highest-quality DNA sequencing technology, that is, "next generation sequencing", the detection of biological threat agents by `cheaper and faster' means is possible. With the application of improved bioinformatic tools for the understanding of these genomes and for parsing unique pathogen genome signatures, along with `state-of-the-art' informatics which include faster computational methods, equipment and databases, it is feasible to apply new algorithms to biothreat agent detection. Two such methods are high-throughput DNA sequencing-based and resequencing microarray-based identification. These are illustrated and validated by two examples involving human adenoviruses, both from real-world test beds.

  17. Challenges, Solutions, and Quality Metrics of Personal Genome Assembly in Advancing Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenming; Wu, Leihong; Yavas, Gokhan; Simonyan, Vahan; Ning, Baitang; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    -response, tailoring drug therapy and detecting tumors. We believe the precision medicine would largely benefit from bioinformatics solutions, particularly for personal genome assembly. PMID:27110816

  18. The Translational Genomics Core at Partners Personalized Medicine: Facilitating the Transition of Research towards Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Ashley; Brown, Alison; Mahanta, Lisa; Amr, Sami S.

    2016-01-01

    The Translational Genomics Core (TGC) at Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) serves as a fee-for-service core laboratory for Partners Healthcare researchers, providing access to technology platforms and analysis pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic research projects. The interaction of the TGC with various components of PPM provides it with a unique infrastructure that allows for greater IT and bioinformatics opportunities, such as sample tracking and data analysis. The following article describes some of the unique opportunities available to an academic research core operating within PPM, such the ability to develop analysis pipelines with a dedicated bioinformatics team and maintain a flexible Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the support of an internal IT team, as well as the operational challenges encountered to respond to emerging technologies, diverse investigator needs, and high staff turnover. In addition, the implementation and operational role of the TGC in the Partners Biobank genotyping project of over 25,000 samples is presented as an example of core activities working with other components of PPM. PMID:26927185

  19. The Translational Genomics Core at Partners Personalized Medicine: Facilitating the Transition of Research towards Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Blau, Ashley; Brown, Alison; Mahanta, Lisa; Amr, Sami S

    2016-02-26

    The Translational Genomics Core (TGC) at Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) serves as a fee-for-service core laboratory for Partners Healthcare researchers, providing access to technology platforms and analysis pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic research projects. The interaction of the TGC with various components of PPM provides it with a unique infrastructure that allows for greater IT and bioinformatics opportunities, such as sample tracking and data analysis. The following article describes some of the unique opportunities available to an academic research core operating within PPM, such the ability to develop analysis pipelines with a dedicated bioinformatics team and maintain a flexible Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the support of an internal IT team, as well as the operational challenges encountered to respond to emerging technologies, diverse investigator needs, and high staff turnover. In addition, the implementation and operational role of the TGC in the Partners Biobank genotyping project of over 25,000 samples is presented as an example of core activities working with other components of PPM.

  20. Evidence that personal genome testing enhances student learning in a course on genomics and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Salari, Keyan; Karczewski, Konrad J; Hudgins, Louanne; Ormond, Kelly E

    2013-01-01

    An emerging debate in academic medical centers is not about the need for providing trainees with fundamental education on genomics, but rather the most effective educational models that should be deployed. At Stanford School of Medicine, a novel hands-on genomics course was developed in 2010 that provided students the option to undergo personal genome testing as part of the course curriculum. We hypothesized that use of personal genome testing in the classroom would enhance the learning experience of students. No data currently exist on how such methods impact student learning; thus, we surveyed students before and after the course to determine its impact. We analyzed responses using paired statistics from the 31 medical and graduate students who completed both pre-course and post-course surveys. Participants were stratified by those who did (N = 23) or did not (N = 8) undergo personal genome testing. In reflecting on the experience, 83% of students who underwent testing stated that they were pleased with their decision compared to 12.5% of students who decided against testing (P = 0.00058). Seventy percent of those who underwent personal genome testing self-reported a better understanding of human genetics on the basis of having undergone testing. Further, students who underwent personal genome testing demonstrated an average 31% increase in pre- to post-course scores on knowledge questions (P = 3.5×10(-6)); this was significantly higher (P = 0.003) than students who did not undergo testing, who showed a non-significant improvement. Undergoing personal genome testing and using personal genotype data in the classroom enhanced students' self-reported and assessed knowledge of genomics, and did not appear to cause significant anxiety. At least for self-selected students, the incorporation of personal genome testing can be an effective educational tool to teach important concepts of clinical genomic testing.

  1. Genomes, Populations and Diseases: Ethnic Genomics and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the progress of ethnic genetics, the genetics of common diseases, and the concepts of personalized medicine. We show the relationship between the structure of genetic diversity in human populations and the varying frequencies of Mendelian and multifactor diseases. We also examine the population basis of pharmacogenetics and evaluate the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy, along with a review of new achievements and prospects in personalized genomics. PMID:22649660

  2. Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics: Collaborations on the Road to Genomic Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Maojo, Victor; Kulikowski, Casimir A.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, the authors compare and contrast medical informatics (MI) and bioinformatics (BI) and provide a viewpoint on their complementarities and potential for collaboration in various subfields. The authors compare MI and BI along several dimensions, including: (1) historical development of the disciplines, (2) their scientific foundations, (3) data quality and analysis, (4) integration of knowledge and databases, (5) informatics tools to support practice, (6) informatics methods to support research (signal processing, imaging and vision, and computational modeling, (7) professional and patient continuing education, and (8) education and training. It is pointed out that, while the two disciplines differ in their histories, scientific foundations, and methodologic approaches to research in various areas, they nevertheless share methods and tools, which provides a basis for exchange of experience in their different applications. MI expertise in developing health care applications and the strength of BI in biological “discovery science” complement each other well. The new field of biomedical informatics (BMI) holds great promise for developing informatics methods that will be crucial in the development of genomic medicine. The future of BMI will be influenced strongly by whether significant advances in clinical practice and biomedical research come about from separate efforts in MI and BI, or from emerging, hybrid informatics subdisciplines at their interface. PMID:12925552

  3. Whole genome identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates by comprehensive data mining and bioinformatic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zvi, Anat; Ariel, Naomi; Fulkerson, John; Sadoff, Jerald C; Shafferman, Avigdor

    2008-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects ~8 million annually culminating in ~2 million deaths. Moreover, about one third of the population is latently infected, 10% of which develop disease during lifetime. Current approved prophylactic TB vaccines (BCG and derivatives thereof) are of variable efficiency in adult protection against pulmonary TB (0%–80%), and directed essentially against early phase infection. Methods A genome-scale dataset was constructed by analyzing published data of: (1) global gene expression studies under conditions which simulate intra-macrophage stress, dormancy, persistence and/or reactivation; (2) cellular and humoral immunity, and vaccine potential. This information was compiled along with revised annotation/bioinformatic characterization of selected gene products and in silico mapping of T-cell epitopes. Protocols for scoring, ranking and prioritization of the antigens were developed and applied. Results Cross-matching of literature and in silico-derived data, in conjunction with the prioritization scheme and biological rationale, allowed for selection of 189 putative vaccine candidates from the entire genome. Within the 189 set, the relative distribution of antigens in 3 functional categories differs significantly from their distribution in the whole genome, with reduction in the Conserved hypothetical category (due to improved annotation) and enrichment in Lipid and in Virulence categories. Other prominent representatives in the 189 set are the PE/PPE proteins; iron sequestration, nitroreductases and proteases, all within the Intermediary metabolism and respiration category; ESX secretion systems, resuscitation promoting factors and lipoproteins, all within the Cell wall category. Application of a ranking scheme based on qualitative and quantitative scores, resulted in a list of 45 best-scoring antigens, of which: 74% belong to the dormancy/reactivation/resuscitation classes; 30% belong

  4. Forward Individualized Medicine from Personal Genomes to Interactomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Groen, Albert K

    2015-01-01

    When considering the variation in the genome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome, and their interaction with the environment, every individual can be rightfully considered as a unique biological entity. Individualized medicine promises to take this uniqueness into account to optimize disease treatment and thereby improve health benefits for every patient. The success of individualized medicine relies on a precise understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship. Although omics technologies advance rapidly, there are several challenges that need to be overcome: Next generation sequencing can efficiently decipher genomic sequences, epigenetic changes, and transcriptomic variation in patients, but it does not automatically indicate how or whether the identified variation will cause pathological changes. This is likely due to the inability to account for (1) the consequences of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, and (2) (post)transcriptional as well as (post)translational processes that eventually determine the concentration of key metabolites. The technologies to accurately measure changes in these latter layers are still under development, and such measurements in humans are also mainly restricted to blood and circulating cells. Despite these challenges, it is already possible to track dynamic changes in the human interactome in healthy and diseased states by using the integration of multi-omics data. In this review, we evaluate the potential value of current major bioinformatics and systems biology-based approaches, including genome wide association studies, epigenetics, gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks, and genome-scale metabolic modeling. Moreover, we address the question whether integrative analysis of personal multi-omics data will help understanding of personal genotype-phenotype relationships.

  5. The Human Genome Project, and recent advances in personalized genomics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brenda J; Nicholls, Stuart G

    2015-01-01

    The language of "personalized medicine" and "personal genomics" has now entered the common lexicon. The idea of personalized medicine is the integration of genomic risk assessment alongside other clinical investigations. Consistent with this approach, testing is delivered by health care professionals who are not medical geneticists, and where results represent risks, as opposed to clinical diagnosis of disease, to be interpreted alongside the entirety of a patient's health and medical data. In this review we consider the evidence concerning the application of such personalized genomics within the context of population screening, and potential implications that arise from this. We highlight two general approaches which illustrate potential uses of genomic information in screening. The first is a narrowly targeted approach in which genetic profiling is linked with standard population-based screening for diseases; the second is a broader targeting of variants associated with multiple single gene disorders, performed opportunistically on patients being investigated for unrelated conditions. In doing so we consider the organization and evaluation of tests and services, the challenge of interpretation with less targeted testing, professional confidence, barriers in practice, and education needs. We conclude by discussing several issues pertinent to health policy, namely: avoiding the conflation of genetics with biological determinism, resisting the "technological imperative", due consideration of the organization of screening services, the need for professional education, as well as informed decision making and public understanding.

  6. Personal genomes in progress: from the human genome project to the personal genome project.

    PubMed

    Lunshof, Jeantine E; Bobe, Jason; Aach, John; Angrist, Misha; Thakuria, Joseph V; Vorhaus, Daniel B; Hoehe, Margret R; Church, George M

    2010-01-01

    The cost of a diploid human genome sequence has dropped from about $70M to $2000 since 2007--even as the standards for redundancy have increased from 7x to 40x in order to improve call rates. Coupled with the low return on investment for common single-nucleotide polylmorphisms, this has caused a significant rise in interest in correlating genome sequences with comprehensive environmental and trait data (GET). The cost of electronic health records, imaging, and microbial, immunological, and behavioral data are also dropping quickly. Sharing such integrated GET datasets and their interpretations with a diversity of researchers and research subjects highlights the need for informed-consent models capable of addressing novel privacy and other issues, as well as for flexible data-sharing resources that make materials and data available with minimum restrictions on use. This article examines the Personal Genome Project's effort to develop a GET database as a public genomics resource broadly accessible to both researchers and research participants, while pursuing the highest standards in research ethics.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of regulatory proteases sequences identified through bioinformatics data mining in Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-Bin; Lou, Zhong-Zi; Li, Li; Brindley, Paul J; Zheng, Yadong; Luo, Xuenong; Hou, Junling; Guo, Aijiang; Jia, Wan-Zhong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-06-04

    Cysticercosis remains a major neglected tropical disease of humanity in many regions, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, Central America and elsewhere. Owing to the emerging drug resistance and the inability of current drugs to prevent re-infection, identification of novel vaccines and chemotherapeutic agents against Taenia solium and related helminth pathogens is a public health priority. The T. solium genome and the predicted proteome were reported recently, providing a wealth of information from which new interventional targets might be identified. In order to characterize and classify the entire repertoire of protease-encoding genes of T. solium, which act fundamental biological roles in all life processes, we analyzed the predicted proteins of this cestode through a combination of bioinformatics tools. Functional annotation was performed to yield insights into the signaling processes relevant to the complex developmental cycle of this tapeworm and to highlight a suite of the proteases as potential intervention targets. Within the genome of this helminth parasite, we identified 200 open reading frames encoding proteases from five clans, which correspond to 1.68% of the 11,902 protein-encoding genes predicted to be present in its genome. These proteases include calpains, cytosolic, mitochondrial signal peptidases, ubiquitylation related proteins, and others. Many not only show significant similarity to proteases in the Conserved Domain Database but have conserved active sites and catalytic domains. KEGG Automatic Annotation Server (KAAS) analysis indicated that ~60% of these proteases share strong sequence identities with proteins of the KEGG database, which are involved in human disease, metabolic pathways, genetic information processes, cellular processes, environmental information processes and organismal systems. Also, we identified signal peptides and transmembrane helices through comparative analysis with classes of important regulatory proteases

  8. The Human Genome Project, and recent advances in personalized genomics

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda J; Nicholls, Stuart G

    2015-01-01

    The language of “personalized medicine” and “personal genomics” has now entered the common lexicon. The idea of personalized medicine is the integration of genomic risk assessment alongside other clinical investigations. Consistent with this approach, testing is delivered by health care professionals who are not medical geneticists, and where results represent risks, as opposed to clinical diagnosis of disease, to be interpreted alongside the entirety of a patient’s health and medical data. In this review we consider the evidence concerning the application of such personalized genomics within the context of population screening, and potential implications that arise from this. We highlight two general approaches which illustrate potential uses of genomic information in screening. The first is a narrowly targeted approach in which genetic profiling is linked with standard population-based screening for diseases; the second is a broader targeting of variants associated with multiple single gene disorders, performed opportunistically on patients being investigated for unrelated conditions. In doing so we consider the organization and evaluation of tests and services, the challenge of interpretation with less targeted testing, professional confidence, barriers in practice, and education needs. We conclude by discussing several issues pertinent to health policy, namely: avoiding the conflation of genetics with biological determinism, resisting the “technological imperative”, due consideration of the organization of screening services, the need for professional education, as well as informed decision making and public understanding. PMID:25733939

  9. An FDA bioinformatics tool for microbial genomics research on molecular characterization of bacterial foodborne pathogens using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hong; Xu, Joshua; Ding, Don; Jackson, Scott A; Patel, Isha R; Frye, Jonathan G; Zou, Wen; Nayak, Rajesh; Foley, Steven; Chen, James; Su, Zhenqiang; Ye, Yanbin; Turner, Steve; Harris, Steve; Zhou, Guangxu; Cerniglia, Carl; Tong, Weida

    2010-10-07

    Advances in microbial genomics and bioinformatics are offering greater insights into the emergence and spread of foodborne pathogens in outbreak scenarios. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed a genomics tool, ArrayTrack™, which provides extensive functionalities to manage, analyze, and interpret genomic data for mammalian species. ArrayTrack™ has been widely adopted by the research community and used for pharmacogenomics data review in the FDA's Voluntary Genomics Data Submission program. ArrayTrack™ has been extended to manage and analyze genomics data from bacterial pathogens of human, animal, and food origin. It was populated with bioinformatics data from public databases such as NCBI, Swiss-Prot, KEGG Pathway, and Gene Ontology to facilitate pathogen detection and characterization. ArrayTrack™'s data processing and visualization tools were enhanced with analysis capabilities designed specifically for microbial genomics including flag-based hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA), flag concordance heat maps, and mixed scatter plots. These specific functionalities were evaluated on data generated from a custom Affymetrix array (FDA-ECSG) previously developed within the FDA. The FDA-ECSG array represents 32 complete genomes of Escherichia coli and Shigella. The new functions were also used to analyze microarray data focusing on antimicrobial resistance genes from Salmonella isolates in a poultry production environment using a universal antimicrobial resistance microarray developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The application of ArrayTrack™ to different microarray platforms demonstrates its utility in microbial genomics research, and thus will improve the capabilities of the FDA to rapidly identify foodborne bacteria and their genetic traits (e.g., antimicrobial resistance, virulence, etc.) during outbreak investigations. ArrayTrack™ is free to use and available to public, private, and academic researchers at

  10. UTGB toolkit for personalized genome browsers

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Taro L.; Yoshimura, Jun; Sasaki, Shin; Ahsan, Budrul; Sasaki, Atsushi; Kuroshu, Reginaldo; Morishita, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput DNA sequencers has increased the pace of collecting enormous amounts of genomic information, yielding billions of nucleotides on a weekly basis. This advance represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude over traditional Sanger sequencers in terms of the number of nucleotides per unit time, allowing even small groups of researchers to obtain huge volumes of genomic data over fairly short period. Consequently, a pressing need exists for the development of personalized genome browsers for analyzing these immense amounts of locally stored data. The UTGB (University of Tokyo Genome Browser) Toolkit is designed to meet three major requirements for personalization of genome browsers: easy installation of the system with minimum efforts, browsing locally stored data and rapid interactive design of web interfaces tailored to individual needs. The UTGB Toolkit is licensed under an open source license. Availability: The software is freely available at http://utgenome.org/. Contact: moris@cb.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp PMID:19497937

  11. Bioinformatics/biostatistics: microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Gabriel S

    2012-01-01

    The quantity and complexity of the molecular-level data generated in both research and clinical settings require the use of sophisticated, powerful computational interpretation techniques. It is for this reason that bioinformatic analysis of complex molecular profiling data has become a fundamental technology in the development of personalized medicine. This chapter provides a high-level overview of the field of bioinformatics and outlines several, classic bioinformatic approaches. The highlighted approaches can be aptly applied to nearly any sort of high-dimensional genomic, proteomic, or metabolomic experiments. Reviewed technologies in this chapter include traditional clustering analysis, the Gene Expression Dynamics Inspector (GEDI), GoMiner (GoMiner), Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), and the Learner of Functional Enrichment (LeFE).

  12. Personalized genomic results: analysis of informational needs.

    PubMed

    Schmidlen, Tara J; Wawak, Lisa; Kasper, Rachel; García-España, J Felipe; Christman, Michael F; Gordon, Erynn S

    2014-08-01

    Use of genomic information in healthcare is increasing; however data on the needs of consumers of genomic information is limited. The Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC) is a longitudinal study investigating the utility of personalized medicine. Participants receive results reflecting risk of common complex conditions and drug-gene pairs deemed actionable by an external review board. To explore the needs of individuals receiving genomic information we reviewed all genetic counseling sessions with CPMC participants. A retrospective qualitative review of notes from 157 genetic counseling inquiries was conducted. Notes were coded for salient themes. Five primary themes; "understanding risk", "basic genetics", "complex disease genetics", "what do I do now?" and "other" were identified. Further review revealed that participants had difficulty with basic genetic concepts, confused relative and absolute risks, and attributed too high a risk burden to individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Despite these hurdles, counseled participants recognized that behavior changes could potentially mitigate risk and there were few comments alluding to an overly deterministic or fatalistic interpretation of results. Participants appeared to recognize the multifactorial nature of the diseases for which results were provided; however education to understand the complexities of genomic risk information was often needed.

  13. Bioinformatics challenges in de novo transcriptome assembly using short read sequences in the absence of a reference genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Buell, C Robin

    2013-04-01

    Plant natural product research can be facilitated through genome and transcriptome sequencing approaches that generate informative sequence and expression datasets that enable characterization of biochemical pathways of interest. As the overwhelming majority of plant-derived natural products are derived from species with little, if any, sequence and/or genomic resources, the ability to perform whole genome shotgun sequencing and assembly has been and will continue to be transformative as access to a genome sequence provides molecular resources and a context for discovery and characterization of biosynthetic pathways. Due to the reduced size and complexity of the transcriptome relative to the genome, transcriptome sequencing provides a rapid, inexpensive approach to access gene sequences, gene expression abundances, and gene expression patterns in any species, including those that lack a reference genome sequence. To date, successful applications of RNA sequencing in conjunction with de novo transcriptome assembly has enabled identification of new genes in an array of biochemical pathways in plants. While sequencing technologies are well developed, challenges remain in the handling and analysis of transcriptome sequences. In this Highlight article, we provide an overview of the bioinformatics challenges associated with transcriptome analyses using short read sequences and how to address these issues in plant species that lack a reference genome.

  14. 2010 Translational bioinformatics year in review

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Katharine S

    2011-01-01

    A review of 2010 research in translational bioinformatics provides much to marvel at. We have seen notable advances in personal genomics, pharmacogenetics, and sequencing. At the same time, the infrastructure for the field has burgeoned. While acknowledging that, according to researchers, the members of this field tend to be overly optimistic, the authors predict a bright future. PMID:21672905

  15. Cake: a bioinformatics pipeline for the integrated analysis of somatic variants in cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mamunur; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Rust, Alistair G.; Adams, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: We have developed Cake, a bioinformatics software pipeline that integrates four publicly available somatic variant-calling algorithms to identify single nucleotide variants with higher sensitivity and accuracy than any one algorithm alone. Cake can be run on a high-performance computer cluster or used as a stand-alone application. Availabilty: Cake is open-source and is available from http://cakesomatic.sourceforge.net/ Contact: da1@sanger.ac.uk Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23803469

  16. Bioinformatic progress and applications in metaproteogenomics for bridging the gap between genomic sequences and metabolic functions in microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Jana; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Halkjaer Nielsen, Per; Planes, Francisco J; Jehmlich, Nico; Ferrer, Manuel; von Bergen, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Metaproteomics of microbial communities promises to add functional information to the blueprint of genes derived from metagenomics. Right from its beginning, the achievements and developments in metaproteomics were closely interlinked with metagenomics. In addition, the evaluation, visualization, and interpretation of metaproteome data demanded for the developments in bioinformatics. This review will give an overview about recent strategies to use genomic data either from public databases or organismal specific genomes/metagenomes to increase the number of identified proteins obtained by mass spectrometric measurements. We will review different published metaproteogenomic approaches in respect to the used MS pipeline and to the used protein identification workflow. Furthermore, different approaches of data visualization and strategies for phylogenetic interpretation of metaproteome data are discussed as well as approaches for functional mapping of the results to the investigated biological systems. This information will in the end allow a comprehensive analysis of interactions and interdependencies within microbial communities.

  17. An ethnically relevant consensus Korean reference genome is a step towards personal reference genomes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunho; Kim, Hak-Min; Jho, Sungwoong; Jun, JeHoon; Lee, Yong Joo; Chae, Kyun Shik; Kim, Chang Geun; Kim, Sangsoo; Eriksson, Anders; Edwards, Jeremy S; Lee, Semin; Kim, Byung Chul; Manica, Andrea; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Church, George M; Bhak, Jong

    2016-11-24

    Human genomes are routinely compared against a universal reference. However, this strategy could miss population-specific and personal genomic variations, which may be detected more efficiently using an ethnically relevant or personal reference. Here we report a hybrid assembly of a Korean reference genome (KOREF) for constructing personal and ethnic references by combining sequencing and mapping methods. We also build its consensus variome reference, providing information on millions of variants from 40 additional ethnically homogeneous genomes from the Korean Personal Genome Project. We find that the ethnically relevant consensus reference can be beneficial for efficient variant detection. Systematic comparison of human assemblies shows the importance of assembly quality, suggesting the necessity of new technologies to comprehensively map ethnic and personal genomic structure variations. In the era of large-scale population genome projects, the leveraging of ethnicity-specific genome assemblies as well as the human reference genome will accelerate mapping all human genome diversity.

  18. An ethnically relevant consensus Korean reference genome is a step towards personal reference genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunho; Kim, Hak-Min; Jho, Sungwoong; Jun, JeHoon; Lee, Yong Joo; Chae, Kyun Shik; Kim, Chang Geun; Kim, Sangsoo; Eriksson, Anders; Edwards, Jeremy S.; Lee, Semin; Kim, Byung Chul; Manica, Andrea; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Church, George M.; Bhak, Jong

    2016-01-01

    Human genomes are routinely compared against a universal reference. However, this strategy could miss population-specific and personal genomic variations, which may be detected more efficiently using an ethnically relevant or personal reference. Here we report a hybrid assembly of a Korean reference genome (KOREF) for constructing personal and ethnic references by combining sequencing and mapping methods. We also build its consensus variome reference, providing information on millions of variants from 40 additional ethnically homogeneous genomes from the Korean Personal Genome Project. We find that the ethnically relevant consensus reference can be beneficial for efficient variant detection. Systematic comparison of human assemblies shows the importance of assembly quality, suggesting the necessity of new technologies to comprehensively map ethnic and personal genomic structure variations. In the era of large-scale population genome projects, the leveraging of ethnicity-specific genome assemblies as well as the human reference genome will accelerate mapping all human genome diversity. PMID:27882922

  19. Personal genomic information management and personalized medicine: challenges, current solutions, and roles of HIM professionals.

    PubMed

    Alzu'bi, Amal; Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the term personalized medicine has received more and more attention in the field of healthcare. The increasing use of this term is closely related to the astonishing advancement in DNA sequencing technologies and other high-throughput biotechnologies. A large amount of personal genomic data can be generated by these technologies in a short time. Consequently, the needs for managing, analyzing, and interpreting these personal genomic data to facilitate personalized care are escalated. In this article, we discuss the challenges for implementing genomics-based personalized medicine in healthcare, current solutions to these challenges, and the roles of health information management (HIM) professionals in genomics-based personalized medicine.

  20. Integrated Bioinformatics, Environmental Epidemiologic and Genomic Approaches to Identify Environmental and Molecular Links between Endometriosis and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Deodutta; Morgan, Marisa; Yoo, Changwon; Deoraj, Alok; Roy, Sandhya; Yadav, Vijay Kumar; Garoub, Mohannad; Assaggaf, Hamza; Doke, Mayur

    2015-01-01

    We present a combined environmental epidemiologic, genomic, and bioinformatics approach to identify: exposure of environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity; epidemiologic association between endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) and health effects, such as, breast cancer or endometriosis; and gene-EDC interactions and disease associations. Human exposure measurement and modeling confirmed estrogenic activity of three selected class of environmental chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), bisphenols (BPs), and phthalates. Meta-analysis showed that PCBs exposure, not Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, increased the summary odds ratio for breast cancer and endometriosis. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EDC interactions and disease associations identified several hundred genes that were altered by exposure to PCBs, phthalate or BPA. EDCs-modified genes in breast neoplasms and endometriosis are part of steroid hormone signaling and inflammation pathways. All three EDCs–PCB 153, phthalates, and BPA influenced five common genes—CYP19A1, EGFR, ESR2, FOS, and IGF1—in breast cancer as well as in endometriosis. These genes are environmentally and estrogen responsive, altered in human breast and uterine tumors and endometriosis lesions, and part of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in cancer. Our findings suggest that breast cancer and endometriosis share some common environmental and molecular risk factors. PMID:26512648

  1. A Novel Bioinformatics Method for Efficient Knowledge Discovery by BLSOM from Big Genomic Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yuki; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Zhao, Yue; Ikemura, Toshimichi

    2014-01-01

    With remarkable increase of genomic sequence data of a wide range of species, novel tools are needed for comprehensive analyses of the big sequence data. Self-Organizing Map (SOM) is an effective tool for clustering and visualizing high-dimensional data such as oligonucleotide composition on one map. By modifying the conventional SOM, we have previously developed Batch-Learning SOM (BLSOM), which allows classification of sequence fragments according to species, solely depending on the oligonucleotide composition. In the present study, we introduce the oligonucleotide BLSOM used for characterization of vertebrate genome sequences. We first analyzed pentanucleotide compositions in 100 kb sequences derived from a wide range of vertebrate genomes and then the compositions in the human and mouse genomes in order to investigate an efficient method for detecting differences between the closely related genomes. BLSOM can recognize the species-specific key combination of oligonucleotide frequencies in each genome, which is called a “genome signature,” and the specific regions specifically enriched in transcription-factor-binding sequences. Because the classification and visualization power is very high, BLSOM is an efficient powerful tool for extracting a wide range of information from massive amounts of genomic sequences (i.e., big sequence data). PMID:24804244

  2. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    PubMed

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci.

  3. ImageJS: Personalized, participated, pervasive, and reproducible image bioinformatics in the web browser

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jonas S.; Iriabho, Egiebade E.; Gorrepati, Vijaya L.; Wilkinson, Sean R.; Grüneberg, Alexander; Robbins, David E.; Hackney, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Image bioinformatics infrastructure typically relies on a combination of server-side high-performance computing and client desktop applications tailored for graphic rendering. On the server side, matrix manipulation environments are often used as the back-end where deployment of specialized analytical workflows takes place. However, neither the server-side nor the client-side desktop solution, by themselves or combined, is conducive to the emergence of open, collaborative, computational ecosystems for image analysis that are both self-sustained and user driven. Materials and Methods: ImageJS was developed as a browser-based webApp, untethered from a server-side backend, by making use of recent advances in the modern web browser such as a very efficient compiler, high-end graphical rendering capabilities, and I/O tailored for code migration. Results: Multiple versioned code hosting services were used to develop distinct ImageJS modules to illustrate its amenability to collaborative deployment without compromise of reproducibility or provenance. The illustrative examples include modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, and filtering. The deployment of image analysis by code migration is in sharp contrast with the more conventional, heavier, and less safe reliance on data transfer. Accordingly, code and data are loaded into the browser by exactly the same script tag loading mechanism, which offers a number of interesting applications that would be hard to attain with more conventional platforms, such as NIH's popular ImageJ application. Conclusions: The modern web browser was found to be advantageous for image bioinformatics in both the research and clinical environments. This conclusion reflects advantages in deployment scalability and analysis reproducibility, as well as the critical ability to deliver advanced computational statistical procedures machines where access to sensitive data is controlled, that is, without local “download and

  4. Genomics and bioinformatics in undergraduate curricula: Contexts for hybrid laboratory/lecture courses for entering and advanced science students.

    PubMed

    Temple, Louise; Cresawn, Steven G; Monroe, Jonathan D

    2010-01-01

    Emerging interest in genomics in the scientific community prompted biologists at James Madison University to create two courses at different levels to modernize the biology curriculum. The courses are hybrids of classroom and laboratory experiences. An upper level class uses raw sequence of a genome (plasmid or virus) as the subject on which to base the experience of genomic analysis. Students also learn bioinformatics and software programs needed to support a project linking structure and function in proteins and showing evolutionary relatedness of similar genes. An optional entry-level course taken in addition to the required first-year curriculum and sponsored in part by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, engages first year students in a primary research project. In the first semester, they isolate and characterize novel bacteriophages that infect soil bacteria. In the second semester, these young scientists annotate the genes on one or more of the unique viruses they discovered. These courses are demanding but exciting for both faculty and students and should be accessible to any interested faculty member. Copyright © 2010 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Personalized genomic disease risk of volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; McGuire, Amy L.; Pereira, Stacey; Caskey, C. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is commonly used for researching the causes of genetic disorders. However, its usefulness in clinical practice for medical diagnosis is in early development. In this report, we demonstrate the value of NGS for genetic risk assessment and evaluate the limitations and barriers for the adoption of this technology into medical practice. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on 81 volunteers, and for each volunteer, we requested personal medical histories, constructed a three-generation pedigree, and required their participation in a comprehensive educational program. We limited our clinical reporting to disease risks based on only rare damaging mutations and known pathogenic variations in genes previously reported to be associated with human disorders. We identified 271 recessive risk alleles (214 genes), 126 dominant risk alleles (101 genes), and 3 X-recessive risk alleles (3 genes). We linked personal disease histories with causative disease genes in 18 volunteers. Furthermore, by incorporating family histories into our genetic analyses, we identified an additional five heritable diseases. Traditional genetic counseling and disease education were provided in verbal and written reports to all volunteers. Our report demonstrates that when genome results are carefully interpreted and integrated with an individual’s medical records and pedigree data, NGS is a valuable diagnostic tool for genetic disease risk. PMID:24082139

  6. LifeStyle-Specific-Islands (LiSSI): Integrated Bioinformatics Platform for Genomic Island Analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Eudes; Röttger, Richard; Hauschild, Anne-Christin; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Böcker, Sebastian; Azevedo, Vasco; Baumbach, Jan

    2017-07-05

    Distinct bacteria are able to cope with highly diverse lifestyles; for instance, they can be free living or host-associated. Thus, these organisms must possess a large and varied genomic arsenal to withstand different environmental conditions. To facilitate the identification of genomic features that might influence bacterial adaptation to a specific niche, we introduce LifeStyle-Specific-Islands (LiSSI). LiSSI combines evolutionary sequence analysis with statistical learning (Random Forest with feature selection, model tuning and robustness analysis). In summary, our strategy aims to identify conserved consecutive homology sequences (islands) in genomes and to identify the most discriminant islands for each lifestyle.

  7. Genomic Discoveries and Personalized Medicine in Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-12-07

    In the past decades, we have witnessed dramatic changes in clinical diagnoses and treatments due to the revolutions of genomics and personalized medicine. Undoubtedly we also met many challenges when we use those advanced technologies in drug discovery and development. In this review, we describe when genomic information is applied in personal healthcare in general. We illustrate some case examples of genomic discoveries and promising personalized medicine applications in the area of neurological disease particular. Available data suggest that individual genomics can be applied to better treat patients in the near future.

  8. A bioinformatics approach to reanalyze the genome annotation of kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Harsh; Kulkarni, Aditi; Dixit, Tanwi; Chaphekar, Deepa; Patole, Milind S

    2014-12-01

    Leishmania donovani is a kinetoplastid protozoan parasite which causes the fatal disease visceral leishmaniasis in humans. Genome sequencing of L. donovani revealed information about the arrangement of genes and genome architecture. After curation of the genome sequence, many genes in L. donovani were assigned as truncated or "partial" genes by the genome sequencing group. In the present study, we have carried out an extensive analysis and attempted to improve the gene models of these partial genes. Our analysis resulted in the identification of 308 partial genes in L. donovani, which were further categorized as C-terminal extensions, joining of genes, tandemly repeated paralogs and wrong chromosomal assignments. We have analyzed each of these genes from these categories and have improved the annotation of existing gene models in L. donovani. Some of these corrections have been confirmed by mass spectrometry derived peptide data from our previous comparative proteogenomics study in L. donovani. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome re-sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of a nutraceutical rice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juncheng; Cheng, Zuxin; Xu, Ming; Huang, Zhiwei; Yang, Zhijian; Huang, Xinying; Zheng, Jingui; Lin, Tongxiang

    2015-06-01

    The genomes of two rice cultivars, Nipponbare and 93-11, have been well studied. However, there is little available genetic information about nutraceutical rice cultivars. To remedy this situation, the present study aimed to provide a basic genetic landscape of nutraceutical rice. The genome of Black-1, a black pericarp rice containing higher levels of anthocyanins, flavonoids, and a more potent antioxidant capacity, was sequenced at ≥30 × coverage using Solexa sequencing technology. The complete sequences of Black-1 genome shared more consensus sequences with indica cultivar 93-11 than with Nipponbare. With reference to the 93-11 genome, Black-1 contained 675,207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, 43,130 insertions and deletions (1-5 bp), 1,770 copy number variations, and 10,911 presence/absence variations. These variations were observed to reside preferentially in Myb domains, NB-ARC domains and kinase domains, providing clues to the diversity of biological functions or secondary metabolisms in this cultivar. Intriguingly, 496 unique genes were identified by comparing it with the genomes of these two rice varieties; among the genes, 119 genes participate in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Furthermore, several unique genes were predicted to be involved in the anthocyanins synthesis pathway. The genome-wide landscape of Black-1 uncovered by this study represents a valuable resource for further studies and for breeding nutraceutical rice varieties.

  10. Personalized medicine, genomics, and pharmacogenomics: a primer for nurses.

    PubMed

    Blix, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Personalized medicine is the study of patients' unique environmental influences as well as the totality of their genetic code-their genome-to tailor personalized risk assessments, diagnoses, prognoses, and treatments. The study of how patients' genomes affect responses to medications, or pharmacogenomics, is a related field. Personalized medicine and genomics are particularly relevant in oncology because of the genetic basis of cancer. Nurses need to understand related issues such as the role of genetic and genomic counseling, the ethical and legal questions surrounding genomics, and the growing direct-to-consumer genomics industry. As genomics research is incorporated into health care, nurses need to understand the technology to provide advocacy and education for patients and their families.

  11. Genomic Analysis of a Marine Bacterium: Bioinformatics for Comparison, Evaluation, and Interpretation of DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Gonzalez, Juan M; Khobragade, Chandrahasya N

    2016-01-01

    A total of five highly related strains of an unidentified marine bacterium were analyzed through their short genome sequences (AM260709-AM260713). Genome-to-Genome Distance (GGDC) showed high similarity to Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (X67024). The generated unique Quick Response (QR) codes indicated no identity to other microbial species or gene sequences. Chaos Game Representation (CGR) showed the number of bases concentrated in the area. Guanine residues were highest in number followed by cytosine. Frequency of Chaos Game Representation (FCGR) indicated that CC and GG blocks have higher frequency in the sequence from the evaluated marine bacterium strains. Maximum GC content for the marine bacterium strains ranged 53-54%. The use of QR codes, CGR, FCGR, and GC dataset helped in identifying and interpreting short genome sequences from specific isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the bootstrap test (1000 replicates) using MEGA6 software. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was carried out using EMBL-EBI MUSCLE program. Thus, generated genomic data are of great assistance for hierarchical classification in Bacterial Systematics which combined with phenotypic features represents a basic procedure for a polyphasic approach on unambiguous bacterial isolate taxonomic classification.

  12. Genomic Analysis of a Marine Bacterium: Bioinformatics for Comparison, Evaluation, and Interpretation of DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Khobragade, Chandrahasya N.

    2016-01-01

    A total of five highly related strains of an unidentified marine bacterium were analyzed through their short genome sequences (AM260709–AM260713). Genome-to-Genome Distance (GGDC) showed high similarity to Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (X67024). The generated unique Quick Response (QR) codes indicated no identity to other microbial species or gene sequences. Chaos Game Representation (CGR) showed the number of bases concentrated in the area. Guanine residues were highest in number followed by cytosine. Frequency of Chaos Game Representation (FCGR) indicated that CC and GG blocks have higher frequency in the sequence from the evaluated marine bacterium strains. Maximum GC content for the marine bacterium strains ranged 53-54%. The use of QR codes, CGR, FCGR, and GC dataset helped in identifying and interpreting short genome sequences from specific isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the bootstrap test (1000 replicates) using MEGA6 software. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was carried out using EMBL-EBI MUSCLE program. Thus, generated genomic data are of great assistance for hierarchical classification in Bacterial Systematics which combined with phenotypic features represents a basic procedure for a polyphasic approach on unambiguous bacterial isolate taxonomic classification. PMID:27882328

  13. "A system biology" approach to bioinformatics and functional genomics in complex human diseases: arthritis.

    PubMed

    Attur, M G; Dave, M N; Tsunoyama, K; Akamatsu, M; Kobori, M; Miki, J; Abramson, S B; Katoh, M; Amin, A R

    2002-10-01

    Human and other annotated genome sequences have facilitated generation of vast amounts of correlative data, from human/animal genetics, normal and disease-affected tissues from complex diseases such as arthritis using gene/protein chips and SNP analysis. These data sets include genes/proteins whose functions are partially known at the cellular level or may be completely unknown (e.g. ESTs). Thus, genomic research has transformed molecular biology from "data poor" to "data rich" science, allowing further division into subpopulations of subcellular fractions, which are often given an "-omic" suffix. These disciplines have to converge at a systemic level to examine the structure and dynamics of cellular and organismal function. The challenge of characterizing ESTs linked to complex diseases is like interpreting sharp images on a blurred background and therefore requires a multidimensional screen for functional genomics ("functionomics") in tissues, mice and zebra fish model, which intertwines various approaches and readouts to study development and homeostasis of a system. In summary, the post-genomic era of functionomics will facilitate to narrow the bridge between correlative data and causative data by quaint hypothesis-driven research using a system approach integrating "intercoms" of interacting and interdependent disciplines forming a unified whole as described in this review for Arthritis.

  14. Bioinformatic genome comparisons for taxonomic and phylogenic assignments using Aeromonas as a test case

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prokaryotic taxonomy is the underpinning of microbiology, providing a framework for the proper identification and naming of organisms. The 'gold standard' of bacterial species delineation is the overall genome similarity as determined by DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH), a technically rigorous yet someti...

  15. A bioinformatic approach to understanding antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria through whole genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Silpak; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2008-09-01

    Intracellular bacteria survive within eukaryotic host cells and are difficult to kill with certain antibiotics. As a result, antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria is becoming commonplace in healthcare institutions. Owing to the lack of methods available for transforming these bacteria, we evaluated the mechanisms of resistance using molecular methods and in silico genome analysis. The objective of this review was to understand the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance through in silico comparisons of the genomes of obligate and facultative intracellular bacteria. The available data on in vitro mutants reported for intracellular bacteria were also reviewed. These genomic data were analysed to find natural mutations in known target genes involved in antibiotic resistance and to look for the presence or absence of different resistance determinants. Our analysis revealed the presence of tetracycline resistance protein (Tet) in Bartonella quintana, Francisella tularensis and Brucella ovis; moreover, most of the Francisella strains possessed the blaA gene, AmpG protein and metallo-beta-lactamase family protein. The presence or absence of folP (dihydropteroate synthase) and folA (dihydrofolate reductase) genes in the genome could explain natural resistance to co-trimoxazole. Finally, multiple genes encoding different efflux pumps were studied. This in silico approach was an effective method for understanding the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria. The whole genome sequence analysis will help to predict several important phenotypic characteristics, in particular resistance to different antibiotics. In the future, stable mutants should be obtained through transformation methods in order to demonstrate experimentally the determinants of resistance in intracellular bacteria.

  16. Challenges of web-based personal genomic data sharing.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Mahsa; Borry, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the relationship between genes and diseases, the increasing availability and sharing of phenotypic and genotypic data have been promoted as an imperative within the scientific community. In parallel with data sharing practices by clinicians and researchers, recent initiatives have been observed in which individuals are sharing personal genomic data. The involvement of individuals in such initiatives is facilitated by the increased accessibility of personal genomic data, offered by private test providers along with availability of online networks. Personal webpages and on-line data sharing platforms such as Consent to Research (Portable Legal Consent), Free the Data, and Genomes Unzipped are being utilized to host and share genotypes, electronic health records and family history uploaded by individuals. Although personal genomic data sharing initiatives vary in nature, the emphasis on the individuals' control on their data in order to benefit research and ultimately health care has seen as a key theme across these initiatives. In line with the growing practice of personal genomic data sharing, this paper aims to shed light on the potential challenges surrounding these initiatives. As in the course of these initiatives individuals are solicited to individually balance the risks and benefits of sharing their genomic data, their awareness of the implications of personal genomic data sharing for themselves and their family members is a necessity. Furthermore, given the sensitivity of genomic data and the controversies around their complete de-identifiability, potential privacy risks and harms originating from unintended uses of data have to be taken into consideration.

  17. Evolving health care through personal genomics.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Heidi L

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid evolution of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, the cost of sequencing a human genome has plummeted, and genomics has started to pervade health care across all stages of life - from preconception to adult medicine. Challenges to fully embracing genomics in a clinical setting remain, but some approaches are starting to overcome these barriers, such as community-driven data sharing to improve the accuracy and efficiency of applying genomics to patient care.

  18. Teaching synthetic biology, bioinformatics and engineering to undergraduates: the interdisciplinary Build-a-Genome course.

    PubMed

    Dymond, Jessica S; Scheifele, Lisa Z; Richardson, Sarah; Lee, Pablo; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Bader, Joel S; Boeke, Jef D

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge in undergraduate life science curricula is the continual evaluation and development of courses that reflect the constantly shifting face of contemporary biological research. Synthetic biology offers an excellent framework within which students may participate in cutting-edge interdisciplinary research and is therefore an attractive addition to the undergraduate biology curriculum. This new discipline offers the promise of a deeper understanding of gene function, gene order, and chromosome structure through the de novo synthesis of genetic information, much as synthetic approaches informed organic chemistry. While considerable progress has been achieved in the synthesis of entire viral and prokaryotic genomes, fabrication of eukaryotic genomes requires synthesis on a scale that is orders of magnitude higher. These high-throughput but labor-intensive projects serve as an ideal way to introduce undergraduates to hands-on synthetic biology research. We are pursuing synthesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes in an undergraduate laboratory setting, the Build-a-Genome course, thereby exposing students to the engineering of biology on a genomewide scale while focusing on a limited region of the genome. A synthetic chromosome III sequence was designed, ordered from commercial suppliers in the form of oligonucleotides, and subsequently assembled by students into approximately 750-bp fragments. Once trained in assembly of such DNA "building blocks" by PCR, the students accomplish high-yield gene synthesis, becoming not only technically proficient but also constructively critical and capable of adapting their protocols as independent researchers. Regular "lab meeting" sessions help prepare them for future roles in laboratory science.

  19. Air Force Genomics, Proteomics, Bioinformatics System, DataCap-Data Collection Module. Phase 1: Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    exist as a series of isolated computational silos, providing a depth of data in a narrow field of research. The Acero Genomics Knowledge Platform (GKP...on top of the Acero Platform. The purpose of the DataCap is to provide the individual researcher with the ability to collect experimental data in a...integrated format compatible with the Acero GKP. This technical report covers the architecture, the design and the operation of the DataCap in its

  20. Teaching Synthetic Biology, Bioinformatics and Engineering to Undergraduates: The Interdisciplinary Build-a-Genome Course

    PubMed Central

    Dymond, Jessica S.; Scheifele, Lisa Z.; Richardson, Sarah; Lee, Pablo; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Bader, Joel S.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge in undergraduate life science curricula is the continual evaluation and development of courses that reflect the constantly shifting face of contemporary biological research. Synthetic biology offers an excellent framework within which students may participate in cutting-edge interdisciplinary research and is therefore an attractive addition to the undergraduate biology curriculum. This new discipline offers the promise of a deeper understanding of gene function, gene order, and chromosome structure through the de novo synthesis of genetic information, much as synthetic approaches informed organic chemistry. While considerable progress has been achieved in the synthesis of entire viral and prokaryotic genomes, fabrication of eukaryotic genomes requires synthesis on a scale that is orders of magnitude higher. These high-throughput but labor-intensive projects serve as an ideal way to introduce undergraduates to hands-on synthetic biology research. We are pursuing synthesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes in an undergraduate laboratory setting, the Build-a-Genome course, thereby exposing students to the engineering of biology on a genomewide scale while focusing on a limited region of the genome. A synthetic chromosome III sequence was designed, ordered from commercial suppliers in the form of oligonucleotides, and subsequently assembled by students into ∼750-bp fragments. Once trained in assembly of such DNA “building blocks” by PCR, the students accomplish high-yield gene synthesis, becoming not only technically proficient but also constructively critical and capable of adapting their protocols as independent researchers. Regular “lab meeting” sessions help prepare them for future roles in laboratory science. PMID:19015540

  1. Methy-Pipe: an integrated bioinformatics pipeline for whole genome bisulfite sequencing data analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peiyong; Sun, Kun; Lun, Fiona M F; Guo, Andy M; Wang, Huating; Chan, K C Allen; Chiu, Rossa W K; Lo, Y M Dennis; Sun, Hao

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation, one of the most important epigenetic modifications, plays a crucial role in various biological processes. The level of DNA methylation can be measured using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at single base resolution. However, until now, there is a paucity of publicly available software for carrying out integrated methylation data analysis. In this study, we implemented Methy-Pipe, which not only fulfills the core data analysis requirements (e.g. sequence alignment, differential methylation analysis, etc.) but also provides useful tools for methylation data annotation and visualization. Specifically, it uses Burrow-Wheeler Transform (BWT) algorithm to directly align bisulfite sequencing reads to a reference genome and implements a novel sliding window based approach with statistical methods for the identification of differentially methylated regions (DMRs). The capability of processing data parallelly allows it to outperform a number of other bisulfite alignment software packages. To demonstrate its utility and performance, we applied it to both real and simulated bisulfite sequencing datasets. The results indicate that Methy-Pipe can accurately estimate methylation densities, identify DMRs and provide a variety of utility programs for downstream methylation data analysis. In summary, Methy-Pipe is a useful pipeline that can process whole genome bisulfite sequencing data in an efficient, accurate, and user-friendly manner. Software and test dataset are available at http://sunlab.lihs.cuhk.edu.hk/methy-pipe/.

  2. Personalized Genomic Medicine with a Patchwork, Partially Owned Genome

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Christopher E.; Seringhaus, Michael R.; Sattler de Sousa e Brito, Clara

    2008-01-01

    “His book was known as the Book of Sand, because neither the book nor the sand have any beginning or end.” — Jorge Luis Borges The human genome is a three billion-letter recipe for the genesis of a human being, directing development from a single-celled embryo to the trillions of adult cells. Since the sequencing of the human genome was announced in 2001, researchers have an increased ability to discern the genetic basis for diseases. This reference genome has opened the door to genomic medicine, aimed at detecting and understanding all genetic variations of the human genome that contribute to the manifestation and progression of disease. The overarching vision of genomic (or “personalized”) medicine is to custom-tailor each treatment for maximum effectiveness in an individual patient. Detecting the variation in a patient’s deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), and protein structures is no longer an insurmountable hurdle. Today, the challenge for genomic medicine lies in contextualizing those myriad genetic variations in terms of their functional consequences for a person’s health and development throughout life and in terms of that patient’s susceptibility to disease and differential clinical responses to medication. Additionally, several recent developments have complicated our understanding of the nominal human genome and, thereby, altered the progression of genomic medicine. In this brief review, we shall focus on these developments and examine how they are changing our understanding of our genome. PMID:18449389

  3. Personal utility in genomic testing: is there such a thing?

    PubMed

    Bunnik, Eline M; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Schermer, Maartje H N

    2015-04-01

    In ethical and regulatory discussions on new applications of genomic testing technologies, the notion of 'personal utility' has been mentioned repeatedly. It has been used to justify direct access to commercially offered genomic testing or feedback of individual research results to research or biobank participants. Sometimes research participants or consumers claim a right to genomic information with an appeal to personal utility. As of yet, no systematic account of the umbrella notion of personal utility has been given. This paper offers a definition of personal utility that places it in the middle of the spectrum between clinical utility and personal perceptions of utility, and that acknowledges its normative charge. The paper discusses two perspectives on personal utility, the healthcare perspective and the consumer perspective, and argues that these are too narrow and too wide, respectively. Instead, it proposes a normative definition of personal utility that postulates information and potential use as necessary conditions of utility. This definition entails that perceived utility does not equal personal utility, and that expert judgment may be necessary to help determine whether a genomic test can have personal utility for someone. Two examples of genomic tests are presented to illustrate the discrepancies between perceived utility and our proposed definition of personal utility. The paper concludes that while there is room for the notion of personal utility in the ethical evaluation and regulation of genomic tests, the justificatory role of personal utility is not unlimited. For in the absence of clinical validity and reasonable potential use of information, there is no personal utility.

  4. The roots of bioinformatics in theoretical biology.

    PubMed

    Hogeweg, Paulien

    2011-03-01

    From the late 1980s onward, the term "bioinformatics" mostly has been used to refer to computational methods for comparative analysis of genome data. However, the term was originally more widely defined as the study of informatic processes in biotic systems. In this essay, I will trace this early history (from a personal point of view) and I will argue that the original meaning of the term is re-emerging.

  5. [Personal genomics: are we debating the right Issues?].

    PubMed

    Vayena, E; Mauch, F

    2012-07-25

    The debate about personal genomics and their role in personalized medicine has been, to some extent, hijacked by the controversy about commercially available genomic tests sold directly to consumers. The clinical validity and utility of such tests are currently limited and most medical associations recommend that consumers refrain from testing. Conversely, DTC genomics proponents and particularly the DTC industry argue that there is personal utility in acquiring genomic information. While it is necessary to debate risks and benefits of DTC genomics, we should not lose sight of the increasingly important role that genomics will play in medical practice and public health. Therefore, and in anticipation of this shift we also need to focus on important implications from the use of genomics information such as genetic discrimination, privacy protection and equitable access to health care. Undoubtedly, personal genomics will challenge our social norms maybe more than our medicine. Sticking to the polarization of «to have or not to have DTC genomics» risks to takes us away from the critical issues we need to be debating.

  6. A bioinformatic analysis of ribonucleotide reductase genes in phage genomes and metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for the formation of deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides, is found in all domains of life and many viral genomes. RNRs are also amongst the most abundant genes identified in environmental metagenomes. This study focused on understanding the distribution, diversity, and evolution of RNRs in phages (viruses that infect bacteria). Hidden Markov Model profiles were used to analyze the proteins encoded by 685 completely sequenced double-stranded DNA phages and 22 environmental viral metagenomes to identify RNR homologs in cultured phages and uncultured viral communities, respectively. Results RNRs were identified in 128 phage genomes, nearly tripling the number of phages known to encode RNRs. Class I RNR was the most common RNR class observed in phages (70%), followed by class II (29%) and class III (28%). Twenty-eight percent of the phages contained genes belonging to multiple RNR classes. RNR class distribution varied according to phage type, isolation environment, and the host’s ability to utilize oxygen. The majority of the phages containing RNRs are Myoviridae (65%), followed by Siphoviridae (30%) and Podoviridae (3%). The phylogeny and genomic organization of phage and host RNRs reveal several distinct evolutionary scenarios involving horizontal gene transfer, co-evolution, and differential selection pressure. Several putative split RNR genes interrupted by self-splicing introns or inteins were identified, providing further evidence for the role of frequent genetic exchange. Finally, viral metagenomic data indicate that RNRs are prevalent and highly dynamic in uncultured viral communities, necessitating future research to determine the environmental conditions under which RNRs provide a selective advantage. Conclusions This comprehensive study describes the distribution, diversity, and evolution of RNRs in phage genomes and environmental viral metagenomes. The distinct distributions of

  7. Identification of Simple Sequence Repeats in Chloroplast Genomes of Magnoliids Through Bioinformatics Approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Deepika; Shanker, Asheesh

    2016-12-01

    Basal angiosperms or Magnoliids is an important clade of commercially important plants which mainly include spices and edible fruits. In this study, 17 chloroplast genome sequences belonging to clade Magnoliids were screened for the identification of chloroplast simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs). Simple sequence repeats or microsatellites are short stretches of DNA up to 1-6 base pair in length. These repeats are ubiquitous and play important role in the development of molecular markers and to study the mapping of traits of economic, medical or ecological interest. A total of 479 SSRs were detected, showing average density of 1 SSR/6.91 kb. Depending on the repeat units, the length of SSRs ranged from 12 to 24 bp for mono-, 12 to 18 bp for di-, 12 to 26 bp for tri-, 12 to 24 bp for tetra-, 15 bp for penta- and 18 bp for hexanucleotide repeats. Mononucleotide repeats were the most frequent (207, 43.21 %) followed by tetranucleotide repeats (130, 27.13 %). Penta- and hexanucleotide repeats were least frequent or absent in these chloroplast genomes.

  8. Personalized- and one- medicine: bioinformatics foundation in health and its economic feasibility.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2015-01-15

    Personalized medicine's foundation rests on the use of molecular technologies, which are being used to identify genetic mutations, polymorphisms, and variants that can be associated with an individual's genetic make up, revealing risk factors and predictive data. Needless to say this same analysis can be performed on various types of cancers, including samples stored for many years under the right conditions. For the most part, these technologies employ microarray and RNA-Seq methodologies, which examine large numbers of gene expressions at a time, providing clustering and patterns of this expression. The methodologies and their evaluative outcomes further demonstrate that more than a single gene is involved with various phenomena. However, given the mass of data emerging from this analysis, and commonalities they reveal between various phenomena/disorders, achieving 100% certainty may not be that easy. Another outcome from this massive store of molecular data is the concept of one medicine. This field has been developed by researchers in a variety of disciplines (e.g., medical and veterinary science) that advocate for greater integration of animal and human health. One medicine takes advantage of the fact that molecular commonalities in major biochemical pathways occur because of evolutionary conservation, which is dependent on stereospecificity. In this regard, the foci of personalized medicine and one medicine are quite broad and require trained professionals, as well as a lowering of cost in order to be better integrated into mainstream medical practice.

  9. Individual genomes instead of race for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Ng, P C; Zhao, Q; Levy, S; Strausberg, R L; Venter, J C

    2008-09-01

    The cost of sequencing and genotyping is aggressively decreasing, enabling pervasive personalized genomic screening for drug reactions. Drug-metabolizing genes have been characterized sufficiently to enable practitioners to go beyond simplistic ethnic characterization and into the precisely targeted world of personal genomics. We examine six drug-metabolizing genes in J. Craig Venter and James Watson, two Caucasian men whose genomes were recently sequenced. Their genetic differences underscore the importance of personalized genomics over a race-based approach to medicine. To attain truly personalized medicine, the scientific community must aim to elucidate the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to drug reactions and not be satisfied with a simple race-based approach.

  10. H3Africa: a tipping point for a revolution in bioinformatics, genomics and health research in Africa.

    PubMed

    Adoga, Moses P; Fatumo, Segun A; Agwale, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    A multi-million dollar research initiative involving the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Wellcome Trust and African scientists has been launched. The initiative, referred to as H3Africa, is an acronym that stands for Human Heredity and Health in Africa. Here, we outline what this initiative is set to achieve and the latest commitments of the key players as at October 2013. The initiative has so far been awarded over $74 million in research grants. During the first set of awards announced in 2012, the NIH granted $5 million a year for a period of five years, while the Wellcome Trust doled out at least $12 million over the period to the research consortium. This was in addition to Wellcome Trust's provision of administrative support, scientific consultation and advanced training, all in collaboration with the African Society for Human Genetics. In addition, during the second set of awards announced in October 2013, the NIH awarded to the laudable initiative 10 new grants of up to $17 million over the next four years. H3Africa is poised to transform the face of research in genomics, bioinformatics and health in Africa. The capacity of African scientists will be enhanced through training and the better research facilities that will be acquired. Research collaborations between Africa and the West will grow and all stakeholders, including the funding partners, African scientists, scientists across the globe, physicians and patients will be the eventual winners.

  11. Bioinformatic evidence and characterization of novel putative large conjugative transposons residing in genomes of genera Bacteroides and Prevotella.

    PubMed

    Gorenc, Katja; Accetto, Tomaž; Avguštin, Gorazd

    2012-07-01

    Bioinformatic evidence of the presence of a large conjugative transposon in ruminal bacterium Prevotella bryantii B(1)4(T) is presented. The described transposon appears to be related to another large conjugative transposon CTnBST, described in Bacteroides uniformis WH207 and to the conjugative transposon CTn3-Bf, which was observed in the genome of Bacteroides fragilis strain YCH46. All three transposons share tra gene regions with high amino acid identity and clearly conserved gene order. Additionally, a second conserved region consisting of hypothetical genes was discovered in all three transposons and named the GG region. This region served as a specific sequence signature and made possible the discovery of several other apparently related hypothetical conjugative transposons in bacteria from the genus Bacteroides. A cluster of genes involved in sugar utilization and metabolism was discovered within the hypothetical CTnB(1)4, to a certain extent resembling the polysaccharide utilization loci which were described recently in some Bacteroides strains. This is the first firm report on the presence of a large mobile genetic element in any strain from the genus Prevotella.

  12. Genome mining of mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA) synthesizing and non-synthesizing cyanobacteria: A bioinformatics study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra P; Klisch, Manfred; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Häder, Donat-P

    2010-02-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are a family of more than 20 compounds having absorption maxima between 310 and 362 nm. These compounds are well known for their UV-absorbing/screening role in various organisms and seem to have evolutionary significance. In the present investigation we tested four cyanobacteria, e.g., Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 6301, for their ability to synthesize MAA and conducted genomic and phylogenetic analysis to identify the possible set of genes that might be involved in the biosynthesis of these compounds. Out of the four investigated species, only A. variabilis PCC 7937 was able to synthesize MAA. Genome mining identified a combination of genes, YP_324358 (predicted DHQ synthase) and YP_324357 (O-methyltransferase), which were present only in A. variabilis PCC 7937 and missing in the other studied cyanobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these two genes are transferred from a cyanobacterial donor to dinoflagellates and finally to metazoa by a lateral gene transfer event. All other cyanobacteria, which have these two genes, also had another copy of the DHQ synthase gene. The predicted protein structure for YP_324358 also suggested that this product is different from the chemically characterized DHQ synthase of Aspergillus nidulans contrary to the YP_324879, which was predicted to be similar to the DHQ synthase. The present study provides a first insight into the genes of cyanobacteria involved in MAA biosynthesis and thus widens the field of research for molecular, bioinformatics and phylogenetic analysis of these evolutionary and industrially important compounds. Based on the results we propose that YP_324358 and YP_324357 gene products are involved in the biosynthesis of the common core (deoxygadusol) of all MAAs.

  13. Personal Genomic Information Management and Personalized Medicine: Challenges, Current Solutions, and Roles of HIM Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Alzu'bi, Amal; Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the term personalized medicine has received more and more attention in the field of healthcare. The increasing use of this term is closely related to the astonishing advancement in DNA sequencing technologies and other high-throughput biotechnologies. A large amount of personal genomic data can be generated by these technologies in a short time. Consequently, the needs for managing, analyzing, and interpreting these personal genomic data to facilitate personalized care are escalated. In this article, we discuss the challenges for implementing genomics-based personalized medicine in healthcare, current solutions to these challenges, and the roles of health information management (HIM) professionals in genomics-based personalized medicine. PMID:24808804

  14. AnnoTALE: bioinformatics tools for identification, annotation, and nomenclature of TALEs from Xanthomonas genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Jan; Reschke, Maik; Erkes, Annett; Streubel, Jana; Morgan, Richard D.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Koebnik, Ralf; Boch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are virulence factors, produced by the bacterial plant-pathogen Xanthomonas, that function as gene activators inside plant cells. Although the contribution of individual TALEs to infectivity has been shown, the specific roles of most TALEs, and the overall TALE diversity in Xanthomonas spp. is not known. TALEs possess a highly repetitive DNA-binding domain, which is notoriously difficult to sequence. Here, we describe an improved method for characterizing TALE genes by the use of PacBio sequencing. We present ‘AnnoTALE’, a suite of applications for the analysis and annotation of TALE genes from Xanthomonas genomes, and for grouping similar TALEs into classes. Based on these classes, we propose a unified nomenclature for Xanthomonas TALEs that reveals similarities pointing to related functionalities. This new classification enables us to compare related TALEs and to identify base substitutions responsible for the evolution of TALE specificities. PMID:26876161

  15. Genomic and bioinformatic analysis of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase in Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Suwanchaichinda, C; Brattsten, L B

    2014-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) enzyme system is a major mechanism of xenobiotic biotransformation. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is required for transfer of electrons from NADPH to P450. One CPR gene was identified in the genome of the malaria-transmitting mosquito Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae). The gene encodes a polypeptide containing highly conserved flavin mononucleotide-, flavin adenine dinucleotide-, and NADPH-binding domains, a unique characteristic of the reductase. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the A. stephensi and other known mosquito CPRs belong to a monophyletic group distinctly separated from other insects in the same order, Diptera. Amino acid residues of CPRs involved in binding of P450 and cytochrome c are conserved between A. stephensi and the Norway rat Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout (Rodentia: Muridae). However, gene structure particularly within the coding region is evidently different between the two organisms. Such difference might arise during the evolution process as also seen in the difference of P450 families and isoforms found in these organisms. CPR in the mosquito A. stephensi is expected to be active and serve as an essential component of the P450 system. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  16. [Genome-wide identification and bioinformatic analysis of PPR gene family in tomato].

    PubMed

    Ding, Anming; Li, Ling; Qu, Xu; Sun, Tingting; Chen, Yaqiong; Zong, Peng; Li, Zunqiang; Gong, Daping; Sun, Yuhe

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPRs) genes constitute one of the largest gene families in plants, which play a broad and essential role in plant growth and development. In this study, the protein sequences annotated by the tomato (S. lycopersicum L.) genome project were screened with the Pfam PPR sequences. A total of 471 putative PPR-encoding genes were identified. Based on the motifs defined in A. thaliana L., protein structure and conserved sequences for each tomato motif were analyzed. We also analyzed phylogenetic relationship, subcellular localization, expression and GO analysis of the identified gene sequences. Our results demonstrate that tomato PPR gene family contains two subfamilies, P and PLS, each accounting for half of the family. PLS subfamily can be divided into four subclasses i.e., PLS, E, E+ and DYW. Each subclass of sequences forms a clade in the phylogenetic tree. The PPR motifs were found highly conserved among plants. The tomato PPR genes were distributed over 12 chromosomes and most of them lack introns. The majority of PPR proteins harbor mitochondrial or chloroplast localization sequences, whereas GO analysis showed that most PPR proteins participate in RNA-related biological processes.

  17. Genomic and Bioinformatic Analysis of NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Reductase in Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Suwanchaichinda, C.; Brattsten, L. B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) enzyme system is a major mechanism of xenobiotic biotransformation. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is required for transfer of electrons from NADPH to P450. One CPR gene was identified in the genome of the malaria-transmitting mosquito Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae). The gene encodes a polypeptide containing highly conserved flavin mononucleotide-, flavin adenine dinucleotide-, and NADPH-binding domains, a unique characteristic of the reductase. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the A. stephensi and other known mosquito CPRs belong to a monophyletic group distinctly separated from other insects in the same order, Diptera. Amino acid residues of CPRs involved in binding of P450 and cytochrome c are conserved between A. stephensi and the Norway rat Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout (Rodentia: Muridae). However, gene structure particularly within the coding region is evidently different between the two organisms. Such difference might arise during the evolution process as also seen in the difference of P450 families and isoforms found in these organisms. CPR in the mosquito A. stephensi is expected to be active and serve as an essential component of the P450 system. PMID:25368081

  18. Glossary of bioinformatics terms.

    PubMed

    2007-06-01

    This collection of terms and definitions commonly encountered in the bioinformatics literature will be updated periodically as Current Protocols in Bioinformatics grows. In addition, an extensive glossary of genetic terms can be found on the Web site of the National Human Genome Research Institute (http://www.genome.gov/glossary.cfm). The entries in that online glossary provide a brief written definition of the term; the user can also listen to an informative explanation of the term using RealAudio or the Windows Media Player.

  19. MEMOSys 2.0: an update of the bioinformatics database for genome-scale models and genomic data.

    PubMed

    Pabinger, Stephan; Snajder, Rene; Hardiman, Timo; Willi, Michaela; Dander, Andreas; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    The MEtabolic MOdel research and development System (MEMOSys) is a versatile database for the management, storage and development of genome-scale models (GEMs). Since its initial release, the database has undergone major improvements, and the new version introduces several new features. First, the novel concept of derived models allows users to create model hierarchies that automatically propagate modifications along their order. Second, all stored components can now be easily enhanced with additional annotations that can be directly extracted from a supplied Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) file. Third, the web application has been substantially revised and now features new query mechanisms, an easy search system for reactions and new link-out services to publicly available databases. Fourth, the updated database now contains 20 publicly available models, which can be easily exported into standardized formats for further analysis. Fifth, MEMOSys 2.0 is now also available as a fully configured virtual image and can be found online at http://www.icbi.at/memosys and http://memoys.i-med.ac.at. Database URL: http://memosys.i-med.ac.at.

  20. Genomic-Bioinformatic Analysis of Transcripts Enriched in the Third-Stage Larva of the Parasitic Nematode Ascaris suum

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cui-Qin; Gasser, Robin B.; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Zhong, Weiwei; Sternberg, Paul W.; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason; Lin, Rui-Qing; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Differential transcription in Ascaris suum was investigated using a genomic-bioinformatic approach. A cDNA archive enriched for molecules in the infective third-stage larva (L3) of A. suum was constructed by suppressive-subtractive hybridization (SSH), and a subset of cDNAs from 3075 clones subjected to microarray analysis using cDNA probes derived from RNA from different developmental stages of A. suum. The cDNAs (n = 498) shown by microarray analysis to be enriched in the L3 were sequenced and subjected to bioinformatic analyses using a semi-automated pipeline (ESTExplorer). Using gene ontology (GO), 235 of these molecules were assigned to ‘biological process’ (n = 68), ‘cellular component’ (n = 50), or ‘molecular function’ (n = 117). Of the 91 clusters assembled, 56 molecules (61.5%) had homologues/orthologues in the free-living nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae and/or other organisms, whereas 35 (38.5%) had no significant similarity to any sequences available in current gene databases. Transcripts encoding protein kinases, protein phosphatases (and their precursors), and enolases were abundantly represented in the L3 of A. suum, as were molecules involved in cellular processes, such as ubiquitination and proteasome function, gene transcription, protein–protein interactions, and function. In silico analyses inferred the C. elegans orthologues/homologues (n = 50) to be involved in apoptosis and insulin signaling (2%), ATP synthesis (2%), carbon metabolism (6%), fatty acid biosynthesis (2%), gap junction (2%), glucose metabolism (6%), or porphyrin metabolism (2%), although 34 (68%) of them could not be mapped to a specific metabolic pathway. Small numbers of these 50 molecules were predicted to be secreted (10%), anchored (2%), and/or transmembrane (12%) proteins. Functionally, 17 (34%) of them were predicted to be associated with (non-wild-type) RNAi phenotypes in C. elegans, the majority being embryonic lethality

  1. Assessing Student Understanding of the "New Biology": Development and Evaluation of a Criterion-Referenced Genomics and Bioinformatics Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Chad Edward

    Over the past decade, hundreds of studies have introduced genomics and bioinformatics (GB) curricula and laboratory activities at the undergraduate level. While these publications have facilitated the teaching and learning of cutting-edge content, there has yet to be an evaluation of these assessment tools to determine if they are meeting the quality control benchmarks set forth by the educational research community. An analysis of these assessment tools indicated that <10% referenced any quality control criteria and that none of the assessments met more than one of the quality control benchmarks. In the absence of evidence that these benchmarks had been met, it is unclear whether these assessment tools are capable of generating valid and reliable inferences about student learning. To remedy this situation the development of a robust GB assessment aligned with the quality control benchmarks was undertaken in order to ensure evidence-based evaluation of student learning outcomes. Content validity is a central piece of construct validity, and it must be used to guide instrument and item development. This study reports on: (1) the correspondence of content validity evidence gathered from independent sources; (2) the process of item development using this evidence; (3) the results from a pilot administration of the assessment; (4) the subsequent modification of the assessment based on the pilot administration results and; (5) the results from the second administration of the assessment. Twenty-nine different subtopics within GB (Appendix B: Genomics and Bioinformatics Expert Survey) were developed based on preliminary GB textbook analyses. These subtopics were analyzed using two methods designed to gather content validity evidence: (1) a survey of GB experts (n=61) and (2) a detailed content analyses of GB textbooks (n=6). By including only the subtopics that were shown to have robust support across these sources, 22 GB subtopics were established for inclusion in the

  2. Personal utility in genomic testing: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Jennefer N; Turbitt, Erin; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2017-06-01

    Researchers and clinicians refer to outcomes of genomic testing that extend beyond clinical utility as 'personal utility'. No systematic delineation of personal utility exists, making it challenging to appreciate its scope. Identifying empirical elements of personal utility reported in the literature offers an inventory that can be subsequently ranked for its relative value by those who have undergone genomic testing. A systematic review was conducted of the peer-reviewed literature reporting non-health-related outcomes of genomic testing from 1 January 2003 to 5 August 2016. Inclusion criteria specified English language, date of publication, and presence of empirical evidence. Identified outcomes were iteratively coded into unique domains. The search returned 551 abstracts from which 31 studies met the inclusion criteria. Study populations and type of genomic testing varied. Coding resulted in 15 distinct elements of personal utility, organized into three domains related to personal outcomes: affective, cognitive, and behavioral; and one domain related to social outcomes. The domains of personal utility may inform pre-test counseling by helping patients anticipate potential value of test results beyond clinical utility. Identified elements may also inform investigations into the prevalence and importance of personal utility to future test users.

  3. Clinical evaluation incorporating a personal genome

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Euan A.; Butte, Atul J.; Wheeler, Matthew T.; Chen, Rong; Klein, Teri E.; Dewey, Frederick E.; Dudley, Joel T.; Ormond, Kelly E.; Pavlovic, Aleksandra; Hudgins, Louanne; Gong, Li; Hodges, Laura M.; Berlin, Dorit S.; Thorn, Caroline F.; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Hebert, Joan M.; Woon, Mark; Sagreiya, Hersh; Whaley, Ryan; Morgan, Alexander A.; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Neff, Norma F; Knowles, Joshua W.; Chou, Mike; Thakuria, Joseph; Rosenbaum, Abraham; Zaranek, Alexander Wait; Church, George; Greely, Henry T.; Quake, Stephen R.; Altman, Russ B.

    2010-01-01

    Background The cost of genomic information has fallen steeply but the path to clinical translation of risk estimates for common variants found in genome wide association studies remains unclear. Since the speed and cost of sequencing complete genomes is rapidly declining, more comprehensive means of analyzing these data in concert with rare variants for genetic risk assessment and individualisation of therapy are required. Here, we present the first integrated analysis of a complete human genome in a clinical context. Methods An individual with a family history of vascular disease and early sudden death was evaluated. Clinical assessment included risk prediction for coronary artery disease, screening for causes of sudden cardiac death, and genetic counselling. Genetic analysis included the development of novel methods for the integration of whole genome sequence data including 2.6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms and 752 copy number variations. The algorithm focused on predicting genetic risk of genes associated with known Mendelian disease, recognised drug responses, and pathogenicity for novel variants. In addition, since integration of risk ratios derived from case control studies is challenging, we estimated posterior probabilities from age and sex appropriate prior probability and likelihood ratios derived for each genotype. In addition, we developed a visualisation approach to account for gene-environment interactions and conditionally dependent risks. Findings We found increased genetic risk for myocardial infarction, type II diabetes and certain cancers. Rare variants in LPA are consistent with the family history of coronary artery disease. Pharmacogenomic analysis suggested a positive response to lipid lowering therapy, likely clopidogrel resistance, and a low initial dosing requirement for warfarin. Many variants of uncertain significance were reported. Interpretation Although challenges remain, our results suggest that whole genome sequencing can

  4. Chemogenomics: a discipline at the crossroad of high throughput technologies, biomarker research, combinatorial chemistry, genomics, cheminformatics, bioinformatics and artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Chemogenomics is the study of the interaction of functional biological systems with exogenous small molecules, or in broader sense the study of the intersection of biological and chemical spaces. Chemogenomics requires expertises in biology, chemistry and computational sciences (bioinformatics, cheminformatics, large scale statistics and machine learning methods) but it is more than the simple apposition of each of these disciplines. Biological entities interacting with small molecules can be isolated proteins or more elaborate systems, from single cells to complete organisms. The biological space is therefore analyzed at various postgenomic levels (genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic or any phenotypic level). The space of small molecules is partially real, corresponding to commercial and academic collections of compounds, and partially virtual, corresponding to the chemical space possibly synthesizable. Synthetic chemistry has developed novel strategies allowing a physical exploration of this universe of possibilities. A major challenge of cheminformatics is to charter the virtual space of small molecules using realistic biological constraints (bioavailability, druggability, structural biological information). Chemogenomics is a descendent of conventional pharmaceutical approaches, since it involves the screening of chemolibraries for their effect on biological targets, and benefits from the advances in the corresponding enabling technologies and the introduction of new biological markers. Screening was originally motivated by the rigorous discovery of new drugs, neglecting and throwing away any molecule that would fail to meet the standards required for a therapeutic treatment. It is now the basis for the discovery of small molecules that might or might not be directly used as drugs, but which have an immense potential for basic research, as probes to explore an increasing number of biological phenomena. Concerns about the environmental impact of chemical industry

  5. Genome-wide bioinformatics analysis of steroid metabolism-associated genes in Nocardioides simplex VKM Ac-2033D.

    PubMed

    Shtratnikova, Victoria Y; Schelkunov, Mikhail I; Fokina, Victoria V; Pekov, Yury A; Ivashina, Tanya; Donova, Marina V

    2016-08-01

    Actinobacteria comprise diverse groups of bacteria capable of full degradation, or modification of different steroid compounds. Steroid catabolism has been characterized best for the representatives of suborder Corynebacterineae, such as Mycobacteria, Rhodococcus and Gordonia, with high content of mycolic acids in the cell envelope, while it is poorly understood for other steroid-transforming actinobacteria, such as representatives of Nocardioides genus belonging to suborder Propionibacterineae. Nocardioides simplex VKM Ac-2033D is an important biotechnological strain which is known for its ability to introduce ∆(1)-double bond in various 1(2)-saturated 3-ketosteroids, and perform convertion of 3β-hydroxy-5-ene steroids to 3-oxo-4-ene steroids, hydrolysis of acetylated steroids, reduction of carbonyl groups at C-17 and C-20 of androstanes and pregnanes, respectively. The strain is also capable of utilizing cholesterol and phytosterol as carbon and energy sources. In this study, a comprehensive bioinformatics genome-wide screening was carried out to predict genes related to steroid metabolism in this organism, their clustering and possible regulation. The predicted operon structure and number of candidate gene copies paralogs have been estimated. Binding sites of steroid catabolism regulators KstR and KstR2 specified for N. simplex VKM Ac-2033D have been calculated de novo. Most of the candidate genes grouped within three main clusters, one of the predicted clusters having no analogs in other actinobacteria studied so far. The results offer a base for further functional studies, expand the understanding of steroid catabolism by actinobacteria, and will contribute to modifying of metabolic pathways in order to generate effective biocatalysts capable of producing valuable bioactive steroids.

  6. lobSTR: A short tandem repeat profiler for personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gymrek, Melissa; Golan, David; Rosset, Saharon; Erlich, Yaniv

    2012-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) have a wide range of applications, including medical genetics, forensics, and genetic genealogy. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) has the potential to profile hundreds of thousands of STR loci. However, mainstream bioinformatics pipelines are inadequate for the task. These pipelines treat STR mapping as gapped alignment, which results in cumbersome processing times and a biased sampling of STR alleles. Here, we present lobSTR, a novel method for profiling STRs in personal genomes. lobSTR harnesses concepts from signal processing and statistical learning to avoid gapped alignment and to address the specific noise patterns in STR calling. The speed and reliability of lobSTR exceed the performance of current mainstream algorithms for STR profiling. We validated lobSTR's accuracy by measuring its consistency in calling STRs from whole-genome sequencing of two biological replicates from the same individual, by tracing Mendelian inheritance patterns in STR alleles in whole-genome sequencing of a HapMap trio, and by comparing lobSTR results to traditional molecular techniques. Encouraged by the speed and accuracy of lobSTR, we used the algorithm to conduct a comprehensive survey of STR variations in a deeply sequenced personal genome. We traced the mutation dynamics of close to 100,000 STR loci and observed more than 50,000 STR variations in a single genome. lobSTR's implementation is an end-to-end solution. The package accepts raw sequencing reads and provides the user with the genotyping results. It is written in C/C++, includes multi-threading capabilities, and is compatible with the BAM format. PMID:22522390

  7. Personal Genomic Testing for Cancer Risk: Results From the Impact of Personal Genomics Study.

    PubMed

    Gray, Stacy W; Gollust, Sarah E; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Chen, Clara A; Cronin, Angel; Kalia, Sarah S; Rana, Huma Q; Ruffin, Mack T; Wang, Catharine; Roberts, J Scott; Green, Robert C

    2017-02-20

    Purpose Significant concerns exist regarding the potential for unwarranted behavior changes and the overuse of health care resources in response to direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing (PGT). However, little is known about customers' behaviors after PGT. Methods Longitudinal surveys were given to new customers of 23andMe (Mountain View, CA) and Pathway Genomics (San Diego, CA). Survey data were linked to individual-level PGT results through a secure data transfer process. Results Of the 1,042 customers who completed baseline and 6-month surveys (response rate, 71.2%), 762 had complete cancer-related data and were analyzed. Most customers reported that learning about their genetic risk of cancers was a motivation for testing (colorectal, 88%; prostate, 95%; breast, 94%). No customers tested positive for pathogenic mutations in highly penetrant cancer susceptibility genes. A minority of individuals received elevated single nucleotide polymorphism-based PGT cancer risk estimates (colorectal, 24%; prostate, 24%; breast, 12%). At 6 months, customers who received elevated PGT cancer risk estimates were not significantly more likely to change their diet, exercise, or advanced planning behaviors or engage in cancer screening, compared with individuals at average or reduced risk. Men who received elevated PGT prostate cancer risk estimates changed their vitamin and supplement use more than those at average or reduced risk (22% v 7.6%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.44 to 8.18). Predictors of 6-month behavior include baseline behavior (exercise, vitamin or supplement use, and screening), worse health status (diet and vitamin or supplement use), and older age (advanced planning, screening). Conclusion Most adults receiving elevated direct-to-consumer PGT single nucleotide polymorphism-based cancer risk estimates did not significantly change their diet, exercise, advanced care planning, or cancer screening behaviors.

  8. Personalized genomic medicine: lessons from the exome.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Benjamin D; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel E; Hadley, Donald W; NISC Comparative Sequencing Program; Teer, Jamie K; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Hansen, Nancy F; Cruz, Pedro; Young, Alice C; Blakesley, Robert W; Lanpher, Brendan; Mayfield Gibson, Stephanie; Sincan, Murat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Mullikin, James C

    2011-01-01

    While genomic sequencing methods are powerful tools in the discovery of the genetic underpinnings of human disease, incidentally-revealed novel genomic risk factors may be equally important, both scientifically, and as relates to direct patient care. We performed whole-exome sequencing on a child with VACTERL association who suffered severe post-surgical neonatal pulmonary hypertension, and identified a potential novel genetic risk factor for this complication: a heterozygous mutation in CPSI. Newborn screening results from this patient's monozygotic twin provided evidence that this mutation, in combination with an environmental trigger (in this case, surgery), may have resulted in pulmonary artery hypertension due to inadequate nitric oxide production. Identification of this genetic risk factor allows for targeted medical preventative measures in this patient as well as relatives with the same mutation, and illustrates the power of incidental medical information unearthed by whole-exome sequencing.

  9. Pharmacogenetics--genomics and personalized psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Möller, H J; Rujescu, D

    2010-06-01

    Pharmacogenetic influences on therapeutic response to e.g. antidepressant or neuroleptic treatment are poorly understood and the lack of efficacy in many of the patients together with side effects can both limit therapy and compliance. Thus the aim of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics is to provide predictive tools for the response to psychopharmacologic agents in the therapy of psychiatric disorders and in that ways to provide a real personalized psychiatry. The following review will summarize the current stage of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics and will critically discuss the possibilities of a personalized medicine.

  10. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema

    Gray, Joe

    2016-07-12

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  11. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  12. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-07

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  13. A security system for personal genome information at DNA level.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Yumi; Shiba, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Masahito; Ohuchi, Azuma

    2002-01-01

    The personal information encoded in genomic DNA should not be made available to the public. With the increasing discoveries of new genes, it has become necessary to establish a security system for personal genome information. Although many security systems that are applied for electrical information in computers have been developed and established, there is no security system for information at DNA level. In this paper, we describe a new security system for information encoded within DNA. The original genomic DNA was mixed with many kinds of dummy DNAs (mixtures of natural and/or artificial DNAs) resulting in the masking of the original information. Using these dummy molecules, we succeeded to completely 'lock'the original genome information. If this information must be 'unlocked', it can be extracted and analyzed by a removal of dummy DNAs using molecular tagging techniques or by selective amplification using key primers.

  14. Bioinformatics for Genome Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gary J. Olsen

    2005-06-30

    Nesbo, Boucher and Doolittle (2001) used phylogenetic trees of four taxa to assess whether euryarchaeal genes share a common history. They have suggested that of the 521 genes examined, each of the three possible tree topologies relating the four taxa was supported essentially equal numbers of times. They suggest that this might be the result of numerous horizontal gene transfer events, essentially randomizing the relationships between gene histories (as inferred in the 521 gene trees) and organismal relationships (which would be a single underlying tree). Motivated by the fact that the order in which sequences are added to a multiple sequence alignment influences the alignment, and ultimately inferred tree, they were interested in the extent to which the variations among inferred trees might be due to variations in the alignment order. This bears directly on their efforts to evaluate and improve upon methods of multiple sequence alignment. They set out to analyze the influence of alignment order on the tree inferred for 43 genes shared among these same 4 taxa. Because alignments produced by CLUSTALW are directed by a rooted guide tree (the denderogram), there are 15 possible alignment orders of 4 taxa. For each gene they tested all 15 alignment orders, and as a 16th option, allowed CLUSTALW to generate its own guide tree. If we supply all 15 possible rooted guide trees, they expected that at least one of them should be as good at CLUSTAL's own guide tree, but most of the time they differed (sometimes being better than CLUSTAL's default tree and sometimes being worse). The difference seems to be that the user-supplied tree is not given meaningful branch lengths, which effect the assumed probability of amino acid changes. They examined the practicality of modifying CLUSTALW to improve its treatment of user-supplied guide trees. This work became ever increasing bogged down in finding and repairing minor bugs in the CLUSTALW code. This effort was put on hold as we feel that our other proposed approaches will ultimately be better.

  15. Implementing personalized cancer genomics in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2013-05-01

    The recent surge in high-throughput sequencing of cancer genomes has supported an expanding molecular classification of cancer. These studies have identified putative predictive biomarkers signifying aberrant oncogene pathway activation and may provide a rationale for matching patients with molecularly targeted therapies in clinical trials. Here, we discuss some of the challenges of adapting these data for rare cancers or molecular subsets of certain cancers, which will require aligning the availability of investigational agents, rapid turnaround of clinical grade sequencing, molecular eligibility and reconsidering clinical trial design and end points.

  16. Overview of the Development of Personalized Genomic Medicine and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David A.; Nemunaitis, John; Fisher, William; Goss, John; Chen, Changyi

    2012-01-01

    Personalized genomic medicine and surgery (PGMS) represents a new approach to health care that customizes patients’ medical treatment according to their own genetic information. This new approach is the result of increased knowledge of the human genome and ways this information can be applied by physicians in the medical and surgical management of their patients. A patient’s genotype can yield important information concerning disease susceptibility and the effectiveness of medications, therefore guiding specific, targeted imaging and treatment therapies. This review summarizes major achievements of human genomic studies and applications of genomics in health care. Five years ago we developed a model for the development of PGMS in which genomic profile guides choice of therapy. In this article we discussed our progress, including an updating of the model, and a future vision of PGMS. PMID:21424870

  17. Genomic approach towards personalized anticancer drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Yutaka; Tsuji, Shingo; Takayama, Tadatoshi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Stratification of patients for multidrug response is a promising strategy for cancer treatment. Genome-based prediction models have great potential for this purpose because the extent of drug sensitivity may be attributed to the heterogeneity of the underlying genetic characteristics of cancer. However, microarray data is difficult to analyze and is not reproducible. Several machine-learning algorithms have therefore been developed in a repeatable manner. Random forests algorithm, which uses an ensemble approach based on classification and regression trees, appears to be superior for predicting multidrug sensitivity. This is because ensemble methods are more effective when there are much more predictors than samples. Here, we review recent advances in the development of classification algorithms using microarray technology for prediction of anticancer sensitivity, discuss the availability of ensemble methods for prediction models, and present data regarding the identification of potential responders to FOLFOX therapy using random forests algorithm.

  18. hfAIM: A reliable bioinformatics approach for in silico genome-wide identification of autophagy-associated Atg8-interacting motifs in various organisms.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingjun; Tzfadia, Oren; Levy, Matan; Weithorn, Efrat; Peled-Zehavi, Hadas; Van Parys, Thomas; Van de Peer, Yves; Galili, Gad

    2016-05-03

    Most of the proteins that are specifically turned over by selective autophagy are recognized by the presence of short Atg8 interacting motifs (AIMs) that facilitate their association with the autophagy apparatus. Such AIMs can be identified by bioinformatics methods based on their defined degenerate consensus F/W/Y-X-X-L/I/V sequences in which X represents any amino acid. Achieving reliability and/or fidelity of the prediction of such AIMs on a genome-wide scale represents a major challenge. Here, we present a bioinformatics approach, high fidelity AIM (hfAIM), which uses additional sequence requirements-the presence of acidic amino acids and the absence of positively charged amino acids in certain positions-to reliably identify AIMs in proteins. We demonstrate that the use of the hfAIM method allows for in silico high fidelity prediction of AIMs in AIM-containing proteins (ACPs) on a genome-wide scale in various organisms. Furthermore, by using hfAIM to identify putative AIMs in the Arabidopsis proteome, we illustrate a potential contribution of selective autophagy to various biological processes. More specifically, we identified 9 peroxisomal PEX proteins that contain hfAIM motifs, among which AtPEX1, AtPEX6 and AtPEX10 possess evolutionary-conserved AIMs. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) results verified that AtPEX6 and AtPEX10 indeed interact with Atg8 in planta. In addition, we show that mutations occurring within or nearby hfAIMs in PEX1, PEX6 and PEX10 caused defects in the growth and development of various organisms. Taken together, the above results suggest that the hfAIM tool can be used to effectively perform genome-wide in silico screens of proteins that are potentially regulated by selective autophagy. The hfAIM system is a web tool that can be accessed at link: http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/hfAIM/.

  19. The clinical potential and challenges of sequencing cancer genomes for personalized medical genomics.

    PubMed

    Cloonan, Nicole; Waddell, Nic; Grimmond, Sean M

    2010-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing is revolutionizing the way in which genomic-scale biological research is performed, and its effects are beginning to be translated medically. Large-scale international collaborations for the comprehensive sequencing of the genome, epigenome, and transcriptomes of cancers and corresponding 'normal' (germ-line) DNA are heralding the start of personalized medical genomics. The promise of eliminating conjecture when determining treatment approaches is certainly appealing for both patients and clinicians; however, several major issues must be resolved before next-generation sequencing will be adopted as a routine clinical tool for patients. This feature review explores the clinical potential and challenges of studying cancer genomes for personalized medical genomics.

  20. Anticipation of Personal Genomics Data Enhances Interest and Learning Environment in Genomics and Molecular Biology Undergraduate Courses.

    PubMed

    Weber, K Scott; Jensen, Jamie L; Johnson, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    An important discussion at colleges is centered on determining more effective models for teaching undergraduates. As personalized genomics has become more common, we hypothesized it could be a valuable tool to make science education more hands on, personal, and engaging for college undergraduates. We hypothesized that providing students with personal genome testing kits would enhance the learning experience of students in two undergraduate courses at Brigham Young University: Advanced Molecular Biology and Genomics. These courses have an emphasis on personal genomics the last two weeks of the semester. Students taking these courses were given the option to receive personal genomics kits in 2014, whereas in 2015 they were not. Students sent their personal genomics samples in on their own and received the data after the course ended. We surveyed students in these courses before and after the two-week emphasis on personal genomics to collect data on whether anticipation of obtaining their own personal genomic data impacted undergraduate student learning. We also tested to see if specific personal genomic assignments improved the learning experience by analyzing the data from the undergraduate students who completed both the pre- and post-course surveys. Anticipation of personal genomic data significantly enhanced student interest and the learning environment based on the time students spent researching personal genomic material and their self-reported attitudes compared to those who did not anticipate getting their own data. Personal genomics homework assignments significantly enhanced the undergraduate student interest and learning based on the same criteria and a personal genomics quiz. We found that for the undergraduate students in both molecular biology and genomics courses, incorporation of personal genomic testing can be an effective educational tool in undergraduate science education.

  1. Anticipation of Personal Genomics Data Enhances Interest and Learning Environment in Genomics and Molecular Biology Undergraduate Courses

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Jensen, Jamie L.; Johnson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    An important discussion at colleges is centered on determining more effective models for teaching undergraduates. As personalized genomics has become more common, we hypothesized it could be a valuable tool to make science education more hands on, personal, and engaging for college undergraduates. We hypothesized that providing students with personal genome testing kits would enhance the learning experience of students in two undergraduate courses at Brigham Young University: Advanced Molecular Biology and Genomics. These courses have an emphasis on personal genomics the last two weeks of the semester. Students taking these courses were given the option to receive personal genomics kits in 2014, whereas in 2015 they were not. Students sent their personal genomics samples in on their own and received the data after the course ended. We surveyed students in these courses before and after the two-week emphasis on personal genomics to collect data on whether anticipation of obtaining their own personal genomic data impacted undergraduate student learning. We also tested to see if specific personal genomic assignments improved the learning experience by analyzing the data from the undergraduate students who completed both the pre- and post-course surveys. Anticipation of personal genomic data significantly enhanced student interest and the learning environment based on the time students spent researching personal genomic material and their self-reported attitudes compared to those who did not anticipate getting their own data. Personal genomics homework assignments significantly enhanced the undergraduate student interest and learning based on the same criteria and a personal genomics quiz. We found that for the undergraduate students in both molecular biology and genomics courses, incorporation of personal genomic testing can be an effective educational tool in undergraduate science education. PMID:26241308

  2. Re-Examining the Gene in Personalized Genomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartol, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Personalized genomics companies (PG; also called "direct-to-consumer genetics") are businesses marketing genetic testing to consumers over the Internet. While much has been written about these new businesses, little attention has been given to their roles in science communication. This paper provides an analysis of the gene concept…

  3. Human genome and the african personality: implications for social work.

    PubMed

    Mickel, Elijah; Miller, Sheila D

    2011-01-01

    The integration of the human genome with the African personality should be viewed as an interdependent whole. The African personality, for purposes of this article, comprises Black experiences, Negritude, and an Africa-centered axiology and epistemology. The outcome results in a spiritual focused collective consciousness. Anthropologically, historically (and with the Human Genome Project), genetically Africa has proven to be the source of all human life. Human kind wherever they exist on the planet using the African personality must be viewed as interconnected. Although racism and its progeny discrimination preexist the human genome project (HGP), the human genome provides an evidence-based rationale for the end to all policy and subsequent practice based on race and racism. Policy must be based on evidence to be competent practice. It would be remiss if not irresponsible of social work and the other behavioral scientist concerned with intervention and prevention behaviors to not infuse the findings of the HCPs. The African personality is a concept that provides a wholistic way to evaluate human behavior from an African worldview.

  4. Re-Examining the Gene in Personalized Genomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartol, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Personalized genomics companies (PG; also called "direct-to-consumer genetics") are businesses marketing genetic testing to consumers over the Internet. While much has been written about these new businesses, little attention has been given to their roles in science communication. This paper provides an analysis of the gene concept…

  5. Assessing structural variation in a personal genome-towards a human reference diploid genome.

    PubMed

    English, Adam C; Salerno, William J; Hampton, Oliver A; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Ambreth, Shruthi; Ritter, Deborah I; Beck, Christine R; Davis, Caleb F; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Ma, Singer; Carroll, Andrew; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Bruestle, Jeremy; Drees, Becky; Hastie, Alex; Lam, Ernest T; White, Simon; Mishra, Pamela; Wang, Min; Han, Yi; Zhang, Feng; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Wheeler, David A; Reid, Jeffrey G; Muzny, Donna M; Rogers, Jeffrey; Sabo, Aniko; Worley, Kim C; Lupski, James R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A

    2015-04-11

    Characterizing large genomic variants is essential to expanding the research and clinical applications of genome sequencing. While multiple data types and methods are available to detect these structural variants (SVs), they remain less characterized than smaller variants because of SV diversity, complexity, and size. These challenges are exacerbated by the experimental and computational demands of SV analysis. Here, we characterize the SV content of a personal genome with Parliament, a publicly available consensus SV-calling infrastructure that merges multiple data types and SV detection methods. We demonstrate Parliament's efficacy via integrated analyses of data from whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization, short-read next-generation sequencing, long-read (Pacific BioSciences RSII), long-insert (Illumina Nextera), and whole-genome architecture (BioNano Irys) data from the personal genome of a single subject (HS1011). From this genome, Parliament identified 31,007 genomic loci between 100 bp and 1 Mbp that are inconsistent with the hg19 reference assembly. Of these loci, 9,777 are supported as putative SVs by hybrid local assembly, long-read PacBio data, or multi-source heuristics. These SVs span 59 Mbp of the reference genome (1.8%) and include 3,801 events identified only with long-read data. The HS1011 data and complete Parliament infrastructure, including a BAM-to-SV workflow, are available on the cloud-based service DNAnexus. HS1011 SV analysis reveals the limits and advantages of multiple sequencing technologies, specifically the impact of long-read SV discovery. With the full Parliament infrastructure, the HS1011 data constitute a public resource for novel SV discovery, software calibration, and personal genome structural variation analysis.

  6. Making Personalized Health Care Even More Personalized: Insights From Activities of the IOM Genomics Roundtable.

    PubMed

    David, Sean P; Johnson, Samuel G; Berger, Adam C; Feero, W Gregory; Terry, Sharon F; Green, Larry A; Phillips, Robert L; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Genomic research has generated much new knowledge into mechanisms of human disease, with the potential to catalyze novel drug discovery and development, prenatal and neonatal screening, clinical pharmacogenomics, more sensitive risk prediction, and enhanced diagnostics. Genomic medicine, however, has been limited by critical evidence gaps, especially those related to clinical utility and applicability to diverse populations. Genomic medicine may have the greatest impact on health care if it is integrated into primary care, where most health care is received and where evidence supports the value of personalized medicine grounded in continuous healing relationships. Redesigned primary care is the most relevant setting for clinically useful genomic medicine research. Taking insights gained from the activities of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health, we apply lessons learned from the patient-centered medical home national experience to implement genomic medicine in a patient-centered, learning health care system.

  7. Making Personalized Health Care Even More Personalized: Insights From Activities of the IOM Genomics Roundtable

    PubMed Central

    David, Sean P.; Johnson, Samuel G.; Berger, Adam C.; Feero, W. Gregory; Terry, Sharon F.; Green, Larry A.; Phillips, Robert L.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic research has generated much new knowledge into mechanisms of human disease, with the potential to catalyze novel drug discovery and development, prenatal and neonatal screening, clinical pharmacogenomics, more sensitive risk prediction, and enhanced diagnostics. Genomic medicine, however, has been limited by critical evidence gaps, especially those related to clinical utility and applicability to diverse populations. Genomic medicine may have the greatest impact on health care if it is integrated into primary care, where most health care is received and where evidence supports the value of personalized medicine grounded in continuous healing relationships. Redesigned primary care is the most relevant setting for clinically useful genomic medicine research. Taking insights gained from the activities of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health, we apply lessons learned from the patient-centered medical home national experience to implement genomic medicine in a patient-centered, learning health care system. PMID:26195686

  8. The whole genome sequences and experimentally phased haplotypes of over 100 personal genomes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qing; Ciotlos, Serban; Zhang, Rebecca Yu; Ball, Madeleine P; Chin, Robert; Carnevali, Paolo; Barua, Nina; Nguyen, Staci; Agarwal, Misha R; Clegg, Tom; Connelly, Abram; Vandewege, Ward; Zaranek, Alexander Wait; Estep, Preston W; Church, George M; Drmanac, Radoje; Peters, Brock A

    2016-10-11

    Since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, it is estimated that more than 200,000 individual whole human genomes have been sequenced. A stunning accomplishment in such a short period of time. However, most of these were sequenced without experimental haplotype data and are therefore missing an important aspect of genome biology. In addition, much of the genomic data is not available to the public and lacks phenotypic information. As part of the Personal Genome Project, blood samples from 184 participants were collected and processed using Complete Genomics' Long Fragment Read technology. Here, we present the experimental whole genome haplotyping and sequencing of these samples to an average read coverage depth of 100X. This is approximately three-fold higher than the read coverage applied to most whole human genome assemblies and ensures the highest quality results. Currently, 114 genomes from this dataset are freely available in the GigaDB repository and are associated with rich phenotypic data; the remaining 70 should be added in the near future as they are approved through the PGP data release process. For reproducibility analyses, 20 genomes were sequenced at least twice using independent LFR barcoded libraries. Seven genomes were also sequenced using Complete Genomics' standard non-barcoded library process. In addition, we report 2.6 million high-quality, rare variants not previously identified in the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms database or the 1000 Genomes Project Phase 3 data. These genomes represent a unique source of haplotype and phenotype data for the scientific community and should help to expand our understanding of human genome evolution and function.

  9. Education and personalized genomics: deciphering the public's genetic health report

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Neil E; Myers, Richard M; Gunter, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Where do members of the public turn to understand what genetic tests mean in terms of their own health? Now that genome-wide association studies and complete genome sequencing are widely available, the importance of education in personalized genomics cannot be overstated. Although some media have introduced the concept of genetic testing to better understand health and disease, the public's understanding of the scope and impact of genetic variation has not kept up with the pace of the science or technology. Unfortunately, the likely sources to which the public turn to for guidance – their physician and the media – are often no better prepared. We examine several venues for information, including print and online guides for both lay and health-oriented audiences, and summarize selected resources in multiple formats. We also note on the roadblocks to progress and discuss ways to remove them, as urgent action is needed to connect people with their genomes in a meaningful way. PMID:20161675

  10. Discover hidden splicing variations by mapping personal transcriptomes to personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Shayna; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Park, Juw Won; Xing, Yi

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq has become a popular technology for studying genetic variation of pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Commonly used RNA-seq aligners rely on the consensus splice site dinucleotide motifs to map reads across splice junctions. Consequently, genomic variants that create novel splice site dinucleotides may produce splice junction RNA-seq reads that cannot be mapped to the reference genome. We developed and evaluated an approach to identify ‘hidden’ splicing variations in personal transcriptomes, by mapping personal RNA-seq data to personal genomes. Computational analysis and experimental validation indicate that this approach identifies personal specific splice junctions at a low false positive rate. Applying this approach to an RNA-seq data set of 75 individuals, we identified 506 personal specific splice junctions, among which 437 were novel splice junctions not documented in current human transcript annotations. 94 splice junctions had splice site SNPs associated with GWAS signals of human traits and diseases. These involve genes whose splicing variations have been implicated in diseases (such as OAS1), as well as novel associations between alternative splicing and diseases (such as ICA1). Collectively, our work demonstrates that the personal genome approach to RNA-seq read alignment enables the discovery of a large but previously unknown catalog of splicing variations in human populations. PMID:26578562

  11. Cloud BioLinux: pre-configured and on-demand bioinformatics computing for the genomics community.

    PubMed

    Krampis, Konstantinos; Booth, Tim; Chapman, Brad; Tiwari, Bela; Bicak, Mesude; Field, Dawn; Nelson, Karen E

    2012-03-19

    A steep drop in the cost of next-generation sequencing during recent years has made the technology affordable to the majority of researchers, but downstream bioinformatic analysis still poses a resource bottleneck for smaller laboratories and institutes that do not have access to substantial computational resources. Sequencing instruments are typically bundled with only the minimal processing and storage capacity required for data capture during sequencing runs. Given the scale of sequence datasets, scientific value cannot be obtained from acquiring a sequencer unless it is accompanied by an equal investment in informatics infrastructure. Cloud BioLinux is a publicly accessible Virtual Machine (VM) that enables scientists to quickly provision on-demand infrastructures for high-performance bioinformatics computing using cloud platforms. Users have instant access to a range of pre-configured command line and graphical software applications, including a full-featured desktop interface, documentation and over 135 bioinformatics packages for applications including sequence alignment, clustering, assembly, display, editing, and phylogeny. Each tool's functionality is fully described in the documentation directly accessible from the graphical interface of the VM. Besides the Amazon EC2 cloud, we have started instances of Cloud BioLinux on a private Eucalyptus cloud installed at the J. Craig Venter Institute, and demonstrated access to the bioinformatic tools interface through a remote connection to EC2 instances from a local desktop computer. Documentation for using Cloud BioLinux on EC2 is available from our project website, while a Eucalyptus cloud image and VirtualBox Appliance is also publicly available for download and use by researchers with access to private clouds. Cloud BioLinux provides a platform for developing bioinformatics infrastructures on the cloud. An automated and configurable process builds Virtual Machines, allowing the development of highly

  12. Cloud BioLinux: pre-configured and on-demand bioinformatics computing for the genomics community

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A steep drop in the cost of next-generation sequencing during recent years has made the technology affordable to the majority of researchers, but downstream bioinformatic analysis still poses a resource bottleneck for smaller laboratories and institutes that do not have access to substantial computational resources. Sequencing instruments are typically bundled with only the minimal processing and storage capacity required for data capture during sequencing runs. Given the scale of sequence datasets, scientific value cannot be obtained from acquiring a sequencer unless it is accompanied by an equal investment in informatics infrastructure. Results Cloud BioLinux is a publicly accessible Virtual Machine (VM) that enables scientists to quickly provision on-demand infrastructures for high-performance bioinformatics computing using cloud platforms. Users have instant access to a range of pre-configured command line and graphical software applications, including a full-featured desktop interface, documentation and over 135 bioinformatics packages for applications including sequence alignment, clustering, assembly, display, editing, and phylogeny. Each tool's functionality is fully described in the documentation directly accessible from the graphical interface of the VM. Besides the Amazon EC2 cloud, we have started instances of Cloud BioLinux on a private Eucalyptus cloud installed at the J. Craig Venter Institute, and demonstrated access to the bioinformatic tools interface through a remote connection to EC2 instances from a local desktop computer. Documentation for using Cloud BioLinux on EC2 is available from our project website, while a Eucalyptus cloud image and VirtualBox Appliance is also publicly available for download and use by researchers with access to private clouds. Conclusions Cloud BioLinux provides a platform for developing bioinformatics infrastructures on the cloud. An automated and configurable process builds Virtual Machines, allowing the

  13. Identification of conserved and polymorphic STRs for personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Short tandem repeats (STRs) are abundant in human genomes. Numerous STRs have been shown to be associated with genetic diseases and gene regulatory functions, and have been selected as genetic markers for evolutionary and forensic analyses. High-throughput next generation sequencers have fostered new cutting-edge computing techniques for genome-scale analyses, and cross-genome comparisons have facilitated the efficient identification of polymorphic STR markers for various applications. Results An automated and efficient system for detecting human polymorphic STRs at the genome scale is proposed in this study. Assembled contigs from next generation sequencing data were aligned and calibrated according to selected reference sequences. To verify identified polymorphic STRs, human genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project were employed for comprehensive analyses, and STR markers from the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and disease-related STR motifs were also applied as cases for evaluation. In addition, we analyzed STR variations for highly conserved homologous genes and human-unique genes. In total 477 polymorphic STRs were identified from 492 human-unique genes, among which 26 STRs were retrieved and clustered into three different groups for efficient comparison. Conclusions We have developed an online system that efficiently identifies polymorphic STRs and provides novel distinguishable STR biomarkers for different levels of specificity. Candidate polymorphic STRs within a personal genome could be easily retrieved and compared to the constructed STR profile through query keywords, gene names, or assembled contigs. PMID:25560225

  14. Harvard Personal Genome Project: lessons from participatory public research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since its initiation in 2005, the Harvard Personal Genome Project has enrolled thousands of volunteers interested in publicly sharing their genome, health and trait data. Because these data are highly identifiable, we use an ‘open consent’ framework that purposefully excludes promises about privacy and requires participants to demonstrate comprehension prior to enrollment. Discussion Our model of non-anonymous, public genomes has led us to a highly participatory model of researcher-participant communication and interaction. The participants, who are highly committed volunteers, self-pursue and donate research-relevant datasets, and are actively engaged in conversations with both our staff and other Personal Genome Project participants. We have quantitatively assessed these communications and donations, and report our experiences with returning research-grade whole genome data to participants. We also observe some of the community growth and discussion that has occurred related to our project. Summary We find that public non-anonymous data is valuable and leads to a participatory research model, which we encourage others to consider. The implementation of this model is greatly facilitated by web-based tools and methods and participant education. Project results are long-term proactive participant involvement and the growth of a community that benefits both researchers and participants. PMID:24713084

  15. In cereo and in silico: tissue microarray (TMA) techniques and bioinformatics are thriving forces in medical science and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Lang, E

    2010-01-01

    Tissue microarray (TMA) techniques are among the most promising developments in biomedicine during the last decade. Bioinformatics techniques are indispensable for storing and processing the masses of data related with tissue archive administration and investigation of raw data. Interrelationship between experimental and computational work will be shown. Tissue specimen arrays allow parallel analysis of huge amounts of samples. TMA techniques thus produce enormous masses of raw data, and optimal use of data can only be made using modern bioinformatics techniques based on huge storage systems, scalable multilayer software architecture and high-throughput algorithms for retrieval and statistical processing. Further crucial issues addressed by informatics techniques are specimen identification during the whole processing chain, and anonymization whenever scientific work is performed without regard to a certain patient. TMA supported by bioinformatics methods has helped in identification of biomarkers, mainly in cancer diagnosis. Moreover, it provides powerful means of quality assurance and training in histopathology. Further statistical analyses seem to be necessary to detect if certain biomarkers are present in nearly all kinds of specimen of the concerned patient, which would allow effective mass screening based on easily accessible specimen. Some investigations showed low dependence on the specimen localization, whereas others suggest to be extremely careful in material selection for the recipient block.

  16. Defining personal utility in genomics: A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Kohler, J; Turbitt, E; Lewis, K L; Wilfond, B S; Jamal, L; Peay, H L; Biesecker, L G; Biesecker, B B

    2017-02-20

    Individual genome sequencing results are valued by patients in ways distinct from clinical utility. Such outcomes have been described as components of "personal utility," a concept that broadly encompasses patient-endorsed benefits, that is operationally defined as non-clinical outcomes. No empirical delineation of these outcomes has been reported. To address this gap, we administered a Delphi survey to adult participants in a NIH clinical exome study to extract the most highly endorsed outcomes constituting personal utility. Forty research participants responded to a Delphi survey to rate 35 items identified by a systematic literature review of personal utility. Two rounds of ranking resulted in 24 items that represented 14 distinct elements of personal utility. Elements most highly endorsed by participants were: increased self-knowledge, knowledge of "the condition," altruism, and anticipated coping. Our findings represent the first systematic effort to delineate elements of personal utility that may be used to anticipate participant expectation and inform genetic counseling prior to sequencing. The 24 items reported need to be studied further in additional clinical genome sequencing studies to assess generalizability in other populations. Further research will help to understand motivations and to predict the meaning and use of results.

  17. SNPedia: a wiki supporting personal genome annotation, interpretation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Cariaso, Michael; Lennon, Greg

    2012-01-01

    SNPedia (http://www.SNPedia.com) is a wiki resource of the functional consequences of human genetic variation as published in peer-reviewed studies. Online since 2006 and freely available for personal use, SNPedia has focused on the medical, phenotypic and genealogical associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Entries are formatted to allow associations to be assigned to single genotypes as well as sets of genotypes (genosets). In this article, we discuss the growth of this resource and its use by affiliated software to create personal genome reports.

  18. Comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae genomes to investigate underlying population structure and type-specific determinants.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maureen H; Desai, Heta P; Morrison, Shatavia S; Benitez, Alvaro J; Wolff, Bernard J; Caravas, Jason; Read, Timothy D; Dean, Deborah; Winchell, Jonas M

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a significant cause of respiratory illness worldwide. Despite a minimal and highly conserved genome, genetic diversity within the species may impact disease. We performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of 107 M. pneumoniae isolates, including 67 newly sequenced using the Pacific BioSciences RS II and/or Illumina MiSeq sequencing platforms. Comparative genomic analysis of 107 genomes revealed >3,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in total, including 520 type-specific SNPs. Population structure analysis supported the existence of six distinct subgroups, three within each type. We developed a predictive model to classify an isolate based on whole genome SNPs called against the reference genome into the identified subtypes, obviating the need for genome assembly. This study is the most comprehensive WGS analysis for M. pneumoniae to date, underscoring the power of combining complementary sequencing technologies to overcome difficult-to-sequence regions and highlighting potential differential genomic signatures in M. pneumoniae.

  19. Illuminating the Black Box of Genome Sequence Assembly: A Free Online Tool to Introduce Students to Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, D. Leland; Campbell, A. Malcolm; Heyer, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have greatly reduced the cost of sequencing genomes. With the current sequencing technology, a genome is broken into fragments and sequenced, producing millions of "reads." A computer algorithm pieces these reads together in the genome assembly process. PHAST is a set of online modules…

  20. Illuminating the Black Box of Genome Sequence Assembly: A Free Online Tool to Introduce Students to Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, D. Leland; Campbell, A. Malcolm; Heyer, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have greatly reduced the cost of sequencing genomes. With the current sequencing technology, a genome is broken into fragments and sequenced, producing millions of "reads." A computer algorithm pieces these reads together in the genome assembly process. PHAST is a set of online modules…

  1. Personalized Genomic Medicine and the Rhetoric of Empowerment

    PubMed Central

    Juengst, Eric T.; Flatt, Michael A.; Settersten, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Advocates of “personalized” genomic medicine maintain that it is revolutionary not just in what it can reveal to us, but in how it will enable us to take control of our health. But we should not assume that patient empowerment always yields positive outcomes. To assess the social impact of personalized medicine, we must anticipate how the virtue might go awry in practice. PMID:22976411

  2. Biology in 'silico': The Bioinformatics Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Explains the Human Genome Project (HGP) and efforts to sequence the human genome. Describes the role of bioinformatics in the project and considers it the genetics Swiss Army Knife, which has many different uses, for use in forensic science, medicine, agriculture, and environmental sciences. Discusses the use of bioinformatics in the high school…

  3. Biology in 'silico': The Bioinformatics Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Explains the Human Genome Project (HGP) and efforts to sequence the human genome. Describes the role of bioinformatics in the project and considers it the genetics Swiss Army Knife, which has many different uses, for use in forensic science, medicine, agriculture, and environmental sciences. Discusses the use of bioinformatics in the high school…

  4. MISIS-2: A bioinformatics tool for in-depth analysis of small RNAs and representation of consensus master genome in viral quasispecies.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Jonathan; Otten, Patricia; Baerlocher, Loïc; Farinelli, Laurent; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2016-07-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA (sRNA) molecules such as miRNAs, siRNAs and piRNAs regulate gene expression and repress transposons and viruses. AGO/PIWI family proteins sort functional sRNAs based on size, 5'-nucleotide and other sequence features. In plants and some animals, viral sRNAs are extremely diverse and cover the entire viral genome sequences, which allows for de novo reconstruction of a complete viral genome by deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of viral sRNAs. Previously, we have developed a tool MISIS to view and analyze sRNA maps of viruses and cellular genome regions which spawn multiple sRNAs. Here we describe a new release of MISIS, MISIS-2, which enables to determine and visualize a consensus sequence and count sRNAs of any chosen sizes and 5'-terminal nucleotide identities. Furthermore we demonstrate the utility of MISIS-2 for identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at each position of a reference sequence and reconstruction of a consensus master genome in evolving viral quasispecies. MISIS-2 is a Java standalone program. It is freely available along with the source code at the website http://www.fasteris.com/apps.

  5. hfAIM: A reliable bioinformatics approach for in silico genome-wide identification of autophagy-associated Atg8-interacting motifs in various organisms

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qingjun; Tzfadia, Oren; Levy, Matan; Weithorn, Efrat; Peled-Zehavi, Hadas; Van Parys, Thomas; Van de Peer, Yves; Galili, Gad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most of the proteins that are specifically turned over by selective autophagy are recognized by the presence of short Atg8 interacting motifs (AIMs) that facilitate their association with the autophagy apparatus. Such AIMs can be identified by bioinformatics methods based on their defined degenerate consensus F/W/Y-X-X-L/I/V sequences in which X represents any amino acid. Achieving reliability and/or fidelity of the prediction of such AIMs on a genome-wide scale represents a major challenge. Here, we present a bioinformatics approach, high fidelity AIM (hfAIM), which uses additional sequence requirements—the presence of acidic amino acids and the absence of positively charged amino acids in certain positions—to reliably identify AIMs in proteins. We demonstrate that the use of the hfAIM method allows for in silico high fidelity prediction of AIMs in AIM-containing proteins (ACPs) on a genome-wide scale in various organisms. Furthermore, by using hfAIM to identify putative AIMs in the Arabidopsis proteome, we illustrate a potential contribution of selective autophagy to various biological processes. More specifically, we identified 9 peroxisomal PEX proteins that contain hfAIM motifs, among which AtPEX1, AtPEX6 and AtPEX10 possess evolutionary-conserved AIMs. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) results verified that AtPEX6 and AtPEX10 indeed interact with Atg8 in planta. In addition, we show that mutations occurring within or nearby hfAIMs in PEX1, PEX6 and PEX10 caused defects in the growth and development of various organisms. Taken together, the above results suggest that the hfAIM tool can be used to effectively perform genome-wide in silico screens of proteins that are potentially regulated by selective autophagy. The hfAIM system is a web tool that can be accessed at link: http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/hfAIM/. PMID:27071037

  6. SpeedSeq: Ultra-fast personal genome analysis and interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Colby; Layer, Ryan M.; Faust, Gregory G.; Lindberg, Michael R.; Rose, David B.; Garrison, Erik P.; Marth, Gabor T.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Hall, Ira M.

    2015-01-01

    SpeedSeq is an open-source genome analysis platform that accomplishes alignment, variant detection and functional annotation of a 50× human genome in 13 hours on a low-cost server, alleviating a bioinformatics bottleneck that typically demands weeks of computation with extensive hands-on expert involvement. SpeedSeq offers competitive or superior performance to current methods for detecting germline and somatic single nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, and includes novel functionality for streamlined interpretation. PMID:26258291

  7. Bioinformatics Pipelines for Targeted Resequencing and Whole-Exome Sequencing of Human and Mouse Genomes: A Virtual Appliance Approach for Instant Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Isaam; Wong, Stephen Q.; Mar, Victoria; Goode, David L.; Caramia, Franco; Doig, Ken; Ryland, Georgina L.; Thompson, Ella R.; Hunter, Sally M.; Halgamuge, Saman K.; Ellul, Jason; Dobrovic, Alexander; Campbell, Ian G.; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; McArthur, Grant A.; Tothill, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted resequencing by massively parallel sequencing has become an effective and affordable way to survey small to large portions of the genome for genetic variation. Despite the rapid development in open source software for analysis of such data, the practical implementation of these tools through construction of sequencing analysis pipelines still remains a challenging and laborious activity, and a major hurdle for many small research and clinical laboratories. We developed TREVA (Targeted REsequencing Virtual Appliance), making pre-built pipelines immediately available as a virtual appliance. Based on virtual machine technologies, TREVA is a solution for rapid and efficient deployment of complex bioinformatics pipelines to laboratories of all sizes, enabling reproducible results. The analyses that are supported in TREVA include: somatic and germline single-nucleotide and insertion/deletion variant calling, copy number analysis, and cohort-based analyses such as pathway and significantly mutated genes analyses. TREVA is flexible and easy to use, and can be customised by Linux-based extensions if required. TREVA can also be deployed on the cloud (cloud computing), enabling instant access without investment overheads for additional hardware. TREVA is available at http://bioinformatics.petermac.org/treva/. PMID:24752294

  8. Genome-Based Bioinformatic Selection of Chromosomal Bacillus anthracis Putative Vaccine Candidates Coupled with Proteomic Identification of Surface-Associated Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, N.; Zvi, A.; Makarova, K. S.; Chitlaru, T.; Elhanany, E.; Velan, B.; Cohen, S.; Friedlander, A. M.; Shafferman, A.

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain) chromosome-derived open reading frames (ORFs), predicted to code for surface exposed or virulence related proteins, were selected as B. anthracis-specific vaccine candidates by a multistep computational screen of the entire draft chromosome sequence (February 2001 version, 460 contigs, The Institute for Genomic Research, Rockville, Md.). The selection procedure combined preliminary annotation (sequence similarity searches and domain assignments), prediction of cellular localization, taxonomical and functional screen and additional filtering criteria (size, number of paralogs). The reductive strategy, combined with manual curation, resulted in selection of 240 candidate ORFs encoding proteins with putative known function, as well as 280 proteins of unknown function. Proteomic analysis of two-dimensional gels of a B. anthracis membrane fraction, verified the expression of some gene products. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses allowed identification of 38 spots cross-reacting with sera from B. anthracis immunized animals. These spots were found to represent eight in vivo immunogens, comprising of EA1, Sap, and 6 proteins whose expression and immunogenicity was not reported before. Five of these 8 immunogens were preselected by the bioinformatic analysis (EA1, Sap, 2 novel SLH proteins and peroxiredoxin/AhpC), as vaccine candidates. This study demonstrates that a combination of the bioinformatic and proteomic strategies may be useful in promoting the development of next generation anthrax vaccine. PMID:12874336

  9. iCAGES: integrated CAncer GEnome Score for comprehensively prioritizing driver genes in personal cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chengliang; Guo, Yunfei; Yang, Hui; He, Zeyu; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Kai

    2016-12-22

    Cancer results from the acquisition of somatic driver mutations. Several computational tools can predict driver genes from population-scale genomic data, but tools for analyzing personal cancer genomes are underdeveloped. Here we developed iCAGES, a novel statistical framework that infers driver variants by integrating contributions from coding, non-coding, and structural variants, identifies driver genes by combining genomic information and prior biological knowledge, then generates prioritized drug treatment. Analysis on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data showed that iCAGES predicts whether patients respond to drug treatment (P = 0.006 by Fisher's exact test) and long-term survival (P = 0.003 from Cox regression). iCAGES is available at http://icages.wglab.org .

  10. Omics technologies, data and bioinformatics principles.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Maria V; Orchard, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    We provide an overview on the state of the art for the Omics technologies, the types of omics data and the bioinformatics resources relevant and related to Omics. We also illustrate the bioinformatics challenges of dealing with high-throughput data. This overview touches several fundamental aspects of Omics and bioinformatics: data standardisation, data sharing, storing Omics data appropriately and exploring Omics data in bioinformatics. Though the principles and concepts presented are true for the various different technological fields, we concentrate in three main Omics fields namely: genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Finally we address the integration of Omics data, and provide several useful links for bioinformatics and Omics.

  11. Genomics and Bioinformatics in Undergraduate Curricula: Contexts for Hybrid Laboratory/Lecture Courses for Entering and Advanced Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Louise; Cresawn, Steven G.; Monroe, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging interest in genomics in the scientific community prompted biologists at James Madison University to create two courses at different levels to modernize the biology curriculum. The courses are hybrids of classroom and laboratory experiences. An upper level class uses raw sequence of a genome (plasmid or virus) as the subject on which to…

  12. Genomics and Bioinformatics in Undergraduate Curricula: Contexts for Hybrid Laboratory/Lecture Courses for Entering and Advanced Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Louise; Cresawn, Steven G.; Monroe, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging interest in genomics in the scientific community prompted biologists at James Madison University to create two courses at different levels to modernize the biology curriculum. The courses are hybrids of classroom and laboratory experiences. An upper level class uses raw sequence of a genome (plasmid or virus) as the subject on which to…

  13. Genomic resources for a commercial flatfish, the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis): EST sequencing, oligo microarray design, and development of the Soleamold bioinformatic platform

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà, Joan; Mercadé, Jaume; Lozano, Juan José; Manchado, Manuel; Tingaud-Sequeira, Angèle; Astola, Antonio; Infante, Carlos; Halm, Silke; Viñas, Jordi; Castellana, Barbara; Asensio, Esther; Cañavate, Pedro; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Piferrer, Francesc; Planas, Josep V; Prat, Francesc; Yúfera, Manuel; Durany, Olga; Subirada, Francesc; Rosell, Elisabet; Maes, Tamara

    2008-01-01

    Background The Senegalese sole, Solea senegalensis, is a highly prized flatfish of growing commercial interest for aquaculture in Southern Europe. However, despite the industrial production of Senegalese sole being hampered primarily by lack of information on the physiological mechanisms involved in reproduction, growth and immunity, very limited genomic information is available on this species. Results Sequencing of a S. senegalensis multi-tissue normalized cDNA library, from adult tissues (brain, stomach, intestine, liver, ovary, and testis), larval stages (pre-metamorphosis, metamorphosis), juvenile stages (post-metamorphosis, abnormal fish), and undifferentiated gonads, generated 10,185 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Clones were sequenced from the 3'-end to identify isoform specific sequences. Assembly of the entire EST collection into contigs gave 5,208 unique sequences of which 1,769 (34%) had matches in GenBank, thus showing a low level of redundancy. The sequence of the 5,208 unigenes was used to design and validate an oligonucleotide microarray representing 5,087 unique Senegalese sole transcripts. Finally, a novel interactive bioinformatic platform, Soleamold, was developed for the Senegalese sole EST collection as well as microarray and ISH data. Conclusion New genomic resources have been developed for S. senegalensis, an economically important fish in aquaculture, which include a collection of expressed genes, an oligonucleotide microarray, and a publicly available bioinformatic platform that can be used to study gene expression in this species. These resources will help elucidate transcriptional regulation in wild and captive Senegalese sole for optimization of its production under intensive culture conditions. PMID:18973667

  14. Re-examining the Gene in Personalized Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartol, Jordan

    2013-10-01

    Personalized genomics companies (PG; also called `direct-to-consumer genetics') are businesses marketing genetic testing to consumers over the Internet. While much has been written about these new businesses, little attention has been given to their roles in science communication. This paper provides an analysis of the gene concept presented to customers and the relation between the information given and the science behind PG. Two quite different gene concepts are present in company rhetoric, but only one features in the science. To explain this, we must appreciate the delicate tension between PG, academic science, public expectation, and market forces.

  15. Enabling personal genomics with an explicit test of epistasis.

    PubMed

    Greene, Casey S; Himmelstein, Daniel S; Nelson, Heather H; Kelsey, Karl T; Williams, Scott M; Andrew, Angeline S; Karagas, Margaret R; Moore, Jason H

    2010-01-01

    One goal of personal genomics is to use information about genomic variation to predict who is at risk for various common diseases. Technological advances in genotyping have spawned several personal genetic testing services that market genotyping services directly to the consumer. An important goal of consumer genetic testing is to provide health information along with the genotyping results. This has the potential to integrate detailed personal genetic and genomic information into healthcare decision making. Despite the potential importance of these advances, there are some important limitations. One concern is that much of the literature that is used to formulate personal genetics reports is based on genetic association studies that consider each genetic variant independently of the others. It is our working hypothesis that the true value of personal genomics will only be realized when the complexity of the genotype-to-phenotype mapping relationship is embraced, rather than ignored. We focus here on complexity in genetic architecture due to epistasis or nonlinear gene-gene interaction. We have previously developed a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) algorithm and software package for detecting nonlinear interactions in genetic association studies. In most prior MDR analyses, the permutation testing strategy used to assess statistical significance was unable to differentiate MDR models that captured only interaction effects from those that also detected independent main effects. Statistical interpretation of MDR models required post-hoc analysis using entropy-based measures of interaction information. We introduce here a novel permutation test that allows the effects of nonlinear interactions between multiple genetic variants to be specifically tested in a manner that is not confounded by linear additive effects. We show using simulated nonlinear interactions that the power using the explicit test of epistasis is no different than a standard permutation

  16. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals Genome Size Reduction and the Emergence of Tyrosine Phosphorylation Site in the Movement Protein of New World Bipartite Begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Eric S.; Kuchie, Joan; Duffy, Siobain

    2014-01-01

    Begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) infection is devastating to a wide variety of agricultural crops including tomato, squash, and cassava. Thus, understanding the replication and adaptation of begomoviruses has important translational value in alleviating substantial economic loss, particularly in developing countries. The bipartite genome of begomoviruses prevalent in the New World and their counterparts in the Old World share a high degree of genome homology except for a partially overlapping reading frame encoding the pre-coat protein (PCP, or AV2). PCP contributes to the essential functions of intercellular movement and suppression of host RNA silencing, but it is only present in the Old World viruses. In this study, we analyzed a set of non-redundant bipartite begomovirus genomes originating from the Old World (N = 28) and the New World (N = 65). Our bioinformatic analysis suggests ∼120 nucleotides were deleted from PCP’s proximal promoter region that may have contributed to its loss in the New World viruses. Consequently, genomes of the New World viruses are smaller than the Old World counterparts, possibly compensating for the loss of the intercellular movement functions of PCP. Additionally, we detected substantial purifying selection on a portion of the New World DNA-B movement protein (MP, or BC1). Further analysis of the New World MP gene revealed the emergence of a putative tyrosine phosphorylation site, which likely explains the increased purifying selection in that region. These findings provide important information about the strategies adopted by bipartite begomoviruses in adapting to new environment and suggest future in planta experiments. PMID:25383632

  17. Bioinformatic analysis reveals genome size reduction and the emergence of tyrosine phosphorylation site in the movement protein of New World bipartite begomoviruses.

    PubMed

    Ho, Eric S; Kuchie, Joan; Duffy, Siobain

    2014-01-01

    Begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) infection is devastating to a wide variety of agricultural crops including tomato, squash, and cassava. Thus, understanding the replication and adaptation of begomoviruses has important translational value in alleviating substantial economic loss, particularly in developing countries. The bipartite genome of begomoviruses prevalent in the New World and their counterparts in the Old World share a high degree of genome homology except for a partially overlapping reading frame encoding the pre-coat protein (PCP, or AV2). PCP contributes to the essential functions of intercellular movement and suppression of host RNA silencing, but it is only present in the Old World viruses. In this study, we analyzed a set of non-redundant bipartite begomovirus genomes originating from the Old World (N = 28) and the New World (N = 65). Our bioinformatic analysis suggests ∼ 120 nucleotides were deleted from PCP's proximal promoter region that may have contributed to its loss in the New World viruses. Consequently, genomes of the New World viruses are smaller than the Old World counterparts, possibly compensating for the loss of the intercellular movement functions of PCP. Additionally, we detected substantial purifying selection on a portion of the New World DNA-B movement protein (MP, or BC1). Further analysis of the New World MP gene revealed the emergence of a putative tyrosine phosphorylation site, which likely explains the increased purifying selection in that region. These findings provide important information about the strategies adopted by bipartite begomoviruses in adapting to new environment and suggest future in planta experiments.

  18. From Wet-Lab to Variations: Concordance and Speed of Bioinformatics Pipelines for Whole Genome and Whole Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Steve; Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos; Marco-Sola, Santiago; Trotta, Jean-Remi; Camps, Jordi; Chacón, Alejandro; Espinosa, Antonio; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Heath, Simon; Beltran, Sergi

    2016-12-01

    As whole genome sequencing becomes cheaper and faster, it will progressively substitute targeted next-generation sequencing as standard practice in research and diagnostics. However, computing cost-performance ratio is not advancing at an equivalent rate. Therefore, it is essential to evaluate the robustness of the variant detection process taking into account the computing resources required. We have benchmarked six combinations of state-of-the-art read aligners (BWA-MEM and GEM3) and variant callers (FreeBayes, GATK HaplotypeCaller, SAMtools) on whole genome and whole exome sequencing data from the NA12878 human sample. Results have been compared between them and against the NIST Genome in a Bottle (GIAB) variants reference dataset. We report differences in speed of up to 20 times in some steps of the process and have observed that SNV, and to a lesser extent InDel, detection is highly consistent in 70% of the genome. SNV, and especially InDel, detection is less reliable in 20% of the genome, and almost unfeasible in the remaining 10%. These findings will aid in choosing the appropriate tools bearing in mind objectives, workload, and computing infrastructure available.

  19. From Wet‐Lab to Variations: Concordance and Speed of Bioinformatics Pipelines for Whole Genome and Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Steve; Fernandez‐Callejo, Marcos; Marco‐Sola, Santiago; Trotta, Jean‐Remi; Camps, Jordi; Chacón, Alejandro; Espinosa, Antonio; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Heath, Simon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As whole genome sequencing becomes cheaper and faster, it will progressively substitute targeted next‐generation sequencing as standard practice in research and diagnostics. However, computing cost–performance ratio is not advancing at an equivalent rate. Therefore, it is essential to evaluate the robustness of the variant detection process taking into account the computing resources required. We have benchmarked six combinations of state‐of‐the‐art read aligners (BWA‐MEM and GEM3) and variant callers (FreeBayes, GATK HaplotypeCaller, SAMtools) on whole genome and whole exome sequencing data from the NA12878 human sample. Results have been compared between them and against the NIST Genome in a Bottle (GIAB) variants reference dataset. We report differences in speed of up to 20 times in some steps of the process and have observed that SNV, and to a lesser extent InDel, detection is highly consistent in 70% of the genome. SNV, and especially InDel, detection is less reliable in 20% of the genome, and almost unfeasible in the remaining 10%. These findings will aid in choosing the appropriate tools bearing in mind objectives, workload, and computing infrastructure available. PMID:27604516

  20. Integration of bioinformatics to biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics and biodegradation are two primary scientific fields in applied microbiology and biotechnology. The present review describes development of various bioinformatics tools that may be applied in the field of biodegradation. Several databases, including the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation database (UM-BBD), a database of biodegradative oxygenases (OxDBase), Biodegradation Network-Molecular Biology Database (Bionemo) MetaCyc, and BioCyc have been developed to enable access to information related to biochemistry and genetics of microbial degradation. In addition, several bioinformatics tools for predicting toxicity and biodegradation of chemicals have been developed. Furthermore, the whole genomes of several potential degrading bacteria have been sequenced and annotated using bioinformatics tools. PMID:24808763

  1. Genome- wide characterization of Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) gene family of sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]: a bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Neha; Jaiswal, Parul; Yadav, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is a heterotrimeric transcription factor (TF) complex with preferential binding to CCAAT elements of promoters, regulating gene expression in most of the higher eukaryotes. The availability of plant genome sequences have revealed multiple number of genes coding for the three subunits, namely NF-YA, NF-YB and NF-YC in contrast to single NF-Y gene for each subunit reported in yeast and animals. A total of 33 NF-YTF comprising of 8 NF-YA, 11 NF-YB and 14 NF-YC subunits were accessed from the sorghum genome. The bioinformatic characterization of NF-Y gene family of sorghum for gene structure, chromosome location, protein motif, phylogeny, gene duplication and in-silico expression under abiotic stresses have been attempted in the present study. The identified SbNF-Y genes are distributed on all the 10 chromosomes of sorghum with variability in the frequency and 18 out of 33 SbNF-Ys were found to be intronless. Segmental duplication event was found to be predominant feature based on gene duplication pattern study. Several orthologs and paralogs groups were disclosed through the comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of SbNF-Y proteins along with 36 Arabidopsis and 28 rice NF-Y proteins. In-silico expression analysis under abiotic stresses using rice transcriptome data revealed several of the sorghum NF-Y genes to be associated with salt, drought, cold and heat stresses.

  2. Bioinformatic Analyses of Unique (Orphan) Core Genes of the Genus Acidithiobacillus: Functional Inferences and Use As Molecular Probes for Genomic and Metagenomic/Transcriptomic Interrogation

    PubMed Central

    González, Carolina; Lazcano, Marcelo; Valdés, Jorge; Holmes, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Using phylogenomic and gene compositional analyses, five highly conserved gene families have been detected in the core genome of the phylogenetically coherent genus Acidithiobacillus of the class Acidithiobacillia. These core gene families are absent in the closest extant genus Thermithiobacillus tepidarius that subtends the Acidithiobacillus genus and roots the deepest in this class. The predicted proteins encoded by these core gene families are not detected by a BLAST search in the NCBI non-redundant database of more than 90 million proteins using a relaxed cut-off of 1.0e−5. None of the five families has a clear functional prediction. However, bioinformatic scrutiny, using pI prediction, motif/domain searches, cellular location predictions, genomic context analyses, and chromosome topology studies together with previously published transcriptomic and proteomic data, suggests that some may have functions associated with membrane remodeling during cell division perhaps in response to pH stress. Despite the high level of amino acid sequence conservation within each family, there is sufficient nucleotide variation of the respective genes to permit the use of the DNA sequences to distinguish different species of Acidithiobacillus, making them useful additions to the armamentarium of tools for phylogenetic analysis. Since the protein families are unique to the Acidithiobacillus genus, they can also be leveraged as probes to detect the genus in environmental metagenomes and metatranscriptomes, including industrial biomining operations, and acid mine drainage (AMD). PMID:28082953

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing and a New Bioinformatics Platform Allow for Rapid Gene Identification in D. melanogaster EMS Screens

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Michael A.; Van Booven, Derek; Hulme, William; Ulloa, Rick H.; Lebrigio, Rafael F. Acosta; Osterloh, Jeannette; Logan, Mary; Freeman, Marc; Zuchner, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis are a powerful approach for identifying genes that modulate specific biological processes in an in vivo setting. The mapping of genes that contain randomly-induced point mutations has become more efficient in Drosophila thanks to the maturation and availability of many types of genetic tools. However, classic approaches to gene mapping are relatively slow and ultimately require extensive Sanger sequencing of candidate chromosomal loci. With the advent of new high-throughput sequencing techniques, it is increasingly efficient to directly re-sequence the whole genome of model organisms. This approach, in combination with traditional chromosomal mapping, has the potential to greatly simplify and accelerate mutation identification in mutants generated in EMS screens. Here we show that next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an accurate and efficient tool for high-throughput sequencing and mutation discovery in Drosophila melanogaster. As a test case, mutant strains of Drosophila that exhibited long-term survival of severed peripheral axons were identified in a forward EMS mutagenesis. All mutants were recessive and fell into a single lethal complementation group, which suggested that a single gene was responsible for the protective axon degenerative phenotype. Whole genome sequencing of these genomes identified the underlying gene ect4. To improve the process of genome wide mutation identification, we developed Genomes Management Application (GEM.app, https://genomics.med.miami.edu), a graphical online user interface to a custom query framework. Using a custom GEM.app query, we were able to identify that each mutant carried a unique non-sense mutation in the gene ect4 (dSarm), which was recently shown by Osterloh et al. to be essential for the activation of axonal degeneration. Our results demonstrate the current advantages and limitations of NGS in Drosophila and we introduce

  4. Playing with heart and soul…and genomes: sports implications and applications of personal genomics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Whether the integration of genetic/omic technologies in sports contexts will facilitate player success, promote player safety, or spur genetic discrimination depends largely upon the game rules established by those currently designing genomic sports medicine programs. The integration has already begun, but there is not yet a playbook for best practices. Thus far discussions have focused largely on whether the integration would occur and how to prevent the integration from occurring, rather than how it could occur in such a way that maximizes benefits, minimizes risks, and avoids the exacerbation of racial disparities. Previous empirical research has identified members of the personal genomics industry offering sports-related DNA tests, and previous legal research has explored the impact of collective bargaining in professional sports as it relates to the employment protections of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA). Building upon that research and upon participant observations with specific sports-related DNA tests purchased from four direct-to-consumer companies in 2011 and broader personal genomics (PGx) services, this anthropological, legal, and ethical (ALE) discussion highlights fundamental issues that must be addressed by those developing personal genomic sports medicine programs, either independently or through collaborations with commercial providers. For example, the vulnerability of student-athletes creates a number of issues that require careful, deliberate consideration. More broadly, however, this ALE discussion highlights potential sports-related implications (that ultimately might mitigate or, conversely, exacerbate racial disparities among athletes) of whole exome/genome sequencing conducted by biomedical researchers and clinicians for non-sports purposes. For example, the possibility that exome/genome sequencing of individuals who are considered to be non-patients, asymptomatic, normal, etc. will reveal the presence of variants of

  5. Playing with heart and soul…and genomes: sports implications and applications of personal genomics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jennifer K

    2013-01-01

    Whether the integration of genetic/omic technologies in sports contexts will facilitate player success, promote player safety, or spur genetic discrimination depends largely upon the game rules established by those currently designing genomic sports medicine programs. The integration has already begun, but there is not yet a playbook for best practices. Thus far discussions have focused largely on whether the integration would occur and how to prevent the integration from occurring, rather than how it could occur in such a way that maximizes benefits, minimizes risks, and avoids the exacerbation of racial disparities. Previous empirical research has identified members of the personal genomics industry offering sports-related DNA tests, and previous legal research has explored the impact of collective bargaining in professional sports as it relates to the employment protections of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA). Building upon that research and upon participant observations with specific sports-related DNA tests purchased from four direct-to-consumer companies in 2011 and broader personal genomics (PGx) services, this anthropological, legal, and ethical (ALE) discussion highlights fundamental issues that must be addressed by those developing personal genomic sports medicine programs, either independently or through collaborations with commercial providers. For example, the vulnerability of student-athletes creates a number of issues that require careful, deliberate consideration. More broadly, however, this ALE discussion highlights potential sports-related implications (that ultimately might mitigate or, conversely, exacerbate racial disparities among athletes) of whole exome/genome sequencing conducted by biomedical researchers and clinicians for non-sports purposes. For example, the possibility that exome/genome sequencing of individuals who are considered to be non-patients, asymptomatic, normal, etc. will reveal the presence of variants of

  6. Hands-on workshops as an effective means of learning advanced technologies including genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Reisdorph, Nichole; Stearman, Robert; Kechris, Katerina; Phang, Tzu Lip; Reisdorph, Richard; Prenni, Jessica; Erle, David J; Coldren, Christopher; Schey, Kevin; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Geraci, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Genomics and proteomics have emerged as key technologies in biomedical research, resulting in a surge of interest in training by investigators keen to incorporate these technologies into their research. At least two types of training can be envisioned in order to produce meaningful results, quality publications and successful grant applications: (1) immediate short-term training workshops and (2) long-term graduate education or visiting scientist programs. We aimed to fill the former need by providing a comprehensive hands-on training course in genomics, proteomics and informatics in a coherent, experimentally-based framework. This was accomplished through a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 10-day Genomics and Proteomics Hands-on Workshop held at National Jewish Health (NJH) and the University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCD). The course content included comprehensive lectures and laboratories in mass spectrometry and genomics technologies, extensive hands-on experience with instrumentation and software, video demonstrations, optional workshops, online sessions, invited keynote speakers, and local and national guest faculty. Here we describe the detailed curriculum and present the results of short- and long-term evaluations from course attendees. Our educational program consistently received positive reviews from participants and had a substantial impact on grant writing and review, manuscript submissions and publications. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Hands-on Workshops as An Effective Means of Learning Advanced Technologies Including Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Reisdorph, Nichole; Stearman, Robert; Kechris, Katerina; Phang, Tzu Lip; Reisdorph, Richard; Prenni, Jessica; Erle, David J.; Coldren, Christopher; Schey, Kevin; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Geraci, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Genomics and proteomics have emerged as key technologies in biomedical research, resulting in a surge of interest in training by investigators keen to incorporate these technologies into their research. At least two types of training can be envisioned in order to produce meaningful results, quality publications and successful grant applications: (1) immediate short-term training workshops and (2) long-term graduate education or visiting scientist programs. We aimed to fill the former need by providing a comprehensive hands-on training course in genomics, proteomics and informatics in a coherent, experimentally-based framework. This was accomplished through a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 10-day Genomics and Proteomics Hands-on Workshop held at National Jewish Health (NJH) and the University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCD). The course content included comprehensive lectures and laboratories in mass spectrometry and genomics technologies, extensive hands-on experience with instrumentation and software, video demonstrations, optional workshops, online sessions, invited keynote speakers, and local and national guest faculty. Here we describe the detailed curriculum and present the results of short- and long-term evaluations from course attendees. Our educational program consistently received positive reviews from participants and had a substantial impact on grant writing and review, manuscript submissions and publications. PMID:24316330

  8. Bioinformatics and systems biology research update from the 15(th) International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB2016).

    PubMed

    Schönbach, Christian; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2016-12-22

    The International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB) has been publishing peer-reviewed conference papers in BMC Bioinformatics since 2006. Of the 44 articles accepted for publication in supplement issues of BMC Bioinformatics, BMC Genomics, BMC Medical Genomics and BMC Systems Biology, 24 articles with a bioinformatics or systems biology focus are reviewed in this editorial. InCoB2017 is scheduled to be held in Shenzen, China, September 20-22, 2017.

  9. Explaining, not just predicting, drives interest in personal genomics.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Susanne F; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Wardle, Jane; Kalia, Sarah S; Moreno, Tanya A; Mountain, Joanna L; Roberts, J Scott; Green, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    There is a widespread assumption that risk prediction is the major driver of customer interest in personal genomic testing (PGT). However, some customers may also be motivated by finding out whether their existing diseases have a genetic etiology. We evaluated the impact of an existing medical diagnosis on customer interest in condition-specific results from PGT. Using a prospective online survey of PGT customers, we measured customer interest prior to receiving PGT results for 11 health conditions, and examined the association between interest and personal medical history of these conditions using logistic regression. We analyzed data from 1,538 PGT customers, mean age 48.7 years, 61 % women, 90 % White, and 47 % college educated. The proportion of customers who were 'very interested' in condition-specific PGT varied considerably, from 28 % for ulcerative colitis to 68% for heart disease. After adjusting for demographic and personal characteristics including family history, having a diagnosis of the condition itself was significantly associated with interest in genetic testing for risk of that condition, with odds ratios ranging from 2.07 (95 % CI 1.28-3.37) for diabetes to 19.99 (95 % CI 4.57-87.35) for multiple sclerosis. PGT customers are particularly interested in genetic markers for their existing medical conditions, suggesting that the value of genetic testing is not only predictive, but also explanatory.

  10. Bioinformatics analysis of circulating cell-free DNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Chan, Landon L; Jiang, Peiyong

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of cell-free DNA molecules in plasma has opened up numerous opportunities in noninvasive diagnosis. Cell-free DNA molecules have become increasingly recognized as promising biomarkers for detection and management of many diseases. The advent of next generation sequencing has provided unprecedented opportunities to scrutinize the characteristics of cell-free DNA molecules in plasma in a genome-wide fashion and at single-base resolution. Consequently, clinical applications of circulating cell-free DNA analysis have not only revolutionized noninvasive prenatal diagnosis but also facilitated cancer detection and monitoring toward an era of blood-based personalized medicine. With the remarkably increasing throughput and lowering cost of next generation sequencing, bioinformatics analysis becomes increasingly demanding to understand the large amount of data generated by these sequencing platforms. In this Review, we highlight the major bioinformatics algorithms involved in the analysis of cell-free DNA sequencing data. Firstly, we briefly describe the biological properties of these molecules and provide an overview of the general bioinformatics approach for the analysis of cell-free DNA. Then, we discuss the specific upstream bioinformatics considerations concerning the analysis of sequencing data of circulating cell-free DNA, followed by further detailed elaboration on each key clinical situation in noninvasive prenatal diagnosis and cancer management where downstream bioinformatics analysis is heavily involved. We also discuss bioinformatics analysis as well as clinical applications of the newly developed massively parallel bisulfite sequencing of cell-free DNA. Finally, we offer our perspectives on the future development of bioinformatics in noninvasive diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioinformatic Analysis of the Genome of Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus Associated with Outbreaks with High Mortality in Chile ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Cottet, L.; Cortez-San Martin, M.; Tello, M.; Olivares, E.; Rivas-Aravena, A.; Vallejos, E.; Sandino, A. M.; Spencer, E.

    2010-01-01

    The infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), an orthomyxovirus, is the major cause of outbreaks of high mortality rates in salmon in Chile. It has been proposed that the virulence of ISAV isolates lies mainly in hemagglutinin-esterase and fusion glycoproteins. However, based on current information, the contribution of other viral genes cannot be ruled out. To study this, we isolated and determined the complete coding sequence of two high-prevalence Chilean isolates associated with outbreaks of high mortality rates: ISAV752_09 and ISAV901_09. These isolates were compared to 15 Norwegian isolates that exhibit differences in their virulence. For this purpose, we performed bioinformatic analyses of (i) functional domains, (ii) specific mutations, (iii) Bayesian phylogenetics, and (iv) structural comparisons between ISAV and influenza virus glycoproteins by using molecular modeling. Phylogenetic analysis shows two genogroups for each protein, one of them containing the Chilean isolates. The gene sequence of the polymerase complex and nucleoprotein indicated that they are closely related to homologues from highly pathogenic Norwegian viruses. Notably, seven of the eight mutations that are present only in the Chilean isolates are on the polymerase complex and nucleoprotein. Structural modeling of hemagglutinin-esterase shows patches of variable residues on its surface. Fusion protein modeling shows that insertions are flexible regions that could affect proteolytic processing, increasing either the accessibility or the number of recognition sites for specific proteases. We found antigenic drift processes related to insertion into the isolated segment 5 of the ISAV752_09. Our results confirm the European origin of Chilean isolates to be the result of reassortments from Norwegian ancestors. PMID:20810724

  12. Bioinformatics of prokaryotic RNAs.

    PubMed

    Backofen, Rolf; Amman, Fabian; Costa, Fabrizio; Findeiß, Sven; Richter, Andreas S; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The genome of most prokaryotes gives rise to surprisingly complex transcriptomes, comprising not only protein-coding mRNAs, often organized as operons, but also harbors dozens or even hundreds of highly structured small regulatory RNAs and unexpectedly large levels of anti-sense transcripts. Comprehensive surveys of prokaryotic transcriptomes and the need to characterize also their non-coding components is heavily dependent on computational methods and workflows, many of which have been developed or at least adapted specifically for the use with bacterial and archaeal data. This review provides an overview on the state-of-the-art of RNA bioinformatics focusing on applications to prokaryotes.

  13. Bioinformatics of prokaryotic RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Backofen, Rolf; Amman, Fabian; Costa, Fabrizio; Findeiß, Sven; Richter, Andreas S; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The genome of most prokaryotes gives rise to surprisingly complex transcriptomes, comprising not only protein-coding mRNAs, often organized as operons, but also harbors dozens or even hundreds of highly structured small regulatory RNAs and unexpectedly large levels of anti-sense transcripts. Comprehensive surveys of prokaryotic transcriptomes and the need to characterize also their non-coding components is heavily dependent on computational methods and workflows, many of which have been developed or at least adapted specifically for the use with bacterial and archaeal data. This review provides an overview on the state-of-the-art of RNA bioinformatics focusing on applications to prokaryotes. PMID:24755880

  14. Crowdsourcing for bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Good, Benjamin M.; Su, Andrew I.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Bioinformatics is faced with a variety of problems that require human involvement. Tasks like genome annotation, image analysis, knowledge-base population and protein structure determination all benefit from human input. In some cases, people are needed in vast quantities, whereas in others, we need just a few with rare abilities. Crowdsourcing encompasses an emerging collection of approaches for harnessing such distributed human intelligence. Recently, the bioinformatics community has begun to apply crowdsourcing in a variety of contexts, yet few resources are available that describe how these human-powered systems work and how to use them effectively in scientific domains. Results: Here, we provide a framework for understanding and applying several different types of crowdsourcing. The framework considers two broad classes: systems for solving large-volume ‘microtasks’ and systems for solving high-difficulty ‘megatasks’. Within these classes, we discuss system types, including volunteer labor, games with a purpose, microtask markets and open innovation contests. We illustrate each system type with successful examples in bioinformatics and conclude with a guide for matching problems to crowdsourcing solutions that highlights the positives and negatives of different approaches. Contact: bgood@scripps.edu PMID:23782614

  15. The Characteristics of Rare Codon Clusters in the Genome and Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus; a Bioinformatics Look

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Mohammadreza; Malekpour, Abdorrasoul; Mortazavi, Mojtaba; Safarpour, Alireza; Naseri, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent studies suggest that rare codon clusters are functionally important for protein activity. METHODS Here, for the first time we analyzed and reported rare codon clusters in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) genome and then identified the location of these rare codon clusters in the structure of HCV protein. This analysis was performed using the Sherlocc program that detects statistically relevant conserved rare codon clusters. RESULTS By this program, we identified the rare codon cluster in three regions of HCV genome; NS2, NS3, and NS5A coding sequence of HCV genome. For further understanding of the role of these rare codon clusters, we studied the location of these rare codon clusters and critical residues in the structure of NS2, NS3 and NS5A proteins. We identified some critical residues near or within rare codon clusters. It should be mentioned that characteristics of these critical residues such as location and situation of side chains are important in assurance of the HCV life cycle. CONCLUSION The characteristics of these residues and their relative status showed that these rare codon clusters play an important role in proper folding of these proteins. Thus, it is likely that these rare codon clusters may have an important role in the function of HCV proteins. This information is helpful in development of new avenues for vaccine and treatment protocols. PMID:25349685

  16. Relationship between microRNA genes incidence and cancer-associated genomic regions in canine tumors: a comprehensive bioinformatics study.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad

    2016-03-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in human cancer biology has been confirmed on a genome-wide scale through the high incidence of these genes in cancer-associated regions. We analyzed the association between canine miRNA genes and cancer-associated regions (deleted and amplified regions) using previously published array of comparative genomic hybridization data on 268 canine cancer samples-comprising osteosarcoma, breast cancer, leukemia, and colorectal cancer. We also assessed this relationship apropos the incidence of miRNA genes in the CpG islands of the canine genome assembly. The association was evaluated using the mixed-effects Poisson regression analysis. Our analyses revealed that 135 miRNA genes were exactly located in the aberrated regions: 77 (57 %) in the loss and 58 (43 %) in amplified regions. Our findings indicated that the miRNA genes were located more frequently in the deleted regions as well as in the CpG islands than in all other regions. Additionally, with the exception of leukemia, the amplified regions significantly contained higher numbers of miRNA genes than did all the other regions.

  17. Genome-wide identification and evolutionary analysis of algal LPAT genes involved in TAG biosynthesis using bioinformatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Parida, Bikram Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase (LPAT) is one of the major triacylglycerol synthesis enzymes, controlling the metabolic flow of lysophosphatidic acid to phosphatidic acid. Experimental studies in Arabidopsis have shown that LPAT activity is exhibited primarily by three distinct isoforms, namely the plastid-located LPAT1, the endoplasmic reticulum-located LPAT2, and the soluble isoform of LPAT (solLPAT). In this study, 24 putative genes representing all LPAT isoforms were identified from the analysis of 11 complete genomes including green algae, red algae, diatoms and higher plants. We observed LPAT1 and solLPAT genes to be ubiquitously present in nearly all genomes examined, whereas LPAT2 genes to have evolved more recently in the plant lineage. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that LPAT1, LPAT2 and solLPAT have convergently evolved through separate evolutionary paths and belong to three different gene families, which was further evidenced by their wide divergence at gene structure and sequence level. The genome distribution supports the hypothesis that each gene encoding a LPAT is not duplicated. Mapping of exon-intron structure of LPAT genes to the domain structure of proteins across different algal and plant species indicates that exon shuffling plays no role in the evolution of LPAT genes. Besides the previously defined motifs, several conserved consensus sequences were discovered which could be useful to distinguish different LPAT isoforms. Taken together, this study will enable the generation of experimental approximations to better understand the functional role of algal LPAT in lipid accumulation.

  18. Genome and Bioinformatic Analysis of a HAdV-B14p1 Virus Isolated from a Baby with Pneumonia in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liuying; An, Junjing; Xie, Zhengde; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Seto, Donald; Xu, Wenbo; Ji, Yixin

    2013-01-01

    The genome of HAdV-B14p1 strain BJ430, isolated from a six-month-old baby diagnosed with bronchial pneumonia at the Beijing Children’s Hospital in December 2010, was sequenced, analyzed, and compared with reference adenovirus genome sequences archived in GenBank. This genome is 34,762 bp in length, remarkably presenting 99.9% identity with the genome from HAdV14p1 strain 303600, which was isolated in the USA (2006). Even more remarkable, it is 99.7% identical with the HAdV-B14p (prototype “de Wit” strain) genome, isolated from The Netherlands in 1955. The patient and its parents presumably had no or limited contact with persons from the USA and Ireland, both of which reported outbreaks of the re-emergent virus HAdV-14p1 recently. These genome data, its analysis, and this report provide a reference for any additional HAdV-B14 outbreak in China and provide the basis for the development of adenovirus vaccines and molecular pathogen surveillance protocols in high-risk areas. PMID:23555956

  19. Fuzzy Logic in Medicine and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Angela; Nieto, Juan J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general view of the current applications of fuzzy logic in medicine and bioinformatics. We particularly review the medical literature using fuzzy logic. We then recall the geometrical interpretation of fuzzy sets as points in a fuzzy hypercube and present two concrete illustrations in medicine (drug addictions) and in bioinformatics (comparison of genomes). PMID:16883057

  20. Rapid Development of Bioinformatics Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Jian; Zhang, Liang

    2003-01-01

    As the Human Genome Project experiences remarkable success and a flood of biological data is produced, bioinformatics becomes a very "hot" cross-disciplinary field, yet experienced bioinformaticians are urgently needed worldwide. This paper summarises the rapid development of bioinformatics education in China, especially related…

  1. Rapid Development of Bioinformatics Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Jian; Zhang, Liang

    2003-01-01

    As the Human Genome Project experiences remarkable success and a flood of biological data is produced, bioinformatics becomes a very "hot" cross-disciplinary field, yet experienced bioinformaticians are urgently needed worldwide. This paper summarises the rapid development of bioinformatics education in China, especially related…

  2. Web-based Gene Pathogenicity Analysis (WGPA): a web platform to interpret gene pathogenicity from personal genome data

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Montana, Juan J.; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Diaz-Diaz, Norberto; Petretto, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Summary: As the volume of patient-specific genome sequences increases the focus of biomedical research is switching from the detection of disease-mutations to their interpretation. To this end a number of techniques have been developed that use mutation data collected within a population to predict whether individual genes are likely to be disease-causing or not. As both sequence data and associated analysis tools proliferate, it becomes increasingly difficult for the community to make sense of these data and their implications. Moreover, no single analysis tool is likely to capture all relevant genomic features that contribute to the gene’s pathogenicity. Here, we introduce Web-based Gene Pathogenicity Analysis (WGPA), a web-based tool to analyze genes impacted by mutations and rank them through the integration of existing prioritization tools, which assess different aspects of gene pathogenicity using population-level sequence data. Additionally, to explore the polygenic contribution of mutations to disease, WGPA implements gene set enrichment analysis to prioritize disease-causing genes and gene interaction networks, therefore providing a comprehensive annotation of personal genomes data in disease. Availability and implementation: wgpa.systems-genetics.net Contact: enrico.petretto@duke-nus.edu.sg Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26490503

  3. A novel pathway for the biosynthesis of heme in Archaea: genome-based bioinformatic predictions and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Sonja; Rolfes, Sarah; Raux-Deery, Evelyne; Warren, Martin J; Jahn, Dieter; Layer, Gunhild

    2010-12-13

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group for many proteins involved in fundamental biological processes in all three domains of life. In Eukaryota and Bacteria heme is formed via a conserved and well-studied biosynthetic pathway. Surprisingly, in Archaea heme biosynthesis proceeds via an alternative route which is poorly understood. In order to formulate a working hypothesis for this novel pathway, we searched 59 completely sequenced archaeal genomes for the presence of gene clusters consisting of established heme biosynthetic genes and colocalized conserved candidate genes. Within the majority of archaeal genomes it was possible to identify such heme biosynthesis gene clusters. From this analysis we have been able to identify several novel heme biosynthesis genes that are restricted to archaea. Intriguingly, several of the encoded proteins display similarity to enzymes involved in heme d(1) biosynthesis. To initiate an experimental verification of our proposals two Methanosarcina barkeri proteins predicted to catalyze the initial steps of archaeal heme biosynthesis were recombinantly produced, purified, and their predicted enzymatic functions verified.

  4. A bioinformatics approach reveals seven nearly-complete RNA-virus genomes in bivalve RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Rosani, Umberto; Gerdol, Marco

    2016-10-18

    Viral metagenomics (viromics) can provide a great contribution in expanding the knowledge of viruses and the relationship with their hosts. Viromic studies on marine organisms are still at a very early stage and only little efforts have been spent in the identification of viruses associated to marine invertebrates to date, leaving the complexity of marine viromes associated to bivalve hosts almost completely unexplored. However, the potential use of viromic approaches in the management of viral diseases affecting aquacultured species has been recently evidenced by the flourishing of studies on the Ostreid herpesvirus type-1, which has been associated with bivalve mortality events. Herein we discuss an effective pipeline to retrieve and reconstruct nearly complete and previously unreported viral genomes from existing host RNA-seq data. As a case study, we report the identification of seven RNA-virus genomes within the frame of a highly diversified viral community that characterizes both Crassostrea gigas and Mytilus galloprovincialis samples collected from the lagoon of Goro (Italy).

  5. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53–3.14), P=1.9 × 10-5). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951–LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37–1.85), P=1.6 × 10−9) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  6. Multifunctionality and diversity of GDSL esterase/lipase gene family in rice (Oryza sativa L. japonica) genome: new insights from bioinformatics analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background GDSL esterases/lipases are a newly discovered subclass of lipolytic enzymes that are very important and attractive research subjects because of their multifunctional properties, such as broad substrate specificity and regiospecificity. Compared with the current knowledge regarding these enzymes in bacteria, our understanding of the plant GDSL enzymes is very limited, although the GDSL gene family in plant species include numerous members in many fully sequenced plant genomes. Only two genes from a large rice GDSL esterase/lipase gene family were previously characterised, and the majority of the members remain unknown. In the present study, we describe the rice OsGELP (Oryza sativa GDSL esterase/lipase protein) gene family at the genomic and proteomic levels, and use this knowledge to provide insights into the multifunctionality of the rice OsGELP enzymes. Results In this study, an extensive bioinformatics analysis identified 114 genes in the rice OsGELP gene family. A complete overview of this family in rice is presented, including the chromosome locations, gene structures, phylogeny, and protein motifs. Among the OsGELPs and the plant GDSL esterase/lipase proteins of known functions, 41 motifs were found that represent the core secondary structure elements or appear specifically in different phylogenetic subclades. The specification and distribution of identified putative conserved clade-common and -specific peptide motifs, and their location on the predicted protein three dimensional structure may possibly signify their functional roles. Potentially important regions for substrate specificity are highlighted, in accordance with protein three-dimensional model and location of the phylogenetic specific conserved motifs. The differential expression of some representative genes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. The phylogenetic analysis, together with protein motif architectures, and the expression profiling were analysed to predict the

  7. Bioinformatics Analysis of the Complete Genome Sequence of the Mango Tree Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 Reveals Traits Relevant to Virulence and Epiphytic Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Arrebola, Eva; Carrión, Víctor J.; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Ramos, Cayo; Cazorla, Francisco M.; de Vicente, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of more than 100 Pseudomonas syringae strains has been sequenced to date; however only few of them have been fully assembled, including P. syringae pv. syringae B728a. Different strains of pv. syringae cause different diseases and have different host specificities; so, UMAF0158 is a P. syringae pv. syringae strain related to B728a but instead of being a bean pathogen it causes apical necrosis of mango trees, and the two strains belong to different phylotypes of pv.syringae and clades of P. syringae. In this study we report the complete sequence and annotation of P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 chromosome and plasmid pPSS158. A comparative analysis with the available sequenced genomes of other 25 P. syringae strains, both closed (the reference genomes DC3000, 1448A and B728a) and draft genomes was performed. The 5.8 Mb UMAF0158 chromosome has 59.3% GC content and comprises 5017 predicted protein-coding genes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the presence of genes potentially implicated in the virulence and epiphytic fitness of this strain. We identified several genetic features, which are absent in B728a, that may explain the ability of UMAF0158 to colonize and infect mango trees: the mangotoxin biosynthetic operon mbo, a gene cluster for cellulose production, two different type III and two type VI secretion systems, and a particular T3SS effector repertoire. A mutant strain defective in the rhizobial-like T3SS Rhc showed no differences compared to wild-type during its interaction with host and non-host plants and worms. Here we report the first complete sequence of the chromosome of a pv. syringae strain pathogenic to a woody plant host. Our data also shed light on the genetic factors that possibly determine the pathogenic and epiphytic lifestyle of UMAF0158. This work provides the basis for further analysis on specific mechanisms that enable this strain to infect woody plants and for the functional analysis of host specificity in the P

  8. Bioinformatics analyses of the differences between lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma using The Cancer Genome Atlas expression data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fenghao; Yang, Xiaodong; Jin, Yulin; Chen, Li; Wang, Lin; Shi, Mengkun; Zhan, Cheng; Shi, Yu; Wang, Qun

    2017-07-01

    The present study aimed to explore gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression differences between lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) were identified by analyzing mRNA and miRNA expression data in normal and cancerous lung tissues that were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. A total of 778 DEGs and 7 DEMs were identified. Altered gene functions and signaling pathways were investigated using Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses, which revealed that DEGs were significantly enriched in extracellular matrix organization, cell differentiation, negative regulation of toll signaling pathway, and several other terms and pathways. Transcription factor (TF)‑miRNA‑gene networks in LUAD and LUSC were predicted using the TargetScan, Miranda, and TRANSFAC databases, which revealed the regulatory links among the TFs, DEMs, and DEGs. The central TFs, i.e., the TFs in the middle of the TF‑miRNA‑gene network, of LUAD and LUSC were similar. Although LUAD and LUSC shared similar miRNAs in the predicted networks, miR‑29b‑3p was demonstrated to be upregulated only in LUAD, whereas miR‑1, miR‑105‑5p, and miR‑193b‑5p were altered in LUSC. These findings may improve our understanding of the different molecular mechanisms in non‑small cell lung cancers and may promote new and accurate strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

  9. Findings from the Section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics.

    PubMed

    Dauchel, H; Lecroq, T

    2016-11-10

    To summarize excellent current research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2015 in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2016, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,566 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 14 articles for peer-review. The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook's section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles focusing this year on data management of large-scale datasets and genomic medicine that are mainly new method-based papers. Three articles explore the high potential of the re-analysis of previously collected data, here from The Cancer Genome Atlas project (TCGA) and one article presents an original analysis of genomic data from sub-Saharan Africa populations. The current research activities in Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain continues to explore new algorithms and statistical models to manage and interpret large-scale genomic datasets. From population wide genome sequencing for cataloging genomic variants to the comprehension of functional impact on pathways and molecular interactions regarding a given pathology, making sense of large genomic data requires a necessary effort to address the issue of clinical translation for precise diagnostic and personalized medicine.

  10. Health System Implications of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Amy L.; Burke, Wylie

    2010-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer personal genome testing is now widely available to consumers. Proponents argue that knowledge is power but critics worry about consumer safety and potential harms resulting from misinterpretation of test information. In this article, we consider the health system implications of direct-to-consumer personal genome testing, focusing on issues of accountability, both corporate and professional. PMID:21071927

  11. Applying Genomic and Bioinformatic Resources to Human Adenovirus Genomes for Use in Vaccine Development and for Applications in Vector Development for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Jason; Walsh, Michael P.; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan; Zhang, Qiwei; Seto, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Technological advances and increasingly cost-effect methodologies in DNA sequencing and computational analysis are providing genome and proteome data for human adenovirus research. Applying these tools, data and derived knowledge to the development of vaccines against these pathogens will provide effective prophylactics. The same data and approaches can be applied to vector development for gene delivery in gene therapy and vaccine delivery protocols. Examination of several field strain genomes and their analyses provide examples of data that are available using these approaches. An example of the development of HAdV-B3 both as a vaccine and also as a vector is presented. PMID:21994597

  12. Genomic expression differences between cutaneous cells from red hair color individuals and black hair color individuals based on bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Gimenez-Xavier, Pol; Visconti, Alessia; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Garcia-García, Francisco; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Escamez, Maria José; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Bataille, Veronique; Del Río, Marcela; Dopazo, Joaquín; Falchi, Mario; Puig, Susana

    2016-12-24

    The MC1R gene plays a crucial role in pigmentation synthesis. Loss-of-function MC1R variants, which impair protein function, are associated with red hair color (RHC) phenotype and increased skin cancer risk. Cultured cutaneous cells bearing loss-of-function MC1R variants show a distinct gene expression profile compared to wild-type MC1R cultured cutaneous cells. We analysed the gene signature associated with RHC co-cultured melanocytes and keratinocytes by Protein-Protein interaction (PPI) network analysis to identify genes related with non-functional MC1R variants. From two detected networks, we selected 23 nodes as hub genes based on topological parameters. Differential expression of hub genes was then evaluated in healthy skin biopsies from RHC and black hair color (BHC) individuals. We also compared gene expression in melanoma tumors from individuals with RHC versus BHC. Gene expression in normal skin from RHC cutaneous cells showed dysregulation in 8 out of 23 hub genes (CLN3, ATG10, WIPI2, SNX2, GABARAPL2, YWHA, PCNA and GBAS). Hub genes did not differ between melanoma tumors in RHC versus BHC individuals. The study suggests that healthy skin cells from RHC individuals present a constitutive genomic deregulation associated with the red hair phenotype and identify novel genes involved in melanocyte biology.

  13. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2016-03-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations.

  14. Genomic insights into ayurvedic and western approaches to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Prasher, Bhavana; Gibson, Greg; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-03-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient Indian system of medicine documented and practised since 1500 B.C., follows a systems approach that has interesting parallels with contemporary personalized genomic medicine approaches to the understanding and management of health and disease. It is based on the trisutra, which are the three aspects of causes, features and therapeutics that are interconnected through a common organizing principle termed 'tridosha'. Tridosha comprise three ascertainable physiological entities; vata (kinetic), pitta (metabolic) and kapha (potential) that are pervasive across systems, work in conjunction with each other, respond to the external environment and maintain homeostasis. Each individual is born with a specific proportion of tridosha that are not only genetically determined but also influenced by the environment during foetal development. Jointly they determine a person's basic constitution, which is termed their 'prakriti'. Development and progressi on of different diseases with their subtypes are thought to depend on the origin and mechanism of perturbation of the doshas, and the aim of therapeutic practice is to ensure that the doshas retain their homeostatic state. Similarly, western systems biology epitomized by translational P4 medicine envisages the integration of multiscalar genetic, cellular, physiological and environmental networks to predict phenotypic outcomes of perturbations. In this perspective article, we aim to outline the shape of a unifying scaffold that may allow the two intellectual traditions to enhance one another. Specifically, we illustrate how a unique integrative 'Ayurgenomics' approach can be used to integrate the trisutra concept of Ayurveda with genomics. We observe biochemical and molecular correlates of prakriti and show how these differ significantly in processes that are linked to intermediate patho-phenotypes, known to take different course in diseases. We also observe a significant enr ichment of the highly connected

  15. iHOPerator: user-scripting a personalized bioinformatics Web, starting with the iHOP website.

    PubMed

    Good, Benjamin M; Kawas, Edward A; Kuo, Byron Yu-Lin; Wilkinson, Mark D

    2006-12-15

    User-scripts are programs stored in Web browsers that can manipulate the content of websites prior to display in the browser. They provide a novel mechanism by which users can conveniently gain increased control over the content and the display of the information presented to them on the Web. As the Web is the primary medium by which scientists retrieve biological information, any improvements in the mechanisms that govern the utility or accessibility of this information may have profound effects. GreaseMonkey is a Mozilla Firefox extension that facilitates the development and deployment of user-scripts for the Firefox web-browser. We utilize this to enhance the content and the presentation of the iHOP (information Hyperlinked Over Proteins) website. The iHOPerator is a GreaseMonkey user-script that augments the gene-centred pages on iHOP by providing a compact, configurable visualization of the defining information for each gene and by enabling additional data, such as biochemical pathway diagrams, to be collected automatically from third party resources and displayed in the same browsing context. This open-source script provides an extension to the iHOP website, demonstrating how user-scripts can personalize and enhance the Web browsing experience in a relevant biological setting. The novel, user-driven controls over the content and the display of Web resources made possible by user-scripts, such as the iHOPerator, herald the beginning of a transition from a resource-centric to a user-centric Web experience. We believe that this transition is a necessary step in the development of Web technology that will eventually result in profound improvements in the way life scientists interact with information.

  16. [Construction and application of bioinformatic analysis platform for aquatic pathogen based on the MilkyWay-2 supercomputer].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Fang; Ningqiu, Li; Xiaozhe, Fu; Kaibin, Li; Qiang, Lin; Lihui, Liu; Cunbin, Shi; Shuqin, Wu

    2015-07-01

    As a key component of life science, bioinformatics has been widely applied in genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. However, the requirement of high-performance computers rather than common personal computers for constructing a bioinformatics platform significantly limited the application of bioinformatics in aquatic science. In this study, we constructed a bioinformatic analysis platform for aquatic pathogen based on the MilkyWay-2 supercomputer. The platform consisted of three functional modules, including genomic and transcriptomic sequencing data analysis, protein structure prediction, and molecular dynamics simulations. To validate the practicability of the platform, we performed bioinformatic analysis on aquatic pathogenic organisms. For example, genes of Flavobacterium johnsoniae M168 were identified and annotated via Blast searches, GO and InterPro annotations. Protein structural models for five small segments of grass carp reovirus HZ-08 were constructed by homology modeling. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on out membrane protein A of Aeromonas hydrophila, and the changes of system temperature, total energy, root mean square deviation and conformation of the loops during equilibration were also observed. These results showed that the bioinformatic analysis platform for aquatic pathogen has been successfully built on the MilkyWay-2 supercomputer. This study will provide insights into the construction of bioinformatic analysis platform for other subjects.

  17. Bioinformatic Analyses of Integral Membrane Transport Proteins Encoded Within the Genome of the Planctomycetes species, Rhodopirellula baltica

    PubMed Central

    Paparoditis, Philipp; Vastermark, Ake; Le, Andrew J.; Fuerst, John A.; Saier, Milton H.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopirellula baltica (R. baltica) is a Planctomycete, known to have intracellular membranes. Because of its unusual cell structure and ecological significance, we have conducted comprehensive analyses of its transmembrane transport proteins. The complete proteome of R. baltica was screened against the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB) to identify recognizable integral membrane transport proteins. 342 proteins were identified with a high degree of confidence, and these fell into several different classes. R. baltica encodes in its genome channels (12%), secondary carriers (33%), and primary active transport proteins (41%) in addition to classes represented in smaller numbers. Relative to most non-marine bacteria, R. baltica possesses a larger number of sodium-dependent symporters but fewer proton-dependent symporters, and it has dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethyl-amine-oxide (TMAO) reductases, consistent with its Na+-rich marine environment. R. baltica also possesses a Na+-translocating NADH:quinone dehydrogenase (Na+-NDH), a Na+ efflux decarboxylase, two Na+-exporting ABC pumps, two Na+-translocating F-type ATPases, two Na+:H+ antiporters and two K+:H+ antiporters. Flagellar motility probably depends on the sodium electrochemical gradient. Surprisingly, R. baltica also has a complete set of H+-translocating electron transport complexes similar to those present in β-proteobacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria. The transport proteins identified proved to be typical of the bacterial domain with little or no indication of the presence of eukaryotic-type transporters. However, novel functionally uncharacterized multispanning membrane proteins were identified, some of which are found only in Rhodopirellula species, but others of which are widely distributed in bacteria. The analyses lead to predictions regarding the physiology, ecology and evolution of R. baltica. PMID:23969110

  18. The Human Gene Mutation Database: building a comprehensive mutation repository for clinical and molecular genetics, diagnostic testing and personalized genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Peter D; Mort, Matthew; Ball, Edward V; Shaw, Katy; Phillips, Andrew; Cooper, David N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD®) is a comprehensive collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are associated with, human inherited disease. By June 2013, the database contained over 141,000 different lesions detected in over 5,700 different genes, with new mutation entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 10,000 per annum. HGMD was originally established in 1996 for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes. However, it has since acquired a much broader utility as a central unified disease-oriented mutation repository utilized by human molecular geneticists, genome scientists, molecular biologists, clinicians and genetic counsellors as well as by those specializing in biopharmaceuticals, bioinformatics and personalized genomics. The public version of HGMD (http://www.hgmd.org) is freely available to registered users from academic institutions/non-profit organizations whilst the subscription version (HGMD Professional) is available to academic, clinical and commercial users under license via BIOBASE GmbH.

  19. Generations of interdisciplinarity in bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Andrew; Lewis, Jamie; Williams, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics, a specialism propelled into relevance by the Human Genome Project and the subsequent -omic turn in the life science, is an interdisciplinary field of research. Qualitative work on the disciplinary identities of bioinformaticians has revealed the tensions involved in work in this “borderland.” As part of our ongoing work on the emergence of bioinformatics, between 2010 and 2011, we conducted a survey of United Kingdom-based academic bioinformaticians. Building on insights drawn from our fieldwork over the past decade, we present results from this survey relevant to a discussion of disciplinary generation and stabilization. Not only is there evidence of an attitudinal divide between the different disciplinary cultures that make up bioinformatics, but there are distinctions between the forerunners, founders and the followers; as inter/disciplines mature, they face challenges that are both inter-disciplinary and inter-generational in nature. PMID:27453689

  20. Generations of interdisciplinarity in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Andrew; Lewis, Jamie; Williams, Matthew L

    2016-04-02

    Bioinformatics, a specialism propelled into relevance by the Human Genome Project and the subsequent -omic turn in the life science, is an interdisciplinary field of research. Qualitative work on the disciplinary identities of bioinformaticians has revealed the tensions involved in work in this "borderland." As part of our ongoing work on the emergence of bioinformatics, between 2010 and 2011, we conducted a survey of United Kingdom-based academic bioinformaticians. Building on insights drawn from our fieldwork over the past decade, we present results from this survey relevant to a discussion of disciplinary generation and stabilization. Not only is there evidence of an attitudinal divide between the different disciplinary cultures that make up bioinformatics, but there are distinctions between the forerunners, founders and the followers; as inter/disciplines mature, they face challenges that are both inter-disciplinary and inter-generational in nature.

  1. Risk estimates for complex disorders: comparing personal genome testing and family history.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, Lila; Shuman, Cheryl; Hayeems, Robin; Dupuis, Annie; Pu, Shuye; Wodak, Shoshana; Chitayat, David; Velsher, Lea; Davies, Jill

    2014-03-01

    Personal genome testing allows the identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with an increased risk for common complex disorders. An area of concern in the use of personal genome testing is how risk estimates generated differ from traditional measures of risk (e.g., family history analysis). We sought to analyze the concordance of risk estimates generated by family history analysis and by personal genome testing. Risk categorizations for 20 complex conditions included in Navigenics personal genome testing were compared with risk categorization estimates derived from family history assessment using the kappa (κ) statistic. The only conditions showing slight agreement between risk assessment methods were Alzheimer disease (κ = 0.131), breast cancer (κ = 0.154), and deep vein thrombosis (κ = 0.201) in females, and colon cancer (κ = 0.124) in males. Eighty-six individuals (11.4%) were found to have additional genetic risks not assessed by personal genome testing after family and medical history assessment, including 38 individuals with family histories suggestive of hereditary cancer syndromes. Discordance between personal genome testing and family history risk estimates suggests that these methods may provide independent information that could be used in a complementary manner. Results also support that eliciting family history adds value to overall risk assessment for individuals undergoing personal genome testing.

  2. Informed decision-making among students analyzing their personal genomes on a whole genome sequencing course: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple laboratories now offer clinical whole genome sequencing (WGS). We anticipate WGS becoming routinely used in research and clinical practice. Many institutions are exploring how best to educate geneticists and other professionals about WGS. Providing students in WGS courses with the option to analyze their own genome sequence is one strategy that might enhance students’ engagement and motivation to learn about personal genomics. However, if this option is presented to students, it is vital they make informed decisions, do not feel pressured into analyzing their own genomes by their course directors or peers, and feel free to analyze a third-party genome if they prefer. We therefore developed a 26-hour introductory genomics course in part to help students make informed decisions about whether to receive personal WGS data in a subsequent advanced genomics course. In the advanced course, they had the option to receive their own personal genome data, or an anonymous genome, at no financial cost to them. Our primary aims were to examine whether students made informed decisions regarding analyzing their personal genomes, and whether there was evidence that the introductory course enabled the students to make a more informed decision. Methods This was a longitudinal cohort study in which students (N = 19) completed questionnaires assessing their intentions, informed decision-making, attitudes and knowledge before (T1) and after (T2) the introductory course, and before the advanced course (T3). Informed decision-making was assessed using the Decisional Conflict Scale. Results At the start of the introductory course (T1), most (17/19) students intended to receive their personal WGS data in the subsequent course, but many expressed conflict around this decision. Decisional conflict decreased after the introductory course (T2) indicating there was an increase in informed decision-making, and did not change before the advanced course (T3). This suggests

  3. Prescription medication changes following direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing: Findings from the Impact of Personal Genomics (PGen) Study

    PubMed Central

    Carere, Deanna Alexis; VanderWeele, Tyler; Vassy, Jason L.; van der Wouden, Cathelijne; Roberts, J. Scott; Kraft, Peter; Green, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To measure the frequency of prescription medication changes following direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing (DTC-PGT) and their association with the pharmacogenomic results received. Methods New DTC-PGT customers were enrolled in 2012 and completed surveys prior to return of results and 6 months post-results; DTC-PGT results were linked to survey data. ‘Atypical response’ pharmacogenomic results were defined as those indicating an increase or decrease in risk of an adverse drug event or likelihood of therapeutic benefit. At follow-up, participants reported prescription medication changes and health care provider consultation. Results Follow-up data were available from 961 participants, of which 54 (5.6%) reported changing a medication they were taking, or starting a new medication, due to their DTC-PGT results. Of these, 45 (83.3%) reported consulting with a health care provider regarding the change. Pharmacogenomic results were available for 961 participants, of which 875 (91.2%) received ≥1 atypical response result. For each such result received, the odds of reporting a prescription medication change increased 1.57 times (95% confidence interval = 1.17, 2.11). Conclusion Receipt of pharmacogenomic results indicating atypical drug response is common with DTC-PGT, and associated with prescription medication changes; however, fewer than 1% of consumers report unsupervised changes at 6 months post-testing. PMID:27657683

  4. Bioinformatics: perspectives for the future.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2004-12-30

    I give here a very personal perspective of Bioinformatics and its future, starting by discussing the origin of the term (and area) of bioinformatics and proceeding by trying to foresee the development of related issues, including pattern recognition/data mining, the need to reintegrate biology, the potential of complex networks as a powerful and flexible framework for bioinformatics and the interplay between bio- and neuroinformatics. Human resource formation and market perspective are also addressed. Given the complexity and vastness of these issues and concepts, as well as the limited size of a scientific article and finite patience of the reader, these perspectives are surely incomplete and biased. However, it is expected that some of the questions and trends that are identified will motivate discussions during the IcoBiCoBi round table (with the same name as this article) and perhaps provide a more ample perspective among the participants of that conference and the readers of this text.

  5. Bioinformatics meets parasitology.

    PubMed

    Cantacessi, C; Campbell, B E; Jex, A R; Young, N D; Hall, R S; Ranganathan, S; Gasser, R B

    2012-05-01

    The advent and integration of high-throughput '-omics' technologies (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, glycomics and lipidomics) are revolutionizing the way biology is done, allowing the systems biology of organisms to be explored. These technologies are now providing unique opportunities for global, molecular investigations of parasites. For example, studies of a transcriptome (all transcripts in an organism, tissue or cell) have become instrumental in providing insights into aspects of gene expression, regulation and function in a parasite, which is a major step to understanding its biology. The purpose of this article was to review recent applications of next-generation sequencing technologies and bioinformatic tools to large-scale investigations of the transcriptomes of parasitic nematodes of socio-economic significance (particularly key species of the order Strongylida) and to indicate the prospects and implications of these explorations for developing novel methods of parasite intervention.

  6. Taking Bioinformatics to Systems Medicine.

    PubMed

    van Kampen, Antoine H C; Moerland, Perry D

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine promotes a range of approaches and strategies to study human health and disease at a systems level with the aim of improving the overall well-being of (healthy) individuals, and preventing, diagnosing, or curing disease. In this chapter we discuss how bioinformatics critically contributes to systems medicine. First, we explain the role of bioinformatics in the management and analysis of data. In particular we show the importance of publicly available biological and clinical repositories to support systems medicine studies. Second, we discuss how the integration and analysis of multiple types of omics data through integrative bioinformatics may facilitate the determination of more predictive and robust disease signatures, lead to a better understanding of (patho)physiological molecular mechanisms, and facilitate personalized medicine. Third, we focus on network analysis and discuss how gene networks can be constructed from omics data and how these networks can be decomposed into smaller modules. We discuss how the resulting modules can be used to generate experimentally testable hypotheses, provide insight into disease mechanisms, and lead to predictive models. Throughout, we provide several examples demonstrating how bioinformatics contributes to systems medicine and discuss future challenges in bioinformatics that need to be addressed to enable the advancement of systems medicine.

  7. Microbial bioinformatics 2020.

    PubMed

    Pallen, Mark J

    2016-09-01

    Microbial bioinformatics in 2020 will remain a vibrant, creative discipline, adding value to the ever-growing flood of new sequence data, while embracing novel technologies and fresh approaches. Databases and search strategies will struggle to cope and manual curation will not be sustainable during the scale-up to the million-microbial-genome era. Microbial taxonomy will have to adapt to a situation in which most microorganisms are discovered and characterised through the analysis of sequences. Genome sequencing will become a routine approach in clinical and research laboratories, with fresh demands for interpretable user-friendly outputs. The "internet of things" will penetrate healthcare systems, so that even a piece of hospital plumbing might have its own IP address that can be integrated with pathogen genome sequences. Microbiome mania will continue, but the tide will turn from molecular barcoding towards metagenomics. Crowd-sourced analyses will collide with cloud computing, but eternal vigilance will be the price of preventing the misinterpretation and overselling of microbial sequence data. Output from hand-held sequencers will be analysed on mobile devices. Open-source training materials will address the need for the development of a skilled labour force. As we boldly go into the third decade of the twenty-first century, microbial sequence space will remain the final frontier! © 2016 The Author. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Privacy Preserving PCA on Distributed Bioinformatics Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, new bioinformatics technologies, such as gene expression microarray, genome-wide association study, proteomics, and metabolomics, have been widely used to simultaneously identify a huge number of human genomic/genetic biomarkers, generate a tremendously large amount of data, and dramatically increase the knowledge on human…

  9. Privacy Preserving PCA on Distributed Bioinformatics Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, new bioinformatics technologies, such as gene expression microarray, genome-wide association study, proteomics, and metabolomics, have been widely used to simultaneously identify a huge number of human genomic/genetic biomarkers, generate a tremendously large amount of data, and dramatically increase the knowledge on human…

  10. Personal Genome Sequencing in Ostensibly Healthy Individuals and the PeopleSeq Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Linderman, Michael D.; Nielsen, Daiva E.; Green, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of ostensibly healthy individuals have had their exome or genome sequenced, but a much smaller number of these individuals have received any personal genomic results from that sequencing. We term those projects in which ostensibly healthy participants can receive sequencing-derived genetic findings and may also have access to their genomic data as participatory predispositional personal genome sequencing (PPGS). Here we are focused on genome sequencing applied in a pre-symptomatic context and so define PPGS to exclude diagnostic genome sequencing intended to identify the molecular cause of suspected or diagnosed genetic disease. In this report we describe the design of completed and underway PPGS projects, briefly summarize the results reported to date and introduce the PeopleSeq Consortium, a newly formed collaboration of PPGS projects designed to collect much-needed longitudinal outcome data. PMID:27023617

  11. CGAT: a model for immersive personalized training in computational genomics.

    PubMed

    Sims, David; Ponting, Chris P; Heger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    How should the next generation of genomics scientists be trained while simultaneously pursuing high quality and diverse research? CGAT, the Computational Genomics Analysis and Training programme, was set up in 2010 by the UK Medical Research Council to complement its investment in next-generation sequencing capacity. CGAT was conceived around the twin goals of training future leaders in genome biology and medicine, and providing much needed capacity to UK science for analysing genome scale data sets. Here we outline the training programme employed by CGAT and describe how it dovetails with collaborative research projects to launch scientists on the road towards independent research careers in genomics. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Personalized health care in 2013: a status report on the impact of genomics.

    PubMed

    Snyderman, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    This issue of the NCMJ describes the impact that genomics has had on the practice of medicine in the decade since the full sequencing of the human genome was completed in 2003. Specifically, it reports on how genomics is affecting health care delivery, describes the concept of personalized health care, and discusses the role that genomics plays in such care. The commentaries and sidebars that follow highlight the opportunities and challenges of bringing genomics into clinical practice. Reading these articles will hopefully give clinicians and others a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of genomic technologies. Emerging capabilities, resulting in part from genomic research, are providing an opportunity to move health care from a reactive, disease-focused model to one that is personalized, predictive, proactive, precise, and patient-centered. Genomics and related technologies have already changed many approaches to care, particularly in the field of oncology, and I believe they will help to transform our overall approach to the delivery of health care. With the rapidly accumulating capabilities being developed and the focus on patient-centered and personalized care, I expect that the practice of medicine will become proactive and personalized within the next decade.

  13. Informing the Design of Direct-to-Consumer Interactive Personal Genomics Reports

    PubMed Central

    Shaer, Orit; Okerlund, Johanna; Balestra, Martina; Stowell, Elizabeth; Ascher, Laura; Bi, Joanna; Schlenker, Claire; Ball, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, people who sought direct-to-consumer genetic testing services have been increasingly confronted with an unprecedented amount of personal genomic information, which influences their decisions, emotional state, and well-being. However, these users of direct-to-consumer genetic services, who vary in their education and interests, frequently have little relevant experience or tools for understanding, reasoning about, and interacting with their personal genomic data. Online interactive techniques can play a central role in making personal genomic data useful for these users. Objective We sought to (1) identify the needs of diverse users as they make sense of their personal genomic data, (2) consequently develop effective interactive visualizations of genomic trait data to address these users’ needs, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of the developed visualizations in facilitating comprehension. Methods The first two user studies, conducted with 63 volunteers in the Personal Genome Project and with 36 personal genomic users who participated in a design workshop, respectively, employed surveys and interviews to identify the needs and expectations of diverse users. Building on the two initial studies, the third study was conducted with 730 Amazon Mechanical Turk users and employed a controlled experimental design to examine the effectiveness of different design interventions on user comprehension. Results The first two studies identified searching, comparing, sharing, and organizing data as fundamental to users’ understanding of personal genomic data. The third study demonstrated that interactive and visual design interventions could improve the understandability of personal genomic reports for consumers. In particular, results showed that a new interactive bubble chart visualization designed for the study resulted in the highest comprehension scores, as well as the highest perceived comprehension scores. These scores were significantly

  14. Motivations and Perceptions of Early Adopters of Personalized Genomics: Perspectives from Research Participants

    PubMed Central

    Gollust, S.E.; Gordon, E.S.; Zayac, C.; Griffin, G.; Christman, M.F.; Pyeritz, R.E.; Wawak, L.; Bernhardt, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: To predict the potential public health impact of personal genomics, empirical research on public perceptions of these services is needed. In this study, ‘early adopters’ of personal genomics were surveyed to assess their motivations, perceptions and intentions. Methods: Participants were recruited from everyone who registered to attend an enrollment event for the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative, a United States-based (Camden, N.J.) research study of the utility of personalized medicine, between March 31, 2009 and April 1, 2010 (n = 369). Participants completed an Internet-based survey about their motivations, awareness of personalized medicine, perceptions of study risks and benefits, and intentions to share results with health care providers. Results: Respondents were motivated to participate for their own curiosity and to find out their disease risk to improve their health. Fewer than 10% expressed deterministic perspectives about genetic risk, but 32% had misperceptions about the research study or personal genomic testing. Most respondents perceived the study to have health-related benefits. Nearly all (92%) intended to share their results with physicians, primarily to request specific medical recommendations. Conclusion: Early adopters of personal genomics are prospectively enthusiastic about using genomic profiling information to improve their health, in close consultation with their physicians. This suggests that early users (i.e. through direct-to-consumer companies or research) may follow up with the health care system. Further research should address whether intentions to seek care match actual behaviors. PMID:21654153

  15. Bioinformatics and Moonlighting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Sergio; Franco, Luís; Calvo, Alejandra; Ferragut, Gabriela; Hermoso, Antoni; Amela, Isaac; Gómez, Antonio; Querol, Enrique; Cedano, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyze and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics, and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are (a) remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, (b) detection of functional motifs and domains, (c) analysis of data from protein–protein interaction databases (PPIs), (d) match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE), and (e) mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs) has the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations – it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences – but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/), previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses. PMID:26157797

  16. Ethical considerations of research policy for personal genome analysis: the approach of the Genome Science Project in Japan.

    PubMed

    Minari, Jusaku; Shirai, Tetsuya; Kato, Kazuto

    2014-12-01

    As evidenced by high-throughput sequencers, genomic technologies have recently undergone radical advances. These technologies enable comprehensive sequencing of personal genomes considerably more efficiently and less expensively than heretofore. These developments present a challenge to the conventional framework of biomedical ethics; under these changing circumstances, each research project has to develop a pragmatic research policy. Based on the experience with a new large-scale project-the Genome Science Project-this article presents a novel approach to conducting a specific policy for personal genome research in the Japanese context. In creating an original informed-consent form template for the project, we present a two-tiered process: making the draft of the template following an analysis of national and international policies; refining the draft template in conjunction with genome project researchers for practical application. Through practical use of the template, we have gained valuable experience in addressing challenges in the ethical review process, such as the importance of sharing details of the latest developments in genomics with members of research ethics committees. We discuss certain limitations of the conventional concept of informed consent and its governance system and suggest the potential of an alternative process using information technology.

  17. What can whole genome expression data tell us about the ecology and evolution of personality?

    PubMed

    Bell, Alison M; Aubin-Horth, Nadia

    2010-12-27

    Consistent individual differences in behaviour, aka personality, pose several evolutionary questions. For example, it is difficult to explain within-individual consistency in behaviour because behavioural plasticity is often advantageous. In addition, selection erodes heritable behavioural variation that is related to fitness, therefore we wish to know the mechanisms that can maintain between-individual variation in behaviour. In this paper, we argue that whole genome expression data can reveal new insights into the proximate mechanisms underlying personality, as well as its evolutionary consequences. After introducing the basics of whole genome expression analysis, we show how whole genome expression data can be used to understand whether behaviours in different contexts are affected by the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest strategies for using the power of genomics to understand what maintains behavioural variation, to study the evolution of behavioural correlations and to compare personality traits across diverse organisms.

  18. What can whole genome expression data tell us about the ecology and evolution of personality?

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Alison M.; Aubin-Horth, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    Consistent individual differences in behaviour, aka personality, pose several evolutionary questions. For example, it is difficult to explain within-individual consistency in behaviour because behavioural plasticity is often advantageous. In addition, selection erodes heritable behavioural variation that is related to fitness, therefore we wish to know the mechanisms that can maintain between-individual variation in behaviour. In this paper, we argue that whole genome expression data can reveal new insights into the proximate mechanisms underlying personality, as well as its evolutionary consequences. After introducing the basics of whole genome expression analysis, we show how whole genome expression data can be used to understand whether behaviours in different contexts are affected by the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest strategies for using the power of genomics to understand what maintains behavioural variation, to study the evolution of behavioural correlations and to compare personality traits across diverse organisms. PMID:21078652

  19. An analytical framework for optimizing variant discovery from personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Highnam, Gareth; Wang, Jason J.; Kusler, Dean; Zook, Justin; Vijayan, Vinaya; Leibovich, Nir; Mittelman, David

    2015-01-01

    The standardization and performance testing of analysis tools is a prerequisite to widespread adoption of genome-wide sequencing, particularly in the clinic. However, performance testing is currently complicated by the paucity of standards and comparison metrics, as well as by the heterogeneity in sequencing platforms, applications and protocols. Here we present the genome comparison and analytic testing (GCAT) platform to facilitate development of performance metrics and comparisons of analysis tools across these metrics. Performance is reported through interactive visualizations of benchmark and performance testing data, with support for data slicing and filtering. The platform is freely accessible at http://www.bioplanet.com/gcat. PMID:25711446

  20. Simultaneous Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing with Short Overlapping Amplicons Suitable for Degraded DNA Using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, Lakshmi; Ralf, Arwin; van Oven, Mannis; Kupiec, Tomasz; Chang, Joseph; Lagacé, Robert; Kayser, Manfred

    2015-12-01

    Whole mitochondrial (mt) genome analysis enables a considerable increase in analysis throughput, and improves the discriminatory power to the maximum possible phylogenetic resolution. Most established protocols on the different massively parallel sequencing (MPS) platforms, however, invariably involve the PCR amplification of large fragments, typically several kilobases in size, which may fail due to mtDNA fragmentation in the available degraded materials. We introduce a MPS tiling approach for simultaneous whole human mt genome sequencing using 161 short overlapping amplicons (average 200 bp) with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. We illustrate the performance of this new method by sequencing 20 DNA samples belonging to different worldwide mtDNA haplogroups. Additional quality control, particularly regarding the potential detection of nuclear insertions of mtDNA (NUMTs), was performed by comparative MPS analysis using the conventional long-range amplification method. Preliminary sensitivity testing revealed that detailed haplogroup inference was feasible with 100 pg genomic input DNA. Complete mt genome coverage was achieved from DNA samples experimentally degraded down to genomic fragment sizes of about 220 bp, and up to 90% coverage from naturally degraded samples. Overall, we introduce a new approach for whole mt genome MPS analysis from degraded and nondegraded materials relevant to resolve and infer maternal genetic ancestry at complete resolution in anthropological, evolutionary, medical, and forensic applications.

  1. Simultaneous Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing with Short Overlapping Amplicons Suitable for Degraded DNA Using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine

    PubMed Central

    Chaitanya, Lakshmi; Ralf, Arwin; van Oven, Mannis; Kupiec, Tomasz; Chang, Joseph; Lagacé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Whole mitochondrial (mt) genome analysis enables a considerable increase in analysis throughput, and improves the discriminatory power to the maximum possible phylogenetic resolution. Most established protocols on the different massively parallel sequencing (MPS) platforms, however, invariably involve the PCR amplification of large fragments, typically several kilobases in size, which may fail due to mtDNA fragmentation in the available degraded materials. We introduce a MPS tiling approach for simultaneous whole human mt genome sequencing using 161 short overlapping amplicons (average 200 bp) with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. We illustrate the performance of this new method by sequencing 20 DNA samples belonging to different worldwide mtDNA haplogroups. Additional quality control, particularly regarding the potential detection of nuclear insertions of mtDNA (NUMTs), was performed by comparative MPS analysis using the conventional long‐range amplification method. Preliminary sensitivity testing revealed that detailed haplogroup inference was feasible with 100 pg genomic input DNA. Complete mt genome coverage was achieved from DNA samples experimentally degraded down to genomic fragment sizes of about 220 bp, and up to 90% coverage from naturally degraded samples. Overall, we introduce a new approach for whole mt genome MPS analysis from degraded and nondegraded materials relevant to resolve and infer maternal genetic ancestry at complete resolution in anthropological, evolutionary, medical, and forensic applications. PMID:26387877

  2. Personal utility is inherent to direct-to-consumer genomic testing.

    PubMed

    Chung, Matthew Wai Heng; Ng, Joseph Chi Fung

    2016-10-01

    People for and against direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic tests are arguing around two issues: first, on whether an autonomy-based account can justify the tests; second, on whether the tests bring any personal utility. Bunnik et al, in an article published in this journal, were doubtful on the latter, especially in clinically irrelevant and uninterpretable sequences, and how far this claim could go in the justification. Here we argue that personal utility is inherent to DTC genomic tests and their results. We discuss Bunnik et al's account of personal utility and identify problems in its motivation and application. We then explore concepts like utility and entertainment which suggest that DTC genomic tests bring personal utility to their consumers, both in the motivation and the content of the tests. This points to an alternative account of personal utility which entails that entertainment value alone is adequate to justify DTC genomic tests, given appropriate strategies to communicate tests results with the consumers. It supports the autonomy-based justification of the test by showing that DTC genomic test itself stands as a valuable option and facilitates meaningful choice of the people. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Computational Biology and Bioinformatics in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Fatumo, Segun A.; Adoga, Moses P.; Ojo, Opeolu O.; Oluwagbemi, Olugbenga; Adeoye, Tolulope; Ewejobi, Itunuoluwa; Adebiyi, Marion; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Bewaji, Clement; Nashiru, Oyekanmi

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, major advances in the field of molecular biology, coupled with advances in genomic technologies, have led to an explosive growth in the biological data generated by the scientific community. The critical need to process and analyze such a deluge of data and turn it into useful knowledge has caused bioinformatics to gain prominence and importance. Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary research area that applies techniques, methodologies, and tools in computer and information science to solve biological problems. In Nigeria, bioinformatics has recently played a vital role in the advancement of biological sciences. As a developing country, the importance of bioinformatics is rapidly gaining acceptance, and bioinformatics groups comprised of biologists, computer scientists, and computer engineers are being constituted at Nigerian universities and research institutes. In this article, we present an overview of bioinformatics education and research in Nigeria. We also discuss professional societies and academic and research institutions that play central roles in advancing the discipline in Nigeria. Finally, we propose strategies that can bolster bioinformatics education and support from policy makers in Nigeria, with potential positive implications for other developing countries. PMID:24763310

  4. Computational biology and bioinformatics in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fatumo, Segun A; Adoga, Moses P; Ojo, Opeolu O; Oluwagbemi, Olugbenga; Adeoye, Tolulope; Ewejobi, Itunuoluwa; Adebiyi, Marion; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Bewaji, Clement; Nashiru, Oyekanmi

    2014-04-01

    Over the past few decades, major advances in the field of molecular biology, coupled with advances in genomic technologies, have led to an explosive growth in the biological data generated by the scientific community. The critical need to process and analyze such a deluge of data and turn it into useful knowledge has caused bioinformatics to gain prominence and importance. Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary research area that applies techniques, methodologies, and tools in computer and information science to solve biological problems. In Nigeria, bioinformatics has recently played a vital role in the advancement of biological sciences. As a developing country, the importance of bioinformatics is rapidly gaining acceptance, and bioinformatics groups comprised of biologists, computer scientists, and computer engineers are being constituted at Nigerian universities and research institutes. In this article, we present an overview of bioinformatics education and research in Nigeria. We also discuss professional societies and academic and research institutions that play central roles in advancing the discipline in Nigeria. Finally, we propose strategies that can bolster bioinformatics education and support from policy makers in Nigeria, with potential positive implications for other developing countries.

  5. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  6. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Gray, Joe

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  7. Personal and population genomics of human regulatory variation.

    PubMed

    Vernot, Benjamin; Stergachis, Andrew B; Maurano, Matthew T; Vierstra, Jeff; Neph, Shane; Thurman, Robert E; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Akey, Joshua M

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics and evolutionary forces acting on regulatory variation in humans remains elusive because of the difficulty in defining functionally important noncoding DNA. Here, we combine genome-scale maps of regulatory DNA marked by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) from 138 cell and tissue types with whole-genome sequences of 53 geographically diverse individuals in order to better delimit the patterns of regulatory variation in humans. We estimate that individuals likely harbor many more functionally important variants in regulatory DNA compared with protein-coding regions, although they are likely to have, on average, smaller effect sizes. Moreover, we demonstrate that there is significant heterogeneity in the level of functional constraint in regulatory DNA among different cell types. We also find marked variability in functional constraint among transcription factor motifs in regulatory DNA, with sequence motifs for major developmental regulators, such as HOX proteins, exhibiting levels of constraint comparable to protein-coding regions. Finally, we perform a genome-wide scan of recent positive selection and identify hundreds of novel substrates of adaptive regulatory evolution that are enriched for biologically interesting pathways such as melanogenesis and adipocytokine signaling. These data and results provide new insights into patterns of regulatory variation in individuals and populations and demonstrate that a large proportion of functionally important variation lies beyond the exome.

  8. Personal and population genomics of human regulatory variation

    PubMed Central

    Vernot, Benjamin; Stergachis, Andrew B.; Maurano, Matthew T.; Vierstra, Jeff; Neph, Shane; Thurman, Robert E.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Akey, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics and evolutionary forces acting on regulatory variation in humans remains elusive because of the difficulty in defining functionally important noncoding DNA. Here, we combine genome-scale maps of regulatory DNA marked by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) from 138 cell and tissue types with whole-genome sequences of 53 geographically diverse individuals in order to better delimit the patterns of regulatory variation in humans. We estimate that individuals likely harbor many more functionally important variants in regulatory DNA compared with protein-coding regions, although they are likely to have, on average, smaller effect sizes. Moreover, we demonstrate that there is significant heterogeneity in the level of functional constraint in regulatory DNA among different cell types. We also find marked variability in functional constraint among transcription factor motifs in regulatory DNA, with sequence motifs for major developmental regulators, such as HOX proteins, exhibiting levels of constraint comparable to protein-coding regions. Finally, we perform a genome-wide scan of recent positive selection and identify hundreds of novel substrates of adaptive regulatory evolution that are enriched for biologically interesting pathways such as melanogenesis and adipocytokine signaling. These data and results provide new insights into patterns of regulatory variation in individuals and populations and demonstrate that a large proportion of functionally important variation lies beyond the exome. PMID:22955981

  9. Population genetic inference from personal genome data: impact of ancestry and admixture on human genomic variation.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Jeffrey M; Gravel, Simon; Byrnes, Jake; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Musharoff, Shaila; Bryc, Katarzyna; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Brisbin, Abra; Sheth, Vrunda; Chen, Rong; McLaughlin, Stephen F; Peckham, Heather E; Omberg, Larsson; Bormann Chung, Christina A; Stanley, Sarah; Pearlstein, Kevin; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Auton, Adam; Keinan, Alon; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G; Russell, Archie; Reynolds, Andy; Clark, Andrew G; Reese, Martin G; Lincoln, Stephen E; Butte, Atul J; De La Vega, Francisco M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2012-10-05

    Full sequencing of individual human genomes has greatly expanded our understanding of human genetic variation and population history. Here, we present a systematic analysis of 50 human genomes from 11 diverse global populations sequenced at high coverage. Our sample includes 12 individuals who have admixed ancestry and who have varying degrees of recent (within the last 500 years) African, Native American, and European ancestry. We found over 21 million single-nucleotide variants that contribute to a 1.75-fold range in nucleotide heterozygosity across diverse human genomes. This heterozygosity ranged from a high of one heterozygous site per kilobase in west African genomes to a low of 0.57 heterozygous sites per kilobase in segments inferred to have diploid Native American ancestry from the genomes of Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals. We show evidence of all three continental ancestries in the genomes of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and African American populations, and the genome-wide statistics are highly consistent across individuals from a population once ancestry proportions have been accounted for. Using a generalized linear model, we identified subtle variations across populations in the proportion of neutral versus deleterious variation and found that genome-wide statistics vary in admixed populations even once ancestry proportions have been factored in. We further infer that multiple periods of gene flow shaped the diversity of admixed populations in the Americas-70% of the European ancestry in today's African Americans dates back to European gene flow happening only 7-8 generations ago.

  10. Population Genetic Inference from Personal Genome Data: Impact of Ancestry and Admixture on Human Genomic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Gravel, Simon; Byrnes, Jake; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Musharoff, Shaila; Bryc, Katarzyna; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D.; Brisbin, Abra; Sheth, Vrunda; Chen, Rong; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Omberg, Larsson; Bormann Chung, Christina A.; Stanley, Sarah; Pearlstein, Kevin; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Auton, Adam; Keinan, Alon; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G.; Russell, Archie; Reynolds, Andy; Clark, Andrew G.; Reese, Martin G.; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Butte, Atul J.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    Full sequencing of individual human genomes has greatly expanded our understanding of human genetic variation and population history. Here, we present a systematic analysis of 50 human genomes from 11 diverse global populations sequenced at high coverage. Our sample includes 12 individuals who have admixed ancestry and who have varying degrees of recent (within the last 500 years) African, Native American, and European ancestry. We found over 21 million single-nucleotide variants that contribute to a 1.75-fold range in nucleotide heterozygosity across diverse human genomes. This heterozygosity ranged from a high of one heterozygous site per kilobase in west African genomes to a low of 0.57 heterozygous sites per kilobase in segments inferred to have diploid Native American ancestry from the genomes of Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals. We show evidence of all three continental ancestries in the genomes of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and African American populations, and the genome-wide statistics are highly consistent across individuals from a population once ancestry proportions have been accounted for. Using a generalized linear model, we identified subtle variations across populations in the proportion of neutral versus deleterious variation and found that genome-wide statistics vary in admixed populations even once ancestry proportions have been factored in. We further infer that multiple periods of gene flow shaped the diversity of admixed populations in the Americas—70% of the European ancestry in today’s African Americans dates back to European gene flow happening only 7–8 generations ago. PMID:23040495

  11. Bioinformatics Methods and Tools to Advance Clinical Care. Findings from the Yearbook 2015 Section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics.

    PubMed

    Soualmia, L F; Lecroq, T

    2015-08-13

    To summarize excellent current research in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2015, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,594 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 15 articles for peer-review. The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook's section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles regarding data management and genome medicine that are mainly tool-based papers. In the first article, the authors present PPISURV a tool for uncovering the role of specific genes in cancer survival outcome. The second article describes the classifier PredictSNP which combines six performing tools for predicting disease-related mutations. In the third article, by presenting a high-coverage map of the human proteome using high resolution mass spectrometry, the authors highlight the need for using mass spectrometry to complement genome annotation. The fourth article is also related to patient survival and decision support. The authors present datamining methods of large-scale datasets of past transplants. The objective is to identify chances of survival. The current research activities still attest the continuous convergence of Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, with a focus this year on dedicated tools and methods to advance clinical care. Indeed, there is a need for powerful tools for managing and interpreting complex, large-scale genomic and biological datasets, but also a need for user-friendly tools developed for the clinicians in their daily practice. All the recent research and

  12. A Survey of Scholarly Literature Describing the Field of Bioinformatics Education and Bioinformatics Educational Research

    PubMed Central

    Taleyarkhan, Manaz; Alvarado, Daniela Rivera; Kane, Michael; Springer, John; Clase, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics education can be broadly defined as the teaching and learning of the use of computer and information technology, along with mathematical and statistical analysis for gathering, storing, analyzing, interpreting, and integrating data to solve biological problems. The recent surge of genomics, proteomics, and structural biology in the potential advancement of research and development in complex biomedical systems has created a need for an educated workforce in bioinformatics. However, effectively integrating bioinformatics education through formal and informal educational settings has been a challenge due in part to its cross-disciplinary nature. In this article, we seek to provide an overview of the state of bioinformatics education. This article identifies: 1) current approaches of bioinformatics education at the undergraduate and graduate levels; 2) the most common concepts and skills being taught in bioinformatics education; 3) pedagogical approaches and methods of delivery for conveying bioinformatics concepts and skills; and 4) assessment results on the impact of these programs, approaches, and methods in students’ attitudes or learning. Based on these findings, it is our goal to describe the landscape of scholarly work in this area and, as a result, identify opportunities and challenges in bioinformatics education. PMID:25452484

  13. Personalized Medicine in a New Genomic Era: Ethical and Legal Aspects.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Maria; Rameez, Mansoor Ali Merchant; Hussain, Syed Ather; Madadin, Mohammed; Menezes, Ritesh G

    2016-11-28

    The genome of two completely unrelated individuals is quite similar apart from minor variations called single nucleotide polymorphisms which contribute to the uniqueness of each and every person. These single nucleotide polymorphisms are of great interest clinically as they are useful in figuring out the susceptibility of certain individuals to particular diseases and for recognizing varied responses to pharmacological interventions. This gives rise to the idea of 'personalized medicine' as an exciting new therapeutic science in this genomic era. Personalized medicine suggests a unique treatment strategy based on an individual's genetic make-up. Its key principles revolve around applied pharmaco-genomics, pharmaco-kinetics and pharmaco-proteomics. Herein, the ethical and legal aspects of personalized medicine in a new genomic era are briefly addressed. The ultimate goal is to comprehensively recognize all relevant forms of genetic variation in each individual and be able to interpret this information in a clinically meaningful manner within the ambit of ethical and legal considerations. The authors of this article firmly believe that personalized medicine has the potential to revolutionize the current landscape of medicine as it makes its way into clinical practice.

  14. Personal genome testing: test characteristics to clarify the discourse on ethical, legal and societal issues.

    PubMed

    Bunnik, Eline M; Schermer, Maartje H N; Janssens, A Cecile J W

    2011-06-14

    As genetics technology proceeds, practices of genetic testing have become more heterogeneous: many different types of tests are finding their way to the public in different settings and for a variety of purposes. This diversification is relevant to the discourse on ethical, legal and societal issues (ELSI) surrounding genetic testing, which must evolve to encompass these differences. One important development is the rise of personal genome testing on the basis of genetic profiling: the testing of multiple genetic variants simultaneously for the prediction of common multifactorial diseases. Currently, an increasing number of companies are offering personal genome tests directly to consumers and are spurring ELSI-discussions, which stand in need of clarification. This paper presents a systematic approach to the ELSI-evaluation of personal genome testing for multifactorial diseases along the lines of its test characteristics. This paper addresses four test characteristics of personal genome testing: its being a non-targeted type of testing, its high analytical validity, low clinical validity and problematic clinical utility. These characteristics raise their own specific ELSI, for example: non-targeted genetic profiling poses serious problems for information provision and informed consent. Questions about the quantity and quality of the necessary information, as well as about moral responsibilities with regard to the provision of information are therefore becoming central themes within ELSI-discussions of personal genome testing. Further, the current low level of clinical validity of genetic profiles raises questions concerning societal risks and regulatory requirements, whereas simultaneously it causes traditional ELSI-issues of clinical genetics, such as psychological and health risks, discrimination, and stigmatization, to lose part of their relevance. Also, classic notions of clinical utility are challenged by the newer notion of 'personal utility.' Consideration

  15. Personal genome testing: Test characteristics to clarify the discourse on ethical, legal and societal issues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As genetics technology proceeds, practices of genetic testing have become more heterogeneous: many different types of tests are finding their way to the public in different settings and for a variety of purposes. This diversification is relevant to the discourse on ethical, legal and societal issues (ELSI) surrounding genetic testing, which must evolve to encompass these differences. One important development is the rise of personal genome testing on the basis of genetic profiling: the testing of multiple genetic variants simultaneously for the prediction of common multifactorial diseases. Currently, an increasing number of companies are offering personal genome tests directly to consumers and are spurring ELSI-discussions, which stand in need of clarification. This paper presents a systematic approach to the ELSI-evaluation of personal genome testing for multifactorial diseases along the lines of its test characteristics. Discussion This paper addresses four test characteristics of personal genome testing: its being a non-targeted type of testing, its high analytical validity, low clinical validity and problematic clinical utility. These characteristics raise their own specific ELSI, for example: non-targeted genetic profiling poses serious problems for information provision and informed consent. Questions about the quantity and quality of the necessary information, as well as about moral responsibilities with regard to the provision of information are therefore becoming central themes within ELSI-discussions of personal genome testing. Further, the current low level of clinical validity of genetic profiles raises questions concerning societal risks and regulatory requirements, whereas simultaneously it causes traditional ELSI-issues of clinical genetics, such as psychological and health risks, discrimination, and stigmatization, to lose part of their relevance. Also, classic notions of clinical utility are challenged by the newer notion of 'personal

  16. Genomics in acute myeloid leukemia: from identification to personalization.

    PubMed

    Martin, James M; Winer, Eric S

    2015-11-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive bone marrow malignancy that is fatal if left untreated. Previous classification was strictly based on morphology, which gave little information in terms of prognosis or guide to treatment. Recent research has provided vital information into the chromosomal and molecular pathogenesis of leukemia development. The discovery of these abnormalities via proteomics and genomics have provided two key insights. First, these novel discoveries provide prognostic significance into the predictive result of chemotherapy. Second, these chromosomal and protein abnormalities have provided potential drug targets for new treatment modalities. This article will elaborate on many of these new molecular findings and discuss their implications on the treatment of AML.

  17. Knowledge and attitudes to personal genomics testing for complex diseases among Nigerians

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The study examined the knowledge and attitudes to personal genomics testing for complex diseases among Nigerians and identified how the knowledge and attitudes vary with gender, age, religion, education and related factors. Methods Data were collected using qualitative method in 2 districts of the Federal Capital Territory. In the study, eight (8) Focused Group Discussions (FGDs) and twenty seven (27) Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) were conducted. Participants for the research were recruited among healthy Nigerians, individuals with complex diseases, health care professionals, community leaders and health policy makers. Result Analysis of the result showed that most respondents in both FGDs and KIIs had limited knowledge about genomics test initially. Their understanding of the test however improved after explanation on its concept. Participants showed positive attitude towards genomics tests. Nevertheless they expressed fear over direct to consumer personal genomics testing, testing unborn babies and disclosure of results to third parties. Culture and religion were found to influence the perspectives of respondents on genomics test particularly those aspects that could either directly contradict their beliefs and practices or lead to actions which contradict them. Conclusion In conclusion, most Nigerians interviewed had limited knowledge of genomics test but with supportive attitude towards its use in predicting future risk of complex diseases after understanding the test concept. Genomics testing for complex diseases was not a common practice in Nigeria. PMID:24766930

  18. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2015-06-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. openSNP–A Crowdsourced Web Resource for Personal Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Greshake, Bastian; Bayer, Philipp E.; Rausch, Helge; Reda, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Genome-Wide Association Studies are widely used to correlate phenotypic traits with genetic variants. These studies usually compare the genetic variation between two groups to single out certain Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that are linked to a phenotypic variation in one of the groups. However, it is necessary to have a large enough sample size to find statistically significant correlations. Direct-To-Consumer (DTC) genetic testing can supply additional data: DTC-companies offer the analysis of a large amount of SNPs for an individual at low cost without the need to consult a physician or geneticist. Over 100,000 people have already been genotyped through Direct-To-Consumer genetic testing companies. However, this data is not public for a variety of reasons and thus cannot be used in research. It seems reasonable to create a central open data repository for such data. Here we present the web platform openSNP, an open database which allows participants of Direct-To-Consumer genetic testing to publish their genetic data at no cost along with phenotypic information. Through this crowdsourced effort of collecting genetic and phenotypic information, openSNP has become a resource for a wide area of studies, including Genome-Wide Association Studies. openSNP is hosted at http://www.opensnp.org, and the code is released under MIT-license at http://github.com/gedankenstuecke/snpr. PMID:24647222

  20. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  1. Bioinformatics in the information age

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, Sylvia J.

    2000-02-01

    There is a well-known story about the blind man examining the elephant: the part of the elephant examined determines his perception of the whole beast. Perhaps bioinformatics--the shotgun marriage between biology and mathematics, computer science, and engineering--is like an elephant that occupies a large chair in the scientific living room. Given the demand for and shortage of researchers with the computer skills to handle large volumes of biological data, where exactly does the bioinformatics elephant sit? There are probably many biologists who feel that a major product of this bioinformatics elephant is large piles of waste material. If you have tried to plow through Web sites and software packages in search of a specific tool for analyzing and collating large amounts of research data, you may well feel the same way. But there has been progress with major initiatives to develop more computing power, educate biologists about computers, increase funding, and set standards. For our purposes, bioinformatics is not simply a biologically inclined rehash of information theory (1) nor is it a hodgepodge of computer science techniques for building, updating, and accessing biological data. Rather bioinformatics incorporates both of these capabilities into a broad interdisciplinary science that involves both conceptual and practical tools for the understanding, generation, processing, and propagation of biological information. As such, bioinformatics is the sine qua non of 21st-century biology. Analyzing gene expression using cDNA microarrays immobilized on slides or other solid supports (gene chips) is set to revolutionize biology and medicine and, in so doing, generate vast quantities of data that have to be accurately interpreted (Fig. 1). As discussed at a meeting a few months ago (Microarray Algorithms and Statistical Analysis: Methods and Standards; Tahoe City, California; 9-12 November 1999), experiments with cDNA arrays must be subjected to quality control

  2. Sequencing and analysis of a South Asian-Indian personal genome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Ratan, Aakrosh; Rajesh, Changanamkandath; Chen, Rong; Kim, Hie Lim; Burhans, Richard; Miller, Webb; Santhosh, Sam; Davuluri, Ramana V; Butte, Atul J; Schuster, Stephan C; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Thomas, George

    2012-08-31

    With over 1.3 billion people, India is estimated to contain three times more genetic diversity than does Europe. Next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the understanding of diversity by enabling whole genome sequencing at greater speed and lower cost. While genomes from people of European and Asian descent have been sequenced, only recently has a single male genome from the Indian subcontinent been published at sufficient depth and coverage. In this study we have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a South Asian Indian female (SAIF) from the Indian state of Kerala. We identified over 3.4 million SNPs in this genome including over 89,873 private variations. Comparison of the SAIF genome with several published personal genomes revealed that this individual shared ~50% of the SNPs with each of these genomes. Analysis of the SAIF mitochondrial genome showed that it was closely related to the U1 haplogroup which has been previously observed in Kerala. We assessed the SAIF genome for SNPs with health and disease consequences and found that the individual was at a higher risk for multiple sclerosis and a few other diseases. In analyzing SNPs that modulate drug response, we found a variation that predicts a favorable response to metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes. SNPs predictive of adverse reaction to warfarin indicated that the SAIF individual is not at risk for bleeding if treated with typical doses of warfarin. In addition, we report the presence of several additional SNPs of medical relevance. This is the first study to report the complete whole genome sequence of a female from the state of Kerala in India. The availability of this complete genome and variants will further aid studies aimed at understanding genetic diversity, identifying clinically relevant changes and assessing disease burden in the Indian population.

  3. Genome-wide analyses for personality traits identify six genomic loci and show correlations with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Lo, Min-Tzu; Hinds, David A; Tung, Joyce Y; Franz, Carol; Fan, Chun-Chieh; Wang, Yunpeng; Smeland, Olav B; Schork, Andrew; Holland, Dominic; Kauppi, Karolina; Sanyal, Nilotpal; Escott-Price, Valentina; Smith, Daniel J; O'Donovan, Michael; Stefansson, Hreinn; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Stefansson, Kari; McEvoy, Linda K; Dale, Anders M; Andreassen, Ole A; Chen, Chi-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Personality is influenced by genetic and environmental factors and associated with mental health. However, the underlying genetic determinants are largely unknown. We identified six genetic loci, including five novel loci, significantly associated with personality traits in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (N = 123,132-260,861). Of these genome-wide significant loci, extraversion was associated with variants in WSCD2 and near PCDH15, and neuroticism with variants on chromosome 8p23.1 and in L3MBTL2. We performed a principal component analysis to extract major dimensions underlying genetic variations among five personality traits and six psychiatric disorders (N = 5,422-18,759). The first genetic dimension separated personality traits and psychiatric disorders, except that neuroticism and openness to experience were clustered with the disorders. High genetic correlations were found between extraversion and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and between openness and schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The second genetic dimension was closely aligned with extraversion-introversion and grouped neuroticism with internalizing psychopathology (e.g., depression or anxiety).

  4. Genome-wide analyses for personality traits identify six genomic loci and show correlations with psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Min-Tzu; Hinds, David A.; Tung, Joyce Y.; Franz, Carol; Fan, Chun-Chieh; Wang, Yunpeng; Smeland, Olav B.; Schork, Andrew; Holland, Dominic; Kauppi, Karolina; Sanyal, Nilotpal; Escott-Price, Valentina; Smith, Daniel J.; O'Donovan, Michael; Stefansson, Hreinn; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E.; Stefansson, Kari; McEvoy, Linda K.; Dale, Anders M.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Chen, Chi-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Summary Personality is influenced by genetic and environmental factors1, and associated with mental health. However, the underlying genetic determinants are largely unknown. We identified six genetic loci, including five novel loci2,3, significantly associated with personality traits in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (N=123,132–260,861). Of these genome-wide significant loci, extraversion was associated with variants in WSCD2 and near PCDH15, and neuroticism with variants on chromosome 8p23.1 and in L3MBTL2. We performed a principal component analysis to extract major dimensions underlying genetic variations among five personality traits and six psychiatric disorders (N=5,422–18,759). The first genetic dimension separated personality traits and psychiatric disorders, except that neuroticism and openness to experience were clustered with the disorders. High genetic correlations were found between extraversion and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and between openness and schizophrenia/bipolar disorder. The second genetic dimension was closely aligned with extraversion-introversion and grouped neuroticism with internalizing psychopathology (e.g., depression/anxiety). PMID:27918536

  5. BreCAN-DB: a repository cum browser of personalized DNA breakpoint profiles of cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Pankaj; Dhapola, Parashar; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2016-01-01

    BreCAN-DB (http://brecandb.igib.res.in) is a repository cum browser of whole genome somatic DNA breakpoint profiles of cancer genomes, mapped at single nucleotide resolution using deep sequencing data. These breakpoints are associated with deletions, insertions, inversions, tandem duplications, translocations and a combination of these structural genomic alterations. The current release of BreCAN-DB features breakpoint profiles from 99 cancer-normal pairs, comprising five cancer types. We identified DNA breakpoints across genomes using high-coverage next-generation sequencing data obtained from TCGA and dbGaP. Further, in these cancer genomes, we methodically identified breakpoint hotspots which were significantly enriched with somatic structural alterations. To visualize the breakpoint profiles, a next-generation genome browser was integrated with BreCAN-DB. Moreover, we also included previously reported breakpoint profiles from 138 cancer-normal pairs, spanning 10 cancer types into the browser. Additionally, BreCAN-DB allows one to identify breakpoint hotspots in user uploaded data set. We have also included a functionality to query overlap of any breakpoint profile with regions of user's interest. Users can download breakpoint profiles from the database or may submit their data to be integrated in BreCAN-DB. We believe that BreCAN-DB will be useful resource for genomics scientific community and is a step towards personalized cancer genomics. PMID:26586806

  6. BreCAN-DB: a repository cum browser of personalized DNA breakpoint profiles of cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Narang, Pankaj; Dhapola, Parashar; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2016-01-04

    BreCAN-DB (http://brecandb.igib.res.in) is a repository cum browser of whole genome somatic DNA breakpoint profiles of cancer genomes, mapped at single nucleotide resolution using deep sequencing data. These breakpoints are associated with deletions, insertions, inversions, tandem duplications, translocations and a combination of these structural genomic alterations. The current release of BreCAN-DB features breakpoint profiles from 99 cancer-normal pairs, comprising five cancer types. We identified DNA breakpoints across genomes using high-coverage next-generation sequencing data obtained from TCGA and dbGaP. Further, in these cancer genomes, we methodically identified breakpoint hotspots which were significantly enriched with somatic structural alterations. To visualize the breakpoint profiles, a next-generation genome browser was integrated with BreCAN-DB. Moreover, we also included previously reported breakpoint profiles from 138 cancer-normal pairs, spanning 10 cancer types into the browser. Additionally, BreCAN-DB allows one to identify breakpoint hotspots in user uploaded data set. We have also included a functionality to query overlap of any breakpoint profile with regions of user's interest. Users can download breakpoint profiles from the database or may submit their data to be integrated in BreCAN-DB. We believe that BreCAN-DB will be useful resource for genomics scientific community and is a step towards personalized cancer genomics.

  7. [Applied problems of mathematical biology and bioinformatics].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical biology and bioinformatics represent a new and rapidly progressing line of investigations which emerged in the course of work on the project "Human genome". The main applied problems of these sciences are grug design, patient-specific medicine and nanobioelectronics. It is shown that progress in the technology of mass sequencing of the human genome has set the stage for starting the national program on patient-specific medicine.

  8. A Platform for Designing Genome-Based Personalized Immunotherapy or Vaccine against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudheer; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Kumar, Rahul; Kumar, Shailesh; Sehgal, Manika; Nagpal, Gandharva

    2016-01-01

    Due to advancement in sequencing technology, genomes of thousands of cancer tissues or cell-lines have been sequenced. Identification of cancer-specific epitopes or neoepitopes from cancer genomes is one of the major challenges in the field of immunotherapy or vaccine development. This paper describes a platform Cancertope, developed for designing genome-based immunotherapy or vaccine against a cancer cell. Broadly, the integrated resources on this platform are apportioned into three precise sections. First section explains a cancer-specific database of neoepitopes generated from genome of 905 cancer cell lines. This database harbors wide range of epitopes (e.g., B-cell, CD8+ T-cell, HLA class I, HLA class II) against 60 cancer-specific vaccine antigens. Second section describes a partially personalized module developed for predicting potential neoepitopes against a user-specific cancer genome. Finally, we describe a fully personalized module developed for identification of neoepitopes from genomes of cancerous and healthy cells of a cancer-patient. In order to assist the scientific community, wide range of tools are incorporated in this platform that includes screening of epitopes against human reference proteome (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/cancertope/). PMID:27832200

  9. Bioinformatics education in India.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Sawant, Sangeeta; Chavan, Vishwas

    2010-11-01

    An account of bioinformatics education in India is presented along with future prospects. Establishment of BTIS network by Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Government of India in the 1980s had been a systematic effort in the development of bioinformatics infrastructure in India to provide services to scientific community. Advances in the field of bioinformatics underpinned the need for well-trained professionals with skills in information technology and biotechnology. As a result, programmes for capacity building in terms of human resource development were initiated. Educational programmes gradually evolved from the organisation of short-term workshops to the institution of formal diploma/degree programmes. A case study of the Master's degree course offered at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune is discussed. Currently, many universities and institutes are offering bioinformatics courses at different levels with variations in the course contents and degree of detailing. BioInformatics National Certification (BINC) examination initiated in 2005 by DBT provides a common yardstick to assess the knowledge and skill sets of students passing out of various institutions. The potential for broadening the scope of bioinformatics to transform it into a data intensive discovery discipline is discussed. This necessitates introduction of amendments in the existing curricula to accommodate the upcoming developments.

  10. Integrating functional genomics to accelerate mechanistic personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tyner, Jeffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of deep sequencing technologies has resulted in the deciphering of tremendous amounts of genetic information. These data have led to major discoveries, and many anecdotes now exist of individual patients whose clinical outcomes have benefited from novel, genetically guided therapeutic strategies. However, the majority of genetic events in cancer are currently undrugged, leading to a biological gap between understanding of tumor genetic etiology and translation to improved clinical approaches. Functional screening has made tremendous strides in recent years with the development of new experimental approaches to studying ex vivo and in vivo drug sensitivity. Numerous discoveries and anecdotes also exist for translation of functional screening into novel clinical strategies; however, the current clinical application of functional screening remains largely confined to small clinical trials at specific academic centers. The intersection between genomic and functional approaches represents an ideal modality to accelerate our understanding of drug sensitivities as they relate to specific genetic events and further understand the full mechanisms underlying drug sensitivity patterns. PMID:28299357

  11. Integrating functional genomics to accelerate mechanistic personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2017-03-01

    The advent of deep sequencing technologies has resulted in the deciphering of tremendous amounts of genetic information. These data have led to major discoveries, and many anecdotes now exist of individual patients whose clinical outcomes have benefited from novel, genetically guided therapeutic strategies. However, the majority of genetic events in cancer are currently undrugged, leading to a biological gap between understanding of tumor genetic etiology and translation to improved clinical approaches. Functional screening has made tremendous strides in recent years with the development of new experimental approaches to studying ex vivo and in vivo drug sensitivity. Numerous discoveries and anecdotes also exist for translation of functional screening into novel clinical strategies; however, the current clinical application of functional screening remains largely confined to small clinical trials at specific academic centers. The intersection between genomic and functional approaches represents an ideal modality to accelerate our understanding of drug sensitivities as they relate to specific genetic events and further understand the full mechanisms underlying drug sensitivity patterns.

  12. Evaluation of next generation mtGenome sequencing using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM)☆

    PubMed Central

    Parson, Walther; Strobl, Christina; Huber, Gabriela; Zimmermann, Bettina; Gomes, Sibylle M.; Souto, Luis; Fendt, Liane; Delport, Rhena; Langit, Reina; Wootton, Sharon; Lagacé, Robert; Irwin, Jodi

    2013-01-01

    Insights into the human mitochondrial phylogeny have been primarily achieved by sequencing full mitochondrial genomes (mtGenomes). In forensic genetics (partial) mtGenome information can be used to assign haplotypes to their phylogenetic backgrounds, which may, in turn, have characteristic geographic distributions that would offer useful information in a forensic case. In addition and perhaps even more relevant in the forensic context, haplogroup-specific patterns of mutations form the basis for quality control of mtDNA sequences. The current method for establishing (partial) mtDNA haplotypes is Sanger-type sequencing (STS), which is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With the emergence of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, the body of available mtDNA data can potentially be extended much more quickly and cost-efficiently. Customized chemistries, laboratory workflows and data analysis packages could support the community and increase the utility of mtDNA analysis in forensics. We have evaluated the performance of mtGenome sequencing using the Personal Genome Machine (PGM) and compared the resulting haplotypes directly with conventional Sanger-type sequencing. A total of 64 mtGenomes (>1 million bases) were established that yielded high concordance with the corresponding STS haplotypes (<0.02% differences). About two-thirds of the differences were observed in or around homopolymeric sequence stretches. In addition, the sequence alignment algorithm employed to align NGS reads played a significant role in the analysis of the data and the resulting mtDNA haplotypes. Further development of alignment software would be desirable to facilitate the application of NGS in mtDNA forensic genetics. PMID:23948325

  13. Direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing: a case study and practical recommendations for “genomic counseling”.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Amy C; Manickam, Kandamurugu

    2012-06-01

    Technological advances and information-seeking consumers have pushed forward the movement of direct-to consumer(DTC) genetic testing. Just like with other types of testing, there are potential risks, benefits and limitations. A major limitation of DTC testing is the incomplete view it provides regarding lifetime risk for common, complex diseases,since most tests only analyze 1–2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and do not include evaluation of medical or family histories, which is necessary to risk assessment. Further, it is not currently well-established whether personal genomic testing results will lead toward improved health behaviors, adverse psychological effects or potential overuse of the health care system. To display these and other issues, we present an in-depth case study of an individual who ordered DTC genetic testing and subsequently sought genetic counseling. This case presents a unique learning experience for the field of genomic counseling, as the patient did not fit the typical assumptions regarding ‘early adopters’ of DTC testing. It also allowed the genetics health care providers involved in the case to identify gaps in current genetic counseling practice that need to be filled and approaches to employ for successful delivery of genomic counseling. Based on our experience, we developed practical recommendations for genomic counseling, which include novel approaches to case preparation, use of electronic tools during the counseling session, and focusing on education as the major component of the genomic counseling session, in order to provide patients with the knowledge necessary to independently interpret and understand large amounts of genomic testing information provided to them.

  14. Highlighting computations in bioscience and bioinformatics: review of the Symposium of Computations in Bioinformatics and Bioscience (SCBB07).

    PubMed

    Lu, Guoqing; Ni, Jun

    2008-05-28

    The Second Symposium on Computations in Bioinformatics and Bioscience (SCBB07) was held in Iowa City, Iowa, USA, on August 13-15, 2007. This annual event attracted dozens of bioinformatics professionals and students, who are interested in solving emerging computational problems in bioscience, from China, Japan, Taiwan and the United States. The Scientific Committee of the symposium selected 18 peer-reviewed papers for publication in this supplemental issue of BMC Bioinformatics. These papers cover a broad spectrum of topics in computational biology and bioinformatics, including DNA, protein and genome sequence analysis, gene expression and microarray analysis, computational proteomics and protein structure classification, systems biology and machine learning.

  15. Genomics and epigenomics: new promises of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Michal-Ruth; Barmeyer, Christian; Timmermann, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    Recent years have brought about a marked extension of our understanding of the somatic basis of cancer. Parallel to the large-scale investigation of diverse tumor genomes the knowledge arose that cancer pathologies are most often not restricted to single genomic events. In contrast, a large number of different alterations in the genomes and epigenomes come together and promote the malignant transformation. The combination of mutations, structural variations and epigenetic alterations differs between each tumor, making individual diagnosis and treatment strategies necessary. This view is summarized in the new discipline of personalized medicine. To satisfy the ideas of this approach each tumor needs to be fully characterized and individual diagnostic and therapeutic strategies designed. Here, we will discuss the power of high-throughput sequencing technologies for genomic and epigenomic analyses. We will provide insight into the current status and how these technologies can be transferred to routine clinical usage.

  16. The miRNA targetome of coronary artery disease is perturbed by functional polymorphisms identified and prioritized by in-depth bioinformatics analyses exploiting genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Bastami, Milad; Nariman-Saleh-Fam, Ziba; Saadatian, Zahra; Nariman-Saleh-Fam, Lida; Omrani, Mir Davood; Ghaderian, Sayyed Mohammad Hossein; Masotti, Andrea

    2016-12-05

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have made great progress in elucidating the genetic influence on complex traits. An overwhelming number of GWAS signals resides in regulatory elements, therefore most post-GWAS studies focused only on transcriptional regulatory variants. However, recent findings have expanded the spectrum of trait/disease-associated regulatory variants beyond transcriptional level and highlighted the importance of post-transcriptional variants like those in miRNA targetome. The present work integrated genome-wide association data of coronary artery disease (CAD) with population-specific linkage disequilibrium structures from 1000 Genomes Project to map disease associations to miRNA targetome. Moreover, we performed a variety of functional prediction analyses to prioritize disease-associated variants (DAVs) influencing miRNA targetome and in-silico analyses to get insights into their functional significance. In conclusion, although the role of miRNA targetome variations in the development of CAD still has to be fully elucidated, we provided a systematic bioinformatics approach to the miRNA targetome variations in CAD. The results of this study will be valuable for researchers interested in the identification of CAD GWAS signals that may implicate polymorphic miRNA targeting.

  17. Attitudes towards Social Networking and Sharing Behaviors among Consumers of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin; Vernez, Simone L; Ormond, K E; Granovetter, Mark

    2013-10-14

    Little is known about how consumers of direct-to-consumer personal genetic services share personal genetic risk information. In an age of ubiquitous online networking and rapid development of social networking tools, understanding how consumers share personal genetic risk assessments is critical in the development of appropriate and effective policies. This exploratory study investigates how consumers share personal genetic information and attitudes towards social networking behaviors. Adult participants aged 23 to 72 years old who purchased direct-to-consumer genetic testing from a personal genomics company were administered a web-based survey regarding their sharing activities and social networking behaviors related to their personal genetic test results. 80 participants completed the survey; of those, 45% shared results on Facebook and 50.9% reported meeting or reconnecting with more than 10 other individuals through the sharing of their personal genetic information. For help interpreting test results, 70.4% turned to Internet websites and online sources, compared to 22.7% who consulted their healthcare providers. Amongst participants, 51.8% reported that they believe the privacy of their personal genetic information would be breached in the future. Consumers actively utilize online social networking tools to help them share and interpret their personal genetic information. These findings suggest a need for careful consideration of policy recommendations in light of the current ambiguity of regulation and oversight of consumer initiated sharing activities.

  18. Attitudes towards Social Networking and Sharing Behaviors among Consumers of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin; Vernez, Simone L.; Ormond, K.E.; Granovetter, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how consumers of direct-to-consumer personal genetic services share personal genetic risk information. In an age of ubiquitous online networking and rapid development of social networking tools, understanding how consumers share personal genetic risk assessments is critical in the development of appropriate and effective policies. This exploratory study investigates how consumers share personal genetic information and attitudes towards social networking behaviors. Methods: Adult participants aged 23 to 72 years old who purchased direct-to-consumer genetic testing from a personal genomics company were administered a web-based survey regarding their sharing activities and social networking behaviors related to their personal genetic test results. Results: 80 participants completed the survey; of those, 45% shared results on Facebook and 50.9% reported meeting or reconnecting with more than 10 other individuals through the sharing of their personal genetic information. For help interpreting test results, 70.4% turned to Internet websites and online sources, compared to 22.7% who consulted their healthcare providers. Amongst participants, 51.8% reported that they believe the privacy of their personal genetic information would be breached in the future. Conclusion: Consumers actively utilize online social networking tools to help them share and interpret their personal genetic information. These findings suggest a need for careful consideration of policy recommendations in light of the current ambiguity of regulation and oversight of consumer initiated sharing activities. PMID:25562728

  19. Informed consent in direct-to-consumer personal genome testing: the outline of a model between specific and generic consent.

    PubMed

    Bunnik, Eline M; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Schermer, Maartje H N

    2014-09-01

    Broad genome-wide testing is increasingly finding its way to the public through the online direct-to-consumer marketing of so-called personal genome tests. Personal genome tests estimate genetic susceptibilities to multiple diseases and other phenotypic traits simultaneously. Providers commonly make use of Terms of Service agreements rather than informed consent procedures. However, to protect consumers from the potential physical, psychological and social harms associated with personal genome testing and to promote autonomous decision-making with regard to the testing offer, we argue that current practices of information provision are insufficient and that there is a place--and a need--for informed consent in personal genome testing, also when it is offered commercially. The increasing quantity, complexity and diversity of most testing offers, however, pose challenges for information provision and informed consent. Both specific and generic models for informed consent fail to meet its moral aims when applied to personal genome testing. Consumers should be enabled to know the limitations, risks and implications of personal genome testing and should be given control over the genetic information they do or do not wish to obtain. We present the outline of a new model for informed consent which can meet both the norm of providing sufficient information and the norm of providing understandable information. The model can be used for personal genome testing, but will also be applicable to other, future forms of broad genetic testing or screening in commercial and clinical settings.

  20. Bioinformatics and Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers take on challenges and opportunities to mine "Big Data" for answers to complex biological questions. Learn how bioinformatics uses advanced computing, mathematics, and technological platforms to store, manage, analyze, and understand data.

  1. Deep brain stimulation, brain maps and personalized medicine: lessons from the human genome project.

    PubMed

    Fins, Joseph J; Shapiro, Zachary E

    2014-01-01

    Although the appellation of personalized medicine is generally attributed to advanced therapeutics in molecular medicine, deep brain stimulation (DBS) can also be so categorized. Like its medical counterpart, DBS is a highly personalized intervention that needs to be tailored to a patient's individual anatomy. And because of this, DBS like more conventional personalized medicine, can be highly specific where the object of care is an N = 1. But that is where the similarities end. Besides their differing medical and surgical provenances, these two varieties of personalized medicine have had strikingly different impacts. The molecular variant, though of a more recent vintage has thrived and is experiencing explosive growth, while DBS still struggles to find a sustainable therapeutic niche. Despite its promise, and success as a vetted treatment for drug resistant Parkinson's Disease, DBS has lagged in broadening its development, often encountering regulatory hurdles and financial barriers necessary to mount an adequate number of quality trials. In this paper we will consider why DBS-or better yet neuromodulation-has encountered these challenges and contrast this experience with the more successful advance of personalized medicine. We will suggest that personalized medicine and DBS's differential performance can be explained as a matter of timing and complexity. We believe that DBS has struggled because it has been a journey of scientific exploration conducted without a map. In contrast to molecular personalized medicine which followed the mapping of the human genome and the Human Genome Project, DBS preceded plans for the mapping of the human brain. We believe that this sequence has given personalized medicine a distinct advantage and that the fullest potential of DBS will be realized both as a cartographical or electrophysiological probe and as a modality of personalized medicine.

  2. Deep learning in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Min, Seonwoo; Lee, Byunghan; Yoon, Sungroh

    2016-07-29

    In the era of big data, transformation of biomedical big data into valuable knowledge has been one of the most important challenges in bioinformatics. Deep learning has advanced rapidly since the early 2000s and now demonstrates state-of-the-art performance in various fields. Accordingly, application of deep learning in bioinformatics to gain insight from data has been emphasized in both academia and industry. Here, we review deep learning in bioinformatics, presenting examples of current research. To provide a useful and comprehensive perspective, we categorize research both by the bioinformatics domain (i.e. omics, biomedical imaging, biomedical signal processing) and deep learning architecture (i.e. deep neural networks, convolutional neural networks, recurrent neural networks, emergent architectures) and present brief descriptions of each study. Additionally, we discuss theoretical and practical issues of deep learning in bioinformatics and suggest future research directions. We believe that this review will provide valuable insights and serve as a starting point for researchers to apply deep learning approaches in their bioinformatics studies.

  3. The UCSC Genome Browser

    PubMed Central

    Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Kent, W. James

    2011-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser is a popular Web-based tool for quickly displaying a requested portion of a genome at any scale, accompanied by a series of aligned annotation “tracks.” The annotations generated by the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics Group and external collaborators include gene predictions, mRNA and expressed sequence tag alignments, simple nucleotide polymorphisms, expression and regulatory data, phenotype and variation data, and pairwise and multiple-species comparative genomics data. All information relevant to a region is presented in one window, facilitating biological analysis and interpretation. The database tables underlying the Genome Browser tracks can be viewed, downloaded, and manipulated using another Web-based application, the UCSC Table Browser. Users can upload personal datasets in a wide variety of formats as custom annotation tracks in both browsers for research or educational purposes. PMID:21975940

  4. Incorporating bioinformatics into biological science education in Nigeria: prospects and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ojo, O O; Omabe, M

    2011-06-01

    The urgency to process and analyze the deluge of data created by proteomics and genomics studies worldwide has caused bioinformatics to gain prominence and importance. However, its multidisciplinary nature has created a unique demand for specialist trained in both biology and computing. Several countries, in response to this challenge, have developed a number of manpower training programmes. This review presents a description of the meaning, scope, history and development of bioinformatics with focus on prospects and challenges facing bioinformatics education worldwide. The paper also provides an overview of attempts at the introduction of bioinformatics in Nigeria; describes the existing bioinformatics scenario in Nigeria and suggests strategies for effective bioinformatics education in Nigeria.

  5. Genomics is changing personal healthcare and medicine: the dawn of iPH (individualized preventive healthcare).

    PubMed

    Mehrian-Shai, Ruty; Reichardt, Juergen K V

    2015-11-04

    This opinion piece focuses on the convergence of information technology (IT) in the form of personal monitors, especially smart phones and possibly also smart watches, individual genomic information and preventive healthcare and medicine. This may benefit each one of us not only individually but also society as a whole through iPH (individualized preventive healthcare). This shift driven by genomic and other technologies may well also change the relationship between patient and physician by empowering the former but giving him/her also much more individual responsibility.

  6. Penalized feature selection and classification in bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian

    2008-01-01

    In bioinformatics studies, supervised classification with high-dimensional input variables is frequently encountered. Examples routinely arise in genomic, epigenetic and proteomic studies. Feature selection can be employed along with classifier construction to avoid over-fitting, to generate more reliable classifier and to provide more insights into the underlying causal relationships. In this article, we provide a review of several recently developed penalized feature selection and classification techniques—which belong to the family of embedded feature selection methods—for bioinformatics studies with high-dimensional input. Classification objective functions, penalty functions and computational algorithms are discussed. Our goal is to make interested researchers aware of these feature selection and classification methods that are applicable to high-dimensional bioinformatics data. PMID:18562478

  7. Targeting the undruggable: immunotherapy meets personalized oncology in the genomic era.

    PubMed

    Martin, S D; Coukos, G; Holt, R A; Nelson, B H

    2015-12-01

    Owing to recent advances in genomic technologies, personalized oncology is poised to fundamentally alter cancer therapy. In this paradigm, the mutational and transcriptional profiles of tumors are assessed, and personalized treatments are designed based on the specific molecular abnormalities relevant to each patient's cancer. To date, such approaches have yielded impressive clinical responses in some patients. However, a major limitation of this strategy has also been revealed: the vast majority of tumor mutations are not targetable by current pharmacological approaches. Immunotherapy offers a promising alternative to exploit tumor mutations as targets for clinical intervention. Mutated proteins can give rise to novel antigens (called neoantigens) that are recognized with high specificity by patient T cells. Indeed, neoantigen-specific T cells have been shown to underlie clinical responses to many standard treatments and immunotherapeutic interventions. Moreover, studies in mouse models targeting neoantigens, and early results from clinical trials, have established proof of concept for personalized immunotherapies targeting next-generation sequencing identified neoantigens. Here, we review basic immunological principles related to T-cell recognition of neoantigens, and we examine recent studies that use genomic data to design personalized immunotherapies. We discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead on the road to improving patient outcomes by incorporating immunotherapy into the paradigm of personalized oncology.

  8. From base pair to bedside: molecular simulation and the translation of genomics to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Wright, David W; Wan, Shunzhou; Shublaq, Nour; Zasada, Stefan J; Coveney, Peter V

    2012-01-01

    Despite the promises made that genomic sequencing would transform therapy by introducing a new era of personalized medicine, relatively few tangible breakthroughs have been made. This has led to the recognition that complex interactions at multiple spatial, temporal, and organizational levels may often combine to produce disease. Understanding this complexity requires that existing and future models are used and interpreted within a framework that incorporates knowledge derived from investigations at multiple levels of biological function. It also requires a computational infrastructure capable of dealing with the vast quantities of data generated by genomic approaches. In this review, we discuss the use of molecular modeling to generate quantitative and qualitative insights at the smallest scales of the systems biology hierarchy, how it can play an important role in the development of a systems understanding of disease and in the application of such knowledge to help discover new therapies and target existing ones on a personal level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. From prenatal genomic diagnosis to fetal personalized medicine: progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Diana W

    2015-01-01

    Thus far, the focus of personalized medicine has been the prevention and treatment of conditions that affect adults. Although advances in genetic technology have been applied more frequently to prenatal diagnosis than to fetal treatment, genetic and genomic information is beginning to influence pregnancy management. Recent developments in sequencing the fetal genome combined with progress in understanding fetal physiology using gene expression arrays indicate that we could have the technical capabilities to apply an individualized medicine approach to the fetus. Here I review recent advances in prenatal genetic diagnostics, the challenges associated with these new technologies and how the information derived from them can be used to advance fetal care. Historically, the goal of prenatal diagnosis has been to provide an informed choice to prospective parents. We are now at a point where that goal can and should be expanded to incorporate genetic, genomic and transcriptomic data to develop new approaches to fetal treatment. PMID:22772565

  10. Pathway analysis of genome-wide association datasets of personality traits.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-N; Kim, B-H; Cho, J; Ryu, S; Shin, H; Sung, J; Shin, C; Cho, N H; Sung, Y A; Choi, B-O; Kim, H-L

    2015-04-01

    Although several genome-wide association (GWA) studies of human personality have been recently published, genetic variants that are highly associated with certain personality traits remain unknown, due to difficulty reproducing results. To further investigate these genetic variants, we assessed biological pathways using GWA datasets. Pathway analysis using GWA data was performed on 1089 Korean women whose personality traits were measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory for the 5-factor model of personality. A total of 1042 pathways containing 8297 genes were included in our study. Of these, 14 pathways were highly enriched with association signals that were validated in 1490 independent samples. These pathways include association of: Neuroticism with axon guidance [L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) interactions]; Extraversion with neuronal system and voltage-gated potassium channels; Agreeableness with L1CAM interaction, neurotransmitter receptor binding and downstream transmission in postsynaptic cells; and Conscientiousness with the interferon-gamma and platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta polypeptide pathways. Several genes that contribute to top-ranked pathways in this study were previously identified in GWA studies or by pathway analysis in schizophrenia or other neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we report the first pathway analysis of all five personality traits. Importantly, our analysis identified novel pathways that contribute to understanding the etiology of personality traits.

  11. SU-D-204-06: Integration of Machine Learning and Bioinformatics Methods to Analyze Genome-Wide Association Study Data for Rectal Bleeding and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, J; Deasy, J; Kerns, S; Ostrer, H; Rosenstein, B

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We investigated whether integration of machine learning and bioinformatics techniques on genome-wide association study (GWAS) data can improve the performance of predictive models in predicting the risk of developing radiation-induced late rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction in prostate cancer patients. Methods: We analyzed a GWAS dataset generated from 385 prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Using genotype information from these patients, we designed a machine learning-based predictive model of late radiation-induced toxicities: rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction. The model building process was performed using 2/3 of samples (training) and the predictive model was tested with 1/3 of samples (validation). To identify important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we computed the SNP importance score, resulting from our random forest regression model. We performed gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis for nearby genes of the important SNPs. Results: After univariate analysis on the training dataset, we filtered out many SNPs with p>0.001, resulting in 749 and 367 SNPs that were used in the model building process for rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction, respectively. On the validation dataset, our random forest regression model achieved the area under the curve (AUC)=0.70 and 0.62 for rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction, respectively. We performed GO enrichment analysis for the top 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% SNPs out of the select SNPs in the univariate analysis. When we used the top 50% SNPs, more plausible biological processes were obtained for both toxicities. An additional test with the top 50% SNPs improved predictive power with AUC=0.71 and 0.65 for rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction. A better performance was achieved with AUC=0.67 when age and androgen deprivation therapy were added to the model for erectile dysfunction. Conclusion: Our approach that combines machine learning and bioinformatics techniques

  12. Eyes wide open: the personal genome project, citizen science and veracity in informed consent

    PubMed Central

    Angrist, Misha

    2012-01-01

    I am a close observer of the Personal Genome Project (PGP) and one of the original ten participants. The PGP was originally conceived as a way to test novel DNA sequencing technologies on human samples and to begin to build a database of human genomes and traits. However, its founder, Harvard geneticist George Church, was concerned about the fact that DNA is the ultimate digital identifier – individuals and many of their traits can be identified. Therefore, he believed that promising participants privacy and confidentiality would be impractical and disingenuous. Moreover, deidentification of samples would impoverish both genotypic and phenotypic data. As a result, the PGP has arguably become best known for its unprecedented approach to informed consent. All participants must pass an exam testing their knowledge of genomic science and privacy issues and agree to forgo the privacy and confidentiality of their genomic data and personal health records. Church aims to scale up to 100,000 participants. This special report discusses the impetus for the project, its early history and its potential to have a lasting impact on the treatment of human subjects in biomedical research. PMID:22328898

  13. Perceptions of genetic counseling services in direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing.

    PubMed

    Darst, B F; Madlensky, L; Schork, N J; Topol, E J; Bloss, C S

    2013-10-01

    To describe consumers' perceptions of genetic counseling services in the context of direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing is the purpose of this research. Utilizing data from the Scripps Genomic Health Initiative, we assessed direct-to-consumer genomic test consumers' utilization and perceptions of genetic counseling services. At long-term follow-up, approximately 14 months post-testing, participants were asked to respond to several items gauging their interactions, if any, with a Navigenics genetic counselor, and their perceptions of those interactions. Out of 1325 individuals who completed long-term follow-up, 187 (14.1%) indicated that they had spoken with a genetic counselor. The most commonly given reason for not utilizing the counseling service was a lack of need due to the perception of already understanding one's results (55.6%). The most common reasons for utilizing the service included wanting to take advantage of a free service (43.9%) and wanting more information on risk calculations (42.2%). Among those who utilized the service, a large fraction reported that counseling improved their understanding of their results (54.5%) and genetics in general (43.9%). A relatively small proportion of participants utilized genetic counseling after direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing. Among those individuals who did utilize the service, however, a large fraction perceived it to be informative, and thus presumably beneficial.

  14. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetics: a promise for genomically-guided therapy and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Zaiou, M; El Amri, H

    2017-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. The basic causes of CVD are not fully understood yet. Substantial evidence suggests that genetic predisposition plays a vital role in the physiopathology of this complex disease. Hence, identification of genetic contributors to CVD will likely add diagnostic accuracy and better prediction of an individual's risk. With high-throughput genetics and genomics technology and newer genome-wide study approaches, a number of genetic variations across the human genome were uncovered. Evidence suggests that genetic defects could influence CVD development and inter-individual responses to widely used cardiovascular drugs like clopidogrel, aspirin, warfarin, and statins, and therefore, they may be integrated into clinical practice. If clinically validated, better understanding of these genetic variations may provide new opportunities for personalized diagnostic, pharmacogenetic-based drug selection and best treatment in personalized medicine. However, numerous gaps remain unsolved due to the lack of underlying pathological mechanisms for how genetic predisposition could contribute to CVD. This review provides an overview of the extraordinary scientific progress in our understanding of genetic and genomic basis of CVD as well as the development of relevant genetic biomarkers for this disease. Some of the actual limitations to the promise of these markers and their translation for the benefit of patients will be discussed.

  15. Eyes wide open: the personal genome project, citizen science and veracity in informed consent.

    PubMed

    Angrist, Misha

    2009-11-01

    I am a close observer of the Personal Genome Project (PGP) and one of the original ten participants. The PGP was originally conceived as a way to test novel DNA sequencing technologies on human samples and to begin to build a database of human genomes and traits. However, its founder, Harvard geneticist George Church, was concerned about the fact that DNA is the ultimate digital identifier - individuals and many of their traits can be identified. Therefore, he believed that promising participants privacy and confidentiality would be impractical and disingenuous. Moreover, deidentification of samples would impoverish both genotypic and phenotypic data. As a result, the PGP has arguably become best known for its unprecedented approach to informed consent. All participants must pass an exam testing their knowledge of genomic science and privacy issues and agree to forgo the privacy and confidentiality of their genomic data and personal health records. Church aims to scale up to 100,000 participants. This special report discusses the impetus for the project, its early history and its potential to have a lasting impact on the treatment of human subjects in biomedical research.

  16. Towards personalized agriculture: what chemical genomics can bring to plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Michael E; McCourt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the dominant drug paradigm in which compounds were developed to "fit all," new models focused around personalized medicine are appearing in which treatments are developed and customized for individual patients. The agricultural biotechnology industry (Ag-biotech) should also think about these new personalized models. For example, most common herbicides are generic in action, which led to the development of genetically modified crops to add specificity. The ease and accessibility of modern genomic analysis, when wedded to accessible large chemical space, should facilitate the discovery of chemicals that are more selective in their utility. Is it possible to develop species-selective herbicides and growth regulators? More generally put, is plant research at a stage where chemicals can be developed that streamline plant development and growth to various environments? We believe the advent of chemical genomics now opens up these and other opportunities to "personalize" agriculture. Furthermore, chemical genomics does not necessarily require genetically tractable plant models, which in principle should allow quick translation to practical applications. For this to happen, however, will require collaboration between the Ag-biotech industry and academic labs for early stage research and development, a situation that has proven very fruitful for Big Pharma.

  17. Genome-wide association study of personality traits in the long life family study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Harold T; Sebastiani, Paola; Sun, Jenny X; Andersen, Stacy L; Daw, E Warwick; Terracciano, Antonio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Perls, Thomas T

    2013-01-01

    Personality traits have been shown to be associated with longevity and healthy aging. In order to discover novel genetic modifiers associated with personality traits as related with longevity, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on personality factors assessed by NEO-five-factor inventory in individuals enrolled in the Long Life Family Study (LLFS), a study of 583 families (N up to 4595) with clustering for longevity in the United States and Denmark. Three SNPs, in almost perfect LD, associated with agreeableness reached genome-wide significance (p < 10(-8)) and replicated in an additional sample of 1279 LLFS subjects, although one (rs9650241) failed to replicate and the other two were not available in two independent replication cohorts, the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging and the New England Centenarian Study. Based on 10,000,000 permutations, the empirical p-value of 2 × 10(-7) was observed for the genome-wide significant SNPs. Seventeen SNPs that reached marginal statistical significance in the two previous GWASs (p-value <10(-4) and 10(-5)), were also marginally significantly associated in this study (p-value <0.05), although none of the associations passed the Bonferroni correction. In addition, we tested age-by-SNP interactions and found some significant associations. Since scores of personality traits in LLFS subjects change in the oldest ages, and genetic factors outweigh environmental factors to achieve extreme ages, these age-by-SNP interactions could be a proxy for complex gene-gene interactions affecting personality traits and longevity.

  18. A Survey of Scholarly Literature Describing the Field of Bioinformatics Education and Bioinformatics Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magana, Alejandra J.; Taleyarkhan, Manaz; Alvarado, Daniela Rivera; Kane, Michael; Springer, John; Clase, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics education can be broadly defined as the teaching and learning of the use of computer and information technology, along with mathematical and statistical analysis for gathering, storing, analyzing, interpreting, and integrating data to solve biological problems. The recent surge of genomics, proteomics, and structural biology in the…

  19. A Survey of Scholarly Literature Describing the Field of Bioinformatics Education and Bioinformatics Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magana, Alejandra J.; Taleyarkhan, Manaz; Alvarado, Daniela Rivera; Kane, Michael; Springer, John; Clase, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics education can be broadly defined as the teaching and learning of the use of computer and information technology, along with mathematical and statistical analysis for gathering, storing, analyzing, interpreting, and integrating data to solve biological problems. The recent surge of genomics, proteomics, and structural biology in the…

  20. Canaries in the coal mine: Personal and professional impact of undergoing whole genome sequencing on medical professionals.

    PubMed

    Zierhut, Heather; McCarthy Veach, Patricia; LeRoy, Bonnie

    2015-11-01

    Public interest in personal whole genome sequencing is increasing. The technology is publicly available and is being used as an educational tool in higher education. Empirical evidence regarding its utility is vital. The goals of this study were to characterize the process of whole genome sequencing in a population of medical and basic science professionals undergoing whole genome sequencing as a part of an educational symposium. Thirty-eight individuals completed one or more surveys from the time of informed consent for whole genome sequencing to 3 months post-symposium. The four surveys assessed demographics, decision-making, communication, decision regret, and personal and professional impact. The most prevalent motivation to participate was professional enhancement, followed by curiosity about the technology, and personal health benefits. The most important initial impact concerned medical implications. Over time, however, impact on professional development was greater than on personal health. Anticipated reactions to receiving whole genome sequencing results generally matched participants' actual reactions and decision regret remained low over time. Benefits and risks of whole genome sequencing included medically actionable results and misunderstanding by healthcare providers. Whole genome sequencing generally had a positive impact professionally and personally on participants. Further education of providers and the public about whole genome sequencing and psychosocial support is warranted.

  1. Chemistry in Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Rust, Peter; Mitchell, John BO; Rzepa, Henry S

    2005-01-01

    Chemical information is now seen as critical for most areas of life sciences. But unlike Bioinformatics, where data is openly available and freely re-usable, most chemical information is closed and cannot be re-distributed without permission. This has led to a failure to adopt modern informatics and software techniques and therefore paucity of chemistry in bioinformatics. New technology, however, offers the hope of making chemical data (compounds and properties) free during the authoring process. We argue that the technology is already available; we require a collective agreement to enhance publication protocols. PMID:15941476

  2. An Online Bioinformatics Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Searls, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Online learning initiatives over the past decade have become increasingly comprehensive in their selection of courses and sophisticated in their presentation, culminating in the recent announcement of a number of consortium and startup activities that promise to make a university education on the internet, free of charge, a real possibility. At this pivotal moment it is appropriate to explore the potential for obtaining comprehensive bioinformatics training with currently existing free video resources. This article presents such a bioinformatics curriculum in the form of a virtual course catalog, together with editorial commentary, and an assessment of strengths, weaknesses, and likely future directions for open online learning in this field. PMID:23028269

  3. Primary care providers’ experiences with and perceptions of personalized genomic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Makuwaza, Tutsirai; Manca, Donna P.; Sopcak, Nicolette; Permaul, Joanne A.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Heisey, Ruth; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A.; Easley, Julie; Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Miedema, Baukje; Pruthi, Sandhya; Sawka, Carol; Schneider, Nancy; Sussman, Jonathan; Urquhart, Robin; Versaevel, Catarina; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess primary care providers’ (PCPs’) experiences with, perceptions of, and desired role in personalized medicine, with a focus on cancer. Design Qualitative study involving focus groups. Setting Urban and rural interprofessional primary care team practices in Alberta and Ontario. Participants Fifty-one PCPs. Methods Semistructured focus groups were conducted and audiorecorded. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed using techniques informed by grounded theory including coding, interpretations of patterns in the data, and constant comparison. Main findings Five focus groups with the 51 participants were conducted; 2 took place in Alberta and 3 in Ontario. Primary care providers described limited experience with personalized medicine, citing breast cancer and prenatal care as main areas of involvement. They expressed concern over their lack of knowledge, in some circumstances relying on personal experiences to inform their attitudes and practice. Participants anticipated an inevitable role in personalized medicine primarily because patients seek and trust their advice; however, there was underlying concern about the magnitude of information and pace of discovery in this area, particularly in direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing. Increased knowledge, closer ties to genetics specialists, and relevant, reliable personalized medicine resources accessible at the point of care were reported as important for successful implementation of personalized medicine. Conclusion Primary care providers are prepared to discuss personalized medicine, but they require better resources. Models of care that support a more meaningful relationship between PCPs and genetics specialists should be pursued. Continuing education strategies need to address knowledge gaps including direct-to-consumer genetic testing, a relatively new area provoking PCP concern. Primary care providers should be mindful of using personal experiences to guide care. PMID:27737998

  4. A tiered-layered-staged model for informed consent in personal genome testing

    PubMed Central

    Bunnik, Eline M; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Schermer, Maartje H N

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, developments in genomics technologies have led to the rise of commercial personal genome testing (PGT): broad genome-wide testing for multiple diseases simultaneously. While some commercial providers require physicians to order a personal genome test, others can be accessed directly. All providers advertise directly to consumers and offer genetic risk information about dozens of diseases in one single purchase. The quantity and the complexity of risk information pose challenges to adequate pre-test and post-test information provision and informed consent. There are currently no guidelines for what should constitute informed consent in PGT or how adequate informed consent can be achieved. In this paper, we propose a tiered-layered-staged model for informed consent. First, the proposed model is tiered as it offers choices between categories of diseases that are associated with distinct ethical, personal or societal issues. Second, the model distinguishes layers of information with a first layer offering minimal, indispensable information that is material to all consumers, and additional layers offering more detailed information made available upon request. Finally, the model stages informed consent as a process by feeding information to consumers in each subsequent stage of the process of undergoing a test, and by accommodating renewed consent for test result updates, resulting from the ongoing development of the science underlying PGT. A tiered-layered-staged model for informed consent with a focus on the consumer perspective can help overcome the ethical problems of information provision and informed consent in direct-to-consumer PGT. PMID:23169494

  5. Systematic Pharmacogenomics Analysis of a Malay Whole Genome: Proof of Concept for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Teh, Lay Kek; Lee, Lian Shien; Ismet, Rose Iszati; Patowary, Ashok; Joshi, Kandarp; Pasha, Ayesha; Ahmed, Azni Zain; Janor, Roziah Mohd; Hamzah, Ahmad Sazali; Adam, Aishah; Yusoff, Khalid; Hoh, Boon Peng; Hatta, Fazleen Haslinda Mohd; Ismail, Mohamad Izwan; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    Background With a higher throughput and lower cost in sequencing, second generation sequencing technology has immense potential for translation into clinical practice and in the realization of pharmacogenomics based patient care. The systematic analysis of whole genome sequences to assess patient to patient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics responses towards drugs would be the next step in future medicine in line with the vision of personalizing medicine. Methods Genomic DNA obtained from a 55 years old, self-declared healthy, anonymous male of Malay descent was sequenced. The subject's mother died of lung cancer and the father had a history of schizophrenia and deceased at the age of 65 years old. A systematic, intuitive computational workflow/pipeline integrating custom algorithm in tandem with large datasets of variant annotations and gene functions for genetic variations with pharmacogenomics impact was developed. A comprehensive pathway map of drug transport, metabolism and action was used as a template to map non-synonymous variations with potential functional consequences. Principal Findings Over 3 million known variations and 100,898 novel variations in the Malay genome were identified. Further in-depth pharmacogenetics analysis revealed a total of 607 unique variants in 563 proteins, with the eventual identification of 4 drug transport genes, 2 drug metabolizing enzyme genes and 33 target genes harboring deleterious SNVs involved in pharmacological pathways, which could have a potential role in clinical settings. Conclusions The current study successfully unravels the potential of personal genome sequencing in understanding the functionally relevant variations with potential influence on drug transport, metabolism and differential therapeutic outcomes. These will be essential for realizing personalized medicine through the use of comprehensive computational pipeline for systematic data mining and analysis. PMID:24009664

  6. Systematic pharmacogenomics analysis of a Malay whole genome: proof of concept for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Teh, Lay Kek; Lee, Lian Shien; Ismet, Rose Iszati; Patowary, Ashok; Joshi, Kandarp; Pasha, Ayesha; Ahmed, Azni Zain; Janor, Roziah Mohd; Hamzah, Ahmad Sazali; Adam, Aishah; Yusoff, Khalid; Hoh, Boon Peng; Hatta, Fazleen Haslinda Mohd; Ismail, Mohamad Izwan; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    With a higher throughput and lower cost in sequencing, second generation sequencing technology has immense potential for translation into clinical practice and in the realization of pharmacogenomics based patient care. The systematic analysis of whole genome sequences to assess patient to patient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics responses towards drugs would be the next step in future medicine in line with the vision of personalizing medicine. Genomic DNA obtained from a 55 years old, self-declared healthy, anonymous male of Malay descent was sequenced. The subject's mother died of lung cancer and the father had a history of schizophrenia and deceased at the age of 65 years old. A systematic, intuitive computational workflow/pipeline integrating custom algorithm in tandem with large datasets of variant annotations and gene functions for genetic variations with pharmacogenomics impact was developed. A comprehensive pathway map of drug transport, metabolism and action was used as a template to map non-synonymous variations with potential functional consequences. Over 3 million known variations and 100,898 novel variations in the Malay genome were identified. Further in-depth pharmacogenetics analysis revealed a total of 607 unique variants in 563 proteins, with the eventual identification of 4 drug transport genes, 2 drug metabolizing enzyme genes and 33 target genes harboring deleterious SNVs involved in pharmacological pathways, which could have a potential role in clinical settings. The current study successfully unravels the potential of personal genome sequencing in understanding the functionally relevant variations with potential influence on drug transport, metabolism and differential therapeutic outcomes. These will be essential for realizing personalized medicine through the use of comprehensive computational pipeline for systematic data mining and analysis.

  7. A survey of scholarly literature describing the field of bioinformatics education and bioinformatics educational research.

    PubMed

    Magana, Alejandra J; Taleyarkhan, Manaz; Alvarado, Daniela Rivera; Kane, Michael; Springer, John; Clase, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics education can be broadly defined as the teaching and learning of the use of computer and information technology, along with mathematical and statistical analysis for gathering, storing, analyzing, interpreting, and integrating data to solve biological problems. The recent surge of genomics, proteomics, and structural biology in the potential advancement of research and development in complex biomedical systems has created a need for an educated workforce in bioinformatics. However, effectively integrating bioinformatics education through formal and informal educational settings has been a challenge due in part to its cross-disciplinary nature. In this article, we seek to provide an overview of the state of bioinformatics education. This article identifies: 1) current approaches of bioinformatics education at the undergraduate and graduate levels; 2) the most common concepts and skills being taught in bioinformatics education; 3) pedagogical approaches and methods of delivery for conveying bioinformatics concepts and skills; and 4) assessment results on the impact of these programs, approaches, and methods in students' attitudes or learning. Based on these findings, it is our goal to describe the landscape of scholarly work in this area and, as a result, identify opportunities and challenges in bioinformatics education. © 2014 A. J. Magana et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Bioinformatics and School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalpech, Roger

    2006-01-01

    The rapidly changing field of bioinformatics is fuelling the need for suitably trained personnel with skills in relevant biological "sub-disciplines" such as proteomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics, etc. But because of the complexity--and sheer weight of data--associated with these new areas of biology, many school teachers feel…

  9. Teaching bioinformatics to engineers.

    PubMed

    Mihalas, George I; Tudor, Anca; Paralescu, Sorin; Andor, Minodora; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lacramioara

    2014-01-01

    The paper refers to our methodology and experience in establishing the content of the course in bioinformatics introduced to the school of "Information Systems in Healthcare" (SIIS), master level. The syllabi of both lectures and laboratory works are presented and discussed.

  10. Introduction to bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Can, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary field mainly involving molecular biology and genetics, computer science, mathematics, and statistics. Data intensive, large-scale biological problems are addressed from a computational point of view. The most common problems are modeling biological processes at the molecular level and making inferences from collected data. A bioinformatics solution usually involves the following steps: Collect statistics from biological data. Build a computational model. Solve a computational modeling problem. Test and evaluate a computational algorithm. This chapter gives a brief introduction to bioinformatics by first providing an introduction to biological terminology and then discussing some classical bioinformatics problems organized by the types of data sources. Sequence analysis is the analysis of DNA and protein sequences for clues regarding function and includes subproblems such as identification of homologs, multiple sequence alignment, searching sequence patterns, and evolutionary analyses. Protein structures are three-dimensional data and the associated problems are structure prediction (secondary and tertiary), analysis of protein structures for clues regarding function, and structural alignment. Gene expression data is usually represented as matrices and analysis of microarray data mostly involves statistics analysis, classification, and clustering approaches. Biological networks such as gene regulatory networks, metabolic pathways, and protein-protein interaction networks are usually modeled as graphs and graph theoretic approaches are used to solve associated problems such as construction and analysis of large-scale networks.

  11. Analysis of the whole mitochondrial genome: translation of the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine system to the diagnostic bench?

    PubMed

    Seneca, Sara; Vancampenhout, Kim; Van Coster, Rudy; Smet, Joél; Lissens, Willy; Vanlander, Arnaud; De Paepe, Boel; Jonckheere, An; Stouffs, Katrien; De Meirleir, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS), an innovative sequencing technology that enables the successful analysis of numerous gene sequences in a massive parallel sequencing approach, has revolutionized the field of molecular biology. Although NGS was introduced in a rather recent past, the technology has already demonstrated its potential and effectiveness in many research projects, and is now on the verge of being introduced into the diagnostic setting of routine laboratories to delineate the molecular basis of genetic disease in undiagnosed patient samples. We tested a benchtop device on retrospective genomic DNA (gDNA) samples of controls and patients with a clinical suspicion of a mitochondrial DNA disorder. This Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine platform is a high-throughput sequencer with a fast turnaround time and reasonable running costs. We challenged the chemistry and technology with the analysis and processing of a mutational spectrum composed of samples with single-nucleotide substitutions, indels (insertions and deletions) and large single or multiple deletions, occasionally in heteroplasmy. The output data were compared with previously obtained conventional dideoxy sequencing results and the mitochondrial revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS). We were able to identify the majority of all nucleotide alterations, but three false-negative results were also encountered in the data set. At the same time, the poor performance of the PGM instrument in regions associated with homopolymeric stretches generated many false-positive miscalls demanding additional manual curation of the data.

  12. Towards personalized agriculture: what chemical genomics can bring to plant biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Michael E.; McCourt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the dominant drug paradigm in which compounds were developed to “fit all,” new models focused around personalized medicine are appearing in which treatments are developed and customized for individual patients. The agricultural biotechnology industry (Ag-biotech) should also think about these new personalized models. For example, most common herbicides are generic in action, which led to the development of genetically modified crops to add specificity. The ease and accessibility of modern genomic analysis, when wedded to accessible large chemical space, should facilitate the discovery of chemicals that are more selective in their utility. Is it possible to develop species-selective herbicides and growth regulators? More generally put, is plant research at a stage where chemicals can be developed that streamline plant development and growth to various environments? We believe the advent of chemical genomics now opens up these and other opportunities to “personalize” agriculture. Furthermore, chemical genomics does not necessarily require genetically tractable plant models, which in principle should allow quick translation to practical applications. For this to happen, however, will require collaboration between the Ag-biotech industry and academic labs for early stage research and development, a situation that has proven very fruitful for Big Pharma. PMID:25183965

  13. Genome-wide association study of personality traits in bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Alliey-Rodriguez, Ney; Zhang, Dandan; Badner, Judith A.; Lahey, Benjamin B.; Zhang, Xiaotong; Dinwiddie, Stephen; Romanos, Benjamin; Plenys, Natalie; Liu, Chunyu; Gershon, Elliot S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association study was carried out on personality traits among bipolar patients as possible endophenotypes for gene discovery in bipolar disorder. Methods The subscales of Cloninger’s Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) and the Zuckerman–Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ) were used as quantitative phenotypes. The genotyping platform was the Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array. The sample consisted of 944 individuals for TCI and 1007 for ZKPQ, all of European ancestry, diagnosed with bipolar disorder by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria. Results Genome-wide significant association was found for two subscales of the TCI, rs10479334 with the ‘Social Acceptance versus Social Intolerance’ subscale (Bonferroni P = 0.014) in an intergenic region, and rs9419788 with the ‘Spiritual Acceptance versus Rational Materialism’ subscale (Bonferroni P = 0.036) in PLCE1 gene. Although genome-wide significance was not reached for ZKPQ scales, lowest P values pinpointed to genes, RXRG for Sensation Seeking, GRM7 and ITK for Neuroticism Anxiety, and SPTLC3 gene for Aggression Hostility. Conclusion After correction for the 25 subscales in TCI and four scales plus two subscales in ZKPQ, phenotype-wide significance was not reached. PMID:21368711

  14. Adopting Genetics: Motivations and Outcomes of Personal Genomic Testing in Adult Adoptees

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Natalie M.; Christensen, Kurt D.; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Broadley, Simon A.; Roberts, J. Scott; Green, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose American adult adoptees may possess limited amounts of information about their biological families and turn to direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing (PGT) for genealogical and medical information. We investigated the motivations and outcomes of adoptees undergoing PGT using data from the Impact of Personal Genomics (PGen) Study. Methods The PGen Study surveyed new 23andMe and Pathway Genomics customers prior to and 6 months after receiving PGT results. Exploratory analyses compared adoptees’ and non-adoptees’ PGT attitudes, expectations, and experiences. We evaluated the association of adoption status with motivations for testing and post-disclosure actions using logistic regression models. Results Of 1607 participants, 80 (5%) were adopted. As compared to non-adoptees, adoptees were more likely to cite limited family health history knowledge (OR = 10.1; 95% CI = 5.7–19.5) and the opportunity to learn genetic disease risks (OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.6–4.8) as strong motivations for PGT. Of 922 participants who completed 6-month follow-up, there was no significant association between adoption status and PGT-motivated healthcare utilization or health behavior change. Conclusion PGT allows adoptees to gain otherwise inaccessible information about their genetic disease risks and ancestry, helping them to fill the void of an incomplete family health history. PMID:26820063

  15. The Listeria monocytogenes Core-Genome Sequence Typer (LmCGST): a bioinformatic pipeline for molecular characterization with next-generation sequence data.

    PubMed

    Pightling, Arthur W; Petronella, Nicholas; Pagotto, Franco

    2015-10-22

    Next-generation sequencing provides a powerful means of molecular characterization. However, methods such as single-nucleotide polymorphism detection or whole-chromosome sequence analysis are computationally expensive, prone to errors, and are still less accessible than traditional typing methods. Here, we present the Listeria monocytogenes core-genome sequence typing method for molecular characterization. This method uses a high-confidence core (HCC) genome, calculated to ensure accurate identification of orthologs. We also developed an evolutionarily relevant nomenclature based upon phylogenetic analysis of HCC genomes. Finally, we created a pipeline (LmCGST; https://sourceforge.net/projects/lmcgst/files/) that takes in raw next-generation sequencing reads, calculates a subject HCC profile, compares it to an expandable database, assigns a sequence type, and performs a phylogenetic analysis. We analyzed 29 high-quality, closed Listeria monocytogenes chromosome sequences and identified loci that are reliable targets for automated molecular characterization methods. We identified 1013 open-reading frames that comprise our high-confidence core (HCC) genome. We then populated a database with HCC profiles from 114 taxa. We sequenced 84 randomly selected isolates from the Listeriosis Reference Service for Canada's collection and analysed them with the LmCGST pipeline. In addition, we generated pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, ribotyping, and in silico multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) data for the 84 isolates and compared the results to those obtained using the CGST method. We found that all of the methods yielded results that are generally congruent. However, due to the increased numbers of categories, the CGST method provides much greater discriminatory power than the other methods tested here. We show that the CGST method provides increased discriminatory power relative to typing methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, ribotyping, and multi-locus sequence

  16. Bioinformatics strategies for the analysis of lipids.

    PubMed

    Wheelock, Craig E; Goto, Susumu; Yetukuri, Laxman; D'Alexandri, Fabio Luiz; Klukas, Christian; Schreiber, Falk; Oresic, Matej

    2009-01-01

    Owing to their importance in cellular physiology and pathology as well as to recent technological advances, the study of lipids has reemerged as a major research target. However, the structural diversity of lipids presents a number of analytical and informatics challenges. The field of lipidomics is a new postgenome discipline that aims to develop comprehensive methods for lipid analysis, necessitating concomitant developments in bioinformatics. The evolving research paradigm requires that new bioinformatics approaches accommodate genomic as well as high-level perspectives, integrating genome, protein, chemical and network information. The incorporation of lipidomics information into these data structures will provide mechanistic understanding of lipid functions and interactions in the context of cellular and organismal physiology. Accordingly, it is vital that specific bioinformatics methods be developed to analyze the wealth of lipid data being acquired. Herein, we present an overview of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database and application of its tools to the analysis of lipid data. We also describe a series of software tools and databases (KGML-ED, VANTED, MZmine, and LipidDB) that can be used for the processing of lipidomics data and biochemical pathway reconstruction, an important next step in the development of the lipidomics field.

  17. Bioinformatic Analysis of Gene Expression for Melanoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Akinori; Fisher, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis of genome-wide gene expression allows us to characterize cells, including melanomas. Gene expression profiles have been generated in various stages of melanomas and analyzed by researchers in unique ways. Lauss et al. compared their melanoma subtypes with those of The Cancer Genome Atlas Network and found consistency between the two studies. PMID:27884291

  18. Implications of Personal Genomic Testing for Health Behaviors: The Case of Smoking.

    PubMed

    Olfson, Emily; Hartz, Sarah; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Green, Robert C; Roberts, J Scott; Bierut, Laura J

    2016-12-01

    Direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing has the potential to influence health behaviors, including smoking. Critics of this testing highlight limited evidence to support positive behavioral benefits and caution that genomic results may provide false reassurance, leading to unhealthy behaviors. This study investigates interest in genetic risks of smoking-related diseases and changes in smoking behaviors among genomic testing consumers. From 2012 to 2013, a longitudinal series of web surveys was conducted. A total of 1464 customers of 23andMe and Pathway Genomics completed a survey prior to viewing genomic test results, of which 1002 participants provided data on smoking behaviors 6 months after receiving results. At baseline, 64% of participants were never smokers, 29% were former smokers, and 7% were current smokers. Most baseline current smokers were very interested in genetic risk results for lung cancer (65%) and heart disease (72%). For lung cancer, this interest was significantly greater than former (50% very interested) and never smokers (37% very interested) (p < .0001). Even though participants were interested in smoking-related disease genetic risks, 96% reported the same smoking status at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Importantly, only 1% (n = 13/916) of former and never smokers became current smokers at 6 months and 22% (n = 14/64) of current smokers reported quitting. Overall, smokers show a high level of interest in genetic risks of smoking-related illnesses. The experience of receiving direct-to-consumer genomic health risks does not appear to have obvious harms related to smoking behaviors, with some potential benefits. In the setting of ongoing controversy surrounding direct-to-consumer genomic testing, this study provides evidence that consumers are interested in genetic risk results of smoking-related diseases. Receiving genomic testing results does not lead to smoking initiation among never smokers or reinitiation among former smokers and

  19. Genomic research and data-mining technology: implications for personal privacy and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Tavani, Herman T

    2004-01-01

    This essay examines issues involving personal privacy and informed consent that arise at the intersection of information and communication technology (ICT) and population genomics research. I begin by briefly examining the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) program requirements that were established to guide researchers working on the Human Genome Project (HGP). Next I consider a case illustration involving deCODE Genetics, a privately owned genetic company in Iceland, which raises some ethical concerns that are not clearly addressed in the current ELSI guidelines. The deCODE case also illustrates some ways in which an ICT technique known as data mining has both aided and posed special challenges for researchers working in the field of population genomics. On the one hand, data-mining tools have greatly assisted researchers in mapping the human genome and in identifying certain "disease genes" common in specific populations (which, in turn, has accelerated the process of finding cures for diseases tha affect those populations). On the other hand, this technology has significantly threatened the privacy of research subjects participating in population genomics studies, who may, unwittingly, contribute to the construction of new groups (based on arbitrary and non-obvious patterns and statistical correlations) that put those subjects at risk for discrimination and stigmatization. In the final section of this paper I examine some ways in which the use of data mining in the context of population genomics research poses a critical challenge for the principle of informed consent, which traditionally has played a central role in protecting the privacy interests of research subjects participating in epidemiological studies.

  20. Bioinformatics prediction of miRNAs in the Prunus persica genome with validation of their precise sequences by miR-RACE.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanping; Bai, Youhuang; Han, Jian; Chen, Ming; Kayesh, Emrul; Jiang, Weibing; Fang, Jinggui

    2013-01-01

    We predicted 262 potential MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belonging to 70 miRNA families from the peach (Prunus persica) genome and two specific 5' and 3' miRNA rapid amplification of cDNA ends (miR-RACE) PCR reactions and sequence-directed cloning were employed to accurately validate 61 unique P. persica miRNAs (Ppe-miRNAs) sequences belonging to 61 families comprising 97 Ppe-miRNAs. Validation of the termini nucleotides in particular can define the real sequences of the Ppe-miRNAs on peach genome. Comparison between predicted and validated Ppe-miRNAs through alignment revealed that 43 unique orthologous sequences were identical, while the remaining 18 exhibited some divergences at their termini nucleotides. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was further employed to analyze the expression of all the 61 miRNAs and 10 putative targets of 8 randomly selected Ppe-miRNAs in peach leaves, flowers and fruits at different stages of development, where both the miRNAs and the putative target genes showed tissue-specific expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Genomic translational research: Paving the way to individualized cardiac functional analyses and personalized cardiology.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2017-03-01

    For most of Medicine's past, the best that physicians could do to cope with disease prevention and treatment was based on the expected response of an average patient. Currently, however, a more personalized/precise approach to cardiology and medicine in general is becoming possible, as the cost of sequencing a human genome has declined substantially. As a result, we are witnessing an era of precipitous advances in biomedicine and bourgeoning understanding of the genetic basis of cardiovascular and other diseases, reminiscent of the resurgence of innovations in physico-mathematical sciences and biology-anatomy-cardiology in the Renaissance, a parallel time of radical change and reformation of medical knowledge, education and practice. Now on the horizon is an individualized, diverse patient-centered, approach to medical practice that encompasses the development of new, gene-based diagnostics and preventive medicine tactics, and offers the broadest range of personalized therapies based on pharmacogenetics. Over time, translation of genomic and high-tech approaches unquestionably will transform clinical practice in cardiology and medicine as a whole, with the adoption of new personalized medicine approaches and procedures. Clearly, future prospects far outweigh present accomplishments, which are best viewed as a promising start. It is now essential for pluridisciplinary health care providers to examine the drivers and barriers to the clinical adoption of this emerging revolutionary paradigm, in order to expedite the realization of its potential. So, we are not there yet, but we are definitely on our way.

  2. Bioinformatic Identification of Rare Codon Clusters (RCCs) in HBV Genome and Evaluation of RCCs in Proteins Structure of Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Mojtaba; Zarenezhad, Mohammad; Gholamzadeh, Saeid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Dehghani, Reza; Malekpour, Abdorrasoul; Meshkibaf, Mohammadhasan; Fakhrzad, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) as an infectious disease that has nine genotypes (A - I) and a 'putative' genotype J. The aim of this study was to identify the rare codon clusters (RCC) in the HBV genome and to evaluate these RCCs in the HBV proteins structure. For detection of protein family accession numbers (Pfam) in HBV proteins, the UniProt database and Pfam search tool were used. Protein family accession numbers is a comprehensive and accurate collection of protein domains and families. It contains annotation of each family in the form of textual descriptions, links to other resources and literature references. Genome projects have used Pfam extensively for large-scale functional annotation of genomic data; Pfam database is a large collection of protein families, each represented by multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models (HMMs). The Pfam search tools are databases that identify Pfam of proteins. These Pfam IDs were analyzed in Sherlocc program and the location of RCCs in HBV genome and proteins were detected and reported as translated EMBL nucleotide sequence data library (TrEMBL) entries. The TrEMBL is a computer-annotated supplement of SWISS-PROT that contains all the translations of European molecular biology laboratory (EMBL) nucleotide sequence entries not yet integrated in SWISS-PROT. Furthermore, the structures of TrEMBL entries proteins were studied in the PDB database and 3D structures of the HBV proteins and locations of RCCs were visualized and studied using Swiss PDB Viewer software®. The Pfam search tool found nine protein families in three frames. Results of Pfams studies in the Sherlocc program showed that this program has not identified RCCs in the external core antigen (PF08290) and truncated HBeAg gene (PF08290) of HBV. By contrast, the RCCs were identified in gene of hepatitis core antigen (PF00906 and the residues 224 - 234 and 251 - 255), large envelope protein S (PF00695 and the residues 53-56 and 70 - 84), X protein (PF00739 and

  3. Bioinformatic Identification of Rare Codon Clusters (RCCs) in HBV Genome and Evaluation of RCCs in Proteins Structure of Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Mojtaba; Zarenezhad, Mohammad; Gholamzadeh, Saeid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Dehghani, Reza; Malekpour, Abdorrasoul; Meshkibaf, Mohammadhasan; Fakhrzad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) as an infectious disease that has nine genotypes (A - I) and a ‘putative’ genotype J. Objectives The aim of this study was to identify the rare codon clusters (RCC) in the HBV genome and to evaluate these RCCs in the HBV proteins structure. Methods For detection of protein family accession numbers (Pfam) in HBV proteins, the UniProt database and Pfam search tool were used. Protein family accession numbers is a comprehensive and accurate collection of protein domains and families. It contains annotation of each family in the form of textual descriptions, links to other resources and literature references. Genome projects have used Pfam extensively for large-scale functional annotation of genomic data; Pfam database is a large collection of protein families, each represented by multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models (HMMs). The Pfam search tools are databases that identify Pfam of proteins. These Pfam IDs were analyzed in Sherlocc program and the location of RCCs in HBV genome and proteins were detected and reported as translated EMBL nucleotide sequence data library (TrEMBL) entries. The TrEMBL is a computer-annotated supplement of SWISS-PROT that contains all the translations of European molecular biology laboratory (EMBL) nucleotide sequence entries not yet integrated in SWISS-PROT. Furthermore, the structures of TrEMBL entries proteins were studied in the PDB database and 3D structures of the HBV proteins and locations of RCCs were visualized and studied using Swiss PDB Viewer software®. Results The Pfam search tool found nine protein families in three frames. Results of Pfams studies in the Sherlocc program showed that this program has not identified RCCs in the external core antigen (PF08290) and truncated HBeAg gene (PF08290) of HBV. By contrast, the RCCs were identified in gene of hepatitis core antigen (PF00906 and the residues 224 - 234 and 251 - 255), large envelope protein S (PF00695 and the residues

  4. Bioinformatics Methods and Tools to Advance Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Lecroq, T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To summarize excellent current research in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. Method We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2015, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,594 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 15 articles for peer-review. Results The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook’s section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles regarding data management and genome medicine that are mainly tool-based papers. In the first article, the authors present PPISURV a tool for uncovering the role of specific genes in cancer survival outcome. The second article describes the classifier PredictSNP which combines six performing tools for predicting disease-related mutations. In the third article, by presenting a high-coverage map of the human proteome using high resolution mass spectrometry, the authors highlight the need for using mass spectrometry to complement genome annotation. The fourth article is also related to patient survival and decision support. The authors present datamining methods of large-scale datasets of past transplants. The objective is to identify chances of survival. Conclusions The current research activities still attest the continuous convergence of Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, with a focus this year on dedicated tools and methods to advance clinical care. Indeed, there is a need for powerful tools for managing and interpreting complex, large-scale genomic and biological datasets, but also a need for user-friendly tools developed for the clinicians in their

  5. A national clinical decision support infrastructure to enable the widespread and consistent practice of genomic and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent years, the completion of the Human Genome Project and other rapid advances in genomics have led to increasing anticipation of an era of genomic and personalized medicine, in which an individual's health is optimized through the use of all available patient data, including data on the individual's genome and its downstream products. Genomic and personalized medicine could transform healthcare systems and catalyze significant reductions in morbidity, mortality, and overall healthcare costs. Discussion Critical to the achievement of more efficient and effective healthcare enabled by genomics is the establishment of a robust, nationwide clinical decision support infrastructure that assists clinicians in their use of genomic assays to guide disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. Requisite components of this infrastructure include the standardized representation of genomic and non-genomic patient data across health information systems; centrally managed repositories of computer-processable medical knowledge; and standardized approaches for applying these knowledge resources against patient data to generate and deliver patient-specific care recommendations. Here, we provide recommendations for establishing a national decision support infrastructure for genomic and personalized medicine that fulfills these needs, leverages existing resources, and is aligned with the Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support commissioned by the U.S. Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Critical to the establishment of this infrastructure will be strong leadership and substantial funding from the federal government. Summary A national clinical decision support infrastructure will be required for reaping the full benefits of genomic and personalized medicine. Essential components of this infrastructure include standards for data representation; centrally managed knowledge repositories; and standardized approaches for

  6. A national clinical decision support infrastructure to enable the widespread and consistent practice of genomic and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lobach, David F; Willard, Huntington F; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2009-03-23

    In recent years, the completion of the Human Genome Project and other rapid advances in genomics have led to increasing anticipation of an era of genomic and personalized medicine, in which an individual's health is optimized through the use of all available patient data, including data on the individual's genome and its downstream products. Genomic and personalized medicine could transform healthcare systems and catalyze significant reductions in morbidity, mortality, and overall healthcare costs. Critical to the achievement of more efficient and effective healthcare enabled by genomics is the establishment of a robust, nationwide clinical decision support infrastructure that assists clinicians in their use of genomic assays to guide disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. Requisite components of this infrastructure include the standardized representation of genomic and non-genomic patient data across health information systems; centrally managed repositories of computer-processable medical knowledge; and standardized approaches for applying these knowledge resources against patient data to generate and deliver patient-specific care recommendations. Here, we provide recommendations for establishing a national decision support infrastructure for genomic and personalized medicine that fulfills these needs, leverages existing resources, and is aligned with the Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support commissioned by the U.S. Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Critical to the establishment of this infrastructure will be strong leadership and substantial funding from the federal government. A national clinical decision support infrastructure will be required for reaping the full benefits of genomic and personalized medicine. Essential components of this infrastructure include standards for data representation; centrally managed knowledge repositories; and standardized approaches for leveraging these knowledge

  7. Towards a career in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Shoba

    2009-12-03

    The 2009 annual conference of the Asia Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet), Asia's oldest bioinformatics organisation from 1998, was organized as the 8th International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB), Sept. 9-11, 2009 at Biopolis, Singapore. InCoB has actively engaged researchers from the area of life sciences, systems biology and clinicians, to facilitate greater synergy between these groups. To encourage bioinformatics students and new researchers, tutorials and student symposium, the Singapore Symposium on Computational Biology (SYMBIO) were organized, along with the Workshop on Education in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (WEBCB) and the Clinical Bioinformatics (CBAS) Symposium. However, to many students and young researchers, pursuing a career in a multi-disciplinary area such as bioinformatics poses a Himalayan challenge. A collection to tips is presented here to provide signposts on the road to a career in bioinformatics. An overview of the application of bioinformatics to traditional and emerging areas, published in this supplement, is also presented to provide possible future avenues of bioinformatics investigation. A case study on the application of e-learning tools in undergraduate bioinformatics curriculum provides information on how to go impart targeted education, to sustain bioinformatics in the Asia-Pacific region. The next InCoB is scheduled to be held in Tokyo, Japan, Sept. 26-28, 2010.

  8. Towards a career in bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 annual conference of the Asia Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet), Asia's oldest bioinformatics organisation from 1998, was organized as the 8th International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB), Sept. 9-11, 2009 at Biopolis, Singapore. InCoB has actively engaged researchers from the area of life sciences, systems biology and clinicians, to facilitate greater synergy between these groups. To encourage bioinformatics students and new researchers, tutorials and student symposium, the Singapore Symposium on Computational Biology (SYMBIO) were organized, along with the Workshop on Education in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (WEBCB) and the Clinical Bioinformatics (CBAS) Symposium. However, to many students and young researchers, pursuing a career in a multi-disciplinary area such as bioinformatics poses a Himalayan challenge. A collection to tips is presented here to provide signposts on the road to a career in bioinformatics. An overview of the application of bioinformatics to traditional and emerging areas, published in this supplement, is also presented to provide possible future avenues of bioinformatics investigation. A case study on the application of e-learning tools in undergraduate bioinformatics curriculum provides information on how to go impart targeted education, to sustain bioinformatics in the Asia-Pacific region. The next InCoB is scheduled to be held in Tokyo, Japan, Sept. 26-28, 2010. PMID:19958508

  9. The Bioinformatics Analysis of Comparative Genomics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC) Provides Insight into Dissimilarities between Intraspecific Groups Differing in Host Association, Virulence, and Epitope Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinmiao; Yang, Li; Dong, Mengxing; Chen, Suting; Lv, Lingna; Cao, Dandan; Fu, Jing; Yang, Tingting; Zhang, Ju; Zhang, Xiangli; Shang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guirong; Sheng, Yongjie; Huang, Hairong; Chen, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis now exceeds HIV as the top infectious disease cause of mortality, and is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). MTBC strains have highly conserved genome sequences (similarity >99%) but dramatically different phenotypes. To analyze the relationship between genotype and phenotype, we conducted the comparative genomic analysis on 12 MTBC strains representing different lineages (i.e., Mycobacterium bovis; M. bovis BCG; M. microti; M. africanum; M. tuberculosis H37Rv; M. tuberculosis H37Ra, and six M. tuberculosis clinical isolates). The analysis focused on the three aspects of pathogenicity: host association, virulence, and epitope variations. Host association analysis indicated that eight mce3 genes, two enoyl-CoA hydratases, and five PE/PPE family genes were present only in human isolates; these may have roles in host-pathogen interactions. There were 15 SNPs found on virulence factors (including five SNPs in three ESX secretion proteins) only in the Beijing strains, which might be related to their more virulent phenotype. A comparison between the virulent H37Rv and non-virulent H37Ra strains revealed three SNPs that were likely associated with the virulence attenuation of H37Ra: S219L (PhoP), A219E (MazG) and a newly identified I228M (EspK). Additionally, a comparison of animal-associated MTBC strains showed that the deletion of the first four genes (i.e., pe35, ppe68, esxB, esxA), rather than all eight genes of RD1, might play a central role in the virulence attenuation of animal isolates. Finally, by comparing epitopes among MTBC strains, we found that four epitopes were lost only in the Beijing strains; this may render them better capable of evading the human immune system, leading to enhanced virulence. Overall, our comparative genomic analysis of MTBC strains reveals the relationship between the highly conserved genotypes and the diverse phenotypes of MTBC, provides insight into pathogenic mechanisms, and facilitates the

  10. Online Tools for Bioinformatics Analyses in Nutrition Sciences12

    PubMed Central

    Malkaram, Sridhar A.; Hassan, Yousef I.; Zempleni, Janos

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in “omics” research have resulted in the creation of large datasets that were generated by consortiums and centers, small datasets that were generated by individual investigators, and bioinformatics tools for mining these datasets. It is important for nutrition laboratories to take full advantage of the analysis tools to interrogate datasets for information relevant to genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. This review provides guidance regarding bioinformatics resources that are currently available in the public domain, with the intent to provide a starting point for investigators who want to take advantage of the opportunities provided by the bioinformatics field. PMID:22983844

  11. After the revolution? Ethical and social challenges in 'personalized genomic medicine'

    PubMed

    Juengst, Eric T; Settersten, Richard A; Fishman, Jennifer R; McGowan, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Personalized genomic medicine (PGM) is a goal that currently unites a wide array of biomedical initiatives, and is promoted as a 'new paradigm for healthcare' by its champions. Its promissory virtues include individualized diagnosis and risk prediction, more effective prevention and health promotion, and patient empowerment. Beyond overcoming scientific and technological hurdles to realizing PGM, proponents may interpret and rank these promises differently, which carries ethical and social implications for the realization of PGM as an approach to healthcare. We examine competing visions of PGM's virtues and the directions in which they could take the field, in order to anticipate policy choices that may lie ahead for researchers, healthcare providers and the public.

  12. Bioinformatics for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kathy A.

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of this paper, bioinformatics is defined as the application of computer technology to the management of biological information. It can be thought of as the science of developing computer databases and algorithms to facilitate and expedite biological research. This is a crosscutting capability that supports nearly all human health areas ranging from computational modeling, to pharmacodynamics research projects, to decision support systems within autonomous medical care. Bioinformatics serves to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the life sciences research program. It provides data, information, and knowledge capture which further supports management of the bioastronautics research roadmap - identifying gaps that still remain and enabling the determination of which risks have been addressed.

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for personality

    PubMed Central

    de Moor, Marleen H.M.; Costa, Paul T.; Terracciano, Antonio; Krueger, Robert F.; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Toshiko, Tanaka; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Esko, Tõnu; Madden, Pamela A F; Derringer, Jaime; Amin, Najaf; Willemsen, Gonneke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Distel, Marijn A.; Uda, Manuela; Sanna, Serena; Spinhoven, Philip; Hartman, Catharina A.; Sullivan, Patrick; Realo, Anu; Allik, Jüri; Heath, Andrew C; Pergadia, Michele L; Agrawal, Arpana; Lin, Peng; Grucza, Richard; Nutile, Teresa; Ciullo, Marina; Rujescu, Dan; Giegling, Ina; Konte, Bettina; Widen, Elisabeth; Cousminer, Diana L; Eriksson, Johan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Luciano, Michelle; Tenesa, Albert; Davies, Gail; Lopez, Lorna M.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schlessinger, David; Montgomery, Grant W.; Wright, Margaret J.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Janssens, A.Cecile J.W.; Oostra, Ben A.; Metspalu, Andres; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Deary, Ian J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Bierut, Laura J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2013-01-01

    Personality can be thought of as a set of characteristics that influence people’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviour across a variety of settings. Variation in personality is predictive of many outcomes in life, including mental health. Here we report on a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) data for personality in ten discovery samples (17 375 adults) and five in-silico replication samples (3 294 adults). All participants were of European ancestry. Personality scores for Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness were based on the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Genotype data were available of ~2.4M Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs; directly typed and imputed using HAPMAP data). In the discovery samples, classical association analyses were performed under an additive model followed by meta-analysis using the weighted inverse variance method. Results showed genome-wide significance for Openness to Experience near the RASA1 gene on 5q14.3 (rs1477268 and rs2032794, P = 2.8 × 10−8 and 3.1 × 10−8) and for Conscientiousness in the brain-expressed KATNAL2 gene on 18q21.1 (rs2576037, P = 4.9 × 10−8). We further conducted a gene-based test that confirmed the association of KATNAL2 to Conscientiousness. In-silico replication did not, however, show significant associations of the top SNPs with Openness and Conscientiousness, although the direction of effect of the KATNAL2 SNP on Conscientiousness was consistent in all replication samples. Larger scale GWA studies and alternative approaches are required for confirmation of KATNAL2 as a novel gene affecting Conscientiousness. PMID:21173776

  14. Personalized evolutionary hypothesis in genomics and auxiliary lymph node through diverse subtelomeric signal profile.

    PubMed

    Mehdipour, Parvin; Javan, Firoozeh; Savad, Shahram; Karbassian, Hamid; Atri, Morteza

    2015-01-24

    Few available data on the genomic-somatic evolution in breast cancer create limitation to provide the appropriate clinical managements. As an example, human subtelomeres (ST) are diverse-prone and variable targets. STs, as hot spots, have positive and negative impacts on the status of health and malady. We showed higher subtelomere signal copy number (SCN) of specific chromosomes in genomics than in auxiliary lymph node (ALN). Dissimilarity of signal intensity (SI) is found for all chromosomes. Significantly higher SI in genomics than in ALN cells were specified as chromosomes 5, 6, 9-12, 16-19 for weak; 1, 5-9, 19, X for medium; and 2, 5, 9, 10, 16, 18 for strong SI. For lacking, and presence of one and two SCNs; p/q ratio reflected differences for all chromosomes; but, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 16, 18, 20, and X chromosomes were involved for three SCN. Chromosomes 1, 4, 9, 12, 17-19 lacked three SCN in ALN and lymphocytes. Weak SI ratio was higher in p- than in q-arm in majority of chromosomes. Manner of evolution and diversity in p- and q-arms is expressive of a novel definition as two diverse domains with a personalized insight. These data have been accompanied by periodic charts as ST array profiles which provide specific and individualized pattern in breast neoplasm. Such profiling at genomics level could be considered as a prediction through the patients' life. Moreover, subtelomere territory by interacting with protein expression of Ki67, cyclin D1, and cyclin E; and molecular targets including telomere length at genomics and somatic level provides package of information to bridge cancer cell biology to the cancer clinic as "puzzling paradigm." © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  15. Distributed computing in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Jain, Eric

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of methods and current applications of distributed computing in bioinformatics. Distributed computing is a strategy of dividing a large workload among multiple computers to reduce processing time, or to make use of resources such as programs and databases that are not available on all computers. Participating computers may be connected either through a local high-speed network or through the Internet.

  16. From Molecules to Patients: The Clinical Applications of Translational Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Regan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective In order to realize the promise of personalized medicine, Translational Bioinformatics (TBI) research will need to continue to address implementation issues across the clinical spectrum. In this review, we aim to evaluate the expanding field of TBI towards clinical applications, and define common themes and current gaps in order to motivate future research. Methods Here we present the state-of-the-art of clinical implementation of TBI-based tools and resources. Our thematic analyses of a targeted literature search of recent TBI-related articles ranged across topics in genomics, data management, hypothesis generation, molecular epidemiology, diagnostics, therapeutics and personalized medicine. Results Open areas of clinically-relevant TBI research identified in this review include developing data standards and best practices, publicly available resources, integrative systems-level approaches, user-friendly tools for clinical support, cloud computing solutions, emerging technologies and means to address pressing legal, ethical and social issues. Conclusions There is a need for further research bridging the gap from foundational TBI-based theories and methodologies to clinical implementation. We have organized the topic themes presented in this review into four conceptual foci – domain analyses, knowledge engineering, computational architectures and computation methods alongside three stages of knowledge development in order to orient future TBI efforts to accelerate the goals of personalized medicine. PMID:26293863

  17. Phylogenetic trees in bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Tom L

    2008-01-01

    Genetic data is often used to infer evolutionary relationships among a collection of viruses, bacteria, animal or plant species, or other operational taxonomic units (OTU). A phylogenetic tree depicts such relationships and provides a visual representation of the estimated branching order of the OTUs. Tree estimation is unique for several reasons, including: the types of data used to represent each OTU; the use ofprobabilistic nucleotide substitution models; the inference goals involving both tree topology and branch length, and the huge number of possible trees for a given sample of a very modest number of OTUs, which implies that fmding the best tree(s) to describe the genetic data for each OTU is computationally demanding. Bioinformatics is too large a field to review here. We focus on that aspect of bioinformatics that includes study of similarities in genetic data from multiple OTUs. Although research questions are diverse, a common underlying challenge is to estimate the evolutionary history of the OTUs. Therefore, this paper reviews the role of phylogenetic tree estimation in bioinformatics, available methods and software, and identifies areas for additional research and development.

  18. Identification of a human papillomavirus-associated oncogenic miRNA panel in human oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma validated by bioinformatics analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel L; Davis, J Wade; Taylor, Kristen H; Johnson, Jeff; Shi, Zonggao; Williams, Russell; Atasoy, Ulus; Lewis, James S; Stack, M Sharon

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a causative agent for an increasing subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs), and current evidence supports these tumors as having identifiable risk factors and improved response to therapy. However, the biochemical and molecular alterations underlying the pathobiology of HPV-associated OPSCC (designated HPV(+) OPSCC) remain unclear. Herein, we profile miRNA expression patterns in HPV(+) OPSCC to provide a more detailed understanding of pathologic molecular events and to identify biomarkers that may have applicability for early diagnosis, improved staging, and prognostic stratification. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in RNA isolated from an initial clinical cohort of HPV(+/-) OPSCC tumors by quantitative PCR-based miRNA profiling. This oncogenic miRNA panel was validated using miRNA sequencing and clinical data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and miRNA in situ hybridization. The HPV-associated oncogenic miRNA panel has potential utility in diagnosis and disease stratification and in mechanistic elucidation of molecular factors that contribute to OPSCC development, progression, and differential response to therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. RGS2 expression predicts amyloid-β sensitivity, MCI and Alzheimer's disease: genome-wide transcriptomic profiling and bioinformatics data mining

    PubMed Central

    Hadar, A; Milanesi, E; Squassina, A; Niola, P; Chillotti, C; Pasmanik-Chor, M; Yaron, O; Martásek, P; Rehavi, M; Weissglas-Volkov, D; Shomron, N; Gozes, I; Gurwitz, D

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequent cause of dementia. Misfolded protein pathological hallmarks of AD are brain deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and phosphorylated tau neurofibrillary tangles. However, doubts about the role of Aβ in AD pathology have been raised as Aβ is a common component of extracellular brain deposits found, also by in vivo imaging, in non-demented aged individuals. It has been suggested that some individuals are more prone to Aβ neurotoxicity and hence more likely to develop AD when aging brains start accumulating Aβ plaques. Here, we applied genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of lymphoblastoid cells lines (LCLs) from healthy individuals and AD patients for identifying genes that predict sensitivity to Aβ. Real-time PCR validation identified 3.78-fold lower expression of RGS2 (regulator of G-protein signaling 2; P=0.0085) in LCLs from healthy individuals exhibiting high vs low Aβ sensitivity. Furthermore, RGS2 showed 3.3-fold lower expression (P=0.0008) in AD LCLs compared with controls. Notably, RGS2 expression in AD LCLs correlated with the patients' cognitive function. Lower RGS2 expression levels were also discovered in published expression data sets from postmortem AD brain tissues as well as in mild cognitive impairment and AD blood samples compared with controls. In conclusion, Aβ sensitivity phenotyping followed by transcriptomic profiling and published patient data mining identified reduced peripheral and brain expression levels of RGS2, a key regulator of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and neuronal plasticity. RGS2 is suggested as a novel AD biomarker (alongside other genes) toward early AD detection and future disease modifying therapeutics. PMID:27701409

  20. How Well Do Customers of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomic Testing Services Comprehend Genetic Test Results? Findings from the Impact of Personal Genomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Ostergren, Jenny E.; Gornick, Michele C.; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Kalia, Sarah S.; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Ruffin, Mack T.; Mountain, Joanna L.; Green, Robert C.; Roberts, J. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess customer comprehension of health-related personal genomic testing (PGT) results. Methods We presented sample reports of genetic results and examined responses to comprehension questions in 1,030 PGT customers (mean age: 46.7 years; 59.9% female; 79.0% college graduates; 14.9% non-White; 4.7% of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity). Sample reports presented a genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes, carrier screening summary results for >30 conditions, results for phenylketonuria and cystic fibrosis, and drug response results for a statin drug. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of participant comprehension. Results Participants exhibited high overall comprehension (mean score: 79.1% correct). The highest comprehension (range: 81.1–97.4% correct) was observed in the statin drug response and carrier screening summary results, and lower comprehension (range: 63.6–74.8% correct) on specific carrier screening results. Higher levels of numeracy, genetic knowledge, and education were significantly associated with greater comprehension. Older age (≥ 60 years) was associated with lower comprehension scores. Conclusions Most customers accurately interpreted the health implications of PGT results; however, comprehension varied by demographic characteristics, numeracy and genetic knowledge, and types and format of the genetic information presented. Results suggest a need to tailor the presentation of PGT results by test type and customer characteristics. PMID:26087778

  1. Development and clinical application of an integrative genomic approach to personalized cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Uzilov, Andrew V; Ding, Wei; Fink, Marc Y; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Brohl, Andrew S; Davis, Claire; Lau, Chun Yee; Pandya, Chetanya; Shah, Hardik; Kasai, Yumi; Powell, James; Micchelli, Mark; Castellanos, Rafael; Zhang, Zhongyang; Linderman, Michael; Kinoshita, Yayoi; Zweig, Micol; Raustad, Katie; Cheung, Kakit; Castillo, Diane; Wooten, Melissa; Bourzgui, Imane; Newman, Leah C; Deikus, Gintaras; Mathew, Bino; Zhu, Jun; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Moe, Aye S; Liao, Jun; Edelmann, Lisa; Dudley, Joel T; Maki, Robert G; Kasarskis, Andrew; Holcombe, Randall F; Mahajan, Milind; Hao, Ke; Reva, Boris; Longtine, Janina; Starcevic, Daniela; Sebra, Robert; Donovan, Michael J; Li, Shuyu; Schadt, Eric E; Chen, Rong

    2016-06-01

    Personalized therapy provides the best outcome of cancer care and its implementation in the clinic has been greatly facilitated by recent convergence of enormous progress in basic cancer research, rapid advancement of new tumor profiling technologies, and an expanding compendium of targeted cancer therapeutics. We developed a personalized cancer therapy (PCT) program in a clinical setting, using an integrative genomics approach to fully characterize the complexity of each tumor. We carried out whole exome sequencing (WES) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping on DNA from tumor and patient-matched normal specimens, as well as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) on available frozen specimens, to identify somatic (tumor-specific) mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs), gene expression changes, gene fusions, and also germline variants. To provide high sensitivity in known cancer mutation hotspots, Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (CHPv2) was also employed. We integrated the resulting data with cancer knowledge bases and developed a specific workflow for each cancer type to improve interpretation of genomic data. We returned genomics findings to 46 patients and their physicians describing somatic alterations and predicting drug response, toxicity, and prognosis. Mean 17.3 cancer-relevant somatic mutations per patient were identified, 13.3-fold, 6.9-fold, and 4.7-fold more than could have been detected using CHPv2, Oncomine Cancer Panel (OCP), and FoundationOne, respectively. Our approach delineated the underlying genetic drivers at the pathway level and provided meaningful predictions of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity. Actionable alterations were found in 91 % of patients (mean 4.9 per patient, including somatic mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression alterations, and germline variants), a 7.5-fold, 2.0-fold, and 1.9-fold increase over what could have been uncovered by CHPv2, OCP, and FoundationOne, respectively. The findings altered

  2. CryptoDB: a Cryptosporidium bioinformatics resource update.

    PubMed

    Heiges, Mark; Wang, Haiming; Robinson, Edward; Aurrecoechea, Cristina; Gao, Xin; Kaluskar, Nivedita; Rhodes, Philippa; Wang, Sammy; He, Cong-Zhou; Su, Yanqi; Miller, John; Kraemer, Eileen; Kissinger, Jessica C

    2006-01-01

    The database, CryptoDB (http://CryptoDB.org), is a community bioinformatics resource for the AIDS-related apicomplexan-parasite, Cryptosporidium. CryptoDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation with expressed sequence tag and genome survey sequence data and provides supplemental bioinformatics analyses and data-mining tools. A simple, yet comprehensive web interface is available for mining and visualizing the data. CryptoDB is allied with the databases PlasmoDB and ToxoDB via ApiDB, an NIH/NIAID-fundedBioinformatics Resource Center. Recent updates to CryptoDB include the deposition of annotated genome sequences for Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis, migration to a relational database (GUS), a new query and visualization interface and the introduction of Web services.

  3. Direct-to-consumer personal genome testing for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Amin, Najaf; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Klaver, Caroline C W

    2014-08-21

    Genetic testing may be the next step in clinical medicine for a more personalized approach in determining risk of disease. Direct-to-consumer (DTC) personal genome tests may fulfill this role. We explored the practicability and predictive value of DTC tests from four companies (23andMe, deCODEme, Easy DNA, Genetic Testing Laboratories) for AMD. Body specimens of three individuals were collected and sent to four companies for DNA genotyping and disease risk estimation. In addition, DNA was also genotyped using Illumina HumanOmniExpress 12v1 array in the Rotterdam Study laboratory, and risk estimates of AMD were calculated using the validated prediction model from the population-based Three Continent AMD Consortium. Genotyped results of the four DTC tests matched genotyping performed by the Rotterdam Study laboratory. The estimated risks provided by the companies varied considerably in the tested individuals, from a 1.6-fold difference for overall relative risk to an up to 12-fold difference for lifetime risk. The lifetime risks for the individuals ranged from 1.4% to 16.1% in the DTC tests, while they varied from 0.5% to 4.2% in the validated prediction model. Most important reasons for the differences in risks were the testing of only a limited set of genetic markers, the choice of the reference population, and the methodology applied for risk calculation. Direct-to-consumer personal genome tests are not suitable for clinical application as yet. More comprehensive genetic testing and inclusion of environmental risk factors may improve risk prediction of AMD. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  4. Agile parallel bioinformatics workflow management using Pwrake.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensaku; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tatebe, Osamu; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro

    2011-09-08

    In bioinformatics projects, scientific workflow systems are widely used to manage computational procedures. Full-featured workflow systems have been proposed to fulfil the demand for workflow management. However, such systems tend to be over-weighted for actual bioinformatics practices. We realize that quick deployment of cutting-edge software implementing advanced algorithms and data formats, and continuous adaptation to changes in computational resources and the environment are often prioritized in scientific workflow management. These features have a greater affinity with the agile software development method through iterative development phases after trial and error.Here, we show the application of a scientific workflow system Pwrake to bioinformatics workflows. Pwrake is a parallel workflow extension of Ruby's standard build tool Rake, the flexibility of which has been demonstrated in the astronomy domain. Therefore, we hypothesize that Pwrake also has advantages in actual bioinformatics workflows. We implemented the Pwrake workflows to process next generation sequencing data using the Genomic Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and Dindel. GATK and Dindel workflows are typical examples of sequential and parallel workflows, respectively. We found that in practice, actual scientific workflow development iterates over two phases, the workflow definition phase and the parameter adjustment phase. We introduced separate workflow definitions to help focus on each of the two developmental phases, as well as helper methods to simplify the descriptions. This approach increased iterative development efficiency. Moreover, we implemented combined workflows to demonstrate modularity of the GATK and Dindel workflows. Pwrake enables agile management of scientific workflows in the bioinformatics domain. The internal domain specific language design built on Ruby gives the flexibility of rakefiles for writing scientific workflows. Furthermore, readability and maintainability of rakefiles

  5. Agile parallel bioinformatics workflow management using Pwrake

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In bioinformatics projects, scientific workflow systems are widely used to manage computational procedures. Full-featured workflow systems have been proposed to fulfil the demand for workflow management. However, such systems tend to be over-weighted for actual bioinformatics practices. We realize that quick deployment of cutting-edge software implementing advanced algorithms and data formats, and continuous adaptation to changes in computational resources and the environment are often prioritized in scientific workflow management. These features have a greater affinity with the agile software development method through iterative development phases after trial and error. Here, we show the application of a scientific workflow system Pwrake to bioinformatics workflows. Pwrake is a parallel workflow extension of Ruby's standard build tool Rake, the flexibility of which has been demonstrated in the astronomy domain. Therefore, we hypothesize that Pwrake also has advantages in actual bioinformatics workflows. Findings We implemented the Pwrake workflows to process next generation sequencing data using the Genomic Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and Dindel. GATK and Dindel workflows are typical examples of sequential and parallel workflows, respectively. We found that in practice, actual scientific workflow development iterates over two phases, the workflow definition phase and the parameter adjustment phase. We introduced separate workflow definitions to help focus on each of the two developmental phases, as well as helper methods to simplify the descriptions. This approach increased iterative development efficiency. Moreover, we implemented combined workflows to demonstrate modularity of the GATK and Dindel workflows. Conclusions Pwrake enables agile management of scientific workflows in the bioinformatics domain. The internal domain specific language design built on Ruby gives the flexibility of rakefiles for writing scientific workflows. Furthermore, readability

  6. Pancreas Cancer Precision Treatment Using Avatar Mice from a Bioinformatics Perspective.

    PubMed

    Perales-Patón, Javier; Piñeiro-Yañez, Elena; Tejero, Héctor; López-Casas, Pedro P; Hidalgo, Manuel; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Al-Shahrour, Fátima

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death among solid malignancies. Unfortunately, PDAC lethality has not substantially decreased over the past 20 years. This aggressiveness is related to the genomic complexity and heterogeneity of PDAC, but also to the absence of an effective screening for the detection of early-stage tumors and a lack of efficient therapeutic options. Therefore, there is an urgent need to improve the arsenal of anti-PDAC drugs for an effective treatment of these patients. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models represent a promising strategy to personalize PDAC treatment, offering a bench testing of candidate treatments and helping to select empirical treatments in PDAC patients with no therapeutic targets. Moreover, bioinformatics-based approaches have the potential to offer systematic insights into PDAC etiology predicting putatively actionable tumor-specific genomic alterations, identifying novel biomarkers and generating disease-associated gene expression signatures. This review focuses on recent efforts to individualize PDAC treatments using PDX models. Additionally, we discuss the current understanding of the PDAC genomic landscape and the putative druggable targets derived from mutational studies. PDAC molecular subclassifications and gene expression profiling studies are reviewed as well. Finally, latest bioinformatics methodologies based on somatic variant detection and prioritization, in silico drug response prediction, and drug repositioning to improve the treatment of advanced PDAC tumors are also covered. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Genetics, Genomics and Cancer Risk Assessment: State of the art and future directions in the era of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; MacDonald, Deborah J.; Culver, Julie O.; Offit, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Scientific and technologic advances are revolutionizing our approach to genetic cancer risk assessment, cancer screening and prevention, and targeted therapy, fulfilling the promise of personalized medicine. In this monograph we review the evolution of scientific discovery in cancer genetics and genomics, and describe current approaches, benefits and barriers to the translation of this information to the practice of preventive medicine. Summaries of known hereditary cancer syndromes and highly penetrant genes are provided and contrasted with recently-discovered genomic variants associated with modest increases in cancer risk. We describe the scope of knowledge, tools, and expertise required for the translation of complex genetic and genomic test information into clinical practice. The challenges of genomic counseling include the need for genetics and genomics professional education and multidisciplinary team training, the need for evidence-based information regarding the clinical utility of testing for genomic variants, the potential dangers posed by premature marketing of first-generation genomic profiles, and the need for new clinical models to improve access to and responsible communication of complex disease-risk information. We conclude that given the experiences and lessons learned in the genetics era, the multidisciplinary model of genetic cancer risk assessment and management will serve as a solid foundation to support the integration of personalized genomic information into the practice of cancer medicine. PMID:21858794

  8. Genetics, genomics, and cancer risk assessment: State of the Art and Future Directions in the Era of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Blazer, Kathleen R; MacDonald, Deborah J; Culver, Julie O; Offit, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Scientific and technologic advances are revolutionizing our approach to genetic cancer risk assessment, cancer screening and prevention, and targeted therapy, fulfilling the promise of personalized medicine. In this monograph, we review the evolution of scientific discovery in cancer genetics and genomics, and describe current approaches, benefits, and barriers to the translation of this information to the practice of preventive medicine. Summaries of known hereditary cancer syndromes and highly penetrant genes are provided and contrasted with recently discovered genomic variants associated with modest increases in cancer risk. We describe the scope of knowledge, tools, and expertise required for the translation of complex genetic and genomic test information into clinical practice. The challenges of genomic counseling include the need for genetics and genomics professional education and multidisciplinary team training, the need for evidence-based information regarding the clinical utility of testing for genomic variants, the potential dangers posed by premature marketing of first-generation genomic profiles, and the need for new clinical models to improve access to and responsible communication of complex disease risk information. We conclude that given the experiences and lessons learned in the genetics era, the multidisciplinary model of genetic cancer risk assessment and management will serve as a solid foundation to support the integration of personalized genomic information into the practice of cancer medicine.

  9. STORMSeq: an open-source, user-friendly pipeline for processing personal genomics data in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Karczewski, Konrad J; Fernald, Guy Haskin; Martin, Alicia R; Snyder, Michael; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Dudley, Joel T

    2014-01-01

    The increasing public availability of personal complete genome sequencing data has ushered in an era of democratized genomics. However, read mapping and variant calling software is constantly improving and individuals with personal genomic data may prefer to customize and update their variant calls. Here, we describe STORMSeq (Scalable Tools for Open-Source Read Mapping), a graphical interface cloud computing solution that does not require a parallel computing environment or extensive technical experience. This customizable and modular system performs read mapping, read cleaning, and variant calling and annotation. At present, STORMSeq costs approximately $2 and 5-10 hours to process a full exome sequence and $30 and 3-8 days to process a whole genome sequence. We provide this open-access and open-source resource as a user-friendly interface in Amazon EC2.

  10. [Application of bioinformatics in researches of industrial biocatalysis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Min; Luo, Hui; Shi, Yue; Sun, Xu-Dong; Shen, Zhong-Yao

    2004-05-01

    Industrial biocatalysis is currently attracting much attention to rebuild or substitute traditional producing process of chemicals and drugs. One of key focuses in industrial biocatalysis is biocatalyst, which is usually one kind of microbial enzyme. In the recent, new technologies of bioinformatics have played and will continue to play more and more significant roles in researches of industrial biocatalysis in response to the waves of genomic revolution. One of the key applications of bioinformatics in biocatalysis is the discovery and identification of the new biocatalyst through advanced DNA and protein sequence search, comparison and analyses in Internet database using different algorithm and software. The unknown genes of microbial enzymes can also be simply harvested by primer design on the basis of bioinformatics analyses. The other key applications of bioinformatics in biocatalysis are the modification and improvement of existing industrial biocatalyst. In this aspect, bioinformatics is of great importance in both rational design and directed evolution of microbial enzymes. Based on the successful prediction of tertiary structures of enzymes using the tool of bioinformatics, the undermentioned experiments, i.e. site-directed mutagenesis, fusion protein construction, DNA family shuffling and saturation mutagenesis, etc, are usually of very high efficiency. On all accounts, bioinformatics will be an essential tool for either biologist or biological engineer in the future researches of industrial biocatalysis, due to its significant function in guiding and quickening the step of discovery and/or improvement of novel biocatalysts.

  11. Personalized medicine beyond genomics: alternative futures in big data-proteomics, environtome and the social proteome.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Vural; Dove, Edward S; Gürsoy, Ulvi K; Şardaş, Semra; Yıldırım, Arif; Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Ömer Barlas, I; Güngör, Kıvanç; Mete, Alper; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-01-01

    No field in science and medicine today remains untouched by Big Data, and psychiatry is no exception. Proteomics is a Big Data technology and a next generation biomarker, supporting novel system diagnostics and therapeutics in psychiatry. Proteomics technology is, in fact, much older than genomics and dates to the 1970s, well before the launch of the international Human Genome Project. While the genome has long been framed as the master or "elite" executive molecule in cell biology, the proteome by contrast is humble. Yet the proteome is critical for life-it ensures the daily functioning of cells and whole organisms. In short, proteins are the blue-collar workers of biology, the down-to-earth molecules that we cannot live without. Since 2010, proteomics has found renewed meaning and international attention with the launch of the Human Proteome Project and the growing interest in Big Data technologies such as proteomics. This article presents an interdisciplinary technology foresight analysis and conceptualizes the terms "environtome" and "social proteome". We define "environtome" as the entire complement of elements external to the human host, from microbiome, ambient temperature and weather conditions to government innovation policies, stock market dynamics, human values, political power and social norms that collectively shape the human host spatially and temporally. The "social proteome" is the subset of the environtome that influences the transition of proteomics technology to innovative applications in society. The social proteome encompasses, for example, new reimbursement schemes and business innovation models for proteomics diagnostics that depart from the "once-a-life-time" genotypic tests and the anticipated hype attendant to context and time sensitive proteomics tests. Building on the "nesting principle" for governance of complex systems as discussed by Elinor Ostrom, we propose here a 3-tiered organizational architecture for Big Data science such as

  12. Bioinformatics Education in Pathology Training: Current Scope and Future Direction.

    PubMed

    Clay, Michael R; Fisher, Kevin E

    2017-01-01

    Training anatomic and clinical pathology residents in the principles of bioinformatics is a challenging endeavor. Most residents receive little to no formal exposure to bioinformatics during medical education, and most of the pathology training is spent interpreting histopathology slides using light microscopy or focused on laboratory regulation, management, and interpretation of discrete laboratory data. At a minimum, residents should be familiar with data structure, data pipelines, data manipulation, and data regulations within clinical laboratories. Fellowship-level training should incorporate advanced principles unique to each subspecialty. Barriers to bioinformatics education include the clinical apprenticeship training model, ill-defined educational milestones, inadequate faculty expertise, and limited exposure during medical training. Online educational resources, case-based learning, and incorporation into molecular genomics education could serve as effective educational strategies. Overall, pathology bioinformatics training can be incorporated into pathology resident curricula, provided there is motivation to incorporate, institutional support, educational resources, and adequate faculty expertise.

  13. Microsoft Biology Initiative: .NET Bioinformatics Platform and Tools

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Acosta, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Microsoft Biology Initiative (MBI) is an effort in Microsoft Research to bring new technology and tools to the area of bioinformatics and biology. This initiative is comprised of two primary components, the Microsoft Biology Foundation (MBF) and the Microsoft Biology Tools (MBT). MBF is a language-neutral bioinformatics toolkit built as an extension to the Microsoft .NET Framework—initially aimed at the area of Genomics research. Currently, it implements a range of parsers for common bioinformatics file formats; a range of algorithms for manipulating DNA, RNA, and protein sequences; and a set of connectors to biological web services such as NCBI BLAST. MBF is available under an open source license, and executables, source code, demo applications, documentation and training materials are freely downloadable from http://research.microsoft.com/bio. MBT is a collection of tools that enable biology and bioinformatics researchers to be more productive in making scientific discoveries.

  14. Genome-wide association uncovers shared genetic effects among personality traits and mood states

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Michelle; Huffman, Jennifer E; Arias-Vásquez, Alejandro; Vinkhuyzen, Anna AE; Middeldorp, Christel M; Giegling, Ina; Payton, Antony; Davies, Gail; Zgaga, Lina; Janzing, Joost; Ke, Xiayi; Galesloot, Tessel; Hartmann, Annette M; Ollier, William; Tenesa, Albert; Hayward, Caroline; Verhagen, Maaike; Montgomery, Grant W; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Konte, Bettina; Starr, John M; Vitart, Veronique; Vos, Pieter E; Madden, Pamela AF; Willemsen, Gonneke; Konnerth, Heike; Horan, Michael A; Porteous, David J; Campbell, Harry; Vermeulen, Sita H; Heath, Andrew C; Wright, Alan; Polasek, Ozren; Kovacevic, Sanja B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Franke, Barbara; Boomsma, Dorret I; Martin, Nicholas G; Rujescu, Dan; Wilson, James F; Buitelaar, Jan; Pendleton, Neil; Rudan, Igor; Deary, Ian J

    2013-01-01

    Measures of personality and psychological distress are correlated and exhibit genetic covariance. We conducted univariate genome-wide SNP (~2.5 million) and gene-based association analyses of these traits and examined the overlap in results across traits, including a prediction analysis of mood states using genetic polygenic scores for personality. Measures of neuroticism, extraversion, and symptoms of anxiety, depression, and general psychological distress were collected in eight European cohorts (n ranged 546 to 1 338; maximum total n=6 268) whose mean age ranged from 55 to 79 years. Meta-analysis of the cohort results was performed, with follow-up associations of the top SNPs and genes investigated in independent cohorts (n=527 to 6 032). Suggestive association (P=8×10−8) of rs1079196 in the FHIT gene was observed with symptoms of anxiety. Other notable associations (P<6.09×10−6) included SNPs in five genes for neuroticism (LCE3C, POLR3A, LMAN1L, ULK3, SCAMP2), KIAA0802 for extraversion, and NOS1 for general psychological distress. An association between symptoms of depression and rs7582472 (near to MGAT5 and NCKAP5) was replicated in two independent samples, but other replication findings were less consistent. Gene-based tests identified a significant locus on chromosome 15 (spanning five genes) associated with neuroticism which replicated (P<0.05) in an independent cohort. Support for common genetic effects among personality and mood (particularly neuroticism and depressive symptoms) was found in terms of SNP association overlap and polygenic score prediction. The variance explained by individual SNPs was very small (up to 1%) confirming that there are no moderate/large effects of common SNPs on personality and related traits. PMID:22628180

  15. Pattern recognition in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Dick; de Ridder, Jeroen; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2013-09-01

    Pattern recognition is concerned with the development of systems that learn to solve a given problem using a set of example instances, each represented by a number of features. These problems include clustering, the grouping of similar instances; classification, the task of assigning a discrete label to a given instance; and dimensionality reduction, combining or selecting features to arrive at a more useful representation. The use of statistical pattern recognition algorithms in bioinformatics is pervasive. Classification and clustering are often applied to high-throughput measurement data arising from microarray, mass spectrometry and next-generation sequencing experiments for selecting markers, predicting phenotype and grouping objects or genes. Less explicitly, classification is at the core of a wide range of tools such as predictors of genes, protein function, functional or genetic interactions, etc., and used extensively in systems biology. A course on pattern recognition (or machine learning) should therefore be at the core of any bioinformatics education program. In this review, we discuss the main elements of a pattern recognition course, based on material developed for courses taught at the BSc, MSc and PhD levels to an audience of bioinformaticians, computer scientists and life scientists. We pay attention to common problems and pitfalls encountered in applications and in interpretation of the results obtained.

  16. Bioinformatics-Aided Venomics

    PubMed Central

    Kaas, Quentin; Craik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Venomics is a modern approach that combines transcriptomics and proteomics to explore the toxin content of venoms. This review will give an overview of computational approaches that have been created to classify and consolidate venomics data, as well as algorithms that have helped discovery and analysis of toxin nucleic acid and protein sequences, toxin three-dimensional structures and toxin functions. Bioinformatics is used to tackle specific challenges associated with the identification and annotations of toxins. Recognizing toxin transcript sequences among second generation sequencing data cannot rely only on basic sequence similarity because toxins are highly divergent. Mass spectrometry sequencing of mature toxins is challenging because toxins can display a large number of post-translational modifications. Identifying the mature toxin region in toxin precursor sequences requires the prediction of the cleavage sites of proprotein convertases, most of which are unknown or not well characterized. Tracing the evolutionary relationships between toxins should consider specific mechanisms of rapid evolution as well as interactions between predatory animals and prey. Rapidly determining the activity of toxins is the main bottleneck in venomics discovery, but some recent bioinformatics and molecular modeling approaches give hope that accurate predictions of toxin specificity could be made in the near future. PMID:26110505

  17. Sequencing technologies and genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Smoczynski, Rafal; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2011-11-01

    The high-throughput - next generation sequencing (HT-NGS) technologies are currently the hottest topic in the field of human and animals genomics researches, which can produce over 100 times more data compared to the most sophisticated capillary sequencers based on the Sanger method. With the ongoing developments of high throughput sequencing machines and advancement of modern bioinformatics tools at unprecedented pace, the target goal of sequencing individual genomes of living organism at a cost of $1,000 each is seemed to be realistically feasible in the near future. In the relatively short time frame since 2005, the HT-NGS technologies are revolutionizing the human and animal genome researches by analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to DNA microarray (ChIP-chip) or sequencing (ChIP-seq), RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), whole genome genotyping, genome wide structural variation, de novo assembling and re-assembling of genome, mutation detection and carrier screening, detection of inherited disorders and complex human diseases, DNA library preparation, paired ends and genomic captures, sequencing of mitochondrial genome and personal genomics. In this review, we addressed the important features of HT-NGS like, first generation DNA sequencers, birth of HT-NGS, second generation HT-NGS platforms, third generation HT-NGS platforms: including single molecule Heliscope™, SMRT™ and RNAP sequencers, Nanopore, Archon Genomics X PRIZE foundation, comparison of second and third HT-NGS platforms, applications, advances and future perspectives of sequencing technologies on human and animal genome research.

  18. After the revolution? Ethical and social challenges in ‘personalized genomic medicine’

    PubMed Central

    Juengst, Eric T; Settersten, Richard A; Fishman, Jennifer R; McGowan, Michelle L

    2013-01-01

    Personalized genomic medicine (PGM) is a goal that currently unites a wide array of biomedical initiatives, and is promoted as a ‘new paradigm for healthcare’ by its champions. Its promissory virtues include individualized diagnosis and risk prediction, more effective prevention and health promotion, and patient empowerment. Beyond overcoming scientific and technological hurdles to realizing PGM, proponents may interpret and rank these promises differently, which carries ethical and social implications for the realization of PGM as an approach to healthcare. We examine competing visions of PGM’s virtues and the directions in which they could take the field, in order to anticipate policy choices that may lie ahead for researchers, healthcare providers and the public. PMID:23662108

  19. Communication about DTC testing: commentary on a 'family experience of personal genomics'.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Anna

    2012-06-01

    This paper provides a commentary on 'Family Experience of Personal Genomics' (Corpas 2012). An overview is offered on the communication literature available to help support individuals and families to communicate about genetic information. Despite there being a wealth of evidence, built on years of genetic counseling practice, this does not appear to have been translated clearly to the Direct to Consumer (DTC) testing market. In many countries it is possible to order a DTC genetic test without the involvement of any health professional; there has been heated debate about whether this is appropriate or not. Much of the focus surrounding this has been on whether it is necessary to have a health professional available to offer their clinical knowledge and help with interpreting the DTC genetic test data. What has been missed from this debate is the importance of enabling customers of DTC testing services access to the abundance of information about how to communicate their genetic risks to others, including immediate family. Family communication about health and indeed genetics can be fraught with difficulty. Genetic health professionals, specifically genetic counselors, have particular expertise in family communication about genetics. Such information could be incredibly useful to kinships as they grapple with knowing how to communicate their genomic information with relatives.

  20. Virtual Bioinformatics Distance Learning Suite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolvanen, Martti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2004-01-01

    Distance learning as a computer-aided concept allows students to take courses from anywhere at any time. In bioinformatics, computers are needed to collect, store, process, and analyze massive amounts of biological and biomedical data. We have applied the concept of distance learning in virtual bioinformatics to provide university course material…

  1. Virtual Bioinformatics Distance Learning Suite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolvanen, Martti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2004-01-01

    Distance learning as a computer-aided concept allows students to take courses from anywhere at any time. In bioinformatics, computers are needed to collect, store, process, and analyze massive amounts of biological and biomedical data. We have applied the concept of distance learning in virtual bioinformatics to provide university course material…

  2. Genome-wide association analysis of eating disorder-related symptoms, behaviors, and personality traits.

    PubMed

    Boraska, Vesna; Davis, Oliver S P; Cherkas, Lynn F; Helder, Sietske G; Harris, Juliette; Krug, Isabel; Liao, Thomas Pei-Chi; Treasure, Janet; Ntalla, Ioanna; Karhunen, Leila; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Christakopoulou, Danai; Raevuori, Anu; Shin, So-Youn; Dedoussis, George V; Kaprio, Jaakko; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2012-10-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are common, complex psychiatric disorders thought to be caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They share many symptoms, behaviors, and personality traits, which may have overlapping heritability. The aim of the present study is to perform a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) of six ED phenotypes comprising three symptom traits from the Eating Disorders Inventory 2 [Drive for Thinness (DT), Body Dissatisfaction (BD), and Bulimia], Weight Fluctuation symptom, Breakfast Skipping behavior and Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder trait (CHIRP). Investigated traits were derived from standardized self-report questionnaires completed by the TwinsUK population-based cohort. We tested 283,744 directly typed SNPs across six phenotypes of interest in the TwinsUK discovery dataset and followed-up signals from various strata using a two-stage replication strategy in two independent cohorts of European ancestry. We meta-analyzed a total of 2,698 individuals for DT, 2,680 for BD, 2,789 (821 cases/1,968 controls) for Bulimia, 1,360 (633 cases/727 controls) for Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder trait, 2,773 (761 cases/2,012 controls) for Breakfast Skipping, and 2,967 (798 cases/2,169 controls) for Weight Fluctuation symptom. In this GWAS analysis of six ED-related phenotypes, we detected association of eight genetic variants with P < 10(-5) . Genetic variants that showed suggestive evidence of association were previously associated with several psychiatric disorders and ED-related phenotypes. Our study indicates that larger-scale collaborative studies will be needed to achieve the necessary power to detect loci underlying ED-related traits.

  3. A genome-wide linkage study of individuals with high scores on NEO personality traits.

    PubMed

    Amin, N; Schuur, M; Gusareva, E S; Isaacs, A; Aulchenko, Y S; Kirichenko, A V; Zorkoltseva, I V; Axenovich, T I; Oostra, B A; Janssens, A C J W; van Duijn, C M

    2012-10-01

    The NEO-Five-Factor Inventory divides human personality traits into five dimensions: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, conscientiousness and agreeableness. In this study, we sought to identify regions harboring genes with large effects on the five NEO personality traits by performing genome-wide linkage analysis of individuals scoring in the extremes of these traits (>90th percentile). Affected-only linkage analysis was performed using an Illumina 6K linkage array in a family-based study, the Erasmus Rucphen Family study. We subsequently determined whether distinct, segregating haplotypes found with linkage analysis were associated with the trait of interest in the population. Finally, a dense single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping array (Illumina 318K) was used to search for copy number variations (CNVs) in the associated regions. In the families with extreme phenotype scores, we found significant evidence of linkage for conscientiousness to 20p13 (rs1434789, log of odds (LOD)=5.86) and suggestive evidence of linkage (LOD >2.8) for neuroticism to 19q, 21q and 22q, extraversion to 1p, 1q, 9p and12q, openness to 12q and 19q, and agreeableness to 2p, 6q, 17q and 21q. Further analysis determined haplotypes in 21q22 for neuroticism (P-values = 0.009, 0.007), in 17q24 for agreeableness (marginal P-value = 0.018) and in 20p13 for conscientiousness (marginal P-values = 0.058, 0.038) segregating in families with large contributions to the LOD scores. No evidence for CNVs in any of the associated regions was found. Our findings imply that there may be genes with relatively large effects involved in personality traits, which may be identified with next-generation sequencing techniques.

  4. Integration of bioinformatics into an undergraduate biology curriculum and the impact on development of mathematical skills.

    PubMed

    Wightman, Bruce; Hark, Amy T

    2012-01-01

    The development of fields such as bioinformatics and genomics has created new challenges and opportunities for undergraduate biology curricula. Students preparing for careers in science, technology, and medicine need more intensive study of bioinformatics and more sophisticated training in the mathematics on which this field is based. In this study, we deliberately integrated bioinformatics instruction at multiple course levels into an existing biology curriculum. Students in an introductory biology course, intermediate lab courses, and advanced project-oriented courses all participated in new course components designed to sequentially introduce bioinformatics skills and knowledge, as well as computational approaches that are common to many bioinformatics applications. In each course, bioinformatics learning was embedded in an existing disciplinary instructional sequence, as opposed to having a single course where all bioinformatics learning occurs. We designed direct and indirect assessment tools to follow student progress through the course sequence. Our data show significant gains in both student confidence and ability in bioinformatics during individual courses and as course level increases. Despite evidence of substantial student learning in both bioinformatics and mathematics, students were skeptical about the link between learning bioinformatics and learning mathematics. While our approach resulted in substantial learning gains, student "buy-in" and engagement might be better in longer project-based activities that demand application of skills to research problems. Nevertheless, in situations where a concentrated focus on project-oriented bioinformatics is not possible or desirable, our approach of integrating multiple smaller components into an existing curriculum provides an alternative.

  5. The potential of translational bioinformatics approaches for pharmacology research.

    PubMed

    Li, Lang

    2015-10-01

    The field of bioinformatics has allowed the interpretation of massive amounts of biological data, ushering in the era of 'omics' to biomedical research. Its potential impact on pharmacology research is enormous and it has shown some emerging successes. A full realization of this potential, however, requires standardized data annotation for large health record databases and molecular data resources. Improved standardization will further stimulate the development of system pharmacology models, using translational bioinformatics methods. This new translational bioinformatics paradigm is highly complementary to current pharmacological research fields, such as personalized medicine, pharmacoepidemiology and drug discovery. In this review, I illustrate the application of transformational bioinformatics to research in numerous pharmacology subdisciplines. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. The potential of translational bioinformatics approaches for pharmacology research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lang

    2015-01-01

    The field of bioinformatics has allowed the interpretation of massive amounts of biological data, ushering in the era of ‘omics’ to biomedical research. Its potential impact on pharmacology research is enormous and it has shown some emerging successes. A full realization of this potential, however, requires standardized data annotation for large health record databases and molecular data resources. Improved standardization will further stimulate the development of system pharmacology models, using translational bioinformatics methods. This new translational bioinformatics paradigm is highly complementary to current pharmacological research fields, such as personalized medicine, pharmacoepidemiology and drug discovery. In this review, I illustrate the application of transformational bioinformatics to research in numerous pharmacology subdisciplines. PMID:25753093

  7. Making Bioinformatics Projects a Meaningful Experience in an Undergraduate Biotechnology or Biomedical Science Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutcliffe, Iain C.; Cummings, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    Bioinformatics has emerged as an important discipline within the biological sciences that allows scientists to decipher and manage the vast quantities of data (such as genome sequences) that are now available. Consequently, there is an obvious need to provide graduates in biosciences with generic, transferable skills in bioinformatics. We present…

  8. Integration of Bioinformatics into an Undergraduate Biology Curriculum and the Impact on Development of Mathematical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wightman, Bruce; Hark, Amy T.

    2012-01-01

    The development of fields such as bioinformatics and genomics has created new challenges and opportunities for undergraduate biology curricula. Students preparing for careers in science, technology, and medicine need more intensive study of bioinformatics and more sophisticated training in the mathematics on which this field is based. In this…

  9. Visualizing and Sharing Results in Bioinformatics Projects: GBrowse and GenBank Exports

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effective tools for presenting and sharing data are necessary for collaborative projects, typical for bioinformatics. In order to facilitate sharing our data with other genomics, molecular biology, and bioinformatics researchers, we have developed software to export our data to GenBank and combined ...

  10. Integration of Bioinformatics into an Undergraduate Biology Curriculum and the Impact on Development of Mathematical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wightman, Bruce; Hark, Amy T.

    2012-01-01

    The development of fields such as bioinformatics and genomics has created new challenges and opportunities for undergraduate biology curricula. Students preparing for careers in science, technology, and medicine need more intensive study of bioinformatics and more sophisticated training in the mathematics on which this field is based. In this…

  11. Making Bioinformatics Projects a Meaningful Experience in an Undergraduate Biotechnology or Biomedical Science Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutcliffe, Iain C.; Cummings, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    Bioinformatics has emerged as an important discipline within the biological sciences that allows scientists to decipher and manage the vast quantities of data (such as genome sequences) that are now available. Consequently, there is an obvious need to provide graduates in biosciences with generic, transferable skills in bioinformatics. We present…

  12. THE PATIENT AS PERSON IN AN INCREASINGLY GENE-CENTRIC UNIVERSE: HOW HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS SHOULD THINK ABOUT GENOMICS AND EVOLUTION

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Timothy P.

    2009-01-01

    In the past, the primary threat to the patient as person was a medical utilitarianism that would sacrifice the individual for the collective, that would coercively (ab)use a person for the sake of an in-group’s health or happiness. Today, the threat is not only from vainglorious social groups but also from valorized genes and genomes. An over-valuation of genes risks making persons seem epiphenomenal. A central thesis of this paper is that religious healthcare professionals have unique resources to combat this. PMID:19170083

  13. The patient as person in an increasingly gene-centric universe: how healthcare professionals should think about genomics and evolution.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Timothy P

    2009-02-15

    In the past, the primary threat to the patient as person was a medical utilitarianism that would sacrifice the individual for the collective, that would coercively (ab)use a person for the sake of an in-group's health or happiness. Today, the threat is not only from vainglorious social groups but also from valorized genes and genomes. An over-valuation of genes risks making persons seem epiphenomenal. A central thesis of this article is that religious healthcare professionals have unique resources to combat this.

  14. Read-mapping using personalized diploid reference genome for RNA sequencing data reduced bias for detecting allele-specific expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Qin, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been applied extensively in many areas of genetics and genomics research. A fundamental problem when comes to analyzing NGS data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. Most of existing software packages rely on a single uniform reference genome and do not automatically take into the consideration of genetic variants. On the other hand, large proportions of incorrectly mapped reads affect the correct interpretation of the NGS experimental results. As an example, Degner et al. showed that detecting allele-specific expression from RNA sequencing data was biased toward the reference allele. In this study, we developed a method that utilize DirectX 11 enabled graphics processing unit (GPU)’s parallel computing power to produces a personalized diploid reference genome based on all known genetic variants of that particular individual. We show that using such a personalized diploid reference genome can improve mapping accuracy and significantly reduce the bias toward reference allele in allele-specific expression analysis. Our method can be applied to any individual that has genotype information obtained either from array-based genotyping or resequencing. Besides the reference genome, no additional changes to alignment algorithm are needed for performing read mapping therefore one can utilize any of the existing read mapping tools and achieve the improved read mapping result. C++ and GPU compute shader source code of the software program is available at: http://code.google.com/p/diploid-mapping/downloads/list. PMID:25621316

  15. Read-mapping using personalized diploid reference genome for RNA sequencing data reduced bias for detecting allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Qin, Zhaohui

    2012-10-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been applied extensively in many areas of genetics and genomics research. A fundamental problem when comes to analyzing NGS data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. Most of existing software packages rely on a single uniform reference genome and do not automatically take into the consideration of genetic variants. On the other hand, large proportions of incorrectly mapped reads affect the correct interpretation of the NGS experimental results. As an example, Degner et al. showed that detecting allele-specific expression from RNA sequencing data was biased toward the reference allele. In this study, we developed a method that utilize DirectX 11 enabled graphics processing unit (GPU)'s parallel computing power to produces a personalized diploid reference genome based on all known genetic variants of that particular individual. We show that using such a personalized diploid reference genome can improve mapping accuracy and significantly reduce the bias toward reference allele in allele-specific expression analysis. Our method can be applied to any individual that has genotype information obtained either from array-based genotyping or resequencing. Besides the reference genome, no additional changes to alignment algorithm are needed for performing read mapping therefore one can utilize any of the existing read mapping tools and achieve the improved read mapping result. C++ and GPU compute shader source code of the software program is available at: http://code.google.com/p/diploid-mapping/downloads/list.

  16. Bioinformatics of cardiovascular miRNA biology.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Meik; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Chunguang; Viereck, Janika; Pachel, Christina; Frantz, Stefan; Thum, Thomas; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ~22 nucleotide non-coding RNAs and are highly conserved among species. Moreover, miRNAs regulate gene expression of a large number of genes associated with important biological functions and signaling pathways. Recently, several miRNAs have been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. Thus, investigating the complex regulatory effect of miRNAs may lead to a better understanding of their functional role in the heart. To achieve this, bioinformatics approaches have to be coupled with validation and screening experiments to understand the complex interactions of miRNAs with the genome. This will boost the subsequent development of diagnostic markers and our understanding of the physiological and therapeutic role of miRNAs in cardiac remodeling. In this review, we focus on and explain different bioinformatics strategies and algorithms for the identification and analysis of miRNAs and their regulatory elements to better understand cardiac miRNA biology. Starting with the biogenesis of miRNAs, we present approaches such as LocARNA and miRBase for combining sequence and structure analysis including phylogenetic comparisons as well as detailed analysis of RNA folding patterns, functional target prediction, signaling pathway as well as functional analysis. We also show how far bioinformatics helps to tackle the unprecedented level of complexity and systemic effects by miRNA, underlining the strong therapeutic potential of miRNA and miRNA target structures in cardiovascular disease. In addition, we discuss drawbacks and limitations of bioinformatics algorithms and the necessity of experimental approaches for miRNA target identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Non-coding RNAs'.

  17. Bioinformatics as a critical prerequisite to transcriptome and proteome studies.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth

    2004-09-01

    Large-scale genomic studies rely strongly on annotations available in databases to design experimental supports such as arrays or to explain results in term of biological meaning. Most of this information originates from bioinformatic predictions. Their accuracy as well as their relevance to existing biological data are critical in avoiding the misinterpretation of experimental results.

  18. Intrageneric Primer Design: Bringing Bioinformatics Tools to the Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, Andre O. S.; Garces, Sergio P. S.

    2006-01-01

    Bioinformatics is one of the fastest growing scientific areas over the last decade. It focuses on the use of informatics tools for the organization and analysis of biological data. An example of their importance is the availability nowadays of dozens of software programs for genomic and proteomic studies. Thus, there is a growing field (private…

  19. Intrageneric Primer Design: Bringing Bioinformatics Tools to the Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, Andre O. S.; Garces, Sergio P. S.

    2006-01-01

    Bioinformatics is one of the fastest growing scientific areas over the last decade. It focuses on the use of informatics tools for the organization and analysis of biological data. An example of their importance is the availability nowadays of dozens of software programs for genomic and proteomic studies. Thus, there is a growing field (private…

  20. A genome-wide association study of Cloninger's temperament scales: implications for the evolutionary genetics of personality.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Karin J H; Zietsch, Brendan P; Medland, Sarah E; Gordon, Scott D; Benyamin, Beben; Nyholt, Dale R; McEvoy, Brian P; Sullivan, Patrick F; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Henders, Anjali K; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wray, Naomi R

    2010-10-01

    Variation in personality traits is 30-60% attributed to genetic influences. Attempts to unravel these genetic influences at the molecular level have, so far, been inconclusive. We performed the first genome-wide association study of Cloninger's temperament scales in a sample of 5117 individuals, in order to identify common genetic variants underlying variation in personality. Participants' scores on Harm Avoidance, Novelty Seeking, Reward Dependence, and Persistence were tested for association with 1,252,387 genetic markers. We also performed gene-based association tests and biological pathway analyses. No genetic variants that significantly contribute to personality variation were identified, while our sample provides over 90% power to detect variants that explain only 1% of the trait variance. This indicates that individual common genetic variants of this size or greater do not contribute to personality trait variation, which has important implications regarding the genetic architecture of personality and the evolutionary mechanisms by which heritable variation is maintained.

  1. A genome-wide association study of Cloninger’s Temperament scales: Implications for the evolutionary genetics of personality

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, Karin J.H.; Zietsch, Brendan P.; Medland, Sarah E.; Gordon, Scott D.; Benyamin, Beben; Nyholt, Dale R.; McEvoy, Brian P.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Henders, Anjali K.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wray, Naomi R.

    2010-01-01

    Variation in personality traits is 30% to 60% attributed to genetic influences. Attempts to unravel these genetic influences at the molecular level have, so far, been inconclusive. We performed the first genome-wide association study of Cloninger’s temperament scales in a sample of 5117 individuals, in order to identify common genetic variants underlying variation in personality. Participants’ scores on Harm Avoidance, Novelty Seeking, Reward Dependence, and Persistence were tested for association with 1,252,387 genetic markers. We also performed gene-based association tests and biological pathway analyses. No genetic variants that significantly contribute to personality variation were identified, while our sample provides over 90% power to detect variants that explain only 1% of the trait variance. This indicates that individual common genetic variants of this size or greater do not contribute to personality trait variation, which has important implications regarding the genetic architecture of personality and the evolutionary mechanisms by which heritable variation is maintained. PMID:20691247

  2. Translational bioinformatics in psychoneuroimmunology: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Translational bioinformatics plays an indispensable role in transforming psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) into personalized medicine. It provides a powerful method to bridge the gaps between various knowledge domains in PNI and systems biology. Translational bioinformatics methods at various systems levels can facilitate pattern recognition, and expedite and validate the discovery of systemic biomarkers to allow their incorporation into clinical trials and outcome assessments. Analysis of the correlations between genotypes and phenotypes including the behavioral-based profiles will contribute to the transition from the disease-based medicine to human-centered medicine. Translational bioinformatics would also enable the establishment of predictive models for patient responses to diseases, vaccines, and drugs. In PNI research, the development of systems biology models such as those of the neurons would play a critical role. Methods based on data integration, data mining, and knowledge representation are essential elements in building health information systems such as electronic health records and computerized decision support systems. Data integration of genes, pathophysiology, and behaviors are needed for a broad range of PNI studies. Knowledge discovery approaches such as network-based systems biology methods are valuable in studying the cross-talks among pathways in various brain regions involved in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Consumers report lower confidence in their genetics knowledge following direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing.

    PubMed

    Carere, Deanna Alexis; Kraft, Peter; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Roberts, J Scott; Green, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure changes to genetics knowledge and self-efficacy following personal genomic testing (PGT). New customers of 23andMe and Pathway Genomics completed a series of online surveys. We measured genetics knowledge (nine true/false items) and genetics self-efficacy (five Likert-scale items) before receipt of results and 6 months after results and used paired methods to evaluate change over time. Correlates of change (e.g., decision regret) were identified using linear regression. 998 PGT customers (59.9% female; 85.8% White; mean age 46.9 ± 15.5 years) were included in our analyses. Mean genetics knowledge score was 8.15 ± 0.95 (out of 9) at baseline and 8.25 ± 0.92 at 6 months (P = 0.0024). Mean self-efficacy score was 29.06 ± 5.59 (out of 35) at baseline and 27.7 ± 5.46 at 6 months (P < 0.0001); on each item, 30-45% of participants reported lower self-efficacy following PGT. Change in self-efficacy was positively associated with health-care provider consultation (P = 0.0042), impact of PGT on perceived control over one's health (P < 0.0001), and perceived value of PGT (P < 0.0001) and was negatively associated with decision regret (P < 0.0001). Lowered genetics self-efficacy following PGT may reflect an appropriate reevaluation by consumers in response to receiving complex genetic information.Genet Med 18 1, 65-72.

  4. Bioinformatics in high school biology curricula: a study of state science standards.

    PubMed

    Wefer, Stephen H; Sheppard, Keith

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation of bioinformatics in modern biology marks a modern revolution in science that promises to influence science education at all levels. This study analyzed secondary school science standards of 49 U.S. states (Iowa has no science framework) and the District of Columbia for content related to bioinformatics. The bioinformatics content of each state's biology standards was analyzed and categorized into nine areas: Human Genome Project/genomics, forensics, evolution, classification, nucleotide variations, medicine, computer use, agriculture/food technology, and science technology and society/socioscientific issues. Findings indicated a generally low representation of bioinformatics-related content, which varied substantially across the different areas, with Human Genome Project/genomics and computer use being the lowest (8%), and evolution being the highest (64%) among states' science frameworks. This essay concludes with recommendations for reworking/rewording existing standards to facilitate the goal of promoting science literacy among secondary school students.

  5. RNA Bioinformatics for Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajia; Shen, Bairong

    2016-01-01

    The high-throughput transcriptomic data generated by deep sequencing technologies urgently require bioinformatics methods for proper data visualization, analysis, storage, and interpretation. The involvement of noncoding RNAs in human diseases highlights their potential as biomarkers and therapeutic targets to facilitate the precision medicine. In this chapter, we give a brief overview of the bioinformatics tools to analyze different aspects of RNAs, in particular ncRNAs. We first describe the emerging bioinformatics methods for RNA identification, structure modeling, functional annotation, and network inference. This is followed by an introduction of potential usefulness of ncRNAs as diagnostic, prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic strategies.

  6. Bioinformatics for cancer immunology and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Charoentong, Pornpimol; Angelova, Mihaela; Efremova, Mirjana; Gallasch, Ralf; Hackl, Hubert; Galon, Jerome; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2012-11-01

    Recent mechanistic insights obtained from preclinical studies and the approval of the first immunotherapies has motivated increasing number of academic investigators and pharmaceutical/biotech companies to further elucidate the role of immunity in tumor pathogenesis and to reconsider the role of immunotherapy. Additionally, technological advances (e.g., next-generation sequencing) are providing unprecedented opportunities to draw a comprehensive picture of the tumor genomics landscape and ultimately enable individualized treatment. However, the increasing complexity of the generated data and the plethora of bioinformatics methods and tools pose considerable challenges to both tumor immunologists and clinical oncologists. In this review, we describe current concepts and future challenges for the management and analysis of data for cancer immunology and immunotherapy. We first highlight publicly available databases with specific focus on cancer immunology including databases for somatic mutations and epitope databases. We then give an overview of the bioinformatics methods for the analysis of next-generation sequencing data (whole-genome and exome sequencing), epitope prediction tools as well as methods for integrative data analysis and network modeling. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can predict and explain important patterns in the genetic and clinical progression of cancer. Therefore, a survey of mathematical models for tumor evolution and tumor-immune cell interaction is included. Finally, we discuss future challenges for individualized immunotherapy and suggest how a combined computational/experimental approaches can lead to new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer, improved diagnosis, and prognosis of the disease and pinpoint novel therapeutic targets.

  7. Global computing for bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Loewe, Laurence

    2002-12-01

    Global computing, the collaboration of idle PCs via the Internet in a SETI@home style, emerges as a new way of massive parallel multiprocessing with potentially enormous CPU power. Its relations to the broader, fast-moving field of Grid computing are discussed without attempting a review of the latter. This review (i) includes a short table of milestones in global computing history, (ii) lists opportunities global computing offers for bioinformatics, (iii) describes the structure of problems well suited for such an approach, (iv) analyses the anatomy of successful projects and (v) points to existing software frameworks. Finally, an evaluation of the various costs shows that global computing indeed has merit, if the problem to be solved is already coded appropriately and a suitable global computing framework can be found. Then, either significant amounts of computing power can be recruited from the general public, or--if employed in an enterprise-wide Intranet for security reasons--idle desktop PCs can substitute for an expensive dedicated cluster.

  8. String Mining in Bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Ghanem, Moustafa

    Sequence analysis is a major area in bioinformatics encompassing the methods and techniques for studying the biological sequences, DNA, RNA, and proteins, on the linear structure level. The focus of this area is generally on the identification of intra- and inter-molecular similarities. Identifying intra-molecular similarities boils down to detecting repeated segments within a given sequence, while identifying inter-molecular similarities amounts to spotting common segments among two or multiple sequences. From a data mining point of view, sequence analysis is nothing but string- or pattern mining specific to biological strings. For a long time, this point of view, however, has not been explicitly embraced neither in the data mining nor in the sequence analysis text books, which may be attributed to the co-evolution of the two apparently independent fields. In other words, although the word "data-mining" is almost missing in the sequence analysis literature, its basic concepts have been implicitly applied. Interestingly, recent research in biological sequence analysis introduced efficient solutions to many problems in data mining, such as querying and analyzing time series [49,53], extracting information from web pages [20], fighting spam mails [50], detecting plagiarism [22], and spotting duplications in software systems [14].

  9. String Mining in Bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Ghanem, Moustafa

    Sequence analysis is a major area in bioinformatics encompassing the methods and techniques for studying the biological sequences, DNA, RNA, and proteins, on the linear structure level. The focus of this area is generally on the identification of intra- and inter-molecular similarities. Identifying intra-molecular similarities boils down to detecting repeated segments within a given sequence, while identifying inter-molecular similarities amounts to spotting common segments among two or multiple sequences. From a data mining point of view, sequence analysis is nothing but string- or pattern mining specific to biological strings. For a long time, this point of view, however, has not been explicitly embraced neither in the data mining nor in the sequence analysis text books, which may be attributed to the co-evolution of the two apparently independent fields. In other words, although the word “data-mining” is almost missing in the sequence analysis literature, its basic concepts have been implicitly applied. Interestingly, recent research in biological sequence analysis introduced efficient solutions to many problems in data mining, such as querying and analyzing time series [49,53], extracting information from web pages [20], fighting spam mails [50], detecting plagiarism [22], and spotting duplications in software systems [14].

  10. Ion torrent personal genome machine sequencing for genomic typing of Neisseria meningitidis for rapid determination of multiple layers of typing information.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Ulrich; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Claus, Heike; Jünemann, Sebastian; Prior, Karola; Harmsen, Dag

    2012-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes invasive meningococcal disease in infants, toddlers, and adolescents worldwide. DNA sequence-based typing, including multilocus sequence typing, analysis of genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance, and sequence typing of vaccine antigens, has become the standard for molecular epidemiology of the organism. However, PCR of multiple targets and consecutive Sanger sequencing provide logistic constraints to reference laboratories. Taking advantage of the recent development of benchtop next-generation sequencers (NGSs) and of BIGSdb, a database accommodating and analyzing genome sequence data, we therefore explored the feasibility and accuracy of Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing for genomic typing of meningococci. Three strains from a previous meningococcus serogroup B community outbreak were selected to compare conventional typing results with data generated by semiconductor chip-based sequencing. In addition, sequencing of the meningococcal type strain MC58 provided information about the general performance of the technology. The PGM technology generated sequence information for all target genes addressed. The results were 100% concordant with conventional typing results, with no further editing being necessary. In addition, the amount of typing information, i.e., nucleotides and target genes analyzed, could be substantially increased by the combined use of genome sequencing and BIGSdb compared to conventional methods. In the near future, affordable and fast benchtop NGS machines like the PGM might enable reference laboratories to switch to genomic typing on a routine basis. This will reduce workloads and rapidly provide information for laboratory surveillance, outbreak investigation, assessment of vaccine preventability, and antibiotic resistance gene monitoring.

  11. Engineering bioinformatics: building reliability, performance and productivity into bioinformatics software.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Brendan; Walsh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of software engineering skills in bioinformatic contexts. We discuss the consequences of this lack, examine existing explanations and remedies to the problem, point out their shortcomings, and propose alternatives. Previous analyses of the problem have tended to treat the use of software in scientific contexts as categorically different from the general application of software engineering in commercial settings. In contrast, we describe bioinformatic software engineering as a specialization of general software engineering, and examine how it should be practiced. Specifically, we highlight the difference between programming and software engineering, list elements of the latter and present the results of a survey of bioinformatic practitioners which quantifies the extent to which those elements are employed in bioinformatics. We propose that the ideal way to bring engineering values into research projects is to bring engineers themselves. We identify the role of Bioinformatic Engineer and describe how such a role would work within bioinformatic research teams. We conclude by recommending an educational emphasis on cross-training software engineers into life sciences, and propose research on Domain Specific Languages to facilitate collaboration between engineers and bioinformaticians.

  12. Engineering bioinformatics: building reliability, performance and productivity into bioinformatics software

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Brendan; Walsh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of software engineering skills in bioinformatic contexts. We discuss the consequences of this lack, examine existing explanations and remedies to the problem, point out their shortcomings, and propose alternatives. Previous analyses of the problem have tended to treat the use of software in scientific contexts as categorically different from the general application of software engineering in commercial settings. In contrast, we describe bioinformatic software engineering as a specialization of general software engineering, and examine how it should be practiced. Specifically, we highlight the difference between programming and software engineering, list elements of the latter and present the results of a survey of bioinformatic practitioners which quantifies the extent to which those elements are employed in bioinformatics. We propose that the ideal way to bring engineering values into research projects is to bring engineers themselves. We identify the role of Bioinformatic Engineer and describe how such a role would work within bioinformatic research teams. We conclude by recommending an educational emphasis on cross-training software engineers into life sciences, and propose research on Domain Specific Languages to facilitate collaboration between engineers and bioinformaticians. PMID:25996054

  13. Psychological and behavioural impact of returning personal results from whole-genome sequencing: the HealthSeq project

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Saskia C; Linderman, Michael D; Suckiel, Sabrina A; Zinberg, Randi; Wasserstein, Melissa; Kasarskis, Andrew; Diaz, George A; Schadt, Eric E

    2017-01-01

    Providing ostensibly healthy individuals with personal results from whole-genome sequencing could lead to improved health and well-being via enhanced disease risk prediction, prevention, and diagnosis, but also poses practical and ethical challenges. Understanding how individuals react psychologically and behaviourally will be key in assessing the potential utility of personal whole-genome sequencing. We conducted an exploratory longitudinal cohort study in which quantitative surveys and in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted before and after personal results were returned to individuals who underwent whole-genome sequencing. The participants were offered a range of interpreted results, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, pharmacogenomics, rare disease-associated variants, and ancestry. They were also offered their raw data. Of the 35 participants at baseline, 29 (82.9%) completed the 6-month follow-up. In the quantitative surveys, test-related distress was low, although it was higher at 1-week than 6-month follow-up (Z=2.68, P=0.007). In the 6-month qualitative interviews, most participants felt happy or relieved about their results. A few were concerned, particularly about rare disease-associated variants and Alzheimer's disease results. Two of the 29 participants had sought clinical follow-up as a direct or indirect consequence of rare disease-associated variants results. Several had mentioned their results to their doctors. Some participants felt having their raw data might be medically useful to them in the future. The majority reported positive reactions to having their genomes sequenced, but there were notable exceptions to this. The impact and value of returning personal results from whole-genome sequencing when implemented on a larger scale remains to be seen. PMID:28051073

  14. Psychological and behavioural impact of returning personal results from whole-genome sequencing: the HealthSeq project.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Saskia C; Linderman, Michael D; Suckiel, Sabrina A; Zinberg, Randi; Wasserstein, Melissa; Kasarskis, Andrew; Diaz, George A; Schadt, Eric E

    2017-02-01

    Providing ostensibly healthy individuals with personal results from whole-genome sequencing could lead to improved health and well-being via enhanced disease risk prediction, prevention, and diagnosis, but also poses practical and ethical challenges. Understanding how individuals react psychologically and behaviourally will be key in assessing the potential utility of personal whole-genome sequencing. We conducted an exploratory longitudinal cohort study in which quantitative surveys and in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted before and after personal results were returned to individuals who underwent whole-genome sequencing. The participants were offered a range of interpreted results, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, pharmacogenomics, rare disease-associated variants, and ancestry. They were also offered their raw data. Of the 35 participants at baseline, 29 (82.9%) completed the 6-month follow-up. In the quantitative surveys, test-related distress was low, although it was higher at 1-week than 6-month follow-up (Z=2.68, P=0.007). In the 6-month qualitative interviews, most participants felt happy or relieved about their results. A few were concerned, particularly about rare disease-associated variants and Alzheimer's disease results. Two of the 29 participants had sought clinical follow-up as a direct or indirect consequence of rare disease-associated variants results. Several had mentioned their results to their doctors. Some participants felt having their raw data might be medically useful to them in the future. The majority reported positive reactions to having their genomes sequenced, but there were notable exceptions to this. The impact and value of returning personal results from whole-genome sequencing when implemented on a larger scale remains to be seen.

  15. CattleTickBase: An integrated Internet-based bioinformatics resource for Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Rhipicephalus microplus genome is large and complex in structure, making a genome sequence difficult to assemble and costly to resource the required bioinformatics. In light of this, a consortium of international collaborators was formed to pool resources to begin sequencing this genome. We have...

  16. Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Extraversion: Findings from the Genetics of Personality Consortium.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Stéphanie M; de Moor, Marleen H M; Verweij, Karin J H; Krueger, Robert F; Luciano, Michelle; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Matteson, Lindsay K; Derringer, Jaime; Esko, Tõnu; Amin, Najaf; Gordon, Scott D; Hansell, Narelle K; Hart, Amy B; Seppälä, Ilkka; Huffman, Jennifer E; Konte, Bettina; Lahti, Jari; Lee, Minyoung; Miller, Mike; Nutile, Teresa; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Viktorin, Alexander; Wedenoja, Juho; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Adkins, Daniel E; Agrawal, Arpana; Allik, Jüri; Appel, Katja; Bigdeli, Timothy B; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Costa, Paul T; Smith, George Davey; Davies, Gail; de Wit, Harriet; Ding, Jun; Engelhardt, Barbara E; Eriksson, Johan G; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franke, Barbara; Giegling, Ina; Grucza, Richard; Hartmann, Annette M; Heath, Andrew C; Heinonen, Kati; Henders, Anjali K; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Iacono, William G; Janzing, Joost; Jokela, Markus; Karlsson, Robert; Kemp, John P; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Latvala, Antti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C; Madden, Pamela A F; Magri, Chiara; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Marten, Jonathan; Maschio, Andrea; Mbarek, Hamdi; Medland, Sarah E; Mihailov, Evelin; Milaneschi, Yuri; Montgomery, Grant W; Nauck, Matthias; Nivard, Michel G; Ouwens, Klaasjan G; Palotie, Aarno; Pettersson, Erik; Polasek, Ozren; Qian, Yong; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Raitakari, Olli T; Realo, Anu; Rose, Richard J; Ruggiero, Daniela; Schmidt, Carsten O; Slutske, Wendy S; Sorice, Rossella; Starr, John M; St Pourcain, Beate; Sutin, Angelina R; Timpson, Nicholas J; Trochet, Holly; Vermeulen, Sita; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Widen, Elisabeth; Wouda, Jasper; Wright, Margaret J; Zgaga, Lina; Porteous, David; Minelli, Alessandra; Palmer, Abraham A; Rujescu, Dan; Ciullo, Marina; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Metspalu, Andres; Kaprio, Jaakko; Deary, Ian J; Räikkönen, Katri; Wilson, James F; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Bierut, Laura J; Hettema, John M; Grabe, Hans J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Evans, David M; Schlessinger, David; Pedersen, Nancy L; Terracciano, Antonio; McGue, Matt; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2016-03-01

    Extraversion is a relatively stable and heritable personality trait associated with numerous psychosocial, lifestyle and health outcomes. Despite its substantial heritability, no genetic variants have been detected in previous genome-wide association (GWA) studies, which may be due to relatively small sample sizes of those studies. Here, we report on a large meta-analysis of GWA studies for extraversion in 63,030 subjects in 29 cohorts. Extraversion item data from multiple personality inventories were harmonized across inventories and cohorts. No genome-wide significant associations were found at the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level but there was one significant hit at the gene level for a long non-coding RNA site (LOC101928162). Genome-wide complex trait analysis in two large cohorts showed that the additive variance explained by common SNPs was not significantly different from zero, but polygenic risk scores, weighted using linkage information, significantly predicted extraversion scores in an independent cohort. These results show that extraversion is a highly polygenic personality trait, with an architecture possibly different from other complex human traits, including other personality traits. Future studies are required to further determine which genetic variants, by what modes of gene action, constitute the heritable nature of extraversion.

  17. Development of a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael J; Shahriari, Neda; Payette, Michael; Mnayer, Laila; Elaba, Zendee

    2016-10-01

    Results of molecular studies are redefining the diagnosis and management of a wide range of skin disorders. Dermatology training programs maintain a relative gap in relevant teaching. To develop a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees at our institution. The aim is to provide trainees with a specialty-appropriate, working knowledge in clinical molecular dermatology. The Departments of Dermatology and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine collaborated on the design and implementation of educational objectives and teaching modalities for the new curriculum. A multidisciplinary curriculum was developed. It comprises: (i) assigned reading from the medical literature and reference textbook; (ii) review of teaching sets; (iii) two 1 hour lectures; (iv) trainee presentations; (v) 1-week rotation in a clinical molecular pathology and cytogenetics laboratory; and (vi) assessments and feedback. Residents who participated in the curriculum to date have found the experience to be of value. Our curriculum provides a framework for other dermatology residency programs to develop their own specific approach to molecular diagnostics education. Such training will provide a foundation for lifelong learning as molecular testing evolves and becomes integral to the practice of dermatology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Erosion of Conserved Binding Sites in Personal Genomes Points to Medical Histories

    PubMed Central

    Guturu, Harendra; Chinchali, Sandeep; Clarke, Shoa L.; Bejerano, Gill

    2016-01-01

    Although many human diseases have a genetic component involving many loci, the majority of studies are statistically underpowered to isolate the many contributing variants, raising the question of the existence of alternate processes to identify disease mutations. To address this question, we collect ancestral transcription factor binding sites disrupted by an individual’s variants and then look for their most significant congregation next to a group of functionally related genes. Strikingly, when the method is applied to five different full human genomes, the top enriched function for each is invariably reflective of their very different medical histories. For example, our method implicates “abnormal cardiac output” for a patient with a longstanding family history of heart disease, “decreased circulating sodium level” for an individual with hypertension, and other biologically appealing links for medical histories spanning narcolepsy to axonal neuropathy. Our results suggest that erosion of gene regulation by mutation load significantly contributes to observed heritable phenotypes that manifest in the medical history. The test we developed exposes a hitherto hidden layer of personal variants that promise to shed new light on human disease penetrance, expressivity and the sensitivity with which we can detect them. PMID:26845687

  19. Advancing Pharmacogenomics Education in the Core PharmD Curriculum through Student Personal Genomic Testing.

    PubMed

    Adams, Solomon M; Anderson, Kacey B; Coons, James C; Smith, Randall B; Meyer, Susan M; Parker, Lisa S; Empey, Philip E

    2016-02-25

    To develop, implement, and evaluate "Test2Learn" a program to enhance pharmacogenomics education through the use of personal genomic testing (PGT) and real genetic data. One hundred twenty-two second-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students in a required course were offered PGT as part of a larger program approach to teach pharmacogenomics within a robust ethical framework. The program added novel learning objectives, lecture materials, analysis tools, and exercises using individual-level and population-level genetic data. Outcomes were assessed with objective measures and pre/post survey instruments. One hundred students (82%) underwent PGT. Knowledge significantly improved on multiple assessments. Genotyped students reported a greater increase in confidence in understanding test results by the end of the course. Similarly, undergoing PGT improved student's self-perceived ability to empathize with patients compared to those not genotyped. Most students (71%) reported feeling PGT was an important part of the course, and 60% reported they had a better understanding of pharmacogenomics specifically because of the opportunity. Implementation of PGT in the core pharmacy curriculum was feasible, well-received, and enhanced student learning of pharmacogenomics.

  20. Erosion of Conserved Binding Sites in Personal Genomes Points to Medical Histories.

    PubMed

    Guturu, Harendra; Chinchali, Sandeep; Clarke, Shoa L; Bejerano, Gill

    2016-02-01

    Although many human diseases have a genetic component involving many loci, the majority of studies are statistically underpowered to isolate the many contributing variants, raising the question of the existence of alternate processes to identify disease mutations. To address this question, we collect ancestral transcription factor binding sites disrupted by an individual's variants and then look for their most significant congregation next to a group of functionally related genes. Strikingly, when the method is applied to five different full human genomes, the top enriched function for each is invariably reflective of their very different medical histories. For example, our method implicates "abnormal cardiac output" for a patient with a longstanding family history of heart disease, "decreased circulating sodium level" for an individual with hypertension, and other biologically appealing links for medical histories spanning narcolepsy to axonal neuropathy. Our results suggest that erosion of gene regulation by mutation load significantly contributes to observed heritable phenotypes that manifest in the medical history. The test we developed exposes a hitherto hidden layer of personal variants that promise to shed new light on human disease penetrance, expressivity and the sensitivity with which we can detect them.

  1. Advancing Pharmacogenomics Education in the Core PharmD Curriculum through Student Personal Genomic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Solomon M.; Anderson, Kacey B.; Coons, James C.; Smith, Randall B.; Meyer, Susan M.; Parker, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop, implement, and evaluate “Test2Learn” a program to enhance pharmacogenomics education through the use of personal genomic testing (PGT) and real genetic data. Design. One hundred twenty-two second-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students in a required course were offered PGT as part of a larger program approach to teach pharmacogenomics within a robust ethical framework. The program added novel learning objectives, lecture materials, analysis tools, and exercises using individual-level and population-level genetic data. Outcomes were assessed with objective measures and pre/post survey instruments. Assessment. One hundred students (82%) underwent PGT. Knowledge significantly improved on multiple assessments. Genotyped students reported a greater increase in confidence in understanding test results by the end of the course. Similarly, undergoing PGT improved student’s self-perceived ability to empathize with patients compared to those not genotyped. Most students (71%) reported feeling PGT was an important part of the course, and 60% reported they had a better understanding of pharmacogenomics specifically because of the opportunity. Conclusion. Implementation of PGT in the core pharmacy curriculum was feasible, well-received, and enhanced student learning of pharmacogenomics. PMID:26941429

  2. Liver transplantation for lethal genetic syndromes: a novel model of personalized genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Petrowsky, Henrik; Brunicardi, F Charles; Leow, Voon Meng; Venick, Robert S; Agopian, Vatche; Kaldas, Fady M; Zarrinpar, Ali; Markovic, Daniela; McDiarmid, Sue V; Hong, Johnny C; Farmer, Douglas G; Hiatt, Jonathan R; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2013-04-01

    Our aim was to analyze our single-center experience with orthotopic liver transplantation for metabolic lethal genetic syndromes in children and adults. From 1984 to 2012, all pediatric (younger than 18 years) and adult (18 years and older) patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation for lethal genetic disorders were identified. Data on diagnostic pathways and specific outcomes were analyzed for both groups. Outcomes measures included recurrence rate as well as graft and patient survival. Metabolic lethal genetic syndrome was the primary indication for orthotopic liver transplantation in 152 of 4,564 patients (3.3%) at University of California, Los Angeles during the study period (74 pediatric patients and 78 adults). Genetic testing was performed in only 12% of the 152 patients and in 39% of patients after 2006. Two patients (1.3%) experienced a recurrence of the genetic disease. Overall 5- and 20-year survival rates were 89% and 77% for children and 73% and 50% for adults. Survival of pediatric patients was superior to adults (log-rank p < 0.009). Multivariate analysis identified age (hazard ratio = 2.18), preoperative life support (hazard ratio = 2.68), and earlier transplantation (hazard ratio = 3.41) as independent predictors of reduced survival. Orthotopic liver transplantation achieved excellent long-term survival in pediatric and adult patients with lethal genetic syndromes and represents a model of personalized genomic medicine by providing gene therapy through solid organ transplantation. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiplex Y-STRs analysis using the ion torrent personal genome machine (PGM).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueying; Ma, Ke; Li, Hui; Cao, Yu; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Huaigu; Ping, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies allow parallel sequencing analyses of many targeted regions of multiple samples at desirable depth of coverage. Routine use of MPS for forensic genetics is on the horizon. In this study, we explore the application of MPS technology in forensic Y-STR analysis. We designed a multiplex assay with 13 Y-STR loci (DYS19, DYS389 I, DYS389 II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS635, GATA-H4) for the purpose of MPS. The multiplex Y-STR assay was amplified in 42 unrelated male individuals and amplicons were sequenced simultaneously using the ion torrent personal genome machine (PGM) system. All loci were detected successfully, except for DYS389 II that exhibited a failure rate of 1.8% due to the relatively long amplicon sizes. We observed 7, 3, 2, 6 and 5 new alleles, respectively in DYS389 II, DYS390, DYS437, DYS448 and DYS635 due to the presence of sub-repeat composition differences, and a new allele in DYS438 because of nucleotide substitution. One allele of DYS390 was inconsistent with allele call from conventional capillary electrophoresis (CE) because of 4 bp deletions upstream of the core repeat unit. This study demonstrates that Y-STR typing by MPS can provide more genetic information, holding the promise for high discriminatory power. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Personal Genomics Services: A Review of Recent Empirical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ostergren, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTC-GT) has sparked much controversy and undergone dramatic changes in its brief history. Debates over appropriate health policies regarding DTC-GT would benefit from empirical research on its benefits, harms, and limitations. We review the recent literature (2011-present) and summarize findings across (1) content analyses of DTC-GT websites, (2) studies of consumer perspectives and experiences, and (3) surveys of relevant health care providers. Findings suggest that neither the health benefits envisioned by DTC-GT proponents (e.g., significant improvements in positive health behaviors) nor the worst fears expressed by its critics (e.g., catastrophic psychological distress and misunderstanding of test results, undue burden on the health care system) have materialized to date. However, research in this area is in its early stages and possesses numerous key limitations. We note needs for future studies to illuminate the impact of DTC-GT and thereby guide practice and policy regarding this rapidly evolving approach to personal genomics. PMID:24058877

  5. Applying massively parallel sequencing to paternity testing on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhao, Xueying; Ma, Ke; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Huaigu; Ping, Yuan; Shao, Chengchen; Xie, Jianhui; Liu, Wenbin

    2017-09-12

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) is a promising supplementary method for forensic genetics and has gradually been applied to forensic casework. In this study, we applied MPS to forensic casework on an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine to evaluate its performance in paternity testing with mismatched STR loci. A total of 15 samples from seven cases containing one mismatched locus by capillary electrophoresis typing were analyzed. Combined paternity index (CPI) and relative chance of paternity were calculated according to the International Society for Forensic Genetics guidelines and the Chinese national standards recommended for paternity testing. With simultaneous analysis of enough STR loci, the results support the certainty of paternity, and the mismatched alleles were considered to be mutations (CPI>10,000). With the detection of allele sequence structures, the origins of the mutations were inferred in some cases. Meanwhile, nine STRs (CSF1PO, D1S1656, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, D8S1179, D12S391, D21S11 and D4S2408) were found in an increased number of unique alleles and three new alleles in three STRs (D2S441, D21S11, and FGA) that have not been reported before were detected. Therefore, MPS can provide valuable information for forensic genetics research and play a promising role in paternity testing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Social networkers' attitudes toward direct-to-consumer personal genome testing.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Amy L; Diaz, Christina M; Wang, Tao; Hilsenbeck, Susan G

    2009-01-01

    This study explores social networkers' interest in and attitudes toward personal genome testing (PGT), focusing on expectations related to the clinical integration of PGT results. An online survey of 1,087 social networking users was conducted to assess 1) use and interest in PGT; 2) attitudes toward PGT companies and test results; and 3) expectations for the clinical integration of PGT. Descriptive statistics were calculated to summarize respondents' characteristics and responses. Six percent of respondents have used PGT, 64% would consider using PGT, and 30% would not use PGT. Of those who would consider using PGT, 74% report they would use it to gain knowledge about disease in their family. 34% of all respondents consider the information obtained from PGT to be a medical diagnosis. 78% of those who would consider PGT would ask their physician for help interpreting test results, and 61% of all respondents believe physicians have a professional obligation to help individuals interpret PGT results. Respondents express interest in using PGT services, primarily for purposes related to their medical care and expect physicians to help interpret PGT results. Physicians should therefore be prepared for patient demands for information and counsel on the basis of PGT results.

  7. Naturally selecting solutions: the use of genetic algorithms in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Manning, Timmy; Sleator, Roy D; Walsh, Paul

    2013-01-01

    For decades, computer scientists have looked to nature for biologically inspired solutions to computational problems; ranging from robotic control to scheduling optimization. Paradoxically, as we move deeper into the post-genomics era, the reverse is occurring, as biologists and bioinformaticians look to computational techniques, to solve a variety of biological problems. One of the most common biologically inspired techniques are genetic algorithms (GAs), which take the Darwinian concept of natural selection as the driving force behind systems for solving real world problems, including those in the bioinformatics domain. Herein, we provide an overview of genetic algorithms and survey some of the most recent applications of this approach to bioinformatics based problems.

  8. Genome-wide association study of the five-factor model of personality in young Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Na; Roh, Seung-Ju; Sung, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Jong-Young; Cho, Juhee; Shin, Hocheol; Kim, Hyung-Lae

    2013-10-01

    Personality is a determinant of behavior and lifestyle associated with health and human diseases. Although personality is known to be a heritable trait, its polygenic nature has made the identification of genetic variants elusive. We performed a genome-wide association study on 1089 Korean women aged 18-40 years whose personality traits were measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory for the five-factor model of personality. To reduce environmental factors that may influence personality traits, this study was restricted to young adult women. In the discovery phase, we identified variants of PTPRD (protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type D) that associated this gene with the Openness domain. Other genes that were previously reported to be associated with neurological phenotypes were also associated with personality traits. In particular, DRD1 and OR1A2 were linked to Neuroticism, NKAIN2 with Extraversion, HTR5A with Openness and DRD3 with Agreeableness. Data from our replication study of 2090 subjects confirmed the association between OR1A2 and Neuroticism. We first identified and confirmed a novel region on OR1A2 associated with Neuroticism [corrected]. Candidate genes for psychiatric disorders were also enriched. These findings contribute to our understanding of the genetic architecture of personality traits and provide critical clues to the neurobiological mechanisms that influence them.

  9. Bioinformatic approaches to interrogating vitamin D receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Moray J

    2017-09-15

    Bioinformatics applies unbiased approaches to develop statistically-robust insight into health and disease. At the global, or "20,000 foot" view bioinformatic analyses of vitamin D receptor (NR1I1/VDR) signaling can measure where the VDR gene or protein exerts a genome-wide significant impact on biology; VDR is significantly implicated in bone biology and immune systems, but not in cancer. With a more VDR-centric, or "2000 foot" view, bioinformatic approaches can interrogate events downstream of VDR activity. Integrative approaches can combine VDR ChIP-Seq in cell systems where significant volumes of publically available data are available. For example, VDR ChIP-Seq studies can be combined with genome-wide association studies to reveal significant associations to immune phenotypes. Similarly, VDR ChIP-Seq can be combined with data from Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to infer the impact of VDR target genes in cancer progression. Therefore, bioinformatic approaches can reveal what aspects of VDR downstream networks are significantly related to disease or phenotype. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Incorporating a Collaborative Web-Based Virtual Laboratory in an Undergraduate Bioinformatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, David

    2010-01-01

    Face-to-face bioinformatics courses commonly include a weekly, in-person computer lab to facilitate active learning, reinforce conceptual material, and teach practical skills. Similarly, fully-online bioinformatics courses employ hands-on exercises to achieve these outcomes, although students typically perform this work offsite. Combining a…

  11. Incorporating a Collaborative Web-Based Virtual Laboratory in an Undergraduate Bioinformatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, David

    2010-01-01

    Face-to-face bioinformatics courses commonly include a weekly, in-person computer lab to facilitate active learning, reinforce conceptual material, and teach practical skills. Similarly, fully-online bioinformatics courses employ hands-on exercises to achieve these outcomes, although students typically perform this work offsite. Combining a…

  12. CLIMB (the Cloud Infrastructure for Microbial Bioinformatics): an online resource for the medical microbiology community

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andy; Southgate, Joel; Poplawski, Radoslaw; Bull, Matthew J.; Richardson, Emily; Ismail, Matthew; Thompson, Simon Elwood-; Kitchen, Christine; Guest, Martyn; Bakke, Marius

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability and decreasing cost of high-throughput sequencing has transformed academic medical microbiology, delivering an explosion in available genomes while also driving advances in bioinformatics. However, many microbiologists are unable to exploit the resulting large genomics datasets because they do not have access to relevant computational resources and to an appropriate bioinformatics infrastructure. Here, we present the Cloud Infrastructure for Microbial Bioinformatics (CLIMB) facility, a shared computing infrastructure that has been designed from the ground up to provide an environment where microbiologists can share and reuse methods and data. PMID:28785418

  13. CLIMB (the Cloud Infrastructure for Microbial Bioinformatics): an online resource for the medical microbiology community.

    PubMed

    Connor, Thomas R; Loman, Nicholas J; Thompson, Simon; Smith, Andy; Southgate, Joel; Poplawski, Radoslaw; Bull, Matthew J; Richardson, Emily; Ismail, Matthew; Thompson, Simon Elwood-; Kitchen, Christine; Guest, Martyn; Bakke, Marius; Sheppard, Samuel K; Pallen, Mark J

    2016-09-01

    The increasing availability and decreasing cost of high-throughput sequencing has transformed academic medical microbiology, delivering an explosion in available genomes while also driving advances in bioinformatics. However, many microbiologists are unable to exploit the resulting large genomics datasets because they do not have access to relevant computational resources and to an appropriate bioinformatics infrastructure. Here, we present the Cloud Infrastructure for Microbial Bioinformatics (CLIMB) facility, a shared computing infrastructure that has been designed from the ground up to provide an environment where microbiologists can share and reuse methods and data.

  14. REVIEW-ARTICLE Bioinformatics: an overview and its applications.

    PubMed

    Diniz, W J S; Canduri, F

    2017-03-15

    Technological advancements in recent years have promoted a marked progress in understanding the genetic basis of phenotypes. In line with these advances, genomics has changed the paradigm of biological questions in full genome-wide scale (genome-wide), revealing an explosion of data and opening up many possibilities. On the other hand, the vast amount of information that has been generated points the challenges that must be overcome for storage (Moore's law) and processing of biological information. In this context, bioinformatics and computational biology have sought to overcome such challenges. This review presents an overview of bioinformatics and its use in the analysis of biological data, exploring approaches, emerging methodologies, and tools that can give biological meaning to the data generated.

  15. The Information Technology Infrastructure for the Translational Genomics Core and the Partners Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Natalie; Holzbach, Ana; Mahanta, Lisa; Aldama, Jackie; Cerretani, Xander; Embree, Kevin; Leon, Irene; Rathi, Neeta; Vickers, Matilde

    2016-01-21

    The Biobank and Translational Genomics core at Partners Personalized Medicine requires robust software and hardware. This Information Technology (IT) infrastructure enables the storage and transfer of large amounts of data, drives efficiencies in the laboratory, maintains data integrity from the time of consent to the time that genomic data is distributed for research, and enables the management of complex genetic data. Here, we describe the functional components of the research IT infrastructure at Partners Personalized Medicine and how they integrate with existing clinical and research systems, review some of the ways in which this IT infrastructure maintains data integrity and security, and discuss some of the challenges inherent to building and maintaining such infrastructure.

  16. The Information Technology Infrastructure for the Translational Genomics Core and the Partners Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Boutin, Natalie; Holzbach, Ana; Mahanta, Lisa; Aldama, Jackie; Cerretani, Xander; Embree, Kevin; Leon, Irene; Rathi, Neeta; Vickers, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    The Biobank and Translational Genomics core at Partners Personalized Medicine requires robust software and hardware. This Information Technology (IT) infrastructure enables the storage and transfer of large amounts of data, drives efficiencies in the laboratory, maintains data integrity from the time of consent to the time that genomic data is distributed for research, and enables the management of complex genetic data. Here, we describe the functional components of the research IT infrastructure at Partners Personalized Medicine and how they integrate with existing clinical and research systems, review some of the ways in which this IT infrastructure maintains data integrity and security, and discuss some of the challenges inherent to building and maintaining such infrastructure. PMID:26805892

  17. Diet and exercise changes following direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Daiva Elena; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Wang, Catharine; Roberts, J Scott; Green, Robert C

    2017-05-02

    The impacts of direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing (PGT) on health behaviors such as diet and exercise are poorly understood. Our investigation aimed to evaluate diet and exercise changes following PGT and to determine if changes were associated with genetic test results obtained from PGT. Customers of 23andMe and Pathway Genomics completed a web-based survey prior to receiving PGT results (baseline) and 6 months post-results. Fruit and vegetable intake (servings/day), and light, vigorous and strength exercise frequency (days/week) were assessed. Changes in diet and exercise were examined using paired t-tests and linear regressions. Additional analyses examined whether outcomes differed by baseline self-reported health (SRH) or content of PGT results. Longitudinal data were available for 1,002 participants. Significant increases were observed for vegetable intake (mean Δ = 0.11 (95% CI = 0.05, 0.17), p = 0.0003) and strength exercise (Δ = 0.14 (0.03, 0.25), p = 0.0153). When stratified by SRH, significant increases were observed for all outcomes among lower SRH participants: fruit intake, Δ = 0.11 (0.02, 0.21), p = 0.0148; vegetable intake, Δ = 0.16 (0.07, 0.25), p = 0.0005; light exercise, Δ = 0.25 (0.03, 0.47), p = 0.0263; vigorous exercise, Δ = 0.23 (0.06, 0.41), p = 0.0097; strength exercise, Δ = 0.19 (0.01, 0.37), p = 0.0369. A significant change among higher SRH participants was only observed for light exercise, and in the opposite direction: Δ = -0.2468 (-0.06, -0.44), p = 0.0111. Genetic results were not consistently associated with any diet or exercise changes. The experience of PGT was associated with modest, mostly positive changes in diet and exercise. Associations were independent of genetic results from PGT.

  18. Genotype-phenotype correlations with personality traits of healthcare professionals: a new use for the Human Genome Project.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Dominic A; Isaacs, David

    2002-04-01

    To describe the genetic basis of various personality traits. Prospective, blinded cohort study comparing questionnaire-reported personality traits with candidate genes for temperament, as revealed by genetic mapping in the Human Genome Project. Non-supervised questionnaires were mailed to MJA subscribers. DNA extracted from newborn screening blood samples of all New South Wales participants was used to perform mutation analysis for candidate personality genes. Tertiary medical care in New South Wales, 1 April 2000 to 1 April 2001. Healthcare professionals who admitted to reading the MJA on at least a semi-regular (monthly) basis. Correlations between occupation, personality and gene mutations were sought using a LOD score in comparison with a classic Poisson d'avril distribution. Mutations were identified that suggested the existence of genes determining several personality traits. Genes coding for belligerence (bel), charisma (lub), cynicism (dub), housekeeping (vac and uum), lack of personality (dul-1), obsessive-compulsive behaviour (pic-e) and gullibility (suk-r) are described. These were found to be selectively represented in certain members of the healthcare profession. The seven most important healthcare personality genes have now been described for posterity.

  19. Bioinformatics: towards new directions for public health.

    PubMed

    Maojo, V; Martin-Sanchez, F

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiologists are reformulating their classical approaches to diseases by considering various issues associated to "omics" areas and technologies. Traditional differences between epidemiology and genetics include background, training, terminologies, study designs and others. Public health and epidemiology are increasingly looking forward to using methodologies and informatics tools, facilitated by the Bioinformatics community, for managing genomic information. Our aim is to describe which are the most important implications related with the increasing use of genomic information for public health practice, research and education. To review the contribution of bioinformatics to these issues, in terms of providing the methods and tools needed for processing genetic information from pathogens and patients. To analyze the research challenges in biomedical informatics related with the need of integration of clinical, environmental and genetic data and the new scenarios arisen in public health. Review of the literature, Internet resources and material and reports generated by internal and external research projects. New developments are needed to advance in the study of the interactions between environmental agents and genetic factors involved in the development of diseases. The use of biomarkers, biobanks, and integrated genomic/clinical databases poses serious challenges for informaticians in order to extract useful information and knowledge for public health, biomedical research and healthcare. From an informatics perspective, integrated medical/biological ontologies and new semantic-based models for managing information provide new challenges for research in areas such as genetic epidemiology and the "omics" disciplines, among others. In this regard, there are various ethical, privacy, informed consent and social implications, that should be carefully addressed by researchers, practitioners and policy makers.

  20. Australians' knowledge and perceptions of direct-to-consumer personal genome testing.

    PubMed

    Savard, J; Mooney-Somers, J; Newson, A J; Kerridge, I

    2014-01-01

    As direct-to-consumer personal genome testing (DTC-PGT) is increasingly available in Australia, knowledge of Australians' perceptions and attitudes towards this technology is needed in order to assess the (potential) impact it might have on the Australian public and healthcare system. To explore the knowledge and perceptions of DTC-PGT in an Australian sample. An online survey asking about knowledge and perceptions of DTC-PGT, undertaken between October 2011 and April 2012, of 270 Australian residents. Results were analysed using SAS. Our study found limited consumer knowledge of, and interest in, pursuing DTC-PGT in Australia. Ninety-three per cent of respondents correctly identified DTC-PGT as available to consumers directly, but only 40% correctly identified its availability in Australia. When asked about the content and value of the information DTC-PGT provides, the majority of respondents indentified that DTC-PGT could provide information about one's health and/or ancestry (82% and 74%). Additionally, respondents indicated they believed this information to be equally important as non-genetic information about one's ancestry and health. While a minority of respondents expressed an intention to pursue DTC-PGT (27%), the majority of respondents, irrespective of whether they wished to pursue it or not, believed that genetic information was as important as non-genetic information in regards to their health and their ancestry. The value ascribed to genetic information suggests that genetics plays a role in people's lives, and that further qualitative research could explore the ways in which people might use and understand the genetic information provided by DTC-PGT. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. Consumer Perceptions of Interactions With Primary Care Providers After Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomic Testing.

    PubMed

    van der Wouden, Cathelijne H; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H; Ruffin, Mack T; Roberts, J Scott; Green, Robert C

    2016-04-19

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) personal genomic testing (PGT) allows individuals to learn about their genetic makeup without going through a physician, but some consumers share their results with their primary care provider (PCP). To describe the characteristics and perceptions of DTC PGT consumers who discuss their results with their PCP. Longitudinal, prospective cohort study. Online survey before and 6 months after results. DTC PGT consumers. Consumer satisfaction with the DTC PGT experience; whether and, if so, how many results could be used to improve health; how many results were not understood; and beliefs about the PCP's understanding of genetics. Participants were asked with whom they had discussed their results. Genetic reports were linked to survey responses. Among 1026 respondents, 63% planned to share their results with a PCP. At 6-month follow-up, 27% reported having done so, and 8% reported sharing with another health care provider only. Common reasons for not sharing results with a health care provider were that the results were not important enough (40%) or that the participant did not have time to do so (37%). Among participants who discussed results with their PCP, 35% were very satisfied with the encounter, and 18% were not at all satisfied. Frequently identified themes in participant descriptions of these encounters were actionability of the results or use in care (32%), PCP engagement or interest (25%), and lack of PCP engagement or interest (22%). Participants may not be representative of all DTC PGT consumers. A comprehensive picture of DTC PGT consumers who shared their results with a health care provider is presented. The proportion that shares results is expected to increase with time after testing as consumers find opportunities for discussion at later appointments or if results become relevant as medical needs evolve. National Institutes of Health.

  2. Translational Bioinformatics Approaches to Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Readhead, Ben; Dudley, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Significance A majority of therapeutic interventions occur late in the pathological process, when treatment outcome can be less predictable and effective, highlighting the need for new precise and preventive therapeutic development strategies that consider genomic and environmental context. Translational bioinformatics is well positioned to contribute to the many challenges inherent in bridging this gap between our current reactive methods of healthcare delivery and the intent of precision medicine, particularly in the areas of drug development, which forms the focus of this review. Recent Advances A variety of powerful informatics methods for organizing and leveraging the vast wealth of available molecular measurements available for a broad range of disease contexts have recently emerged. These include methods for data driven disease classification, drug repositioning, identification of disease biomarkers, and the creation of disease network models, each with significant impacts on drug development approaches. Critical Issues An important bottleneck in the application of bioinformatics methods in translational research is the lack of investigators who are versed in both biomedical domains and informatics. Efforts to nurture both sets of competencies within individuals and to increase interfield visibility will help to accelerate the adoption and increased application of bioinformatics in translational research. Future Directions It is possible to construct predictive, multiscale network models of disease by integrating genotype, gene expression, clinical traits, and other multiscale measures using causal network inference methods. This can enable the identification of the “key drivers” of pathology, which may represent novel therapeutic targets or biomarker candidates that play a more direct role in the etiology of disease. PMID:24527359

  3. The Scientific Foundation for Personal Genomics: Recommendations from a National Institutes of Health–Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Multidisciplinary Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Muin J.; McBride, Colleen M.; Schully, Sheri D.; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Feero, W. Gregory; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Gwinn, Marta; Simons-Morton, Denise G.; Bernhardt, Jay M.; Cargill, Michele; Chanock, Stephen J.; Church, George M.; Coates, Ralph J.; Collins, Francis S.; Croyle, Robert T.; Davis, Barry R.; Downing, Gregory J.; DuRoss, Amy; Friedman, Susan; Gail, Mitchell H.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Green, Robert C.; Greene, Mark H.; Greenland, Philip; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Hsu, Andro; Hudson, Kathy L.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Lauer, Michael S.; Miller, Amy M.; Offit, Kenneth; Ransohoff, David F.; Roberts, J. Scott; Rasooly, Rebekah S.; Stefansson, Kari; Terry, Sharon F.; Teutsch, Steven M.; Trepanier, Angela; Wanke, Kay L.; Witte, John S.; Xu, Jianfeng

    2010-01-01

    The increasing availability of personal genomic tests has led to discussions about the validity and utility of such tests and the balance of benefits and harms. A multidisciplinary workshop was convened by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to review the scientific foundation for using personal genomics in risk assessment and disease prevention and to develop recommendations for targeted research. The clinical validity and utility of personal genomics is a moving target with rapidly developing discoveries but little translation research to close the gap between discoveries and health impact. Workshop participants made recommendations in five domains: (1) developing and applying scientific standards for assessing personal genomic tests; (2) developing and applying a multidisciplinary research agenda, including observational studies and clinical trials to fill knowledge gaps in clinical validity and utility; (3) enhancing credible knowledge synthesis and information dissemination to clinicians and consumers; (4) linking scientific findings to evidence-based recommendations for use of personal genomics; and (5) assessing how the concept of personal utility can affect health benefits, costs, and risks by developing appropriate metrics for evaluation. To fulfill the promise of personal genomics, a rigorous multidisciplinary research agenda is needed. PMID:19617843

  4. The Scientific Foundation for personal genomics: recommendations from a National Institutes of Health-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention multidisciplinary workshop.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Muin J; McBride, Colleen M; Schully, Sheri D; Ioannidis, John P A; Feero, W Gregory; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Gwinn, Marta; Simons-Morton, Denise G; Bernhardt, Jay M; Cargill, Michele; Chanock, Stephen J; Church, George M; Coates, Ralph J; Collins, Francis S; Croyle, Robert T; Davis, Barry R; Downing, Gregory J; Duross, Amy; Friedman, Susan; Gail, Mitchell H; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Green, Robert C; Greene, Mark H; Greenland, Philip; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Hsu, Andro; Hudson, Kathy L; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kimmel, Paul L; Lauer, Michael S; Miller, Amy M; Offit, Kenneth; Ransohoff, David F; Roberts, J Scott; Rasooly, Rebekah S; Stefansson, Kari; Terry, Sharon F; Teutsch, Steven M; Trepanier, Angela; Wanke, Kay L; Witte, John S; Xu, Jianfeng

    2009-08-01

    The increasing availability of personal genomic tests has led to discussions about the validity and utility of such tests and the balance of benefits and harms. A multidisciplinary workshop was convened by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to review the scientific foundation for using personal genomics in risk assessment and disease prevention and to develop recommendations for targeted research. The clinical validity and utility of personal genomics is a moving target with rapidly developing discoveries but little translation research to close the gap between discoveries and health impact. Workshop participants made recommendations in five domains: (1) developing and applying scientific standards for assessing personal genomic tests; (2) developing and applying a multidisciplinary research agenda, including observational studies and clinical trials to fill knowledge gaps in clinical validity and utility; (3) enhancing credible knowledge synthesis and information dissemination to clinicians and consumers; (4) linking scientific findings to evidence-based recommendations for use of personal genomics; and (5) assessing how the concept of personal utility can affect health benefits, costs, and risks by developing appropriate metrics for evaluation. To fulfill the promise of personal genomics, a rigorous multidisciplinary research agenda is needed.

  5. Development of computations in bioscience and bioinformatics and its application: review of the Symposium of Computations in Bioinformatics and Bioscience (SCBB06).

    PubMed

    Deng, Youping; Ni, Jun; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2006-12-12

    The first symposium of computations in bioinformatics and bioscience (SCBB06) was held in Hangzhou, China on June 21-22, 2006. Twenty-six peer-reviewed papers were selected for publication in this special issue of BMC Bioinformatics. These papers cover a broad range of topics including bioinformatics theories, algorithms, applications and tool development. The main technical topics contain gene expression analysis, sequence analysis, genome analysis, phylogenetic analysis, gene function prediction, molecular interaction and system biology, genetics and population study, immune strategy, protein structure prediction and proteomics.

  6. GIW and InCoB, two premier bioinformatics conferences in Asia with a combined 40 years of history.

    PubMed

    Schönbach, Christian; Horton, Paul; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Tan, Tin Wee; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge discovery in bioinformatics thrives on joint and inclusive efforts of stakeholders. Similarly, knowledge dissemination is expected to be more effective and scalable through joint efforts. Therefore, the International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB) and the International Conference on Genome Informatics (GIW) were organized as a joint conference for the first time in 13 years of coexistence. The Asia-Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet) and the Japanese Society for Bioinformatics (JSBi) collaborated to host GIW/InCoB2015 in Tokyo, September 9-11, 2015. The joint endeavour yielded 51 research articles published in seven journals, 78 poster and 89 oral presentations, showcasing bioinformatics research in the Asia-Pacific region. Encouraged by the results and reduced organizational overheads, APBioNet will collaborate with other bioinformatics societies in organizing co-located bioinformatics research and training meetings in the future. InCoB2016 will be hosted in Singapore, September 21-23, 2016.

  7. Generalized Centroid Estimators in Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Michiaki; Kiryu, Hisanori; Iwasaki, Wataru; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    In a number of estimation problems in bioinformatics, accuracy measures of the target problem are usually given, and it is important to design estimators that are suitable to those accuracy measures. However, there is often a discrepancy between an employed estimator and a given accuracy measure of the problem. In this study, we introduce