Science.gov

Sample records for personal injury claims

  1. 33 CFR 25.117 - Proof of amount claimed for personal injury or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of amount claimed for personal injury or death. 25.117 Section 25.117 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CLAIMS General § 25.117 Proof of amount claimed for personal injury or death....

  2. 32 CFR 536.60 - Splitting property damage and personal injury claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the claimant for vehicle damage expeditiously and avoid costs associated with delay such as loss of... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Splitting property damage and personal injury... Splitting property damage and personal injury claims. Normally, a claim will include all damages that...

  3. 32 CFR 536.60 - Splitting property damage and personal injury claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the claimant for vehicle damage expeditiously and avoid costs associated with delay such as loss of... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Splitting property damage and personal injury... Splitting property damage and personal injury claims. Normally, a claim will include all damages that...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.279 - Is FTCA the exclusive remedy for a tort claim, including a claim concerning personal injury or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a claim concerning personal injury or death, resulting from the performance of a self-governance AFA..., including a claim concerning personal injury or death, resulting from the performance of a self-governance AFA? Yes, except as explained in § 1000.272(b). No claim may be filed against a self-governance...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.279 - Is FTCA the exclusive remedy for a tort claim, including a claim concerning personal injury or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a claim concerning personal injury or death, resulting from the performance of a self-governance AFA..., including a claim concerning personal injury or death, resulting from the performance of a self-governance... INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN...

  6. 76 FR 52580 - Procedures To Adjudicate Claims for Personal Injury or Property Damage Arising Out of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... 912 Procedures To Adjudicate Claims for Personal Injury or Property Damage Arising Out of the... the Postal Service's regulations concerning tort claims to update the mailing address of the National Tort Center. DATES: Effective Date: August 23, 2011. ADDRESSES: Written communications should...

  7. 29 CFR 100.401 - Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal injury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 100.401 Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of...

  8. 29 CFR 100.401 - Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal injury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 100.401 Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of...

  9. 29 CFR 100.401 - Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal injury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 100.401 Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of...

  10. 29 CFR 100.401 - Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal injury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 100.401 Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of...

  11. 29 CFR 100.401 - Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal injury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 100.401 Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of or damage to property or for personal... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act for loss of...

  12. 78 FR 47153 - Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act for Loss of or Damage to Property or for Personal Injury...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Part 1076 Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act for Loss of or Damage to Property or for Personal... unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. List of Subjects in 12 CFR Part 1076 Claims... part 1076 to read as follows: CHAPTER X--BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION PART...

  13. 46 CFR 327.27 - Proof of amount claimed for personal injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... written report by the attending physician including: (1) The nature and extent of the injury and the... which to evaluate the written report of the claimant's physician. The Maritime Administration determines... any relevant past injury. (d) If the claimant is employed, a written statement by the...

  14. 33 CFR 25.117 - Proof of amount claimed for personal injury or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Duration of time injuries prevented or limited employment, (4) Past, present, and future limitations on... earnings. (e) If the claimant is self-employed, written statements, or other evidence showing: (1)...

  15. 33 CFR 25.117 - Proof of amount claimed for personal injury or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) A written report by the attending physician including: (1) The nature and extent of the injury and... written report of the claimant's physician. The settlement authority determines the need for this.... (d) If the claimant is employed, a written statement by the claimant's employer certifying...

  16. 46 CFR 310.9 - Medical attention and injury claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Government for which they qualify. See, for example, 42 CFR part 32. Such persons who are not Federal... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical attention and injury claims. 310.9 Section 310.9... Medical attention and injury claims. (a) Medical attention and hospitalization. The school shall...

  17. 46 CFR 310.9 - Medical attention and injury claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Government for which they qualify. See, for example, 42 CFR part 32. Such persons who are not Federal... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical attention and injury claims. 310.9 Section 310.9... Medical attention and injury claims. (a) Medical attention and hospitalization. The school shall...

  18. 46 CFR 310.9 - Medical attention and injury claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Government for which they qualify. See, for example, 42 CFR part 32. Such persons who are not Federal... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical attention and injury claims. 310.9 Section 310.9... Medical attention and injury claims. (a) Medical attention and hospitalization. The school shall...

  19. 46 CFR 310.9 - Medical attention and injury claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Government for which they qualify. See, for example, 42 CFR part 32. Such persons who are not Federal... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical attention and injury claims. 310.9 Section 310.9... Medical attention and injury claims. (a) Medical attention and hospitalization. The school shall...

  20. 46 CFR 310.9 - Medical attention and injury claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Government for which they qualify. See, for example, 42 CFR part 32. Such persons who are not Federal... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical attention and injury claims. 310.9 Section 310.9... Medical attention and injury claims. (a) Medical attention and hospitalization. The school shall...

  1. 25 CFR 900.190 - Is FTCA the exclusive remedy for a tort claim for personal injury or death resulting from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... x-ray technicians, emergency medical technicians and other health care providers including... ASSISTANCE ACT Federal Tort Claims Act Coverage General Provisions Medical-Related Claims § 900.190 Is FTCA... medical, surgical, dental, or related functions by the contractor in carrying out...

  2. Evaluation of a complex, population-based injury claims management intervention for improving injury outcomes: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Collie, Alex; Gabbe, Belinda; Fitzharris, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Injuries resulting from road traffic crashes are a substantial cause of disability and death worldwide. Injured persons receiving compensation have poorer recovery and return to work than those with non-compensable injury. Case or claims management is a critical component of injury compensation systems, and there is now evidence that claims management can have powerful positive impacts on recovery, but can also impede recovery or exacerbate mental health concerns in some injured people. This study seeks to evaluate the impact of a population-based injury claims management intervention in the State of Victoria, Australia, on the health of those injured in motor vehicle crashes, their experience of the compensation process, and the financial viability of the compensation system. Methods and analysis Evaluation of this complex intervention involves a series of linked but stand-alone research projects to assess the anticipated process changes, impacts and outcomes of the intervention over a 5-year time frame. Linkage and analysis of routine administrative and health system data is supplemented with a series of primary studies collecting new information. Additionally, a series of ‘action’ research projects will be undertaken to inform the implementation of the intervention. A program logic model designed by the state government Transport Accident Commission in conjunction with the research team provides the evaluation framework. Ethics and dissemination Relatively few studies have comprehensively examined the impact of compensation system processes on the health of injured persons, their satisfaction with systems processes, and impacts on the financial performance of the compensation scheme itself. The wholesale, population-based transformation of an injury claims management model is a rare opportunity to document impacts of system-level policy change on outcomes of injured persons. Findings will contribute to the evidence base of information on the

  3. 45 CFR 505.1 - Persons eligible to file claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED PROVISIONS OF GENERAL APPLICATION § 505.1 Persons... sections 5(i) and 6(f) of the War Claims Act of 1948, as amended, are: (a) Civilian American citizens... the Act; and (b) Members of the Armed Forces of the United States held as prisoners of war during...

  4. 45 CFR 505.1 - Persons eligible to file claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED PROVISIONS OF GENERAL APPLICATION § 505.1 Persons... sections 5(i) and 6(f) of the War Claims Act of 1948, as amended, are: (a) Civilian American citizens... the Act; and (b) Members of the Armed Forces of the United States held as prisoners of war during...

  5. 45 CFR 505.1 - Persons eligible to file claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED PROVISIONS OF GENERAL APPLICATION § 505.1 Persons... sections 5(i) and 6(f) of the War Claims Act of 1948, as amended, are: (a) Civilian American citizens... the Act; and (b) Members of the Armed Forces of the United States held as prisoners of war during...

  6. 45 CFR 505.1 - Persons eligible to file claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED PROVISIONS OF GENERAL APPLICATION § 505.1 Persons... sections 5(i) and 6(f) of the War Claims Act of 1948, as amended, are: (a) Civilian American citizens... the Act; and (b) Members of the Armed Forces of the United States held as prisoners of war during...

  7. 45 CFR 505.1 - Persons eligible to file claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED PROVISIONS OF GENERAL APPLICATION § 505.1 Persons... sections 5(i) and 6(f) of the War Claims Act of 1948, as amended, are: (a) Civilian American citizens... the Act; and (b) Members of the Armed Forces of the United States held as prisoners of war during...

  8. Trends in Personal Injury Suits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Smissen, Betty

    1985-01-01

    Professional competence becomes more important as personal injury suits against recreation enterprises and parks focus increasingly on the professional responsible for facility safety. All professionals should be aware of and educated in risk management. Trends in liability awards and providers' legal responsibilities in various situations are…

  9. 32 CFR 750.6 - Claims: Presentment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... incident from which the claim arose. The Claim for Damage or Injury, Standard Form 95, shall be used whenever practical for claims under the Federal Tort and Military Claims Acts. Claims under the Personnel... the same incident, each person shall file a claim separately. 2 The Claim for Damage or...

  10. 32 CFR 750.6 - Claims: Presentment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... incident from which the claim arose. The Claim for Damage or Injury, Standard Form 95, shall be used whenever practical for claims under the Federal Tort and Military Claims Acts. Claims under the Personnel... the same incident, each person shall file a claim separately. 2 The Claim for Damage or...

  11. 32 CFR 750.6 - Claims: Presentment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... incident from which the claim arose. The Claim for Damage or Injury, Standard Form 95, shall be used whenever practical for claims under the Federal Tort and Military Claims Acts. Claims under the Personnel... the same incident, each person shall file a claim separately. 2 The Claim for Damage or...

  12. 32 CFR 750.6 - Claims: Presentment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... incident from which the claim arose. The Claim for Damage or Injury, Standard Form 95, shall be used whenever practical for claims under the Federal Tort and Military Claims Acts. Claims under the Personnel... the same incident, each person shall file a claim separately. 2 The Claim for Damage or...

  13. 32 CFR 842.7 - Who may file a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the property or their authorized agent may file a claim for property damage. (b) Personal injury or death. (1) The injured person or authorized agent may file a claim for personal injury. (2) The... local law may file a claim for a minor's personal injury. (3) The executor or administrator of...

  14. 32 CFR 842.7 - Who may file a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of the property or their authorized agent may file a claim for property damage. (b) Personal injury or death. (1) The injured person or authorized agent may file a claim for personal injury. (2) The... local law may file a claim for a minor's personal injury. (3) The executor or administrator of...

  15. The increasing threat of personal watercraft injuries.

    PubMed

    Latch, Rebecca; Fiser, Debra H

    2004-05-01

    A trend of increasing number and severity of injuries associated with use of personal watercraft (PWC) has been noted as the use and popularity of PWC also rises. The rate of injuries secondary to PWC use is greater than that from other water sports. Multiple etiologies of injury have been reported, including closed head trauma, spinal injuries, facial fractures, chest trauma, abdominal injuries, and drowning. These injuries may occur from collision with other objects, falls from the PWC, and encounters with the hydrostatic jet stream. The most significant contributing factors to injury seem to be carelessness and inattention. However, some studies show that substance abuse may also contribute. Recommendations to reduce morbidity and mortality include using U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal flotation devices (PFD), limiting use of PWC to trained adults, and improving recognition of significant PWC injury by medical personnel.

  16. 46 CFR 204.4 - Time limitations on claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.4 Time limitations on claims. (a) A claim... Standard Form 95, “Claims for Damage, Injury, or Death,” or written notification of an incident, together with a claim for money damages in a sum certain, for death, personal injury, or damage to or loss...

  17. 46 CFR 204.4 - Time limitations on claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.4 Time limitations on claims. (a) A claim... Standard Form 95, “Claims for Damage, Injury, or Death,” or written notification of an incident, together with a claim for money damages in a sum certain, for death, personal injury, or damage to or loss...

  18. 46 CFR 204.2 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Claims payable. 204.2 Section 204.2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION POLICY, PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE CLAIMS AGAINST THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.2 Claims payable. Claims for death, personal injury,...

  19. 46 CFR 204.2 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Claims payable. 204.2 Section 204.2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION POLICY, PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE CLAIMS AGAINST THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.2 Claims payable. Claims for death, personal injury,...

  20. 46 CFR 204.2 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Claims payable. 204.2 Section 204.2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION POLICY, PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE CLAIMS AGAINST THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.2 Claims payable. Claims for death, personal injury,...

  1. 33 CFR 25.603 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Not Cognizable Under Other Law § 25.603 Claims payable. A claim for death, personal injury, or damage... member or a civilian employee of the Coast Guard: (a) Incident to the use of a vehicle of the...

  2. 77 FR 65048 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Personal Property Claims, State-27

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... ``Personal Property Claims'' (42 FR 49715). The system settles claims for loss, damage, or destruction of... those Locally Engaged Staff who handle PII are required to take the Foreign Service Institute distance learning course instructing employees on privacy and security requirements, including the rules of...

  3. 32 CFR 644.455 - Claims for loss or damage of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Claims for loss or damage of personal property. 644.455 Section 644.455 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Leaseholds and Leasehold Improvements § 644.455 Claims for loss or damage of...

  4. 27 CFR 70.505 - Requirements on persons intending to file claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... on Distilled Spirits, Wines, and Beer General § 70.505 Requirements on persons intending to file... claim, as provided in § 70.506, and (b) Comply with any other provisions of law or regulations which...

  5. 27 CFR 70.505 - Requirements on persons intending to file claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... on Distilled Spirits, Wines, and Beer General § 70.505 Requirements on persons intending to file... claim, as provided in § 70.506, and (b) Comply with any other provisions of law or regulations which...

  6. 27 CFR 70.505 - Requirements on persons intending to file claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... on Distilled Spirits, Wines, and Beer General § 70.505 Requirements on persons intending to file... claim, as provided in § 70.506, and (b) Comply with any other provisions of law or regulations which...

  7. 27 CFR 70.505 - Requirements on persons intending to file claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... on Distilled Spirits, Wines, and Beer General § 70.505 Requirements on persons intending to file... claim, as provided in § 70.506, and (b) Comply with any other provisions of law or regulations which...

  8. 27 CFR 70.505 - Requirements on persons intending to file claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... on Distilled Spirits, Wines, and Beer General § 70.505 Requirements on persons intending to file... claim, as provided in § 70.506, and (b) Comply with any other provisions of law or regulations which...

  9. 19 CFR 191.33 - Person entitled to claim drawback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... drawback. (a) Direct identification. (1) Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(j)(1), the exporter (or destroyer) shall be... certification provided for under this section may be a blanket certification for a stated period. The claimant... delivery, and the exporter or destroyer shall be entitled to claim drawback (multiple substitutions are...

  10. 19 CFR 191.33 - Person entitled to claim drawback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... drawback. (a) Direct identification. (1) Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(j)(1), the exporter (or destroyer) shall be... certification provided for under this section may be a blanket certification for a stated period. The claimant... delivery, and the exporter or destroyer shall be entitled to claim drawback (multiple substitutions are...

  11. Unreported workers’ compensation claims to the BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses: Establishment factors

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Darrin A.; Bonauto, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies suggest employers underreport injuries to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII); less is known about reporting differences by establishment characteristics. Methods We linked SOII data to Washington State workers’ compensation claims data, using unemployment insurance data to improve linking accuracy. We used multivariable regression models to estimate incidence ratios (IR) of unreported workers’ compensation claims for establishment characteristics. Results An estimated 70% of workers’ compensation claims were reported in SOII. Claims among state and local government establishments were most likely to be reported. Compared to large manufacturing establishments, unreported claims were most common among small educational services establishments (IR = 2.47, 95%CI: 1.52–4.01) and large construction establishments (IR = 2.05, 95%CI: 1.77–2.37). Conclusions Underreporting of workers’ compensation claims to SOII varies by establishment characteristics, obscuring true differences in work injury incidence. Findings may differ from previous research due to differences in study methods. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:274–289, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26792563

  12. Learning From No-Fault Treatment Injury Claims to Improve the Safety of Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Katharine Ann

    2015-01-01

    New Zealand’s treatment injury compensation claims data set provides an uncommon no-fault perspective of patient safety incidents. Analysis of primary care claims data confirmed medication as the leading threat to the safety of older patients in primary care and drew particular attention to the threat posed by antibiotics. For most injuries there was no suggestion of error. The no-fault perspective reveals the greatest threat to the safety of older patients in primary care to be, not error, but the risk posed by treatment itself. To improve patients’ safety, in addition to reducing error, clinicians need to reduce patients’ exposure to treatment risk, where appropriate. PMID:26371269

  13. An analysis of injury claims from low-seam coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, S.; Moore, S.; Dempsey, P.G.

    2009-07-01

    The restricted workspace present in low-seam coal mines forces workers to adopt awkward working postures (kneeling and stooping), which place high physical demands on the knee and lower back. This article provides an analysis of injury claims for eight mining companies operating low-seam coal mines during calendar years 1996-2008. All cost data were normalized using data on the cost of medical care (MPI) as provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Results of the analysis indicate that the knee was the body part that led in terms of claim cost ($4.2 million), followed by injuries to the lower back ($2.7 million). While the average cost per injury for these body parts was $13,100 and $14,400, respectively (close to the average cost of an injury overall), the high frequency of these injuries resulted in their pre-eminence in terms of cost. Analysis of data from individual mining companies suggest that knee and lower back injuries were a consistent problem across companies, as these injuries were each among the top five most costly part of body for seven out of eight companies studied. Results of this investigation suggest that efforts to reduce the frequency of knee and low back injuries in low-seam mines have the potential to create substantial cost savings.

  14. 45 CFR 35.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative claim; who may file. 35.3 Section... AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 35.3 Administrative claim; who may file. (a) A claim for injury to or... person legally entitled to assert such a claim under applicable state law. (d) A claim for loss...

  15. 38 CFR 14.604 - Filing a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., GENERAL COUNSEL, AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS Federal Tort Claims § 14.604 Filing a claim. (a) Each person who... his or her employment, will be furnished a copy of SF 95, Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death. The... the information prescribed by 28 CFR 14.4 to the extent applicable. If a claim is presented to...

  16. 38 CFR 14.604 - Filing a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., GENERAL COUNSEL, AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS Federal Tort Claims § 14.604 Filing a claim. (a) Each person who... his or her employment, will be furnished a copy of SF 95, Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death. The... the information prescribed by 28 CFR 14.4 to the extent applicable. If a claim is presented to...

  17. 38 CFR 14.604 - Filing a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., GENERAL COUNSEL, AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS Federal Tort Claims § 14.604 Filing a claim. (a) Each person who... his or her employment, will be furnished a copy of SF 95, Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death. The... the information prescribed by 28 CFR 14.4 to the extent applicable. If a claim is presented to...

  18. The effects of a medical care utilization review program on back and neck injury claims.

    PubMed

    Battié, Michele C; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Franklin, Gary

    2002-04-01

    A number of quality-based evaluation and treatment protocols have been developed and marketed for the management of work-related musculoskeletal problems. Yet, little is known about their effectiveness in improving patient outcomes. We evaluated one such approach adopted by the Department of Labor and Industries, which insures approximately two-thirds of the non-federal workforce in Washington State. The outcomes of back and neck injury claims (primarily sprains and strains) filed in the 2 months after the program was fully operational were compared with two comparable groups of claims from the same base population filed before the program's availability. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in the number of days of work loss, medical costs, and permanent partial disability awards granted during the 2 years after injury. The quality-based program used as an adjunct to claims management failed to improve outcomes.

  19. Social Security preclusions in personal injury litigation.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian

    2005-08-01

    This editorial scrutinises the impact of preclusion periods for social security entitlements upon personal injury practice. It identifies the differences in calculation in respect of the compensation part of lump sum payments, depending upon whether a plaintiff's case is settled or resolved by litigation. It examines the effect of s 1184K of the Social Security Act 1991 (Cth) and the circumstances in which the discretion to reduce or waive the preclusion period has been exercised in favour of recipients of lump sum payments. It argues that room remains for creative arguments on behalf of plaintiffs, highlighting the potential for the compensatory effect of the lump sum to be undercut if the preclusion provisions are fully applied. PMID:16117154

  20. 32 CFR 564.55 - Claims not payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., a proximate cause of the accident or incident, bars a claim. The law of the place where the accident... the doctrine of comparative negligence will not be applied. (b) Personal injury. Claims for...

  1. 32 CFR 564.55 - Claims not payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., a proximate cause of the accident or incident, bars a claim. The law of the place where the accident... the doctrine of comparative negligence will not be applied. (b) Personal injury. Claims for...

  2. Asbestos exposure and psychic injury--a review of 48 claims.

    PubMed

    Perr, I N

    1992-01-01

    Asbestos exposure has been a common occupational risk resulting in much litigation. Where pulmonary dysfunction has been minimal or even absent, psychic injury has been made an element in claimed damages. Analysis of psychiatric and psychologic claims in 48 cases reveals that diagnoses often do not conform to professional standards, are based on insufficient data sampling, lack adequate overall history as well as medical history, and do not comport with the standard of probability usually required for litigation. The group studied was elderly (mean age--62.6), mostly retired (71%), with some significant medical illnesses (18% on medical retirement). None were retired for pulmonary reasons. As expected, conflict in opinion between the opposing professional medical participants was frequent. Commonly the patients did not substantiate the complaints reported in the medico-legal reports; some ridiculed statements made on their behalf. Many psychological reports reflected simplistic or erroneous concepts of medicine or ignored relevant medical data. This study indicates that in this group claims of psychic injury due to asbestos exposure have little justification and supports the view that the current system of utilization of expert opinions is not reliable or in conformity with reasonable professional standards. Correspondingly, these claims did not result in augmented awards.

  3. 29 CFR 15.304 - Are there limits to claims for loss of or damages to personal property under the WIA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Are there limits to claims for loss of or damages to... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED CLAIMS STATUTES Claims Arising Out of the Operation of the Job Corps § 15.304 Are there limits to claims for loss of or damages to personal...

  4. 29 CFR 15.304 - Are there limits to claims for loss of or damages to personal property under the WIA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Are there limits to claims for loss of or damages to... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED CLAIMS STATUTES Claims Arising Out of the Operation of the Job Corps § 15.304 Are there limits to claims for loss of or damages to personal...

  5. 32 CFR 644.455 - Claims for loss or damage of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Claims for loss or damage of personal property. 644.455 Section 644.455 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Leaseholds and Leasehold...

  6. 32 CFR 644.455 - Claims for loss or damage of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Claims for loss or damage of personal property. 644.455 Section 644.455 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Leaseholds and Leasehold...

  7. 29 CFR 15.42 - Claim procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Federal Tort Claims Act, as amended, for money damages against the United States for injury to or loss of... responsibility of the United States for the personal injury or the damages claimed. (b) Death. In support of a... other evidence or information which may have a bearing on either the responsibility of the United......

  8. 25 CFR 1000.282 - May persons who are not Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May persons who are not Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA? 1000.282 Section 1000.282 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.282 May persons who are...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.282 - May persons who are not Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May persons who are not Indians or Alaska Natives assert claims under FTCA? 1000.282 Section 1000.282 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.282 May persons who are...

  10. 39 CFR 912.6 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative claim; who may file. 912.6 Section... Administrative claim; who may file. (a) A claim for injury to or loss of property may be presented by the owner... any other person legally entitled to assert such a claim in accordance with applicable State law....

  11. 32 CFR 842.7 - Who may file a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... local law may file a claim for a minor's personal injury. (3) The executor or administrator of the decedent's estate or any other person legally entitled to do so under applicable local law may file a claim... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who may file a claim. 842.7 Section...

  12. 33 CFR 25.107 - Who may present claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... interest is barred under § 25.109(a). (2) A claim for personal injury may be presented by the person... joint claim must be presented in the names of and signed by, the joint claimants, and the settlement must be made payable to the joint claimants. (c) A claim may be presented by a duly authorized...

  13. 46 CFR 327.22 - Who may present claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for personal injury may be presented by the person injured. (3) A claim based on death may be... has, in fact, incurred the expenses. (b) A joint claim must be presented in the names of and signed by, the joint claimants, and the settlement will be made payable to the joint claimants. (c) A claim...

  14. 33 CFR 25.107 - Who may present claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... interest is barred under § 25.109(a). (2) A claim for personal injury may be presented by the person... joint claim must be presented in the names of and signed by, the joint claimants, and the settlement must be made payable to the joint claimants. (c) A claim may be presented by a duly authorized...

  15. 46 CFR 327.22 - Who may present claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for personal injury may be presented by the person injured. (3) A claim based on death may be... has, in fact, incurred the expenses. (b) A joint claim must be presented in the names of and signed by, the joint claimants, and the settlement will be made payable to the joint claimants. (c) A claim...

  16. 46 CFR 327.42 - Who may present claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., including an insurer or other subrogee. (2) A claim for personal injury may be presented by the person... joint claim must be presented in the names of and signed by, the joint claimants, and the settlement must be made payable to the joint claimants. (b) A claim may be presented by a duly authorized...

  17. 46 CFR 327.42 - Who may present claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., including an insurer or other subrogee. (2) A claim for personal injury may be presented by the person... joint claim must be presented in the names of and signed by, the joint claimants, and the settlement must be made payable to the joint claimants. (b) A claim may be presented by a duly authorized...

  18. 33 CFR 25.107 - Who may present claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... interest is barred under § 25.109(a). (2) A claim for personal injury may be presented by the person... joint claim must be presented in the names of and signed by, the joint claimants, and the settlement must be made payable to the joint claimants. (c) A claim may be presented by a duly authorized...

  19. 49 CFR 238.117 - Protection against personal injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Requirements § 238.117 Protection against personal injury. On or after November 8, 1999, all moving parts, high voltage equipment, electrical conductors and switches, and pipes carrying hot fluids or gases on...

  20. 49 CFR 238.117 - Protection against personal injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Requirements § 238.117 Protection against personal injury. On or after November 8, 1999, all moving parts, high voltage equipment, electrical conductors and switches, and pipes carrying hot fluids or gases on...

  1. 32 CFR 536.35 - Unique issues related to environmental claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... issues related to environmental claims. Claims for property damage, personal injury, or death arising in... Torts Branch of DOJ. Such claims arising overseas must be reported to the Command Claims Service with... is not usually feasible because settlement of property damage claims must cover all...

  2. 32 CFR 536.35 - Unique issues related to environmental claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... issues related to environmental claims. Claims for property damage, personal injury, or death arising in... Torts Branch of DOJ. Such claims arising overseas must be reported to the Command Claims Service with... is not usually feasible because settlement of property damage claims must cover all...

  3. 32 CFR 536.74 - Scope for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... claims against the United States for death or personal injury, or damage to, or loss or destruction of..., Glossary). (b) A tort claim arising in the United States, its commonwealths, territories, and possessions may be settled under this subpart if the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) does not apply to the type...

  4. 32 CFR 536.74 - Scope for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... claims against the United States for death or personal injury, or damage to, or loss or destruction of..., Glossary). (b) A tort claim arising in the United States, its commonwealths, territories, and possessions may be settled under this subpart if the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) does not apply to the type...

  5. 45 CFR 35.4 - Administrative claims; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... pain and suffering prior to death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain and the decedent's physical...) Personal injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant...

  6. 22 CFR 304.4 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Personal injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the... expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering prior to death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for...

  7. 22 CFR 304.4 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Personal injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the... expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering prior to death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for...

  8. 22 CFR 304.4 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Personal injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the... expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering prior to death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for...

  9. 45 CFR 35.4 - Administrative claims; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pain and suffering prior to death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain and the decedent's physical...) Personal injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant...

  10. Personal Trainer Demographics, Current Practice Trends and Common Trainee Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Waryasz, Gregory R.; Daniels, Alan H.; Gil, Joseph A.; Suric, Vladimir; Eberson, Craig P.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on maintaining a healthy lifestyle has led many individuals to seek advice on exercise from personal trainers. There are few studies to date that evaluate personal trainer education, practice trends, and injuries they have seen while training clients. A survey was distributed to personal trainers using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA) with 605 personal trainers accessing the survey. An exercise related bachelor’s degree was held by 64.2% of survey participants and a certification in personal training by 89.0%. The most common personal trainer certifications were from American College of Sports Medicine (59.2%) and National Strength and Conditioning Association (28.9%). Only 2.9% of all personal trainers surveyed had no exercise-related bachelor’s degree and no personal trainer certification. The most common injuries seen by personal trainers during sessions were lumbar muscle strain (10.7%), rotator cuff tear/tendonitis (8.9%), shin splints (8.1%), ankle sprain (7.5%), and cervical muscle strain (7.4%). There is variability in the practices between different personal trainers when analyzing differences in collegiate education, personal trainer certifications, and strength and conditioning certifications. The clinical implication of the differences in practices is unknown as to the impact on injuries or exercise prescription effectiveness. PMID:27761219

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury and Personality Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Marc; McCabe, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and lifelong disability in the United States for individuals below the age of 45. Current estimates from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicate that at least 1.4 million Americans sustain a TBI annually. TBI affects 475,000 children under age 14 each year in the United States alone.…

  12. Insurance claims data: a possible solution for a national sports injury surveillance system? An evaluation of data information against ASIDD and consensus statements on sports injury surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Åman, Malin; Forssblad, Magnus; Henriksson-Larsén, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background Before preventive actions can be suggested for sports injuries at the national level, a solid surveillance system is required in order to study their epidemiology, risk factors and mechanisms. There are guidelines for sports injury data collection and classifications in the literature for that purpose. In Sweden, 90% of all athletes (57/70 sports federations) are insured with the same insurance company and data from their database could be a foundation for studies on acute sports injuries at the national level. Objective To evaluate the usefulness of sports injury insurance claims data in sports injury surveillance at the national level. Method A database with 27 947 injuries was exported to an Excel file. Access to the corresponding text files was also obtained. Data were reviewed on available information, missing information and dropouts. Comparison with ASIDD (Australian Sports Injury Data Dictionary) and existing consensus statements in the literature (football (soccer), rugby union, tennis, cricket and thoroughbred horse racing) was performed in a structured manner. Result Comparison with ASIDD showed that 93% of the suggested data items were present in the database to at least some extent. Compliance with the consensus statements was generally high (13/18). Almost all claims (83%) contained text information concerning the injury. Conclusions Relatively high-quality sports injury data can be obtained from a specific insurance company at the national level in Sweden. The database has the potential to be a solid base for research on acute sports injuries in different sports at the national level. PMID:24928588

  13. Employer reasons for failing to report eligible workers’ compensation claims in the BLS survey of occupational injuries and illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Wuellner, Sara E.; Bonauto, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little research has been done to identify reasons employers fail to report some injuries and illnesses in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII). Methods We interviewed the 2012 Washington SOII respondents from establishments that had failed to report one or more eligible workers’ compensation claims in the SOII about their reasons for not reporting specific claims. Qualitative content analysis methods were used to identify themes and patterns in the responses. Results Non‐compliance with OSHA recordkeeping or SOII reporting instructions and data entry errors led to unreported claims. Some employers refused to include claims because they did not consider the injury to be work‐related, despite workers’ compensation eligibility. Participant responses brought the SOII eligibility of some claims into question. Conclusion Systematic and non‐systematic errors lead to SOII underreporting. Insufficient recordkeeping systems and limited knowledge of reporting requirements are barriers to accurate workplace injury records. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:343–356, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26970051

  14. Liability for Personal Injury Caused by Defective Medical Computer Programs

    PubMed Central

    Brannigan, Vincent M.

    1980-01-01

    Defective medical computer programs can cause personal injury. Financial responsibility for the injury under tort law will turn on several factors: whether the program is a product or a service, what types of defect exist in the product, and who produced the program. The factors involved in making these decisions are complex, but knowledge of the relevant issues can assist computer personnel in avoiding liability.

  15. Time series forecasting of future claims amount of SOCSO's employment injury scheme (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Faiz; Ismail, Isma Liana; Chek, Mohd Zaki Awang; Jamal, Nur Faezah; Ridzwan, Ahmad Nur Azam Ahmad; Jelas, Imran Md; Noor, Syamsul Ikram Mohd; Ahmad, Abu Bakar

    2012-09-01

    The Employment Injury Scheme (EIS) provides protection to employees who are injured due to accidents whilst working, commuting from home to the work place or during employee takes a break during an authorized recess time or while travelling that is related with his work. The main purpose of this study is to forecast value on claims amount of EIS for the year 2011 until 2015 by using appropriate models. These models were tested on the actual EIS data from year 1972 until year 2010. Three different forecasting models are chosen for comparisons. These are the Naïve with Trend Model, Average Percent Change Model and Double Exponential Smoothing Model. The best model is selected based on the smallest value of error measures using the Mean Squared Error (MSE) and Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE). From the result, the best model that best fit the forecast for the EIS is the Average Percent Change Model. Furthermore, the result also shows the claims amount of EIS for the year 2011 to year 2015 continue to trend upwards from year 2010.

  16. Contraction induced muscle injury: towards personalized training and recovery programs.

    PubMed

    Givli, Sefi

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscles can be injured by their own contractions. Such contraction-induced injury, often accompanied by delayed onset of muscle soreness, is a leading cause of the loss of mobility in the rapidly increasing population of elderly people. Unlike other types of muscle injuries which hurt almost exclusively those who are subjected to intensive exercise such as professional athletes and soldiers in training, contraction induced injury is a phenomenon which may be experienced by people of all ages while performing a variety of daily-life activities. Subjects that experience contraction induced injury report on soreness that usually increases in intensity in the first 24 h after the activity, peaks from 24 to 72 h, and then subsides and disappears in a few days. Despite their clinical importance and wide influence, there are almost no studies, clinical, experimental or computational, that quantitatively relate between the extent of contraction induced injury and activity factors, such as number of repetitions, their frequency and magnitude. The lack of such quantitative information is even more emphasized by the fact that contraction induced injury can be used, if moderate and controlled, to improve muscle performance in the long term. Thus, if properly understood and carefully implemented, contraction induced injury can be used for the purpose of personalized training and recovery programs. In this paper, we review experimental, clinical, and theoretical works, attempting towards drawing a more quantitative description of contraction induced injury and related phenomena.

  17. Applying personal genetic data to injury risk assessment in athletes.

    PubMed

    Goodlin, Gabrielle T; Roos, Andrew K; Roos, Thomas R; Hawkins, Claire; Beache, Sydney; Baur, Stephen; Kim, Stuart K

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have identified genetic markers associated with risk for certain sports-related injuries and performance-related conditions, with the hope that these markers could be used by individual athletes to personalize their training and diet regimens. We found that we could greatly expand the knowledge base of sports genetic information by using published data originally found in health and disease studies. For example, the results from large genome-wide association studies for low bone mineral density in elderly women can be re-purposed for low bone mineral density in young endurance athletes. In total, we found 124 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with: anterior cruciate ligament tear, Achilles tendon injury, low bone mineral density and stress fracture, osteoarthritis, vitamin/mineral deficiencies, and sickle cell trait. Of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, 91% have not previously been used in sports genetics. We conducted a pilot program on fourteen triathletes using this expanded knowledge base of genetic variants associated with sports injury. These athletes were genotyped and educated about how their individual genetic make-up affected their personal risk profile during an hour-long personal consultation. Overall, participants were favorable of the program, found it informative, and most acted upon their genetic results. This pilot program shows that recent genetic research provides valuable information to help reduce sports injuries and to optimize nutrition. There are many genetic studies for health and disease that can be mined to provide useful information to athletes about their individual risk for relevant injuries.

  18. Applying Personal Genetic Data to Injury Risk Assessment in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Roos, Andrew K.; Roos, Thomas R.; Hawkins, Claire; Beache, Sydney; Baur, Stephen; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified genetic markers associated with risk for certain sports-related injuries and performance-related conditions, with the hope that these markers could be used by individual athletes to personalize their training and diet regimens. We found that we could greatly expand the knowledge base of sports genetic information by using published data originally found in health and disease studies. For example, the results from large genome-wide association studies for low bone mineral density in elderly women can be re-purposed for low bone mineral density in young endurance athletes. In total, we found 124 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with: anterior cruciate ligament tear, Achilles tendon injury, low bone mineral density and stress fracture, osteoarthritis, vitamin/mineral deficiencies, and sickle cell trait. Of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, 91% have not previously been used in sports genetics. We conducted a pilot program on fourteen triathletes using this expanded knowledge base of genetic variants associated with sports injury. These athletes were genotyped and educated about how their individual genetic make-up affected their personal risk profile during an hour-long personal consultation. Overall, participants were favorable of the program, found it informative, and most acted upon their genetic results. This pilot program shows that recent genetic research provides valuable information to help reduce sports injuries and to optimize nutrition. There are many genetic studies for health and disease that can be mined to provide useful information to athletes about their individual risk for relevant injuries. PMID:25919592

  19. 76 FR 16039 - Agency Information Collection (Statement of Person Claiming To Have Stood in Relation of a Parent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Statement of Person Claiming To Have Stood in Relation of a Parent... of a Parent, VA Form 21-524. OMB Control Number: 2900-0059. Type of Review: Extension of a currently...-connected death benefits as persons who stood in the relationship of the natural parent of a...

  20. 39 CFR 912.9 - Final denial of claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final denial of claim. 912.9 Section 912.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES PROCEDURES TO ADJUDICATE CLAIMS FOR PERSONAL INJURY OR PROPERTY DAMAGE ARISING OUT OF THE OPERATION OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE § 912.9 Final denial of claim....

  1. 39 CFR 912.9 - Final denial of claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final denial of claim. 912.9 Section 912.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES PROCEDURES TO ADJUDICATE CLAIMS FOR PERSONAL INJURY OR PROPERTY DAMAGE ARISING OUT OF THE OPERATION OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE § 912.9 Final denial of claim....

  2. 39 CFR 912.9 - Final denial of claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final denial of claim. 912.9 Section 912.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES PROCEDURES TO ADJUDICATE CLAIMS FOR PERSONAL INJURY OR PROPERTY DAMAGE ARISING OUT OF THE OPERATION OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE § 912.9 Final denial of claim....

  3. 39 CFR 912.9 - Final denial of claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final denial of claim. 912.9 Section 912.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES PROCEDURES TO ADJUDICATE CLAIMS FOR PERSONAL INJURY OR PROPERTY DAMAGE ARISING OUT OF THE OPERATION OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE § 912.9 Final denial of claim....

  4. Vocational Interests of Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohe, Daniel E.; Athelstan, Gary T.

    1982-01-01

    Studied vocational interests of persons with spinal cord injury. Using the Strong Campbell Interest Inventory, participants' scores were compared to norms for men and women in general on the inventory. Showed their interests were often incongruent with their physical limitations and suggested that counselors must assist in identifying vocational…

  5. 46 CFR 204.1 - Scope and procedure for filing claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CLAIMS AGAINST THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.1 Scope and procedure... of claims against the United States, involving the Maritime Administration, under the Federal Tort Claims Act, based on death, personal injury, or damage to or loss of property. The...

  6. 46 CFR 204.1 - Scope and procedure for filing claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CLAIMS AGAINST THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.1 Scope and procedure... of claims against the United States, involving the Maritime Administration, under the Federal Tort Claims Act, based on death, personal injury, or damage to or loss of property. The...

  7. 46 CFR 204.1 - Scope and procedure for filing claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CLAIMS AGAINST THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.1 Scope and procedure... of claims against the United States, involving the Maritime Administration, under the Federal Tort Claims Act, based on death, personal injury, or damage to or loss of property. The...

  8. 46 CFR 204.1 - Scope and procedure for filing claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CLAIMS AGAINST THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.1 Scope and procedure... of claims against the United States, involving the Maritime Administration, under the Federal Tort Claims Act, based on death, personal injury, or damage to or loss of property. The...

  9. 45 CFR 35.2 - Administrative claim; when presented; place of filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 35.2 Administrative claim; when presented; place of... a claim for money damages in a sum certain for damage to or loss of property, for personal injury... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Administrative claim; when presented; place...

  10. 45 CFR 35.2 - Administrative claim; when presented; place of filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 35.2 Administrative claim; when presented; place of... a claim for money damages in a sum certain for damage to or loss of property, for personal injury... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative claim; when presented; place...

  11. 29 CFR 15.5 - Administrative claim; evidence or information to substantiate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant is required... of payment for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering prior to death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any...

  12. Empowerment of personal injury victims through the internet: design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research has shown that current claims settlement process can have a negative impact on psychological and physical recovery of personal injury (PI) victims. One of the explanations for the negative impact on health is that the claims settlement process is a stressful experience and victims suffer from renewed victimization caused by the claims settlement process. PI victims can experience a lack of information, lack of involvement, lack of 'voice', and poor communication. We present the first study that aims to empower PI victims with respect to the negative impact of the claims settlement process by means of an internet intervention. Methods/design The study is a two armed, randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which 170 PI victims are randomized to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group will get access to a website providing 1) an information module, so participants learn what is happening and what to expect during the claims settlement process, and 2) an e-coach module, so participants learn to cope with problems they experience during the claims settlement process. The control group will get access to a website with hyperlinks to commonly available information only. Participants will be recruited via a PI claims settlement office. Participants are included if they have been involved in a traffic accident which happened less than two years ago, and are at least 18 years old. The main study parameter is the increase of empowerment within the intervention group compared to the control group. Empowerment will be measured by the mastery scale and a self-efficacy scale. The secondary outcomes are perceived justice, burden, well being, work ability, knowledge, amount of damages, and lawyer-client communication. Data are collected at baseline (T0 measurement before randomization), at three months, six months, and twelve months after baseline. Analyses will be conducted according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion This

  13. A model of personality change after traumatic brain injury and the development of the Brain Injury Personality Scales

    PubMed Central

    Obonsawin, M C; Jefferis, S; Lowe, R; Crawford, J R; Fernandes, J; Holland, L; Woldt, K; Worthington, E; Bowie, G

    2007-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to develop models of personality change after traumatic brain injury (TBI) based on information provided by the TBI survivor and a significant other (SO), and to compare the models generated from the two different sources of information. Methods Individuals with and without TBI and an SO were interviewed separately about their current personality. The SOs were also interviewed about the personality of the TBI survivor before the injury. A subset of TBI survivors and their SOs were interviewed twice to assess test–retest reliability. Items which were not associated with personality change after TBI, which could not be measured reliably or which did not contribute to the model, were excluded. Results Of the 123 original items, 29 items from the interview with the survivor and 31 items from the interview with the SO were retained to form the Brain Injury Personality Scales. Separate factor analyses of ratings from each interview (survivor and SO) resulted in seven first order factors. The second order factor analyses for each interview resulted in four factors. Concordance between the information obtained from the two interviews was low. Conclusions The information obtained from the interviews with the TBI survivors and the SOs produced two models with a similar structure: three superordinate factors of personality items (affective regulation, behavioural regulation and engagement) and one superordinate factor of items relevant to mental state (restlessness and range of thought). Despite the similarity in structure, the content of the information obtained from the two interviews was different. PMID:17259352

  14. Identification of Persons with Incident Ocular Diseases Using Health Care Claims Databases

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joshua D.; Blachley, Taylor S.; Musch, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the extent to which incidence rates calculated for common ocular diseases by using claims data may be overestimated according to the length of the disease-free, look-back period used in the analysis. Design Retrospective longitudinal cohort analysis. Methods Billing records of 2457 persons continuously enrolled for 11 years in a managed-care network were searched for International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM) diagnoses of cataract, open-angle glaucoma (OAG), nonexudative age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) at eye-care visits in the first half of 2001, the second half of 2010, and 2011. For each condition, incidence rates calculated by using look-back periods ranging from 0.5 to 9 years were compared with best estimates from a gold-standard period of 9.5 years. Results With a 1-year disease-free look-back period, incidence was overestimated by 260% for cataract, 135% for OAG, 209% for ARMD, and 300% for NPDR. Expanding the disease-free “look back” period to three years resulted in a reduction of incidence overestimation to 40% for cataract, 14% for OAG, 45% for AMD, and 100% for NPDR. A 5-year look-back period yielded incidence rates overestimated by<30% for all four conditions. Conclusions In our claims-data analysis of four common ocular conditions, a disease-free interval ≤ 1 year insufficiently distinguished newly diagnosed from pre-existing disease, resulting in grossly overestimated incidence rates. Using look-back periods of 3–5 years, depending on the specific diagnosis, yielded considerably more accurate estimates of disease incidence. PMID:23972306

  15. 33 CFR 25.203 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... death, personal injury, damage to or loss of real or personal property arising from a maritime tort... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Claims payable. 25.203 Section 25.203 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL...

  16. 33 CFR 25.203 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... death, personal injury, damage to or loss of real or personal property arising from a maritime tort... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claims payable. 25.203 Section 25.203 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL...

  17. 33 CFR 25.203 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... death, personal injury, damage to or loss of real or personal property arising from a maritime tort... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Claims payable. 25.203 Section 25.203 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL...

  18. 32 CFR 750.45 - Filing claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... proper claimants: (1) U.S. citizens and inhabitants. (2) U.S. military personnel and civilian employees, except not for personal injury or death incident to service. (3) Persons in foreign countries who are not.... (2) U.S. Government agencies and departments. (c) When to file/statute of limitations. Claims...

  19. Insurance coverage for employment-related claims

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuermann, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    This article analyzes the principal coverage issues arising under CGL policies for employment-related claims. Section I discusses the bases of the duty to defend and the duty to idemnify in the key CGL policy provisions at issue, including the bodily injury and personal injury coverages. Section II examines the three provisions in CGL policies typically raised as defenses to coverage for employment-related claims and two public policy considerations that may affect claims for coverage. The duty to defend is given closer crutiny in section III. Finally, in section IV the effects of settlement on coverage are discussed. 106 refs.

  20. Tradeoffs of Using Administrative Claims and Medical Records to Identify the Use of Personalized Medicine for Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Su-Ying; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Wang, Grace; Keohane, Carol; Armstrong, Joanne; Morris, William M.; Haas, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Administrative claims and medical records are important data sources to examine healthcare utilization and outcomes. Little is known about identifying personalized medicine technologies in these sources. Objectives To describe agreement, sensitivity, and specificity of administrative claims compared to medical records for two pairs of targeted tests and treatments for breast cancer. Research Design Retrospective analysis of medical records linked to administrative claims from a large health plan. We examined whether agreement varied by factors that facilitate tracking in claims (coding and cost) and that enhance medical record completeness (records from multiple providers). Subjects Women (35 – 65 years) with incident breast cancer diagnosed in 2006–2007 (n=775). Measures Use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and gene expression profiling (GEP) testing, trastuzumab and adjuvant chemotherapy in claims and medical records. Results Agreement between claims and records was substantial for GEP, trastuzumab, and chemotherapy, and lowest for HER2 tests. GEP, an expensive test with unique billing codes, had higher agreement (91.6% vs. 75.2%), sensitivity (94.9% vs. 76.7%), and specificity (90.1% vs. 29.2%) than HER2, a test without unique billing codes. Trastuzumab, a treatment with unique billing codes, had slightly higher agreement (95.1% vs. 90%) and sensitivity (98.1% vs. 87.9%) than adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions Higher agreement and specificity were associated with services that had unique billing codes and high cost. Administrative claims may be sufficient for examining services with unique billing codes. Medical records provide better data for identifying tests lacking specific codes and for research requiring detailed clinical information. PMID:21422962

  1. The demographic and psychiatric characteristics of 110 personal injury litigants.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, B F

    1991-01-01

    One hundred ten litigants who were suing for emotional damages were assessed by the author for medical-legal reasons. Most of the plaintiffs were involved in motor vehicle accidents and suffered from "whiplash" injuries. Semi-structured interviews were used to reach criteria based on DSM-III-R diagnoses. Requests for consultation, on average, came 25 months after the patient's accident. Approximately 70 percent of patients had evidence for continuing physical injuries to account for the physical and emotional symptoms. The most common DSM-III-R diagnoses were psychiatric condition affecting physical illness (N = 56), major depression (N = 27), and somatoform disorder (N = 12). Alternative diagnoses relating the effect of the accident on the patient's life included: emotional reaction to physical condition (N = 29), difficulty coping with developmental tasks (N = 20), severe depression (N = 20), aggravation of normal premorbid personality (N = 18), aggravation of abnormal premorbid personality (N = 14), phobia (N = 7), no permanent effect (N = 12), and independent illness (N = 2). Severe emotional problems and disability are common among litigants. The causes of their suffering are more complex and less poorly understood than is assumed from the pejorative labels that are sometimes applied. Lawyers and the courts need the help of psychiatrists to understand this suffering. Empirical data such as these may lead to better classification systems and improve our understanding and treatment of these patients.

  2. Sport-related dental injury claims to the New Zealand Accident Rehabilitation & Compensation Insurance Corporation, 1993-1996: analysis of the 10 most common sports, excluding rugby union.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Carman, N; Carmichael, S; MacFadyen, E

    1998-12-01

    A large number of New Zealanders participate in sport, either formally or informally; sporting injuries are common. In New Zealand, the Accident Rehabilitation & Compensation Insurance Corporation (ACC) is the main organisation that covers sports-related dental claims. Rugby union claims are the most common. The ACC's national data from 1993 to 1996 relating to dental claims for sports injuries (excluding rugby union) were analysed. This study identified 45 other sports in which participants are also at risk for dental injuries. Total claims per sport for each year were determined, and the "top 10" sports for claims per year were identified and compared for any change over the years studied. The top 10 sports for 1993 and 1994 were, in descending order: swimming, rugby league, basketball, cricket, hockey, soccer, netball, squash, softball-baseball, and tennis. Data for 1995 and 1996 revealed a similar trend, except that touch rugby displaced tennis as the tenth-ranked sport. The most common age group for claims was the age group 10-19 years, with a male:female ratio of approximately 2:1. Many sports, in addition to rugby union, place their participants at risk of dental injury. Awareness of prevention of dental injuries should be more widely promoted for all sports.

  3. Repeat workers' compensation claims: risk factors, costs and work disability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of our study was to describe factors associated with repeat workers' compensation claims and to compare the work disability arising in workers with single and multiple compensation claims. Methods All initial injury claims lodged by persons of working age during a five year period (1996 to 2000) and any repeat claims were extracted from workers' compensation administrative data in the state of Victoria, Australia. Groups of workers with single and multiple claims were identified. Descriptive analysis of claims by affliction, bodily location, industry segment, occupation, employer and workplace was undertaken. Survival analysis determined the impact of these variables on the time between the claims. The economic impact and duration of work incapacity associated with initial and repeat claims was compared between groups. Results 37% of persons with an initial claim lodged a second claim. This group contained a significantly greater proportion of males, were younger and more likely to be employed in manual occupations and high-risk industries than those with single claims. 78% of repeat claims were for a second injury. Duration between the claims was shortest when the working conditions had not changed. The initial claims of repeat claimants resulted in significantly (p < 0.001) lower costs and work disability than the repeat claims. Conclusions A substantial proportion of injured workers experience a second occupational injury or disease. These workers pose a greater economic burden than those with single claims, and also experience a substantially greater cumulative period of work disability. There is potential to reduce the social, health and economic burden of workplace injury by enacting prevention programs targeted at these workers. PMID:21696637

  4. 20 CFR 429.104 - What evidence do I need to submit with my claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, you may be required to submit the following...) If damages for pain and suffering prior to death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain and...

  5. 40 CFR 1620.5 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering before death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the... support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may be required...

  6. 40 CFR 1620.5 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering before death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the... support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may be required...

  7. 40 CFR 1620.5 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering before death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the... support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may be required...

  8. 29 CFR 15.5 - Administrative claim; evidence or information to substantiate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant is required to submit the... for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering prior to death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs...

  9. 40 CFR 1620.5 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering before death are claimed, a physician's detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the... support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may be required...

  10. 32 CFR 536.35 - Unique issues related to environmental claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Unique issues related to environmental claims... issues related to environmental claims. Claims for property damage, personal injury, or death arising in... reported by USARCS to the Environmental Law Division of the Army Litigation Center and the...

  11. 32 CFR 536.35 - Unique issues related to environmental claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unique issues related to environmental claims... issues related to environmental claims. Claims for property damage, personal injury, or death arising in... reported by USARCS to the Environmental Law Division of the Army Litigation Center and the...

  12. 14 CFR 1261.308 - NASA officials authorized to act upon claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true NASA officials authorized to act upon claims... PROCESSING OF MONETARY CLAIMS (GENERAL) Claims Against NASA or Its Employees for Damage to or Loss of Property or Personal Injury or Death-Accruing On or After January 18, 1967 § 1261.308 NASA...

  13. 32 CFR 536.35 - Unique issues related to environmental claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the United States based on contamination by toxic substances found in the air or the ground must be... geographical jurisdiction over the claim and USARCS. Claims for personal injury from contamination frequently arise at an area that is the subject of claims for cleanup of the contamination site. The cleanup...

  14. 29 CFR 15.5 - Administrative claim; evidence or information to substantiate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Administrative claim; evidence or information to substantiate. 15.5 Section 15.5 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL... of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant is required to submit...

  15. Symptom Burden in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Kuehn, Carrie M.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Cardenas, Diane D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine (1) the frequency, severity, and reported course of 7 symptoms in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) and (2) the association between these symptoms and patient functioning. Design Postal survey. Setting Community. Intervention A survey that included measures of the frequency, severity, and recalled course of pain, fatigue, numbness, weakness, shortness of breath, vision loss, and memory loss, as well as a measure of community integration and psychologic functioning was mailed to a sample of persons with SCI. One hundred forty-seven usable surveys were returned (response rate, 43% of surveys mailed). Main Outcome Measures The frequency and average severity of each symptom was computed, and the frequencies of each type of reported course were noted. Analyses estimated the associations among the symptoms, and between symptom severity and measures of patient functioning. Results The most common symptoms were pain, weakness, fatigue, and numbness. All symptoms were reported to remain the same or to get worse more often than they were reported to improve once they began. Pain, weakness, fatigue, and memory loss were the symptoms most closely associated with patient functioning. Conclusions Patients with SCI must deal with a number of secondary complications in addition to any disability caused by the injury itself. Of 7 symptoms studied, pain, weakness, and fatigue appeared to be most common and most closely linked to patient social and mental health functioning. Research is needed to identify the causal relationships between perceived symptoms and quality of life in patients with SCI and to identify effective treatments for those symptoms shown to impact patient functioning. PMID:17466734

  16. Predictors of Personality Change Due to Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents in the First Six Months after Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Max, Jeffrey E.; Levin, Harvey S.; Landis, Julie; Schachar, Russell; Saunders, Ann; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Chapman, Sandra B.; Dennis, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the phenomenology and predictive factors of personality change due to traumatic brain injury. Method: Children (N = 177), aged 5 to 14 years with traumatic brain injury from consecutive admissions to five trauma centers, were followed prospectively at baseline and 6 months with semistructured psychiatric interviews. Injury…

  17. 10 CFR 770.9 - What conditions apply to DOE indemnification of claims against a person or entity based on the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... pollutant or contaminant attributable to DOE? 770.9 Section 770.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF... a hazardous substance or pollutant or contaminant attributable to DOE? (a) If an agreement for the... contaminant that is the basis of the claim. (d) DOE may not indemnify a person or entity for a claim...

  18. Relationship of Personality and Locus of Control With Employment Outcomes among Participants with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Broderick, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    We investigated relationships among personality, locus of control, and current post-injury employment status for 1,391 participants with spinal cord injury. Participants with higher internality locus-of-control scores and activity scores (personality) reported more favorable employment outcomes. Higher scores on chance and powerful others (locus…

  19. 48 CFR 52.247-21 - Contractor Liability for Personal Injury and/or Property Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Personal Injury and/or Property Damage. 52.247-21 Section 52.247-21 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Damage. As prescribed in 47.207-7(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts for... Damage (APR 1984) (a) The Contractor assumes responsibility for all damage or injury to persons...

  20. 48 CFR 52.247-21 - Contractor Liability for Personal Injury and/or Property Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Personal Injury and/or Property Damage. 52.247-21 Section 52.247-21 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Damage. As prescribed in 47.207-7(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts for... Damage (APR 1984) (a) The Contractor assumes responsibility for all damage or injury to persons...

  1. Towards personalized care for persons with spinal cord injury: a study on patients' perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Garrino, Lorenza; Curto, Natascia; Decorte, Rita; Felisi, Nadia; Matta, Ebe; Gregorino, Silvano; Actis, M. Vittoria; Marchisio, Cecilia; Carone, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Objective/background A newly designed Spinal Cord Unit (SCU) was set up at the Orthopedic Traumatology Center (OTC), Turin, Italy, in July 2007. With the relocation of the SCU came the need to reorganize and improve the delivery of its services. The study reported here is a preliminary part of a project entitled ‘Experimentation and evaluation of personalized healthcare for patients with spinal cord injury’, which is a component of an overarching program of targeted research into healthcare funded by the Piedmont Region in 2006. The aim of this study was to assess the perception of care by patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) by collecting important data in order to determine whether an integrated and personalized care pathway could be effective both in hospital and in a rehabilitation setting. Design Qualitative research study. The interview format was based on a narrative approach. Methods Qualitative in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 patients with SCI. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify categories and themes arising from the data. Results Six main categories emerged from the perspectives of patients: expectations of rehabilitation care, impact and welcome, relationship with nurses and their involvement in treatment, relationship with physical therapists and participation in rehabilitation programs, relationship with physicians and their availability and attendance, and imparting of information on injury and rehabilitation outcomes. Care was the aspect new patients admitted to the SCU found most important. When closer relationships with staff formed, the healthcare professionals became an essential support. Patients with SCI commonly stated that receiving explicit information was necessary for accepting their condition. Conclusions Analysis of the patients' perceptions revealed a wealth of details on their experience in the SCU and the need for flexible planning of care time in particular. Incorporating the patients

  2. Cognitive performance in hypotensive persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jegede, Adejoke B.; Rosado-Rivera, Dwindally; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher P.; Sano, Mary; Moyer, Jeremy M.; Brooks, Monifa; Wecht, Jill Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to sympathetic de-centralization, individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), especially those with tetraplegia, often present with hypotension, worsened with upright posture. Several investigations in the non-SCI population have noted a relationship between chronic hypotension and deficits in memory, attention and processing speed and delayed reaction times. Objective To determine cognitive function in persons with SCI who were normotensive or hypotensive over a 24-h observation period while maintaining their routine activities. Methods Subjects included 20 individuals with chronic SCI (2–39 years), 13 with tetraplegia (C4–8) and 7 with paraplegia (T2–11). Individuals with hypotension were defined as having a mean 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) below 110 mmHg for males and 100 mmHg for females, and having spent ≥50% of the total time below these gender-specific thresholds. The cognitive battery used included assessment of memory (CVLT), attention and processing speed (Digit Span, Stroop word and color and Oral Trails A), language (COWAT) and executive function (Oral Trails B and Stroop color–word). Results Demographic parameters did not differ among the hypotensive and normotensive groups; the proportion of individuals with tetraplegia (82%) was higher in the hypotensive group. Memory was significantly impaired (P<0.05) and there was a trend toward slowed attention and processing speed (P<0.06) in the hypotensive compared to the normotensive group. Interpretation These preliminary data suggest that chronic hypotension in persons with SCI is associated with deficits in memory and possibly attention and processing speed, as previously reported in the non-SCI population. PMID:19842013

  3. The Claim of the Personal: Narratives and Reflections in a Time of Exposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, David

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the benefits of a program where he has taught for many years. It is a program that emphasizes personal narratives drawn from memory--and that also celebrates the personal essay, which usually incorporates narrative content. The article begins by addressing concerns expressed about this form of writing. It then…

  4. Self-Esteem Differences among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed 63 people with spinal cord injury (SCI) in either their first, second, or fifth year post-injury. Results indicated that perceived levels of self-esteem decreased following the SCI. Found that self-esteem was lowest in the second year of injury. Self-esteem may be connected to loss of employment. (RJM)

  5. Who's Missing the Point? A Commentary on Claims that Autistic Persons Have a Specific Deficit in Figurative Language Comprehension.

    PubMed

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Pripas-Kapit, Sarah R

    2012-01-01

    It's become a caricature of autistic persons that they don't understand figurative language. Despite empirical evidence to the contrary, three of the four contributions to this special issue endorse this stereotype without question. And all four contributions attribute this supposed deficit to even shakier fallacies, such as the controversial claim that autistic people lack empathy or a 'theory of mind.' In this commentary, we begin by reviewing the literature more exhaustively than the other contributions, and we highlight a point that they missed: Autistic persons are likely to have difficulty comprehending figurative language if they also have difficulty comprehending language in general. There doesn't seem to be a specific deficit in figurative language unique to autism. We also tackle the claim that autistic people lack empathy. And we question the existence of a 'theory of mind area,' while demonstrating the pitfalls that ensnarl researchers when they strain to interpret differences between autistic and non-autistic brain activity as solely autistic deficits.

  6. 28 CFR 14.4 - Administrative claims; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the incident causing death, or itemized receipts of payment for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain... suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the decedent's physical...) Personal injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant...

  7. Religiosity and Spirituality among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: Attitudes, Beliefs, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; Glover-Graf, Noreen M.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 157 persons with spinal cord injury completed the "Spirituality and Spinal Cord Injury Survey" in relation to their spiritual and/or religious attitudes, beliefs, and practices in terms of adapting to their disability. Factor analysis accounting for 69% of the variance revealed four factors related to Spiritual Help and Improvement…

  8. Cardiovascular health and fitness in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lavis, Timothy D; Scelza, William M; Bockenek, William L

    2007-05-01

    There are many issues after spinal cord injury that have an impact on cardiovascular health and fitness. This article discusses many of the secondary conditions and changes that occur and how they are affected by maintenance of an active lifestyle. It also discusses many of the benefits and difficulties individuals face in maintaining a regular exercise program after spinal cord injury.

  9. An investigation of mediums who claim to give information about deceased persons.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Emily Williams; Arcangel, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Growing public interest in the phenomenon of mediumship, particularly among bereaved persons, suggests the need for renewed controlled studies of mediums, both to provide potential clients with criteria for judging mediums and to help researchers learn whether they can produce specific and accurate information to which they have had no normal access and, if so, under what conditions. Two research studies were conducted in which mediums provided readings about particular deceased persons to a proxy sitter. The real sitters then blindly rated the reading that was intended for them along with several control readings. In the first study, the results were not significant. In the second, much larger study the results were highly significant (z = -3.89, p < 0.0001, 2-tailed). The authors discuss 2 possible weaknesses of the successful study and indicate some directions for further research.

  10. 46 CFR 327.47 - Proof of amount claimed for personal injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: (a) Itemized medical, hospital, and burial bills. (b) A written report by the attending physician... written report of the claimant's physician. The Maritime Administration determines the need for this.... (d) If the claimant is employed, a written statement by the claimant's employer certifying...

  11. Nonfatal bathroom injuries among persons aged ≥15 years--United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    2011-06-10

    In 2008, approximately 21.8 million persons aged ≥15 years sustained nonfatal, unintentional injuries, resulting in approximately $67.3 billion in lifetime medical costs. Information about where injuries occur is limited, but bathrooms commonly are believed to be a particularly hazardous location. To investigate this assumption, CDC analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of emergency departments (EDs) to describe the incidence and circumstances of nonfatal injuries in bathrooms (in any setting) among persons aged ≥15 years in the United States. This report describes the results of that investigation, which found that, based on 3,339 cases documented in the 2008 National Electronic Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) database, an estimated 234,094 nonfatal bathroom injuries were treated in U.S. EDs. Injury rates increased with age, and most injuries (81.1%) were caused by falls. All persons, but especially older adults, should be aware of bathroom activities that are associated with a high risk for injury and of environmental modifications that might reduce that risk. PMID:21659980

  12. Linguistic Factors Associated with Self-Inflicted Injury in Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwell, Benjamin Park

    2009-01-01

    The present study builds on previous research, which demonstrated higher levels of depressive and interpersonal conflict language in first-person narrative accounts of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempt (SA) in borderline personality disorder. The present study was designed to examine the semantic similarity of time-sequences…

  13. 32 CFR 536.129 - Claims cognizable as UCMJ claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claims cognizable as UCMJ claims. 536.129... Justice § 536.129 Claims cognizable as UCMJ claims. Claims cognizable under Article 139, UCMJ, are limited... person to liability under Article 139, the soldier's conduct must be such as would constitute a...

  14. Differences in Affect, Life Satisfaction, and Depression between Successfully and Unsuccessfully Rehabilitated Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Martha H.; Holbert, Donald

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether persons with spinal cord injuries who were successfully rehabilitated differed from those who were not with regard to positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and depression. An ex post facto research design compared persons with spinal cord injuries who were previously employed with persons with spinal cord…

  15. 20 CFR 10.912 - What is required to establish a claim for the death gratuity payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... claimant bears the burden of proof to ensure that OWCP has the evidence needed to establish the claim. OWCP... on August 18, 2009. (b) That the injured person, at the time he or she incurred the injury or disease... injury or disease occurred and that the employee's death was causally related to that injury or...

  16. 20 CFR 10.912 - What is required to establish a claim for the death gratuity payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... claimant bears the burden of proof to ensure that OWCP has the evidence needed to establish the claim. OWCP... on August 18, 2009. (b) That the injured person, at the time he or she incurred the injury or disease... injury or disease occurred and that the employee's death was causally related to that injury or...

  17. 20 CFR 10.912 - What is required to establish a claim for the death gratuity payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... claimant bears the burden of proof to ensure that OWCP has the evidence needed to establish the claim. OWCP... on August 18, 2009. (b) That the injured person, at the time he or she incurred the injury or disease... injury or disease occurred and that the employee's death was causally related to that injury or...

  18. 14 CFR 1261.308 - NASA officials authorized to act upon claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false NASA officials authorized to act upon... PROCESSING OF MONETARY CLAIMS (GENERAL) Claims Against NASA or Its Employees for Damage to or Loss of Property or Personal Injury or Death-Accruing On or After January 18, 1967 § 1261.308 NASA...

  19. 14 CFR § 1261.308 - NASA officials authorized to act upon claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NASA officials authorized to act upon... ADMINISTRATION PROCESSING OF MONETARY CLAIMS (GENERAL) Claims Against NASA or Its Employees for Damage to or Loss of Property or Personal Injury or Death-Accruing On or After January 18, 1967 § 1261.308...

  20. 14 CFR 1261.308 - NASA officials authorized to act upon claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NASA officials authorized to act upon... PROCESSING OF MONETARY CLAIMS (GENERAL) Claims Against NASA or Its Employees for Damage to or Loss of Property or Personal Injury or Death-Accruing On or After January 18, 1967 § 1261.308 NASA...

  1. 14 CFR 1261.308 - NASA officials authorized to act upon claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NASA officials authorized to act upon... PROCESSING OF MONETARY CLAIMS (GENERAL) Claims Against NASA or Its Employees for Damage to or Loss of Property or Personal Injury or Death-Accruing On or After January 18, 1967 § 1261.308 NASA...

  2. Exercise and sport for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Jörgensen, Sophie; Stapleton, Jessica

    2012-11-01

    This review article provides an overview of the evidence that links exercise and sports participation to physical and psychological well-being among people with spinal cord injury. Two aspects of physical well-being are examined, including the prevention of chronic disease and the promotion of physical fitness. Multiple aspects of psychosocial well-being are discussed, including mental health, social participation, and life satisfaction. The review concludes with future research recommendations and a discussion of challenges and opportunities for using exercise and sports to promote health and well-being among people living with spinal cord injury.

  3. 10 CFR 770.9 - What conditions apply to DOE indemnification of claims against a person or entity based on the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pollutant or contaminant attributable to DOE? 770.9 Section 770.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What conditions apply to DOE indemnification of claims... transfer of real property for economic development contains an indemnification provision, the person...

  4. Return to Work for Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehman, Paul; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Supported employment was utilized in the vocational rehabilitation of two people with traumatic brain injury and one with a traumatic spinal cord injury. Supported employment was found to yield real work outcomes, though it required substantial amounts of money to return the three patients to relatively low-paying jobs. Funding issues are…

  5. Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poor, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews historical development of organized vocational rehabilitation programming for the spinal cord injured in the United States. Significant factors that affect vocational rehabilitation outcomes with spinal cord injured persons are listed and discussed. (Author)

  6. Community-based training and employment: an effective program for persons with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wall, J R; Niemczura, J G; Rosenthal, M

    1998-01-01

    Occupational entry is an important issue for persons with disabilities, as many become or remain unemployed after their injury. After traumatic brain injury (TBI), individuals exhibit high unemployment rates, especially those persons with injuries of greater severity, a limited premorbid work history and/or persons from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Vocational rehabilitation programs have been developed to improve employability. Traditional vocational rehabilitation approaches, based on integrating work skills with cognitive rehabilitation models have proven only minimally effective with TBI. The supported employment model has been demonstrated to be much more effective with this group, as has an approach that combines vocational and psychosocial skills training along with job support. Even with these generally successful approaches, the literature on vocational rehabilitation in clients from economically disadvantaged environments who are diagnosed with TBI is limited. An approach for the economically disadvantaged, which combines work skills training in a real work community along with supported employment is presented.

  7. On matters of causation in personal injury cases: Considerations in forensic examination

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Robert; Klar, Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatologists are often called to be independent examiners of injured claimants and to address the question: “What is causing the injured person’s symptoms?” This article deals with the legal principles that arise in these cases, including causation, convenient focus, secondary gain, and thin skull rules. We shall first set out two hypothetical scenarios of personal injury cases that set the scene for a discussion of legal principles in personal injury law. With the same two scenarios of personal injury in mind, we shall review the legal principles and the biopsychosocial models of the illnesses concerned and consider the importance of examiners going beyond diagnostic labels towards a more in-depth analysis of illness factors and mechanisms that in turn assist the trier of facts. PMID:27708902

  8. 44 CFR 11.14 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... causing death, or itemized receipts of payment for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering... pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the decedent's physical condition in the... injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may...

  9. 34 CFR 35.4 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... incident causing death, or itemized receipts of payments for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain and..., duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain and the decedent's physical condition in... injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may...

  10. 44 CFR 11.14 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... causing death, or itemized receipts of payment for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain and suffering... pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the decedent's physical condition in the... injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may...

  11. Personality Change due to Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents: Neurocognitive Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Bigler, Erin D.; Hanten, Gerri; Dennis, Maureen; Schachar, Russell J.; Saunders, Ann E.; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Chapman, Sandra B.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Yang, Tony T.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2015-01-01

    Personality Change due to traumatic brain injury (PC) in children is an important psychiatric complication of injury and is a form of severe affective dysregulation. The aim of the study was to examine neurocognitive correlates of PC. The sample included children (n=177) aged 5-14 years with traumatic brain injury from consecutive admissions to 5 trauma centers were followed prospectively at baseline and 6 months with semi-structured psychiatric interviews. Injury severity, socioeconomic status, and neurocognitive function (measures of attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, verbal working memory, executive function, naming/reading, expressive language, motor speed, and motor inhibition) were assessed with standardized instruments. Unremitted PC was present in 26/141 (18%) participants assessed at 6 months post-injury. Attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, and executive function, were significantly associated (p < .05) with PC even after socioeconomic status, injury severity, and pre-injury attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were controlled. These findings are a first step in characterizing concomitant cognitive impairments associated with PC. The results have implications beyond brain injury to potentially elucidate the neurocognitive symptom complex associated with mood instability regardless of etiology. PMID:26185905

  12. Emotional Responses to Self-Injury Imagery among Adults with Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Stacy Shaw; Linehan, Marsha M.; Sylvers, Patrick; Chittams, Jesse; Rizvi, Shireen L.

    2008-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts (SAs) are especially prevalent in borderline personality disorder. One proposed mechanism for the maintenance of NSSI and SAs is escape conditioning, whereby immediate reductions in aversive emotional states negatively reinforce the behaviors. Psychophysiological and subjective indicators of…

  13. Correlates of Depression in Adult Siblings of Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Lynch, Ruth Torkelson

    2006-01-01

    Using Pearlin's stress process model, this study examined correlates of depression in 170 adult siblings of persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Approximately 39% of adult sibling participants evinced "Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression" (CES-D; Radloff, 1977) scores indicating clinically significant depressive symptoms. Background…

  14. Family Resiliency, Family Needs, and Community Reintegration in Persons with Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frain, Julianne; Dillahunt-Aspillaga, Tina; Frain, Michael; Ehkle, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to measure predictors of community reintegration and empirically test the resiliency model of family stress, adjustment, and adaptation in persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The study also aimed to measure family needs by surveying caregiving family members through the use of the Family Needs…

  15. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 4. Individual experience, personal adaptation, and social perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stiens, S A; Bergman, S B; Formal, C S

    1997-03-01

    This learner-directed module highlights contemporary perspectives on personal success in the adjustment and adaptation of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). It is the fourth in a series of five modules within the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This module explores models of the multisystem effects on a person after SCI, disablement, theories of adjustment, patient autonomy, quality of life, community experience, adaptations enhancing sexuality, and minimization of pain after SCI. Perspectives of the patient's experience in disablement, interdisciplinary person-centered rehabilitation, and success of the individual in chosen life roles are emphasized. The module is designed to update SCI issues reviewed in past syllabi.

  16. Examining the Correlation between Objective Injury Parameters, Personality Traits, and Adjustment Measures among Burn Victims

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Oren; Domniz, Noam; Petashnick, Yoel R.; Gilboa, Dalia; Raviv, Tal; Barzilai, Liran; Farber, Nimrod; Harats, Moti; Winkler, Eyal; Haik, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Burn victims experience immense physical and mental hardship during their process of rehabilitation and regaining functionality. We examined different objective burn-related factors as well as psychological ones, in the form of personality traits that may affect the rehabilitation process and its outcome. Objective: To assess the influence and correlation of specific personality traits and objective injury-related parameters on the adjustment of burn victims post-injury. Methods: Sixty-two male patients admitted to our burn unit due to burn injuries were compared with 36 healthy male individuals by use of questionnaires to assess each group’s psychological adjustment parameters. Multivariate and hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to identify differences between the groups. Results: A significant negative correlation was found between the objective burn injury severity (e.g., total body surface area and burn depth) and the adjustment of burn victims (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, Table 3). Moreover, patients more severely injured tend to be more neurotic (p < 0.001), and less extroverted and agreeable (p < 0.01, Table 4). Conclusion: Extroverted burn victims tend to adjust better to their post-injury life while the neurotic patients tend to have difficulties adjusting. This finding may suggest new tools for early identification of maladjustment-prone patients and therefore provide them with better psychological support in a more dedicated manner. PMID:25874193

  17. Comparison of functional and medical assessment in the classification of persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, J H; Sanderson, D J

    1993-01-01

    For many reasons, persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) are classified according to a set of guidelines in which the term classification refers to a numeric value based on some selection of motor, sensory, and/or functional tests. The resulting classification is used as a means of quantifying the extent of neurological injury. Scales that focus on neurological injury (in the acute phase) differ from those that focus on functional ability (in the chronic phase). The relationship among these scales in grouping persons with SCI has not been ascertained. The purpose of the present study was to compare several classification systems within the same group of spinal cord injured subjects. Thirty subjects with traumatic SCI were classified by the same examiner and grouped according to three classification systems: 1) the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Scale; 2) the Bracken Scale; and, 3) the wheelchair basketball (BB) Sports Test. Calculation of Spearman's Rho correlation coefficients showed positive associations between the ASIA Scale and BB Sports Test (0.81). The Bracken Scale showed a negative correlation with the ASIA system (-0.66) and the BB Sports Test (-0.48). Of the three classification systems, the ASIA Scale showed the greatest discrimination in grouping subjects with SCI in both mixed (complete and incomplete), as well as incomplete injuries. It was clear that these three systems could result in different patterns of subject grouping and thus might affect the outcome of the clinical research studies.

  18. 33 CFR 25.113 - Contents of claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... General § 25.113 Contents of claim. (a) A claim under the Federal Tort Claims Act must be presented using Standard Form 95, Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death. (b) A claim under any other Act may be presented... the claim; (4) The amount claimed, supported by independent evidence of property damage or...

  19. 33 CFR 25.113 - Contents of claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... General § 25.113 Contents of claim. (a) A claim under the Federal Tort Claims Act must be presented using Standard Form 95, Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death. (b) A claim under any other Act may be presented... the claim; (4) The amount claimed, supported by independent evidence of property damage or...

  20. Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bedno, Sheryl; Hauret, Keith; Loringer, Kelly; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Mallon, Timothy; Jones, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to document risk factors for any injury and sports- and exercise-related injuries, including personal and occupational stress among active duty service members (SMs) in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. A total of 10,692 SMs completed the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members. The survey asked about demographics, personal stress and occupational stress, injuries from any cause, and participation in sports- and exercise- related activities in the past year. The survey used a complex sampling procedure to create a representative sample of SMs. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of injury outcomes with potential risk factors. 49% of SMs sought medical care for an injury in the past year and 25% sustained a sports- and exercise-related activities injury. Odds of injury were higher for the Army and Marine Corps than for the Air Force or Navy. This survey showed that higher personal and occupational stress was associated with higher risks of injury. SMs who experienced higher levels of personal or occupational stress reported higher risks of injuries. The effects of stress reduction programs on injury risks should be evaluated in military and other young physically active populations.

  1. Personality Change Due to Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents: Neurocognitive Correlates.

    PubMed

    Max, Jeffrey E; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Bigler, Erin D; Hanten, Gerri; Dennis, Maureen; Schachar, Russell J; Saunders, Ann E; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Chapman, Sandra B; Thompson, Wesley K; Yang, Tony T; Levin, Harvey S

    2015-01-01

    Personality change due to traumatic brain injury (PC) in children is an important psychiatric complication of injury and is a form of severe affective dysregulation. This study aimed to examine neurocognitive correlates of PC. The sample included 177 children 5-14 years old with traumatic brain injury who were enrolled from consecutive admissions to five trauma centers. Patients were followed up prospectively at baseline and at 6 months, and they were assessed with semistructured psychiatric interviews. Injury severity, socioeconomic status, and neurocognitive function (measures of attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, verbal working memory, executive function, naming/reading, expressive language, motor speed, and motor inhibition) were assessed with standardized instruments. Unremitted PC was present in 26 (18%) of 141 participants assessed at 6 months postinjury. Attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, and executive function were significantly associated with PC even after socioeconomic status, injury severity, and preinjury attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were controlled. These findings are a first step in characterizing concomitant cognitive impairments associated with PC. The results have implications beyond brain injury to potentially elucidate the neurocognitive symptom complex associated with mood instability regardless of etiology. PMID:26185905

  2. Personality Change Due to Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents: Neurocognitive Correlates.

    PubMed

    Max, Jeffrey E; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Bigler, Erin D; Hanten, Gerri; Dennis, Maureen; Schachar, Russell J; Saunders, Ann E; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Chapman, Sandra B; Thompson, Wesley K; Yang, Tony T; Levin, Harvey S

    2015-01-01

    Personality change due to traumatic brain injury (PC) in children is an important psychiatric complication of injury and is a form of severe affective dysregulation. This study aimed to examine neurocognitive correlates of PC. The sample included 177 children 5-14 years old with traumatic brain injury who were enrolled from consecutive admissions to five trauma centers. Patients were followed up prospectively at baseline and at 6 months, and they were assessed with semistructured psychiatric interviews. Injury severity, socioeconomic status, and neurocognitive function (measures of attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, verbal working memory, executive function, naming/reading, expressive language, motor speed, and motor inhibition) were assessed with standardized instruments. Unremitted PC was present in 26 (18%) of 141 participants assessed at 6 months postinjury. Attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, and executive function were significantly associated with PC even after socioeconomic status, injury severity, and preinjury attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were controlled. These findings are a first step in characterizing concomitant cognitive impairments associated with PC. The results have implications beyond brain injury to potentially elucidate the neurocognitive symptom complex associated with mood instability regardless of etiology.

  3. Rehabilitation Utilization following a Work-Related Traumatic Brain Injury: A Sex-Based Examination of Workers’ Compensation Claims in Victoria, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, E. Niki; Smith, Peter M.; Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Colantonio, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To report on and examine differences in the use of four types of rehabilitation services (occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychology, and speech therapy) by men and women following a work-related traumatic brain injury in Victoria, Australia; and to examine the importance of demographic, need, work-related and geographic factors in explaining these differences. Methods A retrospective cohort design was used to analyze 1786 work-related traumatic brain injury workers’ compensation claims lodged between 2004 and 2012 in Victoria, Australia. ZINB regressions were conducted for each type of rehabilitation service to examine the relationship between sex and rehabilitation use. Covariates included demographic, need-related, work-related, and geographic factors. Results Out of all claims (63% male, 37% female), 13% used occupational therapy, 23% used physiotherapy, 9% used psychology, and 2% used speech therapy at least once during the first year of service utilization. After controlling for demographic, need-related, work-related, and geographic factors, women were more likely to use physiotherapy compared to men. Men and women were equally likely to use occupational therapy and psychology services. The number of visits in the first year for each type of service did not differ between male and female users. Conclusions Our findings support a sex-based approach to studying rehabilitation utilization in work-related populations. Future research is needed to examine other factors associated with rehabilitation utilization and to determine the implications of different rehabilitation utilization patterns on health and return-to-work outcomes. PMID:26982491

  4. Agreement between insurance claim and self-reported hospital and emergency room utilization data among persons with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrea S; Lee, David W; Slezak, Julie; Berger, Jan; Patel, Hitesh; Johnson, Kenneth E

    2003-01-01

    As part of a retrospective evaluation of a diabetes management program, the agreement between self-reported and insurance claim data on hospitalization and emergency room utilization was examined. Data agreement on hospitalization or emergency room visits between the two collection modes was evaluated through the use of simple agreement proportions and the kappa agreement statistic. A total of 1,230 participant responses were studied. The proportions of patients with hospitalization or emergency room visits were indistinguishable between the self-reported and medical claims data, and kappa statistics also indicated good-to-excellent agreement between data sets. The percentages of participants whose self-reported hospitalization and emergency room utilization exactly matched data derived from insurance claims were high (89.1% and 87.2%, respectively). Furthermore, the kappa statistics of agreement for the number of hospitalizations (0.6366) and emergency room visits (0.5390) indicate good agreement between self-reported and insurance claim data. The results of this study suggest either self-reported or insurance claims data can be used to evaluate the impact of health care interventions on hospital or emergency room utilization.

  5. Environmental Factors Item Development for Persons With Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Allen W.; Magasi, Susan; Hammel, Joy; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Garcia, Sofia F.; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Lai, Jin-Shei; Tulsky, David; Gray, David B.; Hollingsworth, Holly; Jerousek, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe methods used in operationalizing environmental factors; to describe the results of a research project to develop measures of environmental factors that affect participation; and to define an initial item set of facilitators and barriers to participation after stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. Design Instrument development included an extensive literature review, item classification and selection, item writing, and cognitive testing following the approach of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System. Setting Community. Participants Content area and outcome measurement experts (n=10) contributed to instrument development; individuals (n=200) with the target conditions participated in focus groups and in cognitive testing (n=15). Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Environmental factor items were categorized in 6 domains: assistive technology; built and natural environment; social environment; services, systems, and policies; access to information and technology; and economic quality of life. Results We binned 2273 items across the 6 domains, winnowed this pool to 291 items for cognitive testing, and recommended 274 items for pilot data collection. Conclusions Five of the 6 domains correspond closely to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health taxonomy of environmental factors; the sixth domain, economic quality of life, reflects an important construct that reflects financial resources that affect participation. Testing with a new and larger sample is underway to evaluate reliability, validity, and sensitivity. PMID:24378804

  6. Cognitive Appraisals and Lived Experiences During Injury Rehabilitation: A Narrative Account Within Personal and Situational Backdrop

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jolly; Mokhtar, Abdul Halim; Abdul Karim, Samihah; Ayathupady Mohanan, Santhosh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The article highlights an athlete’s cognitive appraisals form the onset to return to play. The narrative provides how an athlete constructs a sense of self within personal and situational factors and describes the subjective experiences during rehabilitation Objectives: The study examined the cognitive appraisal and psychological response within the backdrop of personal and situational factors in an injured athlete. Patients and Methods: The study is contextualized within the injury rehabilitation experiences of a cycling national athlete aged about 18 years old who was presented with the complaint of right shoulder pain, following a right shoulder dislocation. The 22 page narrative account provided by the athlete offered a holistic and integrated account of his experiences from the onset to return to play. A six step narrative analysis was analyzed by two qualified psychologists and two medical practitioners. Results: The themes are extracted to understand what was important to the participant. The cognitive appraisal and lived experiences are discussed within three dominant themes: 1) Injury and consequences in sporting life. 2) Childhood experiences, emotions, social support. 3) Trusting relationship, behavioral outcome and hopeful future. The study indicates the influence of personal and situational factors in cognitive appraisals leading to emotional and behavioral responses during rehabilitation. Conclusions: The study demonstrates how individual experiences become a dynamic core of psychological response during injury rehabilitation. The study highlights the cognitive appraisals and, emotional upheaval to provide an understanding of how personal and situational factors affect the psychological responses of an injured athlete. Findings suggest the need to develop a holistic approach as an effective strategy in injury rehabilitation. PMID:26448849

  7. Injuries Following Segway Personal Transporter Accidents: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ashurst, John; Wagner, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    The Segway® self-balancing personal transporter has been used as a means of transport for sightseeing tourists, military, police and emergency medical personnel. Only recently have reports been published about serious injuries that have been sustained while operating this device. This case describes a 67-year-old male who sustained an oblique fracture of the shaft of the femur while using the Segway® for transportation around his community. We also present a review of the literature.

  8. 33 CFR 25.803 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollution Removal Damage Claims § 25.803 Claims payable. A claim for damage to or loss of real or personal... contractors during containment, countermeasures, cleanup, mitigation, and disposal activities under...

  9. 33 CFR 25.803 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Pollution Removal Damage Claims § 25.803 Claims payable. A claim for damage to or loss of real or personal... contractors during containment, countermeasures, cleanup, mitigation, and disposal activities under...

  10. 33 CFR 25.803 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Pollution Removal Damage Claims § 25.803 Claims payable. A claim for damage to or loss of real or personal... contractors during containment, countermeasures, cleanup, mitigation, and disposal activities under...

  11. 33 CFR 25.803 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Pollution Removal Damage Claims § 25.803 Claims payable. A claim for damage to or loss of real or personal... contractors during containment, countermeasures, cleanup, mitigation, and disposal activities under...

  12. 33 CFR 25.803 - Claims payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Pollution Removal Damage Claims § 25.803 Claims payable. A claim for damage to or loss of real or personal... contractors during containment, countermeasures, cleanup, mitigation, and disposal activities under...

  13. Outcomes of a multicomponent intervention on occupational performance in persons with unilateral acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoyas, Elisabet Huertas; Pérez, Eduardo José Pedrero; Águila Maturana, Ana M.; Mota, Gloria Rojo; Piédrola, Rosa Martínez; de Heredia Torres, Marta Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Summary Complications after unilateral acquired brain injury (ABI) can affect various areas of expertise causing (depending on the location of the lesion) impairment in occupational performance. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the concepts of occupational performance and functional independence, both before and after a multicomponent intervention including occupational therapy, in persons with unilateral brain damage. This was a longitudinal quasi-experimental pretest post-test study in a sample of 58 patients with unilateral brain injury (28 with traumatic brain injury and 30 with ischemic stroke). The patients’ level of independence was measured using the short version of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. We also measured quality of performance using the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills. The findings of this study showed that patients with injury in the right hemisphere improved more than those with left hemisphere damage (p<0.001). All the patients with ABI, especially those with right-sided injury, derived benefit from the multicomponent intervention, except in the area of motor skills. More research is needed on the specific techniques that might address such skills. PMID:27358224

  14. The thermic response to food intake in persons with thoracic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Asahara, Ryota; Yamasaki, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the influence of the level of spinal cord injury on the thermic effect of food intake (TEF) in persons with thoracic spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] Seven male subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI; age, 40 ± 6 years) and six able-bodied subjects (AB; age, 37 ± 8 years) volunteered to participate in the present study. The subjects consumed an identical test meal consisting of 7.9 kcal/kg of body weight. Energy expenditure and plasma norepinephrine concentrations were measured over a 3-hour period. [Results] The adjusted TEF at 60 min was almost the same among the three groups [AB, SCI with high thoracic cord (T5-6) injury (HSCI), and SCI with low thoracic cord (T9-12) injury (LSCI)]. Although the LSCI group had almost the same adjusted TEF at 120 min as the AB group, the adjusted TEF at 120 min of the HSCI group was significantly lower than that of the AB group. The changes in plasma norepinephrine concentration and heart rate in response to food intake were similar among the three groups. [Conclusion] SCI at the T5-6 level results in a lower TEF due to sympathetic decentralization. PMID:27190431

  15. 29 CFR 15.303 - How does a Job Corps student file a claim for loss of or damages to personal property under the WIA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED CLAIMS STATUTES Claims Arising Out of the Operation of the Job Corps § 15.303 How does a Job Corps student file a claim for loss of or damages to... the property and the circumstances that gave rise to the loss or damage. (b) All WIA claims under...

  16. 29 CFR 15.303 - How does a Job Corps student file a claim for loss of or damages to personal property under the WIA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED CLAIMS STATUTES Claims Arising Out of the Operation of the Job Corps § 15.303 How does a Job Corps student file a claim for loss of or damages to... the property and the circumstances that gave rise to the loss or damage. (b) All WIA claims under...

  17. The Italian version of the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust (BIRT) personality questionnaires: five new measures of personality change after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Basagni, Benedetta; Navarrete, Eduardo; Bertoni, Debora; Cattran, Charlotte; Mapelli, Daniela; Oddy, Michael; De Tanti, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the translation and adaptation of the BIRT personality questionnaires for the Italian population. This included the replication of validity testing and the collection of normative data. Following translation and adaptation according to cross-cultural guidelines, the questionnaires were administered as a pre-test to a sample of 20 healthy subjects and then to 10 patients. The questionnaires were then administered to 120 healthy subjects equally distributed by sex, education, and age, to collect normative data from an Italian population. The questionnaires were easily administered to both healthy subjects and patients. Statistical analysis on normative data was conducted to find the mean value for each questionnaire. This study lays the foundations for using a new instrument to assess behavioral changes after acquired brain injury on the Italian population. PMID:25981230

  18. The Italian version of the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust (BIRT) personality questionnaires: five new measures of personality change after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Basagni, Benedetta; Navarrete, Eduardo; Bertoni, Debora; Cattran, Charlotte; Mapelli, Daniela; Oddy, Michael; De Tanti, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the translation and adaptation of the BIRT personality questionnaires for the Italian population. This included the replication of validity testing and the collection of normative data. Following translation and adaptation according to cross-cultural guidelines, the questionnaires were administered as a pre-test to a sample of 20 healthy subjects and then to 10 patients. The questionnaires were then administered to 120 healthy subjects equally distributed by sex, education, and age, to collect normative data from an Italian population. The questionnaires were easily administered to both healthy subjects and patients. Statistical analysis on normative data was conducted to find the mean value for each questionnaire. This study lays the foundations for using a new instrument to assess behavioral changes after acquired brain injury on the Italian population.

  19. Enhancing primary care for persons with spinal cord injury: More than improving physical accessibility.

    PubMed

    Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    In Ontario, Canada, legislation exists that mandates that all medical practices be fully accessible by 2025, in an effort to improve access to primary care for persons with physical disabilities. The simple removal of physical barriers may not guarantee improved access to appropriate care. In this clinical note, members of an interprofessional primary care-based Mobility Clinic reflect on opportunities to improve primary care beyond just better physical accessibility for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). The importance of collaborations between funders, researchers, and clinicians are examined. Using a participatory action research model, the unique perspective of consumers and consumer networks are incorporated into the Mobility Clinic's clinical and research efforts to improve primary care for persons with SCI. PMID:26111044

  20. 29 CFR 15.41 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES (Eff. until... claim for damage to persons or property arising out of an act or omission of a student enrolled in the... of a student enrolled in the Job Corps. (b) A claim for damage to person or property hereunder...

  1. Effect of a health claim and personal characteristics on consumer acceptance of fruit juices with different concentrations of açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.).

    PubMed

    Sabbe, Sara; Verbeke, Wim; Deliza, Rosires; Matta, Virginia; Van Damme, Patrick

    2009-08-01

    This study evaluates the effect of a health claim and personal characteristics on the acceptance of two unfamiliar açaí fruit juices that have a low (40% açaí) versus a high (4% açaí) a priori overall liking. Hedonic and sensory measures as well as health- and nutrition-related attribute perceptions and purchase intention were rated before and after health information was presented. Differences in information effects due to interactions with juice type, consumer background attitudes and socio-demographics were investigated. Providing health information yielded a positive, though rather small increase, in overall liking, perceived healthiness and perceived nutritional value of both juices, as well as in their purchase intention. Sensory experiences remained predominant in the acceptance of the fruit juices, although the health claim had a stronger effect on the perceived healthiness and nutritional value of the least-liked juice. Background attitudes and socio-demographic characteristics influenced consumers' acceptance of both unfamiliar fruit juices. Health-oriented consumers were more likely to compromise on taste for an eventual health benefit, though they still preferred the best tasting juice. Consumers with a high food neophobia reported a lower liking for both unfamiliar fruit juices. Older respondents and women were more likely to accept fruit juices that claim a particular health benefit. PMID:19467277

  2. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in writing to the United States his claim or cause of action against the third person to the extent... the injury or disease for which care and treatment is being given and concerning any action...

  3. 44 CFR 11.19 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CLAIMS Administrative Claims Under Federal Tort Claims Act § 11.19... execution of (1) a “Claim for Damage or Injury,” Standard Form 95, or a claims settlement agreement, and (2... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Action on approved claim....

  4. 44 CFR 11.19 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CLAIMS Administrative Claims Under Federal Tort Claims Act § 11.19... execution of (1) a “Claim for Damage or Injury,” Standard Form 95, or a claims settlement agreement, and (2... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Action on approved claim....

  5. Who’s Missing the Point? A Commentary on Claims that Autistic Persons Have a Specific Deficit in Figurative Language Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Pripas-Kapit, Sarah R.

    2014-01-01

    It’s become a caricature of autistic persons that they don’t understand figurative language. Despite empirical evidence to the contrary, three of the four contributions to this special issue endorse this stereotype without question. And all four contributions attribute this supposed deficit to even shakier fallacies, such as the controversial claim that autistic people lack empathy or a ‘theory of mind.’ In this commentary, we begin by reviewing the literature more exhaustively than the other contributions, and we highlight a point that they missed: Autistic persons are likely to have difficulty comprehending figurative language if they also have difficulty comprehending language in general. There doesn’t seem to be a specific deficit in figurative language unique to autism. We also tackle the claim that autistic people lack empathy. And we question the existence of a ‘theory of mind area,’ while demonstrating the pitfalls that ensnarl researchers when they strain to interpret differences between autistic and non-autistic brain activity as solely autistic deficits. PMID:25339845

  6. Modulation of hand aperture during reaching in persons with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Victoria; Hayes, Heather B; Buetefisch, Cathrin; Wolf, Steven L; Trumbower, Randy D

    2014-01-01

    The intact neuromotor system prepares for object grasp by first opening the hand to an aperture that is scaled according to object size and then closing the hand around the object. After cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), hand function is significantly impaired, but the degree to which object-specific hand aperture scaling is affected remains unknown. Here we hypothesized that persons with incomplete cervical SCI have a reduced maximum hand opening capacity but exhibit novel neuromuscular coordination strategies that permit object-specific hand aperture scaling during reaching. To test this hypothesis, we measured hand kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) from seven muscles of the hand and wrist during attempts at maximum hand opening as well as reaching for four balls of different diameters. Our results showed that persons with SCI exhibited significantly reduced maximum hand aperture compared to able-bodied (AB) controls. However, persons with SCI preserved the ability to scale peak hand aperture with ball size during reaching. Persons with SCI also used distinct muscle coordination patterns that included increased co-activity of flexors and extensors at the wrist and hand compared to AB controls. These results suggest that motor planning for aperture modulation is preserved even though execution is limited by constraints on hand opening capacity and altered muscle co-activity. Thus, persons with incomplete cervical SCI may benefit from rehabilitation aimed at increasing hand opening capacity and reducing flexor-extensor co-activity at the wrist and hand. PMID:25511164

  7. Injuries Following Segway Personal Transporter Accidents: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ashurst, John; Wagner, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The Segway® self-balancing personal transporter has been used as a means of transport for sightseeing tourists, military, police and emergency medical personnel. Only recently have reports been published about serious injuries that have been sustained while operating this device. This case describes a 67-year-old male who sustained an oblique fracture of the shaft of the femur while using the Segway® for transportation around his community. We also present a review of the literature. PMID:26587093

  8. 76 FR 2755 - Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Person Claiming To Have Stood in Relation of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... relation of parents to a deceased veteran eligibility for death benefits. DATES: Written comments and... claimants seeking service-connected death benefits as persons who stood in the relationship of the...

  9. 78 FR 65450 - Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Person Claiming To Have Stood in Relation of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... relation of parents to a deceased Veteran eligibility for death benefits. DATES: Written comments and... claimants seeking service-connected death benefits as persons who stood in the relationship of the...

  10. The Impact Of Sports Activities On Quality Of Life Of Persons With A Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eminović, Fadilj; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Pavlović, Dragan; Arsić, Sladjana; Otašević, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Studying the quality of life of people with a spinal cord injury is of great importance as it allows the monitoring of both functioning and adaptation to disability. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between persons with a spinal cord injury involved in sports activities and those not involved in sports activities in relation to their quality of life and the presence of secondary health conditions (pressure ulcers, urinary infections, muscle spasms, osteoporosis, pain, kidney problems-infections, calculosis and poor circulation). Methods The study included a total of 44 participants with spinal cord injury-paraplegia of both genders; 26 of them were athletes and 18 were not athletes. The athletes were training actively for the last two years, minimally 2-3 times per week. A specially designed questionnaire, medical documentation and the Spinal Cord Injury Quality of Life Questionnaire (SCI QL-23) were used for research purposes. Chi-square test was used to analyze the differences between the groups, while multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine the differences between the sets of variables. Results Among the participants, the athletes perceived higher quality of life than the non-athletes (male gender p<0.001 and female gender p<0.05). Regarding secondary health conditions, the athletes reported the presence of less pain (p=0.034) and a subjective feeling of better circulation (p=0.023). Conclusion The implementation of sports activities significantly improves quality of life in the population of people with spinal cord injury-paraplegia. However, sports activities only partially affect secondary health conditions. PMID:27284378

  11. Needlestick injuries in an era of HIV: technical and personal aspects.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Marion; Dickinson, David

    2007-04-01

    Hospitals are workplaces in which HIV has double significance. Needlestick accidents link patients, healthcare workers and cleaning staff through the risk of occupational exposure to HIV. Additionally, concern over needlestick injuries may embody HIV stigma, discrimination and fear. This paper draws on qualitative research from a one-year case study at a large, private South African healthcare company that runs a number of hospitals across the country. Issues surrounding needlestick injuries were discussed with hospital managers, union members, infection-control nurses, health and safety representatives, HIV/AIDS counsellors, and general nursing staff. Needlestick injuries presented a complex set of technical and personal concerns. The research shows that cost-management, human rights, health and safety procedures, stigma and discrimination, and the quality of patient care are all relevant to needlestick injuries in an era of HIV. Participants' concerns focused on: establishing safety procedures, the cost and efficacy of waste disposal systems, access to post-exposure prophylaxis, legal implications, and baseline HIV tests following needlestick injuries. The last topic revealed numerous other issues, including the possibility of health workers 'legitimising' sexually acquired HIV infection by passing it off as an occupational accident. Healthcare facilities should ensure procedures that minimise occupational exposure to HIV and that minimise infection risk in the event of accidents. We propose that hospitals ought to directly encourage staff to learn their HIV status and seek disease management when needed. Likewise, better approaches to dealing with HIV stigma and discrimination are needed, especially to dispel myths of good and bad ways of contracting HIV. PMID:25875344

  12. Profile analyses of the Personality Assessment Inventory following military-related traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jan E; Cooper, Douglas B; Reid, Matthew W; Tate, David F; Lange, Rael T

    2015-05-01

    Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) profiles were examined in 160 U.S. service members (SMs) following mild-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants who sustained a mild TBI had significantly higher PAI scores than those with moderate-severe TBI on eight of the nine clinical scales examined. A two-step cluster analysis identified four PAI profiles, heuristically labeled "High Distress", "Moderate Distress", "Somatic Distress," and "No Distress". Postconcussive and posttraumatic stress symptom severity was highest for the High Distress group, followed by the Somatic and Moderate Distress groups, and the No Distress group. Profile groups differed in age, ethnicity, rank, and TBI severity. Findings indicate that meaningful patterns of behavioral and personality characteristics can be detected in active duty military SMs following TBI, which may prove useful in selecting the most efficacious rehabilitation strategies.

  13. Adaptive logic networks in rehabilitation of persons with incomplete spinal cord injury

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, W.W. |

    1995-12-31

    Persons with incomplete spinal cord injury are generally at least partially paralyzed and are often unable to walk. Manually-controlled electrical stimulation has been used to act upon nerves or muscles to cause leg movement so such persons can achieve functional walking. They use crutches or a mobile walker for support, and initiate each stimulus by pressing a button. Artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques are now making it possible to automate the process of stimulus-initiation. Supervised training of an automatic system can be based on samples of correct stimulation given by the patient or by a therapist, accompanied by data from sensors indicating the state of the person`s body and its relation to the ground during walking. A major issue is generalization, i.e. whether the result of training can be used for control at a later time or in somewhat different circumstances. As the possibilities grow for increasing the number and variety of sensors on a patient, and for easily implanting more numerous stimulation channels, the need is increasing for powerful learning systems which can automatically develop effective and safe control algorithms. This paper explains the foundations of adaptive logic networks, and illustrates how they have been used to develop an experimental walking prosthesis used in a laboratory setting. Successful generalization has been observed using parameters from training which took place minutes to days earlier.

  14. Non-suicidal self-injury: the contribution of general personality functioning.

    PubMed

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N; Lengel, Gregory J; Grant, Demond M

    2013-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a public health problem of increasing significance. The purpose of the present study was to determine if individuals with and without a history of NSSI would differ significantly on the domains and facets of the Five Factor Model (FFM) as well as the facets from the UPPS-P Impulsive Behaviour Scale. Self-report measures of personality, borderline personality disorder and NSSI were administered to an undergraduate sample (n = 211). Individuals who had engaged in NSSI had significantly elevated levels of FFM facets of neuroticism (i.e. anxiousness, angry hostility, depressiveness, self-consciousness, impulsiveness and vulnerability) and openness (i.e. aesthetics, feelings and values) and significantly lower levels of conscientiousness (i.e. order, achievement, self-discipline and deliberation). Additionally, those with an NSSI history scored higher on UPPS-P negative urgency, lack of premeditation and lack of perseverance. The knowledge gained from this study provides further support for personality's role in NSSI. This information may aid in the identification of risk factors for NSSI and assist in efforts examining interventions for NSSI that are targeted toward personality-relevant strategies. PMID:24343925

  15. Personal and environmental factors in relation to injury risk in downhill skiing.

    PubMed

    Bouter, L M; Knipschild, P G; Volovics, A

    1989-08-01

    A case-control study was conducted among Dutch downhill skiers. This article presents data on the circumstances of the accident leading to injury and on personal and environmental risk factors for both cases (n = 572) and controls (n = 576). Most accidents (84%) happened on the pistes and ski lifts were involved in about 6% of them. Bad condition of the ski run (30%) and lost balance (24%) were the direct causes most frequently mentioned. Risk seemed to be constant for particular days and moments of the day. Injury risk for the individual appeared to rise with increasing duration of exposure, although very small durations had an elevated risk as well. A relatively low risk was observed for skiers who reported to be only moderately rested (OR = 0.4) and for those who admitted a certain fear of having a ski accident (OR = 0.6). A relatively high risk was observed for the presence of icy spots (OR = 1.4), while poor visibility (OR = 0.4), the presence of clouds (OR = 0.5), and perceived coldness (OR = 0.5) were associated with a relatively low injury risk. No recommendations for prevention can be based on these results. Most factors mentioned are not open to manipulation and further quantification should involve prospective study designs and independent measurements of these factors.

  16. Differentiating Adolescent Self-Injury from Adolescent Depression: Possible Implications for Borderline Personality Development

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Sheila E.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Hsiao, Ray C.; Vasilev, Christina A.; Yaptangco, Mona; Linehan, Marsha M.; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Self-inflicted injury (SII) in adolescence marks heightened risk for suicide attempts, completed suicide, and adult psychopathology. Although several studies have revealed elevated rates of depression among adolescents who self injure, no one has compared adolescent self injury with adolescent depression on biological, self-, and informant-report markers of vulnerability and risk. Such a comparison may have important implications for treatment, prevention, and developmental models of self injury and borderline personality disorder. We used a multi-method, multi-informant approach to examine how adolescent SII differs from adolescent depression. Self-injuring, depressed, and typical adolescent females (n = 25 per group) and their mothers completed measures of psychopathology and emotion regulation, among others. In addition, we assessed electrodermal responding (EDR), a peripheral biomarker of trait impulsivity. Participants in the SII group (a) scored higher than depressed adolescents on measures of both externalizing psychopathology and emotion dysregulation, and (b) exhibited attenuated EDR, similar to patterns observed among impulsive, externalizing males. Self-injuring adolescents also scored higher on measures of borderline pathology. These findings reveal a coherent pattern of differences between self-injuring and depressed adolescent girls, consistent with theories that SII differs from depression in etiology and developmental course. PMID:22016199

  17. Disaster anxiety and self-assistance behaviours among persons with cervical cord injury in Japan: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kyo; Kitamura, Yayoi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Persons with disabilities, especially those with a severe disability, have a vague anxiety about future disasters; however, the measures of self-assistance for disaster preparedness have not been standardised. The present study aimed to describe disaster-related anxiety and behaviours related to disaster preparedness among persons who have cervical cord injury in Japan. Design Qualitative study. Setting Tokyo Metropolitan area, Japan. Participants 16 persons with cervical cord injury participated. Inclusion criteria were being 20 years old and older, being diagnosed with cervical cord injury, being able to communicate verbally, having an interest in disaster preparedness, and belonging to a self-help group of persons with cervical cord injury in the Tokyo Metropolitan area. Results Participants usually had ‘anxiety about health management’ and it became more serious once they thought about a disaster. We identified three themes in relation to their anxiety: ‘storing needed items,’ ‘staying in a safe place’ and ‘having reliable caregivers.’ We also identified three other themes that were the reasons behind these themes: ‘travel experiences,’ ‘experiences of failure’ and ‘information from peers.’ Conclusions To buffer the anxiety about health management in a disaster, it would be important for persons with cervical cord injury to store needed items, stay in a safe place and have reliable caregivers. Various daily experiences, including experiences of failure, would encourage such behaviours. PMID:27091817

  18. Measurement of the car steering wheel turning force of persons with cervical cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Mitarai, K

    1992-06-01

    Steering wheel turning force was measured in persons with cervical cord injuries for evaluation of their ability to drive a car. Seventeen subjects were divided into two groups according to their functional level: Group I (comprising 11 subjects of functional level C6) and Group II (comprising 6 subjects of functional level C7-C8). A device for hand fastening was attached to a steering wheel, which was mounted onto the rotation shaft of a Cybex machine, and the torque for turning the wheel with the right hand at a constant speed was measured. Persons with cervical cord injuries showed characteristically higher left-turning torque than right-turning torque. Mean values and standard deviation of the two groups were: 0.52 +/- 0.16 kgf-m (left-turning) and 0.40 +/- 0.12 kgf-m (right-turning) for Group I; and 0.81 +/- 0.16 kgf-m (left-turning) and 0.76 +/- 0.15 kgf-m (right-turning) for Group II. Subjects in Group I had a turning torque lower than 0.30 kgf-m (the lowest wheel turning torque shown by Japanese cars equipped with a power-steering system) at a turning angle range of between 0-135 degrees in left-turning and 45-200 degrees in right-turning.

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial of Personalized Motivational Interventions in Substance Using Patients With Facial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Vivek; Murphy, Debra A.; Zigler, Corwin; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke R.; Belin, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The proximate use of illicit drugs or alcohol (substance use) is the most common precipitator of facial injuries among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Reducing these risky behaviors could minimize adverse health sequelae and potential reinjury. The objective of our study was to test whether a culturally competent, personalized motivational intervention incorporated into surgical care could significantly reduce existing substance use behaviors in facial injury patients. Patients and Methods Substance-using subjects (n = 218) presenting with facial injuries to a level 1 trauma center were randomly assigned to either a personalized motivational intervention (PMI) condition or a health-information (HI) control condition. After a brief assessment of the individual’s substance use severity and willingness to change these behaviors, both groups attended 2 counseling sessions with a trained interventionist. The PMI subjects (n = 118) received individualized, motivational interventions, whereas the HI subjects (n = 100) received only general health information. Both groups were reassessed at 6 and 12 months postinjury, and changes in substance-use patterns were measured to assess the effects of intervention. Results The PMI and HI groups were closely matched on their sociodemographic and substance use characteristics. Subjects in the PMI group showed statistically significant declines in drug use at both the 6- and 12-month assessments. The intervention’s effect on lowering illicit drug use was greatest at the 6-month assessment but had weakened by the 1-year follow-up. The efficacy of the PMI was moderated by an individual’s initial drug use severity; individuals with greater drug use dependency at baseline were seen to have larger intervention effects, as did individuals who were most aware of their drug problem and willing to change their substance use behaviors. Unlike illicit drug use, changes in alcohol use did not differ significantly

  20. Non-suicidal self-injury with and without borderline personality disorder: differences in self-injury and diagnostic comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Turner, Brianna J; Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L; Austin, Sara B; Rodriguez, Marcus A; Zachary Rosenthal, M; Chapman, Alexander L

    2015-11-30

    Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) occurs in people with and without borderline personality disorder (BPD), few studies have compared the clinical characteristics of these two groups. The present study sampled adults with a history of NSSI and compared those with and without BPD on (a) NSSI features, (b) co-occurring psychiatric disorders, and (c) severity of depression, suicidal ideation and emotion dysregulation. Participants (NSSI+BPD, n=46; NSSI Only, n=54) completed semi-structured interviews and self-report measures. Whereas the groups did not differ in age of NSSI onset, the NSSI+BPD group engaged in more frequent, recent and severe NSSI, and reported higher rates of skin carving, head banging, self-punching and self-scratching than the NSSI Only group. Participants with BPD also showed greater diagnostic comorbidity, particularly for anxiety disorders, but did not differ from participants without BPD in rates of mood, substance or psychotic disorders. The NSSI+BPD group reported more severe depressive symptomatology, suicidal ideation and emotion dysregulation than the NSSI Only group. Supplementary analyses on the subset of participants with recent (past year) NSSI revealed similarly medium to large differences between those with and without BPD. Implications for assessment and treatment are discussed.

  1. 10 CFR 1014.4 - Administrative claims; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... incident causing death, or itemized receipts of payment for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain and... duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the decedent's physical condition... support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may be required...

  2. 10 CFR 1014.4 - Administrative claims; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... incident causing death, or itemized receipts of payment for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain and... duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the decedent's physical condition... support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may be required...

  3. 10 CFR 1014.4 - Administrative claims; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... incident causing death, or itemized receipts of payment for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain and... duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the decedent's physical condition... support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may be required...

  4. 10 CFR 1014.4 - Administrative claims; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... incident causing death, or itemized receipts of payment for such expenses. (7) If damages for pain and... duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the decedent's physical condition... support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may be required...

  5. 77 FR 73051 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Claims of U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... Compensation for Serious Personal Injuries Against the Government of Iraq and Referred to the Foreign Claims... agencies. Comments should be directed to OMB, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Attention..., as well as a brief abstract: Primary: Individuals. Other: None. Information will be used as a...

  6. 76 FR 71993 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: TSA Claims Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... period soliciting comments, of the following collection of information on March 25, 2011 (76 FR 16799... property loss or damage, a personal injury, or other damages due to the negligent or wrongful act or... circumstances, including motor vehicle accidents and employee loss. The Federal Tort Claims Act (28 U.S.C....

  7. Web-Based Specialist Support for Spinal Cord Injury Person's Care: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Della Mea, Vincenzo; Marin, Dario; Rosin, Claudio; Zampa, Agostino

    2012-01-01

    Persons with disability from spinal cord injury (SCI) are subject to high risk of pathological events and need a regular followup even after discharge from the rehabilitation hospital. To help in followup, we developed a web portal for providing online specialist as well as GP support to SCI persons. After a feasibility study with 13 subjects, the portal has been introduced in the regional healthcare network in order to make it compliant with current legal regulations on data protection, including smartcard authentication. Although a number of training courses have been made to introduce SCI persons to portal use (up to 50 users), the number of accesses remained very low. Reasons for that have been investigated by means of a questionnaire submitted to the initial feasibility study subjects and included the still easier use of telephone versus our web-based smartcard-authenticated portal, in particular, because online communications are still perceived as an unusual way of interacting with the doctor. To summarize, the overall project has been appreciated by the users, but when it is time to ask for help to, the specialist, it is still much easier to make a phone call. PMID:22934107

  8. The behavioral treatment of self-starvation and severe self-injury in a patient with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Bloxham, G; Long, C G; Alderman, N; Hollin, C R

    1993-09-01

    The successful treatment by behavioral methods of self-starvation and self-injury in a 35-year-old psychiatric in-patient, with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder, is described. An individualized program using positive and negative reinforcers to increase food and fluid intake was used, while a token economy therapeutic milieu with time out was used to decrease acts of self-injury and aggression. Progress in treatment generalized to a non-secure treatment environment, and was maintained at an 8-month follow-up. The study illustrates the differential response of active and passive self injurious behaviors to group-based and individual treatments, respectively. PMID:8188851

  9. Greatly increased prevalence of esophageal dysmotility observed in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Radulovic, M; Schilero, G J; Yen, C; Bauman, W A; Wecht, J M; Ivan, A; La Fountaine, M F; Korsten, M A

    2015-10-01

    The effects of spinal cord injury (SCI) on esophageal motility are largely unknown. Furthermore, due to the complete or partial loss of sensory innervation to the upper gastrointestinal tract, a symptom-based diagnosis of esophageal dysmotility is problematic in the SCI population. To determine the prevalence and characterize the type of motility disorders observed in persons with chronic SCI compared with that of able-bodied (AB) controls based on esophageal pressure topography isometrics acquired by high-resolution manometry and categorized by application of the Chicago Classification. High-resolution manometry of the esophagus was performed in 39 individuals: 14 AB, 12 with paraplegia (level of injury between T4-T12) and 13 with tetraplegia (level of injury between C5-C7). A catheter containing multiple pressure sensors arranged at 360° was introduced into the esophagi of subjects at a distance that allowed visualization of both the upper esophageal sphincters (UES) and lower esophageal sphincters (LES). After a period to acquire pressures at baseline, subjects were asked to perform 10 wet swallows with 5-mL boluses of isotonic saline while esophageal pressure and impedance were being recorded. No significant differences were noted for gender, age, or body mass index between AB and SCI groups. Twenty-one of 25 (84%) subjects with SCI had at least one motility abnormality: 12% with Type II achalasia, 4% with Type III achalasia, 20% with esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, 4% with the hypercontractile esophagus, and 48% with peristaltic abnormalities (weak peristalsis with small or large defects or frequent failed peristalsis). In contrast, only 7% (1 out of 14) of the AB subjects had any type of esophageal motility disorder. Despite the lack of subjective complaints and clinical awareness, esophageal dysmotility appears to be a highly prevalent condition in persons with SCI. The use of new and improved techniques, as well as a more stringent

  10. 40 CFR 10.3 - Administrative claims; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative claims; who may file. 10... CLAIMS UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 10.3 Administrative claims; who may file. (a) A claim... by any other person legally entitled to assert such a claim under applicable State law. (d) A...

  11. 34 CFR 35.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative claim; who may file. 35.3 Section 35.3... § 35.3 Administrative claim; who may file. (a) A claim for injury to or loss of property may be... assert such a claim under applicable state law. (d) A claim for loss wholly compensated by an...

  12. 10 CFR 1014.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative claim; who may file. 1014.3 Section 1014.3... § 1014.3 Administrative claim; who may file. (a) A claim for injury to or loss of property may be... to assert such a claim under the applicable State law. (d) A claim for a loss that was...

  13. 14 CFR 15.5 - Administrative claim, who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative claim, who may file. 15.5... claim, who may file. (a) A claim for injury to, or loss of, property may be presented by the owner of... assert such a claim under applicable State law. (d) A claim for loss wholly compensated by an...

  14. 32 CFR 750.44 - Claims not payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Military Claims Act § 750.44 Claims not payable. (a) Any claim for damage, loss, destruction, injury, or... Chapter. (4) Federal Tort Claims Act. 28 U.S.C. 2671, 2672, and 2674-2680. (5) International Agreements...) Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act. 33 U.S.C. 901-950. (e) Any claim for damage to or loss...

  15. 40 CFR 1620.10 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.10 Action on approved claim. (a) Payment of a... Damage, Injury or Death); a claims settlement agreement; and a Standard Form 1145 (Voucher for Payment... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Action on approved claim....

  16. 29 CFR 15.4 - Administrative claim; where to file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES Claims Against the Government Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 15.4 Administrative... executed “Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death” on Standard Form 95, or other written notification of...

  17. 40 CFR 1620.10 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.10 Action on approved claim. (a) Payment of a... Damage, Injury or Death); a claims settlement agreement; and a Standard Form 1145 (Voucher for Payment... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Action on approved claim....

  18. 40 CFR 1620.10 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.10 Action on approved claim. (a) Payment of a... Damage, Injury or Death); a claims settlement agreement; and a Standard Form 1145 (Voucher for Payment... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Action on approved claim....

  19. 40 CFR 1620.10 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.10 Action on approved claim. (a) Payment of a... Damage, Injury or Death); a claims settlement agreement; and a Standard Form 1145 (Voucher for Payment... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Action on approved claim....

  20. 5 CFR 177.110 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 177.110 Action on approved claim. (a) Payment of a... Damage, Injury or Death); a claims settlement agreement; and a Standard Form 1145 (Voucher for Payment... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Action on approved claim. 177.110...

  1. 32 CFR 750.44 - Claims not payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Military Claims Act § 750.44 Claims not payable. (a) Any claim for damage, loss, destruction, injury, or... Chapter. (4) Federal Tort Claims Act. 28 U.S.C. 2671, 2672, and 2674-2680. (5) International Agreements...) Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act. 33 U.S.C. 901-950. (e) Any claim for damage to or loss...

  2. 29 CFR 15.4 - Administrative claim; where to file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES (Eff. until 7-12-12) Claims Against the Government Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 15... section, a properly executed “Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death” on Standard Form 95, or other...

  3. 40 CFR 1620.2 - Administrative claim; when presented.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.2 Administrative claim; when presented. (a... legal representative, an executed Standard Form 95 (Claim for Damage, Injury or Death), or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages stating a sum certain (a specific...

  4. 32 CFR 750.44 - Claims not payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Military Claims Act § 750.44 Claims not payable. (a) Any claim for damage, loss, destruction, injury, or... Chapter. (4) Federal Tort Claims Act. 28 U.S.C. 2671, 2672, and 2674-2680. (5) International Agreements...) Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act. 33 U.S.C. 901-950. (e) Any claim for damage to or loss...

  5. 46 CFR 204.4 - Time limitations on claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time limitations on claims. 204.4 Section 204.4 Shipping... MARITIME ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 204.4 Time limitations on claims. (a) A claim... Standard Form 95, “Claims for Damage, Injury, or Death,” or written notification of an incident,...

  6. Simulation of traumatic brain injury symptoms on the Personality Assessment Inventory: an analogue study.

    PubMed

    Keiski, Michelle A; Shore, Douglas L; Hamilton, Joanna M; Malec, James F

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the operating characteristics of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) validity scales in distinguishing simulators feigning symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while completing the PAI (n = 84) from a clinical sample of patients with TBI who achieved adequate scores on performance validity tests (n = 112). The simulators were divided into two groups: (a) Specific Simulators feigning cognitive and somatic symptoms only or (b) Global Simulators feigning cognitive, somatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The PAI overreporting scales were indeed sensitive to the simulation of TBI symptoms in this analogue design. However, these scales were less sensitive to the feigning of somatic and cognitive TBI symptoms than the feigning of a broad range of cognitive, somatic, and emotional symptoms often associated with TBI. The relationships of TBI simulation to consistency and underreporting scales are also explored.

  7. Training Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Ambulate Using a Powered Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Pierre K; Avedissian, Manuel; Knezevic, Steven; Kornfeld, Stephen; Spungen, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons have become available for overground ambulation in persons with paralyses due to spinal cord injury (SCI) who have intact upper extremity function and are able to maintain upright balance using forearm crutches. To ambulate in an exoskeleton, the user must acquire the ability to maintain balance while standing, sitting and appropriate weight shifting with each step. This can be a challenging task for those with deficits in sensation and proprioception in their lower extremities. This manuscript describes screening criteria and a training program developed at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY to teach users the skills needed to utilize these devices in institutional, home or community environments. Before training can begin, potential users are screened for appropriate range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle joints. Persons with SCI are at an increased risk of sustaining lower extremity fractures, even with minimal strain or trauma, therefore a bone mineral density assessment is performed to reduce the risk of fracture. Also, as part of screening, a physical examination is performed in order to identify additional health-related contraindications. Once the person has successfully passed all screening requirements, they are cleared to begin the training program. The device is properly adjusted to fit the user. A series of static and dynamic balance tasks are taught and performed by the user before learning to walk. The person is taught to ambulate in various environments ranging from indoor level surfaces to outdoors over uneven or changing surfaces. Once skilled enough to be a candidate for home use with the exoskeleton, the user is then required to designate a companion-walker who will train alongside them. Together, the pair must demonstrate the ability to perform various advanced tasks in order to be permitted to use the exoskeleton in their home/community environment. PMID:27340808

  8. Training Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Ambulate Using a Powered Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Asselin, Pierre K.; Avedissian, Manuel; Knezevic, Steven; Kornfeld, Stephen; Spungen, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons have become available for overground ambulation in persons with paralyses due to spinal cord injury (SCI) who have intact upper extremity function and are able to maintain upright balance using forearm crutches. To ambulate in an exoskeleton, the user must acquire the ability to maintain balance while standing, sitting and appropriate weight shifting with each step. This can be a challenging task for those with deficits in sensation and proprioception in their lower extremities. This manuscript describes screening criteria and a training program developed at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY to teach users the skills needed to utilize these devices in institutional, home or community environments. Before training can begin, potential users are screened for appropriate range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle joints. Persons with SCI are at an increased risk of sustaining lower extremity fractures, even with minimal strain or trauma, therefore a bone mineral density assessment is performed to reduce the risk of fracture. Also, as part of screening, a physical examination is performed in order to identify additional health-related contraindications. Once the person has successfully passed all screening requirements, they are cleared to begin the training program. The device is properly adjusted to fit the user. A series of static and dynamic balance tasks are taught and performed by the user before learning to walk. The person is taught to ambulate in various environments ranging from indoor level surfaces to outdoors over uneven or changing surfaces. Once skilled enough to be a candidate for home use with the exoskeleton, the user is then required to designate a companion-walker who will train alongside them. Together, the pair must demonstrate the ability to perform various advanced tasks in order to be permitted to use the exoskeleton in their home/community environment. PMID:27340808

  9. Training Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Ambulate Using a Powered Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Pierre K; Avedissian, Manuel; Knezevic, Steven; Kornfeld, Stephen; Spungen, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons have become available for overground ambulation in persons with paralyses due to spinal cord injury (SCI) who have intact upper extremity function and are able to maintain upright balance using forearm crutches. To ambulate in an exoskeleton, the user must acquire the ability to maintain balance while standing, sitting and appropriate weight shifting with each step. This can be a challenging task for those with deficits in sensation and proprioception in their lower extremities. This manuscript describes screening criteria and a training program developed at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY to teach users the skills needed to utilize these devices in institutional, home or community environments. Before training can begin, potential users are screened for appropriate range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle joints. Persons with SCI are at an increased risk of sustaining lower extremity fractures, even with minimal strain or trauma, therefore a bone mineral density assessment is performed to reduce the risk of fracture. Also, as part of screening, a physical examination is performed in order to identify additional health-related contraindications. Once the person has successfully passed all screening requirements, they are cleared to begin the training program. The device is properly adjusted to fit the user. A series of static and dynamic balance tasks are taught and performed by the user before learning to walk. The person is taught to ambulate in various environments ranging from indoor level surfaces to outdoors over uneven or changing surfaces. Once skilled enough to be a candidate for home use with the exoskeleton, the user is then required to designate a companion-walker who will train alongside them. Together, the pair must demonstrate the ability to perform various advanced tasks in order to be permitted to use the exoskeleton in their home/community environment.

  10. Personal watercraft use by children and adolescents. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Injury and Poison Prevention.

    PubMed

    2000-02-01

    The use of personal watercraft (PWC) has increased dramatically during the past decade as have the speed and mobility of the watercraft. A similar dramatic increase in PWC-related injury and death has occurred simultaneously. No one younger than 16 years should operate a PWC. The operator and all passengers must wear US Coast Guard-approved personal flotation devices. Other safety recommendations are suggested for parents and pediatricians.

  11. Factors influencing mode of claims settlement in workers' compensation cases.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D L; Wood, G A; MacDonald, S

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the variables that influence the means by which 10,192 injured workers settled their compensation claims during 1990. The data on which this study is based come from a state in Australia where there are three means by which workers' compensation claims can be settled by lump sum payment: settlement following a specific injury payment, early settlement payment and settlement following a common law payment. This paper is specifically concerned with identifying the variables that determine whether the claim will be settled by a lump sum payment and whether different modes of claims settlement by lump sum are unique and predictable from a range of variables that include injury characteristics and demographics. The results of logistic regression modelling revealed that those who received a lump sum settlement could be reliably distinguished from those who did not receive such a payment. Each mode of settlement varied in the extent to which it could be predicted. Contrary to expectations, the most difficult form of settlement mode to predict was that of specific injury payments (4% accurate) with the most predictive being early settlement payments (81% accurate). Common law payments were also highly predictable (48% accurate). The form of lump sum payment received by injured workers was found to depend on a range of injury characteristics, indices of severity and for common law payments, gender and potential income loss. It is argued that although injury characteristics play a part in the process of claims settlement, personal circumstances and insurance company policies are influential in dictating the form by which workers compensation cases are finalized. PMID:7797315

  12. Promoting Adaptive Behavior in Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, Extensive Motor and Communication Disabilities, and Consciousness Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Badagliacca, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    These two studies extended the evidence on the use of technology-based intervention packages to promote adaptive behavior in persons with acquired brain injury and multiple disabilities. Study I involved five participants in a minimally conscious state who were provided with intervention packages based on specific arrangements of optic, tilt, or…

  13. Borderline Personality Symptoms Differentiate Non-Suicidal and Suicidal Self-Injury in Ethnically Diverse Adolescent Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Ertelt, Troy W.; Miller, Alec L.; Claes, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is little research on how specific borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms relate to suicide attempts or suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) within adolescent populations, which is important to know given the recent proposal of an NSSI disorder. Even less well known is whether specific BPD symptoms distinguish NSSI…

  14. 46 CFR 327.4 - Claim requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and all other penalty provisions for making false, fictitious, or fraudulent claims, statements or... clinical records of physicians and hospitals related to a seaman's claim for injury, illness, or death... two preceding calendar years. (5) If the claim does not involve a seaman's death, the...

  15. 46 CFR 327.4 - Claim requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and all other penalty provisions for making false, fictitious, or fraudulent claims, statements or... clinical records of physicians and hospitals related to a seaman's claim for injury, illness, or death... two preceding calendar years. (5) If the claim does not involve a seaman's death, the...

  16. Treatment of urinary tract infection in persons with spinal cord injury: guidelines, evidence, and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Pannek, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate current clinical practice in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) in SCI centers where German is spoken and to compare it with current guidelines and evidence-based standards evaluated by a literature review. Methods A standardized questionnaire was mailed to 16 SCI rehabilitation centers. The results were compared with a literature review Results Of the 16 centers, 13 responded. Indications for UTI treatment, medications, and treatment duration differed substantially among the individual centers and from the existing guidelines. Antibiotic treatment is regarded as the method of choice. Compared with the existing literature, patients in two center were undertreated, whereas they were overtreated in seven centers. Conclusion Even in specialized centers, treatment of UTI in patients with SCI is based more on personal experience of the treating physicians than on published evidence. This may at least partly be due to the paucity of evidence-based data. The observed tendency toward overtreatment with antibiotics carries substantial future risks, as this strategy may well lead to the induction of multiresistant bacterial strains. Therefore, developing guidelines would be an important step toward a unification of the different treatment strategies, thus reducing unnecessary antibiotic treatment. Furthermore, evidence-based studies evaluating the success of antibiotic treatment as well as the usefulness of alternative strategies are urgently needed. PMID:21528621

  17. Service patterns related to successful employment outcomes of persons with traumatic brain injury in vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Denise; Pereira, Ana Paula; Wu, Ming-Yi; Ho, Hanson; Chan, Fong

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzed the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) case service report (RSA-911) data for fiscal year 2004 to examine effects of demographic characteristics, work disincentives, and vocational rehabilitation services patterns on employment outcomes of persons with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). The results indicated that European Americans (53%) had appreciably higher competitive employment rates than Native American (50%), Asian Americans (44%), African Americans (42%), and Hispanic/Latino Americans (41%). Clients without co-occurring psychiatric disabilities had a higher employment rate (51%) than those with psychiatric disabilities (45%). Clients without work disincentives showed better employment outcomes (58%) than those with disincentives (45%). An important finding from this analysis was the central role of job search assistance, job placement assistance, and on-the-job support services for persons with TBI in predicting employment outcomes. A data mining technique, the exhaustive CHAID analysis, was used to examine the interaction effects of race, gender, work disincentives and service variables on employment outcomes. The results indicated that the TBI clients in this study could be segmented into 29 homogeneous subgroups with employment rates ranging from a low of 11% to a high of 82%, and these differences can be explained by differences in work disincentives, race, and rehabilitation service patterns.

  18. Reliability and validity of quantitative sensory testing in persons with spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Felix, Elizabeth R; Widerström-Noga, Eva G

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative sensory testing (QST) has been used to assess neurological function in various chronic pain patient populations. In the present study, we investigated the ability of QST to reliably characterize somatosensory dysfunction in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) and neuropathic pain by measuring mechanical, vibration, and thermal detection and pain thresholds. Test-retest reliability was determined based on data collected from 10 subjects with SCI and neuropathic pain who underwent QST on two occasions approximately 3 weeks apart. The intraclass correlation coefficients for mechanical, vibration, warm, and cool detection thresholds were in the "substantial" range, while thresholds for cold pain and hot pain demonstrated "fair" stability in this sample of patients. To determine the validity of QST in persons with SCI-related neuropathic pain, we evaluated the relationship between somatosensory thresholds and severity of neuropathic pain symptoms with multiple linear regression analysis. Thermal pain threshold was the only QST variable significantly related to the severity of neuropathic pain symptoms. The present study provides preliminary evidence that QST is a reliable and valid adjunct measurement strategy for quantifying the neurological dysfunction associated with neuropathic pain in persons with SCI.

  19. Social injury: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of the attitudes towards suicide of lay persons in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Osafo, Joseph; Hjelmeland, Heidi; Akotia, Charity Sylvia; Knizek, Birthe Loa

    2011-01-01

    One way of furthering our understanding of suicidal behaviour is to examine people's attitudes towards it and how they conceive the act. The aim of this study was to understand how lay persons conceive the impact of suicide on others and how that influences their attitudes towards suicide; and discuss the implications for suicide prevention in Ghana. This is a qualitative study, using a semi-structured interview guide to investigate the attitudes and views of 27 lay persons from urban and rural settings in Ghana. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings showed that the perceived breach of interrelatedness between people due to suicidal behaviour influenced the informants’ view of suicide as representing a social injury. Such view of suicide influenced the negative attitudes the informants expressed towards the act. The negative attitudes towards suicide in Ghana are cast in consequential terms. Thus, suicide is an immoral act because it socially affects others negatively. The sense of community within the African ethos and The Moral Causal Ontology for Suffering are theoretical postulations that are used to offer some explanations of the findings in this study. PMID:22065981

  20. 14 CFR 1261.107 - Evidence in support of claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MONETARY CLAIMS (GENERAL) Employees' Personal Property Claims § 1261.107 Evidence in support of claim. (a... repair for property which has been repaired, or one or more written estimates of the cost of repairs...

  1. Severity of urban cycling injuries and the relationship with personal, trip, route and crash characteristics: analyses using four severity metrics

    PubMed Central

    Cripton, Peter A; Shen, Hui; Brubacher, Jeff R; Chipman, Mary; Friedman, Steven M; Harris, M Anne; Winters, Meghan; Reynolds, Conor C O; Cusimano, Michael D; Babul, Shelina; Teschke, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between cycling injury severity and personal, trip, route and crash characteristics. Methods Data from a previous study of injury risk, conducted in Toronto and Vancouver, Canada, were used to classify injury severity using four metrics: (1) did not continue trip by bike; (2) transported to hospital by ambulance; (3) admitted to hospital; and (4) Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS). Multiple logistic regression was used to examine associations with personal, trip, route and crash characteristics. Results Of 683 adults injured while cycling, 528 did not continue their trip by bike, 251 were transported by ambulance and 60 were admitted to hospital for further treatment. Treatment urgencies included 75 as CTAS=1 or 2 (most medically urgent), 284 as CTAS=3, and 320 as CTAS=4 or 5 (least medically urgent). Older age and collision with a motor vehicle were consistently associated with increased severity in all four metrics and statistically significant in three each (both variables with ambulance transport and CTAS; age with hospital admission; and motor vehicle collision with did not continue by bike). Other factors were consistently associated with more severe injuries, but statistically significant in one metric each: downhill grades; higher motor vehicle speeds; sidewalks (these significant for ambulance transport); multiuse paths and local streets (both significant for hospital admission). Conclusions In two of Canada's largest cities, about one-third of the bicycle crashes were collisions with motor vehicles and the resulting injuries were more severe than in other crash circumstances, underscoring the importance of separating cyclists from motor vehicle traffic. Our results also suggest that bicycling injury severity and injury risk would be reduced on facilities that minimise slopes, have lower vehicle speeds, and that are designed for bicycling rather than shared with pedestrians. PMID:25564148

  2. Improving brain injury cognitive rehabilitation by personalized telerehabilitation services: Guttmann neuropersonal trainer.

    PubMed

    Solana, Javier; Cáceres, César; García-Molina, Alberto; Opisso, Eloy; Roig, Teresa; Tormos, José M; Gómez, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive rehabilitation aims to remediate or alleviate the cognitive deficits appearing after an episode of acquired brain injury (ABI). The purpose of this work is to describe the telerehabilitation platform called Guttmann Neuropersonal Trainer (GNPT) which provides new strategies for cognitive rehabilitation, improving efficiency and access to treatments, and to increase knowledge generation from the process. A cognitive rehabilitation process has been modeled to design and develop the system, which allows neuropsychologists to configure and schedule rehabilitation sessions, consisting of set of personalized computerized cognitive exercises grounded on neuroscience and plasticity principles. It provides remote continuous monitoring of patient's performance, by an asynchronous communication strategy. An automatic knowledge extraction method has been used to implement a decision support system, improving treatment customization. GNPT has been implemented in 27 rehabilitation centers and in 83 patients' homes, facilitating the access to the treatment. In total, 1660 patients have been treated. Usability and cost analysis methodologies have been applied to measure the efficiency in real clinical environments. The usability evaluation reveals a system usability score higher than 70 for all target users. The cost efficiency study results show a relation of 1-20 compared to face-to-face rehabilitation. GNPT enables brain-damaged patients to continue and further extend rehabilitation beyond the hospital, improving the efficiency of the rehabilitation process. It allows customized therapeutic plans, providing information to further development of clinical practice guidelines.

  3. Development and Testing of a Vaccination Message Targeted to Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries and Disorders

    PubMed Central

    LaVela, Sherri L; Cameron, Kenzie A; Priebe, Michael; Weaver, Frances M

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: Individuals with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI&D) are at high-risk of complications and death after influenza and pneumonia. Respiratory vaccinations are effective in reducing infection and complications. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a multimedia educational message developed using a strong theoretical basis and targeted consumer input to modify negative perceptions, increase knowledge, and positively influence intentions and beliefs regarding respiratory vaccinations. Methods: Veterans with SCI&D (n = 36) completed a pretest questionnaire, viewed the message, and, after a clinic visit, completed a posttest questionnaire. Mean differences were examined using paired t tests. Providers (n = 25) were surveyed about the content, comprehension, and reception of the message; response frequencies were examined. Results: Respondents showed positive changes in beliefs from pre- to posttest on multiple items related to knowledge, severity, and self efficacy and response efficacy. There were no changes in perception of personal susceptibility to these diseases. Most providers were in favor of using the message in this population. Conclusions: A brief theory-based multimedia intervention is a feasible way to improve knowledge and attitudes about respiratory vaccinations in high-risk populations. PMID:18533411

  4. Ecological validity of the WMS-III rarely missed index in personal injury litigation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Sullivan, Karen; Anderson, Debbie

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the Rarely Missed Index (RMI) to detect cognitive exaggeration in 78 nonlitigant patients (i.e., Mixed Clinical group) and 158 personal injury litigants (i.e., 20 Suspected Exaggerators, 12 Borderline Exaggerators, 126 Genuine Responders). The base rate for probable malingered neurocognitive dysfunction in the litigant sample was 12.7%. The false positive error rate of the RMI in the Genuine Responder and Mixed Clinical group ranged from 5.4% to 8.6%. Positive RMI scores were found in 25% and 41.7% of the Suspected Exaggerator and Borderline Exaggerator groups respectively. The clinical utility of the RMI to identify Suspected Exaggerators versus individuals in the Genuine Responder and Mixed Clinical groups revealed low sensitivity (sensitivity = .25), very high specificity (range = .91 to .95), moderate positive predictive power (range = .50 to .71), and moderate to high negative predictive power (range = .68 to .83). These results do not support the use of the RMI as a reliable predictor of cognitive exaggeration.

  5. Ecological validity of the WMS-III rarely missed index in personal injury litigation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Sullivan, Karen; Anderson, Debbie

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the Rarely Missed Index (RMI) to detect cognitive exaggeration in 78 nonlitigant patients (i.e., Mixed Clinical group) and 158 personal injury litigants (i.e., 20 Suspected Exaggerators, 12 Borderline Exaggerators, 126 Genuine Responders). The base rate for probable malingered neurocognitive dysfunction in the litigant sample was 12.7%. The false positive error rate of the RMI in the Genuine Responder and Mixed Clinical group ranged from 5.4% to 8.6%. Positive RMI scores were found in 25% and 41.7% of the Suspected Exaggerator and Borderline Exaggerator groups respectively. The clinical utility of the RMI to identify Suspected Exaggerators versus individuals in the Genuine Responder and Mixed Clinical groups revealed low sensitivity (sensitivity = .25), very high specificity (range = .91 to .95), moderate positive predictive power (range = .50 to .71), and moderate to high negative predictive power (range = .68 to .83). These results do not support the use of the RMI as a reliable predictor of cognitive exaggeration. PMID:15962688

  6. 39 CFR 912.5 - Administrative claim; when presented.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... representative, an executed Standard Form 95, Claim for Damage or Injury, or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a sum certain for injury to or loss of property... obtained from the local District Tort Claims Coordinator, the National Tort Center, or online at...

  7. 39 CFR 912.5 - Administrative claim; when presented.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... representative, an executed Standard Form 95, Claim for Damage or Injury, or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a sum certain for injury to or loss of property... obtained from the local District Tort Claims Coordinator, the National Tort Center, or online at...

  8. 39 CFR 912.5 - Administrative claim; when presented.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... representative, an executed Standard Form 95, Claim for Damage or Injury, or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a sum certain for injury to or loss of property... obtained from the local District Tort Claims Coordinator, the National Tort Center, or online at...

  9. 39 CFR 912.5 - Administrative claim; when presented.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... representative, an executed Standard Form 95, Claim for Damage or Injury, or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a sum certain for injury to or loss of property... obtained from the local District Tort Claims Coordinator, the National Tort Center, or online at...

  10. Injuries in high-risk persons and high-risk sports. A longitudinal study of 1818 school children.

    PubMed

    Backx, F J; Beijer, H J; Bol, E; Erich, W B

    1991-01-01

    In this Dutch population-based study we attempted to determine the incidence and severity of sports injuries occurring during different kind of sports in a longitudinal way. The study included 1818 school children aged 8 to 17 years. Over a period of 7 months, 399 sports injuries were reported in 324 youngsters. The most common types of injuries were contusions (43%) and sprains (21%). Medical attention was needed in 25% of all cases. Young basketball, handball and korfball players had a nearly 100% chance of suffering one sports injury per year. Volleyball especially had a high incidence rate in practice (6.7 in 1000 hours). Although physical education classes had a low incidence rate, there were significantly more fractures on the upper limb. Etiologically, sports-related factors were much more important than personal-bound factors. The injured youths spent more time in practice than the noninjured ones, both in organized and nonorganized sports (P less than 0.001). High-risk sports were characterized by contact, a high jump rate, and indoor activities. These three factors explained 78% of the total variance. The contact versus noncontact factor accounted for 48% of the medically treated injuries. An additional goal of this study was to explore the seasonal influence as an extrinsic environmental factor. We found that the duration of injury was increased in the spring (P less than 0.05). Specific preventive measures were formulated in order to reduce the number of new and recurring injuries and a proposal was made to implement injury prevention in school curriculums.

  11. 14 CFR 1261.312 - Action on approved claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CLAIMS (GENERAL) Claims Against NASA or Its Employees for Damage to or Loss of Property or Personal... Voucher for Payment of Tort Claims (NASA Form 616) if the claim has been acted upon pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 2473(c)(13), or a Voucher for Payment under Federal Tort Claims Act (Standard Form 1145) if the...

  12. 14 CFR 1261.312 - Action on approved claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CLAIMS (GENERAL) Claims Against NASA or Its Employees for Damage to or Loss of Property or Personal... Voucher for Payment of Tort Claims (NASA Form 616) if the claim has been acted upon pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 2473(c)(13), or a Voucher for Payment under Federal Tort Claims Act (Standard Form 1145) if the...

  13. 32 CFR 536.77 - Applicable law for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... physical injury arising from the same incident as the claim for emotional distress, or the claimant is the immediate family member of an injured party/decedent, was in the zone of danger and manifests physical... physical injuries or intentional emotional distress, but not subrogees (when claiming property loss...

  14. 32 CFR 536.77 - Applicable law for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... physical injury arising from the same incident as the claim for emotional distress, or the claimant is the immediate family member of an injured party/decedent, was in the zone of danger and manifests physical... physical injuries or intentional emotional distress, but not subrogees (when claiming property loss...

  15. 32 CFR 536.77 - Applicable law for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... physical injury arising from the same incident as the claim for emotional distress, or the claimant is the immediate family member of an injured party/decedent, was in the zone of danger and manifests physical... physical injuries or intentional emotional distress, but not subrogees (when claiming property loss...

  16. 22 CFR 304.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Administrative claim; who may file. 304.3... Procedures § 304.3 Administrative claim; who may file. (a) A claim for injury to or loss of property may be... State law. (d) A claim for loss wholly compensated by an insurer with the rights of a subrogee may...

  17. 12 CFR 793.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative claim; who may file. 793.3... Administrative claim; who may file. (a) A claim for injury to or loss of property may be presented by the owner... applicable State law. (d) A claim for loss wholly compensated by an insurer with the rights of a subrogee...

  18. 32 CFR 536.26 - Identification of a proper claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Standard Form (SF) 95 (Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death). When the claim is not presented on an SF 95... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Identification of a proper claim. 536.26 Section 536.26 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND...

  19. 31 CFR 3.2 - Filing of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INDEMNIFICATION OF DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY EMPLOYEES Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 3.2 Filing of... written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a sum certain for injury... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filing of claims. 3.2 Section...

  20. 31 CFR 3.2 - Filing of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INDEMNIFICATION OF DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY EMPLOYEES Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 3.2 Filing of... written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a sum certain for injury... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Filing of claims. 3.2 Section...

  1. 49 CFR 1005.5 - Disposition of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... thereon. (b) When settling a claim for loss or damage, a common carrier by motor vehicle of household... VOLUNTARY DISPOSITION OF LOSS AND DAMAGE CLAIMS AND PROCESSING SALVAGE § 1005.5 Disposition of claims. (a... transmitted claim for loss or damage to baggage or for loss, damage, injury, or delay to property...

  2. 29 CFR 15.104 - Where should the FTCA administrative claim be filed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 15.104 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED CLAIMS STATUTES Claims Against the Government Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 15... designated in paragraph (b) of this section, a properly executed “Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death”...

  3. 29 CFR 15.104 - Where should the FTCA administrative claim be filed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 15.104 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED CLAIMS STATUTES Claims Against the Government Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 15... designated in paragraph (b) of this section, a properly executed “Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death”...

  4. Preserved Error-Monitoring in Borderline Personality Disorder Patients with and without Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Daniel; Vilà-Balló, Adrià; Soto, Àngel; Amengual, Julià; Ribas, Joan; Torrubia, Rafael; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Marco-Pallarés, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Background The presence of non-suicidal self-injury acts in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is very prevalent. These behaviors are a public health concern and have become a poorly understood phenomenon in the community. It has been proposed that the commission of non-suicidal self-injury might be related to a failure in the brain network regulating executive functions. Previous studies have shown that BPD patients present an impairment in their capacity to monitor actions and conflicts associated with the performance of certain actions, which suppose an important aspect of cognitive control. Method We used Event Related Potentials to examine the behavioral and electrophysiological indexes associated with the error monitoring in two BPD outpatients groups (17 patients each) differentiated according to the presence or absence of non-suicidal self-injury behaviors. We also examined 17 age- and intelligence- matched healthy control participants. Results The three groups did not show significant differences in event-related potentials associated with errors (Error-Related Negativity and Pe) nor in theta power increase following errors. Conclusions This is the first study investigating the behavioral and electrophysiological error monitoring indexes in BPD patients characterized by their history of non-suicidal self-injury behaviors. Our results show that error monitoring is preserved in BPD patients and suggest that non-suicidal self-injury acts are not related to a dysfunction in the cognitive control mechanisms. PMID:26636971

  5. 27 CFR 72.32 - Interest claimed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interest claimed. 72.32 Section 72.32 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Remission or Mitigation of Forfeitures § 72.32 Interest claimed. Any person claiming an interest in...

  6. 38 CFR 14.665 - Claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... writing on VA Form 2-4760, Employee's Claim for Reimbursement for Personal Property Damaged or Lost..., children, father or mother or both, or brothers or sisters or both. Claims of survivors shall be settled... property by patients or domiciliary members, a statement as to whether a claim was filed pursuant to 38...

  7. 38 CFR 14.665 - Claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... writing on VA Form 2-4760, Employee's Claim for Reimbursement for Personal Property Damaged or Lost..., children, father or mother or both, or brothers or sisters or both. Claims of survivors shall be settled... property by patients or domiciliary members, a statement as to whether a claim was filed pursuant to 38...

  8. 38 CFR 14.665 - Claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... writing on VA Form 2-4760, Employee's Claim for Reimbursement for Personal Property Damaged or Lost..., children, father or mother or both, or brothers or sisters or both. Claims of survivors shall be settled... property by patients or domiciliary members, a statement as to whether a claim was filed pursuant to 38...

  9. 24 CFR 17.67 - Claims files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claims files. 17.67 Section 17.67... files. Each claims collection officer is responsible for obtaining current credit data about each person against whom a claim is pending in his office. The file shall be kept reasonably up to date by...

  10. The influence of personal blast protection on the distribution and severity of primary blast gut injury.

    PubMed

    Cripps, N P; Cooper, G J

    1996-03-01

    Primary blast injuries have been recognized since World War I when the most significant reported injury was to the lung. The prevalence of injury to tissues containing air was underlined by the frequency of gut blast injury in underwater explosions mostly reported during World War II. Gut injury is the most likely cause of mortality after the more immediate effects of pulmonary primary blast injury. Effective protection has been achieved for lungs exposed to short duration external blast waves by the placement of stress wave decouplers on to the thoracoabdominal wall in a pig model, thus modifying the energy coupled into the body. A combination of two densities of glass-reinforced plastic plate and Plastazote foam (GRP/PZ) effectively eliminated pulmonary injury in 17 protected animals, compared with the production of severe blast lung in nine unprotected animals (p < 0.001). Partial pulmonary protection was achieved using a plasticized lead and plastazote foam decoupling combination (PbPVC/PZ) in a further group of 10 animals. Peak incident overpressures were not significantly different in any group. Small bowel contusions were highly significantly reduced in the GRP/PZ groups when compared with unprotected animals and with PbPVC protected animals (both p < 0.001); no significant reduction was observed in the summed colonic contusion size in any protected group. Intestinal perforations were also highly significantly reduced in both GRP/PZ groups (p < 0.001). Primary pulmonary blast injury and probably small bowel injury are caused by the propagation of coupled stress waves within the body. Elimination of these injuries implies prevention of stress wave propagation. Because colonic injury was not prevented by the same protection, a different mechanism for the injury is suggested: transmission and propagation of shear waves. These findings have important implications for blast protection and the clinical management of primary blast casualties. PMID:8606411

  11. 32 CFR 756.9 - Claims by employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from non-appropriated funds. (b) Personal injury or death—(1) Personal injury or death of citizens or...) for employees of NAFIs who have suffered injury or death arising out of, and in the course of, their... substantial possibility the injury or death is covered under the Act's provisions. (2) Personal injury...

  12. 32 CFR 756.9 - Claims by employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from non-appropriated funds. (b) Personal injury or death—(1) Personal injury or death of citizens or...) for employees of NAFIs who have suffered injury or death arising out of, and in the course of, their... substantial possibility the injury or death is covered under the Act's provisions. (2) Personal injury...

  13. Body composition of active persons with spinal cord injury and with poliomyelitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study sought to evaluate the body composition of subjects with active spinal cord injuries and polio. Two groups of males and females, active, free-living, of similar ages and body mass index (BMI), were distributed according to the source of deficiency: SCI – low spinal cord injury (T5-T12) an...

  14. Relationships between Personality Disorders, Social Disturbances, and Physical Disability Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lezak, Muriel D.

    1987-01-01

    The post-injury psychosocial problems of 42 adult male head injury patients over a 3-year period were evaluated using the Portland Adaptability Inventory. In all time periods, the areas most impaired were social contact, work/school, and leisure as well as elevated frequencies of problems with anxiety, depression, and significant relationships.…

  15. Differentiating Adolescent Self-Injury from Adolescent Depression: Possible Implications for Borderline Personality Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Sheila E.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Hsiao, Ray C.; Vasilev, Christina A.; Yaptangco, Mona; Linehan, Marsha M.; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Self-inflicted injury (SII) in adolescence marks heightened risk for suicide attempts, completed suicide, and adult psychopathology. Although several studies have revealed elevated rates of depression among adolescents who self injure, no one has compared adolescent self injury with adolescent depression on biological, self-, and informant-report…

  16. Vocationally Orientated Rehabilitation Service Requests: The Case of Employed Persons Experiencing a Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda E.; Murphy, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 168 employed people who suffered spinal cord injuries found that 50% were employed after injury; 61% thought they could have benefitted from additional services such as discussion of options and follow-up on vocational issues. Dissatisfaction with employment status was related to perceived need for more services. (Contains 20…

  17. A 20-year Longitudinal Perspective on the Vocational Experiences of Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crewe, Nancy M.

    2000-01-01

    Uses interviews conducted in 1974 and 1994 to investigate the vocational experiences of individuals with spinal cord injuries. Participants had received a spinal cord injury 22-45 years previously. Results revealed that all but seven of the participants had been in remunerative employment. Work experiences, comprehensive rehabilitation service,…

  18. Time and Effort Required by Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Learn to Use a Powered Exoskeleton for Assisted Walking

    PubMed Central

    Bryce, Thomas N.; Dijkers, Marcel P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Powered exoskeletons have been demonstrated as being safe for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), but little is known about how users learn to manage these devices. Objective: To quantify the time and effort required by persons with SCI to learn to use an exoskeleton for assisted walking. Methods: A convenience sample was enrolled to learn to use the first-generation Ekso powered exoskeleton to walk. Participants were given up to 24 weekly sessions of instruction. Data were collected on assistance level, walking distance and speed, heart rate, perceived exertion, and adverse events. Time and effort was quantified by the number of sessions required for participants to stand up, walk for 30 minutes, and sit down, initially with minimal and subsequently with contact guard assistance. Results: Of 22 enrolled participants, 9 screen-failed, and 7 had complete data. All of these 7 were men; 2 had tetraplegia and 5 had motor-complete injuries. Of these, 5 participants could stand, walk, and sit with contact guard or close supervision assistance, and 2 required minimal to moderate assistance. Walk times ranged from 28 to 94 minutes with average speeds ranging from 0.11 to 0.21 m/s. For all participants, heart rate changes and reported perceived exertion were consistent with light to moderate exercise. Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidence that persons with neurological weakness due to SCI can learn to walk with little or no assistance and light to somewhat hard perceived exertion using a powered exoskeleton. Persons with different severities of injury, including those with motor complete C7 tetraplegia and motor incomplete C4 tetraplegia, may be able to learn to use this device. PMID:26364280

  19. Employment at Closure Is Associated with Enhanced Quality of Life and Subjective Well-Being for Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Martha H.; Holbert, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed whether persons with spinal cord injuries who had been successfully rehabilitated into employment following receipt of rehabilitation services had better quality of life and subjective well-being than the unsuccessfully rehabilitated who did not obtain employment following receipt of rehabilitation services. Persons who were…

  20. Cardiovascular and thoracic battle injuries in the Lebanon War. Analysis of 3,000 personal cases.

    PubMed

    Zakharia, A T

    1985-05-01

    This report comprises 3,000 casualties of the Lebanon War whom I operated upon for cardiovascular-thoracic injuries in twelve Lebanese hospitals between January, 1969, and July, 1982. These patients were studied retrospectively through 1978 and prospectively thereafter. The logistics, weapons, wounds, and operative results in this study were unique. The patients' injuries can be categorized as follows: primarily thoracic, 1,251 (42%); peripheral vascular, 1,008 (34%); cardiac, 285 (9%); and thoracic mixed, 456 (15%). The male to female ratio was 3.6:1, the mean age 20 years, and the military to civilian ratio 1.7:1. The mean transport distance was 2 miles in 1,740 patients (58%). In patients with thoracic wounds, the incidence of cardiac involvement (14%) was higher than in World War II and Vietnam. The overall survival rate in casualties with cardiac injuries was 73%--best in pericardial, coronary, and right atrial wounds and dropping to 46% in left ventricular wounds, wherein pump failure was also a factor. A 13% (seven deaths) mortality for patients with injuries to the thoracic great vessels contrasted with the 1.2% (14 deaths) mortality for the rest of the patients with noncardiac thoracic wounds. Open thoracotomy in 818 operations (55%) reflected massive wounds and logistics. Pulmonary resection (310 operations) carried a 1.9% (five deaths) mortality and tube thoracostomy (683 operations) for lesser injuries, 0.7% (four deaths.) Thoracoabdominal injuries were 1.5 times more lethal. Fifty percent (504) of nonthoracic vascular wounds occurred in the femoral-popliteal area as a result of sniper attacks. Subintimal damage averaged 8 cm and mandated saphenous vein grafts in 72%. The mortality for injury to the aorta was 60% (12 deaths), contrasted with 1% (three deaths) for injury to extremity vessels. Hemorrhage and cardiac rupture were the most frequent causes of death. Early, proficient, open surgical control after or concomitant with intensive resuscitation

  1. [Evaluation of the community integration of persons with lateralised post-acute acquired brain injury].

    PubMed

    Huertas-Hoyas, E; Pedrero-Perez, E J; Aguila-Maturana, A M; Gonzalez-Alted, C

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Hemispheric specialization is a topic of interest that has motivated an enormous amount of research in recent decades. After a unilateral brain injury, the consequences can affect various areas of specialization, leading, depending on the location of the injury, impairment in quality of life and community integration. PATIENTS AND METHODS. Cross-sectional study with a sample of 58 patients, 28 traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 30 cerebrovascular accidents, both lateralized. The level of integration in the community is measured by the Community Integration Questionnaire. RESULTS. There were three groups analyzed by considering unilateral injury (full sample, stroke sample, and TBI sample). Results showed a significantly high community integration of people with right hemisphere injury. However, to measure the level of community integration between TBI and stroke, the results showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION. According to the results of the study people with brain injury in the right hemisphere have a better community integration than people with lesions in the left hemisphere regardless of the origin of the lesions (vascular or traumatic). We discussed the reasons that may motivate the differences and clinical implications.

  2. Health Condition and Quality of Life in Persons with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    TRGOVCEVIC, Sanja; MILICEVIC, Milena; NEDOVIC, Goran; JOVANIC, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background During the last few decades, focus of rehabilitation outcome has been redirected to the lifetime monitoring of quality of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in quality of life perceptions between participants with spinal cord injury and participants of typical population. Methods This cross-sectional controlled study of 100 adults aged 18-65 years was based on two questionnaires, Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) and Spinal Cord Injury Quality of Life Questionnaire (QL-23), completed by 23 participants with paraplegia, 21 participants with tetraplegia, and 56 participants of typical population. Mann-Whitney U-test for planned comparison between groups and χ2 test were used to analyze the differences between research groups. Results Participants from control group perceived their general quality of life at higher level in comparison to participants with spinal cord injury (U=415.000, z=-5.804, P<0.000). Negative influence of spinal cord injury was detected in six domains (physical functioning, physical role, bodily pain, vitality, social functioning, mental health). Statistical differences between participants with paraplegia and participants with tetraplegia only in domain of functional limitations (U=103.000, z=-3.256, P<0.005). Conclusion The participants with spinal cord injury perceived both health-related and general quality of life at a lower level in comparison to controls. However, the injury level only partially determined the estimated quality of life. PMID:26175977

  3. 28 CFR 14.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative claim; who may file. 14.3 Section 14.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 14.3 Administrative claim; who may file. (a) A claim for injury to or loss of property may be presented by the owner of the property,...

  4. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  5. 10 CFR 770.9 - What conditions apply to DOE indemnification of claims against a person or entity based on the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What conditions apply to DOE indemnification of claims... pollutant or contaminant attributable to DOE? 770.9 Section 770.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.9 What conditions apply...

  6. 10 CFR 770.9 - What conditions apply to DOE indemnification of claims against a person or entity based on the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What conditions apply to DOE indemnification of claims... pollutant or contaminant attributable to DOE? 770.9 Section 770.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.9 What conditions apply...

  7. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 282 - Submitting a Claim

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submitting a Claim C Appendix C to Part 282.... 282, App. C Appendix C to Part 282—Submitting a Claim (a) Who May Submit a Claim. Any person (“claimant”) may submit a claim who has a demand for money or property against the Government under 31...

  8. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 282 - Submitting a Claim

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submitting a Claim C Appendix C to Part 282.... 282, App. C Appendix C to Part 282—Submitting a Claim (a) Who May Submit a Claim. Any person (“claimant”) may submit a claim who has a demand for money or property against the Government under 31...

  9. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 282 - Submitting a Claim

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submitting a Claim C Appendix C to Part 282.... 282, App. C Appendix C to Part 282—Submitting a Claim (a) Who May Submit a Claim. Any person (“claimant”) may submit a claim who has a demand for money or property against the Government under 31...

  10. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 282 - Submitting a Claim

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submitting a Claim C Appendix C to Part 282.... 282, App. C Appendix C to Part 282—Submitting a Claim (a) Who May Submit a Claim. Any person (“claimant”) may submit a claim who has a demand for money or property against the Government under 31...

  11. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 282 - Submitting a Claim

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submitting a Claim C Appendix C to Part 282.... 282, App. C Appendix C to Part 282—Submitting a Claim (a) Who May Submit a Claim. Any person (“claimant”) may submit a claim who has a demand for money or property against the Government under 31...

  12. 20 CFR 429.109 - Are there any penalties for filing false claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... claims? 429.109 Section 429.109 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES Claims Against the Government Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 429.109 Are there any penalties for filing false claims? A person who files a...

  13. 20 CFR 429.211 - Are there any penalties for filing false claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... claims? 429.211 Section 429.211 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES Claims Under the Military Personnel and Civilian Employees' Claims Act of 1964 § 429.211 Are there any penalties for filing false claims? A person who...

  14. 20 CFR 429.109 - Are there any penalties for filing false claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... claims? 429.109 Section 429.109 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES Claims Against the Government Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 429.109 Are there any penalties for filing false claims? A person who files a...

  15. 20 CFR 429.109 - Are there any penalties for filing false claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... claims? 429.109 Section 429.109 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES Claims Against the Government Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 429.109 Are there any penalties for filing false claims? A person who files a...

  16. Primary care for persons with spinal cord injury - not a novel idea but still under-developed.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H

    2016-09-01

    Primary care for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) has long been recognized as an important issue. Over the last two decades, there has not been any consensus on its contents, pathway or delivery model. Despite the lack of attention on this issue, various health care organizations and settings have successfully developed their own version of primary care for persons with SCI. On the other hand, persons with SCI have also found different ways to obtain primary care through Family Physicians and specialists, often depending on the health care structure of their country. This has blurred the line between what is traditionally seen as primary vs. specialist care. The "medical home" model may be ideal for SCI primary care, and it may be establishsed in different care settings. In order to create this model, health care funding structure, appropriate access to physical facility and SCI knowledge, interdisciplinary provider availability and collaboration, as well as active engagement with persons with SCI are necessary. The SCI community should endorse SCI primary care with effective advocacy and implementation. PMID:27463240

  17. Primary care for persons with spinal cord injury - not a novel idea but still under-developed.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H

    2016-09-01

    Primary care for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) has long been recognized as an important issue. Over the last two decades, there has not been any consensus on its contents, pathway or delivery model. Despite the lack of attention on this issue, various health care organizations and settings have successfully developed their own version of primary care for persons with SCI. On the other hand, persons with SCI have also found different ways to obtain primary care through Family Physicians and specialists, often depending on the health care structure of their country. This has blurred the line between what is traditionally seen as primary vs. specialist care. The "medical home" model may be ideal for SCI primary care, and it may be establishsed in different care settings. In order to create this model, health care funding structure, appropriate access to physical facility and SCI knowledge, interdisciplinary provider availability and collaboration, as well as active engagement with persons with SCI are necessary. The SCI community should endorse SCI primary care with effective advocacy and implementation.

  18. 5 CFR 177.102 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate OPM office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 177.102 Administrative claim... authorized agent or legal representative, an executed Standard Form 95 (Claim for Damage, Injury or Death), or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages stating a...

  19. 44 CFR 11.11 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate FEMA office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Federal Tort Claims Act § 11.11 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate FEMA office. (a) For the purpose of this part, and the provisions of the Federal Tort Claims Act a claim is deemed to have been... “Claim for Damage or Injury,” Standard Form 95, or other written notification of an incident,...

  20. 44 CFR 11.11 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate FEMA office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Tort Claims Act § 11.11 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate FEMA office. (a) For the purpose of this part, and the provisions of the Federal Tort Claims Act a claim is deemed to have been... “Claim for Damage or Injury,” Standard Form 95, or other written notification of an incident,...

  1. 33 CFR 148.221 - How do I claim, or object to a claim, that required information is privileged?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I claim, or object to a... Processing Applications General § 148.221 How do I claim, or object to a claim, that required information is... withheld because it is privileged, and any person can object to that claim. (b) Requests or objections...

  2. Personality.

    PubMed

    Funder, D C

    2001-01-01

    Personality psychology is as active today as at any point in its history. The classic psychoanalytic and trait paradigms are active areas of research, the behaviorist paradigm has evolved into a new social-cognitive paradigm, and the humanistic paradigm is a basis of current work on cross-cultural psychology. Biology and evolutionary theory have also attained the status of new paradigms for personality. Three challenges for the next generation of research are to integrate these disparate approaches to personality (particularly the trait and social-cognitive paradigms), to remedy the imbalance in the person-situation-behavior triad by conceptualizing the basic properties of situations and behaviors, and to add to personality psychology's thin inventory of basic facts concerning the relations between personality and behavior.

  3. The meaning of self-care in persons with cervical spinal cord injury in Japan: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Professionals in Japan tend to regard the individual contexts of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) as the cause of their passive participation in self-care activities or self-management. However, the meaning of self-care involves variables that interrelate with sociocultural factors. Thus, it is necessary to uncover its meaning in the perceptions of persons with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) in order not only to implement better rehabilitation but also to understand the sociocultural constraints that determine the injured person’s attitudes to self-care and long-term health outcomes. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 29 CSCI participants from fourteen municipalities of Osaka, Hyogo, and Ehime prefectures were conducted. Participants contributed diverse perspectives on rehabilitation, lay-professional and family relationships, health promotion, and body conceptions. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory approach to inter-relate categories and to develop theoretical constructions. Results Four main themes emerged from the data: rehabilitation for independence in ADLs; detachment from the body and self; embodiment; and self-management. From the participants’ point of view, rehabilitation programs in Japan aim at improving body functions for ADL performance, but provide little health education. These rehabilitation values might hinder some participants from developing self-esteem for their bodies. Moreover, socially-shaped family caregivers’ active engagement in the participants’ self-care allowed many participants to entirely rely on them for care. Through embodiment, participants found that self-care was not merely a means of independence in ADLs but also of self-management to enhance health and well-being, requiring collaborative relationships with caregivers. Conclusion Personal factors such as low motivation for self-care might be in part a reflection of social expectations of dependence for

  4. 32 CFR 842.46 - Who may file a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... other persons legally entitled to do so under applicable local law may file claims for minors' personal... so under applicable local law, may file claims based on: (1) An individual's death. (2) A cause of... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who may file a claim. 842.46 Section...

  5. Prevention Practice Differences Among Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries Who Rarely Versus Frequently Sustain Pressure Ulcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael L.; Marini, Irmo; Slate, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and not only are costly to treat but also affect the quality of life of those affected by them. Despite a plethora of literature on prevention, there are few wellness studies focusing on the practices of people who do not develop pressure ulcers. This preliminary study sought to…

  6. A Review of Behavioral Treatments for Self-Injurious Behaviors of Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Lo Vullo, Santino V.

    2008-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are considered to be among the most serious of the mental health conditions. Concomitant with many cases of ASD is intellectual disability. Further compounding the disability is the fact that both conditions are known risk factors for self-injurious behavior (SIB). To date, the most effective intervention methods,…

  7. 77 FR 3106 - Damages Received on Account of Personal Physical Injuries or Physical Sickness

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ..., damages received from a legal suit, action, or settlement agreement must be based upon ``tort or tort type..., the section 104(a)(2) exclusion was not limited to damages for physical injuries or sickness. The tort... 3106-3108] [FR Doc No: 2012-1255] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1...

  8. Behavioral Treatment for Pathological Gambling in Persons with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guercio, John M.; Johnson, Taylor; Dixon, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation examined a behavior-analytic clinical treatment package designed to reduce the pathological gambling of 3 individuals with acquired brain injury. A prior history of pathological gambling of each patient was assessed via caregiver report, psychological testing, and direct observation of gambling behavior. Using an 8-week…

  9. Change in Neuroplasticity-Related Proteins in Response to Acute Activity-Based Therapy in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Knoblach, Susan M.; Feather, Jillenne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Activity-based therapy (ABT) focuses on regaining motor and sensory function below the level of the lesion in persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI). This is accomplished through repetitive training of specific motor tasks. Research has shown that ABT may increase neuroplasticity in the rat and human spinal cord. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to examine acute alterations in neuroplasticity-related proteins during ABT in persons with SCI. Methods: Volunteers were current participants in an ABT program and consisted of 12 men and 3 women (age, 31.8 ± 10.9 years) with chronic SCI (injury duration, 63.9 ± 54.4 months). A single 2-hour bout of ABT consisted of standing load bearing, body weight-supported treadmill training, whole body vibration, and functional electrical stimulation. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and immediately after completion of each modality to determine serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), prolactin, and cortisol. Results: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures was used to examine differences in proteins over time. Results revealed baseline levels of BDNF (2.37 ± 1.41 ng/mL) that were lower than previous research has demonstrated in persons with SCI. No change in BDNF or cortisol was found, although prolactin was significantly reduced in response to ABT. Conclusion: Despite the length of the bout, acute changes in BDNF were not observed. Whether different intensities or modalities of ABT may promote acute increases in serum BDNF in individuals with SCI remains to be determined and further study is merited. PMID:25477737

  10. Personalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca Martin

    1996-01-01

    Describes how a typical high school in Huntington Beach, California, curbed disruptive student behavior by personalizing the school experience for "problem" students. Through mostly volunteer efforts, an adopt-a-kid program was initiated that matched kids' learning styles to adults' personality styles and resulted in fewer suspensions and numerous…

  11. 29 CFR 15.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Administrative claim; who may file. 15.3 Section 15.3 Labor... may file. (a) A claim for the injury to or loss of property may be presented by the owner of the... law. (d) A claim for loss wholly compensated by an insurer with the rights of a subrogee may...

  12. 32 CFR 536.22 - Claims investigative responsibility-General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., evaluation, and settlement of tort and tort-related claims for and against the United States. The provisions... involving serious injury or death or those in which property damage exceeds $50,000. A command claims... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Claims investigative responsibility-General....

  13. 32 CFR 536.22 - Claims investigative responsibility-General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., evaluation, and settlement of tort and tort-related claims for and against the United States. The provisions... involving serious injury or death or those in which property damage exceeds $50,000. A command claims... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claims investigative responsibility-General....

  14. 32 CFR 757.15 - Claims not asserted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Claims not asserted. In some cases, public policy considerations limit the DoN's assertion of claims... policies that cover the injury. (c) Employers of merchant seamen. Claims are not asserted against the... transferred to a Department of Veterans' Affairs hospital. This policy does not apply in cases where the...

  15. 32 CFR 757.15 - Claims not asserted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Claims not asserted. In some cases, public policy considerations limit the DoN's assertion of claims... policies that cover the injury. (c) Employers of merchant seamen. Claims are not asserted against the... transferred to a Department of Veterans' Affairs hospital. This policy does not apply in cases where the...

  16. 32 CFR 757.15 - Claims not asserted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Claims not asserted. In some cases, public policy considerations limit the DoN's assertion of claims... policies that cover the injury. (c) Employers of merchant seamen. Claims are not asserted against the... transferred to a Department of Veterans' Affairs hospital. This policy does not apply in cases where the...

  17. 32 CFR 757.15 - Claims not asserted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Claims not asserted. In some cases, public policy considerations limit the DoN's assertion of claims... policies that cover the injury. (c) Employers of merchant seamen. Claims are not asserted against the... transferred to a Department of Veterans' Affairs hospital. This policy does not apply in cases where the...

  18. 32 CFR 757.15 - Claims not asserted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Claims not asserted. In some cases, public policy considerations limit the DoN's assertion of claims... policies that cover the injury. (c) Employers of merchant seamen. Claims are not asserted against the... transferred to a Department of Veterans' Affairs hospital. This policy does not apply in cases where the...

  19. Pilot study of strap-based custom wheelchair seating system in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, John E; Wittig, Becky L; Payette, Mark; Goldish, Gary D; Hansen, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Custom wheelchair seats can be used to help prevent pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury. In this study, a strap-based system was evaluated in three Veterans with spinal cord injury. Interface pressure distributions were measured after transfers, wheeling, and pressure relief maneuvers and after fittings by three different therapists. We found that pressure distribution measures were not generally affected after transfers and wheeling using the strap-based wheelchair and that pressure relief maneuvers were able to be performed. Additionally, all therapists were able to customize the wheelchair seat to clinically acceptable levels in 4 to 40 min for the three subjects. Future studies can test the long-term effects of using the strap-based wheelchair seat and identifying individuals that would most benefit from a rapidly customizable wheelchair seat.

  20. Pilot study of strap-based custom wheelchair seating system in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, John E; Wittig, Becky L; Payette, Mark; Goldish, Gary D; Hansen, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Custom wheelchair seats can be used to help prevent pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury. In this study, a strap-based system was evaluated in three Veterans with spinal cord injury. Interface pressure distributions were measured after transfers, wheeling, and pressure relief maneuvers and after fittings by three different therapists. We found that pressure distribution measures were not generally affected after transfers and wheeling using the strap-based wheelchair and that pressure relief maneuvers were able to be performed. Additionally, all therapists were able to customize the wheelchair seat to clinically acceptable levels in 4 to 40 min for the three subjects. Future studies can test the long-term effects of using the strap-based wheelchair seat and identifying individuals that would most benefit from a rapidly customizable wheelchair seat. PMID:25626113

  1. BEHAVIORAL TREATMENT FOR PATHOLOGICAL GAMBLING IN PERSONS WITH ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Guercio, John M; Johnson, Taylor; Dixon, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation examined a behavior-analytic clinical treatment package designed to reduce the pathological gambling of 3 individuals with acquired brain injury. A prior history of pathological gambling of each patient was assessed via caregiver report, psychological testing, and direct observation of gambling behavior. Using an 8-week one-on-one client–patient format, a treatment program was developed in which the patient learned about the antecedents, consequences, and motivating operations that controlled the emission of gambling behavior. Data were collected on both self-report of gambling urges and behavior following therapy and during in situ gambling opportunities. The therapy program reduced urges to gamble and actual gambling for all patients. The potential of behavior-analytic therapy for reducing the pathological gambling of patients with and without brain injury is discussed. PMID:23060663

  2. Paradoxical facilitation of a free recall of nonwords in persons with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Toomela, A; Tomberg, T; Orasson, A; Tikk, A; Nõmm, M

    1999-04-01

    Brain damage is usually associated with behavioral deficits. However, there is an increasing amount of evidence that lesions of some brain regions are associated with improvements instead of impairments of certain behaviors. We report the results of a study of free recall performance in subjects with traumatic brain injury. One-fourth of the subjects displayed above-normal performance in recall of nonwords. No such facilitation was found with nine lists of words. PMID:10101040

  3. Forensic epidemiologic and biomechanical analysis of a pelvic cavity blowout injury associated with ejection from a personal watercraft (jet-ski).

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael D; Everson, Todd M; Kohles, Sean S

    2013-01-01

    Jet-propelled personal watercraft (PWC) or jet-skis have become increasingly popular. The means of propulsion of PWC, which is a jet of water forced out of small nozzle at the rear of the craft, combined with a high risk of falling off of the seat and into close proximity with the water jet stream, raise the potential for a unique type of injury mechanism. The most serious injuries associated with PWC falls are those that occur when the perineum passes in close proximity to the jet nozzle and the high-pressure water stream enters the vaginal or rectal orifice. We describe the forensic investigation into a case of an anovaginal "blowout" injury in a passenger who was ejected from the rear seat position of a PWC and subsequently suffered life-threatening injuries to the pelvic organs. The investigation included a biomechanical analysis of the injury mechanism, a summary of prior published reports of internal pelvic injuries resulting from PWC falls as well as other water sports and activities, and a comparison of the severity of the injuries resulting from differing mechanisms using the New Injury Severity Score (NISS). The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) NISS values for reported PWC injuries [not including the NISS of 38 in this case study] were 11.2 (± 9.5), while the mean value for reported water-skiing falls was half that of the PWC group at 5.6 (± 5.2). It was concluded that the analyzed injuries were unique to a PWC ejection versus other previously described non-PWC-associated water sport injuries. It is recommended that PWC manufacturers help consumers understand the potential risks to passengers with highly visible warnings and reduce injury risk with revised seat design, and/or passenger seat "deadman" switches. PMID:22925030

  4. Forensic epidemiologic and biomechanical analysis of a pelvic cavity blowout injury associated with ejection from a personal watercraft (jet-ski).

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael D; Everson, Todd M; Kohles, Sean S

    2013-01-01

    Jet-propelled personal watercraft (PWC) or jet-skis have become increasingly popular. The means of propulsion of PWC, which is a jet of water forced out of small nozzle at the rear of the craft, combined with a high risk of falling off of the seat and into close proximity with the water jet stream, raise the potential for a unique type of injury mechanism. The most serious injuries associated with PWC falls are those that occur when the perineum passes in close proximity to the jet nozzle and the high-pressure water stream enters the vaginal or rectal orifice. We describe the forensic investigation into a case of an anovaginal "blowout" injury in a passenger who was ejected from the rear seat position of a PWC and subsequently suffered life-threatening injuries to the pelvic organs. The investigation included a biomechanical analysis of the injury mechanism, a summary of prior published reports of internal pelvic injuries resulting from PWC falls as well as other water sports and activities, and a comparison of the severity of the injuries resulting from differing mechanisms using the New Injury Severity Score (NISS). The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) NISS values for reported PWC injuries [not including the NISS of 38 in this case study] were 11.2 (± 9.5), while the mean value for reported water-skiing falls was half that of the PWC group at 5.6 (± 5.2). It was concluded that the analyzed injuries were unique to a PWC ejection versus other previously described non-PWC-associated water sport injuries. It is recommended that PWC manufacturers help consumers understand the potential risks to passengers with highly visible warnings and reduce injury risk with revised seat design, and/or passenger seat "deadman" switches.

  5. 32 CFR 842.106 - Who may file a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... person legally entitled to do so under applicable local law may file a claim based on: (i) An individual... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who may file a claim. 842.106 Section 842.106... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Claims Under the National Guard Claims Act (32 U.S.C. 715) § 842.106 Who may file a...

  6. 75 FR 1301 - Damages Received on Account of Personal Physical Injuries or Physical Sickness; Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... Register on Tuesday, September 15, 2009 (74 FR 47152). Persons who wish to present oral comments at the... Revenue Building, 1111 Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC. Send submissions to: CC:PA: LPD:PR (REG... CC:PA:LPD:PR (REG-127270-06), Courier's Desk, Internal Revenue Service, 1111 Constitution Avenue,...

  7. Effect of chronic activity-based therapy on bone mineral density and bone turnover in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Harness, Eric T.; Witzke, Kara A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporosis is a severe complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Many exercise modalities are used to slow bone loss, yet their efficacy is equivocal. This study examined the effect of activity-based therapy (ABT) targeting the lower extremities on bone health in individuals with SCI. Methods Thirteen men and women with SCI (age and injury duration = 29.7 ± 7.8 and 1.9 ± 2.7 years) underwent 6 months of ABT. At baseline and after 3 and 6 months of training, blood samples were obtained to assess bone formation (serum procollagen type 1 N propeptide (PINP) and bone resorption (serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), and participants underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans to obtain total body and regional estimates of bone mineral density (BMD). Results Results demonstrated significant increases (p < 0.05) in spine BMD (+4.8 %; 1.27 ± 0.22–1.33 ± 0.24 g/cm2) and decreases (p < 0.01) in total hip BMD (−6.1 %; 0.98 ± 0.18–0.91 ± 0.16 g/cm2) from 0 to 6 months of training. BMD at the bilateral distal femur (−7.5 to −11.0 %) and proximal tibia (− 8.0 to −11.2 %) declined but was not different (p > 0.05) versus baseline. Neither PINP nor CTX was altered (p> 0.05) with training. Conclusions Chronic activity-based therapy did not reverse bone loss typically observed soon after injury, yet reductions in BMD were less than the expected magnitude of decline in lower extremity BMD in persons with recent SCI. PMID:24097172

  8. Functions of non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents and young adults with Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Naomi; Londahl-Shaller, Esme A; Piatigorsky, Auran; Fordwood, Samantha; Stuart, Barbara K; McNiel, Dale E; Klonsky, E David; Ozer, Elizabeth M; Yaeger, Alison M

    2014-05-15

    Rates of deliberate non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) increase during adolescence and young adulthood, particularly in clinical samples, making these important developmental stages for understanding the functions of NSSI. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) symptoms also begin to emerge in adolescence, though little research has examined relationships between BPD symptoms and the functions of NSSI in youth, the primary goal of the present study. Adolescents and young adults recruited from an outpatient psychotherapy clinic (N=36) endorsed a range of NSSI functions on the Inventory of Statements about Self-Injury (Klonsky and Glenn, 2009). Participants engaged in NSSI to serve intrapersonal functions (e.g., regulate affect, punish oneself) more frequently than interpersonal functions (e.g., bond with peers, establish autonomy). As predicted, linear regression analyses indicated that BPD affective dysregulation symptoms were associated with the intrapersonal but not the interpersonal functions of NSSI. In contrast, BPD interpersonal dysfunction symptoms were differentially associated with the interpersonal rather than intrapersonal functions of NSSI. These preliminary data indicate that clusters of BPD symptoms show unique relationships with functions of NSSI in treatment-seeking adolescents and young adults, relationships that can be used to target specific functions of NSSI in treatment planning.

  9. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... service with the Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent... the other provisions of this subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident... authorized places. Claims may be allowable for damage to, or loss of, property arising from fire,...

  10. 5 CFR 180.107 - Claims procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Claims procedure. 180.107 Section 180.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY... General Counsel, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E Street NW., Washington, DC 20415. Claims shall...

  11. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent or wrongful act or... subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident to service with the Department... excluded: (1) Property or damage in quarters or other authorized places. Claims may be allowable for...

  12. Adaptation of computerized posturography to assess seated balance in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Noam Y.; Asselin, Pierre K.; Fineberg, Drew B.; Pisano, Thomas J.; Bauman, William A.; Spungen, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to retain or improve seated balance function after spinal cord injury (SCI) may mean the difference between independence and requiring assistance for basic activities of daily living. Compared with assessments of standing and walking balance, seated balance assessments remain relatively underemphasized and under-utilized. Objective To optimize tools for assessing seated balance deficits and recovery in SCI. Design Cross-sectional observational study of different methods for assessing seated balance function. Setting Veterans Affairs Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury. Participants Seven able-bodied volunteers, seven participants with chronic motor-complete thoracic SCI. Interventions A computerized pressure-plate apparatus designed for testing standing balance was adapted into a seated balance assessment system. Outcome measures Seated section of Berg Balance Scale; modified functional reach test; and two posturography tests: limits of stability and clinical test of sensory integration on balance. Results Seated posturography demonstrated improved correlation with neurological level of lesion compared to that of routinely applied subjective clinical tests. Conclusion Seated posturography represents an appealing outcome measure that may be applied toward the measurement of functional changes in response to various rehabilitation interventions in individuals with paralysis. PMID:23809527

  13. 22 CFR 304.12 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Action on approved claim. 304.12 Section 304.12 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 304.12... execution of (1) a “Claim for Damage or Injury,” Standard From 95; and (2) a “Voucher for Payment,”...

  14. 22 CFR 304.12 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Action on approved claim. 304.12 Section 304.12 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 304.12... execution of (1) a “Claim for Damage or Injury,” Standard From 95; and (2) a “Voucher for Payment,”...

  15. 22 CFR 304.12 - Action on approved claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Action on approved claim. 304.12 Section 304.12 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 304.12... execution of (1) a “Claim for Damage or Injury,” Standard From 95; and (2) a “Voucher for Payment,”...

  16. Estimating dollar-value outcomes of workman`s compensation claims using radial basis function networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, M.F. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) maintains a national data base of outcomes of workers` compensation claims. We consider whether a radial basis function network can predict the total dollar value of a claim based upon medical and demographic indicators (MDI`s). This work used data from 12,130 workers` compensation claims collected over a period of four years from the state of New Mexico. Two problems were addressed: (1) How well can the total incurred medical expense for all claims be predicted from available MDI`s? For individual claims? (2) How well can the duration of disability be predicted from available MDI`s? The available features intuitively correlated with total medical cost were selected, including type of injury, part of body injured, person`s age at time of injury, gender, marital status, etc. These features were statistically standardized and sorted by correlation with outcome valuation. Principal component analysis was applied. A radial basis function neural network was applied to the feature sets in both supervised and unsupervised training modes. For sets used in training, individual case valuations could consistently be predicted to within $1000 over 98% of the time. For these sets, it was possible to predict total medical expense for the training sets themselves to within 10%. When applied as blind tests against sets which were NOT part of the training data, the prediction was within 15% on the whole sets. Results on individual cases were very poor in only 30% of the cases were the predictions for the training sets within $1000 of their actual valuations. Single-factor analysis suggested that the presence of an attorney strongly decorrelated the data. A simple stratification was performed to remove cases involving attorneys and contested claims, and the procedures above repeated. Preliminary results based upon the very limited effort applied indicate that NCCI data support population estimates, but not single-point estimates.

  17. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form in National Guard Soldiers Screening Positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Thuras, Paul; Reddy, Madhavi K.

    2011-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF) was administered to 251 National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from deployment to Iraq. Soldiers were also administered questionnaires to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). On the basis of responses to the…

  18. 41 CFR 303-70.700 - When an employee dies as a result of personal injury sustained while in the performance of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation who is not described in paragraph (a); or (c) A Customs and Border... Management Federal Travel Regulation System PAYMENT OF EXPENSES CONNECTED WITH THE DEATH OF CERTAIN EMPLOYEES... a result of personal injury sustained while in the performance of the employee's law...

  19. 41 CFR 303-70.700 - When an employee dies as a result of personal injury sustained while in the performance of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... law enforcement officer as defined in 5 U.S.C. 5541; (b) An employee in or under the Federal Bureau of... Management Federal Travel Regulation System PAYMENT OF EXPENSES CONNECTED WITH THE DEATH OF CERTAIN EMPLOYEES... a result of personal injury sustained while in the performance of the employee's law...

  20. 41 CFR 303-70.700 - When an employee dies as a result of personal injury sustained while in the performance of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... law enforcement officer as defined in 5 U.S.C. 5541; (b) An employee in or under the Federal Bureau of... Management Federal Travel Regulation System PAYMENT OF EXPENSES CONNECTED WITH THE DEATH OF CERTAIN EMPLOYEES... a result of personal injury sustained while in the performance of the employee's law...

  1. Evaluation of a Community Reintegration Outpatient Program Service for Community-Dwelling Persons with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Patricia; Hébert, Debbie; Hitzig, Sander L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a community reintegration outpatient (CROP) service for promoting well-being and community participation following spinal cord injury (SCI). Participants. Community-dwelling adults (N = 14) with traumatic and nontraumatic SCI. Interventions. The CROP service is a 12-week (1 × week; 120 minutes) interprofessional closed therapeutic education service. Main Outcome Measure(s). Moorong Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES); Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA); Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS); Coping Inventory of Stressful Situations (CISS); World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF); semistructured qualitative interviews. Methods. Twenty-one participants were recruited from two subsequent CROP services, with only 14 persons completing all data assessments. Data were collected at baseline (week 0), at exit (week 12), and at a three-month follow-up. Semistructured interviews were conducted at exit. Results. Self-efficacy (MSES) and positive affect (PANAS) improved from baseline to exit (P < .05), but the changes were not maintained at follow-up. Qualitative analysis identified four major themes related to therapeutic benefits: (1) role of self; (2) knowledge acquisition; (3) skill application; and (4) group processes. Conclusions. Participation in a therapeutic education service has the potential to improve well-being in persons with SCI, but there is a need to identify strategies to maintain long-term gains. PMID:25574397

  2. Alternating stimulation of synergistic muscles during functional electrical stimulation cycling improves endurance in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Decker, M J; Griffin, L; Abraham, L D; Brandt, L

    2010-12-01

    Therapeutic effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) are limited by high rates of muscular fatigue. FES-cycling performance limits and surface mechanomyography (MMG) of 12 persons with SCI were compared under two different stimulation protocols of the quadriceps muscles. One strategy used the standard "co-activation" protocol from the manufacturer of the FES cycle which involved intermittent simultaneous activation of the entire quadriceps muscle group for 400 ms. The other strategy was an "alternation" stimulation protocol which involved alternately stimulating the rectus femoris (RF) muscle for 100 ms and the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles for 100 ms, with two sets with a 400 ms burst. Thus, during the alternation protocol, each of the muscle groups rested for two 100 ms "off" periods in each 400 ms burst. There was no difference in average cycling cadence (28 RPM) between the two protocols. The alternation stimulation protocol produced longer ride times and longer virtual distances traveled and used lower stimulation intensity levels with no differences in average MMG amplitudes compared to the co-activation protocol. These results demonstrate that FES-cycling performance can be enhanced by a synergistic muscle alternation stimulation strategy. PMID:20708950

  3. Alternating stimulation of synergistic muscles during functional electrical stimulation cycling improves endurance in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Decker, M J; Griffin, L; Abraham, L D; Brandt, L

    2010-12-01

    Therapeutic effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) are limited by high rates of muscular fatigue. FES-cycling performance limits and surface mechanomyography (MMG) of 12 persons with SCI were compared under two different stimulation protocols of the quadriceps muscles. One strategy used the standard "co-activation" protocol from the manufacturer of the FES cycle which involved intermittent simultaneous activation of the entire quadriceps muscle group for 400 ms. The other strategy was an "alternation" stimulation protocol which involved alternately stimulating the rectus femoris (RF) muscle for 100 ms and the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles for 100 ms, with two sets with a 400 ms burst. Thus, during the alternation protocol, each of the muscle groups rested for two 100 ms "off" periods in each 400 ms burst. There was no difference in average cycling cadence (28 RPM) between the two protocols. The alternation stimulation protocol produced longer ride times and longer virtual distances traveled and used lower stimulation intensity levels with no differences in average MMG amplitudes compared to the co-activation protocol. These results demonstrate that FES-cycling performance can be enhanced by a synergistic muscle alternation stimulation strategy.

  4. Use of telerehabilitation to manage pressure ulcers in persons with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Vesmarovich, S; Walker, T; Hauber, R P; Temkin, A; Burns, R

    1999-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common and serious secondary complication of spinal cord injury. In addition to being costly and difficult to treat, pressure ulcers may interfere with many aspects of patient and family life, including the ability to meet educational, vocational, and social goals. Treatment of pressure ulcers includes weekly assessment by a clinician, a requirement that often is impossible for clients to meet. In an effort to improve outcomes in wound care treatment, a rehabilitation center undertook an exploratory project to determine whether wound care via telerehabilitation was a viable alternative to clinic visits. Telerehabilitation is the use of telecommunication technology to deliver rehabilitation services at a distance. Eight patients being followed in the outpatient clinic participated in the project. The Picasso Still-Image Videophone was used to capture and send images from the patients' homes to the clinic. Findings from the exploratory study demonstrated that pressure ulcers can be successfully managed via telerehabilitation. PMID:10655800

  5. Telephone and In-Person Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depression after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Vannoy, Steven; Dyer, Joshua; Ludman, Evette; Dikmen, Sureyya; Marshall, Kenneth; Barber, Jason; Temkin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Major depressive disorder (MDD) is prevalent after traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is a lack of evidence regarding effective treatment approaches. We conducted a choice-stratified randomized controlled trial in 100 adults with MDD within 10 years of complicated mild to severe TBI to test the effectiveness of brief cognitive behavioral therapy administered over the telephone (CBT-T) (n=40) or in-person (CBT-IP) (n=18), compared with usual care (UC) (n=42). Participants were recruited from clinical and community settings throughout the United States. The main outcomes were change in depression severity on the clinician-rated 17 item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and the patient-reported Symptom Checklist-20 (SCL-20) over 16 weeks. There was no significant difference between the combined CBT and UC groups over 16 weeks on the HAMD-17 (treatment effect=1.2, 95% CI: −1.5–4.0; p=0.37) and a nonsignificant trend favoring CBT on the SCL-20 (treatment effect=0.28, 95% CI: −0.03–0.59; p=0.074). In follow-up comparisons, the CBT-T group had significantly more improvement on the SCL-20 than the UC group (treatment effect=0.36, 95% CI: 0.01–0.70; p=0.043) and completers of eight or more CBT sessions had significantly improved SCL-20 scores compared with the UC group (treatment effect=0.43, 95% CI: 0.10–0.76; p=0.011). CBT participants reported significantly more symptom improvement (p=0.010) and greater satisfaction with depression care (p<0.001), than did the UC group. In-person and telephone-administered CBT are acceptable and feasible in persons with TBI. Although further research is warranted, telephone CBT holds particular promise for enhancing access and adherence to effective depression treatment. PMID:25072405

  6. Telephone and in-person cognitive behavioral therapy for major depression after traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fann, Jesse R; Bombardier, Charles H; Vannoy, Steven; Dyer, Joshua; Ludman, Evette; Dikmen, Sureyya; Marshall, Kenneth; Barber, Jason; Temkin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is prevalent after traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is a lack of evidence regarding effective treatment approaches. We conducted a choice-stratified randomized controlled trial in 100 adults with MDD within 10 years of complicated mild to severe TBI to test the effectiveness of brief cognitive behavioral therapy administered over the telephone (CBT-T) (n = 40) or in-person (CBT-IP) (n = 18), compared with usual care (UC) (n = 42). Participants were recruited from clinical and community settings throughout the United States. The main outcomes were change in depression severity on the clinician-rated 17 item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and the patient-reported Symptom Checklist-20 (SCL-20) over 16 weeks. There was no significant difference between the combined CBT and UC groups over 16 weeks on the HAMD-17 (treatment effect = 1.2, 95% CI: -1.5-4.0; p = 0.37) and a nonsignificant trend favoring CBT on the SCL-20 (treatment effect = 0.28, 95% CI: -0.03-0.59; p = 0.074). In follow-up comparisons, the CBT-T group had significantly more improvement on the SCL-20 than the UC group (treatment effect = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.01-0.70; p = 0.043) and completers of eight or more CBT sessions had significantly improved SCL-20 scores compared with the UC group (treatment effect = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.10-0.76; p = 0.011). CBT participants reported significantly more symptom improvement (p = 0.010) and greater satisfaction with depression care (p < 0.001), than did the UC group. In-person and telephone-administered CBT are acceptable and feasible in persons with TBI. Although further research is warranted, telephone CBT holds particular promise for enhancing access and adherence to effective depression treatment.

  7. Padova Charter on personal injury and damage under civil-tort law : Medico-legal guidelines on methods of ascertainment and criteria of evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Santo Davide; Baccino, Eric; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Comandè, Giovanni; Domenici, Ranieri; Hernandez-Cueto, Claudio; Gulmen, Mete Korkut; Mendelson, George; Montisci, Massimo; Norelli, Gian Aristide; Pinchi, Vilma; Ranavaya, Mohammed; Shokry, Dina A; Sterzik, Vera; Vermylen, Yvo; Vieira, Duarte Nuno; Viel, Guido; Zoja, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Compensation for personal damage, defined as any pecuniary or non-pecuniary loss causally related to a personal injury under civil-tort law, is strictly based on the local jurisdiction and therefore varies significantly across the world. This manuscript presents the first "International Guidelines on Medico-Legal Methods of Ascertainment and Criteria of Evaluation of Personal Injury and Damage under Civil-Tort Law". This consensus document, which includes a step-by-step illustrated explanation of flow charts articulated in eight sequential steps and a comprehensive description of the ascertainment methodology and the criteria of evaluation, has been developed by an International Working Group composed of juridical and medico-legal experts and adopted as Guidelines by the International Academy of Legal Medicine (IALM).

  8. [Immobilize the person after injury - problems in the practice of the rescuer].

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The rescuer often has to deal with patients who have suffered trauma to the bone , including heads, spine, lower and upper limbs. Serious injuries or multiorgan grudges are a frequent result of communicative cases, and a fast but accurate examination is a condition of the success of a rescue operation, putting the preliminary diagnosis and implementing real rescue activities. Delays in a rescue operation or the lack appropriate the equipment is threatening the patient with the permanent disability or even a loss of life. It is important so that Teams of the Medical Rescue, the Aviation emergency ambulance service, individuals of the State Fire Service and Hospital accident wards have an equipment which will be compatible. With equipment which without no dilemmas will be used according to assigning him without anxiety that the use is equaling for loss of possessions or the exchange on worse or dirty. An next amendment to a bill about the National Medical rescue should obligatorily have regulations on the availability and compatibilities of equipment among others used in immobilizing traumatic and the National Health Fund should develop tough equipment principles in contracting services. All remarks and amendments to the provisions concerning the compatibility of equipment used in grudges they will have an intense influence on the quality of granted benefits in saving the health and the human life as well as will improve the comfort of the work of the paramedic. PMID:27487546

  9. Pilot study to develop telehealth tinnitus management for persons with and without traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Henry, James A; Zaugg, Tara L; Myers, Paula J; Schmidt, Caroline J; Griest, Susan; Legro, Marcia W; Kaelin, Christine; Thielman, Emily J; Storzbach, Daniel M; McMillan, Garnett P; Carlson, Kathleen F

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus, or "ringing in the ears," affects 10%-15% of adults; cases can be problematic and require lifelong management. Many people who have experienced traumatic brain injury (TBI) also experience tinnitus. We developed Progressive Tinnitus Management (PTM), which uses education and counseling to help patients learn how to self-manage their reactions to tinnitus. We adapted PTM by delivering the intervention via telephone and by adding cognitive-behavioral therapy. A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and potential efficacy of this approach for individuals with and without TBI. Participants with clinically significant tinnitus were recruited into three groups: probable symptomatic mild TBI (n = 15), moderate to severe TBI (n = 9), and no symptomatic TBI (n = 12). Participants received telephone counseling (six sessions over 6 months) by an audiologist and a psychologist. Questionnaires were completed at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. All groups showed trends reflecting improvement in self-perceived functional limitations due to tinnitus. A follow-up randomized clinical study is underway. PMID:23341277

  10. Effects of conventional and alternating cushion weight-shifting in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gary A.; Bogie, Kath M.

    2015-01-01

    A repeated-measures study of 13 adult full-time wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (SCI) was carried out to determine whether alternating-pressure air cushion (APAC) use compared with independent pressure relief (IPR) provides reliable, effective pressure relief for individuals with SCI. Bilateral mean ischial interface pressure (IP), transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2), and unilateral laser Doppler blood flow were evaluated. Blood flow component contributions were determined using short-time Fourier transform (STFT)-based spectral analysis. IPR assessment was carried out at recruitment. Study participants then used an APAC for 2 wk every 3 mo for 18 mo. IPR weight-shifting decreased mean ischial IP (p < 0.05) and increased mean TcPO2 (p < 0.05). All variables rapidly returned to preintervention levels following weight-shifting except for the cardiac component of blood flow. APAC-induced weight-shifting decreased mean ischial IP (p < 0.05). Mean TcPO2 increased and was higher than for IPR. STFT analysis indicated that quiet sitting following APAC-induced weight-shifting produced a higher neurogenic component of blood flow than following IPR (p = 0.02). Thus, IPR positively affects multiple aspects of tissue health but produces transient improvements and must be repeated regularly. APAC activation dynamically and continuously alters IP distribution with more sustained positive tissue health effects. PMID:25629607

  11. The Risk of Sleep Disorder Among Persons with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Mollayeva, Shirin; Colantonio, Angela

    2016-06-01

    Sleep disorders and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are among the most commonly occurring neurological problems clinicians encounter simultaneously. Each can cause the other, and both share common predisposing factors. An important question that remains to be addressed is whether high-risk groups can be defined. We observed an accumulation of considerable knowledge on sleep dysfunction in mTBI in recently published works. The results highlight sleep disturbances in mTBI as the product of diverse internal and external influences, acting on a genetically determined substrate. This may partially explain the clinical heterogeneity of mTBI, pointing to the importance of establishing an accurate history on the onset and course of a specific sleep disorder in the early stages post-mTBI in the individual patient. Such an approach will aid not only diagnosis and treatment but may also lead to identification of disorders whose symptoms mimic those of TBI and thereby direct the most suitable treatment and management. PMID:27079955

  12. Effects of conventional and alternating cushion weight-shifting in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gary A; Bogie, Kath M

    2014-01-01

    A repeated-measures study of 13 adult full-time wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (SCI) was carried out to determine whether alternating-pressure air cushion (APAC) use compared with independent pressure relief (IPR) provides reliable, effective pressure relief for individuals with SCI. Bilateral mean ischial interface pressure (IP), transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2), and unilateral laser Doppler blood flow were evaluated. Blood flow component contributions were determined using short-time Fourier transform (STFT)-based spectral analysis. IPR assessment was carried out at recruitment. Study participants then used an APAC for 2 wk every 3 mo for 18 mo. IPR weight-shifting decreased mean ischial IP (p < 0.05) and increased mean TcPO2 (p < 0.05). All variables rapidly returned to preintervention levels following weight-shifting except for the cardiac component of blood flow. APAC-induced weight-shifting decreased mean ischial IP (p < 0.05). Mean TcPO2 increased and was higher than for IPR. STFT analysis indicated that quiet sitting following APAC-induced weight-shifting produced a higher neurogenic component of blood flow than following IPR (p = 0.02). Thus, IPR positively affects multiple aspects of tissue health but produces transient improvements and must be repeated regularly. APAC activation dynamically and continuously alters IP distribution with more sustained positive tissue health effects. PMID:25629607

  13. Small Claims Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKitric, Eloise; Davis, Janet

    The study examined individuals and companies who used small claims courts and the results of decisions reached in small claims cases. A review of studies including an empirical study of two Ohio small claims courts monitored for 12 months made it clear that small claims courts need to be examined to determine if utilization and accessibility to…

  14. 29 CFR 15.301 - What office is responsible for determining liability in claims arising out of the Job Corps?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED CLAIMS STATUTES Claims Arising Out of the... responsible for all FTCA claims involving damage to persons or property arising out of an act or omission of a... or a question of policy. (d) All remaining claims with aggregate damages of $25,000 or more are...

  15. 29 CFR 15.301 - What office is responsible for determining liability in claims arising out of the Job Corps?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED CLAIMS STATUTES Claims Arising Out of the... responsible for all FTCA claims involving damage to persons or property arising out of an act or omission of a... or a question of policy. (d) All remaining claims with aggregate damages of $25,000 or more are...

  16. Unwanted pregnancy: The outer boundary of "treatment injury" in the New Zealand accident compensation scheme.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    The New Zealand accident compensation scheme has undergone many changes over the years and these changes are reflected in the way unwanted pregnancy claims have been dealt with under the regime. The New Zealand Supreme Court has now confirmed that pregnancy as a result of medical misadventure can be classified as a personal injury under the scheme with the result that the woman patient is entitled to the benefits of the scheme and may not pursue a common law claim against the medical practitioner. This article analyses two recent decisions in the context of consideration of the changing fortunes of the unwanted pregnancy claims. PMID:26554207

  17. Unwanted pregnancy: The outer boundary of "treatment injury" in the New Zealand accident compensation scheme.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    The New Zealand accident compensation scheme has undergone many changes over the years and these changes are reflected in the way unwanted pregnancy claims have been dealt with under the regime. The New Zealand Supreme Court has now confirmed that pregnancy as a result of medical misadventure can be classified as a personal injury under the scheme with the result that the woman patient is entitled to the benefits of the scheme and may not pursue a common law claim against the medical practitioner. This article analyses two recent decisions in the context of consideration of the changing fortunes of the unwanted pregnancy claims.

  18. 10 CFR 1014.2 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1014.2 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate office. (a) For... incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a definite amount for injury to or loss of property... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate...

  19. 38 CFR 14.616 - Form and place of filing claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LEGAL SERVICES, GENERAL COUNSEL, AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS Administrative Settlement of Tort Claims... claimant; (2) The amount claimed for injury or death, and for property loss or damage; (3) If property was... submitted by claimant—(1) General. The amount claimed on account of damage to or loss of property or...

  20. 10 CFR 1014.2 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1014.2 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate office. (a) For... incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a definite amount for injury to or loss of property... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate...

  1. 22 CFR 304.2 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate Peace Corps Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 304.2 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate Peace... Damages or Injury,” Standard Form 95, or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Administrative claim; when...

  2. 22 CFR 304.2 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate Peace Corps Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 304.2 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate Peace... Damages or Injury,” Standard Form 95, or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Administrative claim; when...

  3. 22 CFR 304.2 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate Peace Corps Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 304.2 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate Peace... Damages or Injury,” Standard Form 95, or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Administrative claim; when...

  4. 43 CFR 3830.3 - Who may locate mining claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who may locate mining claims? 3830.3... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Introduction § 3830.3 Who may locate mining claims? Persons...

  5. 43 CFR 3830.3 - Who may locate mining claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who may locate mining claims? 3830.3... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Introduction § 3830.3 Who may locate mining claims? Persons...

  6. 43 CFR 3830.3 - Who may locate mining claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who may locate mining claims? 3830.3... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Introduction § 3830.3 Who may locate mining claims? Persons...

  7. 43 CFR 3830.3 - Who may locate mining claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who may locate mining claims? 3830.3... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Introduction § 3830.3 Who may locate mining claims? Persons...

  8. 45 CFR 504.3 - Official claim forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Forces of the United States Held as Prisoner of War in Vietnam; for Persons Assigned to Duty on board the... WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED FILING OF CLAIMS AND PROCEDURES THEREFOR § 504.3 Official claim... or Who Went into Hiding to Avoid Capture or Internment in Southeast Asia During the Vietnam...

  9. 45 CFR 504.3 - Official claim forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Forces of the United States Held as Prisoner of War in Vietnam; for Persons Assigned to Duty on board the... WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED FILING OF CLAIMS AND PROCEDURES THEREFOR § 504.3 Official claim... or Who Went into Hiding to Avoid Capture or Internment in Southeast Asia During the Vietnam...

  10. 45 CFR 504.3 - Official claim forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Forces of the United States Held as Prisoner of War in Vietnam; for Persons Assigned to Duty on board the... WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED FILING OF CLAIMS AND PROCEDURES THEREFOR § 504.3 Official claim... or Who Went into Hiding to Avoid Capture or Internment in Southeast Asia During the Vietnam...

  11. 45 CFR 504.3 - Official claim forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Forces of the United States Held as Prisoner of War in Vietnam; for Persons Assigned to Duty on board the... WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED FILING OF CLAIMS AND PROCEDURES THEREFOR § 504.3 Official claim... or Who Went into Hiding to Avoid Capture or Internment in Southeast Asia During the Vietnam...

  12. 45 CFR 504.3 - Official claim forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Forces of the United States Held as Prisoner of War in Vietnam; for Persons Assigned to Duty on board the... WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED FILING OF CLAIMS AND PROCEDURES THEREFOR § 504.3 Official claim... or Who Went into Hiding to Avoid Capture or Internment in Southeast Asia During the Vietnam...

  13. 5 CFR 180.105 - Claims not allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...' PERSONAL PROPERTY CLAIMS § 180.105 Claims not allowed. (a) A claim is not allowable if: (1) The damage or... claimant or otherwise provided in kind by the United States; (3) Possession of the property lost or damaged... articles of gold, silver, other precious metals, paintings, antiques other than bulky furnishings,...

  14. 40 CFR 14.11 - Principal types of allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Principal types of allowable claims. 14.11 Section 14.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL EMPLOYEE PERSONAL... claim is allowable, the EPA Claims Officer may consider such factors as: The employee's use of the...

  15. 20 CFR 362.10 - Principal types of claims allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... which the loss or damage occurred: (1) In a common or natural disaster; (2) When the property was... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal types of claims allowable. 362.10... PROCEDURES EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY CLAIMS § 362.10 Principal types of claims allowable. (a) In...

  16. 5 CFR 180.106 - Claims involving carriers and insurers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Claims involving carriers and insurers. 180.106 Section 180.106 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY CLAIMS § 180.106 Claims involving carriers and insurers....

  17. 20 CFR 725.301 - Who may file a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who may file a claim. 725.301 Section 725.301 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND... AND HEALTH ACT, AS AMENDED Filing of Claims § 725.301 Who may file a claim. (a) Any person...

  18. Non-suicidal Self-injury in Different Eating Disorder Types: Relevance of Personality Traits and Gender.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed A; Steiger, Howard; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Israel, Mimi; Granero, Roser; Agüera, Zaida; Castro, Rita; Sánchez, Isabel; Riesco, Nadine; Menchón, José M; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    The study explored lifetime prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in female and male individuals with eating disorders (ED) and compared ED symptoms, general psychopathology and personality traits across individuals with and without a history of NSSI. The incremental discriminative capacity of gender on the manifestation of lifetime NSSI was also studied. A total sample of 1649 consecutively admitted ED patients (1515 women and 134 men) participated in the current study [339 ED + NSSI (ED with NSSI) and 1310 ED - NSSI (ED without NSSI)]. Specific self-report measures were included and other clinical and psychopathological indices. The observed lifetime prevalence of NSSI was 20.6% (20.9% in women and 17.2% in men). NSSI was not associated with ED type or gender. However, ED + NSSI patients exhibited more impulsive behaviour, substance-abuse disorders and additional impulse-control disorders, were younger and had more previous treatments. Age was shown to affect the presentation of NSSI. Additionally, ED + NSSI patients exhibited more severe ED and general psychopathological symptoms and had more dysfunctional personality traits when compared with ED - NSSI. ED + NSSI was found to be positively associated with harm avoidance and self-transcendence but negatively with reward dependence, self-directedness and cooperativeness. Thus, the variables with stronger capacity to identify the presence of ED + NSSI were younger age, harm avoidance, self-directedness and self-transcendence. A lack of association between sex and ED subtype with the presence of NSSI was observed.

  19. Explicit and Inferred Motives for Non-suicidal Self Injurious Acts and Urges in Borderline and Avoidant Personality Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Snir, A.; Rafaeli, E.; Gadassi, R.; Berenson, K.; Downey, G.

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a perplexing phenomenon that may have differing motives. The present study employed experience sampling methods (ESM) which inquired explicitly about the motives for NSSI, but also enabled a temporal examination of the antecedents/consequences of NSSI, these allowed us to infer other motives which were not explicitly endorsed. Adults (N=152, aged 18–65) with borderline personality disorder (BPD), avoidant personality disorder (APD), or no psychopathology participated in a 3-week computerized diary study. We examined 5 classes of explicit motives for engaging in NSSI, finding support primarily for internally-directed rather than interpersonally-directed ones. We then used multi-level regression to examine changes in affect, cognition, and behavior surrounding moments of NSSI acts/urges compared to control moments (i.e., without NSSI). We examined changes in five scales of inferred motives, designed to correspond to the five classes of explicit motives. The results highlight differing motives for NSSI among individuals with BPD and APD, with some similarities (mostly in the explicit motives) and some differences (mostly in the inferred motives) between the disorders. Despite their infrequent explicit endorsement, fluctuations in interpersonally-oriented scales were found surrounding NSSI acts/urges. This highlights the need to continue attending to interpersonal aspects of NSSI in research and in clinical practice. Additionally, NSSI urges, like acts, were followed by decline in affective/interpersonal distress (although in a delayed manner). Thus, interventions that build distress tolerance and enhance awareness for affective changes, and for antecedent/consequence patterns in NSSI, could help individuals resist the urge to self-injure. PMID:25867834

  20. Explicit and inferred motives for nonsuicidal self-injurious acts and urges in borderline and avoidant personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Snir, Avigal; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Gadassi, Reuma; Berenson, Kathy; Downey, Geraldine

    2015-07-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a perplexing phenomenon that may have differing motives. The present study used experience sampling methods (ESM) which inquired explicitly about the motives for NSSI, but also enabled a temporal examination of the antecedents/consequences of NSSI; these allow us to infer other motives which were not explicitly endorsed. Adults (n = 152, aged 18-65) with borderline personality disorder (BPD), avoidant personality disorder (APD), or no psychopathology participated in a 3-week computerized diary study. We examined 5 classes of explicit motives for engaging in NSSI, finding support primarily for internally directed rather than interpersonally directed ones. We then used multilevel regression to examine changes in affect, cognition, and behavior surrounding moments of NSSI acts/urges compared with control moments (i.e., without NSSI). We examined changes in 5 scales of inferred motives, designed to correspond to the 5 classes of explicit motives. The results highlight differing motives for NSSI among individuals with BPD and APD, with some similarities (mostly in the explicit motives) and some differences (mostly in the inferred motives) between the disorders. Despite their infrequent explicit endorsement, fluctuations in interpersonally oriented scales were found surrounding NSSI acts/urges. This highlights the need to continue attending to interpersonal aspects of NSSI in research and in clinical practice. Additionally, NSSI urges, like acts, were followed by decline in affective/interpersonal distress (although in a delayed manner). Thus, interventions that build distress tolerance and enhance awareness for affective changes, and for antecedent/consequence patterns in NSSI, could help individuals resist the urge to self-injure. PMID:25867834

  1. Explicit and inferred motives for nonsuicidal self-injurious acts and urges in borderline and avoidant personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Snir, Avigal; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Gadassi, Reuma; Berenson, Kathy; Downey, Geraldine

    2015-07-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a perplexing phenomenon that may have differing motives. The present study used experience sampling methods (ESM) which inquired explicitly about the motives for NSSI, but also enabled a temporal examination of the antecedents/consequences of NSSI; these allow us to infer other motives which were not explicitly endorsed. Adults (n = 152, aged 18-65) with borderline personality disorder (BPD), avoidant personality disorder (APD), or no psychopathology participated in a 3-week computerized diary study. We examined 5 classes of explicit motives for engaging in NSSI, finding support primarily for internally directed rather than interpersonally directed ones. We then used multilevel regression to examine changes in affect, cognition, and behavior surrounding moments of NSSI acts/urges compared with control moments (i.e., without NSSI). We examined changes in 5 scales of inferred motives, designed to correspond to the 5 classes of explicit motives. The results highlight differing motives for NSSI among individuals with BPD and APD, with some similarities (mostly in the explicit motives) and some differences (mostly in the inferred motives) between the disorders. Despite their infrequent explicit endorsement, fluctuations in interpersonally oriented scales were found surrounding NSSI acts/urges. This highlights the need to continue attending to interpersonal aspects of NSSI in research and in clinical practice. Additionally, NSSI urges, like acts, were followed by decline in affective/interpersonal distress (although in a delayed manner). Thus, interventions that build distress tolerance and enhance awareness for affective changes, and for antecedent/consequence patterns in NSSI, could help individuals resist the urge to self-injure.

  2. Immediate video feedback on ramp, wheelie, and curb wheelchair skill training for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Tai; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat; Chang, Li-Shan; Ke, Xiang; Tsai, Liang-Ching; Chen, Yu-Ping; Lewis, James

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the effects of immediate video feedback (IVF) on training ramp, wheelie, and curb wheelchair skills for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) would be equivalent to or better than the traditional wheelchair skill training. Participants were manual wheelchair users with recent SCI (thoracic 1-lumbar 1) who were matched (9 pairs) on motor function level, age, and sex and randomly assigned to a control group (conventional training) or an experimental group (IVF training). Participants learned three wheelchair skills and then went through the wheelchair skill competency test, retention test, and transfer test. Paired t-tests were used to examine the differences in training time (minutes), spotter intervention needed (counts), and successful rate in performance between the two groups. A 2 (groups) x 3 (skills) x 3 (tests) repeated-measures analysis of variance and Bonferroni adjustment test were used to examine differences between groups on wheelchair skills and tests. No differences were found between two groups in training times (minutes) on three wheelchair skills (experimental vs control: ramp 14.92 +/- 5.80 vs 11.69 +/- 7.85; wheelie 17.79 +/- 6.03 vs 19.92 +/- 13.42; and curb 38.35 +/-23.01 vs 48.59 +/- 15.21). This study demonstrated that IVF for training manual wheelchair skills may produce similar results as the conventional training and may be an alternative training method for wheelchair skills. PMID:26360645

  3. Immediate video feedback on ramp, wheelie, and curb wheelchair skill training for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Tai; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat; Chang, Li-Shan; Ke, Xiang; Tsai, Liang-Ching; Chen, Yu-Ping; Lewis, James

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the effects of immediate video feedback (IVF) on training ramp, wheelie, and curb wheelchair skills for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) would be equivalent to or better than the traditional wheelchair skill training. Participants were manual wheelchair users with recent SCI (thoracic 1-lumbar 1) who were matched (9 pairs) on motor function level, age, and sex and randomly assigned to a control group (conventional training) or an experimental group (IVF training). Participants learned three wheelchair skills and then went through the wheelchair skill competency test, retention test, and transfer test. Paired t-tests were used to examine the differences in training time (minutes), spotter intervention needed (counts), and successful rate in performance between the two groups. A 2 (groups) x 3 (skills) x 3 (tests) repeated-measures analysis of variance and Bonferroni adjustment test were used to examine differences between groups on wheelchair skills and tests. No differences were found between two groups in training times (minutes) on three wheelchair skills (experimental vs control: ramp 14.92 +/- 5.80 vs 11.69 +/- 7.85; wheelie 17.79 +/- 6.03 vs 19.92 +/- 13.42; and curb 38.35 +/-23.01 vs 48.59 +/- 15.21). This study demonstrated that IVF for training manual wheelchair skills may produce similar results as the conventional training and may be an alternative training method for wheelchair skills.

  4. Pilot evaluation of a nurse-administered carepath for successful colonoscopy for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Barber, D B; Rogers, S J; Chen, J T; Gulledge, D E; Able, A C

    1999-03-01

    Due to ongoing improvements in medical care, the life expectancy of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) continues to improve and approach that of the able-bodied population. As the SCI population ages, cancer would be expected to increase as a cause of death. When a patient presents with occult fecal blood and anemia, colonscopy to the cecum is often pursued. It has been our experience that 80 percent of patients are found to have inadequate bowel preps resulting in suboptimal colonoscopy when the prep is attempted at home. Because of this, we developed a nurse-administered carepath necessitating a 48-hour admission for bowel prep and colonoscopy. The bowel prep consists of magnesium citrate, polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution, and sodium phosphate/biphosphate enemas. Throughout hospitalization, the patient receives a clear liquid diet. Eighteen patients have been placed on the carepath. At the time of colonoscopy, all 18 were noted to have received an acceptable bowel prep allowing vizualization to the cecum. A description of the carepath and its benefits is presented.

  5. The potential metabolic consequences of cerebral palsy: inferences from the general population and persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bauman, William A

    2009-10-01

    The metabolic consequences of cerebral palsy (CP) have not been reported. The observations and suggestions presented in this article are based on our current knowledge of physiology in the general population and on information on the known metabolic consequences of disability in persons with spinal cord injury. Because of pain, fatigue, and other secondary consequences of CP, adolescents with CP who are ambulatory may become less physically active with age. This phenomenon would be expected to be associated with deconditioning and adverse changes in body composition including atrophy of muscles and an absolute or relative increase in adiposity. Insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and associated adverse metabolic changes may develop. In an unfavorable metabolic milieu, the ability of the pancreas to compensate for mild elevations of circulating glucose may diminish. The combination of reduced fitness and conventional risk factors for cardiovascular disease would be expected to increase the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD); however, there has been no assessment of the risk factors for CHD in adults with CP. Once subgroups with modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease have been identified, risk factors for CHD should be aggressively treated, according to current standards of care.

  6. 5 CFR 180.104 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable claims. 180.104 Section 180.104 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY... are payable: (i) Where personal funds were accepted by responsible Government personnel with...

  7. 32 CFR 536.120 - Claims payable as maritime claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claims payable as maritime claims. 536.120 Section 536.120 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.120 Claims payable as maritime claims....

  8. 32 CFR 536.120 - Claims payable as maritime claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Claims payable as maritime claims. 536.120 Section 536.120 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.120 Claims payable as maritime claims....

  9. Nonfatal traumatic brain injuries related to sports and recreation activities among persons aged ≤19 years--United States, 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) from participation in sports and recreation activities have received increased public awareness, with many states and the federal government considering or implementing laws directing the response to suspected brain injury. Whereas public health programs promote the many benefits of sports and recreation activities, those benefits are tempered by the risk for injury. During 2001--2005, an estimated 207,830 emergency department (ED) visits for concussions and other TBIs related to sports and recreation activities were reported annually, with 65% of TBIs occurring among children aged 5--18 years. Compared with adults, younger persons are at increased risk for TBIs with increased severity and prolonged recovery. To assess and characterize TBIs from sports and recreation activities among children and adolescents, CDC analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System--All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) for the period 2001--2009. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that an estimated 173,285 persons aged ≤19 years were treated in EDs annually for nonfatal TBIs related to sports and recreation activities. From 2001 to 2009, the number of annual TBI-related ED visits increased significantly, from 153,375 to 248,418, with the highest rates among males aged 10--19 years. By increasing awareness of TBI risks from sports and recreation, employing proper technique and protective equipment, and quickly responding to injuries, the incidence, severity, and long-term negative health effects of TBIs among children and adolescents can be reduced.

  10. Gait Characteristics, Range of Motion, and Spasticity Changes in Response to Massage in a Person with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Manella, Christine; Backus, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Our study set out to measure the effect of a specific routine of massage on gait characteristics, range of motion, and spasticity in a person with incomplete spinal cord injury. Methods: This descriptive, pre–post case study, conducted at the outpatient program of a rehabilitation facility, used neuromuscular techniques in massage for a 42-year-old man with incomplete chronic C5 spinal cord injury. The massage was applied to the iliopsoas, triceps surae, and hamstring muscle groups for 3 consecutive days. Main Outcome Measures: Pre- and post-intervention testing included standard goniometric measurement of joint range of motion in the lower extremities, spasticity evaluation using the modified Ashworth scale, and evaluation of gait characteristics using GAITRite Walkway (CIR Systems, Havertown, PA, USA) pressure mapping for ambulation time, cadence, velocity, stride length, base of support, and single- and double-limb support. Results: After the therapeutic intervention, the following gait changes were demonstrated: increase in velocity and cadence of gait, decrease in ambulation time, increase in stride length, and improvements in the percentages of the swing and stance phases of the gait cycle. Conclusions: Specific application of massage therapy influenced gait speed, stride length, and swing and stance phase percentages in one person with incomplete spinal cord injury. Further study is warranted to determine the extent to which massage may affect musculoskeletal and neural impairments that limit gait in people with incomplete spinal cord injury, and the method or routine whose application will yield the most benefit. PMID:21589693

  11. 46 CFR 327.4 - Claim requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the incident occurred; (iii) Time of incident—year, month and day, and the precise time of day, to the... physicians and hospitals related to a seaman's claim for injury, illness, or death shall be attached. If the claimant does not have a copy of each record, the claimant shall identify every physician and...

  12. Evaluating a Surprising Claim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Howard C.

    2013-11-01

    A television advertisement and a website present an interesting question: can rail company CSX really move a ton of freight 468 miles on a gallon of fuel, or is the claim preposterous? Let us examine the claim, first by understanding what is meant, looking at their data, and then converting units to examine the claim quantitatively.

  13. Evaluating a Surprising Claim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard C.

    2013-01-01

    A television advertisement and a website present an interesting question: can rail company CSX "really" move a ton of freight 468 miles on a gallon of fuel, or is the claim preposterous? Let us examine the claim, first by understanding what is meant, looking at their data, and then converting units to examine the claim quantitatively.

  14. 18 CFR 367.9250 - Account 925, Injuries and damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... company against injuries and damages claims of employees or others, losses of such character not covered by insurance, and expenses incurred in settlement of injuries and damages claims. It also must... against claims from injuries and damages by employees or others, such as public liability,...

  15. Oxygen consumption during functional electrical stimulation-assisted exercise in persons with spinal cord injury: implications for fitness and health.

    PubMed

    Hettinga, Dries M; Andrews, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    A lesion in the spinal cord leads in most cases to a significant reduction in active muscle mass, whereby the paralysed muscles cannot contribute to oxygen consumption (VO2) during exercise. Consequently, persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) can only achieve high VO2 values by excessively stressing the upper body musculature, which might increase the risk of musculoskeletal overuse injury. Alternatively, the muscle mass involved may be increased by using functional electrical stimulation (FES). FES-assisted cycling, FES-cycling combined with arm cranking (FES-hybrid exercise) and FES-rowing have all been suggested as candidates for cardiovascular training in SCI. In this article, we review the levels of VO2 (peak [VO2peak] and sub-peak [VO2sub-peak]) that have been reported for SCI subjects using these FES exercise modalities. A systematic literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, SportDiscus and the authors' own files revealed 35 studies that reported on 499 observations of VO2 levels achieved during FES-exercise in SCI. The results show that VO2peak during FES-rowing (1.98 L/min, n = 17; 24.1 mL/kg/min, n = 11) and FES-hybrid exercise (1.78 L/min, n = 67; 26.5 mL/kg/min, n = 35) is considerably higher than during FES-cycling (1.05 L/min, n = 264; 14.3 mL/kg/min, n = 171). VO2sub-peak values during FES-hybrid exercise were higher than during FES-cycling. FES-exercise training can produce large increases in VO2peak; the included studies report average increases of +11% after FES-rowing training, +12% after FES-hybrid exercise training and +28% after FES-cycling training. This review shows that VO2 during FES-rowing or FES-hybrid exercise is considerably higher than during FES-cycling. These observations are confirmed by a limited number of direct comparisons; larger studies to test the differences in effectiveness of the various types of FES-exercise as cardiovascular exercise are needed. The results to date suggest that FES-rowing and FES-hybrid are

  16. Torque and mechanomyogram relationships during electrically-evoked isometric quadriceps contractions in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Islam, Md Anamul; Kean, Victor S P; Davis, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between muscle contractions and joint loading produces torques necessary for movements during activities of daily living. However, during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked contractions in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), a simple and reliable proxy of torque at the muscle level has been minimally investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between muscle mechanomyographic (MMG) characteristics and NMES-evoked isometric quadriceps torques in persons with motor complete SCI. Six SCI participants with lesion levels below C4 [(mean (SD) age, 39.2 (7.9) year; stature, 1.71 (0.05) m; and body mass, 69.3 (12.9) kg)] performed randomly ordered NMES-evoked isometric leg muscle contractions at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion angles on an isokinetic dynamometer. MMG signals were detected by an accelerometer-based vibromyographic sensor placed over the belly of rectus femoris muscle. The relationship between MMG root mean square (MMG-RMS) and NMES-evoked torque revealed a very high association (R(2)=0.91 at 30°; R(2)=0.98 at 60°; and R(2)=0.97 at 90° knee angles; P<0.001). MMG peak-to-peak (MMG-PTP) and stimulation intensity were less well related (R(2)=0.63 at 30°; R(2)=0.67 at 60°; and R(2)=0.45 at 90° knee angles), although were still significantly associated (P≤0.006). Test-retest interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the dependent variables ranged from 0.82 to 0.97 for NMES-evoked torque, between 0.65 and 0.79 for MMG-RMS, and from 0.67 to 0.73 for MMG-PTP. Their standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged between 10.1% and 31.6% (of mean values) for torque, MMG-RMS and MMG-PTP. The MMG peak frequency (MMG-PF) of 30Hz approximated the stimulation frequency, indicating NMES-evoked motor unit firing rate. The results demonstrated knee angle differences in the MMG-RMS versus NMES-isometric torque relationship, but a similar torque related pattern for MMG-PF. These findings

  17. Torque and mechanomyogram relationships during electrically-evoked isometric quadriceps contractions in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Islam, Md Anamul; Kean, Victor S P; Davis, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between muscle contractions and joint loading produces torques necessary for movements during activities of daily living. However, during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked contractions in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), a simple and reliable proxy of torque at the muscle level has been minimally investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between muscle mechanomyographic (MMG) characteristics and NMES-evoked isometric quadriceps torques in persons with motor complete SCI. Six SCI participants with lesion levels below C4 [(mean (SD) age, 39.2 (7.9) year; stature, 1.71 (0.05) m; and body mass, 69.3 (12.9) kg)] performed randomly ordered NMES-evoked isometric leg muscle contractions at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion angles on an isokinetic dynamometer. MMG signals were detected by an accelerometer-based vibromyographic sensor placed over the belly of rectus femoris muscle. The relationship between MMG root mean square (MMG-RMS) and NMES-evoked torque revealed a very high association (R(2)=0.91 at 30°; R(2)=0.98 at 60°; and R(2)=0.97 at 90° knee angles; P<0.001). MMG peak-to-peak (MMG-PTP) and stimulation intensity were less well related (R(2)=0.63 at 30°; R(2)=0.67 at 60°; and R(2)=0.45 at 90° knee angles), although were still significantly associated (P≤0.006). Test-retest interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the dependent variables ranged from 0.82 to 0.97 for NMES-evoked torque, between 0.65 and 0.79 for MMG-RMS, and from 0.67 to 0.73 for MMG-PTP. Their standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged between 10.1% and 31.6% (of mean values) for torque, MMG-RMS and MMG-PTP. The MMG peak frequency (MMG-PF) of 30Hz approximated the stimulation frequency, indicating NMES-evoked motor unit firing rate. The results demonstrated knee angle differences in the MMG-RMS versus NMES-isometric torque relationship, but a similar torque related pattern for MMG-PF. These findings

  18. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Methods: Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Results: Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Conclusion: Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity. PMID:26364281

  19. 20 CFR 702.602 - Notice and claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Does Not Immediately Result in Death or Disability § 702.602 Notice and claims. (a) Time for giving notice of injury or death. Refer to § 702.207. (b) Time for filing of claims. Refer to § 702.212....

  20. Attachment Style, Social Support, and Coping as Psychosocial Correlates of Happiness in Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lisa; Catalano, Denise; Sung, Connie; Phillips, Brian; Chou, Chih-Chin; Chan, Jacob Yui Chung; Chan, Fong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the roles of attachment, social support, and coping as psychosocial correlates in predicting happiness in people with spinal cord injuries. Design: Quantitative descriptive research design using multiple regression and correlation techniques. Participants: 274 individuals with spinal cord injuries. Outcome Measures: Happiness…

  1. Measurement Structure of the Trait Hope Scale in Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Pfaller, Joseph; Moser, Erin; Tu, Wei-Mo; Chan, Fong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the measurement structure of the Trait Hope Scale (THS) among individuals with spinal cord injury. Design: Confirmatory factor analysis and reliability and validity analyses were performed. Participants: 242 individuals with spinal cord injury. Results: Results support the two-factor measurement model for the THS with agency…

  2. 20 CFR 362.11 - Principal types of claims not allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal types of claims not allowable. 362... PROCEDURES EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY CLAIMS § 362.11 Principal types of claims not allowable. (a) Claims...; (2) The loss or damage totals less than $5 or, to the extent of the excess, more than the...

  3. Trend of Occupational Injuries/Diseases in Pakistan: Index Value Analysis of Injured Employed Persons from 2001–02 to 2012–13

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Mohsin

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to analyze the index value trends of injured employed persons (IEPs) covered in Pakistan Labour Force Surveys from 2001–02 to 2012–13. Methods The index value method based on reference years and reference groups was used to analyze the IEP trends in terms of different criteria such as gender, area, employment status, industry types, occupational groups, types of injury, injured body parts, and treatment received. The Pearson correlation coefficient analysis was also performed to investigate the inter-relationship of different occupational variables. Results The values of IEP increased at the end of the studied year in industry divisions such as agriculture, forestry, hunting, and fishing, followed by in manufacturing and construction industry divisions. People associated with major occupations (such as skilled agricultural and fishery workers) and elementary (unskilled) occupations were found to be at an increasing risk of occupational injuries/diseases with an increasing IEP trend. Types of occupational injuries such as sprain or strain, superficial injury, and dislocation increased during the studied years. Major injured parts of body such as upper limb and lower limb found with increasing trend. Types of treatment received, including hospitalization and no treatment, were found to decrease. Increased IEP can be justified due to inadequate health care facilities, especially in rural areas by increased IEP in terms of gender, areas, received treatment, occupational groups and employment status as results found after Pearson correlation coefficient analysis. Conclusion The increasing trend in the IEP% of the total employed persons due to agrarian activities shows that there is a need to improve health care setups in rural areas of Pakistan. PMID:26929831

  4. State Your Claim!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thypin, Marilyn; Glasner, Lynne

    A short fictional work for limited English speakers relates a young couple's experience in learning about small claims court through an incident involving damage to the husband's leather jacket. The damage to the jacket occurred when it was left at a dry clearner, but the dry cleaner claims that it sent the jacket to a special cleaner that handles…

  5. Claim and Continuous Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulová, Iveta; Meravá, Miroslava

    2010-01-01

    The claim will always represent the kind of information that is annoying to recipients. Systematic work with claims has a positive value for the company. Addressing the complaint has a positive effect on continuous improvement. This paper was worked out with the support of VEGA No.1/0229/08 Perspectives of quality management development in coherence with requirements of Slovak republic market.

  6. 20 CFR 10.7 - What forms are needed to process claims under the FECA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (8) CA-7 Claim for Compensation Due to Traumatic Injury or Occupational Disease. (9) CA-7a Time... Section 8102a Death Gratuity. (18) CA-1108 Statement of Recovery Letter with Long Form. (19) CA-1122.... Form No. Title (1) CA-1 Federal Employee's Notice of Traumatic Injury and Claim for Continuation of...

  7. 20 CFR 10.7 - What forms are needed to process claims under the FECA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (8) CA-7 Claim for Compensation Due to Traumatic Injury or Occupational Disease. (9) CA-7a Time... Section 8102a Death Gratuity. (18) CA-1108 Statement of Recovery Letter with Long Form. (19) CA-1122.... Form No. Title (1) CA-1 Federal Employee's Notice of Traumatic Injury and Claim for Continuation of...

  8. 20 CFR 10.7 - What forms are needed to process claims under the FECA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (8) CA-7 Claim for Compensation Due to Traumatic Injury or Occupational Disease. (9) CA-7a Time... Section 8102a Death Gratuity. (18) CA-1108 Statement of Recovery Letter with Long Form. (19) CA-1122.... Form No. Title (1) CA-1 Federal Employee's Notice of Traumatic Injury and Claim for Continuation of...

  9. Formalizing Probabilistic Safety Claims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Hagen, George E.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    A safety claim for a system is a statement that the system, which is subject to hazardous conditions, satisfies a given set of properties. Following work by John Rushby and Bev Littlewood, this paper presents a mathematical framework that can be used to state and formally prove probabilistic safety claims. It also enables hazardous conditions, their uncertainties, and their interactions to be integrated into the safety claim. This framework provides a formal description of the probabilistic composition of an arbitrary number of hazardous conditions and their effects on system behavior. An example is given of a probabilistic safety claim for a conflict detection algorithm for aircraft in a 2D airspace. The motivation for developing this mathematical framework is that it can be used in an automated theorem prover to formally verify safety claims.

  10. 32 CFR 536.129 - Claims cognizable as UCMJ claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Claims cognizable as UCMJ claims. 536.129 Section... § 536.129 Claims cognizable as UCMJ claims. Claims cognizable under Article 139, UCMJ, are limited to... to liability under Article 139, the soldier's conduct must be such as would constitute a violation...

  11. Internees in Poland: psychiatric abuse claim.

    PubMed

    Rich, Vera

    1982-09-30

    The World Psychiatric Association has been asked to intervene on behalf of four Polish internees who are claiming to be victims of psychiatric repression for political reasons. Under martial law, Poland's security forces have shown a renewed interest in psychiatric internment of disruptive persons. PMID:11643799

  12. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent or wrongful act or... subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident to service with the Department... to, or loss of, property arising from fire, flood, hurricane, other natural disaster, theft, or...

  13. 36 CFR 222.62 - Ownership claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.62 Ownership claims. (a) Any person... wild horse or burro territory or range on the National Forest System where such animals are not... National Forest System after November 15, 1973, which become intermingled with wild horses or burros,...

  14. 36 CFR 222.22 - Ownership claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.22 Ownership claims. (a) Any person... wild horse or burro territory or range on the National Forest System where such animals are not... National Forest System after November 15, 1973, which become intermingled with wild horses or burros,...

  15. 36 CFR 222.22 - Ownership claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.22 Ownership claims. (a) Any person... wild horse or burro territory or range on the National Forest System where such animals are not... National Forest System after November 15, 1973, which become intermingled with wild horses or burros,...

  16. 36 CFR 222.62 - Ownership claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.62 Ownership claims. (a) Any person... wild horse or burro territory or range on the National Forest System where such animals are not... National Forest System after November 15, 1973, which become intermingled with wild horses or burros,...

  17. 36 CFR 222.22 - Ownership claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.22 Ownership claims. (a) Any person... wild horse or burro territory or range on the National Forest System where such animals are not... National Forest System after November 15, 1973, which become intermingled with wild horses or burros,...

  18. Personal protective equipment use among students with special health care needs reporting injuries in school-sponsored vocational, career, and technical education programs in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Eric; Shendell, Derek; Eggert, Brain C; Marcella, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Students with special health care needs (SHCNs) and individualized education plans (IEPs) may be injured more often in vocational, career, and technical education (CTE) programs. No research to date considers personal protective equipment (PPE) use among students with SHCNs in school-based programs reporting injuries to agencies. Data from 1999 to 2011 on PPE use among injured students in CTE programs in public schools and private secondary schools for the disabled were analyzed; students with SHCNs were distinguished by IEP status within New Jersey Safe Schools surveilance data. Among students with IEPs using PPE, 36% of injuries occurred to body parts PPE was meant to protect. Likely injury types were cuts-lacerations and burns for students with IEPs using PPE and cuts-lacerations and sprains for students with IEPs not using PPE. Females with IEPs using PPE were injured less often than males across ages. Results suggested students with SHCNs with IEPs need further job-related training with increased emphasis on properly selecting and fitting PPE.

  19. Job performance failure and occupational carpal tunnel claims.

    PubMed

    Butler, Richard J; Liao, Hui

    2002-03-01

    Using a sample of one job type from one firm (to hold job tasks and sick leave/disability policy constant), we estimate the effect of demographic variables, job performance warnings, and workers' compensation benefits on the propensity to file a carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) loss work-time claim. We find that disciplinary notices increase the employees' propensity to file a CTS claim. State maximum workers' compensation benefits are also positively related to CTS claim frequency, however, the relationship is not statistically significant. CTS claimants respond differently than other sprain/strain claimants to benefits and to gender. In particularly, women have relatively more CTS claims, while men have relatively more other sprain/strain claims in our sample. The estimates here underscore the importance of psychosocial factors in the filing of occupational CTS and sprain injuries claims. PMID:11837054

  20. From margins to mainstream: what do we know about work integration for persons with brain injury, mental illness and intellectual disability?

    PubMed

    Kirsh, Bonnie; Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Gewurtz, Rebecca; Dawson, Deirdre; Krupa, Terry; Lysaght, Rosemary; Shaw, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Employment is a right of citizenship and a social determinant of health, but employment rates remain low for persons with disabilities. The purpose of this paper is to examine the principles and practices guiding work integration within the fields of intellectual disability (ID), brain injury, and mental illness and to identify best practices to support transitions to employment across these three groups. This integrative review drew upon an occupational perspective to analyze the current literature. Findings reveal that the need and benefits of working are recognized across disability groups but that philosophical perspectives guiding work integration differ. In the area of mental illness, recovery is seen as a process within which work plays an important role, in ID work is viewed as a planned outcome that is part of the developmental process, and in the field of brain injury, outcomes of employability and employment are emphasized. A common theme across the three disability groups is that in order to facilitate work integration, the person, the job and the work environment are important factors in need of examination. Evidence pointing to the effectiveness of the supported employment model is increasing across these three populations. A framework for guiding the development of further research and for promoting changes to support work integration is presented. PMID:19478411

  1. Processing dental claims electronically.

    PubMed

    Mylan, V

    1996-01-01

    A reduction of healthcare costs is an important part of the reform our society is demanding. We cannot ignore this. Lowering administrative costs is a particularly good way to reduce health care expenditures since this decreases the cost without compromising the quality of services. Implementing an EDI structure for submitting claims and receiving claim remittance advice is one way to significantly reduce the cost of health care by lowering administrative costs. EDI allows the consumer to receive the same level of health care at a lower cost. To accomplish this goal, the industry must accept some standardization. While providers, dental software vendors, and clearinghouses request an electronic claims system that is uniform-payers (insurance companies, State-administered Medicaid programs, etc.) often insist on proprietary formats that fit their own requirements. This impedes the implementation of a successful electronic interchange of data. Under the leadership of the Canadian Dental Association, payers and dentists in Canada were able to create a superior electronic claim processing network, CDAnet. Providers and payers using CDAnet agree that the system works very well. The Canadian dentist does not pay for this service, and insurance companies benefit significantly. Dentists in the USA do not have a universal electronic claim processing network. A USA dentist who wants to send claims electronically has limited selections and often pays additional fees. Organized dentistry has the best opportunity of establishing electronic data interchange between providers and payers in the USA. The first step is creating a universal electronic claim processing system. This system must protect confidentiality by maintaining data that keeps anonymous provider and patient data. It is the dentist who produces the claim. Dentists must become involved in the decisions affecting electronic claim processing. The proper guidance from organized dentistry will enable providers, payers

  2. Comparison of health outcomes between hospitalised and non-hospitalised persons with minor injuries sustained in a road traffic crash in Australia: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Bamini; Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Harris, Ian A; Nicholas, Michael; Maher, Christopher G; Casey, Petrina; Blyth, Fiona; Sindhusake, Doungkamol; Cameron, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This prospective cohort study aimed to investigate whether there are differences in health outcomes among persons with mild or moderate injuries who were hospitalised compared with those not hospitalised following a road traffic crash. Setting Sydney Metropolitan, New South Wales, Australia. Participants Persons aged ≥18 years involved in a motor vehicle crash were surveyed at baseline (n=364), and at 12 (n=284) and 24 months (n=252). A telephone-administered questionnaire obtained information on a range of socioeconomic, and preinjury and postinjury psychological and heath characteristics of all participants. Primary outcome measure Participants who reported admission to hospital for 24 h or more (but less than 7 days) after the crash were classified as being hospitalised; those admitted for less than 24 h were classified as non-hospitalised. Results Around 1 in 5 participants (19.0%) were hospitalised for ≥24 h after the crash. After adjusting for age and sex, hospitalised participants compared with those not hospitalised had approximately 2.6 units (p=0.01) lower Short Form-12 Physical Component Summary (SF-12 PCS) scores (poorer physical well-being) and approximately 4.9 units lower European Quality of Life visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) scores (p=0.05), 12 months later. After further adjusting for education level, whiplash, fracture and injury severity score, participants who were hospitalised had approximately 3.3 units lower SF-12 PCS (p=0.04), 12 months later. The association with EQ-VAS did not persist after multivariable adjustment. No significant differences were observed between the 2 groups in health outcomes at 24-month follow-up. Conclusions These findings indicate that long-term health status is unlikely to be influenced by hospitalisation status after sustaining a mild/moderate injury in a vehicle-related crash. PMID:26408286

  3. Supported Employment and Assistive Technology for Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: Three Illustrations of Successful Work Supports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inge, Katherine J.; Wehman, Paul; Strobel, Wendy; Powell, Deanie; Todd, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    Case studies of three adults with spinal cord injury illustrate the role of assistive technology, employment specialists, and types of workplace supports needed to enable them to secure and maintain employment. Employment specialists are able to analyze accommodation needs and help employers understand them. (SK)

  4. Meeting the Needs of Persons with Acquired Brain Injury in the Republic of Ireland: A Contextual Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Fullerton, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines how the Republic of Ireland conceptualizes disability, specifically acquired brain injury (ABI); how it meets the needs of people with ABI; and its similarities and difference with the U.S. system of ABI professional care, policy, and services. The article provides ideas for improvements and innovations toward ABI…

  5. Capsaicin 8% Patch for Central and Peripheral Neuropathic Pain of Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Trbovich, Michelle; Yang, Huiqing

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is common and often refractory to standard treatments. The capsaicin 8% patch is a Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment of neuropathic pain in postherpetic neuralgia and has demonstrated significant efficacy in human immunodeficiency virus-autonomic neuropathy. The patch defunctionalizes transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors, impairing cutaneous nociceptors for a prolonged period (i.e., 8-12 wks) with no systemic side effects. A retrospective review was conducted on the effects of the patch in two patients with spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain refractory to standard treatments. Two weeks after application, both patients reported complete pain relief. Average onset of relief of 4 days and average duration of relief of 197 days, requiring only one to four applications per year, paralleled findings reported in postherpetic neuralgia and human immunodeficiency virus-autonomic neuropathy trials. Upregulation of capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors after spinal cord injury has been reported. The capsaicin 8% patch is a promising therapeutic agent for neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury.

  6. 40 CFR 704.7 - Confidential business information claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Confidential business information... Provisions for Section 8(a) Information-Gathering Rules § 704.7 Confidential business information claims. (a) Any person submitting a notice under this rule may assert a business confidentiality claim...

  7. 40 CFR 704.7 - Confidential business information claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Confidential business information... Provisions for Section 8(a) Information-Gathering Rules § 704.7 Confidential business information claims. (a) Any person submitting a notice under this rule may assert a business confidentiality claim...

  8. 40 CFR 704.7 - Confidential business information claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Confidential business information... Provisions for Section 8(a) Information-Gathering Rules § 704.7 Confidential business information claims. (a) Any person submitting a notice under this rule may assert a business confidentiality claim...

  9. 32 CFR 842.129 - Settlement of claims against NAFIs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... claim. (b) Claims arising from property damage to or loss from vehicles or loss of personal items stored... this part, and paid using the rules in those subparts. Examples include recreational vehicles stored in authorized lots and used cars parked in onbase sales lots. One exception to this rule is the exclusion...

  10. 32 CFR 842.129 - Settlement of claims against NAFIs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... claim. (b) Claims arising from property damage to or loss from vehicles or loss of personal items stored... this part, and paid using the rules in those subparts. Examples include recreational vehicles stored in authorized lots and used cars parked in onbase sales lots. One exception to this rule is the exclusion...

  11. Modeling the Patient Journey from Injury to Community Reintegration for Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Canadian Centre

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Argelio; Gurling, James; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Burns, Anthony S.; Lewis, Rachel; Soril, Lesley; Fallah, Nader; Street, John T.; Bélanger, Lise; Townson, Andrea; Liang, Liping; Atkins, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient’s journey through the health care system is influenced by clinical and system processes across the continuum of care. Methods To inform optimized access to care and patient flow for individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we developed a simulation model that can examine the full impact of therapeutic or systems interventions across the care continuum for patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries. The objective of this paper is to describe the detailed development of this simulation model for a major trauma and a rehabilitation centre in British Columbia (BC), Canada, as part of the Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project and is referred to as the BC ACT Model V1.0. Findings To demonstrate the utility of the simulation model in clinical and administrative decision-making we present three typical scenarios that illustrate how an investigator can track the indirect impact(s) of medical and administrative interventions, both upstream and downstream along the continuum of care. For example, the model was used to estimate the theoretical impact of a practice that reduced the incidence of pressure ulcers by 70%. This led to a decrease in acute and rehabilitation length of stay of 4 and 2 days, respectively and a decrease in bed utilization of 9% and 3% in acute and rehabilitation. Conclusion The scenario analysis using the BC ACT Model V1.0 demonstrates the flexibility and value of the simulation model as a decision-making tool by providing estimates of the effects of different interventions and allowing them to be objectively compared. Future work will involve developing a generalizable national Canadian ACT Model to examine differences in care delivery and identify the ideal attributes of SCI care delivery. PMID:24023623

  12. Unfalsifiability of security claims.

    PubMed

    Herley, Cormac

    2016-06-01

    There is an inherent asymmetry in computer security: Things can be declared insecure by observation, but not the reverse. There is no observation that allows us to declare an arbitrary system or technique secure. We show that this implies that claims of necessary conditions for security (and sufficient conditions for insecurity) are unfalsifiable. This in turn implies an asymmetry in self-correction: Whereas the claim that countermeasures are sufficient is always subject to correction, the claim that they are necessary is not. Thus, the response to new information can only be to ratchet upward: Newly observed or speculated attack capabilities can argue a countermeasure in, but no possible observation argues one out. Further, when justifications are unfalsifiable, deciding the relative importance of defensive measures reduces to a subjective comparison of assumptions. Relying on such claims is the source of two problems: once we go wrong we stay wrong and errors accumulate, and we have no systematic way to rank or prioritize measures.

  13. 32 CFR 842.50 - Claims not payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carry out the provisions of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 during the existence of a civil... enemy alien is not excluded as to a claim for damage, loss, or destruction of personal property in...

  14. 32 CFR 842.50 - Claims not payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carry out the provisions of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 during the existence of a civil... enemy alien is not excluded as to a claim for damage, loss, or destruction of personal property in...

  15. 32 CFR 842.50 - Claims not payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carry out the provisions of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 during the existence of a civil... enemy alien is not excluded as to a claim for damage, loss, or destruction of personal property in...

  16. 32 CFR 842.50 - Claims not payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carry out the provisions of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 during the existence of a civil... enemy alien is not excluded as to a claim for damage, loss, or destruction of personal property in...

  17. 20 CFR 341.7 - Liability on Board's claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INSURANCE ACT STATUTORY LIEN WHERE SICKNESS BENEFITS PAID § 341.7 Liability on Board's claim. (a) A person or company paying any sum or damages to an employee who has received sickness benefits from the...

  18. 20 CFR 341.7 - Liability on Board's claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... INSURANCE ACT STATUTORY LIEN WHERE SICKNESS BENEFITS PAID § 341.7 Liability on Board's claim. (a) A person or company paying any sum or damages to an employee who has received sickness benefits from the...

  19. 20 CFR 341.7 - Liability on Board's claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... INSURANCE ACT STATUTORY LIEN WHERE SICKNESS BENEFITS PAID § 341.7 Liability on Board's claim. (a) A person or company paying any sum or damages to an employee who has received sickness benefits from the...

  20. 20 CFR 341.7 - Liability on Board's claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... INSURANCE ACT STATUTORY LIEN WHERE SICKNESS BENEFITS PAID § 341.7 Liability on Board's claim. (a) A person or company paying any sum or damages to an employee who has received sickness benefits from the...

  1. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and circulation. If necessary, begin rescue breathing and CPR . If the person's breathing and heart rate are normal but the person is unconscious, treat as if there is a spinal injury . Stabilize the head and neck by placing your ...

  2. Baseline Prevalence of Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Diabetes, and Obesity in Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Potential Threats in the Recovery Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases impede the recovery trajectory of acutely injured persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). This study compares the odds of prevalent heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity between persons with TSCI and persons with lower extremity fractures (LEF) who were discharged from acute care facilities. Methods: 1,776 patients with acute TSCI (cases) and 1,780 randomly selected patients with LEF (controls) discharged from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2009, from all nonfederal hospitals were identified. Data extracted from uniform billing files were compared between cases and controls in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for sociodemographic and clinical covariables. Results: Thirty percent of patients with acute TSCI had at least 1 of 4 conditions compared with 18% of patients with LEF (P < .0001). Persons with acute TSCI were 4 times more likely (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% CI, 1.65–9.97) to have obesity, 2.7 times more likely to have heart disease (P < .001), 2 times more likely to have hypertension (P < .001), and 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes (P = .044) at the onset of TSCI. Disproportionately more Blacks than Whites have TSCI and chronic diseases. Conclusion: This study suggests that there is an increased burden of cardiovascular and cardiometabolic diseases among persons with acute TSCI compared with LEF trauma controls. Unattended comorbid conditions will affect quality of life and the recovery process. This warrants continuous monitoring and management of chronic diseases during the rehabilitation process. PMID:23960701

  3. Intentional torts claims in medical cases.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Tina; Madden, Bill

    2006-02-01

    Civil liability legislation enacted in each Australian jurisdiction following the Ipp Report recommendations created a clear divide between "negligence" and "intentional" torts. The common law action for trespass to the person is to varying extents maintained in the approaches taken by the State and Territory legislatures. This article explores the potential application of intentional torts claims in a medical context in light of recent case law. It identifies advantages for plaintiffs who plead intentional tort claims, including onus of proof, causation, remoteness, the quantum of compensatory damages and the availability of aggravated and exemplary damages.

  4. 37 CFR 1.75 - Claim(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Claim(s). 1.75 Section 1.75... GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Specification § 1.75 Claim(s). (a.... (35 U.S.C. 6; 15 U.S.C. 1113, 1126)...

  5. 37 CFR 1.75 - Claim(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claim(s). 1.75 Section 1.75... GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Specification § 1.75 Claim(s). (a.... (35 U.S.C. 6; 15 U.S.C. 1113, 1126)...

  6. 37 CFR 1.75 - Claim(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Claim(s). 1.75 Section 1.75... GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Specification § 1.75 Claim(s). (a.... (35 U.S.C. 6; 15 U.S.C. 1113, 1126)...

  7. 37 CFR 1.75 - Claim(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claim(s). 1.75 Section 1.75... GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Specification § 1.75 Claim(s). (a.... (35 U.S.C. 6; 15 U.S.C. 1113, 1126)...

  8. 37 CFR 1.75 - Claim(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Claim(s). 1.75 Section 1.75... GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Specification § 1.75 Claim(s). (a.... (35 U.S.C. 6; 15 U.S.C. 1113, 1126)...

  9. The claim from adoption.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Thomas Sobirk

    2002-08-01

    In this article several justifications of what I call 'the claim from adoption' are examined. The claim from adoption is that, instead of expending resources on bringing new children into the world using reproductive technology and then caring for these children, we ought to devote these resources to the adoption and care of existing destitute children. Arguments trading on the idea that resources should be directed to adoption instead of assisted reproduction because already existing people can benefit from such a use of resources whereas we cannot benefit individuals by bringing them into existence are rejected. It is then argued that a utilitarian argument proposed by Christian Munthe that supports the claim from adoption in some situations should be rejected because the support it offers does not extend to certain situations in which it seems morally obvious that resources should be expended on adoption rather than assisted reproduction. A version of the Priority View improves upon Munthe's utilitarianism by supporting the claim from adoption in the cases in which Munthe's argument failed. Some allegedly counterintuitive implications of the Priority View are then discussed, and it is concluded that the Priority View is more plausible than utilitarianism. In a concluding section on policy issues it is argued that, even though the claim from adoption can be justified in a variety of situations, it does not follow that, in these situations, governments should direct resources away from assisted reproduction and towards adoption.

  10. An Overview of Intervention Options for Promoting Adaptive Behavior of Persons with Acquired Brain Injury and Minimally Conscious State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Bosco, Andrea; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the studies directed at helping post-coma persons with minimally conscious state improve their adaptive behavior. Twenty-one studies were identified for the 2000-2010 period (i.e., a period in which an intense debate has occurred about diagnostic, rehabilitative, prognostic, and ethical issues concerning people…

  11. Perceived Participation, Experiences from Persons with Spinal Cord Injury in Their Transition Period from Hospital to Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Velde, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that participation should be achieved at the end of the rehabilitation process. However, there is a lack of consensus on the definition, the conceptualization and the measurement of participation. This study aims to add to the existing body of knowledge of participation by exploring the "person perceived participation" in…

  12. Controlling large malpractice claims: the unexpected impact of damage caps.

    PubMed

    Gronfein, W P; Kinney, E D

    1991-01-01

    Indiana's comprehensive malpractice reforms, inaugurated in 1975, include a cap on damages, a mandated medical review before trial, and a state insurance fund to pay claims equal to or greater than $100,000. We have found that the amount of compensation going to claimants with such large malpractice claims in Indiana is, on average, substantially higher than in Michigan and Ohio. Indiana's mean claim severity between 1977 and 1988 was $404,832, while the means for Michigan and Ohio were $290,022 and $303,220, respectively, with the difference between these three means being highly significant. Although data on claim and claimant characteristics reveal considerable interstate variation, the results of regression analyses show that Indiana claim payment amounts are higher than Michigan or Ohio payments, independent of the effect of factors such as sex, age, severity of injury, allegations of negligence, and year of settlement.

  13. [Spanish validation of the Iowa Rating Scale for Personality Change (IRSPC) for the appraisal of changes in personality in patients with acquired brain injury].

    PubMed

    Guallart-Balet, María; Jiménez-Cortés, Marta P; Tuquet-Calvo, Helena; Pelegrín-Valero, Carmelo; Olivera-Pueyo, Javier; Benabarre-Ciria, Sergio; Tirapu-Ustárroz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introduccion. La Iowa Rating Scale for Personality Change (IRSPC) presenta una serie de caracteristicas (enfasis en las funciones motivacionales y emocionales, evaluacion de las funciones ejecutivas 'cognitivas' en la vida cotidiana, estimacion de la personalidad premorbida, valoracion de la fiabilidad del informador) que hacen muy interesante su utilizacion tanto en la clinica como en la investigacion. Objetivo. Validar en castellano la IRSPC para la evaluacion de los 'cambios de personalidad' secundarios a las lesiones cerebrales de la corteza prefrontal en general y del area ventromedial en particular. Pacientes y metodos. Tras el proceso de traduccion y adaptacion de la guia de la escala al castellano, se realizo un estudio de validacion con 31 pacientes con daño cerebral traumatico y se obtuvieron unos resultados de fiabilidad muy adecuados. Resultados. Los resultados obtenidos al medir la consistencia interna de la IRSPC y los coeficientes de fiabilidad interobservadores y test-retest apoyan dicha afirmacion. La validez del instrumento es confirmada por la validez concurrente (comparandolo con el inventario neuropsiquiatrico) y la validez de constructo (comparando las puntuaciones de los pacientes antes y despues del traumatismo). Conclusiones. La IRSPC es un instrumento fiable y valido para la exploracion clinica, en el contexto de una evaluacion integral de los sintomas derivados de las enfermedades neurologicas en general, y en particular de aquellas en las que se encuentra involucrada la corteza prefrontal ventromedial.

  14. 29 CFR 15.41 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... if the claim is cognizable under the Federal Tort Claims Act (28 U.S.C. 2677). (c) A claim for damage... Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES Claims Arising Out of the Operation of the Job Corps § 15.41 Allowable claims. (a)(1) A claim for damage...

  15. Evidence of T-cell mediated neuronal injury in stiff-person syndrome with anti-amphiphysin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Poh, Mervyn Q W; Simon, Neil G; Buckland, Michael E; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Watson, Shaun

    2014-02-15

    Paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome (SPS) has been associated with antibodies against amphiphysin. Current evidence supports a pathogenic role for anti-amphiphysin antibodies. A 74-year-old female was diagnosed with amphiphysin-associated paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome and associated encephalomyelitis. She had initial response to IVIG, however her symptoms worsened after two months and were resistant to further treatment. Subsequently the patient died and a post-mortem was performed. Neuropathology revealed perivascular and parenchymal lymphocytic infiltrates, with neuronophagia mediated by CD8+ T cells and microglia in brainstem, spinal cord, and mesial temporal lobe structures. These findings suggest a pathogenic role of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells, with potential implication for therapy of future patients.

  16. 20 CFR 725.302 - Evidence of authority to file a claim on behalf of another.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of authority to file a claim on behalf of another. 725.302 Section 725.302 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION... Evidence of authority to file a claim on behalf of another. A person filing a claim on behalf of a...

  17. 20 CFR 725.302 - Evidence of authority to file a claim on behalf of another.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Evidence of authority to file a claim on behalf of another. 725.302 Section 725.302 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS... Evidence of authority to file a claim on behalf of another. A person filing a claim on behalf of a...

  18. 20 CFR 725.302 - Evidence of authority to file a claim on behalf of another.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evidence of authority to file a claim on behalf of another. 725.302 Section 725.302 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS... Evidence of authority to file a claim on behalf of another. A person filing a claim on behalf of a...

  19. 32 CFR 270.12 - Payment in full satisfaction of all claims against the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment in full satisfaction of all claims... INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Payment § 270.12 Payment in full satisfaction of all claims... part shall constitute full satisfaction of all claims by or on behalf of that person against the...

  20. 32 CFR 270.12 - Payment in full satisfaction of all claims against the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Payment in full satisfaction of all claims... INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Payment § 270.12 Payment in full satisfaction of all claims... part shall constitute full satisfaction of all claims by or on behalf of that person against the...

  1. Unfalsifiability of security claims.

    PubMed

    Herley, Cormac

    2016-06-01

    There is an inherent asymmetry in computer security: Things can be declared insecure by observation, but not the reverse. There is no observation that allows us to declare an arbitrary system or technique secure. We show that this implies that claims of necessary conditions for security (and sufficient conditions for insecurity) are unfalsifiable. This in turn implies an asymmetry in self-correction: Whereas the claim that countermeasures are sufficient is always subject to correction, the claim that they are necessary is not. Thus, the response to new information can only be to ratchet upward: Newly observed or speculated attack capabilities can argue a countermeasure in, but no possible observation argues one out. Further, when justifications are unfalsifiable, deciding the relative importance of defensive measures reduces to a subjective comparison of assumptions. Relying on such claims is the source of two problems: once we go wrong we stay wrong and errors accumulate, and we have no systematic way to rank or prioritize measures. PMID:27217574

  2. Personality profile among symptomatic and recovered patients with neck sprain injury, measured by MCMI-I acutely and 6 months after car accidents.

    PubMed

    Borchgrevink, G E; Stiles, T C; Borchgrevink, P C; Lereim, I

    1997-04-01

    The relationships between personality and psychiatric symptoms and long-lasting physical symptoms were assessed in 88 neck sprain patients injured in car accidents. The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-I) was completed at time of occurrence (intake) and 6 months after the injury. The neck sprain patients were divided into three subgroups according to symptoms 6 months after the accident. In addition, the total neck sprain group was compared with three other subject groups. The results indicated that the three neck sprain subgroups did not differ on the MCMI-I neither at intake nor 6 months later. The total neck sprain patients group was significantly different from patients with major depression on all scales of the MCMI-I, but not significantly different compared to patients with localized musculoskeletal pain. Compared to a group of health personnel, there were only a few significant differences. The study does not support the view that premorbid personality traits can predict outcome for neck sprain patients.

  3. Differential response patterns on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) in compensation-seeking and non-compensation-seeking mild traumatic brain injury patients.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Galbreath, Jennifer; Brown, Michelle; Turnbull, Jane

    2012-01-01

    There is relatively little research on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) populations. There is also little research on how compensation-seeking status affects personality assessment results in MTBI patients. The current study examined the PAI scales and subscales in two MTBI groups, one composed of compensation-seeking MTBI patients and the other consisting of non-compensation-seeking MTBI patients. Results indicated significant differences on several scales and subscales between the two MTBI groups, with the compensation-seeking MTBI patients having significantly higher elevations on scales related to somatic preoccupation (Somatic Complaint Scale, SOM), emotional distress (Anxiety Scale, ANX; Anxiety Related Disorders Scale, ARD; Depression Scale, DEP), and the Negative Impression Management, NIM, validity scale. All the SOM subscales and the Anxiety Cognitive (ANX-C) and ANX Affective, ANX-A, subscales were also elevated in the compensation-seeking group. Results indicated that several scales on the PAI were sensitive to group differences in compensation-seeking status in MTBI patients.

  4. Stroop effects in persons with traumatic brain injury: selective attention, speed of processing, or color-naming? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Boaz M; Nguyen, Linh L T; van Lieshout, Pascal H H M

    2011-03-01

    The color word Stroop test is the most common tool used to assess selective attention in persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A larger Stroop effect for TBI patients, as compared to controls, is generally interpreted as reflecting a decrease in selective attention. Alternatively, it has been suggested that this increase in Stroop effects is influenced by group differences in generalized speed of processing (SOP). The current study describes an overview and meta-analysis of 10 studies, where persons with TBI (N = 324) were compared to matched controls (N = 501) on the Stroop task. The findings confirmed that Stroop interference was significantly larger for TBI groups (p = .008). However, these differences may be strongly biased by TBI-related slowdown in generalized SOP (r² = .81 in a Brinley analysis). We also found that TBI-related changes in sensory processing may affect group differences. Mainly, a TBI-related increase in the latency difference between reading and naming the font color of a color-neutral word (r² = .96) was linked to Stroop effects. Our results suggest that, in using Stroop, it seems prudent to control for both sensory factors and SOP to differentiate potential changes in selective attention from other changes following TBI.

  5. The associations between non-suicidal self-injury and borderline personality disorder features among Chinese adolescents.

    PubMed

    You, Jianing; Leung, Freedom; Lai, Ching Man; Fu, Kei

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the relative importance of four major BPD features, that is, affective instability, disturbed interpersonal relationship, unstable sense of self, and behavioral impulsivity, in explaining the presence, initiation, repetition, and discontinuation of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among a 2-year follow-up sample of 4,782 (68.5% girls) Hong Kong Chinese secondary school students. Affective instability, disturbed interpersonal relationship and behavioral impulsivity were significantly associated with the presence of NSSI both concurrently and longitudinally. These three BPD features were also related to the future initiation of NSSI. On the other hand, only behavioral impulsivity made a significant contribution to the repetition of NSSI. Additionally, a lower level of affective instability was also associated with quitting NSSI. We discussed some possible mechanisms underlying the effects of different BPD features on different developmental stages of NSSI.

  6. Role of imagery and verbal labeling in the performance of paired associates tasks by persons with closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Twum, M; Parenté, R

    1994-08-01

    The facilitating effects of visual imagery and verbal labeling strategies on learning and retention were examined with 60 survivors of closed-head injury. Because individuals without known neurological deficits use cognitive strategies when learning new materials, we expected that head-injured subjects could also be taught to use these strategies. Subjects were asked to memorize the verbal and visual paired associates stimulus items from the revised Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R). One group of subjects received mental imagery instructions to help them learn the verbal paired associates. Another group received verbal labeling training to help them learn the visual paired associates. Subjects who received imagery but not verbal labeling instructions were able to recall more paired associations than those who did not receive imagery. Those subjects who received verbal labeling but not imagery instructions recalled more visual paired associations than those who did not. Subjects who received learning instructions also showed better retention of the learned information.

  7. Shoulder Muscular Demand During Lever-Activated Vs Pushrim Wheelchair Propulsion in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Requejo, Philip Santos; Lee, Sharon E; Mulroy, Sara J; Haubert, Lisa Lighthall; Bontrager, Ernest L; Gronley, JoAnne K; Perry, Jacquelin

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: The high demand on the upper limbs during manual wheelchair (WC) use contributes to a high prevalence of shoulder pathology in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Lever-activated (LEVER) WCs have been presented as a less demanding alternative mode of manual WC propulsion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the shoulder muscle electromyographic activity and propulsion characteristics in manual WC users with SCI propelling a standard pushrim (ST) and LEVER WC design. Methods: Twenty men with complete injuries (ASIA A or B) and tetraplegia (C6, n = 5; C7, n = 7) or paraplegia (n = 8) secondary to SCI propelled ST and LEVER WCs at 3 propulsion conditions on a stationary ergometer: self-selected free, self-selected fast, and simulated graded resistance. Average velocity, cycle distance, and cadence; median and peak electromyographic intensity; and duration of electromyography of anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus muscles were compared between LEVER and ST WC propulsion. Results: Significant decreases in pectoralis major and supraspinatus activity were recorded during LEVER compared with ST WC propulsion. However, anterior deltoid and infraspinatus intensities tended to increase during LEVER WC propulsion. Participants with tetraplegia had similar or greater anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, and infraspinatus activity for both ST and LEVER WC propulsion compared with the men with paraplegia. Conclusions: Use of the LEVER WC reduced and shifted the shoulder muscular demands in individuals with paraplegia and tetraplegia. Further studies are needed to determine the impact of LEVER WC propulsion on long-term shoulder function. PMID:19086715

  8. A preliminary evaluation of the motivational model of pain self-management in persons with spinal cord injury related pain

    PubMed Central

    Molton, Ivan R.; Jensen, Mark P.; Nielson, Warren; Cardenas, Diana; Ehde, Dawn M.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pain commonly accompanies long-term disabilities such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Research suggests that patient motivation to engage in adaptive pain coping strategies, such as exercise/stretching and task persistence, is an important factor in determining the impact that this pain will have on quality of life. One recently proposed model (the “Motivational Model of Pain Self-Management”) suggests that motivation to manage pain is influenced by two primary variables: beliefs about the importance of engaging in pain self-management (i.e., “perceived importance”) and beliefs about one's own ability to engage in these behaviors (i.e., “self-efficacy”). The purpose of this study was to provide a preliminary test of this model in a sample of 130 adults with SCI who completed a return by mail survey. Measures included a numerical rating scale of pain intensity and the revised version of the Multidimensional Pain Readiness to Change Questionnaire. Mediation analyses were performed using multiple regression. Results suggested that the effects of perceived importance and self-efficacy on exercise behavior were mediated by readiness to engage in exercise, consistent with the proposed model. However, the model could not be established for the outcome of task persistence. Perspective: This study tests a model describing motivation to engage in pain management behaviors (i.e., “readiness to change”) in adults with spinal cord injury. This model could potentially aid clinicians in their conceptualization of the factors that affect patient motivation to manage pain. PMID:18359668

  9. A Prediction Model for Determining Over Ground Walking Speed After Locomotor Training in Persons With Motor Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Winchester, Patricia; Smith, Patricia; Foreman, Nathan; Mosby, James M; Pacheco, Fides; Querry, Ross; Tansey, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objective: To develop and test a clinically relevant model for predicting the recovery of over ground walking speed after 36 sessions of progressive body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) in individuals with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: A retrospective review and stepwise regression analysis of a SCI clinical outcomes data set. Setting: Outpatient SCI laboratory. Subjects: Thirty individuals with a motor incomplete SCI who had participated in locomotor training with BWSTT. Eight individuals with similar diagnoses were used to prospectively test the prediction model. Main Outcome Measures: Over ground walking speed was assessed using the 10-m walking test. Methods: The locomotor training program consisted of 36 sessions of sequential comprehensive training comprised of robotic assisted BWSTT, followed by manual assisted BWSTT, and over ground walking. The dose of locomotor training was standardized throughout the protocol. Results: Clinical characteristics with predictive value for walking speed were time from injury onset, the presence or absence of voluntary bowel and bladder voiding, a functional spasticity assessment, and over ground walking speed before locomotor training. The model identified that these characteristics accounted for 78.3% of the variability in the actual final over ground walking speed after 36 sessions of locomotor training. The model was successful in prospectively predicting over ground walking speed in the 8 test participants within 4.15 ± 2.22 cm/s in their recovered walking speed. Conclusions: This prediction model can identify individuals who are most likely to experience success using locomotor training by determining an expected magnitude of training effect, thereby allowing individualized decisions regarding the use of this intensive approach to rehabilitation. PMID:19264051

  10. Epidemiology of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Among Persons Older Than 21 Years: A Population-Based Study in South Carolina, 1998–2012

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Saunders, Lee L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A gap exists in the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in a statewide population. Objective: To describe population-based epidemiology and trend of TSCI in persons 22 years and older in South Carolina over a 15-year period from 1998 through 2012. Methods: Data on patients with TSCI were obtained from ongoing statewide TSCI surveillance and follow-up registry. Deaths were ascertained by linking surveillance files and the multiple cause-of-death dataset. Descriptive analyses were completed, and incidence and mortality rates were calculated based on the civilian adult population of the state. Results: Over the 15 years, 3,365 persons with incident TSCI were discharged alive from acute care hospitalization, of whom 555 died during the period of observation. Age-standardized cumulative mortality rate was 14 per million, and the average incidence rate was estimated at 70.8 per million population per year. Age-standardized incidence rate of TSCI increased significantly from 66.9 in 1998 to 111.7 per million in 2012. Standardized incidence rates were significantly higher among non-Whites and males. Motor vehicle crashes and falls were the leading causes, accounting for nearly 70% of TSCI. Conclusions: Standardized incidence and mortality rates of TSCI in South Carolina are higher than reported rates for the US population. Motor vehicle crashes and falls are the leading causes of TSCI. There was a significant increase in the overall trend of the incidence rates over the 15 years. A well-coordinated preventive strategy is needed to reduce incidence and improve survival of persons with TSCI. PMID:26689698

  11. [Medical errors and iatrogenic injury--results of 173 Schlichtungsstellen proceedings in general practice].

    PubMed

    Scheppokat, K D

    2004-09-01

    The Schlichtungsstelle (expert panel for alternative dispute resolution) of Northern Germany receives and decides on large numbers of malpractice claims. We report on 173 panel decisions on claims involving general practitioners: Medical negligence was found in 40%, and patient-injuries due to negligence in 28% of these cases. Treatment-caused injuries of the patient were also found in several of the cases decided against the claimant. In proceedings on the grounds of injections, 26 of 30 claimants concerned had suffered iatrogenic injuries. Treatment-caused injuries were severe in 40 of the 173 patients, fatal in 7. Injury rated and margins of error are much lower in industry than in medicine. Reviews of hospital records identified adverse events in 3-4% of hospitalized patients. Autopsy studies revealed that in 10-50% of cases the diagnosis verified postmortem had been missed clinically. Effective risk-management should be based on a trustful relationship among the persons working together: so that errors and adverse events might be discussed openly and the roles of persons, organization or system can be laid open. PMID:15527195

  12. 28 CFR 79.3 - Compensable claim categories under the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... contracted lung cancer or certain nonmalignant respiratory diseases after being employed in uranium mines... this part. (5) Millers' claims. For persons who contracted lung cancer, certain nonmalignant... persons who contracted lung cancer, certain nonmalignant respiratory diseases, renal cancer, or...

  13. 40 CFR 763.179 - Confidential business information claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2, subpart B. The Agency will place all information not... confidential been disclosed to persons outside of your company? Will it be disclosed to such persons in the... disclosure and harm. (9) In light of section 14(b) of TSCA, if you have claimed information from a health...

  14. 40 CFR 763.179 - Confidential business information claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2, subpart B. The Agency will place all information not... confidential been disclosed to persons outside of your company? Will it be disclosed to such persons in the... disclosure and harm. (9) In light of section 14(b) of TSCA, if you have claimed information from a health...

  15. 40 CFR 725.80 - General provisions for confidentiality claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and... person who asserts a claim of confidentiality for portions of the specific microorganism identity must... for a use of a microorganism must provide the information as described in § 725.88. (3) Any person...

  16. 40 CFR 725.80 - General provisions for confidentiality claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and... person who asserts a claim of confidentiality for portions of the specific microorganism identity must... for a use of a microorganism must provide the information as described in § 725.88. (3) Any person...

  17. 40 CFR 725.80 - General provisions for confidentiality claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and... person who asserts a claim of confidentiality for portions of the specific microorganism identity must... for a use of a microorganism must provide the information as described in § 725.88. (3) Any person...

  18. 40 CFR 725.80 - General provisions for confidentiality claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and... person who asserts a claim of confidentiality for portions of the specific microorganism identity must... for a use of a microorganism must provide the information as described in § 725.88. (3) Any person...

  19. Adventure tourism and adventure sports injury: the New Zealand experience.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Tim A; Page, Stephen J; Macky, Keith A

    2007-11-01

    The primary aims of this study were to establish a client injury baseline for the New Zealand adventure tourism and adventure sport sector, and to examine patterns and trends in claims for injury during participation in adventure activities. Content analysis of narrative text data for compensated injuries occurring in a place for recreation and sport over a 12-month period produced over 15,000 cases involving adventure tourism and adventure sport. As found in previous studies in New Zealand, highest claim counts were observed for activities that are often undertaken independently, rather than commercially. Horse riding, tramping, surfing and mountain biking were found to have highest claim counts, while hang gliding/paragliding/parasailing and jet boating injuries had highest claim costs, suggesting greatest injury severity. Highest claim incidence was observed for horse riding, with female claimants over-represented for this activity. Younger male claimants comprised the largest proportion of adventure injuries, and falls were the most common injury mechanism.

  20. Competence in discourse as a measure of social integration and quality of life in persons with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galski, T; Tompkins, C; Johnston, M V

    1998-09-01

    Persisting difficulties in communication are a serious handicap faced by many after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a major barrier to community reintegration. Conventional approaches to the study of communication problems after TBI have focused on the form of language production and expression, usually in terms of phonological, semantic, and syntactical features. Most TBI patients, however, perform overall within normal ranges on these conventional indicators. More recently, attention has focused on language in its naturally-occurring form, that is, discourse, which is heavily influenced by linguistic, cognitive and social skills. Because most TBI patients are left with residual deficits in these areas, study of discourse abilities seem to be particularly suited to understanding their problems in communication and facilitating eventual reintegration into the community. This study was designed to determine if and how the conversational discourse of TBI patients differs from a matched non-TBI group and whether any identified variables are related to measures of outcome as measured by community integration and quality of life. Additionally, the study was designed to explore the relationship between TBI and features of discourse across conversational, narrative, procedural genres. TBI patients (n = 30) from an out-patient brain injury programme were compared to matched controls (n = 10) in the three discourse genres. Bivariate and multivariate analyses evaluated 23 measures of discourse efficiency, complexity, topic management, information and pragmatic behaviours in each genre as well as measures of psychosocial adjustment, particularly social integration and quality of life. Results indicated that TBIs were significantly different from controls on several measures of discourse and psychosocial adjustment. A number of other features of discourse were found to correlate significantly with social integration and quality of life. Interestingly, discourse variables